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Sample records for a-14 high-al basalts

  1. Derivation of Apollo 14 High-Al Basalts at Discrete Times: Rb-Sr Isotopic Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui. Hejiu; Neal, Clive, R.; Shih, Chi-Yu; Nyquist, Laurence E.

    2012-01-01

    Pristine Apollo 14 (A-14) high-Al basalts represent the oldest volcanic deposits returned from the Moon [1,2] and are relatively enriched in Al2O3 (>11 wt%) compared to other mare basalts (7-11 wt%). Literature Rb-Sr isotopic data suggest there are at least three different eruption episodes for the A-14 high-Al basalts spanning the age range approx.4.3 Ga to approx.3.95 Ga [1,3]. Therefore, the high-Al basalts may record lunar mantle evolution between the formation of lunar crust (approx.4.4 Ga) and the main basin-filling mare volcanism (<3.85 Ga) [4]. The high-Al basalts were originally classified into five compositional groups [5,6], and then regrouped into three with a possible fourth comprising 14072 based on the whole-rock incompatible trace element (ITE) ratios and Rb-Sr radiometric ages [7]. However, Rb-Sr ages of these basalts from different laboratories may not be consistent with each other because of the use of different 87Rb decay constants [8] and different isochron derivation methods over the last four decades. This study involved a literature search for Rb-Sr isotopic data previously reported for the high-Al basalts. With the re-calculated Rb-Sr radiometric ages, eruption episodes of A-14 high-Al basalts were determined, and their petrogenesis was investigated in light of the "new" Rb-Sr isotopic data and published trace element abundances of these basalts.

  2. Petrogenesis of the Northwest Africa 4898 high-Al mare basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaolin; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin; Wang, Linyan; Wang, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 4898 is the only low-Ti, high-Al basaltic lunar meteorite yet recognized. It predominantly consists of pyroxene (53.8 vol%) and plagioclase (38.6 vol%). Pyroxene has a wide range of compositions (En12-62Fs25-62Wo11-36), which display a continuous trend from Mg-rich cores toward Ca-rich mantles and then to Fe-rich rims. Plagioclase has relatively restricted compositions (An87-96Or0-1Ab4-13), and was transformed to maskelynite. The REE zoning of all silicate minerals was not significantly modified by shock metamorphism and weathering. Relatively large (up to 1 mm) olivine phenocrysts have homogenous inner parts with Fo ~74 and sharply decrease to 64 within the thin out rims (~30 μm in width). Four types of inclusions with a variety of textures and modal mineralogy were identified in olivine phenocrysts. The contrasting morphologies of these inclusions and the chemical zoning of olivine phenocrysts suggest NWA 4898 underwent at least two stages of crystallization. The aluminous chromite in NWA 4898 reveals that its high alumina character was inherited from the parental magma, rather than by fractional crystallization. The mineral chemistry and major element compositions of NWA 4898 are different from those of 12038 and Luna 16 basalts, but resemble those of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. However, the trace element compositions demonstrate that NWA 4898 and Apollo 14 high-Al basalts could not have been derived from the same mantle source. REE compositions of its parental magma indicate that NWA 4898 probably originated from a unique depleted mantle source that has not been sampled yet. Unlike Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, which assimilated KREEPy materials during their formation, NWA 4898 could have formed by closed-system fractional crystallization.

  3. Petrogenesis of the Northwest Africa 4898 high-Al mare basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaolin; Hsu, Weibiao; Guan, Yunbin; Wang, Linyan; Wang, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 4898 is the only low-Ti, high-Al basaltic lunar meteorite yet recognized. It predominantly consists of pyroxene (53.8 vol%) and plagioclase (38.6 vol%). Pyroxene has a wide range of compositions (En12-62Fs25-62Wo11-36), which display a continuous trend from Mg-rich cores toward Ca-rich mantles and then to Fe-rich rims. Plagioclase has relatively restricted compositions (An87-96Or0-1Ab4-13), and was transformed to maskelynite. The REE zoning of all silicate minerals was not significantly modified by shock metamorphism and weathering. Relatively large (up to 1 mm) olivine phenocrysts have homogenous inner parts with Fo ~74 and sharply decrease to 64 within the thin out rims (~30 μm in width). Four types of inclusions with a variety of textures and modal mineralogy were identified in olivine phenocrysts. The contrasting morphologies of these inclusions and the chemical zoning of olivine phenocrysts suggest NWA 4898 underwent at least two stages of crystallization. The aluminous chromite in NWA 4898 reveals that its high alumina character was inherited from the parental magma, rather than by fractional crystallization. The mineral chemistry and major element compositions of NWA 4898 are different from those of 12038 and Luna 16 basalts, but resemble those of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. However, the trace element compositions demonstrate that NWA 4898 and Apollo 14 high-Al basalts could not have been derived from the same mantle source. REE compositions of its parental magma indicate that NWA 4898 probably originated from a unique depleted mantle source that has not been sampled yet. Unlike Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, which assimilated KREEPy materials during their formation, NWA 4898 could have formed by closed-system fractional crystallization.

  4. Petrogenesis of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts: Constraints of Rb-Sr isotope and trace element data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, H.; Neal, C. R.; Oshrin, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, the oldest volcanic deposits returned from the Moon, can provide geologic records of the Moon between the formation of lunar crust (~4.4 Ga) and the main basin-filling mare volcanism (< 3.85 Ga). Various models have been proposed for the petrogenesis of the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts [e.g., 1,2]. Whole-rock incompatible trace element ratios define at least 3 compositional groups, and Rb-Sr radiometric age data show that at least three eruption episodes for the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts, each derived from different source regions at discrete times [2,3]. However, the literature Rb-Sr ages were determined by different labs over four decades. Such data may not be comparable due to different 87Rb decay constants and isochron iteration methods used. We have mined literature Rb-Sr isotopic data of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts [3-9] and re-processed them with a consistent 87Rb decay constant [10] using Isoplot 3.70 [11]. Four eruption episodes of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts were confirmed: 4.24±0.10 Ga, 4.03±0.03 Ga, 3.97±0.07 Ga and 3.92±0.03 Ga. Both Rb-Sr isotopic compositions and incompatible trace element ratios of bulk samples show that parental melts of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts formed through mixing of KREEP and other melted mantle cumulate(s). Melt evolution of Apollo 14 high-Al basalts has been investigated by comparing the equilibrium melt compositions (calculated from plagioclase compositions using relevant partition coefficients) to the fractional crystallization (FC) and assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) models. Trace-element petrogenetic modeling of high-Al basalts shows that the equilibrium melt compositions do not fall on a single AFC or FC trajectory. This could be indicative of fluctuating degrees of assimilation (i.e., variable r-values) and/or variable assimilant compositions during petrogenesis. The compositional micro-heterogeneity in Apollo 14 high-Al basalts may partially result from the following volcanic

  5. Derivation of Apollo 14 High-Al Basalts from Distinct Source Regions at Discrete Times: New Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, C. R.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Kramer, G. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Apollo 14 basalts occur predominantly as clasts in breccias, but represent the oldest volcanic products that were returned from the Moon [1]. These basalts are relatively enriched in Al2O3 (11-16 wt%) compared to other mare basalts (7-11 wt%) and were originally classified into 5 compositional groups [2,3]. Neal et al. [4] proposed that a continuum of compositions existed. These were related through assimilation (of KREEP) and fractional crystallization (AFC). Age data, however, show that at least three volcanic episodes are recorded in the sample collection [1,5,6]. Recent work has demonstrated that there are three, possibly four groups of basalts in the Apollo 14 sample collection that were erupted from different source regions at different times [7]. This conclusion was based upon incompatible trace element (ITE) ratios of elements that should not be fractionated from one another during partial melting (Fig. 1). These groups are defined as Group A (Groups 4 & 5 of [3]), Group B (Groups 1 & 2 of [3]), and Group C (Group 3 of [3]). Basalt 14072 is distinct from Groups A-C.

  6. Very high potassium (VHK) basalt - Complications in mare basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.; Laul, J. C.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    The first comprehensive report on the petrology and geochemistry of Apollo 14 VHK (Very High Potassium) basalts and their implications for lunar evolution is presented. The reported data are most consistent with the hypothesis that VHK basalts formed through the partial assimilation of granite by a normal low-Ti, high-Al mare basalt magma. Assimilation was preceded by the diffusion-controlled exchange of alkalis and Ba between basalt magma and the low-temperature melt fraction of the granite. Hypotheses involving volatile/nonvolatile fractionations or long-term enrichment of the source regions in K are inconsistent with the suprachondritic Ba/La ratios and low initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of VHK basalt. An important implication of this conclusion is that granite should be a significant component of the lunar crust at the Apollo 14 site.

  7. The basalts of Mare Frigoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Jaiswal, B.; Hawke, B. R.; Öhman, T.; Giguere, T. A.; Johnson, K.

    2015-10-01

    This paper discusses the methodology and results of a detailed investigation of Mare Frigoris using remote sensing data from Clementine, Lunar Prospector, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, with the objective of mapping and characterizing the compositions and eruptive history of its volcanic units. With the exception of two units in the west, Mare Frigoris and Lacus Mortis are filled with basalts having low-TiO2 to very low TiO2, low-FeO, and high-Al2O3 abundances. These compositions indicate that most of the basalts in Frigoris are high-Al basalts—a potentially undersampled, yet important group in the lunar sample collection for its clues about the heterogeneity of the lunar mantle. Thorium abundances of most of the mare basalts in Frigoris are also low, although much of the mare surface appears elevated due to contamination from impact gardening with the surrounding high-Th Imbrium ejecta. There are, however, a few regional thorium anomalies that are coincident with cryptomare units in the east, the two youngest mare basalt units, and some of the scattered pyroclastic deposits and volcanic constructs. In addition, Mare Frigoris lies directly over the northern extent of the major conduit for a magma plumbing system that fed many of the basalts that filled Oceanus Procellarum, as interpreted by Andrews-Hanna et al. (2014) using data from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory mission. The relationship between this deep-reaching magma conduit and the largest extent of high-Al basalts on the Moon makes Mare Frigoris an intriguing location for further investigation of the lunar mantle.

  8. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  9. Trace-element modelling of mare basalt parental melts: Implications for a heterogeneous lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L. J.; Anand, M.; Strekopytov, S.

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous-source model of mare basalt formation indicates that Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) overturn produced an uneven mixture of early-formed olivine and pyroxene, and late-formed, ilmenite-rich cumulates, which subsequently partially melted to give rise to mare magmas. These heterogeneous cumulate source regions would not only have been characterised by different mineral modal abundances, but also by different trace element compositions. The aim of this work was to investigate the petrology and geochemistry of a diverse suite of Apollo mare basalts, and utilise trace-element modelling in order to understand their petrogenetic history. Chemical modelling confirms that the mare basalts were produced by relatively small degrees of partial melting (<10%) of the LMO cumulates, and that the dominant melting type (batch vs. fractional) varies among different basalt groups. Similarly, single-source mineralogy cannot be applied to all mare basalt types, confirming that the lunar mantle was heterogeneous at the time of generation of mare magmas. Plagioclase is not required in the source of most mare basalts, with the notable exception of the Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Addition of more than 1% plagioclase to the source of other basalts produces weaker negative Eu anomalies than those observed in the samples. AFC calculations demonstrate the compositional differences between materials assimilated into the Apollo 14 high-Al and Apollo 11 high-K mare basalt partial melts, highlighting the complexities of mare basalt petrogenesis.

  10. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  11. Naming Lunar Mare Basalts: Quo Vadimus Redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, G.

    1999-01-01

    and ordering. Classification functions as a primary tool of perception, opening up ways of seeing things and sealing off others. Lacking a classification, mare-basalt petrology appears immature with little consensual perception of the qualities and signifigances of the basalts. The appearance may or may not be the reality, but it demonstrates a need for a functioning, communicatory classification, in particular for the dissemination of ideas and the furtherance of studies. Names are inconsistent both among lunar rocks and between lunar and terrestrial rocks. Samples are labeled by elements, chemistry with tags, chemistry cast into mineralogy, or a mineralogical attribute (respective examples A 14 VHK A 17 high-Ti Group B 1, A 15 quartz-normative, A-12 pigeonite). Such inconsistency is bound to lead to confusion. Chemical descriptions mean different things in mildly different contexts: A low-K Fra Mauro basalt (not a basalt!) contains slightly more K than an Apollo 11 high-K basalt. High-alumina means more than about 11% Al2O3 for mare basalts, but 21% for highlands "basalts." Volcanic KREEP basalts, about 18% Al2O3, are not (usually) qualified with "high-alumina." Yet for terrestrial basalts, high-alumina means more than about 17% Al2O3, Further, even very-low-Ti mare basalts have Ti abundances (about 0.5-1.5% Ti02) as great as typical terrestrial basalts. Thus, parallels between lunar and terrestrial nomenclatures are nonexistent (reinforced by the fact that a mare-basalt composition found on Earth would be too ultramafic to name basalt at all). A separate type of name exists for mare-basalt glasses, which are identified by site, color, and a letter for any subsequent distinctions, e.g., A15 Green Glass C. While the inconsistencies cited above by themselves make nomenclature arcane, a greater source of difficulty is the common use of acronyms such as VHK and VLT. Most of these are partly chemical acronyms, but degrading the symbol Ti to T (for instance) makes them

  12. Evidence for a lower crustal origin of high-Al orthopyroxene megacrysts in Proterozoic anorthosites

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Nodules and xenocrysts dominated by high-Al orthopyroxene (HAO) occur in strongly chilled Proterozoic basaltic dikes which cut the Nain anorthosite complex, Labrador. HAO (En 73-68, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ = 6.5-4.5) lacks exsolution; it occurs both as anhedral xenocrysts up to 10 cm in diameter and with euhedral plagioclase (An55) in ophitic nodules. Rarely, olivine occurs with HAO and Al-spinel with plagioclase. Scarce Fe-rich nodules contain: (1) opx + pig, (2) aug + pig, and (3) coarsely exsolved ulvospinel. Pyroxene pairs yield T's of 1250 to 1170/degree/C, whereas coexisting lamellae in exsolved ulvospinel yield T's between 1145 and 1120/degree/C, with fO/sub 2/ near the WM buffer. If all nodules came from a similar depth, the rare occurrence of olivine with plagioclase suggests a maximum pressure of about 11 kb. The high subsolidus T's of the nodules contrasts with the low T of the host anorthosites at the time of dike emplacement and hence indicates a deep source for the nodules. HAO is nearly identical in composition to the high-Al orthopyroxene megacrysts with exsolved plagioclase (HAOM) found in most Proterozoic anorthosites. Many nodules of plagioclase and HAO also have textures comparable to ophitic occurrences of HAOM in anorthosite. Rafting of cotectic nodules from the lower crust could explain occurrences of HAOM in shallow-level anorthosites. The nodules and xenocrysts are samples of lower crustal cumulates. Their compositions suggest that they were produced by magmas similar to those that were parental to the anorthosites. They lend support to models which derive anorthosites by fractional crystallization of basaltic magma.

  13. Softening Kinetics in High Al and High Al-Nb-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereda, B.; Aretxabaleta, Z.; López, B.

    2015-03-01

    Double-hit torsion tests were performed in order to study the effect of high Al levels (up to 2 wt.%) and Nb microalloying (up to 0.07 wt.%) on the static softening kinetics of 0.2%C-2%Mn steels. The addition of 1%Al leads to a delay in the softening kinetics due to solute-drag effect, equivalent to that exerted by 0.027%Nb. For the 2%Al steels, at temperatures below 1000 °C, γ → α phase transformation occurs after deformation, resulting in a larger retardation of the softening kinetics. At temperatures higher than 1000 °C, Nb in solid solution also contributes to the retardation of the static softening kinetics, and at lower temperatures NbC strain-induced precipitation leads to incomplete softening for the 1%Al steel, and to a complex interaction between softening, phase transformation, and NbC strain-induced precipitation for the 2%Al-Nb steels. The effect of Al on the static softening kinetics was quantified and introduced in a model developed in previous works for the prediction of the austenite microstructural evolution. In order to validate the results of the model, multipass torsion tests were carried out at conditions representative of hot strip and plate rolling mills. Model predictions show reasonable agreement with the results obtained at different deformation conditions.

  14. Generation of incompatible element depleted high-Al melts: Constraints from melt inclusions from the FAMOUS zone, mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubier, M.; Gale, A.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2009-12-01

    High-Al, low-Si and high-Mg melts have been reported for various mid-ocean ridges (Eason and Sinton, EPSL, 2006; le Roux et al., Contrib. Min. Pet., 2002; Lissenberg and Dick, EPSL, 2008) and seem to occur preferentially at slow spreading ridges or close to fracture zones and ridge ends. Two hypotheses have been suggested to explain their chemistry: (1) high-pressure fractionation of clinopyroxene (Eason and Sinton, EPSL, 2006) and (2) a reaction between primitive cumulates and migrating melts in the lower crust (Lissenberg and Dick, EPSL, 2008). Our study of numerous lavas (>100) and melt inclusions (>335) along the FAMOUS segment (Northern mid-Atlantic Ridge) shows that high-Al melts occur both as melt inclusions and lavas, mostly found in the FAMOUS area near the center of the segment. The high-Al lavas studied for their melt inclusions host both high-Al and normal inclusions. No high-Al inclusion has been found in non-high Al basalts. High-Al melts are characterized by high Al2O3 (up to 18.4 wt%), high MgO (>8.3 wt% in the lavas; >10.3 wt% in the inclusions), low SiO2 (48.4-50.5 wt% in the lavas; 46.6-49.0 wt% in the inclusions) and low TiO2 (< 1 wt% in the lavas, < 0.73 wt% in the inclusions) contents. High-Al melt compositions are distinctively lower in highly incompatible elements (Ba as low as 18 ppm in the lavas and 1 ppm in the inclusions). With such low incompatible element concentrations, the high-Al melt inclusions constitute ultra-depleted melts (UDM). High-Al inclusions and lavas also display a relative enrichment in the HREE/MREE ratios compared to normal melts. Similarly, olivine phenocrysts that host high-Al melt inclusions present relatively higher Al2O3, NiO contents and Y/MREE and HREE/MREE than those with normal inclusions. High-pressure clinopyroxene fractionation is inconsistent with the relatively high Sc and very low SiO2 contents in High-Al inclusions. Reaction between a MORB and a plagioclase-rich cumulate results in trace element

  15. Geochronology and petrogenesis of Apollo 14 very high potassium mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Bansal, B. M.; Wiesmann, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rb-Sr, K-Ar, and Sm-Nd isotopic studies were undertaken for two Apollo 14 very high potassium (VHK) highly radiogenic mare basaltic clasts from breccias 14305 and 14168. Rb-Sr data indicate ages of 3.83 + or - 0.08 b.y., and 3.82 + or - 0.12 b.y. for samples 14305 and 14168 respectively, for lambda(Rb-87) = 0.0 139/b.y. Their corresponding initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios are nearly identical, as well as their Ar-39 to Ar-40 age spectra, and it is proposed that they were derived from the same flow. The Sm-Nd isotopic data of whole rock and mineral separates for the two VHK basalts define an internal isochrone age of 3.94 + or - 0.16 b.y. for lambda (Sm-147) = 0.00654/b.y. and an initial Nd-143/Nd-144 of 0.50673 + or - 21. The similarity in isotopic ages suggests that VHK basalts crystallized from a melt about 3.85 b.y. ago. VHK basalts show very large Rb/Sr fractionation but no significant Sm/Nd fractionation at the time of crystallization. The source material had a Rb/Sr ratio similar to those of Apollo 14 high-Al mare basalts and a nearly chrondritic Sm/Nd ratio. Basalt/granite interaction was found to be responsible for the extreme enrichments of Rb/Sr and K/La during the formation of VHK basalts. It is concluded that K, Rb-rich components of granitic wall rocks in the highland crust were selectively introduced into ascending hot high-Al mare basaltic magma upon contact.

  16. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  17. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  18. Basalt Weathering Rates Across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarresitchler, A.; Brantley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Weathering of silicate minerals is a known sink for atmospheric CO2. An estimated 30%-35% of the consumption of CO2 from continental silicate weathering can be attributed to basalt weathering (Dessert et al., 2003). To assess basalt weathering rates we examine weathering advance rates of basalt (w, mm/yr) reported at four scales: denudation rates from basalt watersheds (tens of kilometers), rates of soil formation from soil profiles developed on basaltic parent material of known age (meters), rates of weathering rind formation on basalt clasts (centimeters), and laboratory dissolution rates (millimeters). Basalt weathering advance rates calculated for watersheds range between 0.36 and 9.8x10-3 mm/yr. The weathering advance rate for a basalt soil profile in Hawaii is 8.0x10-3 mm/yr while advance rates for clasts range from 5.6x10-6 to 2.4x10-4 mm/yr. Batch and mixed flow laboratory experiments performed at circum- neutral pH yield advance rates of 2.5x10^{-5} to 3.4x10-7 mm/yr when normalized to BET surface area. These results show increasing advance rates with both increasing scale (from laboratory to watersheds) and increasing temperature. If we assume that basalt weathers at an intrinsic rate that applies to all scales then we conclude that variations in weathering advance rates arise from variations in surface area measurement at different scales (D); therefore, basalt weathering is a fractal system. We measure a fractal dimension (dr) of basalt weathering of 2.2. For Euclidean geometries, measured surface area does not vary with the scale at which it is measured and dr equals 2. For natural surfaces, surface area is related to the scale at which it is measured. As scale increases, the minimum size of the surface irregularities that are measurable also increases. The ratio between BET and geometric normalized laboratory dissolution rates has been defined as a roughness parameter, λ, which ranges from ~10-100. We extend the definition of this roughness parameter

  19. Luna 24 - Opaque mineral chemistry of gabbroic and basaltic fragments from Mare Crisium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    Spinels and ilmenites are relatively sparse in the Luna 24 gabbro and basalts. Spinel compositions show some affinities to those of spinels in Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Luna 16 basalts; a characteristic feature is high Al2O3, reaching a maximum of 19.8 wt%. A comparison of spinels in the Luna 24 gabbro with those in other deep-seated lunar intrusive rocks shows a characteristic trend for Fe/Mg. This trend is systematic from gabbro to anorthosite to troctolite and is interpreted to be P-T dependent. Compositions of spinels in the gabbro fall within the Cr/Al trend defined by the spinels of the basalts, but form a Fe/Mg trend parallel to that of the basalts; this relationship suggests that both the gabbro and the basalts are derived from a closely similar source region, with the basalts originating at a slightly greater depth than the gabbro. The spinels in both rock types are considered to have formed at high crustal levels, at low pressures. The Luna 24 data suggest that the compositional discontinuities which exist between chromian spinels and titanian spinels in a large proportion of mare basalts are the result of nucleation of chromian spinels at high crustal levels prior to eruption, and of titanian spinels during melt crystallization at the lunar surface.

  20. Hanford basalt flow mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, L.L.

    1980-09-01

    Mineralogy of the core samples from five core wells was examined in some detail. The primary mineralogy study included an optical examination of polished mounts, photomicrographs, chemical analyses of feldspars, pyroxenes, metallic oxides and microcrystalline groundmasses and determination from the chemical analyses of the varieties of feldspars, pyroxenes and metallic oxides. From the primary mineralogy data, a firm understanding of the average Hanford basalt flow primary mineralogy emerged. The average primary feldspar was a laboradorite, the average pyroxene was an augite and the average metallic oxide was a solid solution of ilmenite and magnetite. Secondary mineralization consisted of vug filling and joint coating, chiefly with a nontronite-beidellite clay, several zeolites, quartz, calcite, and opal. Specific flow units also were examined to determine the possibility of using the mineralogy to trace flows between core wells. These included units of the Pomona, the Umatilla and a high chromium flow just below the Huntzinger. In the Umatilla, or high barium flow, the compositional variation of the feldspars was unique in range. The pyroxenes in the Pomona were relatively highly zoned and accumulated chromium. The high chromium flow contained chromium spinels that graded in chromium content into simple magnetites very low in chromium content. A study of the statistical relationships of flow unit chemical constituents showed that flow unit constituents could be roughly correlated between wells. The probable cause of the correlation was on-going physical-chemical changes in the source magma.

  1. Flood basalts and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, W. Jason

    1988-01-01

    There appears to be a correlation between the times of flood basalts and mass-extinction events. There is a correlation of flood basalts and hotspot tracks--flood basalts appear to mark the beginning of a new hotspot. Perhaps there is an initial instability in the mantle that bursts forth as a flood basalt but then becomes a steady trickle that persists for many tens of millions of years. Suppose that flood basalts and not impacts cause the environmental changes that lead to mass-extinctions. This is a very testable hypothesis: it predicts that the ages of the flows should agree exactly with the times of extinctions. The Deccan and K-T ages agree with this hypothesis; An iridium anomaly at extinction boundaries apparently can be explained by a scaled-up eruption of the Hawaiian type; the occurrence of shocked-quartz is more of a problem. However if the flood basalts are all well dated and their ages indeed agree with extinction times, then surely some mechanism to appropriately produce shocked-quartz will be found.

  2. Thickness of western mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehon, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An isopach map of the basalt thickness in the western mare basins is constructed from measurements of the exposed external rim height of partially buried craters. The data, although numerically sparse, is sufficiently distributed to yield gross thickness variations. The average basalt thickness in Oceanus Procellarum and adjacent regions is 400 m with local lenses in excess of 1500 m in the circular maria. The total volume of basalt in the western maria is estimated to be in the range of 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power cu km. The chief distinction between the eastern and western maria appears to be one of basalt volumes erupted to the surface. Maximum volumes of basalt are deposited west of the central highlands and flood subjacent terrain to a greater extent than on the east. The surface structures of the western maria reflect the probability of a greater degree of isostatic response to a larger surface loading by the greater accumulation of mare basalt.

  3. Nickel in high-alumina basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.

    1971-01-01

    New analyses of high-alumina basalts reveal an average nickel content higher than previously indicated. Ni in high-alumina basalts correlates with magnesium in the same way as it does in other basalt types. There is therefore no reason, based on Ni contents, to hypothesize a special origin for high-alumina basalts and it is permissible (based on Ni contents) to form andesites by fractional crystallization from high-alumina basalts. ?? 1971.

  4. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    or channel bends that exposes more core lava to cooling than simply that of the shear zones. Thus the channel geometry plays a major role in the thermal history of a flow. As lava flows rarely flow through pre-existing channels of prescribed geometry, we have performed an additional set of analog laboratory experiments to determine the relationship between flow rate, slope, and channel formation in solidifying flows. All flows develop stable uniform channels within solidified levees except when the flow rate is sufficiently low to permit flow front solidification, inflation, and tube formation. On constant slopes, increasing flow rates result in increases in both the rate of flow advance rate and the channel width, and a decrease in levee width. At constant flow rates, both channel width and levee width decrease with increasing slope while flow advance rate increases. Limited data on the geometry of basaltic lava channels indicate that experimental data are consistent with field observations, however, both additional field data and scaling relationships are required to fully utilize the laboratory experiments to predict channel development in basaltic lava flows.

  5. Snowball Earth and basaltic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupre, B.; Godderis, Y.; Nedelec, A.; Donnadieu, Y.; Dessert, C.; Francois, L. M.; Grard, A.

    2003-04-01

    The causes of the Neo-Proterozoic glaciations is still a matter of debate. One potential trigger for those glaciations is a major perturbation of the global carbon cycle, leading to the consumption of atmospheric CO_2, and finally to the cooling of the global climate. The first glacial episode is characterized by intense rift formations. The Proto-Pacific ocean starts to open within the Sturtian stage (800-750 Ma). The onset of rifts cutting through continental surfaces might have been coeval with the spreading of continental flood basalts. As demonstrated by Dessert et al (2001) for the K-T boundary, such events might severely impacts the long term evolution of the global climate, through intense consumption of atmospheric CO_2 by fresh basaltic surfaces, leading to non negligible global cooling at the million year timescale. Based on weathering laws for basaltic and granitic surfaces, we estimate that the onset of continental flood basalts over 6 million km^2 along the equator (crossed by the Proto-Pacific rift) will drive the Earth into global glaciation 1.5 My after the event, assuming a pre-perturbation level of 280 ppmv of CO_2 and a solar luminosity reduced by 6%. The δ13C of carbonates accumulating between the start of the continental plume and the onset of the global glaciation is expected to fall by about 3 ppm in response to the degassing of large amount of mantle carbon into the atmosphere, in agreement with data. This hypothesis raises the question of the cyclicity of the glaciations. Once the glaciation ends, the basaltic surface starts again to weather, and plunge the Earth into a new deep glaciation. Within 30 My, the basaltic trap, originally located at the equator, might have migrated 3500 km southward, within the dryer tropical area. Such migration reduces the consumption of CO_2 by the basaltic surface, preventing the Earth from a new global glaciation.

  6. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth

  7. Rare-earth element geochemistry and the origin of andesites and basalts of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.W.; Cashman, K.V.; Rankin, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    Two types of basalt (a high-Al basalt associated with the rhyolitic centres north of Taupo and a "low-Al" basalt erupted from Red Crater, Tongariro Volcanic Centre) and five types of andesite (labradorite andesite, labradorite-pyroxene andesite, hornblende andesite, pyroxene low-Si andesite and olivine andesite/low-Si andesite) occur in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), North Island, New Zealand. Rare-earth abundances for both basalts and andesites are particularly enriched in light rare-earth elements. High-Al basalts are more enriched than the "low-Al" basalt and have values comparable to the andesites. Labradorite and labradorite-pyroxene andesites all have negative Eu anomalies and hornblende andesites all have negative Ce anomalies. The former is probably due to changing plagioclase composition during fractionation and the latter to late-stage hydration of the magma. Least-squares mixing models indicate that neither high-Al nor "low-Al" basalts are likely sources for labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. High-Al basalts are considered to result from fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene from a garnet-free peridotite at the top of the mantle wedge. Labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites are mainly associated with an older NW-trending arc. The source is likely to be garnet-free but it is not certain whether the andesites result from partial melting of the top of the subducting plate or a hydrated lower portion of the mantle wedge. Pyroxene low-Si andesites probably result from cumulation of pyroxene and calcic plagioclase within labradorite-pyroxene andesites, and hornblende andesites by late-stage hydration of labradorite-pyroxene andesite magma. Olivine andesites, low-Si andesites and "low-Al" basalts are related to the NNE-trending Taupo-Hikurangi arc structure. Although the initial source material is different for these lavas they have probably undergone a similar history to the labradorite/labradorite-pyroxene andesites. All lavas show evidence

  8. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  9. Resistivity logging of fractured basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Stefansson, V.; Axelsson, G.; Sigurdsson, O.

    1982-01-01

    A lumped double porosity model was studied in order to estimate the effect of fractures on resistivity - porosity relations. It is found that the relationship between resistivity and porosity for fractured rock is in general not simple and depends both on the amounts of matrix porosity as well as the fracture orientation. However, when fractures dominate over matrix porosity the exponent is close to 1.0. Resistivity-porosity relations have been determined for large amounts of basaltic formations in Iceland. An exponent close to 1.0 is found in all cases investigated. This is interpreted as fractures constitute a considerable part of the porosity of the basalts. In the IRDP-hole in Eastern Iceland it is found that the ratio of fracture porosity to total porosity decreases with depth.

  10. Permeability within basaltic oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Water-rock interactions within the seafloor are responsible for significant energy and solute fluxes between basaltic oceanic crust and the overlying ocean. Permeability is the primary hydrologic property controlling the form, intensity, and duration of seafloor fluid circulation, but after several decades of characterizing shallow oceanic basement, we are still learning how permeability is created and distributed and how it changes as the crust ages. Core-scale measurements of basaltic oceanic crust yield permeabilities that are quite low (generally 10-22 to 10-17 m²), while in situ measurements in boreholes suggest an overlapping range of values extending several orders of magnitude higher (10-18 to 10-13 m²). Additional indirect estimates include calculations made from borehole temperature and flow meter logs (10-16 to 10-11 m²), numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow at the ridge crest and within ridge flanks (10-16 to 10-9 m²), and several other methods. Qualitative indications of permeability within the basaltic oceanic crust come from an improved understanding of crustal stratigraphy and patterns of alteration and tectonic modification seen in ophiolites, seafloor samples and boreholes. Difficulties in reconciling the wide range of estimated permeabilities arise from differences in experimental scale and critical assumptions regarding the nature and distribution of fluid flow. Many observations and experimental and modeling results are consistent with permeability varying with depth into basement and with primary basement lithology. Permeability also seems to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic throughout much of the basaltic crust, as within crystalline rocks in general. A series of focused experiments is required to resolve permeability in shallow oceanic basement and to directly couple upper crustal hydrogeology to magmatic, tectonic, and geochemical crustal evolution.

  11. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  12. Mars Crust: Made of Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    By combining data from several sources, Harry Y. (Hap) McSween (University of Tennessee), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawaii) and Michael B. Wyatt (Brown University) show that the surface of Mars is composed mostly of basalt not unlike those that make up the Earth's oceanic crust. McSween and his colleagues used data from Martian meteorites, analyses of soils and rocks at robotic landing sites, and chemical and mineralogical information from orbiting spacecraft. The data show that Mars is composed mostly of rocks similar to terrestrial basalts called tholeiites, which make up most oceanic islands, mid-ocean ridges, and the seafloor beneath sediments. The Martian samples differ in some respects that reflect differences in the compositions of the Martian and terrestrial interiors, but in general are a lot like Earth basalts. Cosmochemistst have used the compositions of Martian meteorites to discriminate bulk properties of Mars and Earth, but McSween and coworkers' synthesis shows that the meteorites differ from most of the Martian crust (the meteorites have lower aluminum, for example), calling into question how diagnostic the meteorites are for understanding the Martian interior.

  13. Flood basalts and extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The largest known effusive eruptions during the Cenozoic and Mesozoic Eras, the voluminous flood basalts, have long been suspected as being associated with major extinctions of biotic species. Despite the possible errors attached to the dates in both time series of events, the significance level of the suspected correlation is found here to be 1 percent to 4 percent. Statistically, extinctions lag eruptions by a mean time interval that is indistinguishable from zero, being much less than the average residual derived from the correlation analysis. Oceanic flood basalts, however, must have had a different biological impact, which is still uncertain owing to the small number of known examples and differing physical factors. Although not all continental flood basalts can have produced major extinction events, the noncorrelating eruptions may have led to smaller marine extinction events that terminated at least some of the less catastrophically ending geologic stages. Consequently, the 26 Myr quasi-periodicity seen in major marine extinctions may be only a sampling effect, rather than a manifestation of underlying periodicity.

  14. Flood Basalts and Neoproterozoic Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, G. P.; Cox, G. M.; Kunzmann, M.; Strauss, J. V.; Macdonald, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large igneous provinces (LIPs), which are commonly associated with supercontinental break-up, are the product of the emplacement of >106 km3 of mafic rocks in less than a few million years. LIP magmatism, in particular continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism, perturbs global climate on shorter time scales through the radiative effects of degassed SO2 and CO2. On longer time scales, CFBs alter climate through the effect of the high weatherabilty of mafic rocks (5-10 times greater than average continental crust) on global silicate weathering. A link between flood basalt weathering, Rodinia break-up, and Neoproterozoic snowball glaciation has been postulated. Here we present a new compilation of Nd isotope data on Neoproterozoic mudstones from Laurentia, Australia, and South China along with a new seawater strontium isotope record from well preserved carbonates that support this hypothesis. These datasets are consistent with an outsized role of basalt weathering on the global silicate weathering budget during the second half of the Tonian period (~850 to 725 Ma). Along with Os isotope data, they also suggest that an additional pulse of basalt weathering at the end of the Tonian may have initiated the Sturtian snowball glaciation. CFBs have relatively high concentrations of phosphorous. Hence, the drawdown in atmospheric CO2 required to trigger the Sturtian snowball Earth was likely accomplished through a combination of increased silicate weathering rates and enhanced biological productivity driven by greater nutrient supply to the oceans. CFBs were also the likely source of the iron in Neoproterozoic iron formation (IF), all significant occurrences of which are restricted to Sturtian-aged glacial successions. Dramatic declines in ɛNd following the Cryogenian snowball glaciations are mirrored by stepwise increases in 87Sr/86Sr, reflecting the scouring of the continents by global ice sheets. This continental resurfacing removed the extensive basalt carapace as well as

  15. What lies below the Columbia River Basalt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidel, S.; Kauffman, J.; Garwood, D.; Bush, J.

    2006-12-01

    More than 200,000 sq km of the Pacific Northwest are covered by the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). The lavas were erupted onto a complex structural setting dominated by cratonic rocks, and accreted terranes at a convergent plate margin. Few boreholes penetrate the basalt so the sub-basalt structure must be deduced from geophysical data, the surrounding area and structures within the basalt. In Oregon (OR) and Idaho (ID) the eastern edge of the basalt follows the boundary between the craton and accreted terranes but the suture zone becomes lost beneath the basalt in eastern WA. In northern OR and Washington (WA), a thick basalt sequence in the western part of the province overlies an early Tertiary basin with kms of sediment fill which, in turn, overlies accreted terranes. In eastern WA and western ID, a much thinner basalt sequence overlies cratonic and accreted terrane rocks without thick intervening Tertiary sediments. This basin began in the Eocene and continued into the present; the sediment now controls the location of the Yakima fold belt (YFB). Prior to basalt eruptions, a rugged mountainous terrane existed in eastern WA and ID that probably extended to the west. NW faults and folds (e.g. the Orofino fault zone ID, and Chiwaukum graben and White River-Naches River fault zone, Cascade Range) dominate the prebasalt rocks and must extend under the basalt. Remanents of this NW trend are present in YFB (e.g. Rattlesnake-Wallula fault zone) but these are less prominent than the large basalt anticlinal folds that are decoupled from the basement. CRB dikes have a NW to N trend and are thought to reflect a basement structural weakness. In the basalt province many folds and faults follow this dike trend. Major NE trending faults in the basalts do not have major counterparts beyond the basalt. One fault, the Hite Fault, must form a significant sub-basalt boundary. Dikes to the east of the Hite fault trend N-N20W whereas dikes to the west trend N40-50W

  16. The Use of Basalt, Basalt Fibers and Modified Graphite for Nuclear Waste Repository - 12150

    SciTech Connect

    Gulik, V.I.; Biland, A.B.

    2012-07-01

    New materials enhancing the isolation of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are continuously being developed.. Our research suggests that basalt-based materials, including basalt roving chopped basalt fiber strands, basalt composite rebar and materials based on modified graphite, could be used for enhancing radioactive waste isolation during the storage and disposal phases and maintaining it during a significant portion of the post-closure phase. The basalt vitrification process of nuclear waste is a viable alternative to glass vitrification. Basalt roving, chopped basalt fiber strands and basalt composite rebars can significantly increase the strength and safety characteristics of nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel storages. Materials based on MG are optimal waterproofing materials for nuclear waste containers. (authors)

  17. Mare basalt magma source region and mare basalt magma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, A.B.

    1982-11-15

    Given the available data, we find that the wide range of mare basaltic material characteristics can be explained by a model in which: (1) The mare basalt magma source region lies between the crust-mantle boundary and a maximum depth of 200 km and consists of a relatively uniform peridotite containing 73--80% olivine, 11--14% pyroxene, 4--8% plagioclase, 0.2--9% ilmenite and 1--1.5% chromite. (2) The source region consists of two or more density-graded rhythmic bands, whose compositions grade from that of the very low TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (0.2% ilmenite) to that of the very high TiO/sub 2/ magma source regions (9% ilmenite). These density-graded bands are proposed to have formed as co-crystallizing olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, ilmenite, and chromite settled out of a convecting magma (which was also parental to the crust) in which these crystals were suspended. Since the settling rates of the different minerals were governed by Stoke's law, the heavier minerals settled out more rapidly and therefore earlier than the lighter minerals. Thus the crystal assemblages deposited nearest the descending side of each convection cell were enriched in heavy ilmenite and chromite with respect to lighter olivine and pyroxene and very much lighter plagioclase. The reverse being the case for those units deposited near the ascending sides of the convection cells.

  18. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.; Bengtson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The oceanic crust makes up the largest potential habitat for life on Earth, yet next to nothing is known about the abundance, diversity and ecology of its biosphere. Our understanding of the deep biosphere of subseafloor crust is, with a few exceptions, based on a fossil record. Surprisingly, a majority of the fossilized microorganisms have been interpreted or recently re-interpreted as remnants of fungi rather than prokaryotes. Even though this might be due to a bias in fossilization the presence of fungi in these settings can not be neglected. We have examined fossilized microorganisms in drilled basalt samples collected at the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomography microscopy (SRXTM) studies has revealed a complex morphology and internal structure that corresponds to characteristic fungal morphology. Chitin was detected in the fossilized hyphae, which is another strong argument in favour of a fungal interpretation. Chitin is absent in prokaryotes but a substantial constituent in fungal cell walls. The fungal colonies consist of both hyphae and yeast-like growth states as well as resting structures and possible fruit bodies, thus, the fungi exist in vital colonies in subseafloor basalts. The fungi have also been involved in extensive weathering of secondary mineralisations. In terrestrial environments fungi are known as an important geobiological agent that promotes mineral weathering and decomposition of organic matter, and they occur in vital symbiosis with other microorganisms. It is probable to assume that fungi would play a similar role in subseafloor basalts and have great impact on the ecology and on biogeochemical cycles in such environments.

  19. Searching for nonlocal lithologies in the Apollo 12 regolith: A geochemical and petrological study of basaltic coarse fines from the Apollo lunar soil sample 12023,155

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Louise; Snape, Joshua F.; Crawford, Ian A.; Joy, Katherine H.; Downes, Hilary

    2014-07-01

    New data from a petrological and geochemical examination of 12 coarse basaltic fines from the Apollo 12 soil sample 12023,155 provide evidence of additional geochemical diversity at the landing site. In addition to the bulk chemical composition, major, minor, and trace element analyses of mineral phases are employed to ascertain how these samples relate to the Apollo 12 lithological basalt groups, thereby overcoming the problems of representativeness of small samples. All of the samples studied are low-Ti basalts (0.9-5.7 wt% TiO2), and many fall into the established olivine, pigeonite, and ilmenite classification of Apollo 12 basaltic suites. There are five exceptions: sample 12023,155_1A is mineralogically and compositionally distinct from other Apollo 12 basalt types, with low pigeonite REE concentrations and low Ni (41-55 ppm) and Mn (2400-2556 ppm) concentrations in olivine. Sample 12023,155_11A is also unique, with Fe-rich mineral compositions and low bulk Mg# (=100 × atomic Mg/[Mg+Fe]) of 21.6. Sample 12023,155_7A has different plagioclase chemistry and crystallization trends as well as a wider range of olivine Mg# (34-55) compared with other Apollo 12 basalts, and shows greater similarities to Apollo 14 high-Al basalts. Two other samples (12023,155_4A, and _5A) are similar to the Apollo 12 feldspathic basalt 12038, providing additional evidence that feldspathic basalts represent a lava flow proximal to the Apollo 12 site rather than material introduced by impacts. We suggest that at least one parent magma, and possibly as many as four separate parent magmas, are required in addition to the previously identified olivine, pigeonite, and ilmenite basaltic suites to account for the observed chemical diversity of basalts found in this study.

  20. Modeling Central American basalts using the Arc Basalt Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigenson, M.; Carr, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have used the Arc Basalt Simulator (ABS), developed by JI Kimura, to explore the conditions and components of melting beneath the Central American volcanic front. ABS is a comprehensive forward model that incorporates slab dehydration and melting and mantle wedge fluxing and melting using realistic P-T conditions and experimentally determined phase relations. We have applied ABS versions 3 and 4 to model representative magma types in Nicaragua, which span a broad geochemical range including proximal high- and low-Ti lavas in Nicaragua. Sr-Nd-Pb data require appropriate selection of previously identified sources, including: separate carbonate and hemipelagic sediments, DMM, an enriched mantle isotopically similar to the alkaline basalts of Yojoa, a Himu-influenced mantle derived from Galapagos material and altered oceanic crust (AOC) derived from both MORB and Galapagos seamounts. Following the dry solidus, the dominant arc basalts, exemplified by Cerro Negro lavas, can be generated at about 80-90 km where lawsonite and zoisite break down, releasing LILEs into a hydrous fluid that travels into the wedge. The fluid-triggered melting occurs just above the garnet stability field in the wedge to fit the HREEs. Below 90 Km, slab melting begins and the AOC component dominates, generating a fluid with little or no HFSE depletions, consistent with the unusual high-Ti lavas found in Nicaragua. However, the isotopic data require a much lower sediment input for the high-Ti lavas (consistent with 10Be results on the high-Ti lavas) and an enriched component for the AOC and/or mantle wedge. Following the wet solidus, fits to the Cerro Negro magma only occur in the absence of phengite in the AOC and with the presence of HFSE attracting minerals, rutile, zircon and allanite. The depth of the best fit is 135 km, consistent with current best estimates of the depth to the seismic zone beneath Cerro Negro. Below 150 km, the high-Ti lavas can be generated if the HFSE retaining

  1. Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-03-31

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the

  2. Shock metamorphism of lunar and terrestrial basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Lonar Crater (India) basalt and lunar basalt 75035 were shock loaded under controlled laboratory conditions up to 1000 kbar, generally in a CO/CO2 (1:1) environment evacuated to 10 to the minus seventh power torr. The Kieffer et al. (1976) classification scheme of progressive shock metamorphism is found to apply to lunar basalts. The major shock features of the five classes that span the range 0 to 1000 kbar are described. Only three out of 152 basalt specimens show shock effects in their natural state as severe as Class 2 features. The scarcity of shocked basalt hand samples in contrast to the abundance of shock-produced agglutinates and homogeneous glass spheres in the lunar regolith indicates the dominant role of micrometeorite impact in the evolution of the lunar regolith. The overall glass content in asteroidal and Mercurian regoliths is considered.

  3. Heterogeneity in titaniferous lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Small but real chemical differences exist between subsamples of fine-grained quench-textured titaniferous lunar basalts. The existence of different textural domains with different chemistries is thought to account for most of this variation. In addition to the textural domains, lunar sample 74275 has a population of olivine 'megacrysts' as well as dunite fragments. These materials are thought to be extraneous and to compromise the primary nature of 74275. Recognition of the small chemical variations present may aid in understanding some discrepancies in the experimental-petrology literature. However, these small variations have a distressing petrogenetic significance since they severely limit resolution in recognizing the number and depth of origin of primary magmas.

  4. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-02-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, next to nothing is known about this deep, concealed biosphere. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (~50-200 μm in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few μm:s to ∼20 μm in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma, and probably still is. It is suggested that near future ocean drilling programs prioritize sampling of live species to better understand this concealed biosphere.

  5. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, still we lack substantial information about the abundance, diversity, and consequence of its biosphere. The last two decades have involved major research accomplishments within this field and a change in view of the ocean crust and its potential to harbour life. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (∼50-200 µm in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate-forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few µm to ∼20 µm in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma.

  6. The Mineralogy of the Youngest Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staid, M. I.; Pieters, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The last stage of lunar volcanism produced spectrally distinct basalts on the western nearside of the Moon, which remain unsampled by landing missions. The spectral properties of these late-stage basalts are examined using high-spatial-resolution Clementine images to constrain their mineralogic composition. The young high-Ti basalts in the western Procellarum and Imbrium Basins display a significantly stronger ferrous absorption than earlier mare basalts, suggesting that they may be the most Fe-rich deposits on the Moon. The distinct long-wavelength shape of this ferrous absorption is found to be similar for surface soils and materials excavated from depth. The pervasive character of this absorption feature supports the interpretation of abundant olivine within these late-stage lunar deposits. Important distinctions exist between the early-stage eastern maria and the late-stage western basalts, even though both appear to be Ti-rich. For example, the western maria are more radiogenic than eastern deposits. Telescopic spectra of the high-Ti western maria also exhibit a unique combination of a strong 1 micron feature and a relatively weak or attenuated 2-micron absorption. Pieters et al. concluded that the unusual strength and shape of the 1-micron absorption in western basalts results from an additional absorption from abundant olivine and/or Fe-bearing glass. Either mineralogy could produce the strong long wavelength 1-micron band, but a glassy Fe-rich surface could only form by rapid cooling along the exterior surfaces of flows. Clementine UV-VIS data of late-stage basalts are examined for regions in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium. The spectral properties of western regions are compared to the sampled Apollo 11 basalts in Mare Tranquillitatis, which contain similar albedos and UV-VIS spectral properties. For reference, the western basalts are also compared to the low-Ti and Fe-rich basalts in Mare Serenitatis (mISP). Serenitatis basalts have the strongest

  7. Mare basalts - Crystal chemistry, mineralogy, and petrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Hodges, F. N.; Bence, A. E.; Cameron, M.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper attempts a synthesis of the major-element chemistry, petrography, mineral chemistry, and crystal chemistry of the mare basalts returned by Apollo and Luna missions. A classification of the mare basalts based on major-element chemistry is given, and textural sequences within each major-element group are identified. The mineral chemistry and crystal chemistry of each mineral group are considered within the framework of the major-element groups and the textural sequences. The various classes of models for the origin of the mare basalts and the nature of their source regions are discussed in the context of the major- and trace-element chemistries and experimental investigations.

  8. Anaglyph: Basalt Cliffs, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Basalt cliffs along the northwest edge of the Meseta de Somuncura plateau near Sierra Colorada, Argentina show an unusual and striking pattern of erosion. Stereoscopic observation helps to clarify the landform changing processes active here. Many of the cliffs appear to be rock staircases that have the same color as the plateau's basaltic cap rock. Are these the edges of lower layers in the basalt or are they a train of slivers that are breaking off from, then sliding downslope and away from, the cap rock. They appear to be the latter. Close inspection shows that each stair step is too laterally irregular to be a continuous sheet of bedrock like the cap rock. Also, the steps are not flat but instead are little ridges, as one might expect from broken, tilted, and sliding slices of the cap rock. Stream erosion has cut some gullies into the cliffs and vegetation (appears bright in this infrared image) shows that water springs from and flows down some channels, but land sliding is clearly a major agent of erosion here.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat Thematic Mapper image over a topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, then producing the two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this

  9. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  10. Apollo 17 KREEPy basalt - A rock type intermediate between mare and KREEP basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, G.; Stoeser, D. B.; Wood, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The Apollo 17 KREEPy basalt is a unique lunar volcanic rock, observed only as clasts in the light friable breccia matrix (72275) of Boulder 1, Station 2 at Taurus-Littrow. Its status as a volcanic rock is confirmed by the absence of any meteoritic contamination, a lack of cognate inclusions or xenocrystal material, and low Ni contents in metal grains. The basalt was extruded 4.01 + or - 0.04 b.y. ago, approximately contemporaneously with the high-alumina mare basalts at Fra Mauro; shortly afterwards it was disrupted, probably by the Serenitatis impact, and its fragments emplaced in the South Massif. The basalt, which is quartz-normative and aluminous, is chemically and mineralogically intermediate between the Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the high-alumina mare basalts in most respects. It consists mainly of plagioclase and pigeonitic pyroxene in approximately equal amounts, and 10-30% of mesostatis.

  11. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  12. The Origin of Noble Gas Isotopic Heterogeneity in Icelandic Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Honda, M.; McDougall, I.

    2001-01-01

    Two models for generation of heterogeneous He, Ne and Ar isotopic ratios in Icelandic basalts are evaluated using a mixing model and the observed noble gas elemental ratios in Icelandic basalts,Ocean island Basalt (OIBs) and Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORBs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Shock metamorphism of granulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaal, R. B.; Thompson, T. D.; Hoerz, F.; Bauer, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with an extensive series of shock-recovery experiments performed on both nonporous crystalline basalt and its granulated and sieved counterpart to study the role of porosity and grain size in shock motomorphic effects under otherwise identical conditions. Shocked samples are compared with unshocked starting material in terms of textural and mineralogical modifications attributable to shock. A comparative petrographic and chemical characterization is presented of pulverized and sieved lunar basalt 75035 shocked between 6 and 75 GPa in comparison with holocrystalline disks of the same basalts shocked in 10 earlier experiments. Specifically, a petrographic classification of shock features is given, along with an estimation of relative amounts of shock glasses and a chemical characterization of shock glasses in each shocked granular basalt.

  14. Reduction of mare basalts by sulfur loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brett, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic Fe content and S abundance are inversely correlated in mare basalts. Either S volatilization from the melt results in reduction of Fe2+ to Fe0 or else high S content decreases Fe0 activity in the melt, thus explaining the correlation. All considerations favor the model that metallic iron in mare basalts is due to sulfur loss. The Apollo 11 and 17 mare basalt melts were probably saturated with S at the time of eruption; the Apollo 12 and 15 basalts were probably not saturated. Non-mare rocks show a positive correlation of S abundance with metallic Fe content; it is proposed that this is due to the addition of meteoritic material having a fairly constant Fe0/S ratio. If true, metallic Fe content or S abundance in non-mare rocks provides a measure of degree of meteoritic contamination. ?? 1976.

  15. Basalts Dredged from the Northeastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Engel, C G; Engel, A E

    1963-06-21

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. In addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic theoleiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. The distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope. PMID:17802173

  16. Basalts dredged from the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, C.G.; Engel, A.E.J.

    1963-01-01

    Volcanic rocks dredged from seamounts, fault ridges, and other major geological features of the northeast Pacific Ocean include a wide variety of basalts. Most of these are vesicular, porphyritic types with near analogues in the Hawaiian and other oceanic islands. in addition, aluminous basalts and diabasic tholeiites impoverished in potassium also occur. There is no simple correlation of composition, degree of oxidation, vesiculation, or hydration of these basalts with texture, or depth of dredge site. Most samples appear to have been extruded at much shallower depths than those now pertaining at the dredge site. the distribution of these basalts suggests that the andesite line coincides with or lies on the continent side of the foot of the continental slope.

  17. Basaltic cannibalism at Thrihnukagigur volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudak, M. R.; Feineman, M. D.; La Femina, P. C.; Geirsson, H.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic assimilation of felsic continental crust is a well-documented, relatively common phenomenon. The extent to which basaltic crust is assimilated by magmas, on the other hand, is not well known. Basaltic cannibalism, or the wholesale incorporation of basaltic crustal material into a basaltic magma, is thought to be uncommon because basalt requires more energy than higher silica rocks to melt. Basaltic materials that are unconsolidated, poorly crystalline, or palagonitized may be more easily ingested than fully crystallized massive basalt, thus allowing basaltic cannibalism to occur. Thrihnukagigur volcano, SW Iceland, offers a unique exposure of a buried cinder cone within its evacuated conduit, 100 m below the main vent. The unconsolidated tephra is cross-cut by a NNE-trending dike, which runs across the ceiling of this cave to a vent that produced lava and tephra during the ~4 Ka fissure eruption. Preliminary petrographic and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses indicate that there are two populations of plagioclase present in the system - Population One is stubby (aspect ratio < 1.7) with disequilibrium textures and low Ba/Sr ratios while Population Two is elongate (aspect ratio > 2.1), subhedral to euhedral, and has much higher Ba/Sr ratios. Population One crystals are observed in the cinder cone, dike, and surface lavas, whereas Population Two crystals are observed only in the dike and surface lavas. This suggests that a magma crystallizing a single elongate population of plagioclase intruded the cinder cone and rapidly assimilated the tephra, incorporating the stubbier population of phenocrysts. This conceptual model for basaltic cannibalism is supported by field observations of large-scale erosion upward into the tephra, which is coated by magma flow-back indicating that magma was involved in the thermal etching. While the unique exposure at Thrihnukagigur makes it an exceptional place to investigate basaltic

  18. Basaltic Soil of Gale Crater: Crystalline Component Compared to Martian Basalts and Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Schmidt, M.; Downs, R. T.; Stolper, E. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Farmer, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Morrison, S. M.; Rampe, E. B.; Sarrazin, P.; Yen, A. S.; Anderosn, R. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Spanovich, N.

    2013-01-01

    A significant portion of the soil of the Rocknest dune is crystalline and is consistent with derivation from unweathered basalt. Minerals and their compositions are identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument on MSL Curiosity. Basalt minerals in the soil include plagioclase, olivine, low- and high-calcium pyroxenes, magnetite, ilmenite, and quartz. The only minerals unlikely to have formed in an unaltered basalt are hematite and anhydrite. The mineral proportions and compositions of the Rocknest soil are nearly identical to those of the Adirondack-class basalts of Gusev Crater, Mars, inferred from their bulk composition as analyzed by the MER Spirit rover.

  19. Nickel and Cobalt Partitioning Between Spinel and Basaltic Melt: Applications to Planetary Basalt Suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.

    2002-01-01

    New experimental spinel/melt partition coefficients for Ni and Co have been measured in basalt samples with natural levels of Ni and Co, are lower than previous high doping experiments, and are applied to several planetary basalt suites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  1. Can we identify source lithology of basalt?

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The nature of source rocks of basaltic magmas plays a fundamental role in understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the solid earth. However, identification of source lithology of basalts remains uncertainty. Using a parameterization of multi-decadal melting experiments on a variety of peridotite and pyroxenite, we show here that a parameter called FC3MS value (FeO/CaO-3*MgO/SiO2, all in wt%) can identify most pyroxenite-derived basalts. The continental oceanic island basalt-like volcanic rocks (MgO>7.5%) (C-OIB) in eastern China and Mongolia are too high in the FC3MS value to be derived from peridotite source. The majority of the C-OIB in phase diagrams are equilibrium with garnet and clinopyroxene, indicating that garnet pyroxenite is the dominant source lithology. Our results demonstrate that many reputed evolved low magnesian C-OIBs in fact represent primary pyroxenite melts, suggesting that many previous geological and petrological interpretations of basalts based on the single peridotite model need to be reconsidered. PMID:23676779

  2. Lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystems in deep basalt aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, T.O.; McKinley, J.P.

    1995-10-20

    Bacterial communities were detected in deep crystalline rock aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRB). CRB ground waters contained up to 60 {mu}M dissolved H{sub 2} and autotrophic microorganisms outnumbered heterotrophs. Stable carbon isotope measurements implied that autotrophic methanogenesis dominated this ecosystem and was coupled to the depletion of dissolved inorganic carbon. In laboratory experiments, H{sub 2} a potential energy source for bacteria, was produced by reactions between crushed basalt and anaerobic water. Microcosms containing only crushed basalt and ground water supported microbial growth. These results suggest that the CRB contains a lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem that is independent of photosynthetic primary production. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Sintering of lunar glass and basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Hines, Joy A.; Mckay, David S.; Morris, Richard V.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the sintering behavior of glass and basalt lunar soil simulants. The degree of sintering was assessed by compressive strength testing and microanalysis. Both crushed glass and basalt sinter significantly at 1000 C, with the basalt attaining its maximum strength at 1100 C. Initial sintering occurs in less than 15 min, and the degree of sintering does not increase significantly with time after about 30 min. Glass sinters more readily than crystalline material. Sintering and devitrification both occur on a time scale of minutes in the heated glass, but sintering is apparently more rapid. The processes of sintering and oxygen release by hydrogen reduction of lunar soil are synergistic, and could be combined to produce two extremely useful products at a lunar base.

  4. High-alumina basalts from the Bogda Mountains suggest an arc setting for Chinese Northern Tianshan during the Late Carboniferous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Xu, Yi-Gang; Chen, Yi-Bing; Luo, Zhen-Yu; Hong, Lu-Bing; Ma, Liang; Liu, Hai-Quan

    2016-07-01

    Considerable debate persists as to the tectonic setting of the Tianshan Orogen during the Late Paleozoic, with active subduction system and intraplate large igneous provinces as two dominant schools. With aims of providing constraints on this issue, geochronological and geochemical analyses have been carried out on the Late Carboniferous high-Al basaltic lava (HAB) from the Bogda Mountains. These lavas, in conformable contact with the felsic rocks, belong to the Upper Carboniferous Liushugou Group. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating of two felsic ignimbrites further suggest that they were mainly erupted during 315-319 Ma. The Bogda basaltic lava is classified as HAB given their high Al contents > 16% and their chemical resemblance to those from modern arcs such as Aleutian and Kamchatka. They are characterized by strong enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), strong negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies, and distinct positive Pb anomalies. Hence, they are significantly different from the mantle plume-related basalts, as exemplified by those from Siberian, Emeishan, and Tarim large igneous provinces. Instead, their MORB-like Nd-Hf-Pb isotopes and arc-like trace elements indicate that the Bogda HABs may have been generated from a mantle wedge metasomatized by sediment-derived melts. The sector and oscillatory zoning in clinopyroxene phenocrysts in the Bogda HABs is attributable to rapid dynamic crystallization during magma ascent. High Al content is due to delayed plagioclase nucleation likely by the high crystallization pressure rather than water content. Collectively, our data lend support to an island arc environment during the Late Paleozoic, probably related to southward subduction of the Paleo-Tianshan Ocean.

  5. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  6. Basaltic Volcanism and Ancient Planetary Crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to decipher the origin of rocks which form the ancient lunar crust. Our goal is to better understand how the moon evolved chemically and, more generally, the processes involved in the chemical fractionation of terrestrial planetoids. This research has implications for other planetary bodies besides the Moon, especially smaller planetoids which evolved early in the history of the solar system and are now thermally stable. The three main areas focused on in our work (lunar mare basalts, KREEP basalts, and plutonic rocks of the lunar highlands) provide complementary information on the lunar interior and the processes that formed it.

  7. Vapor deposition in basaltic stalactites, Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, A. K.; Mohrig, D. C.; Welday, E. E.

    Basaltic stalacties suspended from the ceiling of a large lava tube at Kilauea, Hawaii, have totally enclosed vesicles whose walls are covered with euhedral FeTi oxide and silicate crystals. The walls of the vesicles and the exterior surfaces of stalactites are Fe and Ti enriched and Si depleted compared to common basalt. Minerals in vesicles have surface ornamentations on crystal faces which include alkali-enriched, aluminosilicate glass(?) hemispheres. No sulfide-, chloride-, fluoride-, phosphate- or carbonate-bearing minerals are present. Minerals in the stalactites must have formed by deposition from an iron oxide-rich vapor phase produced by the partial melting and vaporization of wall rocks in the tube.

  8. Evidence for Sulfur Degassing in Oceanic Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, D. T.; Saal, A. E.; Rutherford, M. J.; Hauri, E. H.

    2010-12-01

    Sulfur concentration in basaltic magmas is highly dependent on pressure, temperature, fO2, fS2, and bulk composition and therefore undergoes a complex history during melting, melt transport, degassing, and eruption. It was first recognized as a volatile in submarine basalts by Moore and Fabbi (1971) when the S content in glassy pillow rims was higher than the amount of S measured in degassed lavas at the surface. Subsequent studies concluded that degassing of S is not expected to occur in basaltic magmas erupting deeper than 500m below sea level (~50 bars). Therefore, once sulfide saturation (Liu et al, 2007) and fractionation of sulfide melts have been considered, pre-eruptive sulfur concentrations in basaltic magmas have been used to estimate the primitive S content in the melts and their mantle sources. Based on a large compilation of submarine glasses, we will show that basaltic magmas have lost not only CO2 and H2O but also S during degassing at pressures greater than 50 bars. Melt inclusion and glass compositions from submarine oceanic basalts were compiled to examine sulfur variations. Data was filtered for sulfide undersaturated samples using Liu et al.’s (2007) calculation since H2O content was available. A positive correlation between S and Dy was expected as seen by previous studies, which considered S for sulfide undersaturated basalts to behave similar to HREE (Dy) during melting and crystal fractionation (Morgan, 1986; Saal et al, 2002). A S/Dy ratio of 240±20 ppm was determined for the data compilation of the basaltic glasses. A subgroup of samples, dominantly glasses enriched in incompatible trace elements, showed lower S/Dy than the ratio determined above. This lower S/Dy would be controlled either by a change in S or Dy. A simple melting model was used to confirm that the change in S/Dy was not controlled by Dy variation due to the effect of garnet during mantle melting, but by the decrease in S content. The most likely explanation for this

  9. Equilibration of Leachants with Basalt Rock for Repository Simulation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-07-02

    In a nuclear waste repository in basalt, the groundwater will have a low redox potential (Eh) which may affect the leach rate of SRP waste glass. Accurate laboratory simulations of conditions in a basalt reposition must maintain low Eh values throughout the course of the experiment. In this report, important parameters affecting the ability of basalt to maintain appropriate Eh-pH conditions are examined, in particular basalt type and groundwater simulation.

  10. Thermal models for basaltic volcanism on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyil, L.; McEwen, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new model for the thermal emissions from active basaltic eruptions on Io. While our methodology shares many similarities with previous work, it is significantly different in that (1) it uses a field tested cooling model and (2) the model is more applicable to pahoehoe flows and lava lakes than fountain-fed, channelized, 'a'a flows. This model demonstrates the large effect lava porosity has on the surface cooling rate (with denser flows cooling more slowly) and provides a preliminary tool for examining some of the hot spots on Io. The model infrared signature of a basaltic eruption is largely controlled by a single parameter, ??, the average survival time for a lava surface. During an active eruption surfaces are quickly covered or otherwise destroyed and typical values of ?? for a basaltic eruption are expected to be on the order of 10 seconds to 10 minutes. Our model suggests that the Galileo SSI eclipse data are consistent with moderately active to quiescent basaltic lava lakes but are not diagnostic of such activity. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Utilization of lunar ilmenite: Basalt or regolith?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawatra, S. K.; Delao, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    A critical discussion of whether lunar basalt or regolith should be used as a resource for mineral processing schemes on the lunar surface, with pros and cons for each argument is presented. A literature review has shown that the majority of authors feel that mining the lunar basalt, crushing it, and then processing to remove the desired minerals, would be the route to take. The argument that this method would not be a sound mineral processing practice is presented. Mining and crushing are difficult propositions even on Earth; to attempt such processes in the hostile lunar environment would be a phenomenal task. It would be better to start with a simpler scheme, such as processing the regolith, which can be adapted to the multitude of unknowns facing the first lunar production plant. If, however, the lunar mining trend is followed, it must be kept in mind that mining and processing technology which is radically different from what is currently available and used on Earth will have to be developed. Podnieks and Roepke (1987) and Lindroth and Podnieks (1987) have summarized the new technology that may be applicable, but this technology is very similar to the current, 99 percent inefficient technology used on Earth. One such possible technique is sodium vapor fragmentation of basalt. Initial testwork was conducted at Michigan Technological University on terrestrial basalt with extremely promising results, though much time and effort will be needed to fully develop this process.

  12. The biological consequences of flood basalt volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Flood basalt eruptions are among the largest environmental perturbations of the Phanerozoic. The rapid release of CO2 from a large igneous province would have triggered a chain of events that can include climate warming, ocean acidification, reduced seawater carbonate saturation, and expanded oceanic anoxia. Those stressors have widely negative impacts on marine organisms, especially on calcified taxa, by affecting their respiratory physiology and reducing energy available for growth and reproduction. Many Phanerozoic extinctions, most notably the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions, coincided with flood basalt eruptions and shared distinctive patterns of taxonomic and ecological selectivity. In these extinctions, highly active organisms were more likely to survive because they possess physiological adaptations for maintaining internal pH during activity, which also proves useful when buffering pH against ocean acidification. In contrast, species that did not move and had low metabolic rates, such as brachiopods and sponges, suffered considerable losses during these extinctions. Heavily-calcified organisms, especially corals, were particularly vulnerable; as a result, ocean acidification and saturation state changes from flood basalt eruptions often triggered crises in reef ecosystems. This characteristic pattern of selectivity during "physiological" extinctions that closely coincided with flood basalts provides a template for assessing the causes of other extinction events. Because these crises also provide deep time analogues for the ongoing anthropogenic crisis of warming, ocean acidification, and expanded anoxia, the selectivity patterns can also help constrain "winners" and "losers" over upcoming decades.

  13. Basalt-Block Heat-Storage Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Concept for storage of solar heat for later use based on use of basalt, cast into blocks and stacked in inflatable gas-tight enclosure serving as heat-storage chamber. Heat flows to blocks from solar collector during day and from blocks to heat engine at night.

  14. Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.; Phillips, S.; Alexander, J.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurement activities. The objective was to show that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was established by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping was used to establish major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is located northwest of the INEL, was chosen for this study due to the similarity of this surface outcrop geology to that of the underlying bedrock fracture system found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This study showed that hydraulic conductivity of basalt can be reduced through pressure grouting of cementitious material.

  15. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  16. Hydrogen isotope systematics of submarine basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kyser, T.K.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The D/H ratios and water contents in fresh submarine basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and Hawaii indicate that the primary D/H ratios of many submarine lavas have been altered by processes including (1) outgassing, (2) addition of seawater at magmatic temperature, and (3) low-temperature hydration of glass. Decreases in ??D and H2O+ from exteriors to interiors of pillows are explained by outgassing of water whereas inverse relations between ??D and H2O+ in basalts from the Galapagos Rise and the FAMOUS Area are attributed to outgassing of CH4 and H2. A good correlation between ??D values and H2O is observed in a suite of submarine tholeiites dredged from the Kilauea East Rift Zone where seawater (added directly to the magma), affected only the isotopic compositions of hydrogen and argon. Analyses of some glassy rims indicate that the outer millimeter of the glass can undergo lowtemperature hydration by hydroxyl groups having ??D values as low as -100. ??D values vary with H2O contents of subaerial transitional basalts from Molokai, Hawaii, and subaerial alkali basalts from the Society Islands, indicating that the primary ??D values were similar to those of submarine lavas. Extrapolations to possible unaltered ??D values and H2O contents indicate that the primary ??D values of most thoteiite and alkali basalts are near -80 ?? 5: the weight percentages of water are variable, 0.15-0.35 for MOR tholeiites, about 0.25 for Hawaiian tholeiites, and up to 1.1 for alkali basalts. The primary ??D values of -80 for most basalts are comparable to those measured for deep-seated phlogopites. These results indicate that hydrogen, in marked contrast to other elements such as Sr, Nd, Pb, and O, has a uniform isotopic composition in the mantle. This uniformity is best explained by the presence of a homogeneous reservoir of hydrogen that has existed in the mantle since the very early history of the Earth. ?? 1984.

  17. Coatings on Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Coatings on Gusev Plains Basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Surface coatings on Gusev Plains basalt have been observed and may contain hematite and nanophase Fe-oxides along with enrichments in P, S, Cl, and K relative to the underlying rock. The Gusev coatings may be derived from the dissolution of adhering soil and/or parent rock along with the addition of S and Cl from outside sources. Transient water for dissolution could be sourced from melting snow during periods of high obliquity, acid fog, and/or ground water (Haskin et al., 2005). Coatings on basalt in the hyper-arid (less than 2mm y(sup -1)) Atacama Desert may assist in understanding the chemistry, mineralogy and formation mechanisms of the Gusev basalt coatings. The Atacama Desert climate is proposed to be analogous to a paleo-Mars climate that was characterized by limited aqueous activity when the Gusev coatings could have formed. The objectives of this work are to (i) determine the chemical nature and extent of surface coatings on Atacama Desert basalt, and (ii) assess coating formation mechanisms in the Atacama Desert. Preliminary backscattered electron imaging of Atacama basalt thin-sections indicated that the coatings are as thick as 20 m. The boundary between the coating and the basalt labradorite, ilmenite, and augite grains was abrupt indicating that the basalt minerals underwent no chemical dissolution. The Atacama coatings have been added to the basalt instead of being derived from basalt chemical weathering. Semi-quantitative energy dispersive spectroscopy shows the coatings to be chemically homogeneous. The coating is depleted in Ca (0.9 wt% CaO) and enriched in K (1.3 wt.% K2O) and Si (69.1 wt.% SiO2) relative to the augite and labradorite grains. A dust source enriched in Si (e.g., poorly crystalline silica) and K and depleted in Ca appears to have been added to the basalt surface. Unlike the Gusev coatings, no P, S, and Cl enrichment was observed. However, Fe (3.2 wt.% FeO) was present in the Atacama coatings suggesting the present of Fe

  18. H 2O in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from four subduction-related volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Layne, G. D.

    1993-06-01

    Total dissolved H 2O and major element abundances were measured in basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Quaternary eruptions of four subduction-related volcanoes to test the hypothesis that low-MgO high-alumina basalts contain high H 2O at depth [1] and to reveal any petrogenetically significant correlations between arc basalt compositions and H 2O contents. Total dissolved H 2O (combined molecular H 2O and OH groups) measured by ion microprobe in mafic glass inclusions from the 1974 eruption of Fuego, Guatemala, reaches 6.2 wt.%. Dissolved H 2O contents decrease in more evolved Fuego glasses. Correlations of H 2O with MgO, Na 2O, K 2O, S and Cl indicate that aqueous fluid exsolution during magma ascent forced crystallization and differentiation of residual liquids. Low-K 2O magnesian high-alumina basalt glass inclusions from the 3 ka eruption of Black Crater (Medicine Lake volcano, California) have low H 2O contents, near 0.2 wt.%, which are consistent with the MORB-like character of these and other primitive lavas of the Medicine Lake region. Basalt and basaltic andesite glass inclusions from Copco Cone and Goosenest volcano on the Cascade volcanic front north of Mt. Shasta have H 2O contents of up to 3.3 wt.%. The range of H 2O contents in Cascade mafic magmas is too large to have resulted solely from enrichment by crystallization and indicates the participation of an H 2O-rich component in magma generation or crustal-level modification. Whereas fluid-absent melting of amphibole-bearing peridotite can account for the H 2O in most mafic arc liquids, the very high H 2O/alkali ratios of the 1974 Fuego eruptives suggest that an aqueous fluid was involved in the generation of Fuego basalts.

  19. Searching for Non-Vestoid Basaltic Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovitz, Nicholas; Jedicke, R.; Willman, M.; Gaidos, E.

    2006-12-01

    We present an observational campaign designed to target Main Belt asteroids that: (1) have a photometric signature similar to that of 4 Vesta and the Vestoid family, i.e. a basaltic surface indicative of past mineral differentiation, and (2) are dynamically distinct from this family so that they lie outside of the domain of orbital element phase space occupied by the V-type asteroids. The only known non-vestoid asteroid with a basaltic surface is 1459 Magnya (Lazzaro et al. 2000). This is a paradox; collected meteorites include representatives from tens or even hundreds of past or present differentiated parent bodies in the Main Belt, a number that is at least an order of magnitude larger than the two known occurrences of Main Belt differentiation (Scott 2002). Asteroids with potentially basaltic surfaces are chosen based on their Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ugriz photometric magnitudes. Ten different ugriz color combinations, including two principal component colors (Nesvorny et al. 2005), are used to select asteroids that show similarity to Vestoid colors. Objects with colors that meet these criteria are then prioritized based on their dynamical dissimilarity to Vesta. Low-resolution spectroscopy of the highest priority objects is performed using the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) on Keck II in order to unambiguously determine whether or not our candidates have basaltic surfaces. The 0.4-1.0 micron wavelength coverage of this instrument is well suited to resolving both the 0.9 micron olivine/pyroxene absorption feature and the 0.5-0.7 micron slope that are indicative of a basaltic surface and thus that a given asteroid derives from a parent body that has experienced either partial melting or differentiation. Preliminary results from two observing runs in August and September of this year are presented here. This research is supported in part by NSF Planetary Astronomy grant AST04-07134, P.I. R. Jedicke.

  20. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  1. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  2. Geochemistry of apollo 15 basalt 15555 and soil 15531.

    PubMed

    Schnetzler, C C; Philpotts, J A; Nava, D F; Schuhmann, S; Thomas, H H

    1972-01-28

    Major and trace element concentrations have been determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, colorimetry, and isotope dilution in Apollo 15 mare basalt 15555 from the Hadley Rille area; trace element concentrations have also been determined in plagioclase and pyroxene separates from basalt 15555 and in soil 15531 from the same area. Basalt 15555 most closely resembles in composition the Apollo 12 olivine-rich basalts. The concentrations of lithium, potassium, rubidium, barium, rare-earth elements, and zirconium in basalt 15555 are the lowest, and the negative europium anomaly is the smallest, reported for lunar basalts; this basalt might be the least differentiated material yet returned from the moon. Crystallization and removal of about 6 percent of plagioclase similar to that contained in the basalt would account for the observed europium anomaly; if plagioclase is not on the liquidus of this basalt, a multistage origin is indicated. Mineral data indicate that plagioclase and pyroxene approached quasi-equilibrium. Most of the chemical differences between basalt 15555 and soil 15531 would be accounted for if the soil were a mixture of 88 percent basalt, 6 percent KREEP (a component, identified in other Apollo soils, rich in potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) and 6 percent plagioclase (anorthosite?). PMID:17731364

  3. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G.

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  4. Northwest Africa 5298: A Basaltic Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Peslier, Anne; Lapen, Thomas J.; Brandon, Alan; Shafer, John

    2009-01-01

    NWA 5298 is a single 445 g meteorite found near Bir Gandouz, Morocco in March 2008 [1]. This rock has a brown exterior weathered surface instead of a fusion crust and the interior is composed of green mineral grains with interstitial dark patches containing small vesicles and shock melts [1]. This meteorite is classified as a basaltic shergottite [2]. A petrologic study of this Martian meteorite is being carried out with electron microprobe analysis and soon trace element analyses by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Oxygen fugacity is calculated from Fe-Ti oxides pairs in the sample. The data from this study constrains the petrogenesis of basaltic shergottites.

  5. Lead isotope studies of mare basalt 70017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattinson, J. M.; Tilton, G. R.; Todt, W.; Chen, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium, thorium, and isotopic lead data for components of basalt 70017 are reported, and it is found that the whole rock, pyroxene, and ilmenite points in a concordia diagram plot along a chord intersecting the curve at 3.7 and 4.33 eons. The plagioclase data do not seem to lie on this line. The data for 70017 appear to plot along a distinctly different chord in a concordia diagram than do the data for 75055 and 75035, two other Apollo 17 mare basalts. The lead data are in accord with Sm-Nd results. A 3.7 eon crystallization age for 70017 would be consistent with the same kind of parentless lead that is indicated by previous studies of soils and soil breccias from stations at Taurus-Littrow. The Th/U ratio in ilmenite is 2.2, and the concentrations of these two elements are approximately twice those in pyroxene.

  6. Biogenic Mn-Oxides in Subseafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Gustafsson, Håkan; Holm, Nils G

    2015-01-01

    The deep biosphere of the subseafloor basalts is recognized as a major scientific frontier in disciplines like biology, geology, and oceanography. Recently, the presence of fungi in these environments has involved a change of view regarding diversity and ecology. Here, we describe fossilized fungal communities in vugs in subseafloor basalts from a depth of 936.65 metres below seafloor at the Detroit Seamount, Pacific Ocean. These fungal communities are closely associated with botryoidal Mn oxides composed of todorokite. Analyses of the Mn oxides by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy (EPR) indicate a biogenic signature. We suggest, based on mineralogical, morphological and EPR data, a biological origin of the botryoidal Mn oxides. Our results show that fungi are involved in Mn cycling at great depths in the seafloor and we introduce EPR as a means to easily identify biogenic Mn oxides in these environments. PMID:26107948

  7. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  8. Continental basaltic volcanoes — Processes and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G. A.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2008-11-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes are the most common volcanic landforms on the continents. They encompass a range of morphologies from small pyroclastic constructs to larger shields and reflect a wide range of eruptive processes. This paper reviews physical volcanological aspects of continental basaltic eruptions that are driven primarily by magmatic volatiles. Explosive eruption styles include Hawaiian and Strombolian ( sensu stricto) and violent Strombolian end members, and a full spectrum of styles that are transitional between these end members. The end-member explosive styles generate characteristic facies within the resulting pyroclastic constructs (proximal) and beyond in tephra fall deposits (medial to distal). Explosive and effusive behavior can be simultaneous from the same conduit system and is a complex function of composition, ascent rate, degassing, and multiphase processes. Lavas are produced by direct effusion from central vents and fissures or from breakouts (boccas, located along cone slopes or at the base of a cone or rampart) that are controlled by varying combinations of cone structure, feeder dike processes, local effusion rate and topography. Clastogenic lavas are also produced by rapid accumulation of hot material from a pyroclastic column, or by more gradual welding and collapse of a pyroclastic edifice shortly after eruptions. Lava flows interact with — and counteract — cone building through the process of rafting. Eruption processes are closely coupled to shallow magma ascent dynamics, which in turn are variably controlled by pre-existing structures and interaction of the rising magmatic mixture with wall rocks. Locations and length scales of shallow intrusive features can be related to deeper length scales within the magma source zone in the mantle. Coupling between tectonic forces, magma mass flux, and heat flow range from weak (low magma flux basaltic fields) to sufficiently strong that some basaltic fields produce polygenetic

  9. Nanoparticulate mineral matter from basalt dust wastes.

    PubMed

    Dalmora, Adilson C; Ramos, Claudete G; Querol, Xavier; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Taffarel, Silvio R; Moreno, Teresa; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during "stonemeal" soil fertilizer application have been the subject of some concern recently around the world for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the mining district of Nova Prata in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Zn that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and could so present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical composition in typical BDW samples highlights the need to develop cleaning procedures to minimise exposure to these natural fertilizing basalt dust wastes and is thus of direct relevance to both the industrial sector of basalt mining and to agriculture in the region. PMID:26551199

  10. Iron isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Dauphas, Nicolas; Huang, Shichun; Marty, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The iron isotopic compositions of 93 well-characterized basalts from geochemically and geologically diverse mid-ocean ridge segments, oceanic islands and back arc basins were measured. Forty-three MORBs have homogeneous Fe isotopic composition, with δ56Fe ranging from +0.07‰ to +0.14‰ and an average of +0.105 ± 0.006‰ (2SD/√n, n = 43, MSWD = 1.9). Three back arc basin basalts have similar δ56Fe to MORBs. By contrast, OIBs are slightly heterogeneous with δ56Fe ranging from +0.05‰ to +0.14‰ in samples from Koolau and Loihi, Hawaii, and from +0.09‰ to +0.18‰ in samples from the Society Islands and Cook-Austral chain, French Polynesia. Overall, oceanic basalts are isotopically heavier than mantle peridotite and pyroxenite xenoliths, reflecting Fe isotope fractionation during partial melting of the mantle. Iron isotopic variations in OIBs mainly reflect Fe isotope fractionation during fractional crystallization of olivine and pyroxene, enhanced by source heterogeneity in Koolau samples.

  11. How thick are lunar mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, F.

    1978-01-01

    It is argued that De Hon's estimates of the thickness of lunar mare basalts, made by analyzing 'ghost' craters on mare surfaces, were inflated as the result of the crater morphometric data of Pike (1977) to reconstruct rim heights of degraded craters. Crater rim heights of 82 randomly selected highland craters of various states of degradation were determined, and median rim height was compared to that of corresponding fresh impact structures. Results indicate that the thickness estimates of De Hon may be reduced by a factor of 2, and that the total volume of mare basalt produced throughout lunar history could be as little as 1-2 million cubic kilometers. A survey of geochemical and petrographic evidence indicates that lateral transport of regolith components over distances of much greater than 10 km is relatively inefficient; it is suggested that vertical mixing of a highland substrate underlying the basaltic fill may have had a primordial role in generating the observed mare width distributions and high concentrations of exotic components in intrabasin regoliths.

  12. Lunar sample studies. [breccias basalts, and anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Lunar samples discussed and the nature of their analyses are: (1) an Apollo 15 breccia which is thoroughly analyzed as to the nature of the mature regolith from which it derived and the time and nature of the lithification process, (2) two Apollo 11 and one Apollo 12 basalts analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography, (3) eight Apollo 17 mare basalts, also analyzed in terms of chemistry, Cross-Iddings-Pirsson-Washington norms, mineralogy, and petrography. The first seven are shown to be chemically similar although of two main textural groups; the eighth is seen to be distinct in both chemistry and mineralogy, (4) a troctolitic clast from a Fra Mauro breccia, analyzed and contrasted with other high-temperature lunar mineral assemblages. Two basaltic clasts from the same breccia are shown to have affinities with rock 14053, and (5) the uranium-thorium-lead systematics of three Apollo 16 samples are determined; serious terrestrial-lead contamination of the first two samples is attributed to bandsaw cutting in the lunar curatorial facility.

  13. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: I. Afar transitional basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to axial volcanic ranges of spreading centers in the Afar depression, escapes by degassing during residence in crustal magma reservoirs. The investigation employs volcanic gas data to test the degassing hypothesis. Volcanic gases emitted from source vents at Erta'Ale lava lake are used to represent volatiles present in the basalt supplied to magma reservoirs underlying Afar spreading centers. For comparison, volcanic gases from a large fissure eruption at Ardoukoba are used to represent volatiles in basalt after a period of storage in the Afar magma reservoirs. The results confirm the hypothesis. Gases from the lava lake and fissure eruption are the same except for CO 2. They lie along a common CO 2 control line. The fissure eruption gases are six-fold depleted in CO 2 compared to gases from the continuously supplied lava lake. This difference corresponds to a loss of approximately 85% of the initial CO 2. Moreover, gases from the fissure eruption are nearly identical to those emitted by Kilauea basalts that have lost CO 2 by magma reservoir degassing. Mass balance modeling indicates an initial CO 2 content for Afar basalt of 0.12 wt.% compared to CO 2 concentrations as low as 0.02 wt.% after degassing at depth.

  14. Making rhyolite in a basalt crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has long attracted the attention of those concerned with the origin of rhyolitic magmas and indeed of granitic continental crust, because it presents no alternative for such magmas other than deriving them from a basaltic source. Hydrothermally altered basalt has been identified as the progenitor. The fact that rhyolite erupts as pure liquid requires a process of melt-crustal separation that is highly efficient despite the high viscosity of rhyolite melt. Volcanoes in Iceland are foci of basaltic magma injection along the divergent plate boundary. Repeated injection produces remelting, digestion, and sometimes expulsion or lateral withdrawal of material resulting in a caldera, a "crucible" holding down-dropped and interlayered lava flows, tephras, and injected sills. Once melting of this charge begins, a great deal of heat is absorbed in the phase change. Just 1% change in crystallinity per degree gives a melt-present body an effective heat capacity >5 times the subsolidus case. Temperature is thus buffered at the solidus and melt composition at rhyolite. Basalt inputs are episodic ("fires") so likely the resulting generation of rhyolite by melting is too. If frequent enough to offset cooling between events, rhyolite melt extractions will accumulate as a rhyolite magma reservoir rather than as discrete crystallized sills. Evidently, such magma bodies can survive multiple firings without themselves erupting, as the 1875 eruption of Askja Caldera of 0.3 km3 of rhyolite equilibrated at 2-km depth without previous leakage over a ten-millennium period and the surprise discovery of rhyolite magma at 2-km depth in Krafla suggest. Water is required for melting; otherwise melting cannot begin at a temperature lower than that of the heat source. Because the solubility of water in melt is pressure-dependent and almost zero at surface pressure, there must be a minimum depth at which basalt-induced melting can occur and a rhyolite reservoir sustained. In practice, the

  15. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1981-07-01

    The trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. The relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be estimated from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies most of the mantle above the 670 kilometer discontinuity. The source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that lost its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, whereas the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean. PMID:17741173

  16. The mean composition of ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Allison; Dalton, Colleen A.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Su, Yongjun; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-03-01

    mean composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is determined using a global data set of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes compiled from new and previously published data. A global catalog of 771 ridge segments, including their mean depth, length, and spreading rate enables calculation of average compositions for each segment. Segment averages allow weighting by segment length and spreading rate and reduce the bias introduced by uneven sampling. A bootstrapping statistical technique provides rigorous error estimates. Based on the characteristics of the data, we suggest a revised nomenclature for MORB. "ALL MORB" is the total composition of the crust apart from back-arc basins, N-MORB the most likely basalt composition encountered along the ridge >500 km from hot spots, and D-MORB the depleted end-member. ALL MORB and N-MORB are substantially more enriched than early estimates of normal ridge basalts. The mean composition of back-arc spreading centers requires higher extents of melting and greater concentrations of fluid-mobile elements, reflecting the influence of water on back-arc petrogenesis. The average data permit a re-evaluation of several problems of global geochemistry. The K/U ratio reported here (12,340 ± 840) is in accord with previous estimates, much lower than the estimate of Arevalo et al. (2009). The low Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratio of ALL MORB and N-MORB provide constraints on the hypothesis that Earth has a non-chondritic primitive mantle. Either Earth is chondritic in Sm/Nd and the hypothesis is incorrect or MORB preferentially sample an enriched reservoir, requiring a large depleted reservoir in the deep mantle.

  17. Trace Element Diffusion in Basaltic Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holycross, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted high pressure, high temperature experiments to determine simultaneously the diffusivities of 24 trace elements (Sc, V, Rb, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Th, U) in liquids of basaltic composition. Pre-synthesis runs were conducted in graphite capsules in a piston-cylinder apparatus to create two glasses having relatively high and low trace element contents. These glasses were then powdered and paired in diffusion couples by repacking in graphite capsules. All diffusion experiments were executed in a piston cylinder apparatus at 1 GPa pressure and temperatures ranging from 1250-1500º C. Concentration gradients that developed in the glasses were characterized using a laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS). Diffusion coefficients were determined from concentration profiles and show Arrhenian behavior within experimental error. Errors were assigned based on the linear fit of five time series experiments conducted over 500-9000 s to accurately represent the total experimental reproducibility of our results. Data show the highest activation energies are obtained for high field strength elements. Values for the pre-exponential factor, D0, also peak for the high field strength elements. We suggest that trace element diffusion in basaltic melts follows the compensation law (Winchell, 1969), with log D0 exhibiting linear dependence on activation energy. Calculated diffusivities indicate that transport through basaltic melt could be an effective mechanism for fractionating high field strength elements over geologically relevant time scales. Winchell (1969) High Temp. Sci. 1: 200-215

  18. Mare basalt genesis - Modeling trace elements and isotopic ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, A. B.

    1985-11-01

    Various types of mare basalt data have been synthesized, leading to the production of an internally consistent model of the mare basalt source region and mare basalt genesis. The model accounts for the mineralogical, major oxide, compatible siderophile trace element, incompatible trace element, and isotopic characteristics of most of the mare basalt units and of all the pyroclastic glass units for which reliable data are available. Initial tests of the model show that it also reproduces the mineralogy and incompatible trace element characteristics of the complementary highland anorthosite suite of rocks and, in a general way, those of the lunar granite suite of rocks.

  19. Variations in chemical composition of Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical analyses of 30 different Apollo 15 mare basalts were examined to evaluate the effects of closure on the pearson moment correlation coefficient. It is shown possible to describe the Apollo 15 mare basalts in terms of an opaque, an olivine/pyroxene, an anorthite, and a KREEP component, if significant correlations are identified using the expected correlations as null values. Using Q-mode cluster analysis and nonlinear mapping, it is possible to recognize three groups of the mare basalts, groups 1 and 2 belonging to the olivine normative basalt cluster and group 3 to the quartz normative cluster.

  20. An estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Fabbi, Brent P.

    1971-01-01

    Sulfur analyses by X-ray fluorescence give an average content of 107 ppm for 9 samples of fresh subaerially-erupted oceanic basalt and 680 ppm for 38 samples of submarine erupted basalt. This difference is the result of retention of sulfur in basalt quenched on the sea floor and loss of sulfur in basalt by degassing at the surface. The outer glassy part of submarine erupted basalt contains 800??150 ppm sulfur, and this amount is regarded as an estimate of the juvenile sulfur content of the basalt melt from the mantle. The slower cooled interiors of basalt pillows are depleted relative to the rims owing to degassing and escape through surface fractures. Available samples of deep-sea basalts do not indicate a difference in original sulfur content between low-K tholeiite, Hawaiian tholeiite, and alkali basalt. The H2O/S ratio of analyzed volcanic gases is generally lower than the H2O/S ratio of gases presumed lost from surface lavas as determined by chemical differences between pillow rims and surface lavas. This enrichment of volcanic gases in sulfur relative to water may result from a greater degassing of sulfur relative to water from shallow intrusive bodies beneath the volcano. ?? 1971 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Quantifying glassy and crystalline basalt partitioning in the oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Rachael; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2016-04-01

    The upper layers of the oceanic crust are predominately basaltic rock, some of which hosts microbial life. Current studies of microbial life within the ocean crust mainly focus on the sedimentary rock fraction, or those organisms found within glassy basalts while the potential habitability of crystalline basalts are poorly explored. Recently, there has been recognition that microbial life develops within fractures and grain boundaries of crystalline basalts, therefore estimations of total biomass within the oceanic crust may be largely under evaluated. A deeper understanding of the bulk composition and fractionation of rocks within the oceanic crust is required before more accurate estimations of biomass can be made. To augment our understanding of glassy and crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust we created two end-member models describing basalt fractionation: a pillow basalt with massive, or sheet, flows crust and a pillow basalt with sheeted dike crust. Using known measurements of massive flow thickness, dike thickness, chilled margin thickness, pillow lava size, and pillow lava glass thickness, we have calculated the percentage of glassy versus crystalline basalts within the oceanic crust for each model. These models aid our understanding of textural fractionation within the oceanic crust, and can be applied with bioenergetics models to better constrain deep biomass estimates.

  2. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  3. Microbial colonization and alteration of basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einen, J.; Kruber, C.; Øvreås, L.; Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.

    2006-03-01

    Microorganisms have been reported to be associated with the alteration of the glassy margin of seafloor pillow basalts (Thorseth et al., 2001, 2003; Lysnes et al., 2004). The amount of iron and other biological important elements present in basalts and the vast abundance of basaltic glass in the earth's crust, make glass alteration an important process in global element cycling. To gain further insight into microbial communities associated with glass alteration, five microcosm experiments mimicking seafloor conditions were inoculated with seafloor basalt and incubated for one year. Mineral precipitations, microbial attachment to the glass and glass alteration were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the bacterial community composition was fingerprinted by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in combination with sequencing. SEM analysis revealed a microbial community with low morphological diversity of mainly biofilm associated and prosthecate microorganisms. Approximately 30 nm thick alteration rims developed on the glass in all microcosms after one year of incubation; this however was also seen in non inoculated controls. Calcium carbonate precipitates showed parallel, columnar and filamentous crystallization habits in the microcosms as well as in the sterile controls. DGGE analysis showed an alteration in bacterial community profiles in the five different microcosms, as a response to the different energy and redox regimes and time. In all microcosms a reduction in number of DGGE bands, in combination with an increase in cell abundance were recorded during the experiment. Sequence analysis showed that the microcosms were dominated by four groups of organisms with phylogenetic affiliation to four taxa: The Rhodospirillaceae, a family containing phototrophic marine organisms, in which some members are capable of heterotrophic growth in darkness and N2 fixation; the family Hyphomicrobiaceae, a group of prosthecate oligotrophic

  4. Plagioclase mineralogy of olivine alkaline basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    A geological and mineralogical study of the Potrillo volcanics is reported. The investigation consisted first of field mapping to establish and identify the different rock types and volcanic features in order to determine the geological history. Next, samples were collected and analyzed petrographically to determine suitable rocks from the various stratigraphic units for study of plagioclase. Samples selected for further study were crushed and the plagioclase extracted for the determination of composition and structural state. These results were then related to the petrology and crystallization of the basalt.

  5. Mineral chemistry and thermobarometry of peridotite xenoliths from Central Tien Shan basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V.; Batalev, V.; Simonov, V.; Bagdassarov, N.; Litasov, Yu.

    2009-04-01

    Meso-Cenozoic basaltoids were revealed in the Tien Shan on a vast area (>285.000 km2), from the mountainous framing of the Fergana basin in the west to the Dzhungar Alatau spurs in the east. They occur as dikes and stocks among the Paleozoic Tien Shan complexes. Basaltic flows and sills were found among the deposits of the Suluterek Formation localized in the basement of the section of continental sediments filling the Tien Shan neotectonic depressions. In the Toyun basin in China and in the Fergana valley, basaltic flows and sills occur among Cretaceous-Paleogene marine deposits. Meso-Cenozoic effusive bodies are mainly olivine and plagioclase basalts. The trace- and rare-earth-element compositions of rocks show that most of the studied basaltic series in the Tien Shan formed in within-plate magmatic systems related to mantle plume sources. Spinel lherzolite xenoliths were found in basalts from Ortosuu sites located in Kyrgyzstan. New basalt sites with ultramafic xenoliths have high significance for reconstruction of the composition, structure and evolution of the upper mantle of Tien Shan and geodynamic processes in Central Asia. Spinel lherzolite xenoliths are characterized by an anhydrous four-phase mineral assemblage: olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and brown Cr-spinel. Peridotite textures are largely protogranular. Rock forming minerals have high Mg# = 0.87-0.91 in Ol, 0.87-0.91 in Opx, 0.88-0.91 in Cpx, and 0.75-0.77 in Sp. NiO content in olivine reaches 0.4 wt.%. Clinopyroxenes are Cr-diopside and characterized by high Al2O3 (4.6-7.5 wt%), Cr2O3 (0.7 - 1.11 wt%), Na2O (1.4-1.7 wt%) contents and 0.44-0.5 Ca/(Ca+Mg) ratio. Cr/(Cr+Al) ratio in spinel is equal to 0.09-0.18. Temperatures of equilibration for spinel lherzolites range from 920 to 1150C for Opx-Cpx thermometer and from 920 to 1070C for Ca-in-opx thermometer of Brey, Kohler (1990) and 912-1080C for Opx-Cpx thermometer of Wells (1977). Pressures calculated from Cpx barometer of Nimis (1999

  6. East Mariana Basin tholeiites: Cretaceous intraplate basalts or rift basalts related to the Ontong Java plume?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castillo, P.R.; Pringle, M.S.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns suggest the presence of Jurassic oceanic crust in a large area in the western Pacific that includes the East Mariana, Nauru and Pigafetta Basins. Sampling of the igneous crust in this area by the Deep Sea Drilling Program (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) allows direct evaluation of the age and petrogenesis of this crust. ODP Leg 129 drilled a 51 m sequence of basalt pillows and massive flows in the central East Mariana Basin. 40Ar 39Ar ages determined in this study for two Leg 129 basalts average 114.6 ?? 3.2 Ma. This age is in agreement with the Albian-late Aptian paleontologic age of the overlying sediments, but is distinctively younger than the Jurassic age predicted by magnetic anomaly patterns in the basin. Compositionally, the East Mariana Basin basalts are uniformly low-K tholeiites that are depleted in highly incompatible elements compared to moderately incompatible ones, which is typical of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) erupted near hotspots. The Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of the tholeiites ( 87Sr 86Srinit = 0.70360-0.70374; 143Nd 144Ndinit = 0.512769-0.512790; 206Pb 204Pbmeas = 18.355-18.386) also overlap with some Indian Ocean Ridge MORB, although they are distinct from the isotopic compositions of Jurassic basalts drilled in the Pigafetta Basin, the oldest Pacific MORB. The isotopic compositions of the East Mariana Basin tholeiites are also similar to those of intraplate basalts, and in particular, to the isotopic signature of basalts from the nearby Ontong Java and Manihiki Plateaus. The East Mariana Basin tholeiites also share many petrologic and isotopic characteristics with the oceanic basement drilled in the Nauru Basin at DSDP Site 462. In addition, the new 110.8 ?? 1.0 Ma 40Ar 39Ar age for two flows from the bottom of Site 462 in the Nauru Basin is indistinguishable from the age of the East Mariana Basin flows. Thus, while magnetic anomaly patterns predict that the igneous

  7. Crystal Stratigraphy of Two Basalts from Apollo 16: Unique Crystallization of Picritic Basalt 606063,10-16 and Very-Low-Titanium Basalt 65703,9-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Neal, C. R.; Stevens, R. E.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    A geochemical survey of Apollo 16 regolith fragments found five basaltic samples from among hundreds of 2-4 mm regolith fragments of the Apollo 16 site. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalt (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria (approx. 200 km). Identification of basaltic samples at the site not from the ancient regolith breccia indicates input of material via lateral transport by post-basin impacts. The presence of basaltic rocklets and glass at the site is not unprecedented and is required to satisfy mass-balance constraints of regolith compositions. However, preliminary characterization of olivine and plagioclase crystal size distributions indicated the sample textures were distinct from other known mare basalts, and instead had affinities to impact melt textures. Impact melt textures can appear qualitatively similar to pristine basalts, and quantitative analysis is required to distinguish between the two in thin section. The crystal stratigraphy method is a powerful tool in studying of igneous systems, utilizing geochemical analyses across minerals and textural analyses of phases. In particular, trace element signatures can aid in determining the ultimate origin of these samples and variations document subtle changes occurring during their petrogenesis.

  8. Petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts. Part 2: An open system model to explain the pigeonite basalt compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    Original petrogenetic models suggested that the pigeonite basalts were the evolved equivalents of the olivine basalts. Rhodes et al. concluded that the olivine and pigeonite basalts were co-magmatic, but Neal et al. have demonstrated that these two basaltic groups are distinct and unrelated. The pigeonite suite is comprised of porphyritic basalts with a fine-grained ground mass and range continuously to coarse-grained microgabbros with ophitic to graphic textures. Although it was generally recognized that the pigeonite basalts were derived from the olivine basalts by olivine + minor Cr-spinel fractionation, the compositional gap between these groups is difficult to reconcile with such a model. Indeed, Baldridge et al. concluded that these two basaltic groups could not have been co-magmatic. In this paper, we suggest an open system AFC model for pigeonite basalt petrogenesis. The assimilant is lunar anorthositic crust and the r value used is 0.6. While the choice of assimilant composition is difficult to constrain, the modeling demonstrates the feasibility of this model.

  9. Petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts. Part 1: Multiple melts and fractional crystallization to explain olivine and ilmenite basalt compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    Mare basalts returned by the Apollo 12 mission have been divided into 4 groups on the basis of mineralogy and whole-rock chemistry: olivine basalts; pigeonite basalts; ilmenite basalts; and feldspathic basalts. James and Wright and Rhodes et al. concluded that the olivine and pigeonite groups were co-magmatic and that the within group variations are due to fractional crystallization of olivine and minor Cr-spinel, with pigeonite replacing olivine in the pigeonite basalts. Rhodes et al. concluded that the parental compositions for these suites were probably represented by the vitrophyres, and the olivine basalts are comprised essentially of cumulates and the pigeonites of evolved end-members. However, Neal et al. have demonstrated, using trace-element considerations, that the Apollo 12 olivine and pigeonite suites are not related. The ilmenite basalts were studied extensively by Dungan and Brown who noted that both cumulates and evolved fractionates were present within this group. In their modeling, Dungan and Brown used the vitrophyre compositions as parents. Neal et al. demonstrated that the feldspathic suite was probably comprised of only one member - 12038. Herein, the ilmenite and olivine basalts are demonstrated to be the products of several non-modal partial melting events of a single source followed by closed-system fractional crystallization.

  10. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Diane T.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Jacobsen, Steven D.; Hauri, Erik H.; Saal, Alberto E.

    2013-01-01

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  11. Is Ishtar Terra a thickened basaltic crust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    1992-01-01

    The mountain belts of Ishtar Terra and the surrounding tesserae are interpreted as compressional regions. The gravity and surface topography of western Ishtar Terra suggest a thick crust of 60-110 km that results from crustal thickening through tectonic processes. Underthrusting was proposed for the regions along Danu Montes and Itzpapalotl Tessera. Crustal thickening was suggested for the entire Ishtar Terra. In this study, three lithospheric models with total thicknesses of 40.75 and 120 km and initial crustal thicknesses of 3.9 and 18 km are examined. These models could be produced by partial melting and chemical differentiation in the upper mantle of a colder, an Earth-like, and a hotter Venus having temperatures of respectively 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C at the base of their thermal boundary layers associated with mantle convection. The effects of basalt-granulite-eclogite transformation (BGET) on the surface topography of a thickening basaltic crust is investigated adopting the experimental phase diagram and density variations through the phase transformation.

  12. Degassing of reduced carbon from planetary basalts.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Diane T; Rutherford, Malcolm J; Jacobsen, Steven D; Hauri, Erik H; Saal, Alberto E

    2013-05-14

    Degassing of planetary interiors through surface volcanism plays an important role in the evolution of planetary bodies and atmospheres. On Earth, carbon dioxide and water are the primary volatile species in magmas. However, little is known about the speciation and degassing of carbon in magmas formed on other planets (i.e., Moon, Mars, Mercury), where the mantle oxidation state [oxygen fugacity (fO2)] is different from that of the Earth. Using experiments on a lunar basalt composition, we confirm that carbon dissolves as carbonate at an fO2 higher than -0.55 relative to the iron wustite oxygen buffer (IW-0.55), whereas at a lower fO2, we discover that carbon is present mainly as iron pentacarbonyl and in smaller amounts as methane in the melt. The transition of carbon speciation in mantle-derived melts at fO2 less than IW-0.55 is associated with a decrease in carbon solubility by a factor of 2. Thus, the fO2 controls carbon speciation and solubility in mantle-derived melts even more than previous data indicate, and the degassing of reduced carbon from Fe-rich basalts on planetary bodies would produce methane-bearing, CO-rich early atmospheres with a strong greenhouse potential. PMID:23569260

  13. Kinetics of anorthite dissolution in basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Zhang, Youxue; Chen, Yang; Xu, Zhengjiu

    2016-04-01

    We report convection-free anorthite dissolution experiments in a basaltic melt at 1280-1500 °C and 0.5 GPa on two different crystallographic surfaces, (1 2 1 bar) and (3 bar 0 2) to investigate dissolution kinetics. The anisotropy of the anorthite dissolution rate along these two surfaces is negligible. Time series experiments at ∼1280 °C show that anorthite dissolution is mainly controlled by diffusion in the melt within experimental uncertainty. Analytical solutions were used to model the dissolution and diffusion processes, and to obtain the diffusivities and the saturation concentrations of the equilibrium-determining component (Al2O3) for anorthite dissolution into the basaltic melt. For the first time, we are able to show the physical and chemical characteristics of quench growth effect on the near-interface melt using high spatial resolution (0.3 μm) EDS analyses. For anorthite (An# ⩾ 90) saturation in a melt with 39-53 wt% SiO2 and ⩽0.4 wt% H2O, the concentration of Al2O3 in wt% depends on temperature as follows:

  14. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Stephen P.)

    1997-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  15. Emplacement of Columbia River flood basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence is examined for the emplacement of the Umatilla, Wilbur Creek, and the Asotin Members of Columbia River Basalt Group. These flows erupted in the eastern part of the Columbia Plateau during the waning phases of volcanism. The Umatilla Member consists of two flows in the Lewiston basin area and southwestern Columbia Plateau. These flows mixed to form one flow in the central Columbia Plateau. The composition of the younger flow is preserved in the center and the composition of the older flow is at the top and bottom. There is a complete gradation between the two. Flows of the Wilbur Creek and Asotin Members erupted individually in the eastern Columbia Plateau and also mixed together in the central Columbia Plateau. Comparison of the emplacement patterns to intraflow structures and textures of the flows suggests that very little time elapsed between eruptions. In addition, the amount of crust that formed on the earlier flows prior to mixing also suggests rapid emplacement. Calculations of volumetric flow rates through constrictions in channels suggest emplacement times of weeks to months under fast laminar flow for all three members. A new model for the emplacement of Columbia River Basalt Group flows is proposed that suggests rapid eruption and emplacement for the main part of the flow and slower emplacement along the margins as the of the flow margin expands.

  16. Oxygen Isotope Variations in Lunar Mare Basalts through Fractional Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Spicuzza, M.; Day, J. M.; Valley, J. W.; Taylor, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mare basalts, derived from partial melts from the lunar mantle, provide information on the early differentiation and evolution of the Moon. Highly precise and accurate oxygen isotope ratios were obtained on mg-size samples of low-Ti and high-Ti mare basalts from the Apollo 11, 12, 15 and 17 missions. Low-Ti basalts studied include Apollo 12 pigeonite and ilmenite basalts, Apollo 15 olivine- and quartz-norm basalts. High-Ti mare basalts studied include seven chemical groups (Apollo 11 Types A, B1, B3, and Apollo 17 Types A, B1, B2 and C) largely defined on the basis of trace elements, indicative of different mantle sources. High-Ti basalts display significant variation in δ18O, correlating with major elements. Values of δ18O in these high-Ti basalts increase by ~0.3‰ from Mg# = 53 to Mg# = 34, suggesting a fractional crystallization control. The variation within a given chemical group can be successfully modeled by mass-balance involving ~32% fractionation of olivine+ armalcolite + pyroxene + ilmenite+ plagioclase. This model demonstrates that high-Ti basalts with >12 wt% TiO2 and high Mg# are more primitive than those with 7-12 wt% TiO2. A weaker correlation of oxygen isotopes with major elements in low-Ti basalts is also observed. From Mg# of 48 to 38, values of δ18O increase by up to 0.1‰, consistent with removal of a minor quantity of olivine. Low-Ti mare basalts with the highest Mg# (55) have slightly lower 18O values than those with Mg# of 48, consistent with possible olivine accumulation. More primitive samples in low-Ti and high-Ti groups still display distinct δ18O values.18O versus major-element plots. This implies that low- and high-Ti basalts are derived from separate sources, each with homogeneous oxygen isotopic compositions. The hypothesis that high-Ti basalts were generated from the assimilation of ilmenite-bearing rocks by low-Ti basalts is not supported by oxygen isotope compositions. The major-element and δ18O variations of low- and high

  17. Lithium Isotope Systematics in Azores Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Widom, E.; Qiu, L.; Rudnick, R.; Gelinas, A.; Franca, Z.

    2009-05-01

    Basalts from the Azores archipelago and MORB from the nearby Azores Platform exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations attributed to the influence of a heterogeneous mantle plume, with compositions ranging from depleted mantle (DMM) to strong HIMU, EMI and EMII signatures. In order to assess the utility of Li isotopes as a mantle source tracer and to better constrain the origin of heterogeneous mantle beneath the Azores, we have analyzed Li isotopes in a suite of young, fresh, MgO-rich basalts from São Miguel and three Central Group islands including Pico, Faial and Terceira. Despite large variations in radiogenic isotope signatures (e.g. 206Pb/204Pb = 19.3 to 20.1), δ7Li varies only slightly (3.1-4.7‰), and is within the range for global and North Atlantic MORB [1, 2]. More extreme δ7Li values such as those reported previously for some EMII, EMI and HIMU ocean island basalts (-17‰ to +10‰; [3-5]) were not observed. Nevertheless, basalts from the Central Group islands with EMI-type signatures are, on average, slightly heavier in δ7Li than the São Miguel samples, and they exhibit positive correlations with 87Sr/86Sr and negative correlations with 206Pb/204Pb, Nd, and Hf isotopes. Li isotopes do not correlate with indices of fractionation such as MgO, suggesting that the δ7Li correlations with radiogenic isotopes may represent subtle variations in mantle source signatures. Positive and negative correlations of δ7Li with 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, and relatively unradiogenic Os (187Os/188Os = 0.1244-0.1269), may reflect old, slab-fluid metasomatized mantle beneath the Central Group islands. In contrast, δ7Li signatures in the São Miguel basalts do not correlate with radiogenic isotopes. Rather, δ7Li is essentially constant despite extremely high 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb and low ΔɛHf signatures that have been attributed to 3.5 Ga recycled E-MORB or evolved oceanic crust [6; 7]. This suggests either that the São Miguel source

  18. On the connection between mare basalts and picritic volcanic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1987-01-01

    The liquid lines of descent were calculated for low-pressure equilibrium and fractional crystallization of mare basaltic liquids in order to examine the postulated link between picritic volcanic glasses and mare basalts. The models of Longhi (1977, 1982) were modified by including expressions for the armalcolite/ilmenite surface boundary and the Cr-spinel liquidus surface, average molar partition coefficients for armalcolite/liquid pairs, and new experimental data of Longhi and Pan (1987). The results indicate that, with two exceptions, mare basalts and picritic volcanic glasses are not related by simple, linear-surface crystallization processes. However, the compositions of Luna 24 ferrobasalt and Apollo 11 high-K basalts could be closely matched with the lines of liquid descent of certain green and orange picritic glasses, respectively. The calculations also show that the picritic magmas would have fractionated to produce basalts with bulk and mineral compositions similar to those of mare basalts, supporting the hypothesis that mare basalts have fractionated compositions and that the small number of observed linkages between basalts and picritic parents is a consequence of limited sampling.

  19. Constructibility issues associated with a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.A.

    1981-12-04

    This report contains the text and slide reproductions of a speech on nuclear waste disposal in basalt. The presentation addresses the layout of repository access shafts and subsurface facilities resulting from the conceptual design of a nuclear repository in basalt. The constructibility issues that must be resolved prior to construction are described. (DMC)

  20. Influence of basalt/groundwater interactions on radionuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Vandegrift, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    The work presented here is a partial summary of the experimental results obtained in the Laboratory Analog Program. Two aspects of this effort are (1) the interaction between simulated basaltic groundwater and basalt fissures that were either freshly cleaved or laboratory altered by hydrothermal treatment with the simulated groundwater and (2) the effect of this interaction on radionuclide migration through these basalt fissures. The following conclusions of this study bear heavily on the predicted safety of a basalt repository: Sorption properties of freshly fissured basalt and naturally aged basalt are quite different for different chemical species. Analog experiments predict that aged basalt would be an effective retarder of cesium, but would be much less so for actinide elements. Distribution ratios measured from batch experiments with finely ground rock samples (presenting unaltered rock surfaces) are not a reliable means of predicting radionuclide migration in geological repositories. As the near-repository area is resaturated by groundwater, its ability to retard actinide migration will be degraded with time. Disturbing the natural flow of groundwater through the repository area by constructing and backfilling the repository will modify the composition of groundwater. This modified groundwater is likely to interact with and to modify naturally aged basalt surfaces downstream from the repository.

  1. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.; Bild, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear that the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. Vesicularity of basalt erupted at Reykjanes Ridge crest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    Average vesicularity of basalt drilled at three sites on the west flank of the Reykjanes Ridge increases with decreasing age. This change apparently records concomitant decrease in water depth at the ridge crest where the basalt was erupted and suggests substantial upward growth of the crest during the past 35 Myr. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Ibitira: A basaltic achondrite from a distinct parent asteroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2004-01-01

    I have done detailed petrologic study of Ibitira, nominally classified as a basaltic eucrite. The Fe/Mn ratio of Ibitira pyroxenes with <10 mole % wollastonite component is 36.4 0.4, and is well-resolved from those of five basaltic eucrites studied for comparison; 31.2-32.2. Data for the latter completely overlap. Ibitira pyroxenes have lower Fe/Mg than the basaltic eucrite pyroxenes. Thus, the higher Fe/Mn ratio does not reflect a simple difference in oxidation state. Ibitira also has an oxygen isotopic composition, alkali element contents and a Ti/Hf ratio that distinguish it from basaltic eucrites. These differences support derivation from a distinct parent asteroid. Ibitira is the first recognized representative of the fifth known asteroidal basaltic crust.

  4. Lu-Hf constraints on the evolution of lunar basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimaki, H.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The model is constructed using Lu and Hf concentration data and is strengthened by Hf isotopic evidence of Unruh et al. (1984). It is shown that the similarity in MgO/FeO ratios and Cr2O3 content in high-Ti and low-Ti basalts are not important constraints on lunar basalt petrogenesis. The model demonstrates that even the very low Ti or green glass samples are remelting products of a cumulate formed after at least 80-90 percent of the lunar magma ocean had solidified. In the model, all the mare basalts and green glasses were derived from 100-150 km depth in the lunar mantle. The Lu-Hf systematics of KREEP basalts clearly indicate that they would be the final residual liquid of the lunar magma ocean.

  5. Origin of high-alumina basalt, andesite, and dacite magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.

    1964-01-01

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it.

  6. Origin of High-Alumina Basalt, Andesite, and Dacite Magmas.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, W

    1964-10-30

    The typical volcanic rocks of most island arcs and eugeosynclines, and of some continental environments, are basalt, andesite, and dacite, of high alumina content. The high-alumina basalt differs from tholeiitic basalt primarily in having a greater content of the components of calcic plagioclase. Laboratory data indicate that in the upper mantle, below the level at which the basaltic component of mantle rock is transformed by pressure to eclogite or pyroxenite, the entire basaltic portion probably is melted within a narrow temperature range, but that above the level of that transformation plagioclase is melted selectively before pyroxene over a wide temperature range. The broad spectrum of high-alumina magmas may represent widely varying degrees of partial melting above the transformation level, whereas narrow-spectrum tholeiite magma may represent more complete melting beneath it. PMID:17794034

  7. Use and Features of Basalt Formations for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Ho, Anita M.; Reidel, Steve P.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2003-01-01

    Extrusive lava flows of basalt are a potential host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Flood basalts and other large igneous provinces occur worldwide near population and power-producing centers and could securely sequester a significant fraction of global CO2 emissions. We describe the location, extent, and general physical and chemical characteristics of large igneous provinces that satisfy requirements as a good host medium for CO2 sequestration. Most lava flows have vesicular flow tops and bottoms as well as interflow zones that are porous and permeable and serve as regional aquifers. Additionally, basalt is iron-rich, and, under the proper conditions of groundwater pH, temperature, and pressure, injected CO2 will react with iron released from dissolution of primary minerals in the basalt to form stable ferrous carbonate minerals. Conversion of CO2 gas into a solid form was confirmed in laboratory experiments with supercritical CO2 in contact with basalt samples from Washington state.

  8. [Determination of Total Iron and Fe2+ in Basalt].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-xun; Chen, Mei-rong; Jian, Zheng-guo; Wu, Gang; Wu, Zhi-shen

    2015-08-01

    Basalt is the raw material of basalt fiber. The content of FeO and Fe2O3 has a great impact on the properties of basalt fibers. ICP-OES and dichromate method were used to test total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. Suitable instrument parameters and analysis lines of Fe were chosen for ICP-OES. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of ICP-OES is 2.2%, and the recovery is in the range of 98%~101%. The method shows simple, rapid and highly accurate for determination of total Fe and Fe(2+) in basalt. The RSD of ICP-OES and dichromate method is 0.42% and 1.4%, respectively. PMID:26672315

  9. Composition of basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    Studies of volcanic rocks in dredge hauls from the submerged parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggest that it consists largely of tholeiitic basalt with low values of K, Ti, and P. In contrast, the volcanic islands which form the elevated caps on the Ridge are built of alkali basalt with high values of Ti, Fe3+, P, Na, and K. This distinct correlation between the form of the volcanic structures, elevation above the sea floor, and composition suggests that the islands of alkali basalt are derived from a parent tholeiitic magma by differentiation in shallow reservoirs. The volume of low-potassium tholeiites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and elsewhere in the oceans appears to be many times that of the alkali basalts exposed on oceanic islands. Tholeiitic basalts with about 0.2 K2O appear to be the primary and predominant magma erupted on the oceanic floor.

  10. Flood basalt eruptions, comet showers, and mass extinction events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Stothers, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    A chronology of initiation dates of the major continental flood basalt episodes has been established from compilation of published K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of basaltic flows and related basic intrusions. The dating is therefore independent of the biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic time scales, and the estimated errors of the inititation dates are approximately + or - 4 pct. There are 11 distinct episodes of continental flood basalts known during the past 250 Myr. The data show that flood basalt episodes are generally relatively brief geologic events, with intermittent eruptions during peak output periods lasting ony 2 to 3 Myr or less. Statistical analyses suggest that these episodes may have occurred quasi-periodically with a mean cycle time of 32 + or - 1 Myr. The initiation dates of the flood basalts are close to the estimated dates of marine mass extinctions and impact-crater clusters. Although a purely internal forcing might be argued for the flood basalt volcanism, quasi-periodic comet impacts may be the trigger for both the flood basalts and the extinctions. Impact cratering models suggest that large-body impactors lead to deep initial cratering, and therefore may cause mantle disturbances and initiate mantle plume activity. The flood basalt episodes commonly mark the initiation or jump of a mantle hotspot, and are often followed by continental rifting and separation. Evidence from dynamical studies of impacts, occurrences of craters and hotspots, and the geochemistry of boundary layers is synthesized to provide a possible model of impact-generated volcanism. Flood basalt eruptions may themselves have severe effects on climate, and possibly on life. Impacts might, as a result, have led to mass extinctions through direct atmospheric disturbances, and/or indirectly through prolonged flood basalt volcanism.

  11. Cold press sintering of simulated lunar basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to predict the conditions for which the lunar regolith may be adequately sintered, experiments were conducted in which samples of simulated lunar basalt (MLS-1) were pressed at high pressures and then heated in an electric furnace. This sintering process may be referred to as cold press sintering since the material is pressed at room temperature. Although test articles were produced which possessed compressive strengths comparable to that of terrestrial concrete, the cold press sintering process requires very high press pressures and sintering temperatures in order to achieve that strength. Additionally, the prospect of poor internal heat transfer adversely affecting the quality of sintered lunar material is a major concern. Therefore, it is concluded that cold press sintering will most likely be undesirable for the production of lunar construction materials.

  12. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  13. Chemical Weathering Kinetics of Basalt on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to experimentally measure the kinetics for chemical weathering reactions involving basalt on Venus. The thermochemical reactions being studied are important for the CO2 atmosphere-lithosphere cycle on Venus and for the atmosphere-surface reactions controlling the oxidation state of the surface of Venus. These reactions include the formation of carbonate and scapolite minerals, and the oxidation of Fe-bearing minerals. These experiments and calculations are important for interpreting results from the Pioneer Venus, Magellan, Galileo flyby, Venera, and Vega missions to Venus, for interpreting results from Earth-based telescopic observations, and for the design of new Discovery class (e.g., VESAT) and New Millennium missions to Venus such as geochemical landers making in situ elemental and mineralogical analyses, and orbiters, probes and balloons making spectroscopic observations of the sub-cloud atmosphere of Venus.

  14. Isotope geochemistry of caliche developed on basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauth, L. Paul; Brilli, Mauro; Klonowski, Stan

    2003-01-01

    Enormous variations in oxygen and carbon isotopes occur in caliche developed on < 3 Ma basalts in 3 volcanic fields in Arizona, significantly extending the range of δ 18O and δ 13C observed in terrestrial caliche. Within each volcanic field, δ 18O is broadly co-variant with δ 13C and increases as δ 13C increases. The most 18O and 13C enriched samples are for subaerial calcite developed on pinnacles, knobs, and flow lobes that protrude above tephra and soil. The most 18O and 13C depleted samples are for pedogenic carbonate developed in soil atmospheres. The pedogenic caliche has δ 18O fixed by normal precipitation in local meteoric waters at ambient temperatures and has low δ 13C characteristic of microbial soil CO 2. Subaerial caliche has formed from 18O-rich evapoconcentrated meteoric waters that dried out on surfaces after local rains. The associated 13C enrichment is due either to removal of 12C by photosynthesizers in the evaporating drops or to kinetic isotope effects associated with evaporation. Caliche on basalt lava flows thus initially forms with the isotopic signature of evaporation and is subsequently over-layered during burial by calcite carrying the isotopic signature of the soil environment. The large change in carbon isotope composition in subsequent soil calcite defines an isotopic biosignature that should have developed in martian examples if Mars had a "warm, wet" early period and photosynthesizing microbes were present in the early soils. The approach can be similarly applied to terrestrial Precambrian paleocaliche in the search for the earliest record of life on land. Large variations reported for δ 18O of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001 do not necessarily require high temperatures, playa lakes, or flood runoff if the carbonate is an example of altered martian caliche.

  15. Geologic Mapping of Basalt Flows: Implications for Petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T. L.; Champion, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows can display a variety of compositional signatures that hold clues to P, T, and composition of the mantle from which they originated. Compositional variation within basalt flows records individual histories of mantle and crustal processes. At the Cascades rear-arc Newberry and Medicine Lake volcanoes, detailed geologic mapping of compositionally-zoned basalts indicates clearly that "drive-through" sampling of such lava flows would fail to capture the full geochemical story. For these flows, the internal stratigraphy captures the eruptive sequence that took place as the magma reservoir was tapped. Given a range of composition, or exposures of basalt that have different compositions, how does one know whether different eruptions have occurred, or whether a single compositionally-zoned eruption took place? Geologic mapping today goes well beyond traditional approaches using petrography and morphology. In addition to those basic tools, iterative use of multiple chemical analyses and, most critically, paleomagnetic sampling are essential to identifying individual basalt eruptive events. At Medicine Lake volcano in N. CA, 4 compositionally-zoned basalt flows have been documented (see Donnelly-Nolan, 2011, USGS map SIM 2927): (1) basalt of Black Crater and Ross Chimneys; this very small eruptive event produced 0.001 km3 of lava that covers 0.4 km2. SiO2 content increased from 48.3 to 50.6% as the eruption progressed; composition also correlates with latitude; (2) basalt of Giant Crater, 200-sq-km postglacial basaltic andesite to basalt that is characterized by strong variation in a variety of elements (e.g. 47.7-53.2% SiO2, 0.07-1.1% K2O) [Baker et al. 1991 JGR; Donnelly-Nolan et al. 1991 JGR]; (3) basalt of Mammoth Crater, 250-sq-km basaltic andesite to basalt also having strong SiO2 variation (48.2-56.0%), but in addition a lobe enriched in FeO and TiO2; (4) 300-sq-km basalt of Yellowjacket Butte displays limited SiO2 variation, but linear variation

  16. Origin and evolution of high-titanium mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Patrick H.

    The Moon is the sole known locality of exposed high-titanium (high-Ti) basalts in the solar system, but their occurrence has implications for the early evolution of the terrestrial planets. High-Ti basalts derive from partial melts of cumulates in the lunar upper mantle. The ilmenite, clinopyroxene, and olivine cumulates from which these basalts form are late-stage products of crystallization of the lunar magma ocean, a planetary-scale melting event that also likely occurred early on in the evolution of Venus, Mercury, the Earth and Mars. Fortunately, despite the ancient nature of mare volcanism, pristine high-Ti basalts are preserved on the relatively inert lunar surface, and the lunar sample collection contains abundant high-Ti basaltic material. Crystals are quantifiable components of the basaltic system, and are a record of the compositional and temporal history of magmatic evolution. Complementary techniques of textural and in-situ trace element geochemical analyses comprise the crystal stratigraphy method used to investigate this history. I use crystal size distributions and spatial distribution profiles to identify crystal populations and quantitatively evaluate rock textures. I use EPMA and LA-ICP-MS analysis of major crystallizing phases to identify processes affecting evolving magmas. I first show that LA-ICP-MS can determine accurate and precise trace elements for ilmenite, which is a major crystallizing phase in high-Ti basalts. The Taurus-Littrow Valley on the Moon contains high-Ti basalts from multiple distinct magmatic source regions. I propose multiple flow events of some regions were sampled during the Apollo missions, and magma partially crystallized for short residence times at shallow depths. Textural characterization of a high-Ti olivine cumulate shows no other samples experienced crystal accumulation. Finally, I investigate two rocklets found in the lunar highlands that were recently classified as basalts. I confirm their basaltic nature

  17. Petrologic models of 15388, a unique Apollo 15 mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Dasch, E. J.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1993-01-01

    Mare basalt 15388, a feldspathic microgabbro from the Apennine Front, is chemically and petrographically distinct from Apollo 15 picritic, olivine-normative (ON), and quartz-normative basalts. The evolved chemistry, coarse texture, lack of olivine, and occurrence of cristobalite in 15388 argue for derivation by a late-stage magmatic process that is significantly removed from parental magma. It either crystallized from a magma evolved from the more mafic Apollo 15 basalts, or it crystallized from a currently unrepresented magma. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic systematics yield isochron ages of 3.391 plus or minus 0.036 and 3.42 plus or minus 0.07 Ga, respectively, and epsilon(sub Nd) = 8.6 plus or minus 2.4, which is relatively high for Apollo 15 mare basalts. In contrast to chemical patterns of average Apollo 15 ON basalts and Apollo 15 picritic basalt, 15388 has a strongly positive LREE slope, high Ti, shallower HREE slope and a slightly positive Eu anomaly. These features argue against 15388 evolution by simple olivine fractionation of a parental ON or picritic basalt magma, although olivine is a dominant liquidus phase in both potential parents.

  18. The phylogeny of endolithic microbes associated with marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Stingl, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Larry J; Moeseneder, Markus M; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    We examined the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities associated with marine basalts, using over 300 publicly available 16S rDNA sequences and new sequence data from basalt enrichment cultures. Phylogenetic analysis provided support for 11 monophyletic clades originating from ocean crust (sediment, basalt and gabbro). Seven of the ocean crust clades (OCC) are bacterial, while the remaining four OCC are in the Marine Group I (MGI) Crenarchaeota. Most of the OCC were found at diverse geographic sites, suggesting that these microorganisms have cosmopolitan distributions. One OCC in the Crenarchaeota consisted of sequences derived entirely from basalts. The remaining OCC were found in both basalts and sediments. The MGI Crenarchaeota were observed in all studies where archaeal diversity was evaluated. These results demonstrate that basalts are occupied by cosmopolitan clades of microorganisms that are also found in marine sediments but are distinct from microorganisms found in other marine habitats, and that one OCC in the ubiquitous MGI Crenarchaeota clade may be an ecotype specifically adapted to basalt. PMID:17803778

  19. Deep degassing and the eruptibility of flood basalt magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, B. A.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    Individual flood basalt lavas often exceed 103 km3 in volume, and many such lavas erupt during emplacement of flood basalt provinces. The large volume of individual flood basalt lavas demands correspondingly large magma reservoirs within or at the base of the crust. To erupt, some fraction of this magma must become buoyant and overpressure must be sufficient to encourage failure and dike propagation. Because the overpressure associated with a new injection of magma is inversely proportional to the total reservoir volume, buoyancy overpressure has been proposed as a trigger for flood basalt eruptions. To test this hypothesis, we develop a new one-dimensional model for buoyancy overpressure-driven eruptions that combines volatile exsolution, bubble growth and rise, assimilation, and permeable fluid escape through the surrounding country rocks. Degassing during emplacement of flood basalt provinces may have major environmental repercussions. We investigate the temporal evolution of permeable degassing through the crust and degassing during eruptive episodes. We find that assimilation of volatile-rich country rocks strongly enhances flood basalt eruptibility, implying that the eruptive dynamics of flood basalts may be intertwined with their climatic consequences.

  20. Dynamics of Wet Oxidation of High-AL-Content III-V Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.

    1999-01-27

    Oxidation of layers of high-Al-content III-V materials by water vapor has become the enabling process for high-efficiency vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) and has potential applications for reducing substrate current leakage in GaAs-on-insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Because of the established importance of wet oxidation in optoelectronic devices and its potential applications in electronic devices, it has become increasingly important to understand the mechanism of wet oxidation and how it might be expected to affect both the fabrication and subsequent operation of devices that have been made using this technique. The mechanism of wet oxidation and the consequence of this mechanism for heterostructure design and ultimate device operation are discussed here.

  1. Thicknesses of Mare Basalts from Gravity and Topograhy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GONG, S.; Wieczorek, M.; Nimmo, F.; Kiefer, W.; Head, J.; Smith, D.; Zuber, M.

    2015-10-01

    Mare basalts are derived from partial melting of the lunar interior and are mostly located on the near side of the Moon [1, 2]. Their iron-rich composition gives rise to their dark color, but also causes their density to be substantially higher than normal crustal rocks. The total volume of mare basalts can provide crucial information about the Moon's thermal evolution and volcanic activity. Unfortunately, the thicknesses of the mare are only poorly constrained. Here we use gravity data from NASA's GRAIL mission to investigate the thickness of mare basalts.

  2. Pliocene Basaltic Volcanism in The East Anatolia Region (EAR), Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyan, Vural; Özdemir, Yavuz; Keskin, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    East Anatolia Region (EAR) is one of the high Plateau which is occurred with north-south compressional regime formed depending on continent-continent collision between Eurasia and Arabia plates (Şengör and Kidd, 1979). Recent studies have revealed that last oceanic lithosphere in the EAR have completely depleted to 20 million years ago based on fission track ages (Okay et al. 2010). Our initial studies suggest that extensively volcanic activity in the EAR peaked in the Pliocene and continued in the same productivity throughout Quaternary. Voluminous basaltic lava plateaus and basaltic lavas from local eruption centers occurred as a result of high production level of volcanism during the Pliocene time interval. In order to better understand the spatial and temporal variations in Pliocene basaltic volcanism and to reveal isotopic composition, age and petrologic evolution of the basaltic volcanism, we have started to study basaltic volcanism in the East Anatolia within the framework of a TUBITAK project (project number:113Y406). Petrologic and geochemical studies carried out on the Pliocene basaltic lavas indicate the presence of subduction component in the mantle source, changing the character of basaltic volcanism from alkaline to subalkaline and increasing the amount of spinel peridotitic melts (contributions of lithospheric mantle?) in the mantle source between 5.5-3.5 Ma. FC, AFC and EC-AFC modelings reveal that the while basaltic lavas were no or slightly influenced by crustal contamination and fractional crystallization, to more evolved lavas such as bazaltictrachyandesite, basalticandesite, trachybasalt might have been important processes. Results of our melting models and isotopic analysis data (Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, 18O) indicate that the Pliocene basaltic rocks were derived from both shallow and deep mantle sources with different melting degrees ranging between 0.1 - 4 %. The percentage of spinel seems to have increased in the mantle source of the basaltic

  3. Modeling Cooling Rates of Martian Flood Basalt Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Jackson, B.; Milazzo, M. P.; Barnes, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Columnar jointing in large basalt flows have been extensively studied and can provide important clues about the emplacement conditions and cooling history of a basalt flow. The recent discovery of basalt columns on Mars in crater walls near Marte Vallis provides an opportunity to infer conditions on early Mars when the Martian basalt flows were laid down. Comparison of the Martian columns to Earth analogs allows us to gain further insight into the early Martian climate, and among the best terrestrial analogs are the basalt columns in the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in eastern Washington. The CRBG is one of the youngest (< 17 Myrs old) and most extensively studied basalt provinces in the world, extending over 163,700 square km with total thickness exceeding 1 km in some places. The morphologies and textures of CRBG basalt columns suggest that in many places flows ~100 m thick cooled at uniform rates, even deep in the flow interior. Such cooling seems to require the presence of water in the column joints since the flow interiors should have cooled much more slowly than the flow margins if conductive cooling dominated. Secondary features, such pillow basalts, likewise suggest the basalt flows were in direct contact with standing water in many places. At the resolution provided by the orbiting HiRISE camera (0.9 m), the Martian basalt columns resemble the CRBG columns in many respects, and so, subject to important caveats, inferences linking the morphologies of the CRBG columns to their thermal histories can be extended in some respects to the Martian columns. In this presentation, we will describe our analysis of the HiRISE images of the Martian columns and what can be reasonably inferred about their thermal histories and the conditions under which they were emplaced. We will also report on a field expedition to the CRBG in eastern Washington State. During that expedition, we surveyed basalt column outcrops on the ground and from the air using Unmanned Aerial

  4. Basaltic volcanic episodes of the Yucca Mountain region

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize briefly the distribution and geologic characteristics of basaltic volcanism in the Yucca Mountain region during the last 10--12 Ma. This interval largely postdates the major period of silicic volcanism and coincides with and postdates the timing of major extensional faulting in the region. Field and geochronologic data for the basaltic rocks define two distinct episodes. The patterns in the volume and spatial distribution of these basaltic volcanic episodes in the central and southern part of the SNVF are used as a basis for forecasting potential future volcanic activity in vicinity of Yucca Mountain. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Mineral chemistry of Pangidi basalt flows from Andhra Pradesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswara Rao, P. V.; Swaroop, P. C.; Karimulla, Syed

    2012-04-01

    This paper elucidates the compositional studies on clinopyroxene, plagioclase, titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite of basalts of Pangidi area to understand the geothermometry and oxybarometry conditions. Petrographic evidence and anorthite content (up to 85%) of plagioclase and temperature estimates of clinopyroxene indicate that the clinopyroxene is crystallized later than or together with plagioclase. The higher An content indicates that the parent magma is tholeiitic composition. The equilibration temperatures of clinopyroxene (1110-1190°C) and titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (1063-1103°C) are almost similar in lower basalt flow and it is higher for clinopyroxene (900-1110°C) when compared to titaniferous magnetite and ilmenite coexisting mineral phases (748-898°C) in middle and upper basalt flows. From this it can be inferred that the clinopyroxene is crystallized earlier than Fe-Ti oxide phases reequilibration, which indicates that the clinopyroxene temperature is the approximate eruption temperature of the present lava flows. The wide range of temperatures (900-1190°C) attained by clinopyroxene may point out that the equilibration of clinopyroxene crystals initiated from depth till closer to the surface before the melt erupted. Pangidi basalts follow the QFM buffer curve which indicates the more evolved tholeiitic composition. This suggests the parent tholeiitic magma suffered limited fractionation at high temperature under increasing oxygen fugacity in lower basalt flow and more fractionation at medium to lower temperatures under decreasing oxygen fugacity conditions during cooling of middle and upper basalt flows. The variation of oxygen fugacity indicates the oxidizing conditions for lower basalt flow (9.48-10.3) and extremely reducing conditions for middle (12.1-15.5) and upper basalt (12.4-15.54) flows prevailed at the time of cooling. Temperature vs. (FeO+Fe2O3)/(FeO+Fe2O3 +MgO) data plots for present basalts suggested

  6. An Apollo 15 Mare Basalt Fragment and Lunar Mare Provinces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Burling, Trina Cox

    1996-01-01

    Lunar sample 15474,4 is a tiny fragment of olivine-augite vitrophyre that is a mare basalt. Although petroraphically distinct from all other Apollo 15 samples, it has been ignored since its first brief description. Our new petrographic and mineral chemical data show that the olivines and pyroxenes are distinct from those in other basalts. The basalt cooled and solidified extremely rapidly; some of the olivine might be cumulate or crystallized prior to extrusion. Bulk-chemical data show that the sample is probably similar to an evolved Apollo 15 olivine-normative basalt in major elements but is distinct in its rare earth element pattern. Its chemical composition and petrography both show that 15474,4 cannot be derived from other Apollo 15 mare basalts by shallow-level crystal fractionation. It represents a distinct extrusion of magma. Nonetheless, the chemical features that 15474,4 has in common with other Apollo 15 mare basalts, including the high FeO/Sc, the general similarity of the rare earth element pattern, and the common (and chondritic) TiO2/Sm ratio, emphasize the concept of a geochemical province at the Apollo 15 site that is distinct from basalts and provinces elsewhere. In making a consistent picture for the derivation of all of the Apollo 15 basalts, both the commonalities and the differences among the basalts must be explained. The Apollo 15 commonalities and differences suggest that the sources must have consisted of major silicate phases with the same composition but with varied amounts of a magma trapped from a contemporary magma ocean. They probably had a high olivine/pyroxene ratio and underwent small and reasonably consistent degrees of partial melting to produce the basalts. These inferences may be inconsistent with models that suggest greatly different depths of melting among basalts, primitive sources for the green glasses, or extensive olivine fractionation during ascent. An integrated approach to lunar mare provinces, of which the Apollo 15

  7. The Lithium Isotopic Signature of Hawaiian Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, L.; Weis, D.; Hanano, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Recycling of oceanic crust and sediment is a common mechanism to account for the presence of chemical heterogeneities observed in oceanic island basalts (OIBs). On Hawai';i, a mantle plume-sourced OIB with a high mass flux, sampling of deep mantle heterogeneities accounts for the presence of two unique geochemical and geographical trends called the Loa and Kea trends. The Loa trend overlaps the Pacific large low shear velocity province and is distinctly more enriched [1] than the Kea trend with average Pacific mantle compositions [2]. Because of the sizeable fractionation of lithium isotopes in low temperature environments, lithium serves as a tracer for the presence of recycled material in OIB sources, including Hawai'i. In this study, we analyzed 87 samples of Hawaiian basalt from the pre-shield, shield, post-shield, and rejuvenated volcanic stages and 10 samples of altered oceanic crust from ODP Site 843 for lithium isotopes using a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Correlations of lithium isotopes with the radiogenic isotopes Pb, Hf, Nd, and Sr indicate lithium isotopes may be used to trace components in mantle plumes such as Hawai';i. The measured range of lithium isotopes for shield stage lavas is δ7Li = 1.8 - 5.7‰ and for post-shield lavas is δ7Li = 0.8 - 4.7‰. Pre-shield stage lavas (Lo'ihi volcano only) and rejuvenated lavas are the least and most homogeneous volcanic stages, respectively, in lithium isotopes. The Loa and Kea geochemical trends have different lithium isotopic signatures, with Loa trend shield volcanoes exhibiting lighter lithium isotopic signatures (δ7Li = 3.5‰ [N=43]) than Kea trend shield volcanoes (δ7Li = 4.0‰ [N=31]) [3]. Similarly, post-shield lavas have systematically lighter δ7Li than shield lavas. The presence of systematic differences in lithium isotopic signatures may indicate: 1) the sampling of distinct components in the deep source, to account for variations between Kea and Loa trend

  8. The case for old basaltic shergottites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Audrey; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Vervoort, Jeffrey D.; Gillet, Philippe; Albarède, Francis

    2008-02-01

    The crystallization age of shergottites is currently not agreed upon. Although mineral 87Rb- 87Sr, 147Sm- 143Nd, 176Lu- 176Hf, and U-Pb isochrons all give very young ages, typically in the range of 160-180 Ma, 207Pb- 206Pb data support a much older crystallization age at 4.1 Ga, which is consistent with published whole-rock 87Rb- 87Sr data on basaltic shergottites. Different isotopic systems present different complexities, but crater-counting chronology, which shows that a substantial fraction of the Martian surface was resurfaced during the late heavy bombardment, is in favor of an old Martian lithosphere with ages in accordance with Pb-Pb and Rb-Sr isotopic data. A ˜ 4.1 Ga Pb-Pb age of shergottites also agrees with the 142Nd and 182W anomalies found in these rocks and concur with the presence of an actively convecting mantle during the first 500 Myr of the planet's history. We here present new Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, and Pb-Pb mineral isochrons for the basaltic shergottites Shergotty and Los Angeles complementing our previous results on Zagami [Bouvier A., Blichert-Toft J., Vervoort J.D. and Albarède F. (2005). The age of SNC meteorites and the antiquity of the Martian surface, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 240, 221-233]. The internal 147Sm- 143Nd and 176Lu- 176Hf isochrons give young ages of, respectively, 172 ± 40 (MSWD = 2.0) and 188 ± 91 (MSWD = 3.1) for Shergotty, and 181 ± 13 (MSWD = 0.14) and 159 ± 42 (MSWD = 0.01) for Los Angeles. In contrast, the Pb isotope compositions of the leached whole-rock fragments and maskelynite separates of Shergotty and Los Angeles fall on the whole-rock isochron previously established for Zagami and other shergottite samples and collectively yield a Pb-Pb age of 4050 ± 70 Ma for the crystallization of the basaltic shergottite suite. The contrast between the ˜ 170 Ma ages of internal isochrons and the 4.1 Ga age supported by Pb-Pb and 87Rb- 87Sr on whole-rocks simply reflects that the younger age dates the perturbation of a suite of

  9. Stereo Pair: Basalt Cliffs, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Basalt cliffs along the northwest edge of the Meseta de Somuncura plateau near Sierra Colorada, Argentina show an unusual and striking pattern of erosion. Stereoscopic observation helps to clarify the landform changing processes active here. Many of the cliffs appear to be rock staircases that have the same color as the plateau's basaltic cap rock. Are these the edges of lower layers in the basalt or are they a train of slivers that are breaking off from, then sliding downslope and away from, the cap rock. They appear to be the latter. Close inspection shows that each stair step is too laterally irregular to be a continuous sheet of bedrock like the cap rock. Also, the steps are not flat but instead are little ridges, as one might expect from broken, tilted, and sliding slices of the cap rock. Stream erosion has cut some gullies into the cliffs and green vegetation shows that water springs from and flows down some channels, but landsliding is clearly a major agent of erosion here.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South

  10. Fluid and melt inclusions in the Mesozoic Fangcheng basalt from North China Craton: implications for magma evolution and fluid/melt-peridotite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Xiao, Yilin; Gao, Yongjun; Lai, Jianqing; Hou, Zhenhui; Wang, Yangyang

    2013-05-01

    Melt inclusions and fluid inclusions in the Fangcheng basalt were investigated to understand the magma evolution and fluid/melt-peridotite interaction. Primary silicate melt inclusions were trapped in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene phenocrysts in the Fangcheng basalt. Three types of melt inclusions (silicate, carbonate, and sulfide) coexisting with fluid inclusions occur in clinopyroxene xenocrysts and clinopyroxene in clinopyroxenite xenoliths. In situ laser-ablation ICP-MS analyses of major and trace element compositions on individual melt inclusions suggest that the silicate melt inclusions in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene phenocrysts were trapped from the same basaltic magma. The decoupling of major and trace elements in the melt inclusions indicates that the magma evolution was controlled by melt crystallization and contamination from entrapped ultramafic xenoliths. Trace element patterns of melt inclusions are similar to those of the average crust of North China Craton and Yangtze Craton, suggesting a considerable crustal contribution to the magma source. Calculated parental melt of the Fangcheng basalt has features of low MgO (5.96 wt%), high Al2O3 (16.81 wt%), Sr (1,670 ppm), Y (>35 ppm), and high Sr/Y (>40), implying that subducted crustal material was involved in the genesis of the Fangcheng basalt. The coexisting fluid and melt inclusions in clinopyroxene xenocrysts and in clinopyroxene of xenoliths record a rare melt-peridotite reaction, that is olivine + carbonatitic melt1 (rich in Ca) = clinopyroxene + melt2 ± CO2. The produced melt2 is enriched in LREE and CO2 and may fertilize the mantle significantly, which we consider to be the cause for the rapid replacement of lithospheric mantle during the Mesozoic in the region.

  11. Calcium Sulfate in Atacama Desert Basalt: A Possible Analog for Bright Material in Adirondack Basalt, Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Amundson, R.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Ming, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is one of the driest deserts on Earth (< 2mm/y). The hyper-arid conditions allow extraordinary accumulations of sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates in Atacama soils. Examining salt accumulations in the Atacama may assist understanding salt accumulations on Mars. Recent work examining sulfate soils on basalt parent material observed white material in the interior vesicles of surface basalt. This is strikingly similar to the bright-white material present in veins and vesicles of the Adirondack basalt rocks at Gusev Crater which are presumed to consist of S, Cl, and/or Br. The abundance of soil gypsum/anhydrite in the area of the Atacama basalt suggested that the white material consisted of calcium sulfate (Ca-SO4) which was later confirmed by SEM/EDS analysis. This work examines the Ca-SO4 of Atacama basalt in an effort to provide insight into the possible nature of the bright material in the Adirondack basalt of Gusev Crater. The objectives of this work are to (i) discuss variations in Ca-SO4 crystal morphology in the vesicles and (ii) examine the Ca-SO4 interaction(s) with the basalt interior.

  12. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  13. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  14. Basaltic Cone Suggests Constructional Origin of Some Guyots.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M N; Gilbert, C M

    1964-01-17

    A basaltic cinder cone was built beneath the waters of Mono Lake in Pleistocene time. This cone is now exposed. Its internal structure, external form, and petrography suggest that it was constructed with a flat top. PMID:17753148

  15. Lu-Hf CONSTRAINTS ON THE EVOLUTION OF LUNAR BASALTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujimaki, Hirokazu; Tatsumoto, Mistunobu

    1984-01-01

    The authors show that a cumulate-remelting model best explains the recently acquired data on the Lu-Hf systematics of lunar mare basalts. The authors model is first constructed using the Lu and Hf concentration data and it is then further strengthened by the Hf isotopic evidence. The authors also show that the similarity of MgO/FeO ratios and the Cr//2O//3 contents between high-Ti and low-Ti basalts, which have been given significance by A. E. Ringwood and D. H. Green are not important constraints for lunar basalt petrogenesis. The authors principal aim is to revive the remelting model for further consideration with the powerful constraints of Lu-Hf systematics of lunar basalts.

  16. [Comparative carcinogenic properties of basalt fiber and chrysotile-asbestos].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, O V; Kogan, F M; Vanchugova, N N; Frash, V N

    1989-01-01

    In order to eliminate asbestos adverse effect on workers' health it was necessary to use mineral rayon, primarily basalt fibre, instead of asbestos. During a chronic experiment on animals the oncogenicity of 2 kinds of basalt fibre was studied compared to chrysotile asbestos. The dust dose of 25 mg was twice administered by intraperitonial route. All types of dust induced the onset of intraperitonial mesotheliomas but neoplasm rates were significantly lower in the groups exposed to basalt fibre. There was no credible data on the differences between the groups exposed to various types of basalt fibre. Since the latter produced some oncogenic effect, it was necessary to develop a complex of antidust measures, fully corresponding to the measures adopted for carcinogenic dusts. PMID:2545547

  17. Computation of EABF and EBF for basalt rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabul, Yaşar; Amon Susam, Lidya; İçelli, Orhan; Eyecioğlu, Önder

    2015-10-01

    In this study, certain photon absorption parameters including the energy absorption buildup factor (EABF) and exposure buildup factor (EBF) have been investigated for three different basalt samples collected from different parts of Van city. Radiation shielding properties of the basalt samples indicated a strong correlation between photon energy absorption parameters and values of EABF and EBF of basalt samples. It was found that EABF and EBF parameters are related to radiation shielding properties of basalt samples. A new method and algorithm based on ZXCOM was used. Instead of calculating G-P fitting parameters for every effective atomic number (Zeff), EABF and EBF were calculated for Zeff by interpolation, using ANSI/ANS 6.4.3 standard data available for Zeff.

  18. Systematics of Vanadium in Olivine from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    The systematics of vanadium in olivines from the Earth, Moon and Mars allows for the comparison of planetary basalt origin and igneous setting and process. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. A Modified CIPW Norm Calculation for Lunar Mare Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, R. E.; Basu, A.

    2000-01-01

    CIPW norms of lunar mare basalts are anomalously low in pyroxene. A modified norm calculation allowing higher Ca, Ti, Al, Cr, and Mn in di' and hy' obtains closer matches between normative and modal mineralogy.

  20. Potential for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Flood Basalts

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. PETER; Schaef, Herbert T.; Ho, Anita M.; Chien, Yi-Ju; Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2006-12-01

    Flood basalts are a potentially important host medium for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Most lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have enormous capacity for storage of CO2. Interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock overlying sequential flows may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Laboratory experiments confirm relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. Calculations suggest a sufficiently short time frame for onset of carbonate precipitation after CO2 injection that verification of in situ mineralization rates appears feasible in field pilot studies. If proven viable, major flood basalts in the U.S. and India would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity and additional geologic sequestration options in certain regions where more conventional storage options are limited.

  1. Low temperature aqueous alteration of basalt: Mineral assemblages of Deccan basalts and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, R. N.; Mustard, J. F.; Kumar, P. S.; Dyar, M. D.; Breves, E. A.; Sklute, E. C.

    2012-09-01

    Al-rich phyllosilicates (kaolinite, montmorillonite) have been found in layers overlying Fe/Mg-smectites on Mars, and it has been suggested that this stratigraphy formed through in situ leaching at the surface, similar to terrestrial weathering profiles. We are investigating the remotely sensed signatures of this type of weathering using ten samples from a vertical section of altered Deccan basalts and four samples collected nearby as an analog for leaching resulting in Al-rich phyllosilicate over Fe/Mg-smectite stratigraphies. Samples were analyzed with reflectance spectroscopy from 0.28 to 25.0 μm, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for 10 major element concentrations (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti), loss on ignition for volatiles, x-ray diffraction (XRD) for mineralogies, and Mössbauer spectroscopy for Fe redox state. Spectra of basalt samples were dominated by Fe2+ crystal field transitions with weak alteration bands near 1.4 and/or 1.9 μm. Reststrahlen bands in mid-infrared showed the convolution of plagioclase and pyroxene features typical of basalts. Saprolite samples were incompletely leached, and their spectra were dominated by complex Al- and Fe/Mg-bearing smectite clays and retained no original mafic signatures. XRD and Mössbauer detected pyroxene and plagioclase not visible by reflectance spectroscopy in some saprolite samples. Zeolites were present throughout the saprolite. The laterite was the most leached horizon, and all analyses showed kaolinite and iron oxide assemblages. This kaolinite and hematite association would be expected if kaolinite on Mars formed through leaching under conditions similar to those on Earth and has implications for abundant freshwater on the Martian surface.

  2. Degassing of carbon dioxide from basaltic magma at spreading centers: II. mid-oceanic ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Terrence M.

    1989-11-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the CO 2 in basalt supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers escapes by degassing from magma chambers of the oceanic crust. The approach employs mass balance calculations, stepped-heating data for carbon in sea-floor mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORBs), and the CO 2 content determined in part I for transitional basalt supplied to the Erta'Ale spreading center in the Afar depression. It is also shown as part of the analysis that carbon data acquired for sea-floor MORBs by single-heating techniques give systematically high values that are difficult to reconcile with solubility data for CO 2 in MORB liquid and the depths of subridge magma chambers. The results confirm the hypothesis. A conservative estimate of the average loss of CO 2 during degassing from subridge magma chambers is between 30 and 65% of the CO 2 initially present in the magma. The conservative estimate for CO 2 degassing at depth is between two and seven times greater than the maximum amount of volcanic CO 2 degassing from MORB. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers is sufficient to supply much (perhaps most) of the mantle carbon discharged from the global mid-oceanic spreading system to the oceans. CO 2 degassing from subridge magma chambers has several important implications. It may be more important than hydrothermal stripping in supplying mantle carbon to mid-oceanic hydrothermal vents. It is an effective mechanism for removing most of the heavier rare gases (Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and much of the He and Ne in magma supplied to mid-oceanic spreading centers and for transporting them and possibly other volatiles from subridge magma chambers to the ocean-atmosphere system. It should also be an effective mechanism for fractionating carbon isotopes in MORB.

  3. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  4. Basalt Waste Isolation Project Reclamation Support Project:

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1992-06-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Reclamation Support Project began in the spring of 1988 by categorizing sites distributed during operations of the BWIP into those requiring revegetation and those to be abandoned or transferred to other programs. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory's role in this project was to develop plans for reestablishing native vegetation on the first category of sites, to monitor the implementation of these plans, to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts, and to identify remediation methods where necessary. The Reclamation Support Project focused on three major areas: geologic hydrologic boreholes, the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF), and the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF). A number of BWIP reclamation sites seeded between 1989 and 1990 were found to be far below reclamation objectives. These sites were remediated in 1991 using various seedbed treatments designed to rectify problems with water-holding capacity, herbicide activity, surficial crust formation, and nutrient imbalances. Remediation was conducted during November and early December 1991. Sites were examined on a monthly basis thereafter to evaluate plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites early plant growth responses to these treatments. At all remediation sites, early plant growth far exceeded any previously obtained using other methods and seedbed treatments. Seeded plants did best where amendments consisted of soil-plus-compost or fertilizer-only. Vegetation growth on Gable Mountain was less than that found on other areas nearby, but this difference is attributed primarily to the site's altitude and north-facing orientation.

  5. Magnesium-rich Basalts on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2013-05-01

    X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers on NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft are making key measurements regarding the composition and properties of the surface of Mercury, allowing researchers to more clearly decipher the planet's formation and geologic history. The origin of the igneous rocks in the crust of Mercury is the focus of recent research by Karen Stockstill-Cahill and Tim McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), along with Larry Nittler and Shoshana Weider (Carnegie Institution of Washington) and Steven Hauck II (Case Western Reserve University). Using the well-known MELTS computer code Stockstill-Cahill and coauthors worked with MESSENGER-derived and rock-analog compositions to constrain petrologic models of the lavas that erupted on the surface of Mercury. Rock analogs included a partial melt of the Indarch meteorite and a range of Mg-rich terrestrial rocks. Their work shows the lavas on Mercury are most similar to terrestrial magnesian basalt (with lowered FeO content). The implications of the modeling are that Mg-rich lavas came from high-temperature sources in Mercury's mantle and erupted at high temperature with exceptionally low viscosity into thinly bedded and laterally extensive flows, concepts open to further evaluation by laboratory experiments and by geologic mapping of Mercury's surface using MESSENGER's imaging system and laser altimeter to document flow features and dimensions.

  6. Diversity of life in ocean floor basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorseth, I. H.; Torsvik, T.; Torsvik, V.; Daae, F. L.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    Electron microscopy and biomolecular methods have been used to describe and identify microbial communities inhabiting the glassy margins of ocean floor basalts. The investigated samples were collected from a neovolcanic ridge and from older, sediment-covered lava flows in the rift valley of the Knipovich Ridge at a water depth around 3500 m and an ambient seawater temperature of -0.7°C. Successive stages from incipient microbial colonisation, to well-developed biofilms occur on fracture surfaces in the glassy margins. Observed microbial morphologies are various filamentous, coccoidal, oval, rod-shaped and stalked forms. Etch marks in the fresh glass, with form and size resembling the attached microbes, are common. Precipitation of alteration products around microbes has developed hollow subspherical and filamentous structures. These precipitates are often enriched in Fe and Mn. The presence of branching and twisted stalks that resemble those of the iron-oxidising Gallionella, indicate that reduced iron may be utilised in an energy metabolic process. Analysis of 16S-rRNA gene sequences from microbes present in the rock samples, show that the bacterial population inhabiting these samples cluster within the γ- and ɛ-Proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flexibacter/Bacteroides subdivision of the Bacteria, while the Archaea all belong to the Crenarchaeota kingdom. This microbial population appears to be characteristic for the rock and their closest relatives have previously been reported from cold marine waters in the Arctic and Antarctic, deep-sea sediments and hydrothermal environments.

  7. Lead isotope systematics of mare basalt 75075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Tilton, G. R.; Mattinson, J. M.; Vidal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and isotopic lead data are reported for two bulk samples and separated pyroxene, ilmenite and plagioclase from basalt 75075. In a concordia diagram the whole rock, ilmenite and four pyroxene samples define a chord intersecting the concordia curve at approximately 4.25 and 2.8 AE. Three plagioclase samples plot distinctly off the chord. The crystallization age of 75075 is accurately determined at 3.74 AE by Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and K-Ar measurements from other laboratories. It is not possible to adjust the isotopic composition of initial lead so as to reconcile the U-Pb data with a crystallization age of 3.74 AE. The data therefore indicate some type of post-crystallization disturbance of the U-Pb system that is not detected by the other systems. The 75075 data are one of the few examples of this type of age pattern found on the moon. If the disturbance was a single event, it probably occurred around 2.8 AE ago, the time indicated by the pyroxene, whole rock and ilmenite data.

  8. Austin chalk yields oil near basaltic cone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-03

    This paper reports on the completion of a Cretaceous Austin chalk horizontal oil well near a basaltic cone in the Uvalde volcanic field area of Dimmit County, Tex. The well is the HDP Inc. 1 autumn Unit, about 9 miles northeast to Carrizo Springs HDP, which stands for horizontal development and production, of Palo Alto, Calif., drilled the well on a farmout from American Exploration Co., Houston. It initially pumped and flowed 1,600 b/d of oil without stimulation from openhole. HDP drilled about 1,500 ft of horizontal and deviated hole in Austin chalk B-1, the producing horizon. Production in late August was about 500 b/d of oil, pending determination of proration unit size and allowable. The well, in the greater Pearsall field Austin chalk play along the Dimmit-Savala county line, is the first horizontal chalk producer in Elaine field. The field has produced mainly from Escondido sand, Olmos sand and Anacacho limestone, all in the Upper Cretaceous.

  9. Quantifying the Chemical Weathering Efficiency of Basaltic Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, D. E.; Caves, J. K.; Thomas, D.; Chamberlain, C. P.; Maher, K.

    2014-12-01

    The geographic distribution and areal extent of rock type, along with the hydrologic cycle, influence the efficiency of global silicate weathering. Here we define weathering efficiency as the production of HCO3- for a given land surface area. Modern basaltic catchments located on volcanic arcs and continental flood basalts are particularly efficient, as they account for <5% of sub-aerial bedrock but produce ~30% of the modern global weathering flux. Indeed, changes in this weathering efficiency are thought to play an important role in modulating Earth's past climate via changes in the areal extent and paleo-latitude of basaltic catchments (e.g., Deccan and Ethiopian Traps, southeast Asia basaltic terranes). We analyze paired river discharge and solute concentration data for basaltic catchments from both literature studies and the USGS NWIS database to mechanistically understand geographic and climatic influences on weathering efficiency. To quantify the chemical weathering efficiency of modern basalt catchments we use solute production equations and compare the results to global river datasets. The weathering efficiency, quantified via the Damköhler coefficient (Dw [m/yr]), is calculated from fitting concentration-discharge relationships for catchments with paired solute and discharge measurements. Most basalt catchments do not demonstrate 'chemostatic' behavior. The distribution of basalt catchment Dw values (0.194 ± 0.176 (1σ)), derived using SiO2(aq) concentrations, is significantly higher than global river Dw values (mean Dw of 0.036), indicating a greater chemical weathering efficiency. Despite high Dw values and total weathering fluxes per unit area, many basaltic catchments are producing near their predicted weathering flux limit. Thus, weathering fluxes from basaltic catchments are proportionally less responsive to increases in runoff than other lithologies. The results of other solute species (Mg2+ and Ca2+) are comparable, but are influenced both by

  10. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Dzaugis, Mary E.; Spivack, Arthur J.; Dunlea, Ann G.; Murray, Richard W.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium (238U, 235U), thorium (232Th) and potassium (40K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th, and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events) and post-emplacement alteration. However, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma) basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may support as many as

  11. Radiolytic Hydrogen Production in the Subseafloor Basaltic Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Dzaugis, Mary E; Spivack, Arthur J; Dunlea, Ann G; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is produced in geological settings by dissociation of water due to radiation from radioactive decay of naturally occurring uranium ((238)U, (235)U), thorium ((232)Th) and potassium ((40)K). To quantify the potential significance of radiolytic H2 as an electron donor for microbes within the South Pacific subseafloor basaltic aquifer, we use radionuclide concentrations of 43 basalt samples from IODP Expedition 329 to calculate radiolytic H2 production rates in basement fractures. The samples are from three sites with very different basement ages and a wide range of alteration types. U, Th, and K concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude from sample to sample at each site. Comparison of our samples to each other and to the results of previous studies of unaltered East Pacific Rise basalt suggests that significant variations in radionuclide concentrations are due to differences in initial (unaltered basalt) concentrations (which can vary between eruptive events) and post-emplacement alteration. However, there is no clear relationship between alteration type and calculated radiolytic yields. Local maxima in U, Th, and K produce hotspots of H2 production, causing calculated radiolytic rates to differ by up to a factor of 80 from sample to sample. Fracture width also greatly influences H2 production, where microfractures are hotspots for radiolytic H2 production. For example, H2 production rates normalized to water volume are 190 times higher in 1 μm wide fractures than in fractures that are 10 cm wide. To assess the importance of water radiolysis for microbial communities in subseafloor basaltic aquifers, we compare electron transfer rates from radiolysis to rates from iron oxidation in subseafloor basalt. Radiolysis appears likely to be a more important electron donor source than iron oxidation in old (>10 Ma) basement basalt. Radiolytic H2 production in the volume of water adjacent to a square cm of the most radioactive SPG basalt may support as

  12. Basalt: Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, D. S. S.; Abercromby, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Kobayashi, L.; Hughes, S. S.; Chappell, S.; Bramall, N. E.; Deans, M. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Downs, M.; Cockell, C. S.; Stevens, A. H.; Caldwell, B.; Hoffman, J.; Vadhavk, N.; Marquez, J.; Miller, M.; Squyres, S. W.; Lees, D. S.; Fong, T.; Cohen, T.; Smith, T.; Lee, G.; Frank, J.; Colaprete, A.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains) program. BASALT research addresses Science, Science Operations, and Technology. Specifically, BASALT is focused on the investigation of terrestrial volcanic terrains and their habitability as analog environments for early and present-day Mars. Our scientific fieldwork is conducted under simulated Mars mission constraints to evaluate strategically selected concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities with respect to their anticipated value for the joint human and robotic exploration of Mars. a) Science: The BASALT science program is focused on understanding habitability conditions of early and present-day Mars in two relevant Mars-analog locations (the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and the East Rift Zone (ERZ) flows on the Big Island of Hawai'i and the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in Idaho) to characterize and compare the physical and geochemical conditions of life in these environments and to learn how to seek, identify, and characterize life and life-related chemistry in basaltic environments representing these two epochs of martian history. b) Science Operations: The BASALT team will conduct real (non-simulated) biological and geological science at two high-fidelity Mars analogs, all within simulated Mars mission conditions (including communication latencies and bandwidth constraints) that are based on current architectural assumptions for Mars exploration missions. We will identify which human-robotic ConOps and supporting capabilities enable science return and discovery. c) Technology: BASALT will incorporate and evaluate technologies in to our field operations that are directly relevant to conducting the scientific investigations regarding life and life-related chemistry in Mars-analogous terrestrial environments. BASALT technologies include the use of mobile science platforms, extravehicular informatics, display technologies, communication

  13. Genesis of highland basalt breccias - A view from 66095

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. R., Jr.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe and defocused beam analyses of the lunar highland breccia sample 66095 show it consists of a fine-grained subophitic matrix containing a variety of mineral and lithic clasts, such as intergranular and cataclastic ANT, shocked and unshocked plagioclase, and basalts. Consideration of the chemistries of both matrix and clasts provides a basis for a qualitative three-component mixing model consisting of an ANT plutonic complex, a Fra Mauro basalt, and minor meteoric material.

  14. Water Content of Basalt Erupted on the ocean floor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Deep sea pillow basalts dredged from the ocean floor show that vesicularity changes with composition as well as with depth. Alkalic basalts are more vesicular than tholeiitic basalts erupted at the same depth. The vesicularity data, when related to experimentally determined solubility of water in basalt, indicate that K-poor oceanic tholeiites originally contained about 0.25 percent water, Hawaiian tholeiites of intermediate K-content, about 0.5 percent water, and alkali-rich basalts, about 0.9 percent water. Analyses of fresh basalt pillows show a systematic increase of H2O+ as the rocks become more alkalic. K-poor oceanic tholeiites contain 0.06-0.42 percent H2O+, Hawaiian tholeiites, 0.31-0.60 percent H2O+, and alkali rich basalts 0.49-0.98 percent H2O+. The contents of K2O, P2O5, F, and Cl increase directly with an increase in H2O+ content such that at 1.0 weight percent H2O+, K2O is 1.58 percent, P2O5 is 0.55 percent, F is 0.07 percent, and Cl is 0.1 percent. The measured weight percent of deuterium on the rim of one Hawaiian pillow is -6.0 (relative to SMOW); this value, which is similar to other indications of magmatic water, suggests that no appreciable sea water was absorbed by the pillow during or subsequent to eruption on the ocean floor. Concentrations of volatile constituents in the alkali basalt melts relative to tholeiitic melts can be explained by varying degrees of partial melting of mantle material or by fractional crystallization of a magma batch. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Shocked basalt from Lonar Impact Crater, India, and experimental analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Schaal, R. B.; Gibbons, R.; Horz, F.; Milton, D. J.; Dube, A.

    1976-01-01

    Samples of Lonar basalts were experimentally shocked in vacuum to pressures between 200 and 650 kbar by a 20 mm, high-velocity gun. Plagioclase and palagonite in experimentally shocked samples show deformation similar to that in the naturally shocked rocks, but pyroxene does not show optically resolvable edge melting. It is estimated that pressures in excess of 800-1000 kbar are required for the formation of totally shock-melted rocks from nonporous basalt.

  16. Insulation from basaltic stamp sand. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, F. D.

    1981-04-01

    A Midwest Appropriate Technology Grant was awarded to determine the technical and economic feasibility of producing mineral-fiber insulation directly from extensive deposits of basaltic sand produced during former mining and milling operations in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The amounts of local basaltic sands available and representative chemical compositions were determined. The variation of viscosity with temperature and chemical composition was estimated. Samples were melted and either pulled or blown into fiber. In all cases fiber could be made with a reasonable tensile strength to ensure usefulness. It was concluded that it was technically feasible to produce fibers from basaltic stamp sands of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. A technical feasibility study using published data, a cost and design analysis of a basalt fiber production plant, a market survey of fiber needs, and an economic analysis for investing in a basalt fiber venture was undertaken. These studies concluded that the local production of basaltic insulation was both feasible and economically reasonable. It was suggested that the plant be located in a region of greater population density with lower utility costs. A representative one-third of these studies is included as appendices A, B, C, and D.

  17. Sensitivity of geochemical monitoring for CO2 sequestration in basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.; Herron, M.; Grau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalts is a promising target for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage due to high storage capacity, presence of seals, and potential for geochemical trapping which results in binding CO2 into stable carbonate minerals. The success of long-term CO2 storage in igneous rocks highly depends on our ability to monitor mineralization under in situ conditions. The direct chemistry measurements on cores are costly and typically do not provide continuous coverage. In this study we investigate the potential of borehole geochemical logging for monitoring of CO2 mineralization in basalt. Neutron-induced capture gamma ray spectroscopy tools allow obtaining in-situ concentration logs for up to 10 major elements which can be used to construct a quantitative mineralogical model. While this usually provides good bulk mineralogy estimates, detecting small-volume mineral alteration in volcanic rocks remains challenging, especially if borehole conditions are poor. We analyze Schlumberger Elemental Capture Spectroscopy logs and chemical core analysis from the pilot CO2 sequestration project in the Columbia River flood basalt. We use the geochemical spectroscopy logs and quantitative modeling to quantify their sensitivity to secondary mineralization in basalt. We apply statistical analysis to explain the variance in elemental concentrations (and other logs) and establish detection limits for various mineral alteration products in basalt. We use these results to evaluate monitoring capabilities and limitations of geochemical logging for CO2 mineralization after underground injection in basalt and suggest areas for future research.

  18. A basalt trigger for the 1991 eruptions of Pinatubo volcano?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; Hoblitt, R.P.; Reyes, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    THE eruptive products of calc-alkaline volcanos often show evidence for the mixing of basaltic and acid magmas before eruption (see, for example, refs 1, 2). These observations have led to the suggestion3 that the injection of basaltic magma into the base of a magma chamber (or the catastrophic overturn of a stably stratified chamber containing basaltic magma at its base) might trigger an eruption. Here we report evidence for the mixing of basaltic and dacitic magmas shortly before the paroxysmal eruptions of Pinatubo volcano on 15 June 1991. Andesitic scoriae erupted on 12 June contain minerals and glass with disequilibrium compositions, and are considerably more mafic than the dacitic pumices erupted on 15 June. Differences in crystal abundance and glass composition among the pumices may arise from pre-heating of the dacite magma by the underlying basaltic liquid before mixing. Degassing of this basaltic magma may also have contributed to the climatologically important sulphur dioxide emissions that accompanied the Pinatubo eruptions.

  19. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  20. Hotspots, basalts, and the evolution of the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that the trace element concentration patterns of continental and ocean island basalts and of mid-ocean ridge basalts are complementary. Estimates of the relative sizes of the source regions for these fundamentally different basalt types can be arrived at from the trace element enrichment-depletion patterns. Their combined volume occupies the greater part of the mantle above the 670 km discontinuity. It is pointed out that the source regions separated as a result of early mantle differentiation and crystal fractionation from the resulting melt. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source evolved from an eclogite cumulate that gave up its late-stage enriched fluids at various times to the shallower mantle and continental crust. The mid-ocean ridge basalts source is rich in garnet and clinopyroxene, while the continental and ocean island basalt source is a garnet peridotite that has experienced secondary enrichment. These relationships are found to be consistent with the evolution of a terrestrial magma ocean.

  1. Meteoric water - basalt interactions: a field and laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this study is to define and interpret the composition of the meteoric waters in N.E. Iceland in their cycle through the hydrosphere and the upper part of the crust, and to calibrate the natural process by dissolution experiments done in the laboratory. The composition of rain, snow, spring and geothermal waters from the rift zone of N.E. Iceland can be explained by sea-spray addition (1/10000), dissolution of basalts and buffering by alteration minerals. Rates, stoichiometry and activation energy of dissolution, pH vs. time and activity-activity paths were determined by dissolving basaltic rocks under simulated natural conditions at 25 to 60/sup 0/C. Dissolution follows a linear rate law, with basaltic glass dissolving 10 times faster than the crystalline basalt. Rates are independent of pH from 7 to 10. The average activation energy for dissolution of basaltic glass is 31.8 kJ/mol (+/-3). For individual elements leached from crystalline basalt it ranges from 35 to 15 kJ/mol. This indicates that under the experimental conditions reactions on the surfaces of the solids are the rate determining step in the dissolution mechanism. Considerable differences (2 to 4 log units) exist in the calculated oxygen fugacities obtained from different redox species in the geothermal fluids. This is primarily caused by the nonequilibrium state of the sulfur redox pair.

  2. Testing the Origins of Basalt Fragments fro Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Stevens, R. E.; Neal, C. R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several 2-4 mm regolith fragments of basalt from the Apollo 16 site were recently described by [1]. These included a high-Ti vitrophyric basalts (60603,10-16) and one very-low-titanium (VLT) crystalline basalt (65703,9-13). As Apollo 16 was the only highlands sample return mission distant from the maria, identification of basaltic samples at the site indicates input from remote sites via impact processes [1]. However, distinguishing between impact melt and pristine basalt can be notoriously difficult and requires significant sample material [2-6]. The crystal stratigraphy method utilizes essentially non-destructive methods to make these distinctions [7,8]. Crystal stratigraphy combines quantitative petrography in the form of crystal size distributions (CSDs) coupled with mineral geochemistry to reveal the petrogenetic history of samples. The classic CSD plot of crystal size versus population density can reveal insights on growth/cooling rates, residence times, and magma history which in turn can be used to evaluate basaltic vs impact melt origin [7-9]. Electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS analyses of mineral phases complement textural investigations. Trace element variations document subtle changes occurring during the formation of the samples, and are key in the interpretation and preservation of this rare lunar sample collection.

  3. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in basalts from islands in the Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedge, C.E.; Watkins, N.D.; Hildreth, R.A.; Doering, W.P.

    1973-01-01

    87Sr/86Sr ratios of basalts from islands in the Indian Ocean (0.7040) are higher than those of basalts dredged from the Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge (0.7034). The sources of the island basalts have apparently not been in equilibrium with the source of the ridge basalts for roughly 109 years. Both ridge and island basalts in the Indian Ocean are higher in 87Sr/86Sr than are rocks from similar settings in the eastern Pacific. ?? 1973.

  4. Importance of lunar granite and KREEP in very high potassium (VHK) basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five very high potassium (VHK) basalts from Apollo 14 breccia 14303 shows the presence of a KREEP component. An assimilation and fractional crystallization model is presented to describe the basalt evolution. The influence of granite assimilation on the basalt evolution is discussed. The presence of VHK basalts containing only a granite signature and those with both granite and KREEP signatures suggests that there are at least two different VHK basalt flows at the Apollo 14 site.

  5. Basaltic Lava Flow vs. Welded Basaltic Ignimbrite: Determining the Depositional Nature of a Volcanic Flow in the Akaroa Volcanic Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, E. A.; Hampton, S.

    2014-12-01

    Welded basaltic ignimbrites are one of the rarest forms of ignimbrites found on Earth and can often have characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of basaltic lava flows. This study evaluates a basaltic volcanic flow in a coastal cliff sequence in Raupo Bay, Akaroa Volcanic Complex, Banks Peninsula, New Zealand. The Raupo Bay coastal cliff sequence is comprised of 4 units, termed L1, L2, L3, and A, capped by loess. L1 and L2 are basaltic lavas, L3 proximal scoria deposits, which thin inland, and Unit A, a flow with unusual characteristics, which is the focus of this study. Field mapping, sampling, geochemical analysis and petrology were utilized to characterize units. Further detailed structural analysis of Unit A was completed, to determine the nature of the basal contact, variations in welding throughout the unit and the relationship of the layer to the underlying topography. From these analyses it was found: Unit A is thickest in a paleo-valley and thins and mantles higher topography, welding in the unit increases downwards forming topographic controlled columnar jointing, the top of the unit is brecciated and grades into the lower welded/jointed portion, the basal contact is sharp overlying a regional airfall deposit, the unit has a notably distinct geochemical composition from the underlying stratigraphic units, Unit A contains flattened and sheared scoria clasts, has aligned bubbles, and lava lithics. Further thin section analysis of Unit A identified flattened clast boundaries and microlite rimming around phenocrysts. In comparing these features to previous studies on basaltic lavas and ignimbrites it is hypothesized that Unit A is a welded basaltic ignimbrite that was channelized by paleo-topography on the outer flanks of the Akaroa Volcanic Complex. This study furthers the characterization of basaltic ignimbrites and is the first to recognize basaltic ignimbrites within the Akaroa Volcanic Complex.

  6. Icelandic basaltic geothermal field: A natural analog for nuclear waste isolation in basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, G.C.; Grandstaff, D.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1984-11-21

    Analog studies of Icelandic geothermal fields have shown that the design of nuclear waste repositories in basalt can benefit by comparison to the data base already available from the development of these geothermal fields. A high degree of similarity exists between these two systems: their petrology, groundwater geochemistry, mineral solubilities, hydrologic parameters, temperature ranges, water-rock redox equilibria, hydrothermal pH values, and secondary mineralogies all show considerable overlap in the range of values. The experimentally-simulated hydrothermal studies of the basaltic nuclear waste repository rocks have, at this time, produced a data base that receives a strong confirmation from the Icelandic analog. Furthermore, the Icelandic analog should eventually be employed to extrapolate into higher and lower temperatures, into longer time-base chemical comparisons, and into more realistic mineral deposition studies, than have been possible in the laboratory evaluations of the nuclear waste repository designs. This eventual use of the Icelandic analog will require cooperative work with the Icelandic Geological Survey. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Characteristics of inclusions in high-Al steel during electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cheng-bin; Chen, Xi-chun; Guo, Han-jie

    2012-04-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in high-Al steel refined by electroslag remelting (ESR) were investigated by image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results show that the size of almost all the inclusions observed in ESR ingots is less than 5 μm. Inclusions smaller than 3 μm take nearly 75% of the total inclusions observed in each ingot. Inclusions observed in ESR ingots are pure AlN as dominating precipitates and some fine spherical Al2O3 inclusions with a size of 1 μm or less. It is also found that protective gas operation and slag deoxidation treatment during ESR process have significant effects on the number of inclusions smaller than 2 μm but little effects on that of inclusions larger than 2 μm. Thermodynamic calculations show that AlN inclusions are unable to precipitate in the liquid metal pool under the present experimental conditions, while the precipitation of AlN inclusions could take place at the solidifying front due to the microsegregation of Al and N in liquid steel during solidification.

  8. CO 2-water-basalt interaction. Numerical simulation of low temperature CO 2 sequestration into basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gysi, Alexander P.; Stefánsson, Andri

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between CO 2-rich waters and basaltic glass was studied using reaction path modeling in order to get insight into the water-rock reaction process including secondary mineral composition, water chemistry and mass transfer as a function of CO 2 concentration and reaction progress ( ξ). The calculations were carried out at 25-90 °C and pCO 2 to 30 bars and the results were compared to recent experimental observations and natural systems. A thermodynamic dataset was compiled from 25 to 300 °C in order to simulate mineral saturations relevant to basalt alteration in CO 2-rich environment including revised key aqueous species for mineral dissolution reactions and apparent Gibbs energies for clay and carbonate solid solutions observed to form in nature. The dissolution of basaltic glass in CO 2-rich waters was found to be incongruent with the overall water composition and secondary mineral formation depending on reaction progress and pH. Under mildly acid conditions in CO 2 enriched waters (pH <6.5), SiO 2 and simple Al-Si minerals, Ca-Mg-Fe smectites and Ca-Mg-Fe carbonates predominated. Iron, Al and Si were immobile whereas the Mg and Ca mobility depended on the mass of carbonate formed and water pH. Upon quantitative CO 2 mineralization, the pH increased to >8 resulting in Ca-Mg-Fe smectite, zeolites and calcite formation, reducing the mobility of most dissolved elements. The dominant factor determining the reaction path of basalt alteration and the associated element mobility was the pH of the water. In turn, the pH value was determined by the concentration of CO 2 and extent of reaction. The composition of the carbonates depended on the mobility of Ca, Mg and Fe. At pH <6.5, Fe was in the ferrous oxidation state resulting in the formation of Fe-rich carbonates with the incorporation of Ca and Mg. At pH >8, the mobility of Fe and Mg was limited due to the formation of clays whereas Ca was incorporated into calcite, zeolites and clays. Competing

  9. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of <150 m. Static gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  10. Geomechanical rock properties of a basaltic volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Lauren; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Oommen, Thomas; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    In volcanic regions, reliable estimates of mechanical properties for specific volcanic events such as cyclic inflation-deflation cycles by magmatic intrusions, thermal stressing, and high temperatures are crucial for building accurate models of volcanic phenomena. This study focuses on the challenge of characterizing volcanic materials for the numerical analyses of such events. To do this, we evaluated the physical (porosity, permeability) and mechanical (strength) properties of basaltic rocks at Pacaya Volcano (Guatemala) through a variety of laboratory experiments, including: room temperature, high temperature (935 °C), and cyclically-loaded uniaxial compressive strength tests on as-collected and thermally-treated rock samples. Knowledge of the material response to such varied stressing conditions is necessary to analyze potential hazards at Pacaya, whose persistent activity has led to 13 evacuations of towns near the volcano since 1987. The rocks show a non-linear relationship between permeability and porosity, which relates to the importance of the crack network connecting the vesicles in these rocks. Here we show that strength not only decreases with porosity and permeability, but also with prolonged stressing (i.e., at lower strain rates) and upon cooling. Complimentary tests in which cyclic episodes of thermal or load stressing showed no systematic weakening of the material on the scale of our experiments. Most importantly, we show the extremely heterogeneous nature of volcanic edifices that arise from differences in porosity and permeability of the local lithologies, the limited lateral extent of lava flows, and the scars of previous collapse events. Input of these process-specific rock behaviors into slope stability and deformation models can change the resultant hazard analysis. We anticipate that an increased parameterization of rock properties will improve mitigation power.

  11. A new lunar high-Ti basalt type defined from clasts in Apollo 16 breccia 60639

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the detailed examination of three basalt clasts from Apollo 16 breccia 60639 that represent a new variant of high-Ti basalt returned from the Moon by the Apollo 16 mission. Mineral chemistry and whole-rock analyses were conducted on aliquots from three clasts (breccia matrix, basalt, and basalt + breccia matrix). The basalt clasts, which are not overtly porphyritic, contain compositionally zoned pyroxene, olivine, and plagioclase crystals that represent the evolution of the magma during crystallization; ilmenite does not exhibit major-element compositional zoning within individual crystals. Mineral compositions are distinct between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies. In addition, whole-rock analyses identify clear compositional differences between the basalt and breccia matrix lithologies in both major and trace element concentrations. The composition of the mixed lithology aliquots (i.e., basalt + breccia matrix) do not indicate simple two component mixing (i.e., compositions are not intermediate to the basalt and breccia end-members); this apparent incongruity can be accounted for by adding ∼19-40% plagioclase to an amalgamation of the average basalt and individual breccia clast compositions via impact mixing. Whole-rock analyses are consistent with previous analyses of one 60639 basalt clast, which were interpreted to indicate chemical similarity with Apollo 11 and 17 basalts. However, both major and trace elements suggest that the 60639 basalt clasts examined here have compositions that are distinct from Apollo 11 and 17 high-Ti basalts. Although the 60639 basalt clasts have similar characteristics to a variety of previously identified basalt types, the more extensive whole-rock analyses reported here indicate that they represent a type of Apollo high-Ti basalt heretofore unrecognized in the Apollo and lunar meteorite collections. By placing these new analyses in the context of other mare basalt compositions, a petrogenetic model for

  12. Optimization of DNA Extraction from Deep-sea Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Edwards, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies on the microorganisms that inhabit deep-sea basalt can provide information on this dark ecosystem, which will contribution to our understanding of mass transformation and energy flow in the deep ocean. However, molecular methods for use with metal- and clay-rich rock materials such as basalt have not been suitably developed at present, yet are critically required in order to be able to fully evaluate the basalt biotope. For example, inefficient DNA extraction might lead to loss of information about important components of this community, and misinterpretation about the total community diversity and function. In order to investigate the effects of sample pretreated method, particle size, different DNA extraction methods and cell density on extracted DNA yields, two basalt samples were collected from the East Pacific Rise 9° N during research cruise AT11- 20 in Nov 2004. Basalt samples were crushed to different particle size, washed with ddH2O and 100% ethanol respectively, and autoclaved. Marinobacter aquaeolei cultures with different cell densities were inoculated into differently treated basalt samples. Pure culture and basalt samples without inoculation were used as positive and negative control to evaluate the extracting efficiency. FastDNA spin for soil kit, GeneClean for ancient DNA kit and UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit are used for DNA extraction. Results showed that DNA yields increased with culture density. FastDNA spin for soil kit gave the highest DNA yields, which is almost 10 times more than that of UltraCleanTM soil DNA Kit. Ethanol washing and ddH2O washing did not make big difference to DNA yields. Mineral composition and surface areas might also affect DNA yields.

  13. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  14. Paleosecular variation, geochemistry, correlation, and timing of Grande Ronde Basalt lava flows, Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Sawlan, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Co-located paleomagnetic and geochemical sampling of lava flows at eight sections within the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB) was undertaken across the Columbia Plateau in WA and OR. The GRB represents roughly 87% (151,000 km3) of the Miocene Columbia River flood basalt province (174,000 km3) by volume (exclusive of the Steens Mountain Basalt), and recently published 40Ar/39Ar age estimates indicate that it was most likely emplaced within a time interval of less than 400 ka [Barry et al., Lithos 118(3), 213-222, 2010]. GRB flows include four stratigraphic magnetozones within the formation (R1, N1, R2, N2), and the sections currently sampled are mostly within the upper two magnetozones. Because Plateau GRB flows have undergone pervasive low-temperature alteration to varying degrees [see M. Sawlan's abstract, this meeting], particular care has been taken to collect the freshest available rock. Several new flow units have been identified, and similar, but unusual, paleomagnetic directions in stratigraphically adjacent flows of different chemical composition indicate, with high probability, that these flows were emplaced contemporaneously relative to the rate of geomagnetic paleosecular variation (PSV). Thus, several magma sources and their vent systems apparently operated nearly simultaneously and produced a stratigraphic framework in which compositionally distinct flows are intercalated. In addition, transitional directions have been found in flows near the N1/R2 and R2/N2 geomagnetic reversal boundaries, and an excursion to low inclinations occurred during emplacement of the Winter Water member (N2) flows. The detail and sequential nature of the PSV curve recovered from the upper GRB lava flows (R2 & N2) so far indicate extraordinarily rapid eruption of these flows. Comparison of the rate of change shown by our nascent PSV curve for the upper GRB with a recently published one for the Holocene of western North America [Hagstrum and Blinman, G3 11(6), 2010], which covers in

  15. Petrogenesis of pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-04-01

    The pillow basalts from Baolai in southwestern Taiwan have been inferred to bear Dupal signautres based on their Th/Ce ratio, linking the Baolai basalts to the South China Sea (SCS) seamounts that are characterized by Dupal Pb isotope signatures (Smith and Lewis, 2007). In this study, thirty-two Baolai basalt samples were analyzed for abundances of major and trace elements as well as Pb and Nd isotope ratios to verify their Dupal characters and to constrain their petrogenesis significance. The Baolai basalts contain 4-10 % L.O.I.. Three stages of alteration are inferred from plots of L.O.I. abundance versus concentrations major oxides as well as mineral textures and compositions. The first alteration stage was characterized by albitization that converted Ca-rich plagioclase to albite. The second alteration stage was dominated by chloritization of olivine and augite, resulting in increases in L.O.I. abundance. The last alteration stage is represented by formation of secondary calcite in vesicles and cracks. These alteration processes reflect interaction with seawater and apparently did not affect the magmatic Pb isotope composition for the low Pb concentration in seawater. Relative to the North Hemisphere Reference Line (NHRL), the Baolai pillow basalts have higher 208Pb/204Pb ratios at a given 206Pb/204Pb value, showing Dupal anomaly. For their relatively higher 208Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 206Pb/204Pb ratios, the Baolai basalts are distinct from majority of the Cenozoic basalts in the Hainan-Leizhou peninsula, the Indochina peninsula, and the SCS seamounts, for which derivation from the Hainan mantle plume has been recently proposed (Wang et al., 2013). In contrast, the Baolai basalts and the Cenozoic basalts from eastern Guangdong at southeastern China have similar Pb and Nd isotope compositions, indicating derivation from similar mantle sources. However, the Baolai basalts have lower abundance ratios of Zr/Hf (40.3-45.6 versus 46.5-50.5), La/Yb (12

  16. Breakthroughs in Seismic and Borehole Characterization of Basalt Sequestration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E. C.; Hardage, Bob A.; McGrail, B. Peter; Davis, Klarissa N.

    2011-04-01

    Mafic continental flood basalts form a globally important, but under-characterized CO2 sequestration target. The Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) in the northwestern U.S. is up to 5 km thick and covers over 168,000 km2. In India, flood basalts are 3 km thick and cover greater than 500,000 km2. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the CRBG and other basalts react with formation water and super critical (sc) CO2 to precipitate carbonates, thus adding a potential mineral trapping mechanism to the standard trapping mechanisms of most other types of CO2 sequestration reservoirs. Brecciated tops of individual basalt flows in the CRBG form regional aquifers that locally have greater than 30% porosity and three Darcies of permeability. Porous flow tops are potential sites for sequestration of gigatons of scCO2 in areas where the basalts contain unpotable water and are at depths greater than 800 m. In this paper we report on the U.S. DOE Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership surface seismic and borehole geophysical characterization that supports a field test of capacity, integrity, and geochemical reactivity of CRBG reservoirs in eastern Washington, U.S.A. Traditional surface seismic methods have had little success in imaging basalt features in on-shore areas where the basalt is thinly covered by sediment. Processing of the experimental 6.5 km, 5 line 3C seismic swath included constructing an elastic wavefield model, identifying and separating seismic wave modes, and processing the swath as a single 2D line. Important findings include: (1) a wide variety of shear wave energy modes swamp the P-wave seismic records; (2) except at very short geophone offsets, ground roll overprints P-wave signal; and (3) because of extreme velocity contrasts, P-wave events are refracted at incidence angles greater than 7-15 degrees. Subsequent removal of S-wave and other noise during processing resulted in tremendous improvement in image quality. The application of wireline

  17. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  18. Clinker formation in basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vrie, B.; Loock, S.; Henot, J.

    2007-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows are classified according their surface morphology. They can be either aa, displaying a rough clinkery surface or pahoehoe, displaying a smooth clinkerless surface. These two surface types differ also in their emplacement and rheology, and can be differentiated in a shear-strain rate vs. apparent viscosity diagram (Hon & al., 2003). To understand clinker formation, one way is to see how a pahoehoe lava converts to an aa through shear-viscosity changes. Two possibilities occur: 1) the viscosity can increase (e.g. by levee formation) and clinkers will be formed by torque on the flow edges, or 2) the shear-strain will increase (lava influx increasing, topographic obstacles, slope change) and clinker will be formed by crust-breakage. These two clinker formatting processes are called magmatic fragmentation. Clinker will be formed on the summit and to the edges of the flow and they will appear at the base of its according the caterpillar motion usually associated with flows. However, in the Chaîne des Puys (French), basal clinker appears without top clinker (i.e. a pahoehoe lava flow with basal clinker) and thus another explanation is needed to explain them. Clinker samples were collected in different emplacement contexts and different part of flows. The SEM analysis of these samples and comparisons with ash samples from the literature show classical magmatic fragmentation textures (stepped fractures, non- synchronic fractures) in three aa lava flows. However, in one pahoehoe flow there are typical phreatomagmatic textures (blocky shapes, adhering fine particles). There are also shearing structures, such as microfaults in an intermediate flow. Thus, there are at least three different ways to form clinker: 1) classically by fragmentation at the flow base and the edges; 2) by phreatomagmatism at the base flow; 3) by shearing at the flow base and the edges. Basal shearing structures include fault gauges and welded clasts, indicating possible shear

  19. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  20. Stratigraphy of Oceanus Procellarum basalts - Sources and styles of emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitford-Stark, J. L.; Head, J. W., III

    1980-01-01

    The basaltic fill of Oceanus Procellarum has been formally subdivided into four lithostratigraphic formations: The Repsold Formation, the Telemann Formation, the Hermann Formation, and the Sharp Formation. The Repsold Formation is composed of high-Ti basalts and pyroclastic deposits with an estimated age of 3.75 + or - 0.05 b.y. and an estimated volume of about 2.1 x 10 to the 5th cu km. This is overlain by the Telemann Formation composed of very low-Ti basalts and pyroclastic deposits with an estimated age of 3.6 + or - 0.2 b.y. and a volume of 4.2 x 10 to the 5th cu km. The Hermann Formation, composed of intermediate basalts with an estimated age of 3.3 + or - 0.3 b.y., represents the next youngest unit with an estimated volume of 2.2 x 10 to the 5th cu km. The youngest materials in Procellarum are the medium-to-high-Ti basalts comprising the Sharp Formation with an estimated age of 2.7 + or - 0.7 b.y. and a volume of 1.8 x 10 to the 4th cu km.

  1. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth’s surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō’ihi Seamount, Hawai’i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō’ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy. PMID:26733957

  2. Hydrogeologic framework of the Maku area basalts, northwestern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari Moghaddam, Asghar; Fijani, Elham

    2009-06-01

    The Maku area in northwestern Iran is characterized by young lava flows which erupted from Mount Ararat in Turkey. These fractured volcanic rocks overlie alluvium associated with pre-existing rivers and form a good basalt-alluvium aquifer over an area of 650 km2. Groundwater discharge occurs from 12 large springs, ranging from 20 to 4,000 L s-1, and from some extraction wells. Permian and Oligo-Miocene age limestones along the northern boundary of the Bazargan and Poldasht Plains basalts are intensively karstified and groundwater from these high lands easily enters the basalt-alluvium aquifers. The transmissivity of the basalt-alluvium aquifer ranges from 24 to 870 m2 d-1, indicating heterogeneity. Groundwater of the aquifer is a sodium-bicarbonate and mixed cation-bicarbonate type and the concentration of fluoride is higher than the universal maximum admissible concentrations for drinking. In order to determine the chemical composition and identify the source of the high fluoride concentrations in the groundwater of the basaltic area, water samples from the springs, wells and rivers were analyzed. The results indicate that the high fluoride water enters the study area from the Sari Su River.

  3. Similar Microbial Communities Found on Two Distant Seafloor Basalts.

    PubMed

    Singer, Esther; Chong, Lauren S; Heidelberg, John F; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-01-01

    The oceanic crust forms two thirds of the Earth's surface and hosts a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms. While advances have been made in the sedimentary realm, our understanding of the igneous rock portion as a microbial habitat has remained limited. We present the first comparative metagenomic microbial community analysis from ocean floor basalt environments at the Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i, and the East Pacific Rise (EPR; 9°N). Phylogenetic analysis indicates the presence of a total of 43 bacterial and archaeal mono-phyletic groups, dominated by Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, as well as Thaumarchaeota. Functional gene analysis suggests that these Thaumarchaeota play an important role in ammonium oxidation on seafloor basalts. In addition to ammonium oxidation, the seafloor basalt habitat reveals a wide spectrum of other metabolic potentials, including CO2 fixation, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and sulfur oxidation. Basalt communities from Lō'ihi and the EPR show considerable metabolic and phylogenetic overlap down to the genus level despite geographic distance and slightly different seafloor basalt mineralogy. PMID:26733957

  4. A common parentage for Deccan Continental Flood Basalt and Central Indian Ocean Ridge Basalt? A geochemical and isotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D.; Misra, S.; Widdowson, M.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    A comparison of geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions for Deccan Continental Flood Basalts (CFBs) and Central Indian Ridge (CIR) Basalts is presented: these data permit assessment of possible parental linkages between the two regions, and comparison of their respective magmatic evolutionary trends in relation to rift-related tectonic events during Gondwana break-up. The present study reveals that Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) from the northern CIR and basalts of Deccan CFB are geochemically dissimilar because of: (1) the Deccan CFB basalts typically show a greater iron-enrichment as compared to the northern CIR MORB, (2) a multi-element spiderdiagram reveals that the Deccan CFBs reveal a more fractionated slope (Ba/YbN > 1), as compared to relatively flat northern CIR MORB (Ba/YbN < 1), (3) there is greater REE fractionation for Deccan CFB than for the northern CIR MORB (i.e., La/YbN ˜ 2.3 and 1 respectively) and (4) substantial variation of compatible-incompatible trace elements and their ratios among the two basalt groups suggests that partial melting is a dominant process for northern CIR MORB, while fractional crystallization was a more important control to the geochemical variation for Deccan CFB. Further, incompatible trace element ratios (Nb/U and Nb/Pb) and radiogenic isotopic data (Sr-Pb-Nd) indicate that the northern CIR MORBs are similar to depleted mantle [and/or normal (N)-MORB], and often lie on a mixing line between depleted mantle and upper continental crust. By contrast, Deccan CFB compositions lie between the lower continental crust and Ocean island basalt. Accordingly, we conclude that the basaltic suites of the northern CIR MORB and Deccan CFB do not share common parentage, and are therefore genetically unrelated to each other. Instead, we infer that the northern CIR MORB were derived from a depleted mantle source contaminated by upper continental crust, probably during the break up of Gondwanaland; the Deccan CFB are more similar to

  5. Examination of subaerially altered basaltic glass with TEM and EELS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.-S.

    1998-06-17

    We have examined the weathered surfaces of 720 year old Hawaiian basalt glasses that were recovered from a subaerial environment with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy filtered imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques. Whereas the alteration products (palagonite) were physically detached from the underlying glass in most samples, a gel-like amorphous layer was observed adjacent to the glass in a few samples. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gel layer has been observed on weathered basalt. This is significant because analogous gel layers have been observed on nuclear waste glasses reacted in laboratory tests, and this demonstrates an important similarity in the mechanisms of the weathering of basalt and the corrosion of waste glasses.

  6. Lunar basalt meteorite EET 87521: Petrology of the clast population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semenova, A. S.; Nazarov, M. A.; Kononkova, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    The Elephant Moraine meteorite EET 87521 was classified as a lunar mare basalt breccia which is composed mainly of VLT basalt clasts. Here we report on our petrological study of lithic clasts and monomineralic fragments in the thin sections EET 87521,54 and EET 87521,47,1, which were prepared from the meteorite. The results of the study show that EET 87521 consists mainly of Al-rich ferrobasalt clasts and olivine pyroxenite clasts. The bulk composition of the meteorite can be well modelled by the mixing of these lithic components which appear to be differentiates of the Luna 25 basalt melt. KREEP and Mg-rich gabbro components are minor constituents of EET 87521.

  7. Evidence against hydrogen-based microbial ecosystems in basalt aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, R.T.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that hydrogen produced from basalt-ground-water interactions may serve as an energy source that supports the existence of microorganisms in the deep subsurface on Earth and possibly on other planets. However, experiments demonstrated that hydrogen is not produced from basalt at an environmentally relevant, alkaline pH. Small amounts of hydrogen were produced at a lower pH in laboratory incubations, but even this hydrogen production was transitory. Furthermore, geochemical considerations suggest that previously reported rates of hydrogen production cannot be sustained over geologically significant time frames. These findings indicate that hydrogen production from basalt-ground-water interactions may not support microbial metabolism in the subsurface.

  8. Mineralogy of the last lunar basalts: Results from Clementine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staid, M.I.; Pieters, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The last major phase of lunar volcanism produced extensive high-titanium mare deposits on the western nearside which remain unsampled by landing missions. The visible and near-infrared reflectance properties of these basalts are examined using Clementine multispectral images to better constrain their mineralogy. A much stronger 1 ??m ferrous absorption was observed for the western high-titanium basalts than within earlier maria, suggesting that these last major mare eruptions also may have been the most iron-rich. These western basalts also have a distinctly long-wavelength, 1 ??m ferrous absorption which was found to be similar for both surface soils and materials excavated from depth, supporting the interpretation of abundant olivine within these deposits. Spectral variation along flows within the Imbrium basin also suggests variations in ilmenite content along previously mapped lava flows as well as increasing olivine content within subsequent eruptions. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin Cheol; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Moon, Kyung-Man; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    This experiment has examined the corrosion and tribological properties of basalt fiber reinforced composite materials. There were slight changes of weight after the occurring of corrosion based on time and H2SO4 concentration, but in general, the weight increased. It is assumed that this happens due to the basalt fiber precipitate. Prior to the corrosion, friction-wear behavior showed irregular patterns compared to metallic materials, and when it was compared with the behavior after the corrosion, the coefficient of friction was 2 to 3 times greater. The coefficient of friction of all test specimen ranged from 0.1 to 0.2. Such a result has proven that the basalt fiber, similar to the resin rubber, shows regular patterns regardless of time and H2SO4 concentration because of the space made between resins and reinforced materials.

  10. The role of basalt weathering on climate: the Siberian traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grard, A.; François, L.; Dessert, C.; Dupré, B.; Goddéris, Y.

    2003-04-01

    The Siberian traps represent one of the most important flood basalt provinces on Earth. Their onset coincides with a profound faunal mass extinction at the Permo-Trias boundary (250 my ago). The volcanic eruption has also environmental and climatic effects through aerosols and gases injection into the atmosphere. Chemical weathering processes play a major role in biogeochemical cycles and climate evolution. In particular, the weathering of silicate rocks represents an important sink of atmospheric CO_2. At the million-year timescale, the volcanic release of CO_2 into the atmosphere-ocean system is balanced by its consumption during silicate weathering followed by carbonate deposition on the seafloor. Recent data have shown that chemical weathering of basalt is five to ten times more efficient than weathering of acidic silicate rocks such as granite or gneiss (Dessert et al., EPSL, 188 : 459-474, 2001). Thus the weathering of basaltic rocks consumes more atmospheric CO_2 than other silicate rocks. In the case of subaerial basaltic volcanism, an eruption not only releases CO_2 to the atmosphere, but also produces basaltic rocks which weather rapidly, enhancing CO_2 consumption rates. Currently, the Siberian basaltic traps are located in a cold and dry region. The weathering rates of this province are low, and the climatic impact is thus currently low. But in the past, the latitudinal temperature gradient was smaller. During the Permian, the climate was significantly warmer than today. Thus the chemical weathering of the Siberian traps was enhanced at that time, and this process led to a long-term impact on the Triassic climate and on the carbon cycle. The used model calculates the traps impact on the long-term carbon cycle and climate evolution. This model has been refined and adapted to high latitudes environments. We quantify the cooling caused by traps weathering.

  11. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  12. Crustal influence in the generation of continental flood basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Lugmair, G. W.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The suggestion that primordial undifferentiated material may exist in the earth's mantle has recently been revived on the strength of Nd isotope data for two types of young continental rocks - flood basalts and kimberlites. The limited published data show a clustering of Nd isotopic compositions close to those for meteorites with chondritic relative rare-earth (REE) abundance. In contrast, data are presented for samples from the Columbia flood basalt province of the northwestern United States which show large isotopic variability suggestive of mixing processes acting after the separation of the primary magmas from their mantle source.

  13. Petrogenetic modeling of Hawaiian tholeiitic basalts - A geochemical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budahn, J. R.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The abundances of 29 elements in 33 samples of tholeiitic basalts from five volcanoes in Hawaii are determined by neutron-activation analysis; the results are presented in tables and graphs with the data of Murali et al. (1977) for a sixth volcano and characterized in detail; and geochemical partial-melting models are constructed to explain the origin of these basalts. The models proposed are based on olivine crystallization from three distinct source compositions (determined from the REE and Sc partitioning) and correspond to the volcano groups Mauna Kea, Kohala, and Kilauea; Mauna Loa and Lanai; and Koolau.

  14. Near-Primary Oxidized Basalts from the Submarine Vanuatu Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentes, Z.; Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Near-primary melt compositions (i.e., in equilibrium with >Fo89 olivine) are rare in arc systems. Yet, such melts provide essential views of mantle-derived melts, without further modification by fractional crystallization or other crustal processes, and reveal the diversity of melt compositions that exist in the arc mantle wedge. Here, we present new measurements of naturally glassy, near-primary olivine-hosted melt inclusions from one dredge of Evita seamount (SS07/2008 NLD-02) in the southern Vanuatu arc system. Two distinct basalt types were identified in hand sample upon collection, based on contrasting phenocryst assemblage (Type 1: 1% phenocrysts; Type 2: 15% phenocrysts). We selected melt inclusions from each type and determined major elements, S, and Cl by EMP, H2O and CO2 by FTIR, trace elements by LA-ICP-MS, and Fe3+/∑Fe ratios by XANES. Melt inclusions from both lava types show equilibrium with ≥Fo90 olivine, consistent with host olivine compositions, and thus are near-primary melt compositions that have escaped major modification since departing the mantle wedge. Both have similar maximum dissolved H2O (~2.3 wt.%), high Mg# (48-75), and are basalt to basaltic andesite (SiO2 49-55 wt.%). However, the two lava types have very different major and trace element compositions. Inclusions from Type 1 show relatively flat REE patterns and classic negative anomalies in Nb and Ta, and positive anomalies in Pb and Sr typical of normal arc basalts, and have Fe3+/∑Fe ratios similar to global arc basalts (~0.24). In contrast, melt inclusions from Type 2 exhibit steeply sloped REE patterns with strong depletions in the HREE that suggest garnet in the source lithology for these magmas, either in the subducting slab or the mantle wedge. Moreover, the Type 2 inclusions have high La/Yb (29.5-43) and Sr/Y (50-58), which are classically attributed to partial melting of the basaltic slab, although these inclusions are basaltic, not andesitic. Type 2 inclusions also

  15. Seismic wave propagation through an extrusive basalt sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Oliver; Hobbs, Richard; Brown, Richard; Schofield, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Layers of basalt flows within sedimentary successions (e.g. in the Faeroe-Shetland Basin) cause complex scattering and attenuation of seismic waves during seismic exploration surveys. Extrusive basaltic sequences are highly heterogeneous and contain strong impedance contrasts between higher velocity crystalline flow cores (˜6 km s‑1) and the lower velocity fragmented and weathered flow crusts (3-4 km s‑1). Typically, the refracted wave from the basaltic layer is used to build a velocity model by tomography. This velocity model is then used to aid processing of the reflection data where direct determination of velocity is ambiguous, or as a starting point for full waveform inversion, for example. The model may also be used as part of assessing drilling risk of potential wells, as it is believed to constrain the total thickness of the sequence. In heterogeneous media, where the scatter size is of the order of the seismic wavelength or larger, scattering preferentially traps the seismic energy in the low velocity regions. This causes a build-up of energy that is guided along the low velocity layers. This has implications for the interpretation of the observed first arrival of the seismic wave, which may be a biased towards the low velocity regions. This will then lead to an underestimate of the velocity structure and hence the thickness of the basalt, with implications for the drilling of wells hoping to penetrate through the base of the basalts in search of hydrocarbons. Using 2-D acoustic finite difference modelling of the guided wave through a simple layered basalt sequence, we consider the relative importance of different parameters of the basalt on the seismic energy propagating through the layers. These include the proportion of high to low velocity material, the number of layers, their thickness and the roughness of the interfaces between the layers. We observe a non-linear relationship between the ratio of high to low velocity layers and the apparent

  16. Distribution and stratigraphy of basaltic units in Maria Tranquillitatis and Fecunditatis: A Clementine perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajmon, D.; Spudis, P.

    2004-01-01

    Maria Tranquillitatis and Fecunditatis have been mapped based on Clementine image mosaics and derived iron and titanium maps. Impact craters served as stratigraphic probes enabling better delineation of compositionally different basaltic units, determining the distribution of subsurface basalts, and providing estimates of total basalt thickness and the thickness of the surface units. Collected data indicate that volcanism in these maria started with the eruption of low-Ti basalts and evolved toward medium- and high-Ti basalts. Some of the high-Ti basalts in Mare Tranquillitatis began erupting early and were contemporaneous with the low- and medium-Ti basalts; these units form the oldest units exposed on the mare surface. Mare Tranquillitatis is mostly covered with high- Ti basalts. In Mare Fecunditatis, the volume of erupting basalts clearly decreased as the Ti content increased, and the high-Ti basalts occur as a few patches on the mare surface. The basalt in both maria is on the order of several hundred meters thick and locally may be as thick as 1600 m. The new basalt thickness estimates generally fall within the range set by earlier studies, although locally differ. The medium- to high-Ti basalts exposed at the surfaces of both maria are meters to tens of meters thick.

  17. Earliest Silicic Volcanism Associated with Mid-Miocene Flood Basalts: Tuffs Interbedded with Steens Basalt, Nevada and Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, M.; Mahood, G. A.; Benson, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    During the main phase of Steens and Columbia River flood basalt eruptions between ~16.7 and 15.0 Ma, spatially associated silicic volcanism was widespread, ~4,000 km3 of silicic magma erupting at calderas and smaller centers dispersed across ~25,000 km2 in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada (Coble and Mahood, 2012). The oldest flood basalts erupted from a focus at Steens Mountain in eastern Oregon, where the section of lavas is ~1 km thick. The Steens Basalt thins southward to only a few flows thick in northern Nevada, either because fewer flows were emplaced this far from the focus or because fewer dikes propagated to the surface on encountering thicker continental crust and/or were intercepted by growing bodies of silicic magma that ultimately erupted in McDermitt Caldera Field (Rytuba and McKee, 1984), High Rock Caldera Complex, and the Lone Mountain/Hawks Valley center (Wypych et al., 2011). Rhyolitic tuffs have not been recognized interbedded with the basalt lavas in the type section, but we have identified several silicic tuffs interbedded with Steens Basalt in the southern Pueblo Mountains and in the Trout Creek Mountains. Although noted by previous workers (e.g., Avent, 1965; Minor, 1986; Hart et al., 1989), they have not been studied. We identified six tuffaceous intervals 20 cm to 15 m thick in the escarpment of the southern Pueblo Mountains near the Oregon-Nevada border where the Steens basalt section is ~250 m thick, with the base unexposed. Two intervals are lithic-rich, reworked volcaniclastic sediments, but four are primary or only slightly reworked sequences of fall deposits that range from fine ash to lapilli in grain size. The heat and weight of the overlying basaltic lava flows has fused the tuffs so that the upper parts of thicker tuffaceous intervals and entire thinner ones are converted to vitrophyres, with crystals of alkali feldspar × quartz × biotite typically 1-2 mm in diameter set in a dense, black, variably hydrated, glassy matrix. We

  18. Basaltic Volcanism of the Snake River Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Hanan, B. B.; Vetter, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Yellowstone-Snake River Plain (YSRP) volcanic province is the world's best modern example of a time-transgressive hotspot track beneath continental crust. Tomographic images document a thermal anomaly which pierces the Farallon plate at depth and appears to extend to depths of over 1000 km. Many investigators attribute this anomaly to a deep mantle plume, while others recognize the sheet-like aspect of the velocity anomaly and attribute it to lower mantle flow around a fragmented remnant of the Farallon plate. Tholeiitic basalts of the SRP have major element compositions similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), with higher FeO, TiO2, P2O5 and K2O than mid-ocean ridge basalts over a similar range in MgO. Their trace element concentrations also mimic OIB tholeiites, with moderately enriched LREE/HREE ratios, OIB-like HFSE ratios and Nb-Y-Zr systematics. Most SRP basalts show little evidence of crustal assimilation: oxygen isotope compositions are mantle-like, K2O is low and does not increase relative to other incompatible elements during fractionation (e.g., P2O5), and silica contents are consistently low. In contrast, evidence suggests that these basalts evolve primarily through fractional crystallization in relatively shallow magma chambers with episodic magma recharge. Trace element concentration patterns are nearly identical to OIB tholeiites, with somewhat lower slopes on multi-element variations diagrams, consistent with 7-12% partial melting of spinel-facies peridotite (9-18 kb, 40-65 km) with a composition similar to the source of OIB or EMORB. Models show that depleted MORB asthenosphere or primitive mantle peridotite composition sources cannot yield SRP tholeiites, even with residual garnet in the source region to raise LREE/HREE ratios in the melt. There is no indication of residual garnet in the source - which requires that either the lithosphere was relatively thin during formation of the SRP, or that the melts originated within the lithosphere itself

  19. Form and composition of secondary mineralization in fractures in Columbia River basalts

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, J.P.; Rawson, S.A.; Horton, D.G.

    1986-05-01

    Examination of basalt alteration rinds suggests that pyroxene is altered, along with mesostasis, from the inception of hydrothermal alteration along cooling fractures in Columbia River basalts. The only phyllosilicate secondary mineral in fractures is trioctahedral smectite of Fe-saponite composition, throughout the examined thickness of the basalt column. This smectite is compositionally distinct from the minor amounts of mesostasis smectite found in otherwise unaltered outcrop samples of basalt.

  20. 69. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock Co. Inc., Shipbuilding Division, Napa, California. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-4000-2 (right side), dated July 1943. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 68. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Photocopy of General Arrangement of Engine Room. Basalt Rock Co. Inc., Shipbuilding Division, Napa, California. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-4000-2 (left side), dated July 1943. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

    1982-05-01

    The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

  3. Assesment of Alkali Resistance of Basalt Used as Concrete Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    al-Swaidani, Aref M.; Baddoura, Mohammad K.; Aliyan, Samira D.; Choeb, Walid

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to report a part of an ongoing research on the influence of using crushed basalt as aggregates on one of durability-related properties of concrete (i.e. alkali-silica reaction which is the most common form of Alkali-Aggregate Reaction). Alkali resistance has been assessed through several methods specified in the American Standards. Results of petrographic examination, chemical test (ASTM C289) and accelerated mortar bar test (ASTM C1260) have particularly been reported. In addition, the weight change and compressive strength of 28 days cured concrete containing basaltic aggregates were also reported after 90 days of exposure to 10% NaOH solution. Dolomite aggregate were used in the latter test for comparison. The experimental results revealed that basaltic rocks quarried from As-Swaida'a region were suitable for production of aggregates for concrete. According to the test results, the studied basalt aggregates can be classified as innocuous with regard to alkali-silica reaction. Further, the 10% sodium hydroxide attack did not affect the compressive strength of concrete.

  4. Automated identification of basalt spectra in Clementine lunar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, I.; Osinski, G. R.

    2011-06-01

    The identification of fresh basalt spectra plays an important role in lunar stratigraphic studies; however, the process can be time consuming and labor intensive. Thus motivated, we developed an empirically derived algorithm for the automated identification of fresh basalt spectra from Clememtine UVVIS data. This algorithm has the following four parameters and limits: BC Ratio=3(R950-R900)/(R900-R750)<1.1, CD Delta=(R1000-R950)/R750-1.09(R950-R900)/R750>0.003 and <0.06, B Slope=(R900-R750)/(3R750)<-0.012, and Band Depth=(R750-R950)/(R750-R415)>0.1, where R750 represents the unnormalized reflectance of the 750 nm Clementine band, and so on. Algorithm results were found to be accurate to within an error of 4.5% with respect to visual classification, though olivine spectra may be under-represented. Overall, fresh basalts identified by the algorithm are consistent with expectations and previous work in the Mare Humorum area, though accuracy in other areas has not yet been tested. Great potential exists in using this algorithm for identifying craters that have excavated basalts, estimating the thickness of mare and cryptomare deposits, and other applications.

  5. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  6. [The dust factor in the manufacture of basalt fibers].

    PubMed

    Gorban', L N; Riazanov, A V; Voloboeva, A A; Rybak, E A

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the labour conditions of those workers engaged in the production of basalt fibre (BF). Morphological makeup is examined as is dispersity and cytotoxicity of the dust produced in the process of BF making. An issue is addressed of usefulness of setting special hygienic regulations for BF dust. PMID:9035895

  7. Swale built up of drylaid basaltic rock along the Route ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Swale built up of dry-laid basaltic rock along the Route 66 section. Sandia Peak in distance, facing south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  8. The Nature of Mare Basalts in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Gillis, Jeffrey J.; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2000-01-01

    Unlike Apollo 12 and 15 basalts, many mare lavas of the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) have Th concentrations of 2.5-6 ppm and perhaps greater, as well as high TiO2. Lunar "picritic" volcanic glasses from the PKT have a similar range.

  9. Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. 500 ft long retaining wall at left, scale figure in distance, view south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  10. Notice of Release of NBR-1 Germplasm Basalt Milkvetch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basalt milkvetch or threadstalk milkvetch (Astragalus filipes Torr. ex A. Gray) is a perennial legume that is widely distributed on rangelands in western North America and holds promise for rangeland revegetation and restoration programs. No germplasms or cultivars are commercially available for ba...

  11. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show that mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage capacity

  12. Injection and Monitoring at the Wallula Basalt Pilot Project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McGrail, B. Peter; Spane, Frank A.; Amonette, James E.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Continental flood basalts represent one of the largest geologic structures on earth but have received comparatively little attention for geologic storage of CO2. Flood basalt lava flows have flow tops that are porous, permeable, and have large potential capacity for storage of CO2. In appropriate geologic settings, interbedded sediment layers and dense low-permeability basalt rock flow interior sections may act as effective seals allowing time for mineralization reactions to occur. Previous laboratory experiments showed the relatively rapid chemical reaction of CO2-saturated pore water with basalts to form stable carbonate minerals. However, recent laboratory tests with water-saturated supercritical CO2 show thatmore » mineralization reactions occur in this phase as well, providing a second and potentially more important mineralization pathway than was previously understood. Field testing of these concepts is proceeding with drilling of the world’s first supercritical CO2 injection well in flood basalt being completed in May 2009 near the township of Wallula in Washington State and corresponding CO2 injection permit granted by the State of Washington in March 2011. Injection of a nominal 1000 MT of CO2 was completed in August 2013 and site monitoring is in progress. Well logging conducted immediately after injection termination confirmed the presence of CO2 predominantly within the upper flow top region, and showed no evidence of vertical CO2 migration outside the well casing. Shallow soil gas samples collected around the injection well show no evidence of leakage and fluid and gas samples collected from the injection zone show strongly elevated concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mn, and Fe and 13C/18O isotopic shifts that are consistent with basalt-water chemical reactions. If proven viable by this field test and others that are in progress or being planned, major flood basalts in the U.S., India, and perhaps Australia would provide significant additional CO2 storage

  13. Pyroxenes as recorders of lunar basalt petrogenesis - Chemical trends due to crystal-liquid interaction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bence, A. E.; Papike, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the crystallization histories suggested by the chemical, crystallographic, morphological, and paragenetic relationships observed in pyroxenes from basalts collected on the Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, and Luna 16 missions. Although the final stages of lunar basalt crystallization appear to be rapid near-surface events, the initial stages are shown to vary considerably among the different basalt types.

  14. Th-230 - U-238 series disequilibrium of the Olkaria basalts Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, S.; Macdonald, R.; Kelly, M.

    1993-01-01

    U-Th disequilibrium analyses of the Naivasha basalts show a very small (U-238/Th-230) ratios which are lower than any previously analyzed basalts. The broadly positive internal isochron trend from one sample indicates that the basalts may have source heterogeneities, this is supported by earlier work. The Naivasha complex comprises a bimodal suite of basalts and rhyolites. The basalts are divided into two stratigraphic groups each of a transitional nature. The early basalt series (EBS) which were erupted prior to the Group 1 comendites and, the late basalt series (LBS) which erupted temporally between the Broad Acres and the Ololbutot centers. The basalts represent a very small percentage of the overall eruptive volume of material at Naivasha (less than 2 percent). The analyzed samples come from four stratigraphic units in close proximity around Ndabibi, Hell's Gate and Akira areas. The earliest units occur as vesicular flows from the Ndabibi plain. These basalts are olivine-plagioclase phyric with the associated hawaiites being sparsely plagioclase phyric. An absolute age of 0.5Ma was estimated for these basalts. The next youngest basalts flows occur as younger tuft cones in the Ndabibi area and are mainly olivine-plagioclase-clinopyroxcene phyric with one purely plagioclase phyric sample. The final phase of activity at Ndabibi resulted in much younger tuft cones consisting of air fall ashes and lapilli tufts. Many of these contain resorbed plagioclase phenocrysts with sample number 120c also being clinopyroxene phyric. The isotopic evidence for the basalt formation is summarized.

  15. ALS-like skin changes in mice on a chronic low-Ca/Mg high-Al diet.

    PubMed

    Kihira, Tameko; Yoshida, Sohei; Kondo, Tomoyoshi; Yase, Yoshiro; Ono, Seiitsu

    2004-04-15

    Epidemiologic studies of endemic foci of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have shown low concentrations of Ca/Mg and high concentrations of Al/Mn in the drinking water and garden soil, which may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of endemic ALS. We studied the effects of chronic exposure to a low-Ca/Mg high-Al maltol diet on the skin of experimental animals. In ALS patients, atrophy of the epidermis, edematous changes with separated collagen fibrils and an accumulation of amorphous materials between collagen bundles were regarded as pathognomonic skin changes of ALS. Mice chronically fed a low-Ca/Mg high-Al maltol diet showed neuronal degeneration and loss in the spinal cords and cerebral cortices, as well as skin changes including atrophy, separation of collagen fibrils and accumulation of amorphous materials, similar to the skin changes characteristic of ALS. This is the first report of skin changes in animal models similar to those of ALS. We speculate that environmental factors such as chronic low-Ca/Mg high-Al condition play some causative role in the pathogenesis of Kii-ALS. PMID:15050431

  16. Carbon fixation by basalt-hosted microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Beth N.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Delaney, Jennifer; Lee, Raymond W.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic crust is a massive potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet our understanding of this ecosystem is limited due to difficulty in access. In particular, measurements of rates of microbial activity are sparse. We used stable carbon isotope incubations of crustal samples, coupled with functional gene analyses, to examine the potential for carbon fixation on oceanic crust. Both seafloor-exposed and subseafloor basalts were recovered from different mid-ocean ridge and hot spot environments (i.e., the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Loihi Seamount) and incubated with 13C-labeled bicarbonate. Seafloor-exposed basalts revealed incorporation of 13C-label into organic matter over time, though the degree of incorporation was heterogeneous. The incorporation of 13C into biomass was inconclusive in subseafloor basalts. Translating these measurements into potential rates of carbon fixation indicated that 0.1–10 nmol C g-1rock d-1 could be fixed by seafloor-exposed rocks. When scaled to the global production of oceanic crust, this suggests carbon fixation rates of 109–1012 g C year-1, which matches earlier predictions based on thermodynamic calculations. Functional gene analyses indicate that the Calvin cycle is likely the dominant biochemical mechanism for carbon fixation in basalt-hosted biofilms, although the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and reverse TCA cycle likely play some role in net carbon fixation. These results provide empirical evidence for autotrophy in oceanic crust, suggesting that basalt-hosted autotrophy could be a significant contributor of organic matter in this remote and vast environment. PMID:26441854

  17. Carbon fixation by basalt-hosted microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Beth N; Sylvan, Jason B; Rogers, Daniel R; Delaney, Jennifer; Lee, Raymond W; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic crust is a massive potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet our understanding of this ecosystem is limited due to difficulty in access. In particular, measurements of rates of microbial activity are sparse. We used stable carbon isotope incubations of crustal samples, coupled with functional gene analyses, to examine the potential for carbon fixation on oceanic crust. Both seafloor-exposed and subseafloor basalts were recovered from different mid-ocean ridge and hot spot environments (i.e., the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Loihi Seamount) and incubated with (13)C-labeled bicarbonate. Seafloor-exposed basalts revealed incorporation of (13)C-label into organic matter over time, though the degree of incorporation was heterogeneous. The incorporation of (13)C into biomass was inconclusive in subseafloor basalts. Translating these measurements into potential rates of carbon fixation indicated that 0.1-10 nmol C g(-1) rock d(-1) could be fixed by seafloor-exposed rocks. When scaled to the global production of oceanic crust, this suggests carbon fixation rates of 10(9)-10(12) g C year(-1), which matches earlier predictions based on thermodynamic calculations. Functional gene analyses indicate that the Calvin cycle is likely the dominant biochemical mechanism for carbon fixation in basalt-hosted biofilms, although the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway and reverse TCA cycle likely play some role in net carbon fixation. These results provide empirical evidence for autotrophy in oceanic crust, suggesting that basalt-hosted autotrophy could be a significant contributor of organic matter in this remote and vast environment. PMID:26441854

  18. Eruption and emplacement of flood basalt. An example from the large-volume Teepee Butte Member, Columbia River Basalt Group

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P. ); Tolan, T.L. )

    1992-12-01

    Flows of the Teepee Butte Member, Grande Ronde Basalt, issued from a vent system in southeastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho. Three distinct basalt flows were erupted: the Limekiln Rapids flow, the Joseph Creek flow, and the Pruitt Draw flow. Together these mappable flows cover more than 52,000 km[sup 2] and have a volume exceeding 5,000 km[sup 3]. A portion of the vent system for the Joseph Creek flow is exposed in cross section in Joseph Canyon, Washington; it is one of the best preserved Columbia River Basalt Group vent complexes known. The vent complex is about 1 km in cross section, 30 m high, and composed of deposits characteristic of Hawaiian-type volcanism. The vent is asymmetrical; the eastern rampart consists of intercalated pyroclastic deposits and thin pahoehoe flows; the western rampart is composed wholly of pahoehoe flows. Flows of the Teepee Butte Member are compositionally homogeneous and were emplaced as sheet flows, each having several local flow units. Our study supports the importance of linear vent systems and the westward Palouse Slope, along with the large-volume lava flows, in controlling the distribution of Columbia River Basalt Group flows. Other factors, including the number of active fissure segments and topography, modified the shape of the flows and the number of flow units. 45 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Phase relations of a simulated lunar basalt as a function of oxygen fugacity, and their bearing on the petrogenesis of the Apollo 11 basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuthill, R.L.; Sato, M.

    1970-01-01

    A glass of Apollo 11 basalt composition crystallizing at 1 atm at low f{hook}02 showed the following crystallization sequence; ferropseudobrookite at 1210??C, olivine at 1200??C, ilmenite and plagioclase at 1140??C, clinopyroxene at 1113??C. Ferropseudobrookite and olivine have a reaction relation to the melt. This sequence agrees with that assumed on textural grounds for some Apollo 11 basalts. It also indicates that the Apollo 11 basalts cannot have been modified by low-pressure fractionation. ?? 1970.

  20. Architecture and emplacement of flood basalt flow fields: case studies from the Columbia River Basalt Group, NW USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vye-Brown, C.; Self, S.; Barry, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    The physical features and morphologies of collections of lava bodies emplaced during single eruptions (known as flow fields) can be used to understand flood basalt emplacement mechanisms. Characteristics and internal features of lava lobes and whole flow field morphologies result from the forward propagation, radial spread, and cooling of individual lobes and are used as a tool to understand the architecture of extensive flood basalt lavas. The features of three flood basalt flow fields from the Columbia River Basalt Group are presented, including the Palouse Falls flow field, a small (8,890 km2, ˜190 km3) unit by common flood basalt proportions, and visualized in three dimensions. The architecture of the Palouse Falls flow field is compared to the complex Ginkgo and more extensive Sand Hollow flow fields to investigate the degree to which simple emplacement models represent the style, as well as the spatial and temporal developments, of flow fields. Evidence from each flow field supports emplacement by inflation as the predominant mechanism producing thick lobes. Inflation enables existing lobes to transmit lava to form new lobes, thus extending the advance and spread of lava flow fields. Minimum emplacement timescales calculated for each flow field are 19.3 years for Palouse Falls, 8.3 years for Ginkgo, and 16.9 years for Sand Hollow. Simple flow fields can be traced from vent to distal areas and an emplacement sequence visualized, but those with multiple-layered lobes present a degree of complexity that make lava pathways and emplacement sequences more difficult to identify.

  1. Overview of the precursors and dynamics of the 2012-13 basaltic fissure eruption of Tolbachik Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Belousova, Marina; Edwards, Benjamin; Volynets, Anna; Melnikov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    We present a broad overview of the 2012-13 flank fissure eruption of Plosky Tolbachik Volcano in the central Kamchatka Peninsula. The eruption lasted more than nine months and produced approximately 0.55 km3 DRE (volume recalculated to a density of 2.8 g/cm3) of basaltic trachyandesite magma. The 2012-13 eruption of Tolbachik is one of the most voluminous historical eruptions of mafic magma at subduction related volcanoes globally, and it is the second largest at Kamchatka. The eruption was preceded by five months of elevated seismicity and ground inflation, both of which peaked a day before the eruption commenced on 27 November 2012. The batch of high-Al magma ascended from depths of 5-10 km; its apical part contained 54-55 wt.% SiO2, and the main body 52-53 wt.% SiO2. The eruption started by the opening of a 6 km-long radial fissure on the southwestern slope of the volcano that fed multi-vent phreatomagmatic and magmatic explosive activity, as well as intensive effusion of lava with an initial discharge of > 440 m3/s. After 10 days the eruption continued only at the lower part of the fissure, where explosive and effusive activity of Hawaiian-Strombolian type occurred from a lava pond in the crater of the main growing scoria cone. The discharge rate for the nine month long, effusion-dominated eruption gradually declined from 140 to 18 m3/s and formed a compound lava field with a total area of ~ 36 km2; the effusive activity evolved from high-discharge channel-fed 'a'a lavas to dominantly low-discharge tube-fed pahoehoe lavas. On 23 August, the effusion of lava ceased and the intra-crater lava pond drained. Weak Strombolian-type explosions continued for several more days on the crater bottom until the end of the eruption around 5 September 2013. Based on a broad array of new data collected during this eruption, we develop a model for the magma storage and transport system of Plosky Tolbachik that links the storage zones of the two main genetically related magma

  2. Magnetic Excursion Recorded in Basalt at Newberry Volcano, Central Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, D. E.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Lanphere, M. A.; Ramsey, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Paleomagnetic study of basalt flows on the north flank of Newberry Volcano has identified a major eruptive episode that occurred during a magnetic excursion. The measured direction of the basalt flows erupted during the excursion shallows from 81° to 76° inclination along a declination of ˜ 155° . The Virtual Geomagnetic Pole also shallows from 29° to 19° paleolatitude, along a paleolongitude of ˜ 250° , and is located off the west coast of Mexico. Geologic evidence combined with limited argon dating indicate that the basalt erupted from multiple sites about 80,000 years ago, probably during the time of anomalous magnetic directions recorded by ( ˜80 ka) ocean sediments in the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic. The westernmost flows erupted from spatter vents located a few km south of the city of Bend, and flowed north through lava tube(s) which form Stevens Cave, Horse Cave, and Redmond Cave among others. This western lobe flowed more than 50 km to the north, over NW-trending faults of the Tumalo Fault Zone that cut the adjacent and underlying basalt of Bend (40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 78±9 ka; isochron age of 77±19 ka); it is overlain by the basaltic andesite of Klawhop Butte (40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 39±6 ka). One sample of the transitional magnetic direction basalt has a K-Ar age of 77±40 ka; another sample has a 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 92±25 ka and an isochron age of 73±24 ka. The eastern lobe erupted from vents at and near Lava Top Butte, located approximately 15 km SE of the western vents. These eastern lavas flowed through Arnold Cave and formed a broad ~10-12 km rootless shield known as the Badlands, the NE extent of which is about 30 km from Lava Top Butte. The west and east lobes each cover about 150 km2, and comprise an estimated volume of 3-5 km3. Newly acquired 10-meter DEM's and compilation of the mapping in ArcGIS will allow more precise calculation of the total area covered and the volume erupted. Chemical analyses of multiple

  3. Whole rock major element chemistry of KREEP basalt clasts in lunar breccia 15205: Implications for the petrogenesis of volcanic KREEP basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Scott K.; Shervais, John W.

    1993-01-01

    KREEP basalts are a major component of soils and regolith at the Apollo 15 site. Their origin is controversial: both endogenous (volcanic) and exogenous (impact melt) processes have been proposed, but it is now generally agreed that KREEP basalts are volcanic rocks derived from the nearby Apennine Bench formation. Because most pristine KREEP basalts are found only as small clasts in polymict lunar breccias, reliable chemical data are scarce. The primary aim of this study is to characterize the range in chemical composition of pristine KREEP basalt, and to use these data to decipher the petrogenesis of these unique volcanic rocks.

  4. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Basaltic Plagioclase from Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Major, minor and trace element analysis of silicates has allowed for the study of planetary basalts in a comparative planetary mineralogy context. We continue this initiative by exploring the chemistry of plagioclase feldspar in basalts from the Earth, Moon, Mars and 4 Vesta. This paper presents new data on plagioclase from six terrestrial basalt suites including Keweenawan, Island Arc, Hawaiian, Columbia Plateau, Taos Plateau, and Ocean Floor; six lunar basalt suites including Apollo 11 Low K, Apollo 12 Ilmenite, Apollo 12 Olivine, Apollo 12 Pigeonite, Apollo 15 Olivine, and Apollo 15 Pigeonite; two basaltic martian meteorites, Shergotty and QUE 94201; and one unequilibrated eucrite, Pasamonte.

  5. New Field, Geochronological, and Geochemical Data on the Miocene Lovejoy Basalt and its Source, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, N. J.; Busby, C. B.; Gans, P. B.; Wagner, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    The Lovejoy Basalt is a distinctive, aphanitic olivine basalt that flowed through a paleovalley across the northern end of the Sierra Nevada from the Diamond Mountains near Honey Lake to the Sacramento Valley in northern California. Approximately 150 km3 of basalt was erupted in a tectonic setting transitional between subduction, Basin and Range extension, and hot spot volcanism, but the eruptive source and timing of the Lovejoy Basalt have remained controversial. Recent field mapping and geochemical analyses suggest that Thompson Peak, located south of Susanville, California, is the source vent for the Lovejoy Basalt. At Thompson Peak, Lovejoy Basalt forms an elongate, NNW-SSE trending ridge that is capped in its central section by the Basalt of Thompson Peak. Scoria deposits, volcanic bombs, agglutinate and other near vent deposits indicate Thompson Peak as the source for the Lovejoy Basalt. Previous and new mapping indicate that the basalt was channelized within granitic basement, and flowed south from the vent 30 km to Red Clover Creek before bending to the southwest and flowing 65 km to the Sacramento Valley. The Lovejoy Basalt consists of up to 13 flows, all aphyric except for an uppermost plagioclase-phyric flow present between Thompson Peak and Red Clover Creek that locally contains xenocrysts of olivine and garnet. At Table Mountain, the basalt appears to have ponded or inflated, forming very thick flows with prominent N-S trending pressure ridges. The Lovejoy Basalt is a quartz-normative tholeiite that is geochemically similar to the Columbia River Basalt. While a conclusive statement cannot yet be made about the source magma for the Lovejoy Basalt, initial analyses show that it does not appear to be related to the main phase of Cascade arc volcanism, which is predominantly calc-alkaline. Recently published age data for the Lovejoy Basalt suggests that it is coeval with the main phase of the Columbia River Basalt Group; however, our further attempts to

  6. Neodymium isotopes in flood basalts from the Siberian Platform and inferences about their mantle sources

    PubMed Central

    DePaolo, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The initial isotopic compositions of Nd and Sr in basalts from the Central Siberian Plateau and other major continental flood basalts are reported. The continental flood basalts appear to be the product of partial melting of mantle sources that consist of relatively primitive undifferentiated material and are clearly distinct from midocean ridge basalts, which sample mantle reservoirs that have been modified by extraction of continental crust earlier in earth history. These observations provide fundamental constraints on models of mantle structure and dynamics. Isotopic effects of crustal contamination are clearly recognizable in some continental flood basalts, but these effects can be distinguished from isotopic patterns inherited from the mantle magma sources. PMID:16592671

  7. Similarities in basalt and rhyolite lava flow emplacement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnall, Nathan; James, Mike; Tuffen, Hugh; Vye-Brown, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Here we use field observations of rhyolite and basalt lava flows to show similarities in flow processes that span compositionally diverse lava flows. The eruption, and subsequent emplacement, of rhyolite lava flows is currently poorly understood due to the infrequency with which rhyolite eruptions occur. In contrast, the emplacement of basaltic lava flows are much better understood due to very frequent eruptions at locations such as Mt Etna and Hawaii. The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle in Chile enabled the first scientific observations of the emplacement of an extensive rhyolite lava flow. The 30 to 100 m thick flow infilled a topographic depression with a negligible slope angle (0 - 7°). The flow split into two main channels; the southern flow advanced 4 km while the northern flow advanced 3 km before stalling. Once the flow stalled the channels inflated and secondary flows or breakouts formed from the flow front and margins. This cooling rather than volume-limited flow behaviour is common in basaltic lava flows but had never been observed in rhyolite lava flows. We draw on fieldwork conducted at Cordón Caulle and at Mt Etna to compare the emplacement of rhyolite and basaltic flows. The fieldwork identified emplacement features that are present in both lavas, such as inflation, breakouts from the flow font and margins, and squeeze-ups on the flow surfaces. In the case of Cordón Caulle, upon extrusion of a breakout it inflates due to a combination of continued lava supply and vesicle growth. This growth leads to fracturing and breakup of the breakout surface, and in some cases a large central fracture tens of metres deep forms. In contrast, breakouts from basaltic lava flows have a greater range of morphologies depending on the properties of the material in the flows core. In the case of Mt Etna, a range of breakout morphologies are observed including: toothpaste breakouts, flows topped with bladed lava as well as breakouts of pahoehoe or a'a lava. This

  8. Investigation on mechanical properties of basalt composite fabrics (experiment study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Mazraehshahi, H.; Zamani, H.

    2010-06-01

    To fully appreciate the role and application of composite materials to structures, correct understanding of mechanical behaviors required for selection of optimum material. Fabric reinforced composites are composed of a matrix that is reinforced with pliable fabric, glass fabric is most popular reinforcement for different application specially in aircraft structure, although other fabric material are also used. At this study new fabric material called basalt with epoxy resin introduced and mechanical behaviors of this material investigated from view point of testing. For this study two type of fabric with different thickness used. Comparison between this composite reinforcement with popular reinforcement as carbon, glass, kevlar performed. To determine mechanical properties of epoxy based basalt fabric following test procedure performed : 1). Tensile testing according to ASTM D3039 in 0° and 90° direction to find ultimate strength in tension and shear, modulus of elasticity, elangation and ultimate strain. 2). Compression testing according to EN 2850 ultimate compression strength and maximum deformation under compression loading. 3). Shear testing according to ASTM D3518-94 to find in plane shear response of polymer matrix composites materials. 4). Predict flexural properties of sandwich construction which manufactured from basalt facing with PVC foam core according to ASTM C393-94. Material strength properties must be based on enough tests of material to meet the test procedure specifications [1]. For this reason six specimens were manufactured for testing and the tests were performed on them using an INSTRON machine model 5582. In the study, the effect of percent of resin in basalt reinforced composite was investigated. Also the weights of the ballast based composites with different percent of resin were measured with conventional composites. As the weight is an important parameter in aerospace industry when the designer wants to replace one material with

  9. Aqueous Alteration of Basalts: Earth, Moon, and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.

    2007-01-01

    The geologic processes responsible for aqueous alteration of basaltic materials on Mars are modeled beginning with our knowledge of analog processes on Earth, i.e., characterization of elemental and mineralogical compositions of terrestrial environments where the alteration and weathering pathways related to aqueous activity are better understood. A key ingredient to successful modeling of aqueous processes on Mars is identification of phases that have formed by those processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe what is known about the elemental and mineralogical composition of aqueous alteration products of basaltic materials on Mars and their implications for specific aqueous environments based upon our knowledge of terrestrial systems. Although aqueous alteration has not occurred on the Moon, it is crucial to understand the behaviors of basaltic materials exposed to aqueous environments in support of human exploration to the Moon over the next two decades. Several methods or indices have been used to evaluate the extent of basalt alteration/weathering based upon measurements made at Mars by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Moessbauer and Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers. The Mineralogical Alteration Index (MAI) is based upon the percentage of total Fe (Fe(sub T)) present as Fe(3+) in alteration products (Morris et al., 2006). A second method is the evaluation of compositional trends to determine the extent to which elements have been removed from the host rock and the likely formation of secondary phases (Nesbitt and Young, 1992; Ming et al., 2007). Most of the basalts that have been altered by aqueous processes at the two MER landing sites in Gusev crater and on Meridiani Planum have not undergone extensive leaching in an open hydrolytic system with the exception of an outcrop in the Columbia Hills. The extent of aqueous alteration however ranges from relatively unaltered to pervasively altered materials. Several experimental studies have focused upon

  10. Mare basalts on the Apennine Front and the mare stratigraphy of the Apollo 15 landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1989-01-01

    Olivine-normative mare basalts are present on the Apennine Front as crystalline particles and shocked or shock-melted fragments. Picritic basalts, which may be related to the olivine-normative basalts by olivine accumulation, not only occur on the Front but such samples so far recognized are confined to it. Mare volcanic and impact glasses also occur on the Front; all are olivine-normative, though none are quite the equivalent of the typical olivine-normative mare group. The quartz-normative mare basalts are not present (or are extremely rare) on the Front either as crystalline basalts or shocked or glass equivalents. These observations are consistent with the olivine-normative mare basalts being both local and the youngest flows at the site, and the fragments being emplaced on the Front by impacts. The picritic basalts raise the distinct possibility that the olivine-normative basalts also ponded on the Front. An influx of olivine-normative basalts from exotic sources (e.g., a ray from Aristillus) is inconsistent with their abundance, their dominance in the mare soil chemistry, and their age, isotopic, and trace element similarities with the quartz-normative basalts. However, the thermal histories of the olivine-normative basalts require elucidation.

  11. Very low Ti /VLT/ basalts - A new mare rock type from the Apollo 17 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Phaneritic fragments, vitrophyres, and glass beads of a new very low Ti (VLT) mare basalt are found in the Apollo 17 drill core. VLT lithic fragments are characterized by TiO2 content of approximately 0.5%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) of approximately 0.52, CaO/Al2O3 of approximately 0.9, and low alkali content. Although mineral systematics and modal composition of VLT basalt are similar to Apollo 12 and 15 low Ti basalts, VLT basalts cannot be related to these mare basalts by crystal fractionation. Since VLT basalt is isochemical with some of the less mafic green glasses, fractionation of VLT magma from a liquid of green-glass composition is a possibility. Spectral reflectance studies suggest that VLT-type basalts may be relatively common in mare basins.

  12. Subduction of hydrated basalt of the oceanic crust: Implications for recycling of water into the upper mantle and continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Subduction zones are presently the dominant sites on Earth for recycling and mass transfer between the crust and mantle; they feed hydrated basaltic oceanic crust into the upper mantle, where dehydration reactions release aqueous fluids and/or hydrous melts. The loci for fluid and/or melt generation will be determined by the intersection of dehydration reaction boundaries of primary hydrous minerals within the subducted lithosphere with slab geotherms. For metabasalt of the oceanic crust, amphibole is the dominant hydrous mineral. The dehydration melting solidus, vapor-absent melting phase relationships; and amphibole-out phase boundary for a number of natural metabasalts have been determined experimentally, and the pressure-temperature conditions of each of these appear to be dependent on bulk composition. Whether or not the dehydration of amphibole is a fluid-generating or partial melting reaction depends on a number of factors specific to a given subduction zone, such as age and thickness of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, the rate of convergence, and the maturity of the subduction zone. In general, subduction of young, hot oceanic lithosphere will result in partial melting of metabasalt of the oceanic crust within the garnet stability field; these melts are characteristically high-Al2O3 trondhjemites, tonalites and dacites. The presence of residual garnet during partial melting imparts a distinctive trace element signature (e.g., high La/Yb, high Sr/Y and Cr/Y combined with low Cr and Y contents relative to demonstrably mantle-derived arc magmas). Water in eclogitized, subducted basalt of the oceanic crust is therefore strongly partitioned into melts generated below about 3.5 GPa in 'hot' subduction zones. Although phase equilibria experiments relevant to 'cold' subduction of hydrated natural basalts are underway in a number of high-pressure laboratories, little is known with respect to the stability of more exotic hydrous minerals (e.g., ellenbergite) and

  13. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  14. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit rover in Gusev crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N.A.; Christensen, P.R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Des Marias, D.J.; Farmer, J.D.; Gellert, Ralf; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.; Milam, K.A.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Rieder, R.; Ruff, S.W.; De Souza, P.A., Jr.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.; Wang, A.; Wyatt, M.B.; Yen, A.; Zipfel, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain ???25% megacrysts. Chemical analyses of rocks by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer are consistent with picritic basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mo??ssbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  15. Mars weathering analogs - Secondary mineralization in Antarctic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkley, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Alkalic basalt samples from Ross Island, Antarctica, are evaluated as terrestrial analogs to weathered surface materials on Mars. Secondary alteration in the rocks is limited to pneumatolytic oxidation of igneous minerals and glass, rare groundmass clay and zeolite mineralization, and hydrothermal minerals coating fractures and vesicle surfaces. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages consist mainly of K-feldspar, zeolites (phillipsite and chabazite), calcite, and anhydrite. Low alteration rates are attributed to cold and dry environmental factors common to both Antarctica and Mars. It is noted that mechanical weathering (aeolian abrasion) of Martian equivalents to present Antarctic basalts would yield minor hydrothermal minerals and local surface fines composed of primary igneous minerals and glass but would produce few hydrous products, such as palagonite, clay or micas. It is thought that leaching of hydrothermal vein minerals by migrating fluids and redeposition in duricrust deposits may represent an alternate process for incorporating secondary minerals of volcanic origin into Martian surface fines.

  16. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Blaney, D.; Cabrol, N. A.; Christensen, P. R.; Clark, B. C.; Crisp, J. A.; Crumpler, L. S.; DesMarais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Gellert, R.; Ghosh, A.; Gorevan, S.; Graff, T.; Grant, J.; Haskin, L. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B. L.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mossbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust.

  17. Stratigraphic studies: Part A: basalt stratigraphy of southern Mare Serenitatis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; Carr, M.H.; Muehlberger, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Mare Serenitatis has long been noted for its conspicuous dark border (fig. 29-1). The Apollo 17 metric photographs traverse this border in southern Mare Serenitatis and show clearly superposition relationships among the mare and mare-related stratigraphic units. These photographs, together with full-Moon photographs, albedo measurements, and color information (table 29-I), provide the basis for a revised stratigraphic framework for these presumedly basaltic rocks (figs. 29-2 and 29-3). In contrast to most previous studies, we conclude that the darker units are older than lighter ones. Similar conclusions have been reached by Bryan and Adams (part C of sec. 30) and Boyce and Dial (part C of this section). The relatively light-colored central part of Mare Serenitatis is thought to represent the youngest basalt in the region; a very dark unit that includes the Apollo 17 landing site is one of the oldest.

  18. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-11-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  19. Lunar ferroan anorthosites and mare basalt sources - The mixed connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham

    1991-01-01

    Global overturn of a hot, gravitationally unstable lunar mantle immediately following the solidification of a magma ocean explains several characteristics of lunar petrology. Lunar mare basalt sources are inferred to be depleted in europium and alumina. These depletions are consensually attributed to complementary plagioclase floating from a magma ocean. However, in contrast to the mare basalt source parent magma, the ferroan anorthosite parent magma was more evolved by virtue of its lower Mg/Fe ratio and Ni abundances, although less evolved in its poverty of clinopyroxene constituents, flat rare earth pattern, and lower incompatible element abundances. The europium anomaly in mare sources is inferred to be present at 400 km depth, too deep to have been directly influenced by plagioclase crystallization. Massive overturning of the post-magma ocean mantle would have carried down clinopyroxene, ilmenite, and phases containing fractionated rare earths, europium anomalies, and some heat-producing radionuclides.

  20. Flood basalt volcanism during the past 250 million years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, Michael R.; Stothers, Richard B.

    1988-01-01

    A chronology of the initiation dates of major continental flood basalt volcanism is established from published potassium-argon (K-Ar) and argon-argon (Ar-Ar) ages of basaltic rocks and related basic intrusions. The dating is therefore independent of the biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic time scales. Estimated errors of the initiation dates of the volcanic episodes determined from the distributions of the radiometric ages are, approximately, + or - 4 percent. There were 11 distinct episodes during the past 250 million years. Sometimes appearing in pairs, the episodes have occurred quasi-periodically with a mean cycle time of 32 + or - 1 (estimated error of the mean) million years. The initiation dates of the episodes are close to the estimated dates of mass extinctions of marine organisms. Showers of impacting comets may be the cause.

  1. The solubility of olivine in basaltic liquids - An ionic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzberg, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented which enables the temperature at which olivine is in equilibrium with any alkali-depleted basaltic compound to be calculated to within + or - 30 C. It is noted that the error increases substantially when applied to terrestrial basalts which contain several weight percent alkalis. In addition the model predicts and quantifies the reduced activity of SiO4(4-) monomers due to increasing SiO2 concentrations in the melt. It is shown that the coordination of alumina in melts which precipitate olivine only appears to be dominantly octahedral, while titanium acts as a polmerizing agent by interconnecting previously isolated SiO4(4-) monomers. It is concluded that the model is sufficiently sensitive to show that there are small repulsive forces between Mg(2+) and calcium ions which are in association with normative diopside in the melt.

  2. Basaltic rocks analyzed by the Spirit Rover in Gusev Crater.

    PubMed

    McSween, H Y; Arvidson, R E; Bell, J F; Blaney, D; Cabrol, N A; Christensen, P R; Clark, B C; Crisp, J A; Crumpler, L S; Des Marais, D J; Farmer, J D; Gellert, R; Ghosh, A; Gorevan, S; Graff, T; Grant, J; Haskin, L A; Herkenhoff, K E; Johnson, J R; Jolliff, B L; Klingelhoefer, G; Knudson, A T; McLennan, S; Milam, K A; Moersch, J E; Morris, R V; Rieder, R; Ruff, S W; De Souza, P A; Squyres, S W; Wänke, H; Wang, A; Wyatt, M B; Yen, A; Zipfel, J

    2004-08-01

    The Spirit landing site in Gusev Crater on Mars contains dark, fine-grained, vesicular rocks interpreted as lavas. Pancam and Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) spectra suggest that all of these rocks are similar but have variable coatings and dust mantles. Magnified images of brushed and abraded rock surfaces show alteration rinds and veins. Rock interiors contain basalts, containing normative olivine, pyroxenes, plagioclase, and accessory FeTi oxides. Mössbauer, Pancam, and Mini-TES spectra confirm the presence of olivine, magnetite, and probably pyroxene. These basalts extend the known range of rock compositions composing the martian crust. PMID:15297668

  3. The petrogenesis of primary mid-ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elthon, Don

    1990-01-01

    The nature of primary mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is reviewed from the primary-magma composition point of view. The concept of primary MORB magma used in the study stipulates that melting of the mantle produces a discrete identifiable magma that separates from the mantle and ascends toward the surface. Constraints from abyssal peridotites are considered along with constraints from high-pressure phase equilibria studies with emphasis on partial melting of mantle peridotites, basalt-peridotite sandwich techniques, high-pressure experiments on MORB-type compositions, and constraints on the pressure of origin from mineral compositions. Compositional variations in primitive MORB glasses are discussed, and possible models for the origin of these glasses are presented.

  4. Disequilibrium of the 238U series in basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Somayajulu, B.L.K.; Tatsumoto, M.; Rosholt, J.N.; Knight, R.J.

    1966-01-01

    Radioisotope analyses of basalt samples from Hawaii, Japan, and Iwo Jima show that: (1) 234U and 238U are virtually in radioactive equilibrium, (2) 230Th exceeds equilibrium values in all these samples, (3) 210Pb concentrations range from 10-200% of the equilibrium values and average 30% deficient, and (4) 226Ra is probably not in equilibrium with 234U. The source regions of the basalts or magma forming processes are open systems, chemically. The enrichment of some of the uranium-daughter nuclides is insufficient to account for the excess 206Pb in volcanic rocks. The isotopic composition of lead and specific activity of 210Pb in sublimates from Showa-shinzan, Japan are also reported. ?? 1966.

  5. Effect of chromate action on morphology of basalt-inhabitingbacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Kalabegishvili, T.L.; Tsibakhashvili, N.Y.; Holman, H-Y.

    2006-03-01

    Basalt-inhabiting bacteria isolated from polluted basaltshave been demonstrated to be able to tolerate moderate to highconcentrations of chromium oxyanions such as chromate. Previous resultshave shown that macromolecules outside the cell wall of bacteria may playan important role in this survival ability. In this paper, ScanningElectron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) wereapplied to study the chromate-induced morphological changes inchromate-resistant basalt-inhabiting Arthrobacter K-2 and K-4, which wereisolated from the Republic of Georgia. The surfaces of both strainschanged in the presence of chromate. TEM thin sections show that chromatestimulates the appearance of bacteria capsular polysaccharide outside thecell wall, although the chromate concentration does not have a strongeffect on the capsular thickness. These results, in conjunction withthose reported earlier, provide direct evidence to show that capsularpolysaccharides of the bacteria play very important role for thereduction and localization of chromate.

  6. A new basaltic glass microanalytical reference material for multiple techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Steve; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been producing reference materials since the 1950s. Over 50 materials have been developed to cover bulk rock, sediment, and soils for the geological community. These materials are used globally in geochemistry, environmental, and analytical laboratories that perform bulk chemistry and/or microanalysis for instrument calibration and quality assurance testing. To answer the growing demand for higher spatial resolution and sensitivity, there is a need to create a new generation of microanalytical reference materials suitable for a variety of techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy/X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As such, the microanalytical reference material (MRM) needs to be stable under the beam, be homogeneous at scales of better than 10–25 micrometers for the major to ultra-trace element level, and contain all of the analytes (elements or isotopes) of interest. Previous development of basaltic glasses intended for LA-ICP-MS has resulted in a synthetic basaltic matrix series of glasses (USGS GS-series) and a natural basalt series of glasses (BCR-1G, BHVO-2G, and NKT-1G). These materials have been useful for the LA-ICP-MS community but were not originally intended for use by the electron or ion beam community. A material developed from start to finish with intended use in multiple microanalytical instruments would be useful for inter-laboratory and inter-instrument platform comparisons. This article summarizes the experiments undertaken to produce a basalt glass reference material suitable for distribution as a multiple-technique round robin material. The goal of the analytical work presented here is to demonstrate that the elemental homogeneity of the new glass is acceptable for its use as a reference material. Because the round robin exercise is still underway, only

  7. Initial effects of vegetation on Hawaiian basalt weathering rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, M.F.; Berner, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Weathering of Ca and Mg silicates on land and ensuing precipitation and burial of Ca and Mg carbonates in marine sediments is the principal sink for carbon dioxide from the atmosphere/ocean system on geologic time scales. Model calculations of ancient atmospheric CO[sub 2] partial pressure depend strongly on the authors assumptions about the enhancement of silicate weathering rates first by primitive terrestrial biota, then by the appearance and evolution of the vascular plants. Aa and pahoehoe basalts were collected from Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Flows ranged in age (one year to several thousand years) and in ambient climate. Where possible, each flow was sampled beneath a suite of current plant covers: none, lichens, and higher plants. Rocks were embedded in epoxy to preserve the plant-rock interface, then sectioned and subjected to electron probe microanalysis. During initial weathering, vascular plants appeared to promote congruent dissolution of minerals (particularly olivine and Ca-rich plagioclase) and glass near the surfaces of underlying basalts. In the neighborhood of roots, primary cracks widened with time into networks of open channels. This effect was observed prior to the formation of measurable leached zones in exterior grains and prior to the appearance of secondary minerals. As a result, initial mass loss from young, plant-covered basalts appeared to be up to one or more orders of magnitude greater than from bare-rock controls. Despite earlier reports of substantial enhancement of Hawaiian basalt weathering rates by the lichen Stereocaulon vulcani, weathering observed beneath this lichen was comparable to that of unvegetated rocks.

  8. On the natural remanent magnetism of certain mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, M.; Meshkov, E.; Cisowski, S. M.; Hale, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and magnetic properties of five fine-grain mare basalts were investigated. The NRM of two vitrophyres has a large soft component, and the directional stability during AF demagnetization is poor. The remaining samples have NRM which is too soft to be of thermal origin and yet too hard to be simply isothermal contamination. It is suggested that the NRM of the samples could be shock remanent magnetization.

  9. Dissolution of olivine in basaltic liquids: experimental observations and applications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornber, C.R.; Huebner, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of olivine dissolution in synthetic lunar basalt 77115 and a silica-enriched 77115 composition (Sil-77115) at superliquidus temperatures have been determined. Dissolution-rate data have been applied to the problem of the thermal history of fragment-laden impact-melt rocks of the lunar highlands. Textural and chemical criteria are discussed for the recognition of olivine resorption (and growth) phenomena in igneous rocks. -J.A.Z.

  10. Basaltic Shergottite NWA 856: Differentiation of a Martian Magma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferdous, J.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A. H.; Pirotte, Z.

    2016-01-01

    NWA 856 or Djel Ibone, is a basaltic shergottite discovered as a single stone of 320 g in South Morocco in April, 2001. This meteorite is fresh, i.e. shows minimal terrestrial weathering for a desert find. No shergottite discovered in North Africa can be paired with NWA 856. The purpose of this study is to constrain its crystallization history using textural observations, crystallization sequence modeling and in-situ trace element analysis in order to understand differentiation in shergottite magmatic systems.

  11. New Insights into Basaltic Balloon Formation during Submarine Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Kelly, J.; Rosi, M.; Pistolesi, M.; Marani, M.; Roman, C.; Croff Bell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) explorations in the area of the 1891 Foerstner submarine eruption (Pantelleria, Italy) during cruise NA-018 of the E/V Nautilus has provided the first examination of the vent site of a basaltic balloon-forming eruption. Ultra high-resolution bathymetric mapping defined a mound-like vent morphology in water depths of ~250 meter, constructed dominantly of highly vesicular scoriaceous fragments with minor pillow lava flows. The formation of floating basaltic balloons that reached the surface of the Strait of Sicily during the eruption is attributed to a hybrid Strombolian eruption mechanism that involved pre-concentration of volatiles into gas-rich portions of magma beneath the vent. An important difference of this Strombolian mechanism compared to its subaerial counterpart is the occurrence of buoyant magma discharge in the submarine environment caused by localized high gas contents. The added buoyancy flux modifies the fluid dynamic configuration of magma venting on the seafloor allowing for detachment of highly-inflated parcels of gas-rich magma. Some of these parcels contain large gas cavities that are enveloped in a partially quenched shell and maintain sufficient buoyancy to rise to the sea surface as a basaltic balloon. The majority of the vesicular magma maintains only partial positive buoyancy or negative buoyancy and is explosively fragmented to form large quantities of decimeter-scale fragments that accumulate close to the vent. Formation of the basaltic balloons is thus considered a somewhat accidental process that involves a subset of the total erupted volume of magma during the eruption. Suitable conditions for balloon formation include low magma viscosity, pre-concentration of gas, and moderate pressures (i.e.water depth). The dampening effect of seawater greatly reduces the dispersal of pyroclasts resulting in a mound-like vent morphology compared to subaerial scoria cones typically associated with Strombolian activity.

  12. Lead isotope systematics of three Apollo 17 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, G. R.; Chen, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with new and more accurate determinations of uranium, thorium, and isotopic lead data for five bulk samples and separate pyroxene, ilmenite, and plagioclase from basalt 71055. In a concordia diagram, the samples suggest a postcrystallization disturbance of the U-Pb systems of the rock. There is no compelling reason, from U-Pb data, to believe that the moon is younger than 4.55 AE.

  13. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  14. Rock billboards on the basaltic cliff along the Route 66 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rock billboards on the basaltic cliff along the Route 66 alignment, ca. 1926. The sign on the left is for "La Bajada Service Shop" (faint "da" visible), "Santa Fe Camp" in the center, and a petroglyph at far right. View facing northwest. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  15. Supertoxic Flood Basalts: The CAMP - Siberian Trap Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puffer, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Several diverse magma types are represented throughout the CAMP and Siberian Trap LIPs, however, the main extrusive phase of each province is highly unusual among continental flood basalts. The most widespread extrusions were intermediate titanium (ITi-type) CAMP basalt and the lower portion of the Upper Sequence of Siberian Trap. New and recently published data indicate that the geochemistry and petrology of these basalt suites closely resemble each other and infer similar origins. The basalts are characterized by strong negative Nb- Ta anomalies and unusual island arc-like depletion in high field strength elements, particularly Ti, plotted on spider diagrams. The geochemical data is consistent with significant contributions from subducted slabs into the magma source regions. If contaminated, volatile enriched mantle wedges were trapped beneath thick continental plates during the assembly of Pangea, fertile magma sources would have remained dormant until decompression melting was triggered during failed rift, then early rift stages of continental plate disassembly. The combination of volatile enriched sources and highly extensional tectonism would create rare perfect storms of toxicity. Calculated low viscosities assuming negligible carbon dioxide are consistent with rapid crustal penetration. Resulting aphyric melts extruded at enormous effusive rates as thick sub-parallel flows across wide subareal terrains through fissures extending several hundred km in length. High fountain heights would afford ample opportunity for efficient degassing, perhaps into the stratosphere. When the supply of volatile flux was exhausted magmatism ceased. The mass extinctions that coincide with CAMP and Siberian volcanism contrast with some large plume and superplume events that correlate with expansions of biodiversity. This may be due in part to contrasting magma access to sources of toxic volatiles, particularly sulfur concentrations in anoxic subducted sediments.

  16. Recrystallized microbial trace fossils from metamorphosed Permian basalt, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, H.; Sakakibara, M.; Ikehara, M.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial trace fossils on terrestrial basalts can be used as an analogue in the search for traces of life on other terrestrial planets. This study reports on microbial trace fossils within Permian greenstones in the Maizuru Terrane, southwest Japan, which is recognized as back-arc basin oceanic crust that consists mainly of metabasalt and metagabbro. The trace fossils have been studied by means of morphology, mineralogy, elemental mapping, and carbon isotope analysis. Although minute original textures of trace fossils are recrystallized in these rocks, Granulohyalichnus vulgaris isp., Tubulohyalichnus spiralis isp., and Tubulohyalichnus annularis isp. were identified. Significant concentration of C within the trace fossils implies these are organic remnants from microbes. The δ13CPDB values <-7‰ of calcite within the greenstones indicates that the bacterial activity took place prior to the formation of calcite veins. The results support that microbial trace fossils within low-grade metamorphic basalt can be reliably identified based on their morphology and chemical composition, as reveled by elemental mapping. In this context, glassy Martian basalt may be the best rock type to investigate in terms of searching for signs of microbial activity on Earth and other planets.

  17. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  18. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>105 km3) within short time span (<1–3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  19. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-01-01

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (<1-3 Ma) is in principle caused by an abnormally high temperature, extended decompression, a certain amount of mafic source rocks (e.g., pyroxenite), or an elevated H2O content in the mantle source. These four factors are not mutually exclusive. There are growing evidences for high temperature, decompression and mafic source rocks, albeit with hot debate. However, there is currently no convincing evidence of high water content in the source of CFB. We retrieved the initial H2O content of the primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB. PMID:27143196

  20. Basalt Pb isotope analysis and the prehistoric settlement of Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Weisler, M I; Woodhead, J D

    1995-03-14

    The prehistoric settlement of the Pacific Ocean has intrigued scholars and stimulated anthropological debate for the past two centuries. Colonized over a few millennia during the mid to late Holocene, the islands of the Pacific--displaying a wide diversity of geological and biotic variability--provided the stage for endless "natural experiments" in human adaptation. Crucial to understanding the evolution and transformation of island societies is documenting the relative degree of interisland contacts after island colonization. In the western Pacific, ideal materials for archaeologically documenting interisland contact--obsidian, pottery, and shell ornaments--are absent or of limited geographic distribution in Polynesia. Consequently, archaeologists have relied increasingly on fine-grained basalt artifacts as a means for documenting colonization routes and subsequent interisland contacts. Routinely used x-ray fluorescence characterization of oceanic island basalt has some problems for discriminating source rocks and artifacts in provenance studies. The variation in trace and major element abundances is largely controlled by near-surface magma-chamber processes and is broadly similar between most oceanic islands. We demonstrate that Pb isotope analysis accurately discriminates rock source and is an excellent technique for charting the scale, frequency, and temporal span of imported fine-grained basalt artifacts found throughout Polynesia. The technique adds another tool for addressing evolutionary models of interaction, isolation, and cultural divergence in the eastern Pacific. PMID:7892194

  1. Temperature profile around a basaltic sill intruded into wet sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Leslie; Bernard, Andrew; Rember, William C.; Milazzo, Moses; Dundas, Colin M.; Abramov, Oleg; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of heat into wet sediments from magmatic intrusions or lava flows is not well constrained from field data. Such field constraints on numerical models of heat transfer could significantly improve our understanding of water–lava interactions. We use experimentally calibrated pollen darkening to measure the temperature profile around a basaltic sill emplaced into wet lakebed sediments. It is well known that, upon heating, initially transparent palynomorphs darken progressively through golden, brown, and black shades before being destroyed; however, this approach to measuring temperature has not been applied to volcanological questions. We collected sediment samples from established Miocene fossil localities at Clarkia, Idaho. Fossils in the sediments include pollen from numerous tree and shrub species. We experimentally calibrated changes in the color of Clarkia sediment pollen and used this calibration to determine sediment temperatures around a Miocene basaltic sill emplaced in the sediments. Results indicated a flat temperature profile above and below the sill, with T > 325 °C within 1 cm of the basalt-sediment contact, near 300 °C at 1–2 cm from the contact, and ~ 250 °C at 1 m from the sill contact. This profile suggests that heat transport in the sediments was hydrothermally rather than conductively controlled. This information will be used to test numerical models of heat transfer in wet sediments on Earth and Mars.

  2. Shock compression and adiabatic release of a titaniferous mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Jackson, I.; Jeanloz, R.

    1977-01-01

    A report is presented regarding the dynamic properties of a rock indigenous to the mare basins of the moon. The reported data were obtained in a study of sample 70215, a very titanium-rich basalt (58% pyroxene, 18% ilmenite, 15% plagioclase, 6% olivine, and 3% quartz by weight). This rock is probably representative of a class of the earliest mare-filling extrusive rocks which are exposed on the present lunar surface. Two series of experiments were performed. One set of experiments involved the measuring of Hugoniot and release adiabats to 15.7 GPa with a propellant gun apparatus. In the second set of experiments, a light-gas gun was employed to yield Hugoniot data at about 120 GPa and release states at about 90 GPa. Lunar basalt 70215 appears to be among the densest rocks in the present lunar sample collection, having a crystal density of 3.38 g/cu cm and a porosity of about 1.3%. The results of the experiments have important implications for both the degree of shock metamorphism expected for impact processes and the extent of ejecta transport on mare surfaces with high-titanium basalt composition.

  3. Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Annual report, fiscal year 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    During this fiscal year the information available in the fields of geology and hydrology of the Columbia Plateau was consolidated and two reports were issued summarizing this information. In addition, the information on engineered barriers was consolidated and a report summarizing the research to date on waste package development and design of borehole seals was prepared. The waste package studies, when combined with the hydrologic integration, revealed that even under extreme disruptive conditions, a repository in basalt with appropriately designed waste packages can serve as an excellent barrier for containment of radionuclides for the long periods of time required for waste isolation. On July 1, 1980, the first two heater tests at the Near-Surface Test Facility were started and have been successfully operated to this date. The papers on the Near-Surface Test Facility section of this report present the results of the equipment installed and the preliminary results of the testing. In October 1979, the US Department of Energy selected the joint venture of Kaiser Engineers/Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade and Douglas, Inc., to be the architect-engineer to produce a conceptual design of a repository in basalt. During the year, this design has progressed and concept selection has now been completed. This annual report presents a summary of the highlights of the work completed during fiscal year 1980. It is intended to supplement and summarize the nearly 200 papers and reports that have been distributed to date as a part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project studies.

  4. Spitzer IRS Spectra of Basaltic Asteroids: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Emery, Joshua P.; Moskovitz, Nick; Stewart, Heather; Marchis, Frank

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a Spitzer program to observe the 5.2--38 micron spectra of small basaltic asteroids using the Spitzer IRS (Infrared Spectrograph). Our targets include members of the dynamical family of the unique large differentiated asteroid 4 Vesta ("Vestoids"), four outer-main-belt basaltic asteroids whose orbits exclude them from originating on 4 Vesta, and the basaltic near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 4055 Magellan. We will compare the compositions and thermophysical properties of the non-Vestoid objects with those of the dynamical vestoids to provide insight on the extent of metal-silicate differentiation on planetsimals during the epoch of planet formation in the early Solar System. As of this writing, spectra of asteroids 10537 (1991 RY16) and 2763 Jeans have been returned. Analysis of these data are ongolng. Observations of 956 Elisa, 2653 Principia, 4215 Kamo, 7472 Kumakiri, and 1459 Magnya have been scheduled and are expected to be available by the time of the DPS meeting. NIR spectra and lightcurves o f the target asteroids are also being observed in support of this program.

  5. The consanguinity of the oldest Apollo 11 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. P.; Coish, R. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    The textural, mineralogical, and chemical relationships between three of the oldest dates lunar mare basalt samples returned by Apollo 11 (10003, 10029 and 10062) were investigated. Very strong resemblances were noted between the modal minerologies of 10003 and 10029. Significantly more modal olivine and cristobalite was observed in 10062 than in the other basalt samples. A detailed examination of mineral-chemical relationships among the samples revealed similarities between 10003 and 10062 and differences between these two rocks and 10029, the most significant of which is the presence of akaganeite in 10029, implying that lawrencite was present in the pristine sample of 10029 but not in 10003 and 10062. Results of a Wright-Doherty mixing program used to test various fractional crystallization schemes show that 10062 can be derived from a liquid with the composition of either 10003 or 10029 by removing 2-5% ilmenite and 5% olivine. By removing about 6% plagioclase, 10003 can be derived from a liquid with the bulk composition of 10062. It is concluded that 10003 and 10029 may have come from different basaltic flows, whereas it is possible that 10003 and 10062 were derived from the same parental magma by near-surface fractionation of olivine plus ilmenite or of plagioclase plus or minus olivine.

  6. Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep-sea basalt

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, David S.; Takahashi, Taro; Slagle, Angela L.

    2008-01-01

    Developing a method for secure sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formations is one of our most pressing global scientific problems. Injection into deep-sea basalt formations provides unique and significant advantages over other potential geological storage options, including (i) vast reservoir capacities sufficient to accommodate centuries-long U.S. production of fossil fuel CO2 at locations within pipeline distances to populated areas and CO2 sources along the U.S. west coast; (ii) sufficiently closed water-rock circulation pathways for the chemical reaction of CO2 with basalt to produce stable and nontoxic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+)CO3 infilling minerals, and (iii) significant risk reduction for post-injection leakage by geological, gravitational, and hydrate-trapping mechanisms. CO2 sequestration in established sediment-covered basalt aquifers on the Juan de Fuca plate offer promising locations to securely accommodate more than a century of future U.S. emissions, warranting energized scientific research, technological assessment, and economic evaluation to establish a viable pilot injection program in the future. PMID:18626013

  7. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation project: Boreholes, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-03-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. An extensive site characterization program was begun to determine the feasibility of using the basalts beneath the Hanford Site for the repository. Site research focused primarily on determining the direction and speed of groundwater movement, the uniformity of basalt layers, and tectonic stability. Some 98 boreholes were sited, drilled, deepened, or modified by BWIP between 1977 and 1988 to test the geologic properties of the Site. On December 22, 1987, President Reagan signed into law the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which effectively stopped all repository-related activities except reclamation of disturbed lands at the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 48 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. 42 CFR 59a.14 - How to apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How to apply. 59a.14 Section 59a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.14 How to apply. In addition to any other...

  9. 42 CFR 59a.14 - How to apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How to apply. 59a.14 Section 59a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.14 How to apply. In addition to any other...

  10. 42 CFR 59a.14 - How to apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How to apply. 59a.14 Section 59a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.14 How to apply. In addition to any other...

  11. 42 CFR 59a.14 - How to apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How to apply. 59a.14 Section 59a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.14 How to apply. In addition to any other...

  12. 42 CFR 59a.14 - How to apply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How to apply. 59a.14 Section 59a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.14 How to apply. In addition to any other...

  13. Origin of the 'Gabbro' Signature in Ocean Island Basalts: Constraints from Osmium Isotopic Ratios of Galapagos Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Dale, C. W.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Re-Os isotope system has become increasingly used as a tracer of lithological heterogeneity in the convecting mantle, with radiogenic 187Os/188Os in high-Os oceanic basalts and picrites widely interpreted as evidence of a melt contribution from ancient recycled oceanic crust. When combined with 206Pb/204Pb and O isotopes, 187Os/188Os ratios have been used to identify distinct lithological units (i.e. sediments, gabbros and basalts). We report new 187Os/188Os for basalts with high Os (>40 ppt) and MgO from Galápagos, which range from near primitive mantle values (0.130) to highly radiogenic (0.155). While co-variations in 187Os/188Os and 206Pb/204Pb for some Galápagos basalts (Floreana-type) are HIMU like, and consistent with melting of ancient recycled oceanic crust, others have variable 187Os/188Os ratios and primitive to depleted mantle like 206Pb/204Pb. Similar variations in Os and Pb isotopic space have been interpreted in other OIB suites as melts from recycled ancient oceanic gabbros, entrained by upwelling mantle plumes. Nevertheless, a marked east-west spatial variation in 187Os/188Os of Galápagos basalts does not correlate with postulated lithological variations in the Galápagos plume (Vidito et al., 2013). We show that basalts in eastern Galápagos with elevated 187Os/188Os and positive Sr anomalies occur in the vicinity of over-thickened 10 Ma gabbroic crust, that formed when the Galápagos plume was on-axis. We propose the elevated 187Os/188Os of Galápagos basalts are due to in-situ assimilation of young gabbroic lower crust, with high Re/Os, rather than melting of ancient recycled material in the Galápagos plume. In western Galápagos recent plume accreted crust is thick but more mafic, the melt flux higher and assimilation more sporadic. The contamination thresholds of Os and MgO in Galápagos basalts occur at higher contents than for many global OIBs (Azores, Iceland, Hawaii) and may reflect both a relatively low melt flux into the crust

  14. Rhyolite, dacite, andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt volcanism on the Alarcon Rise spreading-center, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, B. M.; Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Castillo, P. R.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcon Rise is a ~50 km long intermediate-rate (~50mm/a) spreading segment at the southern end of the Gulf of California. The Rise is bounded by the Tamayo and Pescadero transforms to the south and north. In Spring 2012, an MBARI-led expedition mapped a ~1.5- 3km wide swath of the ridge axis at 1-m resolution and completed 9 ROV dives (Clague et al., this session). Sampling during the ROV dives was supplemented by use of a wax-tip corer to recover volcanic glass: 194 glassy lava samples were recovered from the Rise. The vast majority of lava flows along the axis are basalt and rare basaltic andesite. More than half the basalts are plagioclase-phyric to ultraphyric (Martin et al., this session), and the rest are aphyric. Rare samples also include olivine or olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Analyses of half of the recovered glass basalt rinds range in MgO from 4.3 to 8.5 wt.% and those with MgO > 6 wt % have K2O/TiO2 = 0.07-0.11. The basalts are broadly characterized as normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB). E-MORB is also present near the center of the ridge segment, but has been found only as pyroclasts in sediment cores. A much greater range in lava composition is associated with an unusual volcanic dome-like edifice that lies ~9 km south of the Pescadero transform. Two dives in the vicinity of the dome collected lava and volcaniclastic samples consisting of moderately to sparsely phyric light brown to colorless volcanic glass. Feldspar is the dominant phase, but magnetite, fayalitic olivine, light tan and light green clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, zircon, and rare pyrite blebs also occur. Melt-inclusions are common in many phenocrysts, especially of plagioclase. Hydrous mineral phases are not observed. These samples have rhyolitic glass compositions (75.8- 77.4 SiO2 wt %), but their whole-rock compositions will be somewhat less silicic. Pillow flows to the immediate west have dacitic glass compositions (67.4- 68.8 wt % SiO2). Basaltic andesitic

  15. Shallow Plumbing Systems for Small-Volume Basaltic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. N.; Valentine, G. A.; Krier, D. J.; Perry, F. V.

    2006-12-01

    We characterize the subvolcanic geometry of small-volume basaltic volcanoes (magmatic volatile-driven eruptions, 0.1 to 0.5 km3) based on a synthesis of field studies of 5 basaltic volcanoes with varying degrees of erosion exposing feeder dikes, conduits, and vent areas <250 m depth. Study areas include East Grants Ridge (New Mexico), Basalt Ridge, East Basalt Ridge, Paiute Ridge, and Southeast Crater Flat (Nevada). Basaltic feeder dikes ~250 to 100 m deep have typical widths of 4 - 12 m, with smooth host-rock contacts (rhyolite tuff). At depths <100 m, heterogeneities in the host rock form preferential pathways for small dike splays and sills, resulting in a 30-m effective width at 50 m depth. The development of a complex conduit above ~50-70 m depth is reflected in bifurcating dikes and brecciation and stoping of the country rock. The overall zone of effect <50 m depth is <110 m wide (220 m elongated along the feeder dike). Based on comparisons with theoretical conduit flow models, the width of the feeder dike from 250 to 500 m depth is expected to range from 1 to 10 m and is expected to decrease to about 1-2 meters below ~500 m. The flaring shape of the observed feeder systems is similar to results of theoretical modeling using lithostatic pressure- balanced flow conditions. Sizes of observed conduits differ from modeled dimensions by up to a factor of 10 in the shallow (<50 m) subsurface, but >100 m depth the difference is a factor of two to five. This difference is primarily due to the fact that observed eroded conduits record the superimposed effects of multiple eruptive events while theoretical model results define dimensions necessary for a single, steady eruption phase. The complex details of magma-host rock interactions observed at the study areas (contact welding, brecciation, bifurcating dikes and sills, and stoping) represent the mechanisms by which the lithostatic pressure-balanced geometry is attained. The similarity in the normalized shapes of

  16. Assessing Eruption Column Height in Ancient Flood Basalt Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Self, Stephen; Schmidt, Anja; Hunter, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    A buoyant plume model is used to explore the ability of flood basalt eruptions to inject climate-relevant gases into the stratosphere. An example from the 1986 Izu-Oshima basaltic fissure eruption validates the model's ability to reproduce the observed maximum plume heights of 12-16 km above sea level, sustained above fire-fountains. The model predicts maximum plume heights of 13-17 km for source widths of between 4-16 m when 32% (by mass) of the erupted magma is fragmented and involved in the buoyant plume (effective volatile content of 6 wt%). Assuming that the Miocene-age Roza eruption (part of the Columbia River Basalt Group) sustained fire-fountains of similar height to Izu-Oshima (1.6 km above the vent), we show that the Roza eruption could have sustained buoyant ash and gas plumes that extended into the stratosphere at approximately 45 deg N. Assuming 5 km long active fissure segments and 9000 Mt of SO2 released during explosive phases over a 10-15 year duration, the approximately 180 km of known Roza fissure length could have supported approximately 36 explosive events/phases, each with a duration of 3-4 days. Each 5 km fissure segment could have emitted 62 Mt of SO2 per day into the stratosphere while actively fountaining, the equivalent of about three 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruptions per day. Each fissure segment could have had one to several vents, which subsequently produced lava without significant fountaining for a longer period within the decades-long eruption. Sensitivity of plume rise height to ancient atmospheric conditions is explored. Although eruptions in the Deccan Traps (approximately 66 Ma) may have generated buoyant plumes that rose to altitudes in excess of 18 km, they may not have reached the stratosphere because the tropopause was substantially higher in the late Cretaceous. Our results indicate that some flood basalt eruptions, such as Roza, were capable of repeatedly injecting large masses of SO2 into the stratosphere. Thus sustained

  17. Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic glass beads - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual glass beads representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic glass beads from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic glass beads at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic glass beads is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.

  18. Petrology and geochemistry of olivine-normative and quartz-normative basalts from regolith breccia 15498 - New diversity in Apollo 15 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, Scott K.; Shervais, John W.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of mare basalt clasts from Apollo 15 shows a greater diversity than previously recognized and provides new constraints on the petrogenesis of these basalts. The quartz-normative basalts (QNB) from 15498 are divided into four groups based on chemical variations: primitive, intermediate/1, intermediate/2, and evolved. The olivine-normative basalts (ONB) are divided into three groups: low-SiO2, high-SiO2, and olivine-pyroxene cumulates. Least-squares mixing calculations show that the high SiO2 ONBs may be parental to the QNB suite. Variations within the low-SiO2 ONBs are explained by olivine factionation. It is suggested that the presence of these basalt types may result from the position of breccia 15498 near the edge of the mare plain where normal ONBs are scarce, and from its presumed origin as ejecta from Dune Crater.

  19. Extrinsic controls on inter-basaltic plant ecosystems in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province, Washington State, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, Alena; Jolley, David W.; Hartley, Adrian J.

    2015-04-01

    The impact Large Igneous Province (LIP) volcanism may have had on paleoclimate, fauna and flora is still controversy. Inter-lava field plant ecosystems have the potential to record in detail the effects LIPs had on the environment in the immediate vicinity of volcanic activity. The Miocene Columbia River Flood Basalt Province (CRBP), Washington State, USA, provides excellent exposure of an entire LIP stratigraphy and offers a detailed record of inter-basaltic plant ecosystems throughout LIP evolution. The CRBP lava field comprise numerous basaltic lava flows that are intercalated with fluvial and lacustrine sediments which formed during phases of volcanic quiescence. The LIP volcanic evolution is characterised by an initial phase of high eruption volumes and eruptions rates, which is followed by waning volcanism associated with longer interbed intervals. Inter-lava field plant ecosystems are expected to correlate with phases of volcanic evolution: short interbed intervals should be dominated by early seral succession, while longer intervals should record more mature seral successions. The palynological record of the sedimentary interbeds however indicates a decline in successional status within the long interbed intervals of CRBP stratigraphy. An integrated analysis of sedimentary facies and geochemistry suggests intense volcanic ash fall derived from the adjacent Yellowstone hot spot as a major trigger for repetitive successional re-setting. This implies that inter-lava field ecosystem maturity was controlled by extrinsic forcing, and argues against environmental changes solely driven by LIPs of similar scale and magnitude to that of the CRBP.

  20. Hydrothermal Alteration on Basaltic Mauna Kea Volcano as a Template for Identification of Hydrothermal Alteration on Basaltic Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Bell, J. F., III

    2003-01-01

    Certain samples of palagonitic tephra from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii) are spectral analogues for bright martian surface materials at visible and near-IR wavelengths because both are characterized by a ferric absorption edge extending from about 400 to 750 nm and relatively constant reflectivity extending from about 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm. Palagonite is a yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass. For Mars-analogue palagonite, the pigment is nanometersized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout an allophane-like hydrated basaltic glass matrix. Crystalline phyllosilicates are not generally detected, and the hydration state of the is not known. The poorly crystalline nature of glass alteration products implies relatively low temperature formation pathways. We report here x-ray diffraction, major element, Mossbauer, and VNIR data for 9 basaltic tephras. Thermal emission spectra are reported in a separate abstract. Our multidisciplinary approach both tightly constrains mineralogical interpretations and maximizes overlap with datasets available for the martian surface available now and in the future.

  1. Lunar Mare Basalts as Analogues for Martian Volcanic Compositions: Evidence from Visible, Near-IR, and Thermal Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Christensen, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    The lunar mare basalts potentially provide a unique sample suite for understanding the nature of basalts on the martian surface. Our current knowledge of the mineralogical and chemical composition of the basaltic material on Mars comes from studies of the basaltic martian meteorites and from orbital and surface remote sensing observations. Petrographic observations of basaltic martian meteorites (e.g., Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA79001) show that the dominant phases are pyroxene (primarily pigeonite and augite), maskelynite (a diaplectic glass formed from plagioclase by shock), and olivine [1,2]. Pigeonite, a low calcium pyroxene, is generally not found in abundance in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon [3]. Lunar samples thus provide a means to examine a variety of pigeonite-rich basalts that also have bulk elemental compositions (particularly low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts) that are comparable to basaltic SNC meteorites [4,5]. Furthermore, lunar basalts may be mineralogically better suited as analogues of the martian surface basalts than the basaltic martian meteorites because the plagioclase feldspar in the basaltic Martian meteorites, but not in the lunar surface basalts, is largely present as maskelynite [1,2]. Analysis of lunar mare basalts my also lead to additional endmember spectra for spectral libraries. This is particularly important analysis of martian thermal emission spectra, because the spectral library apparently contains a single pigeonite spectrum derived from a synthetic sample [6].

  2. Geochemical affinities of a Late Precambrian basaltic dike, Adirondack Lowlands, Northern New York

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, R.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Late Precambrian rifting and the opening of the Iapetus Ocean basin have produced a series of NE-trending basaltic dikes in the Adirondack Lowlands of New York. Twelve samples were taken from the largest of these dikes, a 14 km long body, in order to study the chemical variability along and across strike and to characterize the source region. The dike consists of an assemblage of plagioclase, Ti-rich clinopyroxene, magnetite/ilmenite and a hydrated phase that was probably olivine. All analyzed samples contain normative olivine, and most contain normative nepheline, indicative of alkalic affinities. Chemical variations are relatively minor, with generally as much variation occurring across strike (max. width 10m) as along strike. SiO[sub 2] varies from 43.9--45.0 wt%; TiO[sub 2]: 4.8--5.1 wt%; P[sub 2]O[sub 5]: 0.8--1.1 wt%; Ni: 55--79 ppm; Sr:P 300--600 ppm; Rb: 35--66 ppm; Y/Nb = 1.1; Zr/Nb = 8. Chondrite normalized REE patterns show strong LREE enrichment. Tectonic discrimination plots (Zr--Ti/100--Y[star]) are indicative of within plate magmatism, and plots of Y/nb vs. Zr/Nb suggest an enriched, OIB-type mantle plume source. Trace element characteristics suggest a genetic correlation with Late Precambrian, rift related magmas of the Ottawa Graben and of the eastern Adirondack Mountains and western Vermont.

  3. Lu-Hf AND Sm-Nd EVOLUTION IN LUNAR MARE BASALTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.; Stille, P.; Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1984-01-01

    Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data for mare basalts combined with Rb-Sr and total REE data taken from the literature suggest that the mare basalts were derived by small ( less than equivalent to 10%) degrees of partial melting of cumulate sources, but that the magma ocean from which these sources formed was light REE and hf-enriched. Calculated source compositions range from lherzolite to olivine websterite. Nonmodal melting of small amounts of ilmenite ( less than equivalent to 3%) in the sources seems to be required by the Lu/Hf data. A comparison of the Hf and Nd isotopic characteristics between the mare basalts and terrestrial oceanic basalts reveals that the epsilon Hf/ epsilon Nd ratios in low-Ti mare basalts are much higher than in terrestrial ocean basalts.

  4. Engineered barrier development for a nuclear waste repository in basalt: an integration of current knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.J.

    1980-05-01

    This document represents a compilation of data and interpretive studies conducted as part of the engineered barriers program of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The overall objective of these studies is to provide information on barrier system designs, emplacement and isolation techniques, and chemical reactions expected in a nuclear waste repository located in the basalts underlying the Hanford Site within the state of Washington. Backfills, waste-basalt interactions, sorption, borehole plugging, etc., are among the topics discussed.

  5. Scappoose Formation, Columbia County, Oregon: new evidence of age and relation to Columbia River basalt group

    SciTech Connect

    VanAtta, R.O.; Kelty, K.B.

    1985-05-01

    The Scappoose Formation, considered to be late Oligocene to early Miocene in age, was originally believed to be disconformably separated from both the underlying Pittsburg Bluff Formation and the overlying Yakima subgroup of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Recent mapping and petrography show that it lies disconformably on both the Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations, and interfingers with the Yakima Basalt. The Scappoose is composed of fluvial sandstone, conglomerate, and carbonaceous to coal-bearing mud rock, intertongued with shallow neritic to estuarine siltstone, mud rock, and minor sandstone. Chemistry of basalt clasts from fluvial conglomerates reveals that they are derived from the Yakima subgroup. Basalt conglomerate and palagonitic sediments in the upper part of the formation are intercalated with Grande Ronde basalt (Yakima subgroup) flows at many localities. Flows of Yakima Basalt are also invasive into originally wet, unconsolidated Scappoose sediment. Grande Ronde basalt and the Frenchman Springs Member of the Wanapum basalt overlie conglomerate of the Scappoose. In places, the Scappoose Formation is absent, and Yakima Basalt lies directly on the Pittsburg Bluff and Keasey Formations. The thickness of both the Scappoose Formation and the Columbia River Basalt Group varies widely, indicating that both were deposited over a paleotopography with a relief up to 800 ft (245 m). The definition of the boundaries of the Scappoose Formation should be revised, owing to the disconformable relation of the Scappoose to both the underlying Keasey and Pittsburg Bluff Formations and to the Scappoose's intercalation with the overlying Yakima Basalt. Definition of age must also be revised, inasmuch as sedimentation of the formation was coeval with Columbia River Basalt volcanism.

  6. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  7. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd chronology and genealogy of mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Depaolo, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of two Apollo 11 mare basalts, high-K basalt 10072 and low-K basalt 10062, are reported. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Ar-40-Ar-39 ages are in good agreement and indicate an extensive time interval for filling of the Sea of Tranquility, presumably by thin lava flows, in agreement with similar observations for the Ocean of Storms. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions on Apollo 11 basalts reveal at least two parent sources producing basalts. The Sm-Nd isotopic data demonstrate that low-K and high-Ti basalts from Apollo 11 and 17 derived from distinct reservoirs, while low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalt sources have Sm/Nd similar to the sources of Apollo 11 basalts. Groupings of mare basalt based on Ti content and on isotopic data do not coincide.

  8. Basalt fiber manufacturing technology and the possibility of its use in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaeva, E.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Nikitin, V.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Lysakov, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article touches upon the technology of basalt fiber manufacturing and prospects of its use in dental practice. Two kinds of construction using basalt fiber have been proposed. The first one is a splinting construction for mobile teeth and the second one is the reinforced base for removable plate-denture. The work presents the results of the investigation of physical and mechanical properties of the constructions based on basalt fiber. It also describes the aspects of biomechanical modeling of such constructions in the ANSYS software package. The results of the investigation have proved that applying constructions using basalt fiber is highly promising for prosthetic dentistry practice.

  9. Chemical and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of the large mare basalt clast in breccia 15459

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L.; Lindstrom, M.; Bansal, B.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Shih, C.-Y.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate that the large mare basalt clast in Apollo 15 breccia 15459 may represent one or more independent magma types. The complex nonequilibrium pyroxene and plagioclase compositions and relatively abundant mesostasis suggest that the 15459 clast is not a slowly cooled crystal cumulate. The addition of about 40 percent olivine to an olivine-normative basalt parental magma is found to be necessary to explain the high MgO abundances of picritic basalts by the accumulation of olivine in the magma. The present clast has a slightly younger age and a slightly higher Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio than most Apollo 15 basalts.

  10. Wet Oxidation of High-Al-Content III-V Semiconductors: Important Materials Considerations for Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol I.H.

    1999-05-19

    Wet oxidation of high-Al-content AIGaAs semiconductor layers in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) has produced devices with record low threshold currents and voltages and with wall-plug efficiencies greater than 50%. Wet oxidation of buried AlGaAs layers has been employed to reduce the problems associated with substrate current leakage in GaAs-on- insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Wet oxidation of high-Al-content AlGaAs semiconductor layers in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) has produced devices with record low threshold currents and voltages and with wall-plug efficiencies greater than 50%. Wet oxidation of buried AlGaAs layers has been employed to reduce the problems associated with substrate current leakage in GaAs-on- insulator (GOI) MESFETS. Wet oxidation has also been considered as a route to the long-sought goal of a IH-V MIS technology. To continue improving device designs for even higher performance and to establish a truly manufacturable technology based on wet oxidation, the effect of oxidation of a given layer on the properties of the entire device structure must be understood. The oxidation of a given layer can strongly affect the electrical and chemical properties of adjacent layers. Many of these effects are derived from the production of large amounts of elemental As during the oxidation reaction, the resultant generation of point defects, and the diffusion of these defects into adjacent regions. This can modify the chemical and electrical properties of these regions in ways that can impact device design, fabrication, and performance. Current understanding of the problem is discussed here.

  11. Basalt weathering in an Arctic Mars-analog site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesavage, Tiffany; Thompson, Aaron; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-07-01

    The martian surface has undergone chemical and physical weathering in the past, and these processes may continue intermittently today. To explore whether martian rocks are likely to retain features indicative of weathering, we investigated how basaltic material weathers on Earth. Specifically, we investigated weathering of a Quaternary-aged basaltic flow at the Sverrefjell volcano in Svalbard, above the Arctic Circle. This flow weathered since deglaciation under cold, dry (<400 mm/yr) conditions. We analyzed a ∼75-cm core of regolith for chemical loss and then characterized the mineralogical and morphological properties using electron microscopy (EM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and selective chemical dissolution. In addition, we ran colloidal dispersion, wetting/drying, and freeze/thaw experiments. In the regolith, we observed concentrations of short-range ordered (SRO) phases similar to those observed in warmer, wetter volcanic ash soils. IR and EM analyses of the clay-sized fraction were consistent with allophane as the predominant secondary phase. Selective chemical extractions targeting SRO phases indicated lower Al/Si ratios than those observed in volcanic soils reported in warmer localities, which we attribute to Si-rich allophane and/or abundant Si-rich rock coatings. The oxic circumneutral-pH colloidal dispersion experiments mobilized Al, Fe and Ti primarily as 260-415 nm particles and Ca, Mg and Na as solutes. Si was lost both in the colloidal and dissolved forms. Dispersed colloids likely contain allophane and ferrihydrite. Under anoxic conditions, dissolution of Fe oxide cements also released fines. The experiments help to explain elemental loss from the clay-sized regolith fraction at Svalbard: observed depletions in Ca, K, Mg and Na were likely due to solute loss, while particle-reactive Al, Fe, Si and Ti were mostly retained. Wetting/drying was observed to be as effective as freeze/thaw in driving material loss. It is thus

  12. Ilmenite exsolution schemes in Apollo-17 high-Ti basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.; Heiken, G. ); Muhich, T. . Dept. of Geology)

    1990-01-01

    Combined electron microprobe and scanning electron microscope (SEM) x-ray image analyses are used to obtain semiquantitative data on the relations between ilmenite grains and their exsolved chromite and rutile. Comparisons of these data for ilmenites in four Apollo-17 high-Ti basalts with a database of electron microprobe analyses from the literature indicates that Cr expulsion from ilmenite can be as important as Fe{sup 2+} reduction in causing subsolidus exsolution of chromite and rutile from ilmenite. 12 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Mechanical properties of basalt cores from DSDP Hole 504B

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Static Young's modulus, ultimate compressive strength, and relative ductility have been measured in both uniaxial and triaxial compression tests on oven-dried, copper-jacketed, cylindrical specimens from basalt cores from DSDP Hole 504B at room temperature and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/. The results indicate drilling rates correlate with both uniaxial and triaxial compressive strengths; compressive strengths also correlate with both static and dynamic Young's moduli of elasticity. P-wave velocity may be useful as a predictor for drilling rates. (ACR)

  14. Two new basaltic objects in the Outer Main Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Roig, F.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Moskovitz, N. A.

    2007-08-01

    The existence of basalt on the surface of asteroids provides information about their thermal history that is likely related to their formation and collisional evolution. Basaltic materials on the surface of an asteroid are indicators of past partial melting, a phenomenon that occurs due to the complicated interplay of heating and cooling processes within the interior of rocky bodies. Until recently, most of the known basaltic asteroids, taxonomically classified as V-type, were members of the Vesta dynamical family. Currently, several V-type asteroids are know to reside outside the Vesta family (e.g. [3][8]), and several NEAs with basaltic mineralogical surface composition have been recognized (e.g. [5] [1][6]). The asteroid (1459) Magnya, a basaltic object in the outer asteroid belt [10], is sufficiently distant from the Vesta family so that its probability of origin from this family is very low [11]. [12] presented the possibility of searching yet unknown V-type asteroids using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A sub-product of this survey is the Moving Objects Catalog (MOC), which in its third release provides five band photometry for 43424 asteroids [7][9]. [12] introduced a systematic method to identify possible candidate V-type asteroids from the SDSS-MOC, applying the Principal Components Analysis to the data. They found 263 V-type candidates that are not members of the Vesta dynamical family. The most interesting result is the presence of 8 V-type candidates in the middle/outer asteroid belt, i.e. with a > 2.5 AU: (7472), (10537), (21238), (40521), (44496), (55613), (66905) and (105041). These asteroids are quite isolated in proper elements space and do not belong to any of the major dynamical families. They are not close in proper elements space to (1459) Magnya either. In a recent study, [2] analyzed the spectra of (21238) in the near infrared (NIR) and confirmed its basaltic nature. In this work we present low resolution spectra

  15. Two new basaltic objects in the Outer Main Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, R.; Roig, F.; Gil-Hutton, R.; Moskovitz, N. A.

    2007-08-01

    The existence of basalt on the surface of asteroids provides information about their thermal history that is likely related to their formation and collisional evolution. Basaltic materials on the surface of an asteroid are indicators of past partial melting, a phenomenon that occurs due to the complicated interplay of heating and cooling processes within the interior of rocky bodies. Until recently, most of the known basaltic asteroids, taxonomically classified as V-type, were members of the Vesta dynamical family. Currently, several V-type asteroids are know to reside outside the Vesta family (e.g. [3][8]), and several NEAs with basaltic mineralogical surface composition have been recognized (e.g. [5] [1][6]). The asteroid (1459) Magnya, a basaltic object in the outer asteroid belt [10], is sufficiently distant from the Vesta family so that its probability of origin from this family is very low [11]. [12] presented the possibility of searching yet unknown V-type asteroids using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A sub-product of this survey is the Moving Objects Catalog (MOC), which in its third release provides five band photometry for 43424 asteroids [7][9]. [12] introduced a systematic method to identify possible candidate V-type asteroids from the SDSS-MOC, applying the Principal Components Analysis to the data. They found 263 V-type candidates that are not members of the Vesta dynamical family. The most interesting result is the presence of 8 V-type candidates in the middle/outer asteroid belt, i.e. with a > 2.5 AU: (7472), (10537), (21238), (40521), (44496), (55613), (66905) and (105041). These asteroids are quite isolated in proper elements space and do not belong to any of the major dynamical families. They are not close in proper elements space to (1459) Magnya either. In a recent study, [2] analyzed the spectra of (21238) in the near infrared (NIR) and confirmed its basaltic nature. In this work we present low resolution spectra

  16. Dissolved hydrogen and methane in the oceanic basaltic biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Cowen, James P.; Olson, Eric J.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Jungbluth, Sean P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Rappé, Michael S.

    2014-11-01

    The oceanic basaltic crust is the largest aquifer on Earth and has the potential to harbor substantial subsurface microbial ecosystems, which hitherto remains largely uncharacterized and is analogous to extraterrestrial subsurface habitats. Within the sediment-buried 3.5 Myr old basaltic crust of the eastern Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, the circulating basement fluids have moderate temperature (∼65 °C) and low to undetectable dissolved oxygen and nitrate concentrations. Sulfate, present in high concentrations, is therefore expected to serve as the major electron acceptor in this subsurface environment. This study focused on the availability and potential sources of two important electron donors, methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2), for the subseafloor biosphere. High integrity basement fluids were collected via fluid delivery lines associated with Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kits (CORKs) that extend from basement depths to outlet ports at the seafloor. Two new CORKs installed during IODP 327 in 2010, 1362A and 1362B, were sampled in 2011 and 2013. The two CORKs are superior than earlier style CORKs in that they are equipped with coated casing and polytetrafluoroethylene fluid delivery lines, reducing the interaction between casing materials with the environment. Additional samples were collected from an earlier style CORK at Borehole 1301A. The basement fluids are enriched in H2 (0.05-1.8 μmol/kg), suggesting that the ocean basaltic aquifer can support H2-driven metabolism. The basement fluids also contain significant amount of CH4 (5-32 μmol/kg), revealing CH4 as an available substrate for subseafloor basaltic habitats. The δ13C values of CH4 from the three boreholes ranged from -22.5 to -58‰, while the δ2H values ranged from -316 to 57‰. The isotopic compositions of CH4 and the molecular compositions of hydrocarbons suggest that CH4 in the basement fluids is of both biogenic and abiotic origins, varying among sites

  17. Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, boreholes 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) has been undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in fulfillment of obligations and commitments made under the National Environmental Policy Act and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. This restoration program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility reclamation. Detailed descriptions of these reclamation projects may be found in a number of previous reports. This report describes the second phase of the reclamation program for the BWIP boreholes and analyzes its success relative to the reclamation objective. 6 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bennecke, W.M.

    1996-10-01

    A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well.

  20. Chemical compositions of martian basalts (shergottites): Some inferences on basalt formation, mantle metasomatism, and differentiation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-12-01

    Bulk chemical compositions of the shergottite basalts provide important constraints on magma genesis and mantle processes in Mars. Abundances of many major and trace elements in the shergottites covary in 2 distinct groups: Group 1 (G1) includes mostly highly incompatible elements (e.g., La, Th), and Group 2 (G2) includes mostly moderately incompatible elements (e.g., Ti, Lu, Al, Hf). Covariations of G2 elements (not necessarily linear) are consistent with partitioning between basalt magma and orthopyroxene + olivine. This fractionation represents partial melting to form the shergottites and their crystallization; the restite minerals cannot include aluminous phase(s), phosphate, ilmenite, zircon, or sulfides. Overall, abundances of G1 elements are decoupled from those of G2. In graphing abundances of a G1 element against those of a G2 element, G1/G2 abundance ratios do not appear to be random but are restricted to 4 values. Shergottites with a given G1/G2 value need not have the same crystallization age and need not fall on a single fractionation trajectory involving compatible elements (e.g., Ti versus Fe*). These observations imply that the G1/G2 families were established before basalt formation and suggest metasomatic enrichment of their source region (major carrier of G2 elements) by a component rich in G1 elements. Group 1 elements were efficiently separated from G2 elements very early in Mars' history. Such efficient fractionation is not consistent with simple petrogenesis; it requires multiple fractionations, "complex" petrogenetic processes, or minerals with unusual geochemistry. The behavior of phosphorus in this early fractionation event is inexplicable by normal petrogenetic processes and minerals. Several explanations are possible, including significant compatibility of P in majoritic garnet and the presence of P-bearing iron metal (or a phosphide phase) in the residual solid assemblage (carrier of G2 elements). If the latter, Mars' mantle is more

  1. Smectite Formation from Basaltic Glass Under Acidic Conditions on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Massive deposits of phyllosilicates of the smectite group, including Mg/Fe-smectite, have been identified in Mars's ancient Noachian terrain. The observed smectite is hypothesized to form through aqueous alteration of basaltic crust under neutral to alkaline pH conditions. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere suggested for ancient Mars were favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, the detection of large-scale carbonate deposits is limited on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits may have formed under acidic conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. In this work we investigated formation of saponite at a pH of approximately 4 from Mars-analogue synthetic Adirondack basaltic glass of composition similar to Adirondack class rocks located at Gusev crater. Hydrothermal (200º Centigrade) 14 day experiments were performed with and without 10 millimoles Fe(II) or Mg under anoxic condition [hereafter denoted as anoxic_Fe, anoxic_Mg and anoxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)] and under oxic condition [hereafter denoted as oxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)]. Characterization and formation conditions of the synthesized saponite provided insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for saponite formation on Mars.

  2. Los Angeles: The most differentiated basaltic martian meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Warren, Paul H.; Greenwood, James P.; Verish, Robert S.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Hervig, Richard L.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.

    2000-11-01

    Los Angeles is a new martian meteorite that expands the compositional range of basaltic shergottites. Compared to Shergotty, Zagami, QUE94201, and EET79001-B, Los Angeles is more differentiated, with higher concentrations of incompatible elements (e.g., La) and a higher abundance of late-stage phases such as phosphates and K-rich feldspathic glass. The pyroxene crystallization trend starts at compositions more ferroan than in other martian basalts. Trace elements indicate a greater similarity to Shergotty and Zagami than to QUE94201 or EET79001-B, but the Mg/Fe ratio is low even compared to postulated parent melts of Shergotty and Zagami. Pyroxene in Los Angeles has 0.7 4-μm-thick exsolution lamellae, ˜10 times thicker than those in Shergotty and Zagami. Opaque oxide compositions suggest a low equilibration temperature at an oxygen fugacity near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer. Los Angeles cooled more slowly than Shergotty and Zagami. Slow cooling, coupled with the ferroan bulk composition, produced abundant fine-grained intergrowths of fayalite, hedenbergite, and silica, by the breakdown of pyroxferroite. Shock effects in Los Angeles include maskelynitized plagioclase, pyroxene with mosaic extinction, and rare fault zones. One such fault ruptured a previously decomposed zone of pyroxferroite. Although highly differentiated, the bulk composition of Los Angeles is not close to the low-Ca/Si composition of the globally wind-stirred soil of Mars.

  3. Continental flood basalts derived from the hydrous mantle transition zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan-Ce; Wilde, Simon A; Li, Qiu-Li; Yang, Ya-Nan

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been postulated that the Earth's hydrous mantle transition zone may play a key role in intraplate magmatism, but no confirmatory evidence has been reported. Here we demonstrate that hydrothermally altered subducted oceanic crust was involved in generating the late Cenozoic Chifeng continental flood basalts of East Asia. This study combines oxygen isotopes with conventional geochemistry to provide evidence for an origin in the hydrous mantle transition zone. These observations lead us to propose an alternative thermochemical model, whereby slab-triggered wet upwelling produces large volumes of melt that may rise from the hydrous mantle transition zone. This model explains the lack of pre-magmatic lithospheric extension or a hotspot track and also the arc-like signatures observed in some large-scale intracontinental magmas. Deep-Earth water cycling, linked to cold subduction, slab stagnation, wet mantle upwelling and assembly/breakup of supercontinents, can potentially account for the chemical diversity of many continental flood basalts. PMID:26169260

  4. Fluid/Melt Partition Coefficients Of Halogens In Basaltic Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alletti, M.; Baker, D.; Scaillet, B.; Aiuppa, A.; Moretti, R.; Ottolini, L.

    2007-12-01

    Despite the importance of halogens (F, Cl) in volcanic degassing, solubility and fluid/melt partitioning of these elements have not been comprehensively studied in natural basaltic melts. Experimental determinations of halogen solubility in Mount Etna melts are lacking, despite this volcano being one of the most active and intensively monitored on Earth with an estimated output of thousands tonnes of halogens per day. In order to better understand halogen degassing, we present the results of a series of halogen partitioning experiments performed at different pressures (1-200 MPa), redox conditions (from Δ NNO = + 2 to Δ NNO = - 0.3) and fluid compositions. Experiments used a hawaiitic, glassy, alkaline basalt with Mg# = 0.59, sampled during the July 2001 eruption of Mount Etna. A series of experiments were conducted using H2O-NaCl or H2O-NaF solutions. The effect of CO2 in multi-component fluid H2O-CO2-NaCl or H2O-CO2-NaF was also investigated. The experimental run products were mostly glasses, but a few run products contained less than 10% crystals. The concentration of halogens in the fluid phase after the experiment was calculated from mass balance, and the partition coefficients for both Cl and F at the studied conditions determined. Using these measurements and thermodynamical models, the dependence of these partition coefficients on the fugacities of various gaseous species was investigated.

  5. CO2-filled vesicles in mid-ocean basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Batchelder, J.N.; Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Volatile-filled vesicles are present in minor amounts in all samples of mid-ocean basalt yet collected (and presumably erupted) down to depths of 4.8 km. When such vesicles are pierced in liquid under standard conditions, the volume expansion of the gas is 0.2 ?? 0.05 times the eruption pressure in bars or 20 ?? 5 times the eruption depth in km. Such expansion could be used as a measure of eruption depth. A variety of techniques: (1) vacuum crushing and gas chromatographic, freezing separation, and mass spectrographic analyses; (2) measurements of phase changes on a freezing microscope stage; (3) microscopic chemical and solubility observations; and (4) volume change measurements, all indicate that CO2 comprises more than 95% by volume of the vesicle gas in several submarine basalt samples from the Atlantic and Pacific. The CO2 held in vesicles is present in quantities about equal to or greater than that presumed to be dissolved in the glass (melt) and amounts to 400-900 ppm of the rock. The rigid temperature of the glass is 800-1000??C and increases for shallower samples. A sulfur gas was originally present in subordinate amounts in the vesicles, but has largely reacted with iron in the vesicle walls to produce sulfide spherules. ?? 1977.

  6. Solubilities of nitrogen and noble gases in basalt melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazaki, A.; Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen and noble gases are important tracers in geochemistry and chosmochemistry. Compared to noble gases, however, physicochemical properties of nitrogen, such as solubility in melt or melt/silicate partition, are not well known. Solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt depends on redox condition of the atmosphere. For example, solubility of nitrogen in E chondrite melt under reducing conditions is as high as 2 mol percent at 1500 C, suggesting that nitrogen is chemically dissolved in silicate melts, i.e., being dissolved as free anions or replacing oxygen sites in silicate network. However, the solubility and the dissolution mechanism of nitrogen under oxidizing conditions are not well investigated. To obtain nitrogen solubility in silicate melts under various redox conditions and to understand its mechanism, we are conducting experiments by using (15)N(15)N-labeled nitrogen gas. This makes it easy to distinguish dissolved nitrogen from later contamination of atmospheric nitrogen, and hence enables us to measure the nitrogen solubility accurately. As a preliminary experiment, we have measured solubility of nitrogen in basalt melt under the atmospheric oxygen pressure.

  7. Experimental assessment of borehole wall drilling damage in basaltic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-06-01

    Ring tension tests, permeability tests, and microscopic fracture studies have been performed to investigate the borehole damage induced at low confining pressure by three drilling techniques (diamond, percussion and rotary). Specimens are drilled with three hole sizes (38, 76, and 102 mm diameter) in Pomona basalt and Grande basaltic andesite. The damaged zone is characterized in terms of fractures and fracture patterns around the hole, and in terms of tensile strength reduction of the rock around the holes. Experimental results show that the thickness of the damaged zone around the hole ranges from 0.0 to 1.7 mm. A larger drill bit induces more wall damage than does a smaller one. Different drilling techniques show different damage characteristics (intensity and distribution). Damage characteristics are governed not only by drilling parameters (bit size, weight on bit, rotational speed, diamond radius, and energy), but also by properties of the rock. The weaker rock tends to show more intense damage than does the stronger one. Cracks within grains or cleavage fractures are predominant in slightly coarser grained rock (larger than 0.5 mm grain size) while intergranular cracks are predominant in very fine grained rock (smaller than 0.01 mm grain size). The damaged zones play no significant role in the flow path around a borehole plug.

  8. Composition and origin of basaltic magma of the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, H.A.

    1955-01-01

    Silica-saturated basaltic magma is the source of the voluminous lava flows, erupted frequently and rapidly in the primitive shield-building stage of activity, that form the bulk of each Hawaiian volcano. This magma may be available in batches that differ slightly in free silica content from batch to batch both at the same and at different volcanoes; differentiation by fractionation of olivine does not occur within this primitive magma. Silica-deficient basaltic magma, enriched in alkali, is the source of commonly porphyritic lava flows erupted less frequently and in relatively negligible volume during a declining and decadent stage of activity at some Hawaiian volcanoes. Differentiation by fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and augite is evident among these lavas, but does not account for the silica deficiency or the alkali enrichment. Most of the data of Hawaiian volcanism and petrology can be explained by a hypothesis that batches of magma are melted from crystalline paridotite by a recurrent process (distortion of the equatorial bulge by forced and free nutational stresses) that accomplishes the melting only of the plagioclase and pyroxene component but not the excess olivine and more refractory components within a zone of fixed and limited depth. Eruption exhausts the supply of meltable magma under a given locality and, in the absence of more violent melting processes, leaves a stratum of crystalline refractory components. ?? 1955.

  9. Humps and hollows: basalt weathering in low-latitude mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jasper; Grab, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Physical, chemical and biological weathering processes are significant contributors to landscape development in mountain blocks worldwide, and over long time scales, but the interplay between different weathering processes is uncertain. Jurassic-age basalt lava flows underlie the Drakensberg mountain range of eastern Lesotho, southern Africa (summits 3200-3400 m asl), and weathered bedrock is commonly exposed on flat plateau surfaces. Subaerial weathering throughout the Quaternary and Holocene has resulted in a range of weathering forms, some of which exploit pre-existing cooling fractures within the basalts, and some of which are independent of geological control. These forms include pseudokarst-style potholes, karren and other microforms. The geometry, chemistry of water contained within the potholes, seasonal presence of ice, sediment and organic residues all suggest that physical, chemical and biological weathering processes are significant at different times and in different ways in subaerial weathering. Moreover, it is also likely that these process-types show pronounced seasonal variability that means that the interplay between different processes is subtle. Aggregated rates of land surface denudation or geomorphic development of single landforms therefore hide this subtle interplay between different processes. Changes in mountain summit soil depth (through soil erosion), ecosystems and climate will change this balance between different processes, and will operate over different spatial and temporal scales.

  10. Basalts dredged from the Amirante ridge, western Indian ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, R.L.; Engel, C.G.; Hilde, T.W.C.

    1968-01-01

    Oceanic tholeiitic basalts were dredged from 2500 to 3000 m depth on each flank of the Amirante Ridge, 1200 km southeast of Somalia in the western Indian Ocean, by R.V. Argo in 1964. One sample, probably shed from a flow or dike in basement beneath the coralline cap, gave a wholerock KAr age of 82??16??106 years. The age is similar to those reported by others for agglomerate from Providence Reef, nearer Madagascar, and for gabbro from Chain Ridge, the southwest member of Owen Fracture Zone, nearer the Somali coast. The Amirante Cretaceous-Early Tertiary occurrence lies between the "continental" 650 ?? 106 years granites of Seychelles Archipelago and the large Precambrian "continental" block of Madagascar. Trends of major structures and distribution of the related topographic and magnetic-anomaly lineations in 7-8 ?? 106 km2of the surrounding Indian Ocean suggest that in addition to spreading of the seafloor from the seismically-active Mid-Indian Ocean Ridge-Carlsberg Ridge complex there has been, since mid-Mesozoic time, distributed left-lateral shear along 52??-54??E that has moved Madagascar at least 700 km south relative to Seychelles Bank. Measurements by other indicate the absolute movement of Madagascar has been southward as well. The emplacement of oceanic tholeiitic basalts at shallow depth, the development of volcanic topography between the sedimented Somali and Mascarene basins, and the existence of the faulted Amirante Trench and Ridge are consequences of the displacement. ?? 1968.

  11. Alteration products of shock metamorphosed basalt from a range of shock pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the possibility that shock metamorphosed basalt weathers at faster rates than unshocked protoliths, a petrographic study of weathering products in shocked basalts is necessary. Lonar Crater, India is a fortuitous impact ~550 ka [Jourdan et al., 2010] into Deccan flood basalt. Deccan basalt is an excellent spectral analog for Martian basalts [Bandfield et al., 2000], and hence Lonar basalt shocked to a range of pressures [Kieffer et al., 1976] are excellent samples to compare to shergottites and remote sensing data of Mars. Shocked basalt is found as clasts in a thin, ~1 m suevite breccia layer that drapes an ~8 m lithic breccia that comprises the majority of the Lonar ejecta blanket. The lithic breccia represents the “throw out” ejected over the crater rim and only consists of clasts of unshocked and Class 1 (fractured grains) shocked basalt. The suevite breccia or “fall out” consists of all classes of shocked basalt classified by Kieffer et al. [1976]. Petrography of these clasts from suevite breccia outcrops will be shown and discussed. Class 2 shocked basalt shows intense shattering and fracturing of clinopyroxene grains, and labradorite has been converted to maskelynite (Figure 1). Classes 3 and 4 can be differentiated from Class 2 as the labradorite glass shows evidence of flow and vesiculation (e.g., Class 4 in Figure 2), respectively. Petrographic images of impact melts (Class 5) exhibit schlieren and flow features similar to lechatelierite from Meteor Crater and other terrestrial impact melts. The growth of hematite (Figure 1), calcite, chlorite, and serpentine within shattered augite and augite-maskelynite boundaries will be shown with comparisons to these minerals in unshocked basalt. Also discussed will be the petrography of shocked basalt talus vs. that of the in-situ clasts, as this bias in sample collection is influenced by what shocked basalt remains after ~550 ka. Class 2 shocked basalt in plain and cross polarized light. Note

  12. Basalt generation at the Apollo 12 site. Part 1: New data, classification, and re-evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Hacker, Matthew D.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1994-01-01

    New data are reported from five previously unanalyzed Apollo 12 mare basalts that are incorporated into an evaluation of previous petrogenetic models and classification schemes for these basalts. This paper proposes a classification for Apollo 12 mare basalts on the basis of whole-rock Mg# (molar 100*(Mg/(Mg+Fe))) and Rb/Sr ratio (analyzed by isotope dilution), whereby the ilmenite, olivine, and pigeonite basalt groups are readily distinguished from each other. Scrutiny of the Apollo 12 feldspathic 'suite' demonstrates that two of the three basalts previously assigned to this group (12031, 12038, 12072) can be reclassified: 12031 is a plagioclase-rich pigeonite basalt; and 12072 is an olivine basalt. Only basalt 12038 stands out as a unique sample to the Apollo 12 site, but whether this represents a single sample from another flow at the Apollo 12 site or is exotic to this site is equivocal. The question of whether the olivine and pigeonite basalt suites are co-magmatic is addressed by incompatible trace-element chemistry: the trends defined by these two suites when Co/Sm and Sm/Eu ratios are plotted against Rb/Sr ratio demonstrate that these two basaltic types cannot be co-magmatic. Crystal fractionation/accumulation paths have been calculated and show that neither the pigeonite, olivine, or ilmenite basalts are related by this process. Each suite requires a distinct and separate source region. This study also examines sample heterogeneity and the degree to which whole-rock analyses are representative, which is critical when petrogenetic interpretation is undertaken. Sample heterogeneity has been investigated petrographically (inhomogeneous mineral distribution) with consideration of duplicate analyses, and whether a specific sample (using average data) plots consistently upon a fractionation trend when a number of different compostional parameters are considered. Using these criteria, four basalts have been identified where reported analyses are not

  13. Diary of a flood basalt: A stratigraphic tour of two sections within the Oligocene Ethiopian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, T. O.; Bradley, B. L.; Krans, S. R.; Kappelman, J. W.; Yirgu, G.; Ayalew, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flood basalts are the most significant magmatic events on the planet, influencing our environment by modifying the lithosphere and atmosphere. Our understanding of flood basalt processes comes almost entirely from within the rock record - typically a vast pile of basaltic lavas, hiatuses, and sedimentary horizons. Stratigraphic continuity is thus a critical characteristic to constrain the processes associated with the formation of flood basalt provinces. Oceanic flood basalts are difficult to access in situ, leaving continental equivalents our primary target. The Oligocene Ethiopian Traps is among the youngest and most intact flood basalt provinces, making this a premier region to examine flood basalt stratigraphy. Leveraging recent road building, we have constructed a flow by flow stratigraphy for two ~1500m independent sections of the Low-Ti region of the Ethiopian traps, separated by ~70 km. These sections lie towards the edge of the modern exposure of the Ethiopian flood basalts, however the remarkable parallelism of flows and the lack of evidence of pinching suggests that the province was significantly more aerially extensive towards the west. For the most continuous ~1200m section, median flow thickness is about ~15m in the lower ~400m and upper ~400m of the flood basalt sequence, but flows thin significantly to a median of 4m in the central portion of this sequence. The petrography shows distinctive patterns through the pile: largely aphyric and clinopyroxene/olivine phyric flows are more common towards the base of the sequence and transition to largely plagioclase phyric basalts. At the top of the flood basalt pile a further transition from plagioclase phyric to largely aphyric flows is observed. Paleosols become more frequent and are thicker towards the top of the sequence. These observations point to a gradual temporal shift in the differentiation depths and flux of magmas entering the Ethiopian lithosphere.

  14. Basaltic Magmatism: The Dominant Factor in the Petrologic and Tectonic Evolution of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Silicate bodies such as the Moon, Mars, probably Mercury, and possibly Venus, appear to have evolved in three main stages: a first (felsic) differentiation, a late heavy bombardment, and a second (basaltic) differentiation. It has been proposed that the Earth underwent a similar sequence. This paper argues that the second differentiation, basaltic magmatism, has dominated the petrologic and tectonic evolution of the Earth for four billion years. A global andesitic crust, formed during and after accretion of the planet, was disrupted by major impacts that triggered mantle upwelling and sea-floor spreading about 4 billion years ago. The oceanic crust collectively has since been formed by basaltic volcanism, from spreading centers and mantle plumes. However, the continental crust has also been greatly affected. Basaltic underplating has promoted anatexis and diapiric intrusion of granitoids in granite-greenstone terrains, as well as providing heat for regional metamorphism. Basaltic intrusions, such as the Nipissing diabase of the Sudbury area, have added to the thickness of continental crust. Satellite magnetic surveys suggest that there are more such basaltic intrusions than previously realized; examples include the Bangui anomaly of central Africa and the Kentucky anomaly. Basaltic overplating from mafic dike swarms has repeatedly flooded continents; had it not been for erosion, they would be covered with basalt as Venus is today. The tectonic effects of basaltic volcanism on continents have only recently been realized. The World Stress Map project has discovered that continents are under horizontal compressive stress, caused by push from mid-ocean ridges, i.e., by basaltic volcanism. The stress fields are generally uniform over large intraplate areas, and could contribute to intraplate tectonism. Seafloor spreading has demonstrably been effective for at least 200 million years, and ridge push thus a contributor to tectonic activity for that long. Collectively, the

  15. Seismic wave propagation through surface basalts - implications for coal seismic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Zhou, Binzhong; Hatherly, Peter; Fu, Li-Yun

    2010-02-01

    Seismic reflection surveying is one of the most widely used and effective techniques for coal seam structure delineation and risk mitigation for underground longwall mining. However, the ability of the method can be compromised by the presence of volcanic cover. This problem arises within parts of the Bowen and Sydney Basins of Australia and seismic surveying can be unsuccessful. As a consequence, such areas are less attractive for coal mining. Techniques to improve the success of seismic surveying over basalt flows are needed. In this paper, we use elastic wave-equation-based forward modelling techniques to investigate the effects and characteristics of seismic wave propagation under different settings involving changes in basalt properties, its thickness, lateral extent, relative position to the shot position and various forms of inhomogeneity. The modelling results suggests that: 1) basalts with high impedance contrasts and multiple flows generate strong multiples and weak reflectors; 2) thin basalts have less effect than thick basalts; 3) partial basalt cover has less effect than full basalt cover; 4) low frequency seismic waves (especially at large offsets) have better penetration through the basalt than high frequency waves; and 5) the deeper the coal seams are below basalts of limited extent, the less influence the basalts will have on the wave propagation. In addition to providing insights into the issues that arise when seismic surveying under basalts, these observations suggest that careful management of seismic noise and the acquisition of long-offset seismic data with low-frequency geophones have the potential to improve the seismic results.

  16. The degassing and crystallisation behaviour of basaltic lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; Tuffen, H.; Pinkerton, H.; James, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Degassing is a fundamental volcanic process that can play a major role in controlling eruptive styles. Volatile loss during magma ascent and decompression increases the liquidus temperature of the residual melt, resulting in undercooling that can trigger crystallisation (1,2). Late-stage crystallisation and vesiculation are significant factors in controlling the eruptive behaviour of volcanoes of intermediate composition (2), but their effects on basaltic volcanic activity have yet to be fully investigated. We present the results of experiments designed to measure the degassing and crystallisation behaviour of volcanic rocks at temperatures up to 1250°C, using thermo-gravimetric analysis coupled with differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS). During TGA-DSC-MS analysis, volatiles released from a sample under a controlled heating programme are identified in a mass spectrometer whilst changes to the sample weight and heat flow are simultaneously recorded. By subjecting samples of basaltic lava and bombs to two heating cycles, we have shown that the onset of degassing (mass loss) is systematically followed by crystallisation (exothermic events) on the first heating cycle. During the second cycle, when the sample has been fully degassed, no mass loss or crystallisation are recorded. Our results also highlight complexities in the processes; in some cases up to four pulses of degassing and crystallisation have been identified during a single heating cycle. Our results allow us to measure the total volatile content of samples, the onset temperatures of degassing and crystallisation and the time lag between the two processes, and the enthalpy, hence percentage, of crystallisation taking place. These results have important implications for our understanding of basaltic volcanic eruptions. During effusive basaltic eruptions, lava can travel many kilometres, threatening property and infrastructure. The final areal flow extent is partly dependent on

  17. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  18. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  19. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  20. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  1. 32 CFR 169a.14 - Military personnel commercial activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Military personnel commercial activity. 169a.14... CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.14 Military personnel commercial activity. Commercial activities performed exclusively by military personnel not subject to deployment in...

  2. Intracanyon basalt lavas of the Debed River (northern Armenia), part of a Pliocene-Pleistocene continental flood basalt province in the South Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Gevorgyan, Hripsime; Israyelyan, Arsen; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-03-01

    Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene (~ 3.25-2.05 Ma), 200-400 m thick basalt lavas outcrop in the South Caucasus region, including the Kars-Erzurum Plateau (northeastern Turkey), the Javakheti Plateau (Georgia-Armenia), and the Lori Plateau (northern Armenia). These fissure-fed, rapidly erupted fluid lavas filled pre-existing river valleys over many tens of kilometres. The basalts exposed in the Debed River canyon, northern Armenia, are ~ 200 m thick and of three morphological types: (1) basal pillow basalts and hyaloclastites, overlain by (2) columnar-jointed pahoehoe sheet flows, in turn overlain by (3) slabby pahoehoe and rubbly pahoehoe flows. The lower and middle lavas show evidence for damming of river drainage, like many lavas of the Columbia River flood basalt province, Scotland, Ireland, and Iceland. There is also evidence for syn-volcanic faulting of the early lavas. Related basalts also outcrop in the Gegham Uplands and the Hrazdan River basin in Armenia. This 3.25-2.05 Ma South Caucasus basalt province, covering parts of Turkey, Georgia and Armenia, has an estimated areal extent of ~ 15,000 km2 and volume of ~ 2250 km3. Because its main geological features are remarkably like those of many continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces, we consider it a true, albeit small, CFB province. It is the smallest and youngest CFB in the world. An analogue closely similar in major features is the Late Miocene Altos de Jalisco CFB province in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Both provinces formed during lithospheric pull-apart and transtensional faulting. Their broader significance is in showing flood basalt size distribution to be a continuum without natural breaks, with implications for geodynamic models.

  3. Searching for neuKREEP: An EMP study of Apollo 11 Group A basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerde, Eric A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    The Apollo 11 and 17 landing sites are characterized by the presence of high-Ti basalts (TiO2 greater than 6 percent). The Group A basalts of Apollo 11 have elevated K compositions (greater than 2000 ppm); and are enriched in incompatible trace elements relative to the other types of high-Ti basalt found in the region. These unique basalts also are the youngest of all high-Ti basalts, with an age of 3.56 +/- 0.02 Ga. Recent modelling of the Apollo 11 Group A basalts by Jerde et al. has demonstrated that this unique variety of high-Ti basalt may have formed through fractionation of a liquid with the composition of the Apollo 11 orange glass, coupled with assimilation of evolved material (dubbed neuKREEP and having similarities to lunar quartz monzodiorite). Assimilation of this material would impart its REE signature on the liquid, resulting in the elevated REE abundances observed. Minerals such as whitlockite which contain a large portion of the REE budget can be expected to reflect the REE characteristics of the assimilant. To this end, an examination of the whitlockite present in the Apollo 11 Group A basalts was undertaken to search for evidence of the neuKREEP material assimilated.

  4. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. Final draft, technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, W.C.; Voorhees, M.L.; Prickett, T.A.

    1980-05-23

    This technical memorandum was prepared to: (1) describe a typical basalt radionuclide repository site, (2) describe geologic and hydrologic processes associated with regional radionuclide transport in basalts, (3) define the parameters required to model regional radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site, and (4) develop a ''conceptual model'' of radionuclide transport from a basalt repository site. In a general hydrological sense, basalts may be described as layered sequences of aquifers and aquitards. The Columbia River Basalt, centered near the semi-arid Pasco Basin, is considered by many to be typical basalt repository host rock. Detailed description of the flow system including flow velocities with high-low hydraulic conductivity sequences are not possible with existing data. However, according to theory, waste-transport routes are ultimately towards the Columbia River and the lengths of flow paths from the repository to the biosphere may be relatively short. There are many physical, chemical, thermal, and nuclear processes with associated parameters that together determine the possible pattern of radionuclide migration in basalts and surrounding formations. Brief process descriptions and associated parameter lists are provided. Emphasis has been placed on the use of the distribution coefficient in simulating ion exchange. The use of the distribution coefficient approach is limited because it takes into account only relatively fast mass transfer processes. In general, knowledge of hydrogeochemical processes is primitive.

  5. Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Quarterly report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Deju, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the technical progress for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 1980. The overall Basalt Waste Isolation Project is divided into the following principal work areas: systems integration; geosciences; hydrology; engineered barriers; near-surface test facility; engineering testing; and repository studies. Summaries of major accomplishments for each of these areas are reported.

  6. Deep-ocean basalts: inert gas content and uncertainties in age dating.

    PubMed

    Noble, C S; Naughton, J J

    1968-10-11

    The radiogenic argon and helium contents of three basalts erupted into the deep ocean from an active volcano (Kilauea) have been measured. Ages calculated from these measurements increase with sample depth up to 22 million years for lavas deduced to be recent. Caution is urged in applying dates from deep-ocean basalts in studies on ocean-floor spreading. PMID:17779379

  7. Sr-isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Wooden, J. L.; Wiesmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    As part of a study of Apollo 12 basalts, crystallization ages and initial Sr-87/Sr-86 (I) were determined for pigeonite basalts 12039 and 12055 and ilmenite basalt 12051. Sr-86/Sr-87 measurements for a larger suite of whole rock and plagioclase samples were obtained, and it is found that I-values for olivine and pigeonite basalts are indistinguishable while I-values for ilmenite basalts are distinctly lower. A self-consistent model for the evolution of the Sr-isotopic composition and REE abundances suggests that basalt was formed by small (2-10%) degrees of melting of cumulate sources composed of varying proportions of olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene. This model requires nonchondritic relative abundances of the REE in the parental liquid at the time of formation of the cumulate sources. The model also describes Sr-isotopic composition and REE abundances of Apollo 17 high-Ti basalts and Apollo 15 low-Ti basalts. A lunar 'scenario' involving open system crystallization of a magma ocean from the crust downward is proposed.

  8. Surface modification of basalt with silane coupling agent on asphalt mixture moisture damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yahong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yinhui; Li, Wensheng; Yuan, Jianmin; Tan, Ligang; Wang, Shuangyin; Wu, Zhenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on γ-(methacryloyloxy) propyltrimethoxysilane (KH570). The surface of basalt rocks was modified by KH570 and the new silane coupling agent (NSCA), and the interfacial interaction between silane coupling agent and basalt was also studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the silane coupling agent molecule bound strongly with basalt rocks. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer of coupling agent was formed on the surface of modified basalt. The boiling test and immersion Marshall test confirmed that the moisture sensitivity of basalt modified with the new silane coupling agent increased more significantly than that untreated and treated with KH570. The Retained Marshall Strength of basalt modified with the new coupling agent increased from 71.74% to 87.79% compared with untreated basalt. The results indicated that the new silane coupling agent played an important role in improving the interfacial performance between basalt and asphalt.

  9. Feldspar basalts in lunar soil and the nature of the lunar continents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Harmon, R. S.; Warner, J.; Brett, R.; Jakes, P.; Brown, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is found that 25% on the Apollo-14 glasses have the same composition as the glasses in two samples taken from the Luna-16 column. The compositions are equivalent to feldspar basalt and anorthosite gabbro, and are similar to the feldspar basalts identified from Surveyor-7 analysis for lunar continents.

  10. Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2009-02-01

    We used molecular techniques to analyze basalts of varying ages that were collected from the East Pacific Rise, 9 degrees N, from the rift axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and from neighboring seamounts. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA terminal restriction fragment polymorphism data revealed that basalt endoliths are distinct from seawater and that communities clustered, to some degree, based on the age of the host rock. This age-based clustering suggests that alteration processes may affect community structure. Cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed 12 different phyla and subphyla associated with basalts. These include the Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, the candidate phylum SBR1093 in the bacteria, and in the Archaea Marine Benthic Group B, none of which have been previously reported in basalts. We delineated novel ocean crust clades in the gamma-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Actinobacteria that are composed entirely of basalt-associated microflora, and may represent basalt ecotypes. Finally, microarray analysis of functional genes in basalt revealed that genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane oxidation, methanogenesis and nitrogen fixation are present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. These novel processes could exert a profound influence on ocean chemistry. PMID:18843298

  11. Thicknesses of mare basalts on the Moon from gravity and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shengxia; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Nimmo, Francis; Kiefer, Walter S.; Head, James W.; Huang, Chengli; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-05-01

    A new method of determining the thickness of mare basalts on the Moon is introduced that is made possible by high-resolution gravity data acquired from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission. Using a localized multitaper spherical-harmonic analysis, an effective density spectrum is calculated that provides an estimate of the average crustal density as a function of spherical harmonic degree. By comparing the observed effective density spectrum with one generated from a theoretical model, the thickness of mare basalts can be constrained. We assume that the grain density of the basalts is known from remote sensing data and petrologic considerations, we assign a constant porosity to the basalts, and we let both the thickness of the basalts and the density of the underlying crust vary. Using this method, the total thickness of basalts was estimated on the nearside hemisphere, yielding an average of 0.74 km with 1σ upper and lower bounds of 1.62 km and 100 m, respectively. The region of Marius Hills, which is a long-lived volcanic complex, is found to have the thickest basalts, with an average of 2.86 km and 1σ limits of 3.65 and 1.02 km, respectively. The crust beneath the Mare Imbrium basalts is found to have an atypically high density of about 3000 kg m-3 that we interpret as representing a mafic, unfractured, impact melt sheet.

  12. Spectral evidence for weathered basalt as an alternative to andesite in the northern lowlands of Mars.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Michael B; McSween, Harry Y

    2002-05-16

    Mineral abundances derived from the analysis of remotely sensed thermal emission data from Mars have been interpreted to indicate that the surface is composed of basalt (Surface Type 1) and andesite (Surface Type 2). The global distribution of these rock types is divided roughly along the planetary dichotomy which separates ancient, heavily cratered crust in the southern hemisphere (basalt) from younger lowland plains in the north (andesite). But the existence of such a large volume of andesite is difficult to reconcile with our present understanding of the geological evolution of Mars. Here we reinterpret martian surface rock lithologies using mineral abundances from previous work and new mineralogies derived from a spectral end-member set representing minerals common in unaltered and low-temperature aqueously altered basalts. Our results continue to indicate the dominance of unaltered basalt in the southern highlands, but reveal that the northern lowlands can be interpreted as weathered basalt as an alternative to andesite. The coincidence between locations of such altered basalt and a suggested northern ocean basin implies that lowland plains material may be composed of basalts weathered under submarine conditions or weathered basaltic sediments transported into this depocentre. PMID:12015596

  13. Prokaryotic diversity, distribution, and insights into their role in biogeochemical cycling in marine basalts

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Olivia U.; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A.; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Fisk, Martin R.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2008-09-30

    We used molecular techniques to analyze basalts of varying ages that were collected from the East Pacific Rise, 9 oN, from the rift axis of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, and from neighboring seamounts. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA Terminal Restriction Fragment Polymorphism data revealed that basalt endoliths are distinct from seawater and that communities clustered, to some degree, based on the age of the host rock. This age-based clustering suggests that alteration processes may affect community structure. Cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes revealed twelve different phyla and sub-phyla associated with basalts. These include the Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, the candidate phylum SBR1093 in the c, andin the Archaea Marine Benthic Group B, none of which have been previously reported in basalts. We delineated novel ocean crust clades in the gamma-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Actinobacteria that are composed entirely of basalt associated microflora, and may represent basalt ecotypes. Finally, microarray analysis of functional genes in basalt revealed that genes coding for previously unreported processes such as carbon fixation, methane-oxidation, methanogenesis, and nitrogen fixation are present, suggesting that basalts harbor previously unrecognized metabolic diversity. These novel processes could exert a profound influence on ocean chemistry.

  14. Strontium Distribution Coefficients of Basalt Core Samples from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    J. J. Colello; J. J. Rosentreter; R. C. Bartholomay; M. J. Liszewski

    1998-12-01

    Strontium distribution coefficients (Kd's) were measured for 24 basalt core samples collected from selected sites at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The measurements were made to help assess the variability of strontium Kd's as part of an ongoing investigation of strontium transport properties through geologic materials at the INEEL. The investigation is being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experiments were used to measure Kd's of basalt core samples using an aqueous solution representative of wastewater in waste-disposal ponds at the INEEL. Calculated strontium Kd's of the 24 basalt core samples ranged from 3.6{+-}1.3 to 29.4{+-}1.6 milliliters per gram. These results indicate a narrow range of variability in the strontium sorptive capacities of basalt relative to those of the sedimentary materials at the INEEL. The narrow range of the basalt Kd's can be attributed to physical and chemical properties of the basalt, and to compositional changes in the equilibrated solutions after being mixed with the basalt. The small Kd's indicate that basalt is not a major contributor in preventing the movement of strontium-90 in solution.

  15. Investigating the Origin of Th in Mare Basalts of the Western Procellarum Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flor, E. L.; Gillis, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Clementine spectral reflectance and compositional data and Lunar Prospector gamma-ray data are used to map individual basalt flows in the western Procellarum and to investigate whether Th was inherent to the basalts or the result of surface contamination. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Systematics of Ni, Co, Cr and V in Olivine from Planetary Melt Systems: Martian Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, C. D. K.; Jones, J. H.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) data for Ni, Co, Cr, and V in olivine in martian basalts is compared to data from lunar and terrestrial basalts. We use experimentally-derived and published D values to calculate as-yet unsampled, olivine-bearing, non-cumulus melt compositions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Spinel from Apollo 12 Olivine Mare Basalts: Chemical Systematics of Selected Major, Minor, and Trace Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Spilde, M. N.

    2002-01-01

    Spinels from Apollo 12 Olivine basalts have been studied by Electron and Ion microprobe techniques. The zoning trends of major, minor and trace elements provide new insights into the conditions under which planetary basalts form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Extracellular enzyme activity and microbial diversity measured on seafloor exposed basalts from Loihi seamount indicate the importance of basalts to global biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Sylvan, Jason B; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-08-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1); the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1). The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 μM, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 μM. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  19. Basalt-CO2-H2O Interactions and Variability in Carbonate Mineralization Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2009-02-01

    Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the U.S., India, Iceland, and Canada. Our previous laboratory studies with Columbia River basalts showed relative quick precipitation of carbonate minerals compared to other siliclastic rocks when batch reacted with water and supercritical CO2. In this study, our prior work with Columbia River basalt was extended to tests with basalts from the eastern U.S., India, and Africa. The basalts are all similar in bulk chemistry and share common minerals such as plagioclase, augite, and a glassy mesostasis. Single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions indicate similar cation release behavior among the basalt samples tested. Despite similar bulk chemistry and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments with CO2 saturated water show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as precipitate chemistry and morphology. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the U.S. is by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. Calcite grains with classic “dogtooth spar” morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn) were observed in post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts. Other basalts produced solid precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Polished cross sections of the reacted grains show precipitate overgrowths with irregular regions outlined by dark and bright layers indicative of zonations of different compositions. For example, SEM-EDX analysis across carbonate precipitates, which resulted from 854 days of reaction of the Central Atlantic Mafic Province (CAMP

  20. Moon and earth - Compositional differences inferred from siderophiles, volatiles, and alkalis in basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R.; Anders, E.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of RNAA analyses of 18 trace elements in 25 low-Ti lunar and 10 terrestrial oceanic basalts indicated that the volatiles such as Ag, Bi, and Br are depleted in lunar basalts by nearly constant factors of 0.026 relative to terrestrial basalts. This constancy is not consistent with models that derive the moon's volatiles from partial recondensation of the earth's mantle or from partial degassing of a captured body; it is consistent with models which derive planetary volatiles from a thin veneer of C-chondrite material. Chalcogens (Se and Te) have almost constant and identical abundances in lunar and terrestrial basalts; siderophiles show abundant Ni in lunar basalts, while Ir, Re, Ge, and Au are depleted.

  1. A preliminary analysis of lunar extra-mare basalts - Distribution, compositions, ages, volumes, and eruption styles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitford-Stark, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extra-mare basalts occupy 8.5% of the lunar basalt area and comprise 1% of the total mare basalt volume. They are preferentially located where the crust is thin and topographically low. In terms of age, eruption style, and composition they are as variable as the mare basalts. In some instances extrusion in extra-mare craters was preceded by floor-fracturing whereas in other cases it apparently was not. The volume of lava erupted may have been controlled more by the volume of magma produced than by hydrostatic effects. A minimum of nearly 1300 separate basalt eruptions is indicated; the true value could be nearer 30,000 separate eruptions.

  2. Dissolution behaviour of model basalt fibres studied by surface analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, T.; Scheffler, C.; Mäder, E.; Heinrich, G.; Jesson, D. A.; Watts, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    New concepts of surface modifications aimed at the enhancement of alkali resistance of basalt fibres require research work on chemical composition of interacting surface layers as well as knowledge about fundamental processes of basaltic glass dissolution. Therefore, two model basalt fibres manufactured out of subalkaline and alkaline rock material were leached in NaOH solution at a temperature of 80 °C for up to 11 days. The formation of a corrosion shell was observed in both cases and was analyzed by SEM/EDX. The model fibres out of subalkaline rocks show dissolution kinetic, which is two-staged, whereas the more alkaline fibre reflects a linear one. The complex composition of basalt fibre is detected by EDX and XPS. The surface of basalt fibres is rich in Si and Al. XPS high resolution spectra provide information on oxidation state of iron.

  3. Correlation between compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of high strength concrete incorporating chopped basalt fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Nasir; Fadhilnuruddin, Muhd; Elshekh, Ali Elheber Ahmed; Fathi, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), is considered as the most important test for non-destructive techniques that are used to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of high strength concrete (HSC). The relationship between the compressive strength of HSC containing chopped basalt fibre stands (CBSF) and UPV was investigated. The concrete specimens were prepared using a different ratio of CBSF as internal strengthening materials. The compressive strength measurements were conducted at the sample ages of 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days; whilst, the ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured at 28 days. The result of HSC's compressive strength with the chopped basalt fibre did not show any improvement; instead, it was decreased. The UPV of the chopped basalt fibre reinforced concrete has been found to be less than that of the control mix for each addition ratio of the basalt fibre. A relationship plot is gained between the cube compressive strength for HSC and UPV with various amounts of chopped basalt fibres.

  4. 87Sr 86Sr ratios for basalt from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.

    1983-01-01

    87Sr 86Sr ratios of 15 samples of basalt dredged from Loihi Seamount range from 0.70334 to 0.70368. The basalt types range from tholeiite to basanite in composition and can be divided into six groups on the basis of abundances of K2O, Na2O, Rb and Sr and 87Sr 86Sr ratio. The isotopic data require that the various basalt types be derived from source regions differing in Sr isotopic composition. The Loihi basalts may be produced by mixing of isotopically distinct sources, but the tholeiites and alkalic basalts from Loihi do not show a well-developed inverse trend between Rb/Sr and 87Sr 86Sr that is characteristic of the later stages of Hawaiian volcanoes such as Haleakala and Koolau. ?? 1983.

  5. Determination of basic physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks from P-wave velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakuş, Askeri; Akatay, Mahmut

    2013-12-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of basaltic rocks used as main building material in historical buildings in Diyarbakir show great diversity depending on the place of origin. Especially, earthquake studies as well as restoration jobs and civil engineers and architects who work on building dynamics need to know basic material properties of basaltic rocks that are the main building material. In this study, the basalt samples obtained from 18 different locations of the Diyarbakir area were tested in order to estimate the main material properties of basalts used in historical buildings without collecting samples from them. Subsequently, statistical relationships between the nondestructive P-wave velocity and other properties of basalts were investigated. Consequently, highly correlated models (R2 = 0.717-0.890) were obtained between P-wave velocity and density, porosity, uniaxial compressive strength, Brazilian tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio.

  6. Is plagioclase removal responsible for the negative Eu anomaly in the source regions of mare basalts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a negative Eu anomaly in the mare basalts has been suggested to indicate prior separation and flotation of plagioclase from the basalt source region during its crystallization from a lunar magma ocean (LMO). Are there any mare basalts derived from a mantle source which did not experience prior plagioclase separation? Crystal chemical rationale for REE substitution in pyroxene suggests that the combination of REE size and charge, M2 site characteristics of pyroxene, fO2, magma chemistry, and temperature may account for the negative Eu anomaly in the source region of some types of primitive, low TiO2 mare basalts. This origin for the negative Eu anomaly does not preclude the possibility of the LMO as many mare basalts still require prior plagioclase crystallization and separation and/or hybridization involving a KREEP component.

  7. Potential for microbial oxidation of ferrous iron in basaltic glass.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Mai Yia; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Roden, Eric E

    2015-05-01

    Basaltic glass (BG) is an amorphous ferrous iron [Fe(II)]-containing material present in basaltic rocks, which are abundant on rocky planets such as Earth and Mars. Previous research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial metabolism, which has important ramifications for potential past and present microbial life on Mars. However, to date there has been no direct demonstration of microbially catalyzed oxidation of Fe(II) in BG. In this study, three different culture systems were used to investigate the potential for microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in BG, including (1) the chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing "Straub culture"; (2) the mixotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing organism Desulfitobacterium frappieri strain G2; and (3) indigenous microorganisms from a streambed Fe seep in Wisconsin. The BG employed consisted of clay and silt-sized particles of freshly quenched lava from the TEB flow in Kilauea, Hawaii. Soluble Fe(II) or chemically reduced NAu-2 smectite (RS) were employed as positive controls to verify Fe(II) oxidation activity in the culture systems. All three systems demonstrated oxidation of soluble Fe(II) and/or structural Fe(II) in RS, whereas no oxidation of Fe(II) in BG material was observed. The inability of the Straub culture to oxidize Fe(II) in BG was particularly surprising, as this culture can oxidize other insoluble Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as biotite, magnetite, and siderite. Although the reason for the resistance of the BG toward enzymatic oxidation remains unknown, it seems possible that the absence of distinct crystal faces or edge sites in the amorphous glass renders the material resistant to such attack. These findings have implications with regard to the idea that Fe(II)-Si-rich phases in basalt rocks could provide a basis for chemolithotrophic microbial life on Mars, specifically in neutral-pH environments where acid-promoted mineral dissolution and

  8. Ice-Confined Basaltic Lava Flows: Review and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I.; Edwards, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Basaltic lavas that are interpreted as having been emplaced in subglacial or ice-confined subaerial settings are known from several localities in Iceland, British Columbia and Antarctica. At least four different types of observations have been used to date to identify emplacement of basaltic lavas in an ice-rich environment: i) gross flow morphology, ii) surface structures, iii) evidence for ice-confined water during emplacement, and iv) lava fracture patterns. Five types of ice-confined lava are identified: sheets, lobes, mounds, linear ridges and sinuous ridges. While the appearance of lavas is controlled by the same factors as in the submarine environment, such as the geometry and configuration of vents and lava tubes, flow rheology and rates, and underlying topography, the presence of ice can lead to distinct features that are specific to the ice-confined setting. Other types have very similar or identical equivalents in submarine environment, albeit with some oversteepening/ice contact surfaces. Ice-confined lavas can form as (1) subaerial or subaqueous lavas emplaced against ice open to the air, (2) subaqueous lavas emplaced into pre-existing sub-ice drainage networks, and (3) subaqueous lavas emplaced into ponded water beneath ice. Their surface structures reflect the relationship between rates of lava flow emplacement at the site of ice-water-lava contact, ice melting and water drainage. Variations in local lava flow rates could be due to lava cooling, constriction, inflation, tube development, ice melting, ice collapse, lava collapse, changes in eruption rate etc. Episodes of higher lava flow rate would favour direct ice contact and plastic compression against the ice, generating oversteepened and/or overthickened chilled margins, cavities in the lava formed by melting of enveloped ice blocks (cryolith cavities) and structures such as flattened pillows and lava clasts embedded into the glassy margins. Melting back of the confining ice generates space to

  9. An oceanic flood basalt province within the Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, C. W.; Duncan, R. A.; Storey, M.; Lewis, J.; Estrada, J. J.

    1998-02-01

    The thick oceanic crust of the Caribbean plate appears to be the tectonized remnant of an eastern Pacific oceanic plateau that has been inserted between North and South America. The emplacement of the plateau into its present position has resulted in the obduction and exposure of its margins, providing an opportunity to study the age relations, internal structure and compositional features of the plateau. We present the results of 40Ar- 39Ar radiometric dating, major-, trace-element, and isotopic compositions of basalts from some of the exposed sections as well as drill core basalt samples from Leg 15 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Five widely spaced, margin sections yielded ages ranging from 91 to 88 Ma. Less well-constrained radiometric ages from the drill cores, combined with the biostratigraphic age of surrounding sediments indicate a minimum crystallization age of ˜90 Ma in the Venezuelan Basin. The synchroneity of ages across the region is consistent with a flood basalt origin for the bulk of the Caribbean plateau (i.e., large volume, rapidly erupted, regionally extensive volcanism). The ages and compositions are also consistent with plate reconstructions that place the Caribbean plateau in the vicinity of the Galápagos hotspot at its inception. The trace-element and isotopic compositions of the ˜90 Ma rocks indicate a depleted mantle and an enriched, plume-like mantle were involved in melting to varying degrees across the plateau. Within the same region, a volumetrically secondary, but widespread magmatic event occurred at 76 Ma, as is evident in Curaçao, western Colombia, Haiti, and at DSDP Site 152/ODP Site 1001 near the Hess Escarpment. Limited trace-element data indicate that this phase of magmatism was generally more depleted than the first. We speculate that magmatism may have resulted from upwelling of mantle, still hot from the 90 Ma event, during lithospheric extension attending gravitational collapse of the plateau, and/or tectonic

  10. An oceanic flood basalt province within the Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, J. J.; Lewis, J.; Storey, M.; Duncan, R. A.; Sinton, C. W.

    1998-02-01

    The thick oceanic crust of the Caribbean plate appears to be the tectonized remnant of an eastern Pacific oceanic plateau that has been inserted between North and South America. The emplacement of the plateau into its present position has resulted in the obduction and exposure of its margins, providing an opportunity to study the age relations, internal structure and compositional features of the plateau. We present the results of 40Ar-39Ar radiometric dating, major-, trace-element, and isotopic compositions of basalts from some of the exposed sections as well as drill core basalt samples from Leg 15 of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. Five widely spaced, margin sections yielded ages ranging from 91 to 88 Ma. Less well-constrained radiometric ages from the drill cores, combined with the biostratigraphic age of surrounding sediments indicate a minimum crystallization age of ~90 Ma in the Venezuelan Basin. The synchroneity of ages across the region is consistent with a flood basalt origin for the bulk of the Caribbean plateau (i.e., large volume, rapidly erupted, regionally extensive volcanism). The ages and compositions are also consistent with plate reconstructions that place the Caribbean plateau in the vicinity of the Galápagos hotspot at its inception. The trace-element and isotopic compositions of the ~90 Ma rocks indicate a depleted mantle and an enriched, plume-like mantle were involved in melting to varying degrees across the plateau. Within the same region, a volumetrically secondary, but widespread magmatic event occurred at 76 Ma, as is evident in Curaçao, western Colombia, Haiti, and at DSDP Site 152/ODP Site 1001 near the Hess Escarpment. Limited trace-element data indicate that this phase of magmatism was generally more depleted than the first. We speculate that magmatism may have resulted from upwelling of mantle, still hot from the 90 Ma event, during lithospheric extension attending gravitational collapse of the plateau, and/or tectonic emplacement

  11. Highly Al-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles produced by Ball Mill Method: structural and electronic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Desireé M. de los Navas, Javier Sánchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Alcántara, Rodrigo; Fernández-Lorenzo, Concha; Martín-Calleja, Joaquín

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Highly Al-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using a Ball Mill Method. • Al doping delayed anatase to rutile phase transformation. • Al doping allow controlling the structural and electronic properties of nanoparticles. - Abstract: This study presents an easy method for synthesizing highly doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The Ball Mill method was used to synthesize pure and Al-doped titanium dioxide, with an atomic percentage up to 15.7 at.% Al/(Al + Ti). The samples were annealed at 773 K, 973 K and 1173 K, and characterized using ICP-AES, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FT-IR, TG, STEM, XPS, and UV–vis spectroscopy. The effect of doping and the calcination temperature on the structure and properties of the nanoparticles were studied. The results show high levels of internal doping due to the substitution of Ti{sup 4+} ions by Al{sup 3+} in the TiO{sub 2} lattice. Furthermore, anatase to rutile transformation occurs at higher temperatures when the percentage of doping increases. Therefore, Al doping allows us to control the structural and electronic properties of the nanoparticle synthesized. So, it is possible to obtain nanoparticles with anatase as predominant phase in a higher range of temperature.

  12. Some volcanologic aspects of Columbia River basalt volcanism relevant to the extinction controversy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    The Columbia River Basalt Group is the youngest and most thoroughly studied flood-basalt province known; information about it should be relevant to questions about the possible relation of flood-basalt volcanism to mass extinctions. The group has a total volume of about 174,000 cu km and covers an area of about 164,000 sq km. It was erupted between 17.5 and 6 Ma, as measured by K-Ar and Ar-40/Ar-39 dates. Early eruptions formed the Imnaha Basalt. More than 85 percent of the group was produced during a 1.5 my period between 17 and 15.5 Ma, forming the Grande Ronde and greatly subordinate Picture Gorge Basalts. Later flows formed the Wanapum Basalt, which includes the well-known Roza Member, and the Saddle Mountains Basalt. Linear vent systems for many of the flows are known and are located only in the eastern third of the Columbia Plateau. No systematic migration of vents occurred throughout the 11.5 my period of activity; this and other considerations make it unlikely that the province is related to a hot spot. Model calculations based on observations that little cooling occurred during flow of hundreds of kilometers suggest eruption and emplacement durations of a few days. Some voluminous flows occur in all formations, but most such flows apparently were erupted during Grande Ronde time. The eruption and emplacement of more than 1,000 cu km of 1100 C basaltic lava on the surface within several days doubtless had at least local meteorologic effects. Whether the effects were broader can at present only be hypothesized. Grande Ronde Basalt and Picture Gorge Basalts contain moderately common but thin sedimentary interbeds between flows, whereas earlier and later formations contain numerous, locally thick sediment accumulations. Volcaniclastic debris derived from extra-plateau sources commonly occurs in the testbeds.

  13. Continental crustal formation and recycling: Evidence from oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, A. D.; Tarney, J.; Norry, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the wealth of geochemical data for subduction-related magma types, and the clear importance of such magmas in the creation of continental crust, there is still no concensus about the relative magnitudes of crustal creation versus crustal destruction (i.e., recycling of crust into the mantle). The role of subducted sediment in the formation of the arc magmas is now well documented; but what proportion of sediment is taken into the deeper mantle? Integrated isotopic and trace element studies of magmas erupted far from presently active subduction zones, in particular basaltic rocks erupted in the ocean basins, are providing important information about the role of crustal recycling. By identifying potential chemical tracers, it is impossible to monitor the effects of crustal recycling, and produce models predicting the mass of material recycled into the mantle throughout long periods of geological time.

  14. Aqueous Alteration of Basaltic Glass Under a Simulated Mars Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Moore, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    For the past several years we have been performing experiments designed to produce brines under Mars-simulated conditions. Previously, we had generated and analyzed Mars-analog brines by allowing a mixture of minerals derived from SNC mineralogy to soak in pure water under a synthetic current-Mars atmosphere and under a gas similar to the present Mars atmosphere but with added acidic gases. The latest version of these experiments incubates basaltic glass, obtained from recent Kilauea flows (Mother's Day flow in December 2002), in pure water under a present-day Mars analog atmosphere at 25 C. This abstract and our presentation will discuss the composition of these Mars-analog brines and implications for Mars surface chemistry.

  15. Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Xu, Jin-Yu; Li, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced porous aggregates-geopolymer based cellular material (BFRPGCM) was prepared. The stress-strain curve has been worked out. The ideal energy-absorbing efficiency has been analyzed and the application prospect has been explored. The results show the following: fiber reinforced cellular material has successively sized pore structures; the stress-strain curve has two stages: elastic stage and yielding plateau stage; the greatest value of the ideal energy-absorbing efficiency of BFRPGCM is 89.11%, which suggests BFRPGCM has excellent energy-absorbing property. Thus, it can be seen that BFRPGCM is easy and simple to make, has high plasticity, low density and excellent energy-absorbing features. So, BFRPGCM is a promising energy-absorbing material used especially in civil defense engineering.

  16. Applications of dynamic crystallization studies - Lunar olivine-normative basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, A. S.; Taylor, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic crystallization studies were performed on two synthetic glasses similar in composition to the mare olivine-normative basalt samples 12009 and 15555. The effects of viscosity (primarily a function of FeO) and the initial temperature of cooling on mineral chemistry, texture, and temperature of appearance of phases were investigated. Olivine compositions seem to indicate that, for the two types of melt cooled at the same rate, there are no significant differences in the degree of undercooling at which olivine nucleates, but it is found that olivine-nucleated densities differ. The cooling rate of 15555 is estimated. Since the temperature at which cooling is initiated affects texture, mineral chemistry, and temperature of appearance of phases so greatly, caution is recommended in the application of experimental data to natural rock systems.

  17. Melting of subducted basalt at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Andrault, Denis; Pesce, Giacomo; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Hénot, Jean-Marc; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-05-23

    The geological materials in Earth's lowermost mantle control the characteristics and interpretation of seismic ultra-low velocity zones at the base of the core-mantle boundary. Partial melting of the bulk lower mantle is often advocated as the cause, but this does not explain the nonubiquitous character of these regional seismic features. We explored the melting properties of mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB), which can reach the lowermost mantle after subduction of oceanic crust. At a pressure representative of the core-mantle boundary (135 gigapascals), the onset of melting occurs at ~3800 kelvin, which is ~350 kelvin below the mantle solidus. The SiO2-rich liquid generated either remains trapped in the MORB material or solidifies after reacting with the surrounding MgO-rich mantle, remixing subducted MORB with the lowermost mantle. PMID:24855266

  18. Voluminous Icelandic Basaltic Eruptions Appear To Cause Abrupt Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on June 21, 1783, Laki volcano in southern Iceland erupted 14.7 km3 basalt, ejecting 24 Mt SO_{2} into the stratosphere where it was blown eastward and northward and 98 Mt into the troposphere where the jet stream transported it southeastward to Europe. The "dry fog" observed in Europe with an estimated mean concentration of 60 ppbv SO2, raised daytime temperatures as much as 3.3^{o}C, causing the warmest July in England from 1659 when measurements began until 1983. SO2, tropospheric O_{3}, NO2, and fine ash absorb ultraviolet energy from the sun that causes the bonds between and within their atoms to oscillate at 47 times higher frequency than the bonds in CO_{2} absorbing infrared radiation. Temperature is proportional to the kinetic energy of these oscillations, i.e. the frequency squared. Thus these gases are raised to much higher temperatures than greenhouse gases. The Stefan-Boltzmann law says that radiation from these molecules is a constant times temperature raised to the fourth power. As a result, SO2 and ash radiate far more energy back to earth than CO_{2}, causing warming. Another way to look at the energy involved shows that 15 ppbv SO2 in the 0.3-0.42 μm wavelength band absorbs as much solar energy per unit volume as 388,000 ppbv CO_{2} absorbs infrared energy in the 12.7-17.5 μm band. Basaltic volcanoes such as Laki emit 10 to 100 times more SO2 than more evolved magmas and are less explosive, leaving most of the SO_{2} in the troposphere. All 14 Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) sudden warmings between 46 and 11 ka are contemporaneous with the highest levels of sulfate in the GISP2 drill hole near Summit Greenland. These DO events typically warmed the northern hemisphere out of the ice age within decades, but as volcanism waned, ocean temperatures cooled the world back into an ice age within centuries. The world finally exited the ice age when voluminous volcanism continued from 11.6 to 9.6 ka. Basaltic table mountains or tuyas in Iceland document

  19. The variation of magma discharge during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    The different types of magmatic flow in basaltic eruptions are discussed, and processes explaining the eruptive history of specific volcanoes are investigated. The effusion rate curve is divided into waxing and waning flow parts, and the ideal, elastic response of the reservoir in the waning phase is analytically shown. Historical eruption rates of Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Etna are presented, demonstrating that for each volcano there is a trend of decreasing rate with increasing duration of eruption, a relationship not predicted by a simple elastic model of magma release. The eruptive histories of these volcanoes is explained by the processes of modification of the eruptive conduits and the continued supply of magma from depth during eruption. Discharge variations from Paricutin, Hekla, and Kilauea Iki are discussed in detail.

  20. Aeromagnetic Expression of Buried Basaltic Volcanoes Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Leary, D. W.; Mankinen, E.A.; Blakely, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Ponce, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey has defined a number of small dipolar anomalies indicating the presence of magnetic bodies buried beneath the surface of Crater Flat and the Amargosa Desert. Results of potential-field modeling indicate that isolated, small-volume, highly magnetic bodies embedded within the alluvial deposits of both areas produce the anomalies. Their physical characteristics and the fact that they tend to be aligned along major structural trends provide strong support for the hypothesis that the anomalies reflect buried basaltic volcanic centers. Other, similar anomalies are identified as possible targets for further investigation. High-resolution gravity and ground-magnetic surveys, perhaps along with drilling sources of selected anomalies and radiometric age determinations, can provide valuable constraints in estimating potential volcanic hazard to the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain.

  1. Cooling histories of Apollo 15 quartz-normative basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, T. L.; Walker, D.

    1977-01-01

    Controlled cooling rate studies of vitrophyre 15597 are used to calculate the physical properties of a quartz-normative magma as well as cooling histories of Apollo 15 quartz-normative basalts (QNB). Pyroxene phenocrysts of a QNB magma do not settle appreciably during the cooling of the flow unit; this behavior is consistent with the small degree of chemical differentiation that occurred between members of the suite. Two types of cooling histories for QNB are discerned. The vitrophyres experienced initial slow cooling followed by rapid cooling, and the coarse-grained microgabbros underwent slow nearly linear cooling histories. Textural evidence suggests that lunar vitrophyres crystallized near the top of the flow. It is suggested that the pattern of cooling may have been caused by the chilling of liquids that inherited early crystals in the interior of the flow.

  2. Mantle plume helium in submarine basalts from the galapagos platform.

    PubMed

    Graham, D W; Christie, D M; Harpp, K S; Lupton, J E

    1993-12-24

    Helium-3/helium-4 ratios in submarine basalt glasses from the Galapagos Archipelago range up to 23 times the atmospheric ratio in the west and southwest. These results indicate the presence of a relatively undegassed mantle plume at the Galápagos hot spot and place Galápagos alongside Hawaii, Iceland, and Samoa as the only localities known to have such high helium-3/helium-4 ratios. Lower ratios across the rest of the Galápagos Archipelago reflect systematic variations in the degree of dilution of the plume by entrainment of depleted material from the asthenosphere. These spatial variations reveal the dynamics of the underlying mantle plume and its interaction with the nearby Galápagos Spreading Center. PMID:17794969

  3. Interim reclamation report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploration shaft site

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.

    1990-02-01

    In 1968, a program was started to assess the feasibility of storing Hanford Site defense waste in deep caverns constructed in basalt. This program was expanded in 1976 to include investigations of the Hanford Site as a potential location for a mined commercial nuclear waste repository. Extensive studies of the geotechnical aspects of the site were undertaken, including preparations for drilling a large diameter Exploratory Shaft. This report describes the development of the reclamation program for the Exploratory Shaft Facility, its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation program is to return sites disturbed by the repository program as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native plant species. 43 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Endogenic craters on basaltic lava flows - Size frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Gault, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circular crater forms, termed collapse depressions, which occur on many basalt flows on the earth have also been detected on the moon and Mars and possibly on Mercury and Io. The admixture of collapse craters with impact craters would affect age determinations of planetary surface units based on impact crater statistics by making them appear anomalously old. In the work described in the present paper, the techniques conventionally used in planetary crater counting were applied to the determination of the size range and size frequency distribution of collapse craters on lava flows in Idaho, California, and New Mexico. Collapse depressions range in size from 3 to 80 m in diameter; their cumulative size distributions are similar to those of small impact craters on the moon.

  5. Crystallization of tholeiitic basalt in Alae Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, D.L.; Wright, T.L.; Moore, J.G.

    1966-01-01

    The eruption of Kilauea Volcano August 21-23, 1963, left 600,000 cubic meters of basaltic lava in a lava lake as much as 15 meters deep in Alae pit crater. Field studies of the lake began August 27 and include repeated core drilling, measurements of temperature in the crust and melt, and precise level surveys of the lake surface. The last interstitial melt in the lake solidified late in September 1964; by mid August 1965 the maximum temperature was 690??C at a depth of 11.5 meters. Pumice air-quenched from about 1140??C contains only 5 percent crystals - clinopyroxene, cuhedral olivine (Fo 80), and a trace of plagioclase, (An 70). Drill cores taken from the zone of crystallization in the lake show that olivine continued crystallizing to about 1070??C; below that it reacts with the melt, becoming corroded and mantled by pyroxene and plagioclase. Below 1070??C, pyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at a constant ratio. Ilmenite first appeared at about 1070??C and was joined by magnetite at about 1050??C; both increased rapidly in abundance to 1000??C. Apatite first appeared as minute needles in interstitial glass at 1000??C. Both the abundance and index of refraction of glass quenched from melt decreased nearly linearly with falling temperature. At 1070??C the quenched lava contains about 65 percent dark-brown glass with an index of 1.61; at 980??C it contains about 8 percent colorless glass with an index of 1.49. Below 980??C, the percentage of glass remained constant. Progressive crystallization forced exsolution of gases from the melt fraction; these formed vesicles and angular pores, causing expansion of the crystallizing lava and lifting the surface of the central part of the lake an average of 19.5 cm. The solidified basalt underwent pneumatolitic alteration, including deposition of cristobalite at 800??C, reddish alteration of olivine at 700??C, tarnishing of ilmenite at 550??C, deposition of anhydrite at 250??C, and deposition of native sulfur at 100??C

  6. Bubble plumes generated during recharge of basaltic magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jeremy C.; Woods, Andrew W.

    2001-03-01

    CO 2 is relatively insoluble in basaltic magma at low crustal pressures. It therefore exists as a gas phase in the form of bubbles in shallow crustal reservoirs. Over time these bubbles may separate gravitationally from the magma in the chamber. As a result, any new magma which recharges the chamber from deeper in the crust may be more bubble-rich and hence of lower density than the magma in the chamber. Using scaling arguments, we show that for typical recharge fluxes, such a source of low-viscosity, bubble-rich basalt may generate a turbulent bubble plume within the chamber. We also show that the bubbles are typically sufficiently small to have a low Reynolds number and to remain in the flow. We then present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which identify that the motion of such a turbulent bubble-driven line plume is well described by the classical theory of buoyant plumes. Using the classical plume theory we then examine the effect of the return flow associated with such bubble plumes on the mixing and redistribution of bubbles within the chamber. Using this model, we show that a relatively deep bubbly layer of magma may form below a thin foam layer at the roof. If, as an eruption proceeds, there is a continuing influx at the base of the chamber, then our model suggests that the bubble content of the bubbly layer may gradually increase. This may lead to a transition from lava flow activity to more explosive fire-fountaining activity. The foam layer at the top of the chamber may provide a flux for the continual outgassing from the flanks of the volcano [Ryan, Am. Geophys. Union Geophys. Monogr. 91 (1990)] and if it deepens sufficiently it may contribute to the eruptive activity [Vergniolle and Jaupart, J. Geophys. Res. 95 (1990) 2793-3001].

  7. Relative cooling rates derived from basalt column geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodell, Daniel; Porritt, Lucy; Russell, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    Columnar joints form as a brittle relaxation response to tensile stresses that accumulate during cooling of lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, and intrusive magma bodies. Columnar jointing forms in different deposit types, in deposits of different compositions, and different outcrop geometries. Despite this diversity, columns follow a few "rules": column diameter is inversely proportional to cooling rate (small/quick cooling times, small diameter columns), columns only ever coalesce (never bifurcate), and columnar joints always propagate parallel to but in the opposite direction of heat flow (towards the hottest part of the flow). Using these "rules," cooling histories and emplacement environments can be reconstructed. While column geometries and definitions of various columnar structures vary between authors (upper and lower colonnade and entablature vs. master cracks and pseudopillows), this study focuses on relatively simple outcrops of basalt lava within the Cheakamus River valley near Whistler, BC, Canada. The basalt lavas described here, thought to have erupted subglacially, contain columns comprising only well-defined upper and lower colonnades (i.e., no entablature). Comparing the relative thicknesses of upper and lower colonnades reveals the cooling history, relative cooling rates, and amounts of heat transferred from the upper and lower flow boundaries. Forward numerical models using the finite element method are created with Matlab using the Partial Differential Equation Toolbox to model the outcrops in the Whistler field area, and determine the cooling rates and thermal gradients experienced by the lava flows during their formation. This study finds that noticeable differences in the thickness of upper and lower colonnades within an outcrop occur only when there are large differences in cooling rates between the upper and lower flow surfaces. Modeling shows that the cooling rates must differ by approximately an order of magnitude to produce the observed

  8. Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

    1982-03-01

    Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

  9. Petrological and Geochemical characterization of central Chihuahua basalts: a possible local sign of rifting activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Garcia-Rascon, M.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Morton-Bermea, O.

    2012-12-01

    The central part of the mexican state, Chihuahua, is the oriental border of the Sierra Madre Occidental (silicic large igneous province), which consist of series of ignimbrites divided into two volcanic groups of andesites and rhyolites. In the central region of Chihuahua, the volcanic rocks are now part of the Basin and Range, allowing the presence of mafic rocks in the lower areas. The study area is located approximately 200 km to the NW of Chihuahua city near to La Guajolota town, in the Namiquipa County. There are at least 5 outcrops of basalts to the west of the road, named Puerto de Lopez, Malpaises, El Tascate, Quebrada Honda, and Carrizalio, respectively. These outcrops have only been previously described by the Mexican Geologic Survey (SGM) as thin basaltic flows, with vesicles filled with quartz, and phenocrystals of labradorite, andesine, oligoclase and olivine. Petrologically, the basalts present different textures, from small phenocrysts of plagioclase in a very fine matrix to large, zoned and sometimes broken phenocrysts of plagioclase in a coarser matrix. All samples have olivine in an advanced state of alteration, iddingsite. The geochemical analyses report that these basaltic flows contain characteristics of rift basalts. The rocks have a normative olivine values from 5.78 to 27.26 and nepheline values from 0 to 2.34. In the TAS diagram the samples straddle the join between basalt and trachy-basalt, reflecting a high K2O content. The Mg# average is 0.297, a value that suggests that the basalts do not come from a primitive magma. The basalts have high values of Ba (945-1334 ppm), Cu (54-147 ppm), and Zn (123-615 ppm). The contents of Rb (23-57 ppm), Sr (659-810 ppm), Y (26-33 ppm), Zr (148-217 ppm) and Cr (79-98 ppm) are characteristics of rift basalts. Using discrimination diagrams, the basalts plot in the field of within plate, supporting the rifting origin. Outcrops of other basalts, at about 80 to 100 km to the east of the study area, Lomas El

  10. A mantle plume beneath California? The mid-Miocene Lovejoy Flood Basalt, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, N.J.; Busby, C.J.; Gans, P.B.; Putirka, K.; Wagner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Lovejoy basalt represents the largest eruptive unit identified in California, and its age, volume, and chemistry indicate a genetic affinity with the Columbia River Basalt Group and its associated mantle-plume activity. Recent field mapping, geochemical analyses, and radiometric dating suggest that the Lovejoy basalt erupted during the mid-Miocene from a fissure at Thompson Peak, south of Susanville, California. The Lovejoy flowed through a paleovalley across the northern end of the Sierra Nevada to the Sacramento Valley, a distance of 240 km. Approximately 150 km3 of basalt were erupted over a span of only a few centuries. Our age dates for the Lovejoy basalt cluster are near 15.4 Ma and suggest that it is coeval with the 16.1-15.0 Ma Imnaha and Grande Ronde flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Our new mapping and age dating support the interpretation that the Lovejoy basalt erupted in a forearc position relative to the ancestral Cascades arc, in contrast with the Columbia River Basalt Group, which erupted in a backarc position. The arc front shifted trenchward into the Sierran block after 15.4 Ma. However, the Lovejoy basalt appears to be unrelated to volcanism of the predominantly calc-alkaline Cascade arc; instead, the Lovejoy is broadly tholeiitic, with trace-element characteristics similar to the Columbia River Basalt Group. Association of the Lovejoy basalt with mid-Miocene flood basalt volcanism has considerable implications for North American plume dynamics and strengthens the thermal "point source" explanation, as provided by the mantle-plume hypothesis. Alternatives to the plume hypothesis usually call upon lithosphere-scale cracks to control magmatic migrations in the Yellowstone-Columbia River basalt region. However, it is difficult to imagine a lithosphere-scale flaw that crosses Precambrian basement and accreted terranes to reach the Sierra microplate, where the Lovejoy is located. Therefore, we propose that the Lovejoy represents a rapid

  11. Paleomagnetic, geochronologic, and petrologic data discriminate tholeiitic basalts of the northern Hat Creek graben, northeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffler, L. J.; Champion, D. E.; Calvert, A. T.; Clynne, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic mapping carried out in 2010-2012 under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Geological Survey and Pacific Gas and Electric Company provides the framework for geochronologic, paleomagnetic, and petrologic studies of the widespread low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT) basalts that inundate low topography between higher-elevation remnants of >1 Ma calc-alkaline volcanoes in the northern part of the Hat Creek graben. These tholeiitic basalts are monotonously similar in appearance and cannot be distinguished one from another with any confidence in the field or petrographically. They are, however, distinctive in age, paleomagnetic secular directions, and major-element compositions, allowing us to map three major tholeiitic units: the basalt of Rocky Ledge (40Ar/39Ar determinations on 3 different exposures give 203.2 ± 13.7 ka, 186.8 ± 12.5 ka, and 203.9 ± 15.2 ka; weighted average 197 ± 8 ka), the basalt of Rock Spring (545.7 ± 6.7 ka), and the basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (647.3 ± 21.7 ka). These tholeiitic units are overlain to the east by the calc-alkaline basalt west of Six Mile Hill (53.5 ± 2.0 ka) and to the south by the calc-alkaline basaltic andesite of Cinder Butte (38 ± 7 ka) and the tholeiitic Hat Creek Basalt (24 ± 6 ka). These latter two ages are from Turrin et al. (2007); all other ages are new 40Ar/39Ar determinations from the USGS geochronology laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Paleomagnetic directions of the tholeiitic basalt of Rocky Ledge (16 sites) cluster tightly at inclination and declination of 63° and 349°, respectively. Inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Rock Spring (3 sites) cluster at 43° and 14°, whereas inclinations and declinations for the tholeiitic basalt of Sam Wolfin Spring (7 sites) cluster at 54° and 5°. On Pearce diagrams of the chemical compositions (e.g., Ti vs. Mg; P/K vs. Ti/K), the three units plot in distinct fields with no overlap

  12. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt. Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of three basalt waste isolation project staff hydrologists

    SciTech Connect

    Runchal, A.K.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Olmsted, E.; Davis, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The present study implemented a probability encoding method to estimate the probability distributions of selected hydrologic variables for the Cohassett basalt flow top and flow interior, and the anisotropy ratio of the interior of the Cohassett basalt flow beneath the Hanford Site. Site-speciic data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance. However, this information is required to complete preliminary performance assessment studies. Rockwell chose a probability encoding method developed by SRI International to generate credible and auditable estimates of the probability distributions of effective porosity and hydraulic conductivity anisotropy. The results indicate significant differences of opinion among the experts. This was especially true of the values of the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow interior for which estimates differ by more than five orders of magnitude. The experts are in greater agreement about the values of effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top; their estimates for this variable are generally within one to two orders of magnitiude of each other. For anisotropy ratio, the expert estimates are generally within two or three orders of magnitude of each other. Based on this study, the Rockwell hydrologists estimate the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top to be generally higher than do the independent experts. For the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a smaller uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts. On the other hand, for the effective porosity and anisotropy ratio of the Cohassett basalt flow interior, the estimates of the Rockwell hydrologists indicate a larger uncertainty than do the estimates of the independent experts.

  13. Distinguishing between basalts produced by endogenic volcanism and impact processes: A non-destrwuctive method using quantitative petrography of lunar basaltic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Donohue, Patrick; Fagan, Amy L.; O'Sullivan, Katie; Oshrin, Jocelyn; Roberts, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Impact processes play an important role in shaping and reshaping the surfaces of airless planetary bodies. Such processes produce regoliths and generate melts that crystallize and record the homogenization of the geology at the impact site. If the volume of melt is substantial, the resultant crystallized product has an igneous texture and may be free of xenolithic clasts making it difficult to distinguish from melts produced by endogenic magmatic processes. This has been clearly demonstrated during the return of the Apollo samples from the Moon, where Apollo 14 basalt 14310 was initially described as a mare basalt and was only subsequently reclassified as an impact melt following detailed and time consuming crystallization experiments. Another way of distinguishing lunar impact melts from endogenically-derived mare basalts is through the quantification of the highly siderophile elements (HSE: Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir, Pt, Os), which have relatively low abundances in pristine lunar samples but are high in meteorites and, therefore, may be enriched in impact melts. However, these analyses consume relatively large quantities of valuable sample and because of mass constraints cannot be performed on many lunar samples. In this paper we present a quantitative petrographic method that has the potential to distinguish lunar impact melts from endogenically-derived mare basalts using plagioclase and olivine crystal size distributions (CSDs). The slopes and intercepts of these CSDs are used to show that olivine from impact melts displays a steeper CSD relative to olivine from mare basalts. For plagioclase, generally impacts melts display CSDs with shallower gradients than those from endogenous mare basalts and, as for olivines, plot in a distinct field on a CSD slope vs. CSD intercept plot. Using just a thin section to distinguish impact melts from mare basalts enables the goals of future robotic sample return missions to determine the age of the South Pole-Aitken basin in the Moon

  14. Tracing volatile loss during the eruption of individual flood basalt flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, K. W.; Vye, C.; Gannoun, A.; Self, S.

    2010-12-01

    Continental flood basalt (CFB) volcanism is characterised by the repeated eruption of huge batches of magma, producing enormous basalt provinces (105-106 km3) over relatively brief intervals of time, and delivering large masses of volcanic gas to the atmosphere. The release of gases and aerosols during CFB volcanism is thought to have had a significant impact on the atmosphere, ocean chemistry and climate [1-3]. The key factors influencing atmospheric chemistry and the environmental impact of CFB eruptions are the timing, mechanism and duration of volatile release during individual eruptions, but for the most part such information remains poorly known. The 187Re-187Os isotope system offers a highly sensitive tracer of the evolution of melt chemistry, and of the timing and mechanism of volatile release. This is partly because the contrasting behaviour of Re and Os during melting results in the extreme fractionation of parent/daughter (Re/Os) isotope ratios, thus magmatic phases can yield precise chronological information, and crustal rocks develop highly radiogenic isotope compositions that can be readily traced if assimilated [4]. Partly also because Re behaves as a highly volatile element during sub-aerial volcanism [5]. This study presents 187Re-187Os isotope data for rocks and minerals from two flows in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Group, one of the youngest flood basalt provinces that formed over a 2 million year interval in the Mid-Miocene. The 2,660 km3 Sand Hollow flow field displays small major and trace element variations, both laterally and vertically across the flow, indicative of fractional crystallisation, but the elemental data cannot be used to distinguish source variations and/or crustal contamination. However, Os isotopes indicate systematic crustal contamination over the timescale of an individual eruption, where the earliest formed lavas show the greatest degree of contamination. Isotope and elemental data for phenocryst phases from the 40

  15. Effect of Al2O3 on the Crystallization of Mold Flux for Casting High Al Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lejun; Wang, Wanlin; Zhou, Kechao

    2015-06-01

    In order to lower the weight of automotive bodies for better fuel-efficiency and occupant safety, the demand for high Al-containing advanced high strength steel, such as transformation-induced plasticity and twinning-induced plasticity steel, is increasing. However, high aluminum content in steels would tend to significantly affect the properties of mold flux during the continuous casting process. In this paper, a kinetic study of the effect of Al2O3 content on the crystallization behavior of mold flux was conducted by using the single hot thermocouple technique and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model combined with the Arrhenius Equation. The results suggested that Al2O3 behaves as an amphoteric oxide in the crystallization process of mold flux. The precipitated phases of mold flux change from cuspidine (Ca4Si2O7F2) into nepheline (NaAlSiO4) and CaF2, and then into gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) with the increase of Al2O3 content. The kinetics study of the isothermal crystallization process indicated that the effective crystallization rate ( k) and Avrami exponent ( n) also first increased and then decreased with the increase of Al2O3 content. The values for the crystallization activation energy of mold flux with different Al2O3 contents were E R0.8A7 = 150.76 ± 17.89 kJ/mol, E R0.8A20 = 136.43 ± 6.48 kJ/mol, E R0.8A30 = 108.63 ± 12.25 kJ/mol and E R0.8A40 = 116.15 ± 8.17 kJ/mol.

  16. On the Use of Fractal Surfaces to Understand Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Basalt Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Catherine E.; Hobbs, Richard W.; Rusch, Roxanne

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand how a layered basalt sequence affects the propagation of a seismic wave, which has implications for sub-basalt seismic imaging. This is achieved by the construction of detailed, realistic models of basalt sequences, using data derived directly from outcrop analogues. Field data on the surface roughness of basaltic lava flows were captured using terrestrial laser scanning and satellite remote sensing. The fractal properties of the surface roughness were derived, and it can be shown that the lava flow surface is fractal over length scales up to approximately 2 km. The fractal properties were then used to construct synthetic lava flow surfaces using a von Karman power spectrum, and the resulting surfaces were then stacked to create a synthetic lava flow sequence. P-wave velocity data were then added, and the resulting model was used to generate synthetic seismic data. The resulting stacked section shows that the ability to resolve the internal structure of the lava flows is quickly lost due to scattering and attenuation by the basalt pile. A further result from generating wide-angle data is that the appearance of a lower-velocity layer below the basalt sequence may be caused by destructive interference within the basalt itself.

  17. Isotopic composition of lead in oceanic basalt and its implication to mantle evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1978-01-01

    New data are given in this report for (1) Pb isotopic compositions and U, Th, and Pb concentrations of basalts from the island of Hawaii; (2) redetermined Pb isotopic compositions of some abyssal tholeiites; and (3) U, Th, and Pb concentrations of altered and fresh abyssal basalts, and basalt genesis and mantle evolution are discussed. The Th U ratios of abyssal and Japanese tholeiites are distinctly lower than those of tholeiites and alkali basalts from other areas. It is thought that these low values reflect a part of the mantle depleted in large ionic lithophile elements. Thus a mantle evolution model is presented, in which Th U ratios of the depleted zone in the mantle have decreased to ???2, and U Pb ratios have increased, showing an apparent ???1.5-b.y. isochron trend in the 207Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb plot. The Pb isotopic compositions of basalts from the island of Hawaii are distinct for each of the five volcanoes, and within each volcano, Pb's of tholeiites and alkali basalts are similar. An interaction between partially melted material (hot plume?) of the asthenosphere and the lithosphere is suggested to explain the trend in the Pb isotopic compositions of Hawaiian basalts. ?? 1978.

  18. Petrogenesis of mesosiderites. I - Origin of mafic lithologies and comparison with basaltic achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New petrologic and trace element data on basaltic and gabbroic clasts in mesosiderites and basaltic achondrites, combined with existing petrologic and trace element data, have served as a basis for interpretation of the petrogenesis of mesosiderite clasts. Compared with the basaltic achondrites, the mesosiderite basaltic and gabbroic clasts contain more abundant modal tridymite and merrilite, and more commonly contain augite as a late magmatic phase. Their pyroxenes tend to be more MgO-rich, and have lower Fe/Mn ratios which are positively correlated with the Fe/Mg ratio. Some of the mesosiderite basaltic and gabbroic clasts contain xenocrystic plagioclase. The basaltic clasts commonly show superchondritic Eu/Sm ratios and slight LREE depletions. The cumulate gabbro clasts are extremely depleted in LIL, have very high Eu/Sm ratios and high Lu/Sm ratios. All of these features can be explained by a model in which the mafic lithologies of mesosiderites were formed by remelting of a mixed basalt-cumulate gabbro-metal source region near the parent body surface.

  19. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-10-10

    Pb, Sr, Nd isotopes of seven basalt glasses collected by the submersible Alvin from the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (SJFR) are almost identical (/sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.18.45, /sup 207/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.15.47, /sup 208/Pb//sup 204/Pbapprox.37.81, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Srapprox.0.70249, /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Ndapprox.0.51315). Whereas all basalts appear cogenetic, four of the samples have uniform abundances of U, Th, Rb, Nd, Sm, Pb, and Sr, indicating that they are also comagmatic. Two basalt glasses dredged previously at the SJFR have similar isotopic compositions but higher concentrations of U, Th, and Pb. The /sup 206/Pb//sup 204/Pb ratios are intermediate between generally less radiogenic ridge basalts from south of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR) and often more radiogenic basalts from the northern JFR and NE Pacific seamounts. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions closely resemble data of other ridge basalts from the northernmost East Pacific Rise and are intermediate between isotopically more diverse seamount basalts produced nearby.

  20. Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Darcy E; Sleep, Norman H

    2012-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction decimated up to 95% of carbonate shell-bearing marine species and 80% of land animals. Isotopic excursions, dissolution of shallow marine carbonates, and the demise of carbonate shell-bearing organisms suggest global warming and ocean acidification. The temporal association of the extinction with the Siberia flood basalts at approximately 250 Ma is well known, and recent evidence suggests these flood basalts may have mobilized carbon in thick deposits of organic-rich sediments. Large isotopic excursions recorded in this period are potentially explained by rapid venting of coal-derived methane, which has primarily been attributed to metamorphism of coal by basaltic intrusion. However, recently discovered contemporaneous deposits of fly ash in northern Canada suggest large-scale combustion of coal as an additional mechanism for rapid release of carbon. This massive coal combustion may have resulted from explosive interaction with basalt sills of the Siberian Traps. Here we present physical analysis of explosive eruption of coal and basalt, demonstrating that it is a viable mechanism for global extinction. We describe and constrain the physics of this process including necessary magnitudes of basaltic intrusion, mixing and mobilization of coal and basalt, ascent to the surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise necessary for global distribution. PMID:22184229

  1. Exploration of the Faroes Region: Seismic images beneath a basalt province

    SciTech Connect

    Boldreel, L.O.; Keser Neish, J.; Ziska, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Faroes Region, located between Iceland and Scotland, represent one of the significant Tertiary Igneous provinces of Western Europe. During the Paleocene and Eocene, vast amounts of basaltic material was extruded and therefore superimposed upon the pre-existing structural and stratigraphic fabric of the area. This basalt cover presents a substantial barrier to exploration in the area, and has not been penetrated by drilling to date. However, recent advances in geophysical data acquisition and processing resulted in the acquisition of state of the art data sets in 1994 and 1995. This seismic data demonstrates imaging capability both within and beneath the basalt, allowing definition of intra and sub basalt units in the more basinal areas. Seismic studies carried out within the basalt units give valuable information concerning the paleogeography and subsidence behaviour of the area. Shot records from these surveys have been analyzed for their wide angle reflection and refraction information in order to constrain the velocity model for the overlying Tertiary section and to study the velocity behaviour of the basalt units themselves. Application of this analysis has resulted in the derivation of substantially more accurate depth estimates for the underlying units. This study demonstrates that penetration of the basalt and resolution of the underlying features is possible, making petroleum exploration in the Faroese offshore area viable.

  2. Basaltic glass as a habitat for microbial life: Implications for astrobiology and planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, M. R. M.; Banerjee, N. R.; Flemming, R. L.; Bridge, N. J.; Schultz, C.

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that terrestrial subaqueous basalts and hyaloclastites are suitable microbial habitats. During subaqueous basaltic volcanism, glass is produced by the quenching of basaltic magma upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing the glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks that have been exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to the alteration and modification of the rocks and produces characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of the alteration textures by minerals such as phyllosilicates, zeolites and titanite may enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggests the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend as far back as ˜3.5 billion years ago and is widespread in oceanic crust and its metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  3. Quality assessment of the melanocratic basalt outcrops for the mineral fiber producing, Southern Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Perevozchikov, Boris V.; Osovetsky, Boris M.; Menshikova, Elena A.; Kazymov, Konstantin P.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, basalt fibers catch the attention of their superior physical and chemical properties in which they rank below only expensive carbon and silicon carbide fibers. The high tensile strength, elastic modulus, durability against environmental factors, acids, and alkalis, long service life, extended operating temperature range, and low hygroscopicity allow basalt fibers to find increasing application in new materials. The suitability of raw for basalt fibers production is determined by the effect of rheological and crystallization properties of basalt melts, higher the ratio of viscosity to surface tension η/σ more stable the formation of fibers, it constrains the mineral and chemical composition of the raw material. An integrated petrographic and mineralogical investigation of melanocratic basalts from the Southern Urals, was carried out to assess the suitability for the production of high quality basalt fibers. The results presented herein confirm as the intense metamorphism and the refractory impurities altered the quality of the row material ant its possibility of producing fine staple and continuous basalt fibers.

  4. Mafic Atlas: Looking at basalt rock formations for potential carbon sequestration application

    DOE Data Explorer

    Basalt formations are prevalent in the Big Sky region, and while less studied than other potential storage sites for CO2, they may play an important role in geologic sequestration due to their unique geochemical and physical properties. Regionally, basalts offer significant long-term storage potential estimated in the range of 33-134 billion metric tons. These estimates scaled globally suggest that the five largest basalt provinces could sequester 10,000 years of the world’s CO2 emissions. Basalt provinces are globally distributed and could significantly expand CO2 storage options in regions where conventional storage is limited or non-existent. BSCSP and Idaho State University developed a national Mafic Atlas to assess the sequestration potential of basalts through modeling studies, laboratory testing, and insights developed from mafic rock pilot projects. The Mafic Atlas online mapping application highlights the Columbia River Basalt Group in Washington and Oregon and its proximity to the West Coast power load. Features of the map include: • Carbon storage capacity estimates for regional basalt provinces • Click-able well locations that link to US Geological Survey well log datasets • Live GeoRSS feeds and an address finder • Custom drawing and printing tools to create your own map • Search tools to explore the Mafic database. [copied from http://www.bigskyco2.org/atlas/mafic

  5. Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Darcy E.; Sleep, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction decimated up to 95% of carbonate shell-bearing marine species and 80% of land animals. Isotopic excursions, dissolution of shallow marine carbonates, and the demise of carbonate shell-bearing organisms suggest global warming and ocean acidification. The temporal association of the extinction with the Siberia flood basalts at approximately 250 Ma is well known, and recent evidence suggests these flood basalts may have mobilized carbon in thick deposits of organic-rich sediments. Large isotopic excursions recorded in this period are potentially explained by rapid venting of coal-derived methane, which has primarily been attributed to metamorphism of coal by basaltic intrusion. However, recently discovered contemporaneous deposits of fly ash in northern Canada suggest large-scale combustion of coal as an additional mechanism for rapid release of carbon. This massive coal combustion may have resulted from explosive interaction with basalt sills of the Siberian Traps. Here we present physical analysis of explosive eruption of coal and basalt, demonstrating that it is a viable mechanism for global extinction. We describe and constrain the physics of this process including necessary magnitudes of basaltic intrusion, mixing and mobilization of coal and basalt, ascent to the surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise necessary for global distribution. PMID:22184229

  6. Explosive eruption of coal and basalt and the end-Permian mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Darcy E.; Sleep, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    The end-Permian extinction decimated up to 95% of carbonate shell-bearing marine species and 80% of land animals. Isotopic excursions, dissolution of shallow marine carbonates, and the demise of carbonate shell-bearing organisms suggest global warming and ocean acidification. The temporal association of the extinction with the Siberia flood basalts at approximately 250 Ma is well known, and recent evidence suggests these flood basalts may have mobilized carbon in thick deposits of organic-rich sediments. Large isotopic excursions recorded in this period are potentially explained by rapid venting of coal-derived methane, which has primarily been attributed to metamorphism of coal by basaltic intrusion. However, recently discovered contemporaneous deposits of fly ash in northern Canada suggest large-scale combustion of coal as an additional mechanism for rapid release of carbon. This massive coal combustion may have resulted from explosive interaction with basalt sills of the Siberian Traps. Here we present physical analysis of explosive eruption of coal and basalt, demonstrating that it is a viable mechanism for global extinction. We describe and constrain the physics of this process including necessary magnitudes of basaltic intrusion, mixing and mobilization of coal and basalt, ascent to the surface, explosive combustion, and the atmospheric rise necessary for global distribution.

  7. Concentrations and isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in ocean-floor basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Marais, D.J.D.; Ueda, A.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fresh submarine basalt glasses from Galapagos Ridge, FAMOUS area, Cayman Trough and Kilauea east rift contain 22 to 160 ppm carbon and 0.3 to 2.8 ppm nitrogen, respectively, as the sums of dissolved species and vesicle-filling gases (CO2 and N2). The large range of variation in carbon content is due to combined effect of depth-dependency of the solubility of carbon in basalt melt and varying extents of vapour loss during magma emplacement as well as in sample crushing. The isotopic ratios of indigenous carbon and nitrogen are in very narrow ranges,-6.2 ?? 0.2% relative to PDB and +0.2 ?? 0.6 %. relative to atmospheric nitrogen, respectively. In basalt samples from Juan de Fuca Ridge, however, isotopically light carbon (??13C = around -24%.) predominates over the indigenous carbon; no indigenous heavy carbon was found. Except for Galapagos Ridge samples, these ocean-floor basalts contain 670 to 1100 ppm sulfur, averaging 810 ppm, in the form of both sulfide and sulfate, whereas basalts from Galapagos Ridge are higher in both sulfur (1490 and 1570 ppm) and iron (11.08% total iron as FeO). The ??34S values average +0.3 ?? 0.5%. with average fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide of +7.4 ?? 1.6%.. The sulfate/sulfide ratios tend to increase with increasing water content of basalt, probably because the oxygen fugacity increases with increasing water content in basalt melt. ?? 1984.

  8. Basalt generation at the Apollo 12 site. Part 2: Source heterogeneity, multiple melts, and crustal contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Hacker, Matthew D.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Liu, Yun-Gang; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1994-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Apollo 12 mare basalts has been examined with emphasis on trace-element ratios and abundances. Vitrophyric basalts were used as parental compositions for the modeling, and proportions of fractionating phases were determined using the MAGFOX prograqm of Longhi (1991). Crystal fractionation processes within crustal and sub-crustal magma chambers are evaluated as a function of pressure. Knowledge of the fractionating phases allows trace-element variations to be considered as either source related or as a product of post-magma-generation processes. For the ilmenite and olivine basalts, trace-element variations are inherited from the source, but the pigeonite basalt data have been interpreted with open-system evolution processes through crustal assimilation. Three groups of basalts have been examined: (1) Pigeonite basalts-produced by the assimilation of lunar crustal material by a parental melt (up to 3% assimilation and 10% crystal fractionation, with an 'r' value of 0.3). (2) Ilmenite basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (4-8%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, augite, and plagioclase, brought together by overturn of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) cumulate pile. After generation, which did not exhaust any of the minerals in the source, these melts experienced closed-system crystal fractionation/accumulation. (3) Olivine basalts-produced by variable degrees of partial melting (5-10%) of a source of olivine, pigeonite, and augite. After generation, again without exhausting any of the minerals in the source, these melts evolved through crystal accumulation. The evolved liquid counterparts of these cumulates have not been sampled. The source compositions for the ilmenite and olivine basalts were calculated by assuming that the vitrophyric compositions were primary and the magmas were produced by non-modal batch melting. Although the magnitude is unclear, evaluation of these source regions indicates that both be composed of early- and

  9. Evolution of Late Cenozoic basaltic volcanism in the Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F. . Dept. of Geology); Farmer, G.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Cenozoic volcanism in the Mojave Desert region of southern California comprises two main groups: early Miocene ([approx]24--18 Ma) synextensional magmatism ranging from basalt to rhyolite, and postkinematic middle Miocene to Quaternary volcanism that is almost exclusively basaltic. Flat-lying basalts of the latter group, herein termed the Mojave Neovolcanic Belt (MNB), are distributed across the central and eastern Mojave Desert, and were erupted in three main pulses: (1) during the middle Miocene ([approx]17--15 Ma), in a belt from near Tiefort Mtn. to the El Paso Mts.; (2) during the late Miocene ([approx]9--4 Ma); and (3) in a Plio-Quaternary pulse ([approx]3--0 Ma) that includes the southern Cima field and all the cones scattered along the axis of the Barstow-Bristol trough. Several temporal and geographic trends are evident in the MNB. In general, younger basalts are higher in [var epsilon][sub Nd], lower in [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr, more alkalic, less crustally contaminated, and more likely to contain mantle xenoliths than older basalts. Mantle xenoliths are restricted to the eastern and southern Mojave block. Basalts of all three groups become dramatically richer in K[sub 2]O to the east, ranging from subalkaline basalts in the west to alkali basalts and trachybasalts in the east. Isotopic provinciality is apparent, but mantle differences are difficult to distinguish from the effects of crustal contamination. Lavas with mantle xenoliths consistently have [var epsilon][sub Nd] > 5 and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr < 0.7042. Eruptive centers of the MNB show no consistent relationship to regional tectonic features. Although alkali basalts are generally associated with rifting, several MNB volcanoes were erupted through active fold and thrust belts.

  10. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite LAP 02205, a New Low-Ti Basalt Possibly Launch Paired with NWA 032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    2004-01-01

    Lunar meteorite LAP 02205 is a 1.23 kg basalt collected during the 2002 field season in the La- Paz ice field, Antarctica [1]. We present a petrographic description including mineral modes and compositions, and the major-element composition of the bulk meteorite. LAP 02205 is an Fe-rich, moderately low-Ti mare basalt that is similar in composition, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry to the NWA 032 basaltic lunar meteorite. LAP 02205 is yet another of the moderately low- Ti basaltic meteorites that are underrepresented among Apollo and Luna samples but that appear from remote sensing to be the most common basalt type on the Moon.

  11. Correlation of deep moonquakes and mare basalts: Implications for lunar mantle structure and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuan; Muirhead, Alicia C.; Zhong, Shijie

    2012-07-01

    The genesis of mare basalts and deep moonquakes are important events that have major implications for understanding the thermal evolution and interior dynamics of the Moon. The eruption of mare basalts predominantly from 3.9 Ga to 3 Ga ago represents one of the most important events in lunar geological history. Deep moonquakes recorded by the Apollo Seismic Network show the dynamic nature of the present-day lunar mantle. In this study, we have correlated the presence of the mare basalts, using FeO concentration as a proxy, with the epicenters of 52 well-located deep moonquake (DMQ) clusters. We determine FeO concentrations of 13 wt.% or higher to be representative of the mare basalt deposits. Our analysis shows that over 63% of the DMQs occur within 1° from the mare basalt deposits, while over 80% of the DMQs are within 5° from the mare basalt deposits. Our analysis also shows that for the same amount of randomly distributed DMQs within a spherical cap on the nearside that encompasses all the nearside DMQs, the probability of over 80% of the DMQs occurring within 5° from the mare basalt deposits is about 0.01, thus rejecting a random distribution of the DMQs with respect to the mare basalts. The correlation between mare basalts and the DMQs from our analysis suggests that the mare basalts may be derived from melting processes at relatively large depths, consistent with previous petrology and geodynamic studies. We propose that the water and volatiles in the mare basalt source material (i.e., a mixture of ilmenite cumulates and olivine orthopyroxene, together called MIC) play an important role in causing the DMQs and that the DMQs delineate the present-day locations of MIC in the deep mantle. Since the mare basalts are predominately distributed on the nearside, our results further suggest that the DMQs may indeed be largely nearside features, which is a prediction that can be tested in future lunar seismic exploration.

  12. Pyroclastic Deposits in Floor-Fractured Craters: A Unique Style or Lunar Basaltic Volcanism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; DonaldsonHanna, Kerri L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Moriarty, Daniel P.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Bennett, Kristen A.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Paige, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The lunar maria were formed by effusive fissure flows of low-viscosity basalt. Regional pyroclastic deposits were formed by deep-sourced fire-fountain eruptions dominated by basaltic glass. Basaltic material is also erupted from small vents within floor-fractured impact craters. These craters are characterized by shallow, flat floors cut by radial, concentric and/or polygonal fractures. Schultz [1] identified and classified over 200 examples. Low albedo pyroclastic deposits originate from depressions along the fractures in many of these craters.

  13. Basalt models for the Mars penetrator mission: Geology of the Amboy Lava Field, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Bunch, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    Amboy lava field (San Bernardino County, California) is a Holocene basalt flow selected as a test site for potential Mars Penetrators. A discussion is presented of (1) the general relations of basalt flow features and textures to styles of eruptions on earth, (2) the types of basalt flows likely to be encountered on Mars and the rationale for selection of the Amboy lava field as a test site, (3) the general geology of the Amboy lava field, and (4) detailed descriptions of the target sites at Amboy lava field.

  14. Oxidized basalts on the surface of Venus: Compositional implications of measured spectral properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Patterson, W.; Pratt, S.; Head, J. W.; Garvin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Venera Lander reflectance data are compared with high temperature spectra of the same basaltic materials. The dark, flat unoxidized basalts are still inconsistent with the Venera data in the near-infrared. Basaltic material with a ferric component, however, would satisfy both the increase in reflectance beyond 0.7 microns as well as the dark, relatively colorless character in the visible. Therefore, it is concluded that besaltic surfaces of Venus represented by these measurements either contain minerals with uncommon characteristics, or, more likely, are relatively oxidized.

  15. The Karoo igneous province — A problem area for inferring tectonic setting from basalt geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Andrew R.

    1987-06-01

    Tholeiitic basalts and associated intrusives are the major component of the Karoo igneous province. They are of Mesozoic age and constitute one of the world's classic continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces. It has been argued that most Karoo basalts have not undergone significant contamination with continental crust and that their lithospheric mantle source areas were enriched in incompatible minor and trace elements during the Proterozoic. The only exceptions to this are late-stage MORB-like dolerites near the present-day continental margins which are considered to be of asthenospheric origin. When data for the "southern" Karoo basalts are plotted on many of the geochemical discriminant diagrams which have been used to infer tectonic setting, essentially all of them would be classified as calc-alkali basalts (CAB's) or low-K tholeiites. Virtually none of them plot in the compositional fields designated as characteristic of "within-plate" basalts. There is little likelihood that the compositions of the Karoo basalts can be controlled by active subduction at the time of their eruption and no convincing evidence that a "subduction component" has been added to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle under the entire area in which the basalts crop out. It must be concluded that the mantle source areas for CAB's and the southern Karoo basalts have marked similarities. In contrast, the data for "northern" Karoo basalts largely plot in the "within-plate" field on geochemical discriminant diagrams. Available data suggest that the source composition and/or the restite mineralogy and degree of partial melting are different for southern and northern Karoo basalts. There is no evidence for any difference in tectonic setting between the southern and northern Karoo basalts at the time they were erupted. This appears to be clear evidence that specific mantle source characteristics and/or magmatic processes can vary within a single CFB province to an extent that renders at least

  16. Experimentally reproduced textures and mineral chemistries of high-titanium mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usselman, T. M.; Lofgren, G. E.; Williams, R. J.; Donaldson, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Many of the textures, morphologies, and mineral chemistries of the high-titanium mare basalts have been experimentally duplicated using single-stage cooling histories. Lunar high-titanium mare basalts are modeled in a 1 m thick gravitationally differentiating flow based on cooling rates, thermal models, and modal olivine contents. The low-pressure equilibrium phase relations of a synthetic high-titanium basalt composition were investigated as a function of oxygen fugacity, and petrographic criteria are developed for the recognition of phenocrysts which were present in the liquid at the time of eruption.

  17. An experiment-based model for the petrogenesis of high-alumina basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, J. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    To understand magmatism at convergent margins, one must know the origin of their characteristic plagioclase-rich high-alumina basalts (HABs). Wet melting experiments on basalts at 3 kilobars yielded high-alumina liquids and a coexisting mineral assemblage with plagioclase crystallization in these melts, while mafic minerals underwent limited crystallization or even resorption. These results suggest that hydrous HAB liquids, presumably formed by fractionation of a hydrous basalt at depth, precipitate voluminous plagioclase as pressure drops during ascent and eruption. Plagioclase accumulation is not necessarily required to explain the petrogenesis of plagioclase-rich HAB.

  18. Electron microprobe evaluation of terrestrial basalts for whole-rock K-Ar dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1972-01-01

    Four basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating were analyzed with an electron microprobe to locate potassium concentrations. Highest concentrations of potassium were found in those mineral phases which were the last to crystallize. The two reliable samples had potassium concentrated in fine-grained interstitial feldspar and along grain boundaries of earlier formed plagioclase crystals. The two unreliable samples had potassium concentrated in the glassy matrix, demonstrating the ineffectiveness of basaltic glass as a retainer of radiogenic argon. In selecting basalt samples for whole-rock K-Ar dating, particular emphasis should be placed on determining the nature and condition of the fine-grained interstitial phases. ?? 1972.

  19. Composition, mineralogy, and petrology of 28 mare basalts from Apollo 15 rake samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty-eight mare basalts from three Apollo 15 rake sample sections are divided into five rock groups which are considered to represent at least five rock units. Three of these groups (pyroxene-phyric basalt, olivine-phyric basalt, and olivine microgabbro) are from the mare area and are probably near-surface local mare rock units. The remaining groups (feldspathic peridotite and feldspathic microgabbro) are found outside the mare, in Spur Crater at the foot of the Apennines; they may come from deeper levels of the local mare or from a more distant source.

  20. Petrography of Lunar Meteorite MET 01210, A New Basaltic Regolith Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.; Haskin, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar meteorite MET 01210 (hereafter referred to as MET) is a 22.8 g breccia collected during the 2001 field season in the Meteorite Hills, Antarctica. Although initially classified as an anorthositic breccia, MET is a regolith breccia composed predominantly of very-low-Ti (VLT) basaltic material. Four other brecciated lunar meteorites (NWA 773, QUE 94281, EET 87/96, Yamato 79/98) with a significant VLT basaltic component have been identified. We present here the petrography and bulk major element composition of MET and compare it to previously studied basaltic lunar meteorite breccias.

  1. Mantle Metasomatism in Mars: Evidence from Bulk Chemical Compositions of Martian Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bulk compositions of martian meteorite basalts suggest that they formed from a highly depleted mantle that was variably metasomatised and enriched in incompatible elements. These results are consistent with radio-isotope results. Bulk chemical compositions of basaltic rocks retain clues and tracers to their origins and histories. Interpretations of bulk compositions are not so straight-forward as once envisioned, because real-world magmatic processes can be far from theoretical simple models like one-stage partial melting or closed-system fractional crystallization. Yet, bulk chemistry can shed a broad (if dim) light on Martian basalt petrogenesis that complements the sharply focussed illumination of radio-isotope systematics.

  2. Determination of Planetary Basalt Parentage: A Simple Technique Using the Electron Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of major and minor elements in silicate phases to understand differences among basaltic systems and the influence of different planetary environments on basalt chemistry (e.g., Papike [1]). Intriguing data displays presented by Papike [1] include a plot of Mn vs. Fe (atoms per formula unit, afu) for pyroxene and olivine and a plot showing the anorthite content of plagioclase from different planetary basalts. Here we combine portions of these plots (Fig. 4) and provide all new data for olivine and plagioclase.

  3. Circumventing shallow air contamination in Mid Ocean Ridge Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Parai, Rita; Tucker, Jonathan; Middleton, Jennifer; Langmuir, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Noble gases in mantle-derived basalts provide a rich portrait of mantle degassing and surface-interior volatile exchange. However, the ubiquity of shallow-level air contamination frequently obscures the mantle noble gas signal. In a majority of samples, shallow air contamination dominates the noble gas budget. As a result, reconstructing the variability in heavy noble gas mantle source compositions and inferring the history of deep recycling of atmospheric noble gases is difficult. For example, in the gas-rich popping rock 2ΠD43, 129Xe/130Xe ratios reach 7.7±0.23 in individual step-crushes, but the bulk composition of the sample is close to air (129Xe/130Xe of 6.7). Here, we present results from experiments designed to elucidate the source of shallow air contamination in MORBs. Step-crushes were carried out to measure He, Ne, Ar and Xe isotopic compositions on two aliquots of a depleted popping glass that was dredged from between the Kane and Atlantis Fracture Zones of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in May 2012. One aliquot was sealed in ultrapure N2 after dredge retrieval, while the other aliquot was left exposed to air for 3.5 years. The bulk 20Ne/22Ne and 129Xe/130Xe ratios measured in the aliquot bottled in ultrapure N2 are 12.3 and 7.6, respectively, and are nearly identical to the estimated mantle source values. On the other hand, step crushes in the aliquot left exposed to air for several years show Ne isotopic compositions that are shifted towards air, with a bulk 20Ne/22Ne of 11.5; the bulk 129Xe/130Xe, however, was close to 7.6. These results indicate that lighter noble gases exchange more efficiently between the bubbles trapped in basalt glass and air, suggesting a diffusive or kinetic mechanism for the incorporation of the shallow air contamination. Importantly, in Ne-Ar or Ar-Xe space, step-crushes from the bottled aliquot display a trend that can be easily fit with a simple two-component hyperbolic mixing between mantle and atmosphere noble gases. Step

  4. Mafic volcaniclastic deposits in flood basalt provinces: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.-S.; Ukstins Peate, I.; McClintock, M. K.; Xu, Y. G.; Skilling, I. P.; White, J. D. L.; Houghton, B. F.

    2005-07-01

    Flood volcanic provinces are assumed generally to consist exclusively of thick lavas and shallow intrusive rocks (mostly sills), with any pyroclastic rocks limited to silicic compositions. However, mafic volcaniclastic deposits (MVDs) exist in many provinces, and the eruptions that formed such deposits are potentially meaningful in terms of potential atmospheric impacts and links with mass extinctions. The province where MVDs are the most voluminous—the Siberian Traps—is also the one temporally associated with the greatest Phanerozoic mass extinction. A lot remains to be learned about these deposits and eruptions before a convincing genetic link can be established, but as a first step, this contribution reviews in some detail the current knowledge on MVDs for the provinces in which they are better known, i.e. the North Atlantic Igneous Province (including Greenland, the Faeroe Islands, the British Isles, and tephra layers in the North Sea basin and vicinity), the Ontong Java plateau, the Ferrar, and the Karoo. We also provide a brief overview of what is known about MVDs in other provinces such as the Columbia River Basalts, the Afro-Arabian province, the Deccan Traps, the Siberian Traps, the Emeishan, and an Archean example from Australia. The thickest accumulations of MVDs occur in flood basalt provinces where they underlie the lava pile (Faeroes: > 1 km, Ferrar province: ≥ 400 m, Siberian Traps: 700 m). In the Faeroes case, the great thickness of MVDs can be attributed to accumulation in a local sedimentary basin, but in the Ferrar and Siberian provinces the deposits are widespread (> 3 × 10 5 km 2 for the latter). On the Ontong Java plateau over 300 m of MVDs occur in one drill hole without any overlying lavas. Where the volcaniclastic deposits are sandwiched between lavas, their thickness is much less. In most of the cases reviewed, primary MVDs are predominantly of phreatomagmatic origin, as indicated by the clast assemblage generally consisting of

  5. Global Oceanic Basalt Geochemistry From EarthChem Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. W.; Sarbas, B.; Jochum, K. P.; Stracke, A.

    2004-12-01

    For the past 21 years, global trace element systematics in oceanic basalts have been systematically developed, using mass spectrometry, by the MPI geochemistry department in Mainz, starting with Ba-Rb-Cs, and continuing with K-U-Th, Nb-U-Th, Pb-Ce, Pr-Mo, Nb-Ta, Sn-REE, Sb-REE, and Y-Ho relations. These were complemented by other groups, contributing e.g. Sr-REE relationships and more refined Nb-Ta systematics. Goal of these investigations was to establish relative trace element compatibilities during mantle melting, the corresponding enrichment and depletion patterns in MORB, OIB, subduction-related volcanics and the continental crust, and the relationships to Bulk Silicate Earth abundances through comparisons with element abundances in meteorites and in the continental crust (see e.g. [1]). Most of these studies were initially based on extremely limited data sets, often fewer than 100 analyses, because routine analytical techniques such as XRF and INAA were inadequate, either in sensitivity or accuracy or both, for many of the elements of interest. The advent of ICPMS technology has increased the volume of available, useable data enormously. The most recent development of laser source ICPMS is accelerating the acquisition of comprehensive trace element data even more dramatically. Although the general quality of recent trace element analyses has improved significantly, there remain large differences in reliability between published data because of varying analytical uncertainties and sample alteration. Thus, quality assurance remains an enormous task. In any case, now and in the foreseeable future, it will be impossible to assess global geochemical data without the use of comprehensive databases. Such databases are now available under http://www.earthchem.org/, comprising http://beta.petdb.ciesin.columbia.edu/; http://georoc.mpch-mainz.gwdg.de/, and http://navdat.geo.ku.edu/ . Unfortunately, the use of such databases is not without pitfalls. Often, appropriate

  6. Thicknesses and Volumes of Lunar Mare Basalt Flow Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Head, J. W.; Wolf, U.; Jaumann, R.; Neukum, G.

    Reliable estimates of the flow thickness are crucial to our understanding of the vol- umes and the flux of lunar mare basalt volcanism. Previous work on basalt flow unit thicknesses was based on (1) shadow measurements in high-resolution images that were taken under low-sun conditions, (2) in situ observations, e.g. of Hadley Rille at the Apollo 15 landing site, and (3) on studies of the chemical kinetic aspects of lava emplacement and cooling. These studies revealed flow unit thicknesses between 1 and 96 m. Flow unit thicknesses derived from imaging data are on average ~21 m, in contrast to chemical kinetic considerations that yield thicknesses of less than 10 m. We used crater size-distribution measurements to estimate flow unit thicknesses. A large number (~60) of our crater counts show evidence for resurfacing events and these "irregularities" in the crater size distributions are used to infer the thickness of the resurfacing layer, that is the thickness of lava flows in several nearside basins. We find that the average minimum flow unit height of all investigated units is on the order of 34 m (+7/-6 m) and that the average maximum flow unit height is about 53 m (+9/- 9 m). On average the thinnest flow units were detected for units in Mare Insularum, Mare Cognitum, and Mare Nubium, thickest flows are exposed in Mare Tranquilli- tatis and Mare Humorum. Average thicknesses of flow units in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium are slightly larger than in Mare Insularum, Mare Cognitum, and Mare Nubium, but are smaller than in Mare Tranquillitatis and Mare Humorum. The minimum average volume of all investigated flow units is~590 km3 and the maximum average volume is~940 km3. Our data indicate that the most voluminous flow units are located in Mare Humorum and Mare Tranquillitatis. As crater counts for units in Mare Serenitatis do not exhibit prominent deflections we conclude that these units have not to been resurfaced with flows thick enough to be detected in the

  7. The significance of fractional crystallization in the petrogenesis of Apollo 17 Type A and B high-Ti basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Hughes, S. S.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1990-06-01

    Whole-rock and mineral analyses of 26 'new' type A and B Apollo 17 basalts are reported. The petrography and mineral chemistry of these basalts are similar to previously reported Apollo 17 basalts. However, these 'new' whole-rock data extend the compositional ranges of previously reported type A and B basalts and require the division of the type B basalts into type B1 and B2 varieties. These three types display similar trends when both major and trace elements are plotted against a fractionation index of Cr/La ratio. Major element compositions of basalts from all three types fall on olivine + Ti oxide control lines. This study demonstrates that Apollo 17 type A, B1, and B2 basalts have a relatively simple petrogenesis, with the only postmagma-generation process being fractional crystallization.

  8. Petrological, magnetic and chemical properties of basalt dredged from an abyssal hill in the North-east pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luyendyk, B.P.; Engel, C.G.

    1969-01-01

    OVER the years, samples of basalt from the oceanic crust have been taken mainly from seamounts, fracture zones and ridge and rise crests1-6, and rarely from the vast fields of abyssal hills which cover a large part of the deep-sea floor. The basalt sampled from the deeper regions of the oceanic crust (for example, on fault scarps) is a distinct variety of tholeiitic basalt, while alkali basalt is restricted to the volcanic edifices4. Oceanic tholeiitic basalt differs from alkali basalt and continental tholeiite chiefly in having a relatively low percentage of K2O (0.2 weight per cent)4. Some authors have speculated that this type of tholeiitic basalt is the major extrusion from the upper mantle and constitutes the predominant rock type in the upper oceanic crust. ?? 1969 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. The significance of fractional crystallization in the petrogenesis of Apollo 17 Type A and B high-Ti basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Hughes, Scott S.; Schmitt, Roman A.

    1990-01-01

    Whole-rock and mineral analyses of 26 'new' type A and B Apollo 17 basalts are reported. The petrography and mineral chemistry of these basalts are similar to previously reported Apollo 17 basalts. However, these 'new' whole-rock data extend the compositional ranges of previously reported type A and B basalts and require the division of the type B basalts into type B1 and B2 varieties. These three types display similar trends when both major and trace elements are plotted against a fractionation index of Cr/La ratio. Major element compositions of basalts from all three types fall on olivine + Ti oxide control lines. This study demonstrates that Apollo 17 type A, B1, and B2 basalts have a relatively simple petrogenesis, with the only postmagma-generation process being fractional crystallization.

  10. Long-term alteration of basaltic glass: Mechanisms and rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin; Jollivet, Patrick; Rébiscoul, Diane; Gin, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    The long-term behavior study of archaeological artifacts and natural minerals and glasses revealed discrepancies between laboratory and field data. For a better understanding of the cause of these discrepancies and to reinforce the use of basaltic glass as an analog for nuclear waste glasses, this study focuses on the determination of alteration rates and processes of synthetic basaltic glass in residual rate regime. Laboratory batch experiments were performed at high surface-to-volume ratios at 90 and 30 °C for more than 1000 days. In all the experiments, the residual rate regime was reached after about 6 months. The residual alteration rates at 30 and 90 °C were 4.0 ± 1.0 × 10-6 and 9.5 ± 3.2 × 10-6 g·m-2·d-1, respectively. At 90 °C, this residual alteration rate is five orders of magnitude lower than the forward alteration rate (0.8 g·m-2·d-1). Altered powders and monoliths were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. From glass core to solution, the altered materials are structured as follows: pristine glass, gel (corresponding to the palagonitic layer of natural glasses) and intergranular clays. To assess the passivating properties of this alteration film, we used solid characterization, an isotopically-tagged post-leaching experiment and the measurement of mobile species diffusion coefficients through the alteration film at different stages of reaction using various techniques (solution analysis and X-ray Reflectometry). These characterizations showed that the alteration film formed during residual rate alteration is passivating even without clogged porosity within the gel. Diffusion coefficients of water and alkali metals - respectively diffusing to and from the pristine glass - through the alteration film dropped from 10-20 to 10-19 m2·s-1 during the first alteration stages to 10-25 m2·s-1 in residual rate regime.

  11. Lithium isotopes in hydrothermally altered basalts from Hengill (SW Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney-Carron, A.; Vigier, N.; Millot, R.; Hardarson, B. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Li isotope signatures of hydrothermal fluids are remarkably constant (δ7Li = 8.0 ± 1.9 ‰) irrespective of the water/rock ratio (W / R), permeability, temperature or fluid involved (seawater or meteoric). High temperature hydrothermal fluids represent the second most significant source of Li to the ocean, yet the homogeneity of the Li isotopic signatures of this source remains to be explained and in this context, the lack of data for the corresponding altered phases is problematic. We measured Li contents and Li isotope signatures (as well as mineralogy, composition and local fluid temperature) in hyaloclastites collected from a borehole in the Hellisheidi geothermal system (Iceland) which have been altered by high temperature aqueous fluids (from 170 to 300 °C). Li is more enriched in the solid phases than the other alkali metals, highlighting its greater ability to be incorporated into secondary phases, especially at high temperatures (>250 °C). Mass balance calculations show that the low Li concentrations in hydrothermal fluids are best explained by a high water/rock ratio and a high permeability of this system. The Li isotopic signature of the altered hyaloclastites (δ7Li between +1.9 and + 4.0 ‰) remains close to the fresh basalt at deep levels and high temperatures (290-300 °C) (as measured δ7Li range between +3.7 and + 4.0 ‰), and decreases at shallower depths and lower temperatures (150-270 °C) (δ7Li between +1.9 and + 3.1 ‰). A mass balance model involving basalt dissolution, secondary phase formation, and successive isotope equilibrium during the migration and the cooling of the percolating fluid was developed. The corresponding apparent mineral-fluid Li isotope fractionation factors resulting from precipitation of secondary phases (ΔLi7minerals-fluid) range between 0‰ at 300 °C and - 8.5 ‰ at 170 °C and highlight a key role of chlorite. Applying the same approach to mid-ridge oceanic hydrothermal systems allows the relatively

  12. Petrogenesis of basalt-trachyte lavas from Olmoti Crater, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C., III; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    Olmoti Crater is part of the Plio-Pleistocene Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH) in northern Tanzania to the south of Gregory Rift. The Gregory Rift is part of the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) that stretches some 4000 km from the Read Sea and Gulf of Aden in the north to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. Here, we (1) characterize the chemistry and mineral compositions of lavas from Olmoti Crater, (2) determine the age and duration of Olmoti volcanic activity through 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Olmoti Crater wall lavas and (3) determine the genesis of Olmoti lavas and the relationship to other NVH and EARS volcanics and (4) their correlation with volcanics in the Olduvai and Laetoli stratigraphic sequences. Olmoti lavas collected from the lower part of the exposed crater wall section (OLS) range from basalt to trachyandesite whereas the upper part of the section (OUS) is trachytic. Petrography and major and trace element data reflect a very low degree partial melt origin for the Olmoti lavas, presumably of peridotite, followed by extensive fractionation. The 87Sr/ 86Sr data overlap whereas Nd and Pb isotope data are distinct between OLS and OUS samples. Interpretation of the isotope data suggests mixing of enriched mantle (EM I) with high-μ-like reservoirs, consistent with the model of Bell and Blenkinsop [Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., 1987. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites: implications for mantle heterogeneity. Geology 5, 99-102] for East African carbonatite lavas. The isotope ratios are within the range of values defined by Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB) globally and moderate normalized Tb/Yb ratios (2.3-1.6) in these lavas suggest melting in the lithospheric mantle consistent with other studies in the region. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental-heating analyses of matrix and anorthoclase separates from Olmoti OLS and OUS lavas indicate that volcanic activity was short in duration, lasting ˜200 kyr from 2.01 ± 0.03 Ma to 1.80 ± 0

  13. Calcium isotopic compositions of mid-ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, Z.; Sun, W.; Wang, G. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Earth's mantle has heterogeneous calcium isotopic compositions. But the reason why mantle has its heterogeneity remains uncertain. In general, δ44/40Ca values of mantle xenolith samples have a variation of >0.45‰. While ultramafic rocks, especially dunites, have higher δ44/40Ca values than volcanic rocks, and there is a positive correlation between δ44/40Ca and Ca/Mg. These phenomena imply that the heterogeneity of Ca isotopic compositions of mantle xenolith samples might result from different degrees of melt extraction, as indicated by large Ca isotopic fractionation between co-existing clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. However, because ancient marine carbonate has its own unique calcium isotopic characteristics, recycling of even a small amount of ancient marine carbonates into the mantle could also cause the heterogeneity of Ca isotopes in Earth's mantle. This could be the reason why oceanic island basalts (OIB) have lighter Ca isotopic compositions than the mantle xenolith. Thus, the lighter Ca isotopic compositions in the mantle source cannot only be ascribed to magmatic processes. Therefore, it is more important to know calcium isotopic characteristics during partial melting and oceanic crust contamination.Mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) are formed from the partial melts of the upper mantle and are rarely affected by crustal contamination. Different types of MORB, including D-MORB, N-MORB and E-MORB, have experienced different degrees of partial melting and contamination of enriched end-members. Here we report calcium isotopic characteristic of different types of MORB, we believe it will be very helpful to understand the behaviors of Ca isotopes during partial melting and it is possible to provide further information to discover the reason why calcium isotopic compositions is heterogeneous in Earth's mantle. This work was supported by Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41373007, No. 41490632 and No. 91328204

  14. Mineralogy, Petrology and Oxygen Fugacity of the LaPaz Icefield Lunar Basaltic Meteorites and the Origin of Evolved Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, S. J.; Righter, K.; Brandon, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    LAP 02205 is a 1.2 kg lunar mare basalt meteorite found in the Lap Paz ice field of Antarctica in 2002 [1]. Four similar meteorites were also found within the same region [1] and all five have a combined mass of 1.9 kg (LAP 02224, LAP 02226, LAP 02436 and LAP 03632, hereafter called the LAP meteorites). The LAP meteorites all contain a similar texture, mineral assemblage, and composition. A lunar origin for these samples comes from O isotopic data for LAP 02205 [1], Fe/Mn ratios of pyroxenes [1-5], and the presence of distinct lunar mineralogy such as Fe metal and baddeleyite. The LAP meteorites may represent an area of the Moon, which has never been sampled by Apollo missions, or by other lunar meteorites. The data from this study will be used to compare the LAP meteorites to Apollo mare basalts and lunar basaltic meteorites, and will ultimately help to constrain their origin.

  15. Extracellular Enzyme Activity and Microbial Diversity Measured on Seafloor Exposed Basalts from Loihi Seamount Indicate the Importance of Basalts to Global Biogeochemical Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)−1 h−1; the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)−1 h−1. The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 μM, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 μM. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  16. The mode of emplacement of Neogene flood basalts in eastern Iceland: Facies architecture and structure of simple aphyric basalt groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Riishuus, Morten S.

    2014-12-01

    Simple flows (tabular) in the Neogene flood basalt sections of Iceland are described and their mode of emplacement assessed. The flows belong to three aphyric basalt groups: the Kumlafell group, the Hólmatindur group and the Hjálmadalur group. The groups can be traced over 50 km and originate in the Breiðdalur-Thingmuli volcanic zone. The groups have flow fields that display mixed volcanic facies architecture and can be classified after dominating type morphology. The Kumlafell and the Hólmatindur groups have predominantly simple flows of pāhoehoe and rubbly pāhoehoe morphologies with minor compound or lobate pāhoehoe flows. The Hjálmadalur group has simple flows of rubbly pāhoehoe, but also includes minor compound or lobate flows of rubble and 'a'ā. Simple flows are most common in the distal and medial areas from the vents, while more lobate flows in proximal areas. The simple flows are formed by extensive sheet lobes that are several kilometers long with plane-parallel contacts, some reaching thicknesses of ~ 40 m (aspect ratios < 0.01). They have overlapping contacts and are free of tubes and inflation structures. Their internal structure consists generally of a simple upper vesicular crust, a dense core and a thin basal vesicular zone. The brecciated flow-top is formed by clinker and crustal rubble, the clinker often welded or agglutinated. The simple flows erupted from seemingly short-lived fissures and have the characteristics of cooling-limited flows. We estimate the effusion rates to be ~ 105 m3/s for the simple flows of the Kumlafell and Hólmatindur groups and ~ 104 m3/s for the Hjálmadalur group. The longest flows advanced 15-20 km from the fissures, with lava streams of fast propagating flows inducing tearing and brecciation of the chilled crust. Compound or lobate areas appear to reflect areas of low effusion rates or the interaction of the lava with topographic barriers or wetlands, resulting in chaotic flowage. Slowing lobes with

  17. The effect of water on the physical and thermodynamic properties of calc-alkaline basalt and basaltic andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present corresponding viscosity and heat capacity data obtained on a series of hydrated glasses and supercooled melts for Fe-free calc-alkaline basaltic (sb, NBO/T = 0.67) and basaltic andesite analogues (sba, NBO/T = 0.40). Water contents range from nominally anhydrous to 3.76 wt.% H2O. Density measurements on relaxed (1 atm) hydrous glasses (post-viscometry) yield a partial molar volume of H2O of 12.9 and of 11.4 cm3mol-1 for sba and sb, respectively. Viscosity data were obtained at temperatures in the neighbourhood of the glass transition using the parallel-plate method, and at superliquidus temperatures using the concentric-cylinder and falling-sphere methods. The effect of water on viscosity is most dramatic at low temperatures, with the addition of ~2 wt.% H2O resulting in a reduction of the temperature at which the viscosity of the melt is 1012 Pa s (T12) of 170-180°C. The viscosity of a calc-alkaline basaltic andesite magma with 2 wt.% H2O at depth would increase by a factor of ~100 upon complete degassing during ascent. Calorimetric measurements were made with a Perkin-Elmer 8500 Differential Scanning Calorimeter up to 750°C, the limit of the instrument, depending on the sample water content. The increase in heat capacity associated with the transition from a glass to a supercooled liquid is on the order of ~25-30% and is higher in magnitude the more depolymerized the liquid. Our preliminary results suggest that the heat capacity of the hydrous sba and sb liquids decreases with increasing temperature immediately above the glass transition, similar to borosilicate and titanosilicate melts. In the anhydrous titano- and boro-silicate melts, this anomalous behaviour was linked to T-dependent mixing of B or Ti with Si. In sb and sba, the observed decrease in configurational heat capacity with increasing temperature may be related to the interplay of 'polymerizing' (viscosity-increasing) vs. 'depolymerizing' (viscosity-decreasing) solution mechanisms of

  18. Where did Anomalous Basaltic Meteorites get Their Oxygen Anomaly? The Case of Bunburra Rockhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P. A.; Greenwood, R. C.; Franchi, I. A.; Friedrich, J. M.; Towner, M. C.

    2013-09-01

    A number of eucrite-like basaltic meteorites have been identified that have oxygen isotopic compositions which plot away from the main HED mass fractionation line. We are exploring some options to explain this with data from Bunburra Rockhole.

  19. An Interactive Computer Program for Simulating the Effects of Olivine Fractionation from Basaltic and Ultrabasic Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Thomas H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes interactive computer program (listing available from author) which simulates olivine fractionation from basaltic/ultrabasic liquid. The menu-driven nature of the program (for Apple II microcomputer) allows students to select ideal Rayleigh fractionation or equilibrium crystallization. (JN)

  20. Oxygen fugacity of basaltic magmas and the role of gas-forming elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that major variations in the relative oxygen fugacity of a basaltic magma are caused primarily by gas-forming elements, especially carbon and hydrogen. According to this theory, carbon, present in the source region of a basaltic magma, reduces the host magma during ascent, as isothermally carbon becomes more reducing with decreasing pressure. For an anhydrous magma such as lunar basalts, this reduction continues through the extrusive phase and the relative oxygen fugacity decreases rapidly until buffered by the precipitation of a metallic phase. For hydrous magmas such as terrestrial basalts, reduction by carbon is eventually superceded by oxidation due to loss of H2 generated by the reaction of C with H2O and by thermal dissociation of H2O. The relative oxygen fugacity of a hydrous magma initially decreases as a magma ascends from the source region and then increases until magnetite crystallization curbs the rising trend of the relative oxygen fugacity.

  1. Shatter Cones in Basalt: A Natural Example from the Vista Alegre Impact Structure, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, L.; Nestola, F.; Viti, C.; Crósta, A. P.; Koeberl, C.

    2015-09-01

    Shatter cones, formed in fine-grained basalt in the Vista Alegre impact structure (Brazil), exhibit cataclastic layers sub-parallel to the striated surfaces and a continuous melt rock film, investigated with TEM, decorating the striated surface.

  2. Initial basalt target site selection evaluation for the Mars penetrator drop test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, T. E.; Quaide, W. L.; Polkowski, G.

    1976-01-01

    Potential basalt target sites for an air drop penetrator test were described and the criteria involved in site selection were discussed. A summary of the background field geology and recommendations for optimum sites are also presented.

  3. Characterization and Distribution of Lunar Mare Basalt Types Using Remote Sensing Techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C.

    1977-01-01

    The types of basal to be found on the moon were identified using reflectance spectra from a variety of lunar mare surfaces and craters as well as geochemical interpretations of laboratory measurements of reflectance from lunar, terrestrial, and meteoritic samples. Findings indicate that major basaltic units are not represented in lunar sample collections. The existence of late stage high titanium basalts is confirmed. All maria contain lateral variations of compositionally heterogenous basalts; some are vertically inhomogenous with distinctly different subsurface composition. Some basalt types are spectrally gradational, suggesting minor variations in composition. Mineral components of unsampled units can be defined if spectra are obtained with sufficient spectral coverage (.3 to 2.5 micron m) and spatial resolution (approximating .5 km).

  4. Petrology of dune sand derived from basalt on the Ka'u Desert, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Dune sand from the Ka'u Desert, southwest flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, is moderately well-sorted (median = 1.60 Phi, deviation = 0.60, skewness = 0.25, kurtosis = 0.68) and composed mostly of frosted subangular particles of basalt glass ('unfractionated' olivine-normative tholeitte), olivine, lithic fragments (subophitic and intersertal basalts; magnetite-ilmenite-rich basalts), reticular basalt glass, magnetite, ilmenite, and plagioclase, in approximately that order of abundance. Quantitative lithological comparison of the dune sand with sand-sized ash from the Keanakakoi Formation supports suggestions that the dune sand was derived largely from Keanakakoi ash. The dune sand is too well sorted to have been emplaced in its present form by base-surge but could have evolved by post-eruption reworking of the ash.

  5. Age and petrology of the Kalaupapa Basalt, Molokai, Hawaii ( geochemistry, Sr isotopes).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The post-erosional Kalaupapa Basalt on East Molokai, Hawaii, erupted between 0.34 and 0.57 million years ago to form the Kalaupapa Peninsula. The Kalaupapa Basalt ranges in composition from basanite to lava transitional between alkalic and tholeiitic basalt. Rare-earth and other trace-element abundances suggest that the Kalaupapa Basalt could be generated by 11-17% partial melting of a light-REE-enriched source like that from which the post-erosional lavas of the Honolulu Group on Oahu were generated by 2-11% melting. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the lavas range from 0.70320 to 0.70332, suggesting that the variation in composition mainly reflects variation in the melting process rather than heterogeneity of sources. The length of the period of volcanic quiescence that preceded eruption of post-erosional lavas in the Hawaiian Islands decreased as volcanism progressed from Kauai toward Kilauea. - Authors

  6. Consortium reports on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757, a new type of mare basalt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanai, Keizo; Takeda, Hiroshi; Lindstrom, M. M.; Tatsumoto, M.; Torigoe, N.; Misawa, K.; Warren, P. H.; Kallemeyn, G. W.; Koeberl, C.; Kojima, H.

    1993-01-01

    Consortium studies on lunar meteorites Yamato 793169 and Asuka 881757 (formerly Asuka-31) were performed to characterize these new samples from unknown locations in the lunar mare. Both meteorites are coarse-grained mare rocks having low Mg/Fe ratios (bulk mg'=30-35) and low TiO2 (1.5-2.5 percent in homogenized bulk samples). They are intermediate between VLT and low-Ti mare basalts. Although these meteorites are not identical to each other, their mineral and bulk compositions, isotopic systematics, and crystallization ages are remarkably similar and distinct from those of all other mare basalts. They appear to represent a new type of low-Ti mare basalt that crystallized at about 3.9Ga. These meteorites are inconsistent with the canonical correlation between the TiO2 contents and ages of mare basalts and suggest that our knowledge of lunar volcanism is far from complete.

  7. Planetary Basalt Construction of a Launch/Landing Pad - PISCES Project Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    Provide a briefing on the progress of a joint project between the PISCES and NASA to develop and demonstrate technologies associated with planetary robotic construction using basalt: called “Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement” (ACME).

  8. D-Poor Hydrogen in Lunar Mare Basalts Assimilated from Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.; Boyce, J. W.; Greenwood, J. P.; Eiler, J. M.; Gross, J.; Guan, Y.; Ma, C.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-05-01

    D/H in apatites in mare basalts decreases with Fe-Mg homogenization of their pyroxenes. This suggests that the low D/H represents hydrogen from lunar regolith, which masquerading as an igneous component.

  9. Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes in basalts and sulfides from the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegner, E.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic Pb, Sr, and Nd data were collected by the Alvin submersible from seven basalt glasses in the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge (JFR), giving similar ratios for Pb-206/Pb-204 of about 18.45, for Pb-207/Pb-204 of about 15.47, for Pb-208/Pb-204 of about 37.81, for Sr-87/Sr-86 of about 0.70249, and for Nd-143/Nd-144 of about 0.51315. Data suggest that the basalts are all cogenetic, and that four of the samples are also comagmatic. It is concluded that isotopic data for the JFR and seamount basalts provide additional support for the mantle blob cluster model (Allegre et al., 1984), suggesting the involvement of multiple components in the genesis of ridge basalts, and including an unusual end-member that has nonradiogenic Sr and variable Pb-206/Pb-204 isotopic compositions.

  10. Mare Basalt Volcanism: Generation, Ascent, Eruption, and History of Emplacement of Secondary Crust on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Wilson, L.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analyses of the generation, ascent, intrusion and eruption of basaltic magma provides new insight into magma source depths, supply processes, transport and emplacement mechanisms (dike intrusions, effusive and explosive eruptions).

  11. Real-Time Observation of Early Stage Damage During Hypervelocity Impacts into Basalt Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberley, J.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    Hypervelocity impacts were conducted on basalt targets bonded to glass allowing for the early stages of damage accumulation to be observed in real time. Results show that significant damage accumulates before the arrival of tensile wave reflections.

  12. In-situ stress measurement in a jointed basalt: the suitability of five overcoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, E.C.; Rundle, T.A.; McCabe, W.M.; Kim, K.

    1983-05-01

    Overcoring tests were conducted at the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF) to assess the suitability of five techniques (US Bureau of Mines borehole deformation gauge (BDG), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) hollow inclusion stress cell, epoxy inclusion, Lulea triaxial gauge (LuH gauge), and Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) doorstopper) for in situ stress determination in a closely jointed basalt. This effort is in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation project, which is studying the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in the basalts of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. This paper preents the results from the overcoring study that formed the basis for selection of two techniques to be used during the further exploration of the basalt formations at depth.

  13. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  14. Basaltic magmatism on the Moon. A perspective from volcanic picritic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    It is widely accepted that basaltic magmas are products of partial fusion of peridotite within planetary mantles. As such they provide valuable insights into the structure and processes of planetary interiors. Those compositions which approach primary melt compositions provide both a clearer vision of planetary interiors and a starting point at which to understand basaltic evolution. Within the collection of lunar samples returned by the Apollo and Luna missions are homogeneous, picritic glass beads of volcanic origin. These glass beads provide a unique perspective concerning the origin of mare basalts, the characteristics of the lunar interior, and processes culminating in the early differentiation of the moon. In this presentation, we report our ion microprobe derived trace element data from all picritic glasses previously identified. We place this trace element data and literature isotopic and experimental data on the picritic glasses with the framework of mare basaltic magmatism.

  15. Comparative Planetary Mineralogy: Co, Ni Systematics in Chromite from Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karner, J. M.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Righter,K.

    2005-01-01

    Spinel is a minor but important phase in planetary basalts because its variable composition often reflects basalt petrogenesis. For example, complicated zoning trends in spinel can give clues to melt evolution [1], and V concentrations in chromite lend insight into magma oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [2]. Nickel and Co are two elements that are commonly used as a measure of melt fractionation, and their partitioning between olivine and melt is fairly well understood. Less clear is their partitioning into spinel, although [3] has explored Ni and Co systematics in experimental charges. This study documents Ni and Co behavior in early crystallizing spinel (chromite) from several planetary basalts in an attempt to compare our results with [3], and also gain insight into basalt evolution on the three planets.

  16. Goldschmidt Conference 2005: Field Trip Guide to the Columbia River Basalt Group

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Barton S.; Petcovic, Heather L.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-06-16

    This field trip guide was prepared for the 2005 Goldschmidt Conference held in Moscow, Idaho. The field trip guide provides a two day introduction to the features of the Columbia River Basalt Group in eastern Washington.

  17. Emplacement of Long Lava Flows: Detailed Topography of the Carrizozo Basalt Lava Flow, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R; Johnston, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Carrizozo flow in south-central New Mexico was examined to obtain detailed topography for a long basaltic lava flow. This information will be helpful in evaluating emplacement models for long lava flows.

  18. Geochemistry of East African Rift basalts: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Tanya

    2007-06-01

    Mafic lavas erupted along the East African Rift System from the Afar triangle in northern Ethiopia to the Rungwe province in southern Tanzania display a wide range of geochemical and isotopic compositions that reflect heterogeneity in both source and process. In areas with the lowest degree of crustal extension (the Western and Southern Kenya Rifts) primitive lavas record the greatest extent of lithospheric melting, manifest in elevated abundances of incompatible elements and highly radiogenic Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions. Where prolonged extension has removed most or all of the mantle lithosphere (the Turkana and Northern Kenya Rifts), a larger role for sub-lithospheric processes is indicated. At intermediate degrees of extension (the Main Ethiopian Rift) both lithospheric and sub-lithospheric contributions are observed, and crustal assimilation occurs in some cases. Despite the wide compositional range of African Rift basalts, a restricted number of source domains contribute to magmatism throughout the area. These individual domains are: (1) the subcontinental mantle lithosphere; (2) a plume source with high-μ Sr-Nd-Pb-He isotopic affinities, present in all areas within and south of the Turkana Depression; and (3) a plume source with isotopic signatures analogous to those observed in some ocean islands, including high 3He/ 4He values, present throughout the Ethiopian Rift and the Afar region. The two plume sources may both be derived from the South African Superplume, which is likely to be a compositionally heterogeneous feature of the lower mantle.

  19. Visualizing microscopic structure of simulated model basalt melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohara, Bidur; Karki, Bijaya B.

    2013-08-01

    We perform a detailed visualization-based analysis of atomic-position series data for model basalt melt obtained from first-principles (quantum mechanical) molecular dynamics simulations. To gain insight into the short- and mid-range order of the melt structure, we extract and visualize the details of radial distribution function (RDF) and coordination environment. The first peaks of all partial RDFs lie in the distance range of 1.6-4 Å and the corresponding mean coordination numbers vary from less than 1 to more than 9. The coordination environments involving cations and anions differ substantially from each other, each consisting of a rich set of coordination states. These states vary both spatially and temporally: The per-atom coordination information extracted on the fly is rendered instantaneously as the spheres and polyhedra as well as along the corresponding trajectories using a color-coding scheme. The information is also visualized as clusters formed by atoms that are coordinated at different time intervals during the entire simulation. The Si-O coordination is comprised of almost all tetrahedra (4-fold) whereas the Al-O coordination includes both tetrahedra (4-fold) and pentahedra (5-fold). The animated visualization suggests that the melt structure can be viewed as a dynamic (partial) network of Al/Si-O coordination polyhedra connected via bridging oxygen in an inhomogeneous distribution of mobile magnesium and calcium atoms.

  20. The Rheology of Three-Phase Basaltic Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Truby, J.; Mueller, S. P.; Mader, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of magma is controlled by its rheology which, in turn, is a function of its crystal and bubble content. We develop the first empirically-validated model for the rheology of a three-phase magma (i.e. one containing both bubbles and crystals). The model is valid at low bubble capillary number (where bubble deformation is small) which is typical of basaltic magma. We adopt an 'effective-medium' approach in which the bubbly melt is treated as a continuous medium which suspends the crystals. The resulting three-phase model combines separate two-phase models for bubble suspension rheology and crystal suspension rheology, which are taken from the literature. The model is validated against new analogue experimental data for three-phase suspensions of bubbles and spherical particles, collected in the low bubble capillary number regime. Good agreement is found across the experimental range of particle volume fraction (0 ≤ Фp ≤0.5) and bubble volume fraction (0 ≤ Фb ≤ 0.3). Consistent with model predictions, experimental results demonstrate that, at low capillarity, bubble growth in a crystal-poor magma increases its viscosity, whilst bubble growth in a crystal-rich magma decreases its viscosity. The validity range of the model makes it particularly applicable to the transport of magma in the sub-volcanic plumbing system. The model is trivially extended to account for variations in crystal shape, and for the high capillarity regime; these extended models await experimental validation.

  1. Possible solar noble-gas component in Hawaiian basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honda, M.; McDougall, I.; Patterson, D.B.; Doulgeris, A.; Clague, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    THE noble-gas elemental and isotopic composition in the Earth is significantly different from that of the present atmosphere, and provides an important clue to the origin and history of the Earth and its atmosphere. Possible candidates for the noble-gas composition of the primordial Earth include a solar-like component, a planetary-like component (as observed in primitive meteorites) and a component similar in composition to the present atmosphere. In an attempt to identify the contributions of such components, we have measured isotope ratios of helium and neon in fresh basaltic glasses dredged from Loihi seamount and the East Rift Zone of Kilauea1-3. We find a systematic enrichment in 20Ne and 21Ne relative to 22Ne, compared with atmospheric neon. The helium and neon isotope signatures observed in our samples can be explained by mixing of solar, present atmospheric, radiogenic and nucleogenic components. These data suggest that the noble-gas isotopic composition of the mantle source of the Hawaiian plume is different from that of the present atmosphere, and that it includes a significant solar-like component. We infer that this component was acquired during the formation of the Earth.

  2. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Carbon and its isotopes in mid-oceanic basaltic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Three carbon components are evident in eleven analyzed mid-oceanic basalts: carbon on sample surfaces (resembling adsorbed gases, organic matter, or other non-magmatic carbon species acquired by the glasses subsequent to their eruption), mantle carbon dioxide in vesicles, and mantle carbon dissolved in the glasses. The combustion technique employed recovered only reduced sulfur, all of which appears to be indigenous to the glasses. The dissolved carbon concentration (measured in vesicle-free glass) increases with the eruption depth of the spreading ridge, and is consistent with earlier data which show that magma carbon solubility increases with pressure. The total glass carbon content (dissolved plus vesicular carbon) may be controlled by the depth of the shallowest ridge magma chamber. Carbon isotopic fractionation accompanies magma degassing; vesicle CO2 is about 3.8??? enriched in 13C, relative to dissolved carbon. Despite this fractionation, ??13CPDB values for all spreading ridge glasses lie within the range -5.6 and -7.5, and the ??13CPDB of mantle carbon likely lies between -5 and -7. The carbon abundances and ??13CPDB values of Kilauea East Rift glasses apparently are influenced by the differentiation and movement of magma within that Hawaiian volcano. Using 3He and carbon data for submarine hydrothermal fluids, the present-day mid-oceanic ridge mantle carbon flux is estimated very roughly to be about 1.0 ?? 1013 g C/yr. Such a flux requires 8 Gyr to accumulate the earth's present crustal carbon inventory. ?? 1984.

  4. A study of titanomagnetites in basaltic rocks from Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipka, J.; Madsen, M. B.; Orlicky, D.; Koch, C. J. W.; Mørup, S.

    1988-09-01

    The magnetic fractions of basaltic rock samples from Nigeria have been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The relative areas of the magnetically split components in the Mössbauer spectra decrease with increasing temperature. It is shown that this is not because of superparamagnetic relaxation but rather due to inhomogeneous distributions of the iron atoms in the titanomagnetites which lead to a distribution in Curie temperatures. Heating of some samples in air results in an increase in the Curie temperature and an increase in the magnetic susceptibility at room temperature. For other samples the susceptibility had decreased after heating, and the Curie temperature was not affected. Mössbauer and X-ray studies of the heated samples showed a transformation of titanomagnetite into magnetite and titanium-oxides and a partial oxidation of magnetite into hematite. These observations can explain the changes in the magnetic susceptibility. The results suggest that Mössbauer studies of iron-titanium oxides can give information on the cooling history of rock samples.

  5. Highly siderophile element abundances in Eoarchean komatiite and basalt protoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Elizabeth A.; Maier, Wolfgang D.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Plume-derived, Mg-rich, volcanic rocks (komatiites, high-Mg basalts, and their metamorphic equivalents) can record secular changes in the highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances of mantle sources. An apparent secular time-dependent enrichment trend in HSE abundances from Paleoarchean to Paleoproterozoic mantle-derived rocks could represent the protracted homogenization of a Late Veneer chondritic contaminant into the pre-Late Veneer komatiite source. To search for a possible time dependence of a late accretion signature in the Eoarchean mantle, we report new data from rare >3700 Myr-old mafic and ultramafic schists locked in supracrustal belts from the Inukjuak domain (Québec, Canada) and the Akilia association (West Greenland). Our analysis shows that some of these experienced HSE mobility and/or include a cumulate component (Touboul et al. in Chem Geol 383:63-75, 2014), whereas several of the oldest samples show some of the most depleted HSE abundances measured for rocks of this composition. We consider these new data for the oldest documented rocks of komatiite protolith in light of the Late Veneer hypothesis.

  6. Complex Formation History of Highly Evolved Basaltic Shergottite, Zagami

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niihara, T.; Misawa, K.; Mikouchi, T.; Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Hirata, D.

    2012-01-01

    Zagami, a basaltic shergottite, contains several kinds of lithologies such as Normal Zagami consisting of Fine-grained (FG) and Coarse-grained (CG), Dark Mottled lithology (DML), and Olivine-rich late-stage melt pocket (DN). Treiman and Sutton concluded that Zagami (Normal Zagami) is a fractional crystallization product from a single magma. It has been suggested that there were two igneous stages (deep magma chamber and shallow magma chamber or surface lava flow) on the basis of chemical zoning features of pyroxenes which have homogeneous Mg-rich cores and FeO, CaO zoning at the rims. Nyquist et al. reported that FG has a different initial Sr isotopic ratio than CG and DML, and suggested the possibility of magma mixing on Mars. Here we report new results of petrology and mineralogy for DML and the Olivine-rich lithology (we do not use DN here), the most evolved lithology in this rock, to understand the relationship among lithologies and reveal Zagami s formation history

  7. Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination of TCE in a Basalt Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    K. S. Sorenson; L. N. Peterson; R. Ely

    1999-04-01

    A field evaluation of enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater has been in progress since November 1998 to determine whether in situ biodegradation can be significantly enhanced through the addition of an electron donor (lactate). An in situ treatment cell was established in the residual source area of a large TCE plume in a fractured basalt aquifer utilizing continuous ground water extraction approximately 150 meters downgradient of the injection location. After a 1-month tracer test and baseline sampling period, the pulsed injection of lactate was begun. Ground water samples were collected from 11 sampling points on a biweekly basis and in situ water quality parameters were recorded every 4 hours at two locations. Within 2 weeks after the initial lactate injection, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were observed to decrease substantially at all sampling locations within 40 m of the injection well. Decreases in nitrate and sulfate concentrations were also observed. Both quantitative in situ rate estimation methods and qualitative measures such as changes in redox conditions, decreases in chlorine number, and changes in biomass indicator parameters are being used throughout the test to evaluate the extent to which biodegradation of TCE is enhanced.

  8. Enhanced Reductive Dechlorination of TCE in a Basalt Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Kent Soren; Peterson, Lance Nutting; Ely, R. L.

    1999-04-01

    A field evaluation of enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in ground water has been in progress since November 1998 to determine whether in situ biodegradation can be significantly enhanced through the addition of an electron donor (lactate). An in situ treatment cell was established in the residual source area of a large TCE plume in a fractured basalt aquifer utilizing continuous ground water extraction approximately 150 meters downgradient of the injection location. After a 1-month tracer test and baseline sampling period, the pulsed injection of lactate was begun. Ground water samples were collected from 11 sampling points on a biweekly basis and in situ water quality parameters were recorded every 4 hours at two locations. Within 2 weeks after the initial lactate injection, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were observed to decrease substantially at all sampling locations within 40 m of the injection well. Decreases in nitrate and sulfate concentrations were also observed. Both quantitative in situ rate estimation methods and qualitative measures such as changes in redox conditions, decreases in chlorine number, and changes in biomass indicator parameters are being used throughout the test to evaluate the extent to which biodegradation of TCE is enhanced.

  9. Structural change in molten basalt at deep mantle conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Drewitt, James W E; Konôpková, Zuzana; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Morton, Donna M; Rai, Nachiketa; van Westrenen, Wim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Silicate liquids play a key part at all stages of deep Earth evolution, ranging from core and crust formation billions of years ago to present-day volcanic activity. Quantitative models of these processes require knowledge of the structural changes and compression mechanisms that take place in liquid silicates at the high pressures and temperatures in the Earth's interior. However, obtaining such knowledge has long been impeded by the challenging nature of the experiments. In recent years, structural and density information for silica glass was obtained at record pressures of up to 100 GPa (ref. 1), a major step towards obtaining data on the molten state. Here we report the structure of molten basalt up to 60 GPa by means of in situ X-ray diffraction. The coordination of silicon increases from four under ambient conditions to six at 35 GPa, similar to what has been reported in silica glass. The compressibility of the melt after the completion of the coordination change is lower than at lower pressure, implying that only a high-order equation of state can accurately describe the density evolution of silicate melts over the pressure range of the whole mantle. The transition pressure coincides with a marked change in the pressure-evolution of nickel partitioning between molten iron and molten silicates, indicating that melt compressibility controls siderophile-element partitioning. PMID:24201283

  10. Off-gassing induced tracer release from molten basalt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Callow, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification (ISV) field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1990 to assess ISV suitability for long-term stabilization of buried waste that contains transuranic and other radionuclide contaminants. The ISV process uses electrical resistance heating to melt buried waste and soil in place, which upon cooldown and resolidification fixes the waste into a vitrified (glass-like) form. In these two ISV field tests, small quantities of rare-earth oxides (tracers DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) were placed in the test pits to simulate the presence of plutonium oxides and assess plutonium retention/release behavior. The analysis presented in this report indicates that dissolution of tracer oxides into basaltic melts can be expected with subsequent tracer molecular or microparticle carry-off by escaping gas bubbles, which is similar to adsorptive bubble separation and ion flotation processes employed in the chemical industry to separate dilute heavy species from liquids under gas sparging conditions. Gaseous bubble escape from the melt surface and associated aerosolization is believed to be responsible for small quantities of tracer ejection from the melt surface to the cover hood and off-gas collection system. Methods of controlling off-gassing during ISV would be expected to improve the overall retention of such heavy oxide contaminants during melting/vitrification of buried waste.

  11. A case study of integrated hydrocarbon exploration through basalt

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, R.; Eggers, D. ); Crebs, T. ); Fox, T.

    1994-11-01

    A large unexplored tectonic basin with the potential for significant hydrocarbon accumulations was identified in north-central Oregon using a variety of geophysical techniques. The basin, informally named after the local town of Heppner, is covered by several thousand feet of Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) but is readily identified by a gravity low against the Blue Mountains Uplift. The Paleocene/Eocene Herren Formation (Pigg, 1961), which outcrops on the Blue Mountains Uplift south of the Heppner Basin, offered good source and reservoir potential. Based on lateral extent, thickness and paleocurrent structures in the Herren Formation, the unit was expected to be present in the basin. Gravity modeling produced nonunique interpretations, thus magnetotelluric (MT) information was used to constrain the CRBG thickness. Static shifts in the MT data were removed using transient electromagnetic (TEM) data before MT data inversion. After extensive experimentation, adequate seismic data were obtained for structural mapping, but the seismic data were interpretable with confidence only after MT determinations of the CRBG thickness. As a result of the favorable geologic and geophysical information, the ARCO Hanna [number sign]1 well was drilled to 9,100 ft (2,800 m) near Heppner, oregon in section 23, T2S, R27E in 1988. Geophysical well logs indicate the Clarno Formation has densities and resistivities sufficient to account for the gravity and electrical anomalies defining the prospect. Poor seismic quality was explained by the heterogeneous nature of the pre-CRBG volcanic section encountered in the well.

  12. Alteration of Rock Fragments from Columbia River Basalt Microcosms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentworth, Susan J.; Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; McKay, David S.; Stevens, Todd O.

    1999-01-01

    During an earlier study, microorganisms were grown microcosms consisting of sterilized chips of Columbia River Basalt (CRB) and natural CRB ground water with its natural microflora; environmental conditions simulated a deep subsurface, anaerobic, dark environment. Subsequent scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM) studies revealed the presence of several types of bacteria and biofilm, some of which were mineralized. Some of these biological features are very similar to possible biogenic features found in two meteorites from Mars, ALH84001 (found in Antarctica) and Nakhla (observed to fall in Egypt). Both ALH84001 and Nakhla contain traces of low-temperature aqueous alteration of silicates, oxides, and sulfides. The goals of this study are to use high-resolution field-emission SEM (FE-SEM) to examine the CRB samples for evidence of alteration features similar to those in the martian meteorites, to determine the extent of alteration during the CRB microcosm experiments, and to determine whether effects of biological activity can be distinguished from inorganic effects.

  13. Chemistry and isotope ratios of sulfur in basalts and volcanic gases at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen basalts and some volcanic gases from the submarine and subaerial parts of Kilauea volcano were analyzed for the concentration and isotope ratios of sulfur. By means of a newly developed technique, sulfide and sulfate sulfur in the basalts were separately but simultaneously determined. The submarine basalt has 700 ?? 100 ppm total sulfur with ??34S??s of 0.7 ?? 0.1 ???. The sulfate/sulfide molar ratio ranges from 0.15 to 0.56 and the fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide is +7.5 ?? 1.5???. On the other hand, the concentration and ??34S??s values of the total sulfur in the subaerial basalt are reduced to 150 ?? 50 ppm and -0.8 ?? 0.2???, respectively. The sulfate to sulfide ratio and the fractionation factor between them are also smaller, 0.01 to 0.25 and +3.0???, respectively. Chemical and isotopic evidence strongly suggests that sulfate and sulfide in the submarine basalt are in chemical and isotopic equilibria with each other at magmatic conditions. Their relative abundance and the isotope fractionation factors may be used to estimate the f{hook}o2 and temperature of these basalts at the time of their extrusion onto the sea floor. The observed change in sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios from the submarine to subaerial basalts can be interpreted as degassing of the SO2 from basalt thereby depleting sulfate and 34S in basalt. The volcanic sulfur gases, predominantly SO2, from the 1971 and 1974 fissures in Kilauea Crater have ??34S values of 0.8 to 0.9%., slightly heavier than the total sulfur in the submarine basalts and definitely heavier than the subaerial basalts, in accord with the above model. However, the ??34S value of sulfur gases (largely SO2) from Sulfur Bank is 8.0%., implying a secondary origin of the sulfur. The ??34S values of native sulfur deposits at various sites of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanos, sulfate ions of four deep wells and hydrogen sulfide from a geothermal well along the east rift zone are also reported. The high

  14. An improbable concentration of basaltic meteorite falls (HED and mesosiderite) in the mid-20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1993-06-01

    The present examination of the historical record of HED and mesosiderite basaltic meteorite falls attempts to determine whether that record is consistent with completely random fall times. Strong evidence for nonrandomness emerges, in view of a significant cluster of falls for the 1924-1939 period. The causes of the cluster appear to have acted only on basaltic meteorites, and in a way that was of only 15-year-duration.

  15. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar–Ar and K–Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang–Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4–3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40–0.66; TiO2/MgO = 0.23–0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4–3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3–3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60–1.28; TiO2/MgO = 0.30–0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment–magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts. PMID:26581905

  16. Microbial community diversity in seafloor basalt from the Arctic spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Lysnes, Kristine; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav; Øvreås, Lise; Torsvik, Terje; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2004-11-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting recent (< or =1 million years old; Ma) seafloor basalts from the Arctic spreading ridges were analyzed using traditional enrichment culturing methods in combination with culture-independent molecular phylogenetic techniques. Fragments of 16S rDNA were amplified from the basalt samples by polymerase chain reaction, and fingerprints of the bacterial and archaeal communities were generated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. This analysis indicates a substantial degree of complexity in the samples studied, showing 20-40 dominating bands per profile for the bacterial assemblages. For the archaeal assemblages, a much lower number of bands (6-12) were detected. The phylogenetic affiliations of the predominant electrophoretic bands were inferred by performing a comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Sequences obtained from basalts affiliated with eight main phylogenetic groups of Bacteria, but were limited to only one group of the Archaea. The most frequently retrieved bacterial sequences affiliated with the gamma-proteobacteria, alpha-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. The archaeal sequences were restricted to the marine Group 1: Crenarchaeota. Our results indicate that the basalt harbors a distinctive microbial community, as the majority of the sequences differed from those retrieved from the surrounding seawater as well as from sequences previously reported from seawater and deep-sea sediments. Most of the sequences did not match precisely any sequences in the database, indicating that the indigenous Arctic ridge basalt microbial community is yet uncharacterized. Results from enrichment cultures showed that autolithotrophic methanogens and iron reducing bacteria were present in the seafloor basalts. We suggest that microbial catalyzed cycling of iron may be important in low-temperature alteration of ocean crust basalt. The phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the seafloor basalt

  17. The deep water cycle and origin of cratonic flood basalts: two examples from the Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic flood basalt volcanism is the most puzzling phenomenon compared to all other types of intraplate volcanism. Cratons are thick and cold; the two parameters which suppress melting of either sublithospheric or lithospheric mantle in dry conditions. Fusible eclogites at hot plume geotherm start to melt in sublithospheric depth (~ 230 km), but geochemical arguments require that, in addition to eclogitic component, significant volume of flood basalts are from peridotitic mantle. Dry peridotitic mantle cannot be melted unless the lithospheric thickness reduced to about 60 km. That is why modern plume models incorporate lithospheric delamination and/or initially thinned lithosphere to explain cratonic flood basalts. However, if lithosphere remained thick, which was the case for the Siberian craton by the time of formation of its Devonian (Vilyui) and Permo-Triassic (Siberian) flood basalt provinces, then plume model is unable to explain the flood basalt volcanism. If mantle is wet, the peridotitic solidus lowered such as it can start to melt at sublithospheric depth (for example, 2 wt. % H2O-bearing peridotite starts to melt at ~320 km depth even at a normal mantle geotherm). In this presentation I will show that fluxing of mantle via the deep water cycle process may explain the Siberian craton flood basalts and many other continental flood basalts. According to the deep water cycle model, water is carried to the mantle transition zone by fast subducting slabs (may be in form of solid ice VII), then water is released from the slabs due to warming to the ambient mantle temperature, then localized hydration creates buoyant wet diapirs (or melt-bearing diapirs), the diapirs raise up to the sublithosheric depth were melt accumulates for the following tectonically triggered flood basalt eruptions.

  18. Visible/near-infrared spectra and two-layer modeling of palagonite-coated basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Grundy, William M.

    Fine-grained dust coatings on Martian rocks and soils obscure underlying surfaces and hinder mineralogic interpretations of both remote sensing and in-situ observations. We investigate laboratory visible/near-infrared spectra of various thicknesses of palagonite coatings on basalt substrates. We develop a two-layer Hapke scattering model incorporating porosity, grain size, and derived absorption coefficients of palagonite and basalt that reproduces the observed spectra only when the single scattering particle phase function is varied with wavelength.

  19. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang-Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4-3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40-0.66 TiO2/MgO = 0.23-0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4-3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3-3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60-1.28 TiO2/MgO = 0.30-0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment-magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts.

  20. Mineralogy and petrology of basaltic fragments from the Luna 24 drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coish, R. A.; Taylor, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    The petrology of rock fragments and monomineralic grains from Luna 24 samples is described, and a petrogenetic scheme for the derivation of Mare Crisium basalts is presented. Components of the rock fragments include subophitic basalts, metabasalts, late-stage fragments, olivine vitrophyres, and non-mare lithic fragments of possible cumulate origin. Among the monomineralic grains (which are much more abundant than the rock fragments) are pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, ilmenite and native Fe.

  1. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. A.; Ridley, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as “underplating,” are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  2. Deep Crustal Structure beneath Large Igneous Provinces and the Petrologic Evolution of Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mark; Ridley, Victoria

    2010-05-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ~6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ~5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp~7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hotspots such as Hawaii, the Marqueses, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ~6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ~15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby better

  3. Deep crustal structure beneath large igneous provinces and the petrologic evolution of flood basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Victoria A.; Richards, Mark A.

    2010-09-01

    We present a review of seismological constraints on deep crustal structures underlying large igneous provinces (LIPs), largely from wide-angle seismic refraction surveys. The main purpose of this review is to ascertain whether this seismic evidence is consistent with, or contrary to, petrological models for the genesis of flood basalt lavas. Where high-quality data are available beneath continental flood basalt (CFB) provinces (Emeishan, Columbia River, Deccan, Siberia), high-velocity structures (Vp ˜ 6.9-7.5 km/sec) are typically found immediately overlying the Moho in layers of order ˜5-15 km thick. Oceanic plateau (OP) LIPs exhibit similar layers, with a conspicuous layer of very high crustal velocity (Vp ˜ 7.7 km/sec) beneath the enormous Ontong-Java plateau. These structures are similar to inferred ultramafic underplating structures seen beneath active hot spots such as Hawaii, the Marquesas, and La Reunion. Petrogenetic models for flood basalt volcanism based on hot plume melting beneath mature lithosphere suggest that these deep seismic structures may consist in large part of cumulate bodies of olivine and clinopyroxene which result from ponding and deep-crustal fractionation of ultramafic primary melts. Such fractionation is necessary to produce basalts with typical MgO contents of ˜6-8%, as observed for the vast bulk of observed flood basalts, from primary melts with MgO contents of order ˜15-18% (or greater) such as result from hot, deep melting beneath the lithosphere. The volumes of cumulate bodies and ultramafic intrusions in the lowermost crust, often described in the literature as "underplating," are comparable to those of the overlying basaltic formations, also consistent with petrological models. Further definition of the deep seismic structure beneath such prominent LIPs as the Ontong-Java Plateau could place better constraints on flood basalt petrogenesis by determining the relative volumes of ultramafic bodies and basaltic lavas, thereby

  4. Visible/near-infrared spectra and two-layer modeling of palagonite-coated Basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Grundy, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Fine-grained dust coatings on Martian rocks and soils obscure underlying surfaces and hinder mineralogic interpretations of both remote sensing and in-situ observations. We investigate laboratory visible/near-infrared spectra of various thicknesses of palagonite coatings on basalt substrates. We develop a two-layer Hapke scattering model incorporating porosity, grain size, and derived absorption coefficients of palagonite and basalt that reproduces the observed spectra only when the single scattering particle phase function is varied with wavelength.

  5. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Cenozoic basalts from the Leiqiong area, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kung-suan; Chen, Ju-chin; Juang, Wen-shing

    2000-06-01

    The Leiqiong area, which includes the Leizhou Peninsula and the northern part of the Hainan Island, is the largest province of exposed basalts in southern China. Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating indicates that incipient volcanism in the Leiqiong area may have taken place in late Oligocene time and gradually increased in tempo toward the Miocene and Pliocene Epoch. Volcanic activities were most extensive during Pleistocene, and declined and ended in Holocene. Based on radiometric age dating and geographic distribution, Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism in Hainan Island can be grouped into two stages and six eruptive regions. The early volcanism is dominated by flood type fissure eruption of quartz tholeiites and olivine tholeiites whereas the later phase is dominated by central type eruption of alkali olivine basalts and olivine tholeiites. The systematic decrease of MgO, ΣFeO and TiO 2 with increasing SiO 2 content for basalts from Hainan Island indicates that fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene and Ti-bearing opaques may have occurred during magmatic evolution. From coexisting Fe-Ti oxide minerals, it is estimated that the equilibrium temperatures range from 895-986°C and oxygen fugacities range from 10 -13.4 to 10 -10.7 atmospheres in the basaltic magmas. The incompatible element ratios and the chondrite-normalized REE patterns of basalts from the Leiqiong area are generally similar to OIB. The Nb/U ratios (less than 37) in most of the tholeiitic rocks and the negative Nb anomaly observed in the spidergram of some basalts indicated that the influence of a paleo-subduction zone derived component can not be excluded in considering the genesis of the basalts from the Leiqiong area. The tholeiites in the Leiqiong area may have mixed with a more enriched lithospheric mantle component as well as undergone relatively larger percentages of partial melting than the alkali basalts.

  6. Growing magma chambers control the distribution of small-scale flood basalts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xun; Chen, Li-Hui; Zeng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale continental flood basalts are a global phenomenon characterized by regular spatio-temporal distributions. However, no genetic mechanism has been proposed to explain the visible but overlooked distribution patterns of these continental basaltic volcanism. Here we present a case study from eastern China, combining major and trace element analyses with Ar-Ar and K-Ar dating to show that the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts is controlled by the growth of long-lived magma chambers. Evolved basalts (SiO2 > 47.5 wt.%) from Xinchang-Shengzhou, a small-scale Cenozoic flood basalt field in Zhejiang province, eastern China, show a northward younging trend over the period 9.4-3.0 Ma. With northward migration, the magmas evolved only slightly ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.40-0.66; TiO2/MgO = 0.23-0.35) during about 6 Myr (9.4-3.3 Ma). When the flood basalts reached the northern end of the province, the magmas evolved rapidly (3.3-3.0 Ma) through a broad range of compositions ((Na2O + K2O)/MgO = 0.60-1.28; TiO2/MgO = 0.30-0.57). The distribution and two-stage compositional evolution of the migrating flood basalts record continuous magma replenishment that buffered against magmatic evolution and induced magma chamber growth. Our results demonstrate that the magma replenishment-magma chamber growth model explains the spatio-temporal distribution of small-scale flood basalts. PMID:26581905

  7. Volatile degassing of basaltic achondrite parent bodies Evidence from alkali elements and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The Na, K, Rb, Cs, and P abundances in eucrites, diogenites, basaltic clasts from polymict eucrite, howardites, and mesosiderites are examined, and compared with an average of highly incompatible refractory (AHIR) elements normalized to cosmic abundances. It is observed that basaltic eucrites and basaltic clasts show a positive correlation between K, Rb, and Cs, and alkali element/AHIR ratios; the volatile loss of the alkali elements from the basalt affects the parent body inventory of volatile elements. The data reveal that for diogenites, the alkali /AHIR ratios are 1.4-2 times greater than in basaltic eucrites and are more variable; and the negative relation between K, Rb, Cs, and the alkali/AHIR ratio correlate with progressive alkali loss through volatile outgassing during crystallization of one or more magmas resulting in a greater than 90 percent loss of the volatile element inventory from the parent body. It is also detected that P displays volatile loss from the basaltic eucrites and elevated P/AHIR ratios in diogenites.

  8. Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd evolution in lunar mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, D. M.; Tatsumoto, M.; Stille, P.; Patchett, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Existing cumulate remelting models for mare basalt genesis are evaluated in light of Lu-Hf, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd data and overall REE characteristics in order to determine the simplest model that can account for these data. A data base for comparing Lu-Hf evolution in the lunar mantle as inferred from Lu-Hf analyses of oceanic basalts is presented along with a preliminary comparison of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd evolution betwee mare basalts and terrestrial oceanic basalts. It is found that Lu/Hf characteristics of mare basalts cannot be explained in terms of modal melting of cumulate sources formed from a magma ocean with chondritic Lu/Hf. The data are consistent with a model in which the cumulate sources formed from a light REE + HF-enriched magma ocean. Nonmodal melting of ilmenite in the sources is also required. The Lu-Hf data suggest that even the high-Ti basalt sources contained no more than about 3 percent ilmenite.

  9. Effect of sea water interaction on strontium isotope composition of deep-sea basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julius, Dasch E.; Hedge, C.E.; Dymond, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of rim-to-interior samples of fresh tholeiitic pillow basalts, deuterically altered holocrystalline basalts, and older, weathered tholeiitic basalts from the deep sea indicate that 87Sr 86Sr ratios of the older basalts are raised by low temperature interaction with strontium dissolved in sea water. 87Sr 86Sr correlates positively with H2O in these basalts; however, there is little detectable modification of the strontium isotope composition in rocks with H2O contents less than 1%. The isotope changes appear to be a function of relatively long-term, low-temperature weathering, rather than high-temperature or deuteric alteration. Strontium abundance and isotopic data for these rocks suggest that strontium content is only slightly modified by interaction with sea water, and it is a relatively insensitive indicator of marine alteration. Average Rb-Sr parameters for samples of apparently unaltered basalt are: Rb = 1.11 ppm; Sr = 132 ppm; 87Sr 86Sr = 0.70247. ?? 1973.

  10. Astrobiological and Planetary Exploration Implications of Microbial Ichnofossils in Terrestrial Basaltic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, N. J.; Izawa, M. M.; Banerjee, N. R.; Flemming, R. L.; Schultz, C.

    2009-05-01

    Over the past decade, studies have demonstrated that terrestrial basaltic glass in pillow rims and hyaloclastites are suitable microbial habitats. Microbes rapidly begin colonizing the glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks that have been exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to the alteration and modification of the rocks to produce characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. The early precipitation of sub-micron titanite grains within the biologically etched alteration structures serves as an agent for preservation that may persist for geologically extended periods of time in the absence of later penetrative deformation. These microbial alteration structures have been observed in several Archean greenstone belts including the Abitibi greenstone belt (2.7 Ga), Pilbara craton (3.35 Ga), and the Barberton greenstone belt (3.5 Ga). Archean subaqueous volcanic rocks provide an excellent analogue for a potential habitat for possible early Martian life, given that basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust. A wide variety of recent evidence strongly suggests the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander, and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Beyond Mars, other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus, and other icy satellites, may well host subaqueous basaltic glasses. We will explore the implications of the newly discovered geological record of basaltic glass bioalteration and basaltic glass as a microbial habitat for planetary exploration and astrobiology.

  11. Mineralogy, geochemistry and expansion testing of an alkali-reactive basalt from western Anatolia, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Copuroglu, Oguzhan; Andic-Cakir, Ozge; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.; Kuehnel, Radko

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the alkali-silica reaction performance of a basalt rock from western Anatolia, Turkey is reported. It is observed that the rock causes severe gel formation in the concrete microbar test. It appears that the main source of expansion is the reactive glassy phase of the basalt matrix having approximately 70% of SiO{sub 2}. The study presents the microstructural characteristics of unreacted and reacted basalt aggregate by optical and electron microscopy and discusses the possible reaction mechanism. Microstructural analysis revealed that the dissolution of silica is overwhelming in the matrix of the basalt and it eventually generates four consequences: (1) Formation of alkali-silica reaction gel at the aggregate perimeter, (2) increased porosity and permeability of the basalt matrix, (3) reduction of mechanical properties of the aggregate and (4) additional gel formation within the aggregate. It is concluded that the basalt rock is highly prone to alkali-silica reaction. As an aggregate, this rock is not suitable for concrete production.

  12. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  13. Interpretation of trace element and isotope features of basalts: relevance of field relations, petrology, major element data, phase equilibria, and magma chamber modeling in basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, M. J.; Herzberg, C.

    2002-06-01

    The concentrations and ratios of the major elements determine the physical properties and the phase equilibria behavior of peridotites and basalts in response to the changing energy contents of the systems. The behavior of the trace elements and isotopic features are influenced in their turn by the phase equilibria, by the physical character of the partial melting and partial crystallization processes, and by the way in which a magma interacts with its wall rocks. Concentrating on the trace element and isotope contents of basalts to the exclusion of the field relations, petrology, major element data, and phase equilibria is as improvident as slaughtering the buffalo for the sake of its tongue. The crust is a cool boundary layer and a density filter, which impedes the upward transfer of hot, dense "primary" picritic and komatiitic liquids. Planetary crusts are sites of large-scale contamination and extensive partial crystallization of primitive melts striving to escape to the surface. Escape of truly unmodified primitive melts to the surface is a rare event, requiring the resolution of daunting problems in chemical and mechanical engineering. Primary status for volumetrically abundant basalts such as mid-ocean ridge basalt, ocean island basalt, and continental flood basalts is denied by their low-pressure cotectic character, first remarked upon on petrological grounds in 1928 and on experimental grounds in 1962. These basalt liquids are products of crystal-liquid separation at low pressure. Primary status for these common basalts is further denied by the phase equilibria of such compositions at elevated pressures, when the required residual mantle mineralogy (magnesian olivine and orthopyroxene) is not stable at the liquidus. It is also denied by the picritic or komatiitic nature of partial melts of candidate upper-mantle compositions at high pressures - a conclusion supported by calculation of the melt composition, which would need to be extracted in order to

  14. Primitive and contaminated basalts from the Southern Rocky Mountains, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.; Lipman, P.W.; Hedge, C.E.; Kurasawa, H.

    1969-01-01

    Basalts in the Southern Rocky Mountains province have been analyzed to determine if any of them are primitive. Alkali plagioclase xenocrysts armored with calcic plagioclase seem to be the best petrographic indicator of contamination. The next best indicator of contamination is quartz xenocrysts armored with clinopyroxene. On the rocks and the region studied, K2O apparently is the only major element with promise of separating primitive basalt from contaminated basalt inasmuch as it constitutes more than 1 % in all the obviously contaminated basalts. K2O: lead (> 4 ppm) and thorium (> 2 ppm) contents and Rb/Sr (> 0.035) are the most indicative of the trace elements studied. Using these criteria, three basalt samples are primitive (although one contains 1.7% K2O) and are similar in traceelement contents to Hawaiian and Eastern Honshu, Japan, primitive basalts. Contamination causes lead isotope ratios, 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb, to become less radiogenic, but it has little or no effect on 87Sr/86Sr. We interpret the effect on lead isotopes to be due to assimilation either of lower crustal granitic rocks, which contain 5-10 times as much lead as basalt and which have been low in U/Pb and Th/Pb since Precambrian times, or of upper crustal Precambrian or Paleozoic rocks, which have lost much of their radiogenic lead because of heating prior to assimilation. The lack of definite effects on strontium isotopes may be due to the lesser strontium contents of granitic crustal rocks relative to basaltic rocks coupled with lack of a large radiogenic enrichment in the crustal rocks. Lead isotope ratios were found to be less radiogenic in plagioclase separates from an obviously contaminated basalt than in the primitive basalts. The feldspar separate that is rich in sodic plagioclase xenocrysts was found to be similar to the whole-rock composition for 206Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb whereas a more dense fraction probably enriched in more calcic plagioclase phenocrysts is more similar

  15. Petrogenesis of Mt. Baker Basalts and Andesites: Constraints From Mineral Chemistry and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; McCallum, I. S.

    2009-12-01

    Basalts in continental arcs are volumetrically subordinate to andesites and this is the case for Mt. Baker in the northern Cascade magmatic arc. However, basalts provide indirect evidence on mantle compositions and processes that produce magmas parental to the abundant andesites and dacites of the stratocones. Basalts at Mt. Baker erupted from monogenetic vents peripheral to the andesitic stratocone. Flows are variable in composition; some samples would more appropriately be classified as basaltic andesites. The “basalts” have relatively low Mg/(Mg+Fe) indicating that they have evolved from their original compositions. Samples studied are Park Butte, Tarn Plateau, Lk. Shannon, Sulphur Cr. basalts, and Cathedral Crag, Hogback, and Rankin Ridge basaltic andesites. Mt. Baker lavas belong to the calc-alkaline basalt suite (CAB) defined by Bacon et al. (1997) and preserve arc geochemical features. High alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) are absent. Equilibrium mineral pairs and whole rock compositions were used to calculate pre-eruptive temperatures, water contents, and redox states of the “basalts.” All samples have zoned olivine phenocrysts with Fo68 to Fo87 cores and chromite inclusions. Cpx and zoned plagioclase occur in all flows, but opx occurs only in Cathedral Crag, Rankin Ridge, and Tarn Plateau. Ti-magnetite and ilmenite coexist in all flows except for Sulphur Cr., Lk. Shannon and Hogback, which contain a single Fe-Ti oxide. Liquidus temperatures range from 1080 to 1232°C and are negatively correlated with water contents. Water contents estimated using liquidus depression due to H2O (0.8 to 5.4 wt.%) agree well with plag core-whole rock equilibria estimates (1.2 to 3.9 wt.%). Park Butte, Sulphur Cr. and Lk. Shannon had <1.5 wt.% H2O, and Cathedral Crag is most hydrous. Redox states from ol-chr pairs (QFM +0.1 to +2.8) and Fe-Ti oxide pairs (QFM -0.6 to +1.8) indicate that Park Butte and Sulphur Cr. are most oxidized and Cathedral Crag most reduced

  16. Differential control in the formation of river potholes on basalts of the Paraná Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Adalto Gonçalves; Binda, Andrey Luis

    2015-04-01

    Variations in rock properties control geomorphic processes and thus landscape evolution. Potholes developed on basaltic riverbeds are generally associated with vesicular-amygdaloidal zones, although they also occur in massive basalts. Until now, this relationship has not been quantified, nor have the parameters controlling the development of these features in basalts been evaluated. Based on field data collected from 71 sites distributed in three rivers in the Paraná Volcanic Province (PVP), southern Brazil, we investigated the relationship between the occurrence of potholes and features of basalt flows. Reaches were analyzed both in areas with potholes and in areas without these features. The data collected refer to the joint density, the intact rock strength measured with a Schmidt hammer and the typology of basaltic units in terms of vesicularity. It was found that potholes preferentially occur in vesicular-amygdaloidal units (86%). This predominance is not associated with the joint density, which is the same in massive basalts (≈5 m/m2); moreover, potholes occur in basalts with very different joint densities. The intact rock strength is lower in vesicular-amygdaloidal basalts (58) than in massive basalts (61) and does not explain fully the preferential abrasion in vesicular-amygdaloidal units because potholes occur with varying resistances. The basalt strength is a secondary variable. The controlling parameter seems to be vesicularity, which by producing irregularities in the bed and flow triggers the formation of potholes. In the massive basalts, irregularities are produced primarily by joints. In massive basalts there seems to be an upper threshold of stream power beyond which the formation of potholes is restricted (drainage area ≈700 km2; slope ≈0.06). A lower threshold in stream power could also exist to massive basalts of the study area and it is suggested by the inexistence of potholes in sites with drainage area less than 100 km2.

  17. Iridocorneal Endothelial Syndrome in a 14-Year-Old Male.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Elisabeth P; Ball, David C; Alward, Wallace L M

    2016-02-01

    The iridocorneal endothelial syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral glaucoma that is almost never seen in children. We report a case of iridocorneal endothelial in a 14-year-old boy who did not yet have ocular hypertension or glaucoma. PMID:26035422

  18. 42 CFR 54a.14 - Determination of nonprofit status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...'s listing in the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) most recent list of tax-exempt organizations... 54a.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS CHARITABLE... DISCRETIONARY FUNDING UNDER TITLE V OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ACT, 42 U.S.C. 290aa, ET SEQ., FOR...

  19. Density of basalt core from Hilo drill hole, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    Density measurements of 1600 samples of core from 889 to 3097 m depth below sea level in the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Program hole near Hilo, Hawaii show marked differences between the basaltic rock types and help define stratigraphy in the hole. Water-saturated densities of subaerial lava flows (occurring above 1079 m depth) have the broadest range because of the large density variation within a single lava flow. Water-saturated densities commonly range from 2.0 to 3.0 with an average of 2.55 ?? 0.24 g/cc. Dikes and sills range from 2.8 to 3.1 g/cc). Densities of hyaloclastite commonly range from 2.3 to 2.7, with an overall average of about 2.5 g/cc. The low-density of most hyaloclastite is due primarily to palagonitization of abundant glass and presence of secondary minerals in the interstices between fragments. Four principal zones of pillow lava, separated by hyaloclastite, occur in the drill core. The shallowest (1983-2136 m) is paradoxically the densest, averaging 3.01 ?? 0.10 g/cc. The second (2234-2470 m) is decidedly the lightest, averaging 2.67 ?? 0.13 g/cc. The third (2640-2790 m) and fourth (2918-bottom at 3097 m) are high, averaging 2.89 ?? 0.17 and 2.97 ?? 0.08 g/cc, respectively. The first pillow zone includes degassed pillows i.e. lava erupted on land that flowed into the sea. These pillows are poor in vesicles, because the subaerial, one-atmosphere vesicles were compressed when the flow descended to deeper water and higher pressure. The second (low-density, non-degassed) pillow zone is the most vesicle-rich, apparently because it was erupted subaqueously at a shallow depth. The higher densities of the third and fourth zones result from a low vesicularity of only a few percent and an olivine content averaging more than 5% for the third zone and about 10% for the fourth zone. The uppermost hyaloclastite extending about 400 m below the bottom of the subaerial basalt is poorly cemented and absorbs up to 6 wt% of water when immersed. Progressing

  20. H2S Injection and Sequestration into Basalt - The SulFix Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbrandsson, S.; Moola, P.; Stefansson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric H2S emissions are among major environmental concern associated with geothermal energy utilization. It is therefore of great importance for the geothermal power sector to reduce H2S emissions. Known solutions for H2S neutralization are both expensive and include production of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid that needs to be disposed of. Icelandic energy companies that utilize geothermal power for electricity production have decided to try to find an environmentally friendly and economically feasible solution to reduce the H2S emission, in a joint venture called SulFix. The aim of SulFix project is to explore the possibilities of injecting H2S dissolved in water into basaltic formations in close proximity to the power plants for permanent fixation as sulfides. The formation of sulfides is a natural process in geothermal systems. Due to basalt being rich in iron and dissolving readily at acidic conditions, it is feasible to re-inject the H2S dissolved in water, into basaltic formations to form pyrite. To estimate the mineralization rates of H2S, in the basaltic formation, flow through experiments in columns were conducted at various H2S concentrations, temperatures (100 - 240°C) and both fresh and altered basaltic glass. The results indicate that pyrite rapidly forms during injection into fresh basalt but the precipiation in altered basalt is slower. Three different alteration stages, as a function of distance from inlet, can be observed in the column with fresh basaltic glass; (1) dissolution features along with precipitation, (2) precipitation increases, both sulfides and other secondary minerals and (3) the basalt looks to be unaltered and little if any precipitation is observed. The sulfur has precipitated in the first half of the column and thereafter the solution is possibly close to be supersaturated with respect to the rock. These results indicate that the H2S sequestration into basalt is possible under geothermal conditions. The rate limiting