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Sample records for a-412-801 ball bearings

  1. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  2. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  3. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  4. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  5. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  6. Ball and Roller Bearings. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual provides a subject reference for ball and roller bearings. The following topics are included: (1) bearing nomenclature, (2) bearing uses, (3) bearing capacities, (4) shop area working conditions, (5) bearing removal, (6) bearing cleaning and inspection, (7) bearing replacement, (8) bearing lubrication, (9) bearing installation, (10)…

  7. Vibrations of Hybrid Ceramic Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1996-05-01

    Hybrid ceramic ball bearings with silicone nitride balls and steel rings were tested, and the vibration characteristics were compared with those of conventional steel ball bearings. In this study, two types of hybrid ceramic ball bearings and two types of conventional steel ball bearings were used as test bearings. The test bearings were operated under several rotational speeds and axial loads. The radial and the axial vibrations on the outer ring of each test bearing were detected by an accelerometer. The vibrations were examined by using an FFT analyzer. From the experimental results, analysis and discussion, the vibration characteristics of hybrid ceramic ball bearings, compared with those of conventional steel ball bearings, are explained.

  8. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  9. Contact Sensors on Ceramic Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jia; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Romero, Edwar

    2002-01-01

    Integration of micro contact sensors onto a ball bearing is a critical technology necessary for on-line bearing health monitoring in an industrial harsh environment and evaluation of the bearing performance and design. The current planner fabrication methods offered by the MEMS technology restrict the possibility of integrating micro sensor onto a double contoured bearing surface in a more traditional manufacturing environment. We have developed an unique technique to directly fabricate micron-sized pressure and temperature sensors onto a miniature ceramic ball bearing. A complete fabrication process, based on sensor design, surface preparation, optimized sputtering parameters, photolithographic techniques and sensor post-treatment, is described. Pressure and temperature measurement results on a miniature ceramic ball bearing show good correlation with numerical thermal-EHL analysis and good wear resistance. Keywords: Ball Bearing, Thin film Sensor, Pressure sensor, Temperature Sensor, adhesion, wear resistance, Non-developable surface, and thermal-EHL.

  10. Titanium carbide coatings for aerospace ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, Hans J.; Haenni, Werner; Hintermann, HANS-E.

    1988-01-01

    In conventional ball bearings, steel to steel contacts between the balls and the raceways are at the origin of microwelds which lead to material transfer, surface roughening, lubricant breakdown, and finally to a loss in the bearing performances. To minimize the microwelding tendencies of the contacting partners it is necessary to modify their surface materials; the solid to solid collisions themselves are difficult to avoid. The use of titanium carbide coated steel balls can bring spectacular improvements in the performances and lifetimes of both oil-grease lubricated and oil-grease free bearings in a series of severe applications.

  11. Ball bearing heat analysis program (BABHAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Ball Bearing Heat Analysis Program (BABHAP) is an attempt to assemble a series of equations, some of which are non-linear algebraic systems, in a logical order, which when solved, provide a complex analysis of load distribution among the balls, ball velocities, heat generation resulting from friction, applied load, and ball spinning, minimum lubricant film thickness, and many additional characteristics of ball bearing systems. Although initial design requirements for BABHAP were dictated by the core limitations of the PDP 11/45 computer, (approximately 8K of real words with limited number of instructions) the program dimensions can easily be expanded for large core computers such as the UNIVAC 1108. The PDP version of BABHAP is also operational on the UNIVAC system with the exception that the PDP uses 029 punch and the UNIVAC uses 026. A conversion program was written to allow transfer between machines.

  12. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  13. Intelligent monitoring of ball bearing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. I.; Mengel, J. M.

    1992-09-01

    Ball bearings are widely used in various kinds of robots, manufacturing machines, and equipment. In order to enhance productivity and improve product quality, an on-line monitoring system is essential to check the status of ball bearings. In this work, peak amplitude in the frequency domain, peak RMS, and the power spectrum were used as indirect indices to develop a system for monitoring and classifying ball bearing defects. These indices were then processed by artificial neural networks. Six different cases of ball bearing states were observed. The data from these observations were then input into neural networks with different architectures to train these neural networks in a learning process. All the trained neural networks are capable of distinguishing the normal bearings from defective bearings with a 100 percent success rate. They can also classify the bearing conditions into six different states with a success rate of up to 97 per cent. The effects of training set sizes and neural network structures on the monitoring performance have also been investigated.

  14. Ball Bearing Analysis with the ORBIS Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpin, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Ball bearing design is critical to the success of aerospace mechanisms. Key bearing performance parameters, such as load capability, stiffness, torque, and life all depend on accurate determination of the internal load distribution. Hence, a good analytical bearing tool that provides both comprehensive capabilities and reliable results becomes a significant asset to the engineer. This paper introduces the ORBIS bearing tool. A discussion of key modeling assumptions and a technical overview is provided. Numerous validation studies and case studies using the ORBIS tool are presented. All results suggest the ORBIS code closely correlates to predictions on bearing internal load distributions, stiffness, deflection and stresses.

  15. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  16. The Ball Bearing as a Motor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenberg, H.

    1978-01-01

    Develops a theory to explain the effect that, when a current passes through a ball bearing, it can act as a motor. The motor can run in either direction on both DC and AC and can be self-starting on DC. Presents some experimental results in support of the theory. (Author/GA)

  17. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluation of hot-pressed silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Two grades of hot-pressed silicon nitride balls were tested under rolling contact conditions in a five-ball fatigue tester. A digital computer program was used to predict the dynamic performance characteristics and fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls relative to that with bearings containing steel balls. The results obtained include the finding that fatigue spalls on silicon nitride balls are similar in appearance to those obtained with typical bearing steels.

  18. Low-Wear Ball-Bearing Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkinson, Elden L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed ball-bearing separator for use in cryogenic pump stronger and more resistant to wear. Consists of molded plastic-and-metal composite ring imbued with solid lubricant and containing embedded metal ring. Obtains combination of strength and lubricity. Before molding and machining, ring includes tooling portion for handling and indexing. Molded composite blend of PTFE and fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP) filled with brass and bronze powder and molybdenum disulfide powder.

  19. Reexamination of Ball-Race Conformity Effects on Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis in this report considers the life of the ball set as well as the respective lives of the races to reassess the effect of ball-race conformity on ball bearing life. The related changes in ball bearing life are incorporated in life factors that can be used to modify the bearing predicted life using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations and the ANSI/ABMA and ISO Standards. Two simple algebraic relationships were established to calculate life factors LF(sub c) to determine the effect of inner- and outer-race conformity combinations on bearing L(sub 10) life for deepgroove and angular-contact ball bearings, respectively. Depending on the bearing type and series as well as conformity combinations, the calculated life for deep-groove ball bearings can be over 40 percent less than that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. For angular-contact ball bearings, the life can vary between +16 and -39 percent from that calculated by the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. Comparing the two ball bearing types, the life factors LF(sub c) for the deep-groove bearings can be as much as 40 percent lower than that for angular-contact ball bearings.

  20. High-precision silicon nitride balls for bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cundill, Robin T.

    1992-04-01

    Hybrid ceramic bearings are now commercially available for use in high performance applications where the properties of the ceramic balls give advantages in terms of higher operating speeds, increased stiffness, lower fraction and less heat generation. Most hybrid bearings are high precision angular contact ball bearings fitted with silicon nitride balls, which have to be finished to ISO dimensional grades 3 and 5. Ball diameter variation and deviation from the spherical form has to be less than 0.125 micrometers for Grade 5 balls and less than 0.08 micrometers for Grade 3 balls. Surface finish of silicon nitride balls is typically 0.003 - 0.010 micrometers Rq (0.002 - 0.008 micrometers Ra). At this level, the basic material microstructures is discernible which facilitates inspection for material and other faults.

  1. Hardening treatment of friction surfaces of ball journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, A. O.; Davidov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the technology of finishing plasma hardening by the application of the multi-layer nanocoating Si-O-C-N system to harden the friction surfaces of the ball journal bearings. The authors of the paper have studied the applied wear-resistant anti-friction coating tribological characteristics, which determine the increase in wear resistance of the ball journal bearings.

  2. Ball motion and sliding friction in an arched outer-race ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of the ball and sliding friction in an arched outer-race ball bearing under thrust load is analyzed. Fatigue life evaluations were made. The analysis is applied to a 150-millimeter-bore ball bearing. The results indicated that for high-speed light-load applications the arched bearing has significant improvement in fatigue life over that of a conventional bearing. An arching of 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) was found to be optimal. Also, for an arched bearing a considerable amount of spinning occurs at the outer-race contacts.

  3. Ball motion and sliding friction in an arched outer race ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    The motion of the ball and sliding friction in an arched outer race ball bearing under thrust loads is determined. Fatigue life evaluations were made. The analysis is applied to a 150 millimeter bore ball bearing. The results indicated that for high speed-light load applications the arched bearing has significant improvement in fatigue life over that of a conventional bearing. An arching of 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) was found to be an optimal. For an arched bearing it was also found that a considerable amount of spinning occurs at the outer race contacts.

  4. Ball motion and sliding friction in an arched outer race ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of the ball and sliding friction in an arched outer-race ball bearing under thrust load is determined. Fatigue life evaluations were made. The analysis is applied to a 150 millimeter bore ball bearing. The results indicated that for high speed-light load applications the arched bearing has significant improvement in fatigue life over that of a conventional bearing. An arching of 0.254 mm (0.01 in.) was found to be an optimal. For an arched bearing it was also found that a considerable amount of spinning occurs at the outer race contacts.

  5. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chungkao Hsieh.

    1993-11-02

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection. 5 figures.

  6. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Hsieh, Chung-Kao

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection.

  7. Fatigue life and performance testing of hybrid ceramic ball bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Y.P.; Prason, P.K.; Dezzani, M.

    1996-03-01

    Hybrid ceramic ball bearings are finding increased applications in machine tool spindles and aerospace vehicles. Results of three types of testing hybrid ceramic ball bearing are presented and discussed. The first is the classical endurance testing of highly loaded hybrid bearings with good lubrication. The second is the endurance test of hybrid nitrided bearings after running in a contaminated lubricant which caused dented raceways. The third is the high-speed performance testing of spindle bearings lubricated with grease or an oil-air mixture. Recent material development, bearing temperature at high-speed and reliability considerations are discussed. 14 refs., 9 fig., 4 tab.

  8. Development of special lubricants for ball bearings operating in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A ball bearing life test program was performed to obtain data on the efficiencies of various lubricated and self-lubricating ball retainer systems for instrument bearings in a vacuum environment. The program utilized light to moderate radial loads at relatively low speeds on a NASA-GSFC designed and supplied test rig. Several systems were found which gave acceptable bearing life under the test conditions used, but the most consistent low running torques after testing resulted from oil lubrication.

  9. Relation between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outer-race conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life, that includes the life of the ball set, caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  10. Relation Between Hertz Stress-Life Exponent, Ball-Race Conformity, and Ball Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.; Root, Lawrence E.

    2008-01-01

    ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards based on Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory are normalized for ball bearings having inner- and outerrace conformities of 52 percent (0.52) and made from pre-1940 bearing steel. The Lundberg-Palmgren theory incorporates an inverse 9th power relation between Hertz stress and fatigue life for ball bearings. The effect of race conformity on ball set life independent of race life is not incorporated into the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. In addition, post-1960 vacuum-processed bearing steel exhibits a 12th power relation between Hertz stress and life. The work reported extends the previous work of Zaretsky, Poplawski, and Root to calculate changes in bearing life--that includes the life of the ball set--caused by race conformity, Hertz stress-life exponent, ball bearing type and bearing series. The bearing fatigue life in actual application will usually be equal to or greater than that calculated using the ANSI/ABMA and ISO standards that incorporate the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The relative fatigue life of an individual race is more sensitive to changes in race conformity for Hertz stress-life exponent n of 12 than where n = 9. However, when the effects are combined to predict actual bearing life for a specified set of conditions and bearing geometry, the predicted life of the bearing will be greater for a value of n = 12 than n = 9.

  11. Ball bearing lubrication: The elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The history of ball bearings is examined, taking into account rollers and the wheel in the early civilizations, the development of early forms of rolling-element bearings in the classical civilizations, the Middle Ages, the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of the precision ball bearing, scientific studies of contact mechanics and rolling friction, and the past fifty years. An introduction to ball bearings is presented, and aspects of ball bearing mechanics are explored. Basic characteristics of lubrication are considered along with lubrication equations, the lubrication of rigid ellipsoidal solids, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory. Attention is given to the theoretical results for fully flooded elliptical hydrodynamic contacts, the theoretical results for starved elliptical contacts, experimental investigations, the elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts for materials of low elastic modulus, the film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication, and applications.

  12. F117-PW-100 hybrid ball bearing ceramic technology insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, J.R.; Dell, J.; Galbato, A.T.; Ragen, M.A.

    1996-04-01

    Results of an Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) sponsored project to demonstrate the operational benefits of incorporating advanced structural ceramic ball elements into the F117-PW-100 aircraft gas turbine engine high rotor thrust bearings is described. This program consists of design, fabrication, and experimental evaluation of candidate hybrid ball bearing designs in Pratt and Whitney and MRC Bearings test facilities. The bearing design criteria and development test conditions utilized for the project are compatible with the requirements of the F117-PW-100 engine system application. Two hybrid bearing designs were produced by analytically varying internal geometry features such as M-50 race curvatures and contact angles to optimize for the modulus of elasticity of the ceramic balls. CERBEC grade NBD 200 silicon nitride ceramic balls (1 1/8 in. size) demonstrated integrity and a quadruple rolling contact fatigue life improvement versus state-of-the-art M-50 steel balls in single ball test rigs. Thermal performance data obtained in full-scale bearing rig performance testing with 178 mm size hybrid and all-steel baseline bearings will be fabricated for full-scale bearing rig endurance tests to be conducted in 1995--1996 as a prerequisite to validation in operating F117-PW-100 engines in 1996--1997.

  13. Ball to separator contact forces in angular contact ball bearings under thrust and radial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bore ball bearing operating at speeds to 12,000 rpm under radial and thrust loads. Information is also reported on cage to inner race land contact force, cage to inner race land clearance, and cage to shaft speed ratios.

  14. Stiffness calculation and application of spline-ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo-Zhong; Zhou, Yu-Ming; Yang, De-Hua

    2006-12-01

    Spline-ball bearing is widely adopted in large precision instruments because of its distinctive performance. For the sake of carrying out detail investigation of a full instrument system, practical stiffness formulae of such bearing are introduced with elastic contact mechanics, which are successfully applied for calculating the stiffness of the bearing used in astronomical telescope. Appropriate treatment of the stiffness of such bearing in the finite element analysis is also discussed and illustrated.

  15. Experimental ball bearing dynamics study. [by high speed photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic method was employed to record the kinematic performance of rolling elements in turbo machinery ball bearings. The 110 mm split inner ring test bearings had nominal contact angles of 26 deg and 34 deg. High speed films were taken at inner ring speeds of 4,000, 8,000 and 12,000 rpm and at thrust loads of 4,448 N and 22,240 N (1,000 and 5,000 lbs). The films were measured and this data reduced to obtain separator speed, ball speed and ball spin axis orientation.

  16. Effect of Hoop Stress on Ball Bearing Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard; Coe, Harold H.

    1995-01-01

    A finite-element analysis (FEA) of a generic, dimensionally normalized inner race of an angular-contact ball bearing was performed under varying conditions of speed and the press (or interference) fit of the inner-race bore on a journal. The FEA results at the ball-race contact were used to derive an equation from which was obtained the radius of an equivalent cylindrical bearing race with the same or similar hoop stress. The radius of the equivalent cylinder was used to obtain a generalized closed-form approximation of the hoop stresses at the ball-inner-race contact in an angular-contact ball bearing. A life analysis was performed on both a 45- and a 120-mm-bore, angular-contact ball bearing. The predicted lives with and without hoop stress were compared with experimental endurance results obtained at 12000 and 25000 rpm with the 120-mm-bore ball bearing. A life factor equation based on hoop stress is presented.

  17. Test Apparatus For Oversize Ball-Bearing Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William R.

    1988-01-01

    See-through machine enables direct observation and indirect measurements at moderate speeds. Model of ball bearing, six times larger than real bearing, rotated in test machine. Transparency of walls and simulated lubricant reveal flow patterns and allow visible-light and infrared photographs to be made.

  18. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  19. Fatigue life of high-speed ball bearings with silicon nitride balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling-element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7-mm- diameter silicon nitride balls at maximum Hertz stresses ranging from 4.27 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m to 6.21 x 10 to the 9th power n/sq m at a race temperature of 328K. The fatigue life of NC-132 hot-pressed silicon nitride was found to be equal to typical bearing steels and much greater than other ceramic or cermet materials at the same stress levels. A digital computer program was used to predict the fatigue life of 120-mm- bore angular-contact ball bearings containing either steel or silicon nitride balls. The analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  20. Ball Bearings Equipped for In Situ Lubrication on Demand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jansen, Mark; Predmore, Roamer

    2005-01-01

    In situ systems that provide fresh lubricants to ball/race contacts on demand have been developed to prolong the operational lives of ball bearings. These systems were originally intended to be incorporated into ball bearings in mechanisms that are required to operate in outer space for years, in conditions in which lubricants tend to deteriorate and/or evaporate. These systems may also be useful for similarly prolonging bearing lifetimes on Earth. Reservoirs have been among the means used previously to resupply lubricants. Lubricant- resupply reservoirs are bulky and add complexity to bearing assemblies. In addition, such a reservoir cannot be turned on or off as needed: it supplies lubricant continuously, often leading to an excess of lubricant in the bearing. A lubricator of the present type includes a porous ring cartridge attached to the inner or the outer ring of a ball bearing (see Figure 1). Oil is stored in the porous cartridge and is released by heating the cartridge: Because the thermal expansion of the oil exceeds that of the cartridge, heating causes the ejection of some oil. A metal film can be deposited on a face of the cartridge to serve as an electrical-resistance heater. The heater can be activated in response to a measured increase in torque that signals depletion of oil from the bearing/race contacts. Because the oil has low surface tension and readily wets the bearing-ring material, it spreads over the bearing ring and eventually reaches the ball/race contacts. The Marangoni effect (a surface-tension gradient associated with a temperature gradient) is utilized to enhance the desired transfer of lubricant to the ball/race contacts during heating. For a test, a ball bearing designed for use at low speed was assembled without lubricant and equipped with a porous-ring lubricator, the resistance heater of which consumed a power of less than 1 W when triggered on by a torque-measuring device. In the test, a load of 20 lb (.89 N) was applied and the

  1. Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings in high-speed turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A high speed, high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump was designed, fabricated, and tested under a previous contract. This design was then modified to incorporate hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on both the pump end and turbine end to replace the original conventional ball bearing packages. The design, analysis, turbopump modification, assembly, and testing of the turbopump with hybrid bearings is presented here. Initial design considerations and rotordynamic performance analysis was made to define expected turbopump operating characteristics and are reported. The results of testing the turbopump to speeds of 9215 rad/s (88,000 rpm) using a wide range of hydrostatic bearing supply pressures are presented. The hydrostatic bearing test data and the rotordynamic behavior of the turbopump was closely analyzed and are included in the report. The testing of hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings on a turbopump to the high speed requirements has indicated the configuration concept is feasible. The program has presented a great deal of information on the technology requirements of integrating the hybrid bearing into high speed turbopump designs for improved bearing life.

  2. Ball bearing versus magnetic bearing reaction and momentum wheels as momentum actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1980-01-01

    Different bearing technologies of momentum actuators for the attitude control of satellites are compared and a guideline for the selection of the suitable momentum actuators or momentum actuator configurations to meet given mission goals with high reliability and low cost is developed. The comparison between ball bearing and magnetic bearing momentum actuators shows that given mission requirements can be economically met by employing the ball bearing technology without decreasing reliability and lifetime. However, for some special mission requirements, such as 'zero friction at zero speed,' fine pointing (met by vernier gimballing), and/or active damping, magnetic bearings may be advantageous. This makes it evident that magnetic bearing technology will not replace ball bearing technology for momentum actuators, but will supplement it for some special mission requirements.

  3. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Schuller, Fredrick T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10,000 to 24,000 rpm. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17,800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13,350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing.

  4. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Schuller, Frederick T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10000 to 24000 RPM. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing.

  5. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Addy, H.E. Jr.; Schuller, F.T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10,000 to 24,000 rpm. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17,800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13,350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing. 10 refs.

  6. Ion implantation of silicon nitride ball bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Hypothesis for ion implantation effect was that stress concentrations reflected into the bulk due to topography such as polishing imperfections, texture in the race, or transferred material, might be reduced due to surface amorphization. 42 control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. Six ion implanted balls were tested to an extended period of 150 h. Accelerated testing was done in a V groove so that wear was on two narrow wear tracks. Rutherford backscattering, XRPS, profilometry, optical microscopy, nanoindentation hardness, and white light interferometry were used. The balls were implanted with 150-keV C ions at fluence 1.1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The samples had preexisting surface defects (C-cracks), so the failure rate of the control group was unacceptable. None of the ion-implanted samples failed in 150 h of testing. Probability of randomly selecting 6 samples from the control group that would perform this well is about 5%, so there is good probability that ion implantation improved performance. Possible reasons are discussed. Wear tracks, microstructure, and impurity content were studied in possible relation to C-cracks.

  7. Extended Life Testing of Duplex Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, Jeffrey; Robertson, Michael; Hodges, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Space Systems performed bearing life testing for the Scan Mirror Motor/Encoder Assembly (SMMA), part of the Scan Mirror Assembly on-board the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS) on the NASA Glory Spacecraft. The baseline bearing life test duration extended beyond the launch date for the Glory Spacecraft; a risk that the program was willing to undertake with the understanding that if any anomalies or failures occurred before the required life was achieved, then the mission objectives or operating profile could be modified on orbit to take those results into account. Even though the Glory Spacecraft failed to reach orbit during its launch in March of 2011, the bearing life testing was continued through a mutual understanding of value between Sierra Nevada Corporation and our customer; with a revised goal of testing to failure rather than completing a required number of life cycles. Life testing thus far has not only exceeded the original mission required life, but has also exceeded the published test data for Cumulative Degradation Factor (CDF) from NASA/CR-2009-215681. Many lessons were learned along the way regarding long life testing. The bearing life test has been temporarily suspended due to test support equipment issues.

  8. Incipient failure detection (IFD) of SSME ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Because of the immense noise background during the operation of a large engine such as the SSME, the relatively low level unique ball bearing signatures were often buried by the overall machine signal. As a result, the most commonly used bearing failure detection technique, pattern recognition using power spectral density (PSD) constructed from the extracted bearing signals, is rendered useless. Data enhancement techniques were carried out by using a HP5451C Fourier Analyzer. The signal was preprocessed by a Digital Audio Crop. DAC-1024I noise cancelling filter in order to estimate the desired signal corrupted by the backgound noise. Reference levels of good bearings were established. Any deviation of bearing signals from these reference levels indicate the incipient bearing failures.

  9. 48 CFR 252.225-7016 - Restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of ball and roller bearings. 252.225-7016 Section 252.225-7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7016 Restriction on acquisition of ball... of Ball and Roller Bearings (JUN 2011) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— (1) Bearing...

  10. 48 CFR 252.225-7016 - Restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of ball and roller bearings. 252.225-7016 Section 252.225-7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7016 Restriction on acquisition of ball... OF BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS (JUN 2011) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— (1) Bearing...

  11. 48 CFR 252.225-7016 - Restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of ball and roller bearings. 252.225-7016 Section 252.225-7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7016 Restriction on acquisition of ball... of Ball and Roller Bearings (JUN 2011) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— (1) Bearing...

  12. 48 CFR 252.225-7016 - Restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of ball and roller bearings. 252.225-7016 Section 252.225-7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7016 Restriction on acquisition of ball... of Ball and Roller Bearings (JUN 2011) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause— (1) Bearing...

  13. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  14. Interference-Fit Life Factors for Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hoop stresses on the rolling-element fatigue life of angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings was determined for common inner-ring interference fits at the ABEC-5 tolerance level. The analysis was applied to over 1150 bearing configurations and load cases. Hoop stresses were superimposed on the Hertzian principal stresses created by the applied bearing load to calculate the inner-race maximum shearing stress. The resulting fatigue life of the bearing was recalculated through a series of equations. The reduction in the fatigue life is presented as life factors that are applied to the unfactored bearing life. The life factors found in this study ranged from 1.00 (no life reduction)--where there was no net interface pressure--to a worst case of 0.38 (a 62-percent life reduction). For a given interference fit, the reduction in life is different for angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings. Interference fits also affect the maximum Hertz stress-life relation. Experimental data of Czyzewski, showing the effect of interference fit on rolling-element fatigue life, were reanalyzed to determine the shear stress-life exponent. The Czyzewski data shear stress-life exponent c equals 8.77, compared with the assumed value of 9. Results are presented as tables and charts of life factors for angular-contact and deep-groove ball bearings with light, normal, and heavy loads and interference fits ranging from extremely light to extremely heavy.

  15. The ball bearing as a rheological test device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.

    1984-01-01

    An angular-contact ball bearing provides an easily obtainable, precise mechanical system for rheological tests on thin films under high pressure. The test conditions are by definition similar to those found in practice. Accessible independent variables include size, pressure, bulk temperature, roughness, adsorbed surfactant, fluid type, fluid quantity, fluid supply rate, film thickness, entrainment velocity, transit time, and combined strain. Easily measured or inferred variables include slip, changes in film thickness with time (transients), strain rate, lubricant elastic modulus (thin film, high pressure), tractive force, lubricant chemical degradation rate, and lubricant degradation product. Methods for setting and obtaining these quantities in a bearing are discussed, together with experimental limitations on them.

  16. Study of ball bearing torque under elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Allen, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spinning and rolling torques were measured in an angular-contact ball bearing with and without a cage under several lubrication regimes in a modified NASA spinning torque apparatus. Two lubricants were used - a di-2 ethylhexyl sebacate and a synthetic paraffinic oil, at shaft speeds of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm and bearing loads from 45 newtons (10 lb) to 403 newtons (90 lb). An analytical model was developed from previous spinning friction models to include rolling with spinning under lubrication regimes from thin film to flooded conditions. The bearing torque values have a wide variation, under any condition of speed and load, depending on the amount of lubricant present in the bearing. The analytical model compared favorably with experimental results under several lubrication regimes.

  17. Metallurgical Analysis of Ball Bearing Seized During Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhay K.; Swathi Kiranmayee, M.; Ramesh Narayanan, P.; Sreekumar, K.; Sinha, P. P.

    2012-06-01

    440C stainless steel of martensitic grade is being extensively used for bearing application because of its high wear and corrosion resistance. This alloy steel with 1 wt.% C along with 17 wt.% Cr, 1 wt.% Mn and up to 0.75 wt.% Mo has a number of primary carbides, which provide high hardness and good wear resistance. Owing to its unique performance characteristic, this steel finds a number of applications in space program. One such application is bearing used in booster pump assembly of propulsion system. During one of the ground tests of propulsion system, booster pump bearing seized operation after performing its partial intended function. The bearing was removed from the assembly and cut open. The ball and outer caging were analyzed using metallographic techniques and compared with another bearing taken from the fresh stock. Study indicated that ball as well as outer caging experienced exposure to high temperature and resulted in phase transformation. This article highlights the details of investigations carried out.

  18. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, S.M.; Pfaffenberger, E.E. )

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized. 6 refs.

  19. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Stephen M.; Pfaffenberger, Eugene E.

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized.

  20. Predicted characteristics of an optimized series-hybrid conical hydrostatic ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Optimized series-hybrid fluid-film ball bearings are described and operating characteristics are calculated and discussed. It is predicted that a series-hybrid bearing may be constructed which will reduce ball-bearing speed by 30 percent thereby increasing bearing fatigue life by factors of up to 5.9. Flow rates required are less than 9 kilograms per minute.

  1. 76 FR 10335 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Germany: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... FR 20900 (May 15, 1989). On June 30, 2010, we initiated an administrative review of the order on ball..., 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). After analysis of the quantity and value of the sales of ball bearings... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Germany: Initiation of Antidumping...

  2. 48 CFR 252.225-7016 - Restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of ball and roller bearings. 252.225-7016 Section 252.225-7016 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7016 Restriction on acquisition of ball... of Ball and Roller Bearings (MAR 2006) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause' (1)...

  3. A systematic study of ball passing frequencies based on dynamic modeling of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Linkai; Cao, Hongrui; He, Zhengjia; Li, Yamin

    2015-11-01

    Ball passing frequencies (BPFs) are very important features for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling ball bearings. The ball passing frequency on outer raceway (BPFO) and the ball passing frequency on inner raceway (BPFI) are usually calculated by two well-known kinematics equations. In this paper, a systematic study of BPFs of rolling ball bearings is carried out. A novel method for accurately calculating BPFs based on a complete dynamic model of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects is proposed. In the used dynamic model, three-dimensional motions, relative slippage, cage effects and localized surface defects are all considered. Moreover, localized surface defects are modeled accurately with consideration of the finite size of the ball, the additional clearance due to material absence, and changes of contact force directions. The reasonability of the proposed method for the prediction of dynamic behaviors of actual ball bearings with localized surface defects and for the calculation of BPFs is discussed by investigating the motion characteristics of a ball when it rolls through a defect. Parametric investigation shows that the shaft speed, external loads, the friction coefficient, raceway groove curvature factors, the initial contact angle, and defect sizes have great effects on BPFs. For a loaded ball bearing, the combination of rolling and sliding in contact region occurs, and the BPFs calculated by simple kinematical relationships are inaccurate, especially for high speed, low external load, and large initial contact angle conditions where severe skidding occurs. The hypothesis that the percentage variation of the spacing between impulses in a defective ball bearing was about 1-2% reported in previous investigations can be satisfied only for the conditions where the skidding effect in a bearing is slight. Finally, the proposed method is verified with two experiments.

  4. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications. [coated with titanium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Haenni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, M.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings for hostile environments were developed. They consist of normal ball bearing steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear-resistant, chemical vapor deposited (C.V.D) TiC. Experiments in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, have shown that such bearings are suitable for space applications.

  5. 76 FR 798 - Ball Bearings From Japan and the United Kingdom

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 731-TA-394-A & 399-A (Second Review) (Fourth Remand)] Ball Bearings From Japan... antidumping duty order on ball bearings from Japan. For further information concerning the conduct of this... and remanded-in-part the Commission's determinations in Certain Bearings and Parts Thereof from...

  6. Unbalance Response Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Speed and Load Dependent Nonlinear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2003-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic analysis requires that bearing forces corresponding to the actual bearing deflection be utilized. For this work bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS, a recently developed rolling-element bearing analysis code. Bearing stiffness was found to be a strong function of bearing deflection, with higher deflection producing markedly higher stiffness. Curves fitted to the bearing data for a range of speeds and loads were supplied to a flexible rotor unbalance response analysis. The rotordynamic analysis showed that vibration response varied nonlinearly with the amount of rotor imbalance. Moreover, the increase in stiffness as critical speeds were approached caused a large increase in rotor and bearing vibration amplitude over part of the speed range compared to the case of constant bearing stiffness. Regions of bistable operation were possible, in which the amplitude at a given speed was much larger during rotor acceleration than during deceleration. A moderate amount of damping will eliminate the bistable region, but this damping is not inherent in ball bearings.

  7. Comparison of Models for Ball Bearing Dynamic Capacity and Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pradeep K.; Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized formulations for dynamic capacity and life of ball bearings, based on the models introduced by Lundberg and Palmgren and Zaretsky, have been developed and implemented in the bearing dynamics computer code, ADORE. Unlike the original Lundberg-Palmgren dynamic capacity equation, where the elastic properties are part of the life constant, the generalized formulations permit variation of elastic properties of the interacting materials. The newly updated Lundberg-Palmgren model allows prediction of life as a function of elastic properties. For elastic properties similar to those of AISI 52100 bearing steel, both the original and updated Lundberg-Palmgren models provide identical results. A comparison between the Lundberg-Palmgren and the Zaretsky models shows that at relatively light loads the Zaretsky model predicts a much higher life than the Lundberg-Palmgren model. As the load increases, the Zaretsky model provides a much faster drop off in life. This is because the Zaretsky model is much more sensitive to load than the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The generalized implementation where all model parameters can be varied provides an effective tool for future model validation and enhancement in bearing life prediction capabilities.

  8. Characterisation of lubrication effect on performances and lifetime of ceramic and hybrid ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Gesu, Frédéric; Sicre, Jacques

    2001-09-01

    In the context of high accuracy pointing applications, Astrium SAS have investigated, with support of CNES, the use of bearings with silicon nitride balls as an alternative technological solution to the standard lubricated stainless steel ball bearings, in order to reduce as far as possible the torque noise in mechanisms, and to avoid outgassing pollution. Performances of lubricated ceramic ball bearings are available in technological literature, therefore the effort was focused on the search of possible use of low speed rotating ceramic ball bearings without any lubricant, with the goal to achieve or exceed the lifetime performances of standard dry-lubricated stainless steel ball bearings, and to get rid of their on-ground operation constraints. This three-year study exhibits promising results, limited by the behaviour of cage material under dry conditions. No visible wear of neither ceramic ball nor steel or ceramic rings was pointed out.

  9. Analysis of an arched outer-race ball bearing considering centrifugal forces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust-load analysis of a 150-mm angular contact ball bearing, taking into account centrifugal forces but omitting gyroscopics, elastohydrodynamics, and thermal effects. A Newton-Raphson method of iteration is used to evaluate the radial and axial projection of the distance between the ball center and the outer raceway groove curvature center. Fatigue life of the bearing is evaluated. Results for life, contact loads, and angles are given for a conventional bearing and two arched bearings.

  10. Transient Vibration Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Load-dependent Non-linear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic transient analysis requires bearing forces to be determined at each step of the transient solution. Analyses have been carried out to show the effect of accurate bearing transient forces (accounting for non-linear speed and load dependent bearing stiffness) as compared to conventional use of average rolling-element bearing stiffness. Bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball and Roller Bearing Analysis - Advanced High Speed) and supplied to the rotordynamics code ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) for accurate simulation of rotor transient behavior. COBRA-AHS is a fast-running 5 degree-of-freedom computer code able to calculate high speed rolling-element bearing load-displacement data for radial and angular contact ball bearings and also for cylindrical and tapered roller beatings. Results show that use of nonlinear bearing characteristics is essential for accurate prediction of rotordynamic behavior.

  11. A study on the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings under various lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinç, S. K.; Temiz, V.; Kamburoǧlu, E.

    2013-12-01

    Polymer bearings are generally praised by the manufacturers for running silently. However such statements never go beyond qualitative assumptions. Therefore, studying polymer ball bearing noise would have been meaningful solely on the perspective of silent running machinery. On the other hand, the service life of a polymer ball bearing is unpredictable and there's no preventive maintenance practice that provides data regarding the condition of a polymer ball bearing. In this study, we assume that an investigation of their noise characteristics could also reveal clues concerning their performances. The main objective of this study is to determine the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings lubricated with different lubricant greases of varying viscosity grades through experimental means. Sound pressure level measurements of SKF brand polymer bearings with polypropylene rings, polypropylene cage and glass balls were made with a 1/2 inch microphone in 1/3-octave bands, at frequencies up to 12.5 kHz, under various radial loads and rotational speeds. The bearings were mounted on a shaft driven by an AC motor with stepless speed control, adjustable between 0 - 1400 rpm. The ball bearings were running inside an acoustic chamber designed for the insulation of environmental noise and the noise of the motor at target frequencies. The resulting sound pressure level spectra were evaluated and the effects of the lubrication conditions on the noise of the ball bearing and possible diagnostic insight that could be gained through studying bearing noise characteristics were discussed.

  12. Critical flaw size in silicon nitride ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, George Arthur

    Aircraft engine and bearing manufacturers have been aggressively pursuing advanced materials technology systems solutions to meet main shaft-bearing needs of advanced military aircraft engines. Ceramic silicon nitride hybrid bearings are being developed for such high performance applications. Though silicon nitride exhibits many favorable properties such as high compressive strength, high hardness, a third of the density of steel, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high corrosion and temperature resistance, they also have low fracture toughness and are susceptible to failure from fatigue spalls emanating from pre-existing surface flaws that can grow under rolling contact fatigue (RCF). Rolling elements and raceways are among the most demanding components in aircraft engines due to a combination of high cyclic contact stresses, long expected component lifetimes, corrosive environment, and the high consequence of fatigue failure. The cost of these rolling elements increases exponentially with the decrease in allowable flaw size for service applications. Hence the range of 3D non-planar surface flaw geometries subject to RCF is simulated to determine the critical flaw size (CFS) or the largest allowable flaw that does not grow under service conditions. This dissertation is a numerical and experimental investigation of surface flaws in ceramic balls subjected to RCF and has resulted in the following analyses: Crack Shape Determination: the nucleation of surface flaws from ball impact that occurs during the manufacturing process is simulated. By examining the subsurface Hertzian stresses between contacting spheres, their applicability to predicting and characterizing crack size and shape is established. It is demonstrated that a wide range of cone and partial cone cracks, observed in practice, can be generated using the proposed approaches. RCF Simulation: the procedure and concerns in modeling nonplanar 3D cracks subject to RCF using FEA for stress intensity

  13. Parched elasto hydrodynamic lubrication film thickness measurement in an instrument ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, E.; Schritz, B.; Prahl, J.

    1988-01-01

    Parched Elasto Hydrodynamic Lubricant (PEHL) film thickness in a large instrument ball bearing is measured by electrical capacitance across its ball set. Correlation is shown between changes in film thickness and changes in Basic Speed Ratio (BSR) measured at the same time. BSR is confirmed as a sensitive, non-intrusive measure of transients in film thickness in a real bearing.

  14. 75 FR 30856 - Ball Bearings From Japan and the United Kingdom

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... FR 68036 (Nov. 8, 2002). In accordance with sections 201.16(c) and 207.3 of the Commission's rules... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 731-TA-394-A & 399-A (Second Review) (Third Remand)] Ball Bearings From Japan... antidumping orders on ball bearings from Japan and the United Kingdom. For further information concerning...

  15. 77 FR 53844 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France and Italy: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocations in Part, 77 FR 40565 (July 10, 2012... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France and Italy: Rescission of... (the Department) initiated administrative reviews of the antidumping duty orders on ball bearings...

  16. 75 FR 76297 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Restriction on Ball and Roller Bearings (DFARS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ...DoD is issuing a final rule amending the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to revise the domestic source restriction on acquisition of ball and roller bearings. This final rule, which implements the DoD annual appropriations act domestic source restrictions, requires that each ball or roller bearing be manufactured in the United States, its outlying areas, or Canada,......

  17. Performance of solid lubricated ball bearings at high-temperatures in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto; Hasegawa, Masaji; Moriyama, Minoru

    1994-07-01

    Ball bearings which can operate at high temperatures in a vacuum will be required with advances in technology. Among the issues for the operation of ball bearings at high temperatures, solid lubricants and bearing materials are crucial. The aim of this study was to develop ball bearings for use at high temperatures in a vacuum. The tested bearings were 20-mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si3N4 balls, and Si3N4 bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS2 film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500 C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in a vacuum. Excellent performance at 500 C in a vacuum was obtained for Si3N4 bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5x10(exp 7) revolutions. After the tests, the bearings were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350 C in a vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were operated without failure at 350 C in a vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation revealed the existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings.

  18. 76 FR 58768 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, and Italy; Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Reviews, 76 FR 52937 (August 24, 2011) (Final Results). The period of review is May 1, 2009, through April... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, and Italy; Amended... ball bearings and parts thereof from France, Germany, and Italy. See Ball Bearings and Parts...

  19. Comparison of experimental and predicted performance of 150-millimeter-bore solid and drilled ball bearings to 3 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Munson, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Seven 150-millimeter-bore ball bearings were run under 8900-newton (2000-lbf) thrust load at speeds from 6670 to 20,000 rpm (1 million to 3 million DN). Four of the bearings had conventional solid balls, and three bearings had drilled (cylindrically hollow) balls with 50-percent mass reduction. The bearings were under-race cooled and slot lubricated with a type 2 ester oil at flow rates from 4.35 x 0.001 to 5.94 x 0.001 cubic meter/min (1.15 to 1.57 gal/min). Friction torque and temperature were measured on all bearings. While there was considerable spread in the temperature data, the drilled ball bearings tended to run slightly cooler than the solid ball bearings at higher speeds. No significant difference in torque was noted, however, between the solid and drilled ball bearings. One bearing of each type was rerun at 17,800-newton (4000-lbf) thrust load. The solid ball bearings performed satisfactorily at 3 million DN. However, at about 2 million DN the drilled ball bearing experienced a broken ball, and cracks appeared in other balls as a result of flexure fatigue. Metallurgical examination of the cracked balls indicated a brittle structure in the bore of the drilled balls.

  20. Evaluation of outer race tilt and lubrication on ball wear and SSME bearing life reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.; Stockwell, R. D.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of the SSME bearing operation were evaluated. The possibility of elastohydrodynamics (EHD) lubrication with a cryogenic fluid was analyzed. Films as thick as .61 microns were predicted with one theory which may be thick enough to provide hydrodynamic support. The film formation, however, is heavily dependent on good surface finish and a low bulk bearing temperature. Bearing dynamics to determine if the radial stiffness of a bearing which are dependent on bearing misalignment were analyzed. Four ball tests were conducted at several environmental conditions from an LN2 bath to 426 C in air. Surface coatings and ball materials are evaluated. Severe wear and high friction are measured for all ball materials except when the balls have surface lubricant coatings.

  1. Characterization of Lubricants on Ball Bearings by FT-IR Using an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W.; Pepper, S. V.; Wright, A. A.; Grady, B.

    2007-01-01

    Fourier Transform-Infrared reflectance microspectroscopy has been used extensively for the examination of coatings on nonplanar surfaces such as ball bearings. While this technique offers considerable advantages, practical application has many drawbacks, some of which are easily overcome by the use of integrating sphere technology. This paper describes the use of an integrating sphere for the quantification of thin layers of lubricant on the surface of ball bearings and the parameters which require optimization in order to obtain reliable data. Several applications of the technique are discussed including determination of lubricant load on 12.7 mm steel ball bearings and the examination of degraded lubricant on post mortem specimens.

  2. A ball-bearing structured triboelectric nanogenerator for nondestructive damage and rotating speed measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Hui; Han, Chang Bao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-26

    A ball-bearing structure based triboelectric nanogenerator (B-TENG) with interdigitative-electrodes was developed that can not only collect energy from rotational kinetic energy, but also serve as a self-powered and multifunctional sensor. The B-TENG relies on the rolling electrification between PTFE balls on Cu interdigitative-electrodes, which delivers an open-circuit voltage of ∼40 V and a short-circuit current of ∼1.2 μA at a rotating speed of 300 rpm for 4 mm PTFE balls. Using the output signals of B-TENG, a nondestructive detection for the damage of PTFE balls was realized without demounting the bearing. Besides, based on the periodic signals produced from B-TENG, the rotation speed of ball-bearing can be obtained according to the time difference between several cycles. PMID:26808345

  3. A ball-bearing structured triboelectric nanogenerator for nondestructive damage and rotating speed measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao Hui; Han, Chang Bao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-02-01

    A ball-bearing structure based triboelectric nanogenerator (B-TENG) with interdigitative-electrodes was developed that can not only collect energy from rotational kinetic energy, but also serve as a self-powered and multifunctional sensor. The B-TENG relies on the rolling electrification between PTFE balls on Cu interdigitative-electrodes, which delivers an open-circuit voltage of ∼40 V and a short-circuit current of ∼1.2 μA at a rotating speed of 300 rpm for 4 mm PTFE balls. Using the output signals of B-TENG, a nondestructive detection for the damage of PTFE balls was realized without demounting the bearing. Besides, based on the periodic signals produced from B-TENG, the rotation speed of ball-bearing can be obtained according to the time difference between several cycles.

  4. Measurement of separator contact forces in ball bearings using a derotation prism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    A derotation prism was used to produce a stationary image of balls deflecting a portion of the separator. Ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bearing at speeds to 12,000 rpm were found to be 25 N (five lb) maximum. Inner race land contact force was found to vary up to 20 N (four lb).

  5. Nonlinear dynamic model for skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to predict the skidding behavior of angular contact ball bearings under combined load condition. The centrifugal and gyroscopic effects induced by ball rotation and revolution, Hertz contact between the ball and inner/outer races, discontinuous contact between the ball and cage and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are considered in the model. Through comparisons with the tested results of the reference, the dynamic model is verified. Based upon these, variations of ball slipping speed with time and space are discussed for the bearing under combined load condition. It is shown that radial load leads to the fluctuations in the slipping velocity of the ball contacting with inner/outer races, especially for the ball in load-decreasing regions. Adding the radial load would significantly increase the amplitude and range of slipping velocity, indicating that the skidding becomes more serious. As the ball still withstands contact load in the load-decreasing region, large slipping velocity would increase the temperature of both bearing and lubricant oil, intensify the wear and then might shorten the bearing service life. Therefore, the radial load should be considered carefully in the design and monitoring of rotating machinery.

  6. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., Appropriations Acts, and Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7009 Restriction on ball...

  7. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., Appropriations Acts, and Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7009 Restriction on ball...

  8. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., Appropriations Acts, and Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7009 Restriction on ball...

  9. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., Appropriations Acts, and Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7009 Restriction on ball...

  10. 76 FR 327 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France: Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ..., 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). Rescission of Review in Part In accordance with 19 CFR 351.213(d)(1... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France: Partial Rescission of... (the Department) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on ball...

  11. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., Appropriations Acts, and Other Statutory Restrictions on Foreign Acquisition 225.7009 Restriction on ball...

  12. Analysis of Black Bearing Balls from a Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovinski, Marjorie F.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2005-01-01

    A significantly deteriorated ball bearing mechanism from a body flap actuator on Space Shuttle OV-103 was disassembled and the balls submitted for analysis in conjunction with Return to Flight activities. The OV-103 balls, referred to as the "black balls", were subjected to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman micro spectroscopy, surface profilometry, and optical and electron microscopy. The spectroscopic results in combination with microscopy analysis allowed a determination of the lubricant degradation pathway. The chemical attack mechanism does not adequately explain the unique visual appearance of the black balls. Numerous efforts have unsuccessfully focused on duplication of the phenomena causing this unique surface structure and appearance of the black balls. Further detail will be presented supporting these conclusions along with plausible explanations of the unique black appearance to the balls.

  13. Evaluation of load-life relation with ball bearings at 500 deg F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature suggests that a stress-life exponent of approximately 12 is typical of vacuum-processed steels for ball bearings rather than the exponent of 9 which has been generally accepted by the bearing industry and bearing users. Tests run with vacuum-degassed AISI 52100 balls in the five-ball fatigue tester at four maximum Hertz stress levels in the range from 650000 to 875000 psi showed good agreement with the literature. However, tests run with consumable-electrode vacuum melted AISI M-50 steel angular-contact ball bearings at 500 deg F at three thrust loads did not show significant deviation from the accepted ninth power stress-life relation.

  14. Evaluation of load-life relation with ball bearings at 500 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the literature suggests that a stress-life exponent of approximately 12 is typical of vacuum-processed steels for ball bearings rather than the exponent of 9 which has been generally accepted by the bearing industry and bearing users. Tests run with vacuum-degassed AISI 52100 balls in the five-ball fatigue tester at four maximum Hertz stress levels in the range from 650,000 to 875,000 psi showed good agreement with the literature. However, tests run with consumable-electrode vacuum melted AISI M-50 steel angular-contact ball bearings at 500 F at three thrust loads did not show significant deviation from the accepted ninth power stress-life relation.

  15. Analysis of a spacecraft instrument ball bearing assembly lubricated by a perfluoroalkylether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.; Jones, W. R., Jr.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of a spacecraft instrument ball bearing assembly, subjected to a scanning life test, was performed to determine the possible case of rotational problems involving these units aboard several satellites. The analysis indicated an ineffective transfer of a fluorinated liquid lubricant from a phenolic retainer to the bearing balls. Part of the analysis led to a novel HPLC separation method employing a fluorinated mobile phase in conjunction with silica based size exclusion columns.

  16. Experimental investigation of the thermal contact resistance of a space-use deep groove ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Katsuhiko

    An investigation is conducted to experimentally verify an analytical method that determines the thermal contact resistance between the balls and the inner and outer rings of a space-use ball bearing. A single row bearing made from stainless steel 440 C is tested in a vacuum environment, and steady-state temperature distributions are measured to evaluate the heat flow across the stationary bearing. Test results are given for the conditions of axial, radial, and combined loading. It is concluded that the proposed calculation method accurately predicts the thermal contact resistance between the elements of a dry bearing with smooth contact surfaces.

  17. Effect of Internal Clearance on Load Distribution and Life of Radially Loaded Ball and Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of internal clearance on radially loaded deepgroove ball and cylindrical roller bearing load distribution and fatigue life was determined for four clearance groups defined in the bearing standards. The analysis was extended to negative clearance (interference) conditions to produce a curve of life factor versus internal clearance. Rolling-element loads can be optimized and bearing life maximized for a small negative operating clearance. Life declines gradually with positive clearance and rapidly with increasing negative clearance. Relationships were found between bearing life and internal clearance as a function of ball or roller diameter, adjusted for load. Results are presented as life factors for radially loaded bearings independent of bearing size or applied load. In addition, a modified Stribeck Equation is presented that relates the maximum rolling-element load to internal bearing clearance.

  18. Long life, high speed, thrust-load ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term bearing operation at three million DN can be achieved with high degree of reliability using full combination of sophisticated but currently available state-of-the-art bearing materials and designs, lubricants, and lubricating techniques.

  19. Evaluation of ball and roller bearings restored by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The restoration by grinding of those rolling element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircaft engine and transmission overhaul is considered. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine and transmission for the pilot program. Groups of each of these bearings were visually and dimensionally inspected for suitability for restoration. A total of 250 bearings were restored by grinding. Of this number, 30 bearings from each type were endurance tested to a TBO of 1600 hours. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The two bearing failures which occurred were due to defective rolling elements and were typical of those which may occur in new bearings. The restorable component yield to the three groups was in excess of 90 percent.

  20. Evaluation of ball and roller bearings restored by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. Groups of each of these bearings were visually and dimensionally inspected for suitability for restoration. A total of 250 bearings were restored by grinding. Of this number, 30 bearings from each type were endurance tested to a TBO of 1600 hours. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The two bearing failures which occurred were due to defective rolling elements and were typical of those which may occur in new bearings. The restorable component yield to the three groups was in excess of 90 percent.

  1. An autopsy case related to a terrorist attack using a ball-bearing bomb.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Masataka; Biwasaka, Hitoshi; Niitsu, Hisae; Saigusa, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Yasuhiro

    2009-03-01

    We encountered an autopsy case related to a terrorist attack using a ball-bearing bomb. The decedent was a 51-year-old male without significant medical histories. During dinner in a restaurant, the perpetrator suddenly exploded a ball-bearing bomb, the blast from which blew the victim off his chair. The victim was found to be unresponsive, and pronounced dead. X-ray photographs taken before autopsy revealed six spherical shadows. Three penetrating wounds in the head, one in the neck and chest, and two in the left upper arm were observed in vivo. Six projectiles recovered from the body were identified as ball-bearings, one of which traveled through the midbrain, diencephalon, and left temporal lobe. Although blast injuries and penetrating wounds are often combined in bomb attack victims, penetrating brain injury would be the cause of death in this case. Lethal injuries to major organs can thus occur even though the destructive force of a ball-bearing bomb is weak. X-ray films were informative for detecting the ball-bearings in this case, suggesting that autopsy imaging is essential in cases of terrorism victims. PMID:18783977

  2. Stiffness matrix formulation for double row angular contact ball bearings: Analytical development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Aydin; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-10-01

    Though double row angular contact ball bearings are widely used in industrial, automotive, and aircraft applications, the scientific literature on double row bearings is sparse. It is also shown that the stiffness matrices of two single row bearings may not be simply superposed to obtain the stiffness matrix of a double row bearing. To overcome the deficiency in the literature, a new, comprehensive, analytical approach is proposed based on the Hertzian theory for back-to-back, face-to-face, and tandem arrangements. The elements of the five-dimensional stiffness matrix for double row angular contact ball bearings are computed given either the mean bearing displacement or the mean load vector. The diagonal elements of the proposed stiffness matrix are verified with a commercial code for all arrangements under three loading scenarios. Some changes in stiffness coefficients are investigated by varying critical kinematic and geometric parameters to provide more insight. Finally, the calculated natural frequencies of a shaft-bearing experiment are successfully compared with measurements, thus validating the proposed stiffness formulation. For double row angular contact ball bearings, the moment stiffness and cross-coupling stiffness terms are significant, and the contact angle changes under loads. The proposed formulation is also valid for paired (duplex) bearings which behave as an integrated double row unit when the surrounding structural elements are sufficiently rigid.

  3. Predicted and experimental performance of large-bore high-speed ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The values of inner and outer race temperature, cage speed, and heat transferred to the lubricant or bearing power loss, calculated using the computer programs Shaberth and Cybean, with the corresponding experimental data for the large bore ball and roller bearings were compared. After the development of computer program, it is important that values calculated using such program are compared with actual bearing performance data to assess the programs predictive capability. Several comprehensive computer programs currently in use are capable of predicting rolling bearing operating and performance characteristics. These programs accept input data of bearing internal geometry, bearing material and lubricant properties, and bearing operating conditions. The programs solve several sets of equations that characterize rolling element bearings. The output produced typically consists of rolling element loads and Hertz stresses, operating contact angles, component speed, heat generation, local temperatures, bearing fatigue life, and power loss. Two of these programs, Shaberth and Cybean were developed.

  4. Arched-outer-race ball-bearing analysis considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A first-order thrust load analysis that considers centrifugal forces but which neglects gyroscopics, elastohydrodynamics, and thermal effects was performed. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm-bore angular-contact ball bearing. Fatigue life, contact loads, and contact angles are shown for conventional and arched bearings. The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high-speed applications. In particular, at an applied load of 4448 n (1000 lb) and a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) the arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing.

  5. Evaluation of drilled-ball bearings at DN values to three million. 2: Experimental skid study and endurance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    Both drilled-and solid-ball 120-mm-bore bearings were tested at speeds up to 24,000 rpm to determine skid characteristics. The thrust loads were varied from 5000 lb down to 370 lb. No gross skidding occurred, and the behavior of the two bearing types was generally similar; however, two drilled-ball bearing failures occurred during the skid tests. In the endurance tests, 25 cycles of start, run (for one hour), and stop were completed before a drilled-ball bearing failed. In all three cases, the ball had failed in flexure fatigue.

  6. 78 FR 76104 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Japan and the United Kingdom: Notice of Reinstatement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... Roller Bearings, and Spherical Plain Bearings, and Parts Thereof From Japan, 54 FR 20904 (May 15, 1989... Value: Ball Bearings, and Cylindrical Roller Bearings and Parts Thereof From the United Kingdom, 54 FR... Initiation of Five-year (``Sunset'') Reviews, 70 FR 31423 (June 1, 2005), and Certain Bearings From...

  7. Dynamic simulation of infrared signature of deep groove ball bearing based on ANSYS/LS-DYNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wei; Yang, Li; Hong, Yixun

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic simulation of infrared signature of the deep groove ball bearing (DGBB) was carried out based on ANSYS/LS-DYNA. A finite element model of the ball-raceway contact of the was established, and the slide friction between the ball and the raceway was considered as the main reason of heat generation, and the impacts of radial load, rotation speed and the coefficient of friction to the heat generation and the infrared characteristics of distribution were discussed in detail. The relative errors between the simulation results and the theoretical calculation value are less than 10%, which proves this simulation model is accurate and reliable.

  8. Nondestructive Testing of Aeronautic Bearing Ceramic Balls by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, S.; Deneuville, F.; Duquennoy, M.; Ouaftouh, M.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-04-09

    Although ceramic balls are used for bearings in the aerospace industries, defects in ceramic material could be dangerous, particularly if such defects are located close to the surface. We propose a non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride balls, based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy. From their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls. The proposed methodology can both excite and detect vibrations over a large frequency range, in order to estimate the velocity of surface waves, which permits cortical areas to be tested specifically.

  9. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication in an instrument ball-bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Snediker, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    The paper deals with experimental measurement of bearing torque and 'percentage of lubrication' in instrument size (R6) bearings. The primary parameter found to affect bearing performance for several lubricant investigations is base viscosity. Inference of EHD film thickness is made from the percentage of film measurements which are compared with X-ray data. A reasonable correlation between the two types of data is presented, thereby, paving the way toward the use of the more universally applicable percentage of film measurements for the determination of EHD conditions in real bearing systems.

  10. Filtration effects on ball bearing life and condition in a contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ball bearings were fatigue tested with a noncontaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant and with a contaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant under four levels of filtration. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns. Aircraft turbine engine contaminants were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing hour. Bearing life and running track condition generally improved with finer filtration. The experimental lives of 3- and 30-micron filter bearings were statistically equivalent, approaching those obtained with the noncontaminated lubricant bearings. Compared to these bearings, the lives of the 49-micron bearings were statistically lower. The 105-micron bearings experienced gross wear. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

  11. Filtration effects on ball bearing life and condition in a contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ball bearings were fatigue tested with a noncontaminated lubricant and with a contaminated lubricant under four levels of filtration. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns. Aircraft turbine engine contaminants were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing hour. Bearing life and running track condition generally improved with finer filtration. The experimental lives of 3 and 30 micron filter bearings were statistically equivalent, approaching those obtained with the noncontaminated lubricant bearings. Compared to these bearings, the lives of the 49 micron bearings were statistically lower. The 105 micron bearings experienced gross wear. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

  12. A BAPTA employing rotary transformers, stepper motors and ceramic ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1981-01-01

    The utilization of rotary transformers as an alternative to slip rings for the power transfer from solar panels to a satellite's main body could be advantageous, especially if an ac bus system is taken into consideration. Different approaches with main emphasis on the electromagnetic design were investigated and showed efficiencies of up to 99% with a 3 kW power capability. A solidly preloaded pair of ball bearings with ceramic balls assures proper transformer air gaps and acceptable torque changes over temperature and temperature gradients. The bearing and power transfer assembly is driven by a direct drive stepper motor with inherent redundancy properties and needs no caging mechanism.

  13. Effect of Silicon Nitride Balls and Rollers on Rolling Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the introduction of silicon nitride rollers and balls into conventional rolling-element bearings. For a given applied load, the contact (Hertz) stress in a hybrid bearing will be higher than an all-steel rolling-element bearing. The silicon nitride rolling-element life as well as the lives of the steel races were used to determine the resultant bearing life of both hybrid and all-steel bearings. Life factors were determined and reported for hybrid bearings. Under nominal operating speeds, the resultant calculated lives of the deep-groove, angular-contact, and cylindrical roller hybrid bearings with races made of post-1960 bearing steel increased by factors of 3.7, 3.2, and 5.5, respectively, from those calculated using the Lundberg-Palmgren equations. An all-steel bearing under the same load will have a longer life than the equivalent hybrid bearing under the same conditions. Under these conditions, hybrid bearings are predicted to have a lower fatigue life than all-steel bearings by 58 percent for deep-groove bearings, 41 percent for angular-contact bearings, and 28 percent for cylindrical roller bearings.

  14. The properties of thin-section, four-point-contact ball bearings in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowntree, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thin section, four-point-contact ball bearings are increasinly employed in spacecraft mechanisms because of the potential advantages they offer. However, litte was previously known of their torque, thermal conductance and stiffness properties at conditions anticipated for their use in space. An investigation of these properties are described. It was found that frictional (Coulomb) torque, thermal conductance and stiffness all show marked dependence on the bearing preload, the housing design, the bearing external fit (i.e., free fit or interference) and on the thermal gradient across the races. Optimum bearing performance is achieved only if these properties are well understood. The necessary data to understand these properties are provided.

  15. Probabilistic Analysis of Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Zaretsky, Erin V.

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis, using the 2-parameter Weibull-Johnson method, was performed on experimental life test data from space shuttle actuator bearings. Experiments were performed on a test rig under simulated conditions to determine the life and failure mechanism of the grease lubricated bearings that support the input shaft of the space shuttle body flap actuators. The failure mechanism was wear that can cause loss of bearing preload. These tests established life and reliability data for both shuttle flight and ground operation. Test data were used to estimate the failure rate and reliability as a function of the number of shuttle missions flown. The Weibull analysis of the test data for a 2-bearing shaft assembly in each body flap actuator established a reliability level of 99.6 percent for a life of 12 missions. A probabilistic system analysis for four shuttles, each of which has four actuators, predicts a single bearing failure in one actuator of one shuttle after 22 missions (a total of 88 missions for a 4-shuttle fleet). This prediction is comparable with actual shuttle flight history in which a single actuator bearing was found to have failed by wear at 20 missions.

  16. Probabilistic Analysis of Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis, using the 2-parameter Weibull-Johnson method, was performed on experimental life test data from space shuttle actuator bearings. Experiments were performed on a test rig under simulated conditions to determine the life and failure mechanism of the grease lubricated bearings that support the input shaft of the space shuttle body flap actuators. The failure mechanism was wear that can cause loss of bearing preload. These tests established life and reliability data for both shuttle flight and ground operation. Test data were used to estimate the failure rate and reliability as a function of the number of shuttle missions flown. The Weibull analysis of the test data for the four actuators on one shuttle, each with a 2-bearing shaft assembly, established a reliability level of 96.9 percent for a life of 12 missions. A probabilistic system analysis for four shuttles, each of which has four actuators, predicts a single bearing failure in one actuator of one shuttle after 22 missions (a total of 88 missions for a 4-shuttle fleet). This prediction is comparable with actual shuttle flight history in which a single actuator bearing was found to have failed by wear at 20 missions.

  17. High frequency ultrasonic detection of C-crack defects in silicon nitride bearing balls.

    PubMed

    Deneuville, F; Duquennoy, M; Ouaftouh; Ourak, M; Jenot, F; Desvaux, S

    2009-01-01

    A non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride bearing balls based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy is proposed here. Through the theoretical study of their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls using a vibration mode that is similar to surface wave propagation. The study of the influence of C-crack defects on the resonances of Rayleigh modes is presented here. These C-cracks are typically formed by impacts between balls during finishing or handling. They are frequently found on the surface of silicon nitride bearing balls and these C-cracks decrease the rolling contact fatigue life considerably. This kind of defect is difficult to detect because the C-shaped surface crack is very small and narrow (500 microm x 5 microm), and its depth does not exceed 50 microm. The proposed methodology can both excite spheroidal vibrations in the ceramic balls and detect such vibrations over a large frequency range. In particular, high frequency vibrations are considered because these are similar to the surface waves propagating in the cortical zone of the ceramic balls and consequently they can be used to detect C-crack defects. PMID:18657837

  18. Comparison of tungsten carbide and stainless steel ball bearings for grinding single maize kernels in a reciprocating grinder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reciprocating grinders can grind single maize kernels by shaking the kernel in a vial with a ball bearing. This process results in a grind quality that is not satisfactory for many experiments. Tungesten carbide ball bearings are nearly twice as dense as steel, so we compared their grinding performa...

  19. The in-vacuo torque performance of dry-lubricated ball bearings at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, S. G.; Roberts, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of dry-lubricated, angular contact ball bearings in vacuum at a temperature of 20 degrees K has been investigated, and is compared with the in-vacuo performance at room temperatures. Bearings were lubricated using dry-lubricant techniques which have been previously established for space applications involving operations at or near room temperature. Comparative tests were undertaken using three lubricants: molybdenum disulphide, lead, and PTFE. Results obtained using the three lubricants are presented.

  20. Analysis of an arched outer-race ball bearing considering centrifugal forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    A Newton-Raphson method of iteration was used in evaluating the radial and axial projection of the distance between the ball center and the outer raceway groove curvature center (V and W). Fatigue life evaluations were made. The similar analysis of a conventional bearing can be directly obtained from the arched bearing analysis by simply letting the amount of arching be zero (g = 0) and not considering equations related to the unloaded half of the outer race. The analysis was applied to a 150-mm angular contact ball bearing. Results for life, contact loads, and angles are shown for a conventional bearing (g = 0) and two arched bearings (g = 0.127 mm (0.005 in.), and 0.254 mm (0.010 in.)). The results indicate that an arched bearing is highly desirable for high speed applications. In particular, for a DN value of 3 million (20,000 rpm) and an applied axial load of 4448 N (1000 lb), an arched bearing shows an improvement in life of 306 percent over that of a conventional bearing. At 4.2 million DN (28,000 rpm), the corresponding improvement is 340 percent. It was also found for low speeds, the arched bearing does not offer the advantages that it does for high speed applications.

  1. A Study on the Effects of Ball Defects on the Fatigue Life in Hybrid Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Ching-Yao; Foerster, Chad E.; O'Brien, Michael J.; Hardy, Brian S.; Goyal, Vinay K.; Nelson, Benjamin A.; Robinson, Ernest Y.; Ward, Peter C.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid ball bearings using silicon nitride ceramic balls with steel rings are increasingly being used in space mechanism applications due to their high wear resistance and long rolling contact fatigue life. However, qualitative and quantitative reports of the effects of ball defects that cause early fatigue failure are rare. We report on our approach to study these effects. Our strategy includes characterization of defects encountered in use, generation of similar defects in a laboratory setting, execution of full-scale bearing tests to obtain lifetimes, post-test characterization, and related finite-element modeling to understand the stress concentration of these defects. We have confirmed that at least one type of defect of appropriate size can significantly reduce fatigue life. Our method can be used to evaluate other defects as they occur or are encountered.

  2. Two Magnets and a Ball Bearing: A Simple Demonstration of the Methods of Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, W. C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the behavior of a bar magnet with a steel ball bearing on one pole as it approaches another bar magnet. Maps the problem onto electrostatics and explains observations based on the behavior of point charges near an isolated, uncharged sphere. Offers a simple demonstration of the method of images in electrostatics. (Author/NB)

  3. Effect of carburized layer on rolling contact fatigue of 52100 ball bearing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kotkowski, K.; Cegielski, H.; Przylecki, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Results of investigations of rolling contact fatigue life of 52100 ball bearing steel for two groups of specimens, carburized and non-carburized, are presented in the paper. A carburized layer improves the contact fatigue life ten times, when L{sub 10} lives are compared, or improves the fatigue strength by {approximately}18%, when load capacities are compared.

  4. 77 FR 33159 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, and Italy: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Department published the antidumping duty orders on ball bearings and parts thereof from France (54 FR 20902), Germany (54 FR 20900), and Italy (54 FR 20903) in the ] Federal Register. On June 28, 2011, in accordance... Request for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June 28, 2011).\\1\\ \\1\\ On July 16, 2011, we revoked...

  5. A Method for Evaluating Dynamical Friction in Linear Ball Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yusaku; Maru, Koichi; Jin, Tao; Yupapin, Preecha P.; Mitatha, Somsak

    2010-01-01

    A method is proposed for evaluating the dynamical friction of linear bearings, whose motion is not perfectly linear due to some play in its internal mechanism. In this method, the moving part of a linear bearing is made to move freely, and the force acting on the moving part is measured as the inertial force given by the product of its mass and the acceleration of its centre of gravity. To evaluate the acceleration of its centre of gravity, the acceleration of two different points on it is measured using a dual-axis optical interferometer. PMID:22163457

  6. An evaluation of grease ball bearing lubricants in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demorest, K. E.; Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Because many future spacecraft will require mechanisms to operate for long periods of time in environments which are inimical to most bearing lubricants, a series of tests has been started to evaluate 25 grease type lubricants in R-4 size bearings in vacuum at ambient temperature for a 1 year period. Four repetitions of each test are made to provide statistical samples. These tests will be used to select from two to five lubricants for 5 year tests in the same environment. At the present time fifteen test sets have been completed and five sets are being tested. The best results to date have been obtained with perfluoropolyether greases.

  7. Performance of 75 millimeter-bore arched outer-race ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the operating characteristics of 75-mm bore, arched outer-race bearings, and to compare the data with those for a similar, but conventional, deep groove ball bearing. Further, results of an analytical study, made using a computer program developed previously, were compared with the experimental data. Bearings were tested up to 28,000 rpm shaft speed with a load of 2200 N (500 lb). The amount of arching was 0.13, 0.25, and 0.51 mm (.005, .010, and .020 in.). All bearings operated satisfactorily. The outer-race temperatures and the torques, however, were consistently higher for the arched bearings than for the conventional bearing.

  8. Performance of 75-millimeter bore arched outer-race ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the operating characteristics of 75-mm bore, arched outer-race bearings, and to compare the data with those for a similar, but conventional, deep groove ball bearing. Further, results of an analytical study, made using a computer program developed previously, were compared with the experimental data. Bearings were tested up to 28,000 rpm shaft speed with a load of 2,200 N (500 lb). The amount of arching was 0.13, 0.25, and 0.51 mm (0.005, 0.010, and 0.020 in). All bearings operated satisfactorily. The outer-race temperatures and the torques, however, were consistently higher for the arched bearings than for the conventional bearings

  9. Ceramic bearing development. Silicon nitride bearing balls of improved reliability: Thermal oxidation. Final report, 1 January 1995-31 October 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Burk, C.B.

    1996-11-01

    The major objective of this work was to improve the reliability of silicon nitride bearing balls by means of an optimized thermal oxidation treatment. Previous work had shown that the thermal fracture resistance of silicon nitride bearing balls increased when the balls were heated and oxidized in air. An optimized oxidation treatment for NBD-200 silicon nitride balls was developed, using a thermal proof test matrix. This oxidation treatment increased the thermal fracture resistance of the balls. Ball-on-rod RCF testing of oxidized and non-oxidized balls was performed at 786 KSI contact stress, with nitrided M50-NIL rods. RCF testing did not produce a significant percentage of ball failures for either the oxidized or non-oxidized condition. Alternative methods, such as four ball fatigue testing, should be considered for future work. The oxidation treatment degraded ball surface and geometry, and is suspected as a contributing factor to short rod life. Oxidation treatment does not appear to be a useful technique for improving the reliability of NBD-200 bearing balls.

  10. How to apply life adjustment factors for ball and roller bearings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crecelius, W. J., Jr.; Harris, T. A.; Moyer, C. A.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Sherlock, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Practical problems applicable to the selection, design, and lubrication of rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed. The solutions to these problems are based upon the new ASME Engineering Design Guide - Life Adjustment Factors for Ball and Roller Bearings. Design and selection criteria are based upon materials and processing factors such as melting practice, metalworking, and heat treatment. Environmental factors considered include bearing misalignment and speed. Selection of a lubricant is based upon elastohydrodynamic lubrication principles in addition to lubricant type and chemistry.

  11. Theoretical study on the thermal contact resistance of a space-use deep groove ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Katsuhiko

    The thermal contact resistance between the balls and the inner and outer rings of a space-use deep groove ball bearing is analyzed assuming that heat transfer between smooth contacting elements occurs through the elastic contact areas. It is also assumed that the stationary bearing sustains axial and/or radial loads under steady-state temperature condition. The shapes and sizes of the contact areas are calculated using the Hertzian theory. The thermal analysis is based on an isolated isothermal elliptic contact area supplying heat to an insulated half-space. The formulation of the resistance is given as a function of a geometric factor of the contact area and the thermal conductivity of the bearing. In particular, an expression for the axial load is derived with careful consideration of changes in contact angle induced by elastic deformation at the contact area.

  12. Performance of ball bearings operated at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C in vacuum{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Katsumi; Suzuki, Mineo; Nishimura, Makoto

    1995-09-01

    Ball bearing tests were carried out at temperatures up to 500{degrees}C and a rotational speed of 600 rpm under an axial load of 50 N in vacuum. Tested bearings were 20 mm bore-sized angular contact ball bearings. Three combinations of bearing materials were tested: M-50 bearings, hybrid bearings with M-50 races and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bearings. M-50 bearings were lubricated with a silver film. Hybrid and ceramic bearings were lubricated with a pre-coated sputtered MoS{sub 2} film and a self-lubricating hot-pressed composite retainer. Excellent performance at 500{degrees}C in vacuum was obtained for Si{sub 3}Ni{sub 4} bearings. Frictional torque was low and stable for more than 5 x 10{sup 7} revolutions. The bearings after the test were in very good condition with a small amount of wear. Hybrid bearings also showed very good performance at 350{degrees}C in vacuum. M-50 steel bearings were feasible for use at 350{degrees} in vacuum, although frictional torque was rather high and unstable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis and scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) observation revealed existence of a film on the ball surface transferred from the composite retainer for both hybrid and ceramic bearings. 7 refs., 19 figs., 5 figs.

  13. A parametric heat transfer study for cryogenic ball bearings in SSME HPOTP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Mingking K.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical modeling is to examine the effects of coolant convective heat transfer coefficient and frictional heating on the local temperature characteristics of a ball element in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) bearing. The present modeling uses a control-volume based, finite-difference method to solve the non-dimensionalized heat conduction equation in spherical coordinate system. The dimensionless temperature is found as a function of Biot number, heat flux ratio between the two race contacts, and location in the ball. The current results show that, for a given cooling capability, the ball temperature generally increases almost linearly with the heat input from the race-contacts. This increase is always very high at one of the two contacts. An increase in heat transfer coefficient generally reduces the ball temperature and alleviates the temperature gradient, except for the regions very close to the race contacts. For a 10-fold increase of heat transfer coefficient, temperature decrease is 35 percent for the average over entire ball, and 10 percent at the inner-race contact. The corresponding change of temperature gradient displays opposing trends between the regions immediately adjacent to the contacts and the remaining portion of the ball. The average temperature gradient in the vicinity of both contacts increases approximately 70 to 100 percent. A higher temperature gradient produces excessive thermal stress locally which may be detrimental to the material integrity. This, however, is the only unfavorable issue for an increase of heat transfer coefficient.

  14. A comparison of the performance of solid and liquid lubricants in oscillating spacecraft ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, S.

    1994-01-01

    The European Space Tribology Laboratory (ESTL) has been engaged in a program to compare the performance of oscillating ball bearings when lubricated by a number of space lubricants, both liquid and solid. The results have shown that mean torque levels are increased by up to a factor of five above the normal running torque, and that often torque peaks of even greater magnitudes are present at the ends of travel. It is believed that these effects are caused by a build-up of compacted debris in the contact zone, thus reducing the ball/race conformity ratio.

  15. Design of High-speed Wear Lifetime Tester of the Instrument Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. H.; Gu, J. M.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X. Y.

    2006-10-01

    The instrument ball bearings are the key components of movable components for various kinds of measuring and control instruments; they often operate in the environmental condition of high-speed and light preload. In general, the non metal, disposable oilimpregnated retainer material has been used for these kinds of high precision miniature bearing. The engineering practice shows that the common failure mode of them is the wear which appears under the condition of insufficient lubrication condition. As the results, the vibration and noise will be enlarged, so does the frictional torque, which makes the ball bearings to lose its original working accuracy. It is the lifetime test of bearings that can enable the designers and manufacturers to chose the material of the bearing properly, optimize the product structure, mend the manufacturing technique process, and to enhance the technical level of the bearing products significantly. In this paper, the wear lifetime tester has been designed according to the requirements of the life test for the instrument ball bearings, which consists of the main body of tester, electric system, drive unit and computer measure and control system, etc. The motor spindle has been selected to drive the device which is supported by the aerostatic bearing; frequency conversion speed adjustment mode, its scope of rotating speed is between 0 and 10,000 rpm. A pair of bearings can be tested under the pure axial preload condition, the maximum load is up to 50N, the control accuracy is ±2% the scope of temperature control is up to 200°C. The variation of frictional torque on the bearing couple will be measured by an online torque transducer. The variation of power dissipation can be monitored under arbitrary speed by use of an on-line high-precision power meter. The wear and quality situation of the contact surface of the bearings will be reflected on these two parameters. Meanwhile, the values of temperature and vibration will also be monitored

  16. Dynamic analysis of double-row self-aligning ball bearings due to applied loads, internal clearance, surface waviness and number of balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Yaobin; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yang, Chenlong

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a three degrees of freedom (dof) model was established for a double-row self-aligning ball bearing (SABB) system, and was applied to study the dynamic behavior of the system during starting process and constant speed rotating process. A mathematical model was developed concerning stiffness and damping characteristics of the bearing, as well as three-dimensional applied load, rotor centrifugal force, etc. Balls and races were all considered as nonlinear springs, and the contact force between ball and race was calculated based on classic Hertzian elastic contact deformation theory and deformation compatibility theory. The changes of each ball's contact force and loaded angle of each row were taken into account. In order to solve the nonlinear dynamical equilibrium equations of the system, these equations were rewritten as differential equations and the fourth order Runge-Kutta method was used to solve the equations iteratively. In order to verify accuracy of the dynamical model and correctness of the numerical solution method, a kind of SABB-BRF30 was chosen for case studies. The effects of several important governing parameters, such as radial and axial applied loads, normal internal, inner and outer races waviness, and number of balls were investigated. These parametric studies led to a complete characterization of the shaft-bearing system vibration transmission. The research provided a theoretical reference for new type bearing design, shaft-bearing system kinetic analysis, optimal design, etc.

  17. Performance of 75-millimeter-bore bearings using electron-beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio of 1.26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the rolling element fatigue life of electron beam-welded hollow balls with a diameter ratio (o.d./i.d.) of 1.26 and to determine the operating characteristics of bearings using these hollow balls. Similar bearings with solid balls were also tested and the data compared. The bearings were operated at shaft speeds up to 28,000 rpm with a thrust load of 2200 N (500 lb). Ball failures during the bearing tests were due to flexure fatigue. The solid and hollow ball bearings tested showed little difference in outer race temperatures and indicated the same bearing torque. The 17.5-mm (0.6875-in.) diameter balls were also tested in the five-ball fatigue tester and showed no significant difference in life when compared with the life of a solid ball.

  18. Design and Operating Characteristics of High-Speed, Small-Bore, Angular-Contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1998-01-01

    The computer program SHABERTH was used to analyze 35-mm-bore, angular-contact ball bearings designed and manufactured for high-speed turbomachinery applications. Parametric tests of the bearings were conducted on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester and were compared with the computer predictions. Four bearing and cage designs were studied. The bearings were lubricated either by jet lubrication or through the split inner ring with and without outer-ring cooling. The predicted bearing life decreased with increasing speed because of increased operating contact stresses caused by changes in contact angle and centrifugal load. For thrust loads only, the difference in calculated life for the 24 deg. and 30 deg. contact-angle bearings was insignificant. However, for combined loading, the 24 deg. contact-angle bearing gave longer life. For split-inner-ring bearings, optimal operating conditions were obtained with a 24 deg. contact angle and an inner-ring, land-guided cage, using outer-ring cooling in conjunction with low lubricant flow rates. Lower temperature and power losses were obtained with a single-outer-ring, land-guided cage for the 24 deg. contact-angle bearing having a relieved inner ring and partially relieved outer ring. Inner-ring temperatures were independent of lubrication mode and cage design. In comparison with measured values, reasonably good engineering correlation was obtained using the computer program SHABERTH for predicted bearing power loss and for inner- and outer-ring temperatures. The Parker formula for XCAV (used in SHABERTH, a measure of oil volume in the bearing cavity) may need to be refined to reflect bearing lubrication mode, cage design, and location of cage-controlling land.

  19. Test results and flight experience of ball bearing momentum and reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1990-01-01

    The required satellite mission durations and levels of reliability have been considerably increased: While in the beginning of the 70's 3 to 5 year missions were planned, the standard is now 10 years with an expansion to 15 years and more for such programs as INTELSAT VII. Based on a 20 year test and flight experience with basically the same design, ball bearing momentum and reaction wheels with the required 15 year mission capability can be provided.

  20. Evaluation of 1-aryl-2,5-dithiohydrazodicarbonamides as EP additives on bearing balls of different composition in a four ball machine

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, A.; Verma, V.K.; Prasad, N. )

    1992-08-01

    A number of 1-aryl-2,5-dithiohydrazodicarbonamides are synthesized, and their friction and wear properties are evaluated on a four-ball machine using paraffin oil as a base oil. The additive, 1-p-Cl-phenyl-2,5-dithiohydrazodicarbonamide, is found to be equally effective on steel bearing balls of different compositions. The shape and elemental composition of the wear-scars were investigated by SEM and by Auger Electron Spectroscopy, respectively. 15 refs.

  1. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  2. Wear mechanisms found in angular contact ball bearings of the SSME's LOX turbopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, T. J.

    1992-07-01

    Extensive experimental investigations were carried out on used flight bearings of the Phase 2 high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) in order to determine the wear mechanisms, dominant wear modes, and their extent and causes. The report shows methodology, surface analysis techniques used, result, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for heavy bearing wear in LOX was identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. The mode relies on the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear in bearings appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are given.

  3. 76 FR 57019 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany and Italy: Final Results of Sunset Reviews...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... parts thereof from France, Germany, and Italy. See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR... Germany, 54 FR 20900 (May 15, 1989), and Antidumping Duty Orders: Ball Bearings and Cylindrical Roller..., and Parts Thereof From France, 54 FR 20902 (May 15, 1989), Antidumping Duty Orders: Ball...

  4. 75 FR 26920 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Reviews, Preliminary Results...

  5. Toward a 3D dynamic model of a faulty duplex ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Gideon; Klein, Renata; Kushnirsky, Alex; Bortman, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Bearings are vital components for safe and proper operation of machinery. Increasing efficiency of bearing diagnostics usually requires training of health and usage monitoring systems via expensive and time-consuming ground calibration tests. The main goal of this research, therefore, is to improve bearing dynamics modeling tools in order to reduce the time and budget needed to implement the health and usage monitoring approach. The proposed three-dimensional ball bearing dynamic model is based on the classic dynamic and kinematic equations. Interactions between the bodies are simulated using non-linear springs combined with dampers described by Hertz-type contact relation. The force friction is simulated using the hyperbolic-tangent function. The model allows simulation of a wide range of mechanical faults. It is validated by comparison to known bearing behavior and to experimental results. The model results are verified by demonstrating numerical convergence. The model results for the two cases of single and duplex angular ball bearings with axial deformation in the outer ring are presented. The qualitative investigation provides insight into bearing dynamics, the sensitivity study generalizes the qualitative findings for similar cases, and the comparison to the test results validates model reliability. The article demonstrates the variety of the cases that the 3D bearing model can simulate and the findings to which it may lead. The research allowed the identification of new patterns generated by single and duplex bearings with axially deformed outer race. It also enlightened the difference between single and duplex bearing manifestation. In the current research the dynamic model enabled better understanding of the physical behavior of the faulted bearings. Therefore, it is expected that the modeling approach has the potential to simplify and improve the development process of diagnostic algorithms. • A deformed outer race of a single axially loaded bearing is

  6. Application of continuous casting steel 100Cr6 (SAE 52100) for bearing balls

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.; Hirsch, Th.; Mayr, P.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the investigation was to study the feasibility of applying continuous casting steel 100Cr6 (SAE 52100) for bearing balls. It was found that two of three continuous casted steel batches have longer or at least similar rolling contact fatigue lifetimes compared to one ingot casted batch. For one of the continuous casted batches, the rolling contact fatigue lifetime was 30% less. The micro- and macrostructure and the residual stresses below the surface of the balls were comparable. There is also no obvious difference between the four batches in the metallurgical parameters like contents of oxygen, titanium and sulfur as well as in the distribution of carbides and their network. The reason for the shorter lifetime of one batch finally was found to be due not to the continuous casting process itself. There was a difference in the cross section of the different casting moulds, and by this in the speed of solidification. As a consequence an increased segregation of alloying elements was observed. So the primary carbides of this batch were of bigger size and higher amounts have been detected within a larger cross section of the bloom. Finally the inferior distribution and size of carbides in the layers of maximum equivalent stress below the surface were found to be crack initiation points. The reduced lifetime of one batch therefore could be correlated to these metallurgical differences. It has been demonstrated that bearing balls made from continuous casted steel 100Cr6 (SAE 52100) have similar or better rolling contact fatigue lifetime than bearing balls made from ingot casted material. However, it is necessary to have minimal amounts of micro- and macro-inclusions as well as a homogeneous distribution of carbides, particularly in the main segregation areas. For that reason, the steel quality of every type of continuous casting machine has to be evaluated separately.

  7. Early fault detection in automotive ball bearings using the minimum variance cepstrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Su; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2013-07-01

    Ball bearings in automotive wheels play an important role in a vehicle. They enable an automobile to run and simultaneously support the vehicle. Once faults are generated, even if they are small, they often grow fast even under normal driving condition and cause vibration and noise. Therefore, it is critical to detect faults as early as possible to prevent bearings from generating harsh noise and vibration. How early faults can be detected is associated with how well a detecting method finds the information of early faults from measured signal. Incipient faults are so small that the fault signal is inherently buried by noise. Minimum variance cepstrum (MVC) has been introduced for the observation of periodic impulse signal under noisy environments. We are particularly focusing on the definition of MVC that goes back to the original definition by Bogert et al. in comparison with the recently prevalent definition of cepstral analysis. In this work, the MVC is, therefore, obtained by liftering a logarithmic power spectrum, and the lifter bank is designed by the minimum variance algorithm. Furthermore, it is also shown how efficient the method is for detecting periodic fault signal made by early faults by using automotive ball bearings, with which an automobile is equipped under running conditions. We were able to detect incipient faults in 4 out of 12 normal bearings which passed acceptance test as well as in bearings that were recalled due to noise and vibration. In addition, we compared the results of the proposed method with results obtained using other older well-established early fault detection methods that were chosen from 4 groups of methods which were classified by the domain of observation. The results demonstrated that MVC determined bearing fault periods more clearly than other methods under the given condition.

  8. Experimental Analysis of Damping and Tribological Characteristics of Nano-CuO Particle Mixed Lubricant in Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, E.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental analysis of damping capacity and tribological characteristics of nano CuO added Servosystem 68 lubricant is attempted. CuO nano particles were synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and characterized. Prior to dispersion into lubricant, CuO nano particles were coated with 0.2 wt.% surfactant (Span-80) to stabilize the nano fluid. Tribological characteristics of particle added lubricant were tested in ASTM D 4172 four ball wear tester. Scanning electron microscopy test results of worn surfaces of nano CuO particle added lubricant were smoother than base lubricant. The particle added lubricant was applied in a new ball bearing and three defected ball bearings. When particle added lubricant was used, the ball defected bearing's vibration amplitude was reduced by 21.94% whereas it was 16.46% for new bearing and was ≤ 11% for other defected bearings. The formation of protection film of CuO over ball surface and regime of full film lubrication near the ball zone were observed to be reason for improved damping of vibrations.

  9. Predicting steady-state temperature, life, skid, and film thickness in a greased preloaded hybrid ball bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Poplawski, J.V.; Atwell, D.R.; Lubas, M.J.; Odessky, V. |

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the SHABERTH computer program supplemented with experimental temperature and skid data to quantify steady-state bearing operation. Parametric studies on ball diameter and number, contact angle, curvature, grease type, and preload are presented with their influence on contact stress, fatigue life, skid load, film thickness, and inner and outer race temperatures. These results are compared for a steel versus hybrid bearing set in a DB and DFSL mounting. The method presented can be applied to the design of other steel and hybrid ball thrust bearing systems.

  10. Appropriate IMFs associated with cepstrum and envelope analysis for ball-bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Wen-Chang; Pan, Min-Chun

    2014-03-01

    The traditional envelope analysis is an effective method for the fault detection of rolling bearings. However, all the resonant frequency bands must be examined during the bearing-fault detection process. To handle the above deficiency, this paper proposes using the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to select a proper intrinsic mode function (IMF) for the subsequent detection tools; here both envelope analysis and cepstrum analysis are employed and compared. By virtue of the band-pass filtering nature of EMD, the resonant frequency bands of structure to be measured are captured in the IMFs. As impulses arising from rolling elements striking bearing faults modulate with structure resonance, proper IMFs potentially enable to characterize fault signatures. In the study, faulty ball bearings are used to justify the proposed method, and comparisons with the traditional envelope analysis are made. Post the use of IMFs highlighting faultybearing features, the performance of using envelope analysis and cepstrum analysis to single out bearing faults is objectively compared and addressed; it is noted that generally envelope analysis offers better performance.

  11. Performance improvement of silicon nitride ball bearings by ion implantation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Miner, J.

    1998-03-01

    The present report summarizes technical results of CRADA No. ORNL 92-128 with the Pratt and Whitney Division of United Technologies Corporation. The stated purpose of the program was to assess the 3effect of ion implantation on the rolling contact performance of engineering silicon nitride bearings, to determine by post-test analyses of the bearings the reasons for improved or reduced performance and the mechanisms of failure, if applicable, and to relate the overall results to basic property changes including but not limited to swelling, hardness, modulus, micromechanical properties, and surface morphology. Forty-two control samples were tested to an intended runout period of 60 h. It was possible to supply only six balls for ion implantation, but an extended test period goal of 150 h was used. The balls were implanted with C-ions at 150 keV to a fluence of 1.1 {times} 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. The collection of samples had pre-existing defects called C-cracks in the surfaces. As a result, seven of the control samples had severe spalls before reaching the goal of 60 h for an unacceptable failure rate of 0.003/sample-h. None of the ion-implanted samples experienced engineering failure in 150 h of testing. Analytical techniques have been used to characterize ion implantation results, to characterize wear tracks, and to characterize microstructure and impurity content. In possible relation to C-cracks. It is encouraging that ion implantation can mitigate the C-crack failure mode. However, the practical implications are compromised by the fact that bearings with C-cracks would, in no case, be acceptable in engineering practice, as this type of defect was not anticipated when the program was designed. The most important reason for the use of ceramic bearings is energy efficiency.

  12. Detection And Diagnosis Of Ball Bearing Imperfections In Reaction Wheels By Micro-Vibration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, M. P.; van der Heide, E.; Seiler, R.; Cottaar, E. J. E.

    2012-07-01

    The results of micro-vibration test contain information on unbalance level, torque ripples, and most importantly the bearing health status. In this paper, the envelop analysis technique is proposed for localizing imperfections in the bearing. The envelop analysis, which is a powerful method used in ball bearing fault diagnosis, is adapted to the micro-vibration data. This method analyzes the data around the structural resonance: through the amplification of the vibration smaller faults can be detected. The procedure of envelope analysis, its practical issues and robustness are validated with simulated signals. Finally, the envelope analysis is applied to diagnose and evaluate the change in bearing status throughout two environmental tests: sine vibration and full ECSS shock. The result of envelope analysis shows its high sensitivity in revealing the development of small imperfections, makes an initial step in reaction wheel condition monitoring (on-ground and in-flight) and provides insights in design improvement to further lower micro vibration levels of reaction wheels.

  13. Performance of high speed ball bearings with lead plated retainers in liquid hydrogen for potential use in a radiation environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisander, D. W.; Brewe, D. E.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ball bearings (40-mm bore) with lead coated, aluminum-bronze retainers were operated successfully in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 1780 newtons (400 lb) for running times up to 15 hours. The lead transfer films on the bearing surfaces prevented galling of bearing components. The lead coated retainers used in this investigation show promise for use in the high radiation environments, where polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) based materials are not suitable. Failure was a result of the loss of lead lubricant on the retainer-inner-land and ball-pocket surfaces. The longest bearing life (15 hr) was achieved with a lead coating thickness of 50 micrometers (0.002 in.) on the retainer. Other bearings had lives of 2 to 6 hours.

  14. SVD and Hankel matrix based de-noising approach for ball bearing fault detection and its assessment using artificial faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golafshan, Reza; Yuce Sanliturk, Kenan

    2016-03-01

    Ball bearings remain one of the most crucial components in industrial machines and due to their critical role, it is of great importance to monitor their conditions under operation. However, due to the background noise in acquired signals, it is not always possible to identify probable faults. This incapability in identifying the faults makes the de-noising process one of the most essential steps in the field of Condition Monitoring (CM) and fault detection. In the present study, Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Hankel matrix based de-noising process is successfully applied to the ball bearing time domain vibration signals as well as to their spectrums for the elimination of the background noise and the improvement the reliability of the fault detection process. The test cases conducted using experimental as well as the simulated vibration signals demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed de-noising approach for the ball bearing fault detection.

  15. 76 FR 47149 - Initiation of Five-Year (“Sunset”) Review: Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... of Antidumping Duty Orders, 76 FR 41761 (July 15, 2011). The Department is not initiating Sunset... inadvertently included two revoked antidumping duty orders, Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from Japan (A-588-804) (third review) and Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from the United Kingdom (A-412-801)...

  16. Lubrication of 35-millimeter-bore ball bearings of several designs to 2.5 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with 35mm bore, angular contact ball bearings with either a single or double outer and guided cage. The bearings were either lubricated by oil jets or employed inner ring lubrication. Outer ring cooling was added in selected tests. Lubricant flow to the bearing ranged from 300 to 1900 cc/min. All bearings were successfully run at speeds to 2.5 million DN. Increasing the lubricant flow decreased bearing ring temperatures but increased bearing power lines. The power loss and race temperatures of a jet lubricated with double outer land guided cage were always higher than those of the single land guided design at similar test conditions. The lowest bearing operating temperatures were achieved when inner ring lubrication and outer ring cooling were combined. It is found that cage slip of a double outer land guided cage is approximately twice that of a single outer land guided cage.

  17. Parametric study of the lubrication of thrust loaded 120-mm bore ball bearings to 3 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    A parametric study was performed with 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings under varying thrust loads, bearing and lubricant temperatures, and cooling and lubricant flow rates. Contact angles were nominally 20 and 24 deg with bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Endurance tests were run at 3 million DN and a temperature of 492 K (425 F) with 10 bearings having a nominal 24 deg contact angle at a thrust load of 22241 N (5000 lb). Bearing operating temperature, differences in temperatures between the inner and outer races, and bearing power consumption can be tuned to any desirable operating requirement by varying 4 parameters. These parameters are outer-race cooling, inner-race cooling, lubricant flow to the inner race, and oil inlet temperature. Preliminary endurance tests at 3 million DN and 492 K (425 F) indicate that long term bearing operation can be achieved with a high degree of reliability.

  18. Effect of cage design on characteristics of high-speed-jet-lubricated 35-millimeter-bore ball bearing. [turbojet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.; Pinel, S. I.; Signer, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with a 35 mm bore angular contact ball bearing with a double outer land guided cage. Provisions were made for jet lubrication and outer-ring cooling of the bearing. Test conditions included a combined thrust and radial load at nominal shaft speeds of 48,000 rpm, and an oil-in temperature of 394 K (250 F). Successful operation of the test bearing was accomplished up to 2.5 million DN. Test results were compared with those obtained with similar bearing having a single outer land guided cage. Higher temperatures were generated with the double outer land guided cage bearing, and bearing power loss and cage slip were greater. Cooling the outer ring resulted in a decrease in overall bearing operating temperature.

  19. Towards a complete numerical description of lubricant film dynamics in ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Stefan; Frei, Stefan; Richter, Thomas; Rannacher, Rolf

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we propose a framework for a detailed finite element analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in ball bearings. Our contribution to this field is twofold. First, we present a fully monolithic ALE method for the treatment of fluid-structure interaction. For the lubricant, we use the full Navier-Stokes equations in combination with a pressure-dependent viscosity law and include thermal effects. Second, we introduce a novel method for a fully implicit treatment of the evolution of the lubricants' free surface using Nitsches method. This allows for arbitrarily large time steps independent of the spatial discretization. Despite the variety of numerical challenges present in this application, such as anisotropy and extreme values of pressure, our approach for the first time shows robustness up to high rotational speeds as required in industrial applications. We describe the numerical ingredients we use in detail and present numerical results that validate our approaches and demonstrate its capabilities.

  20. Grease test system for improved life of ball and roller bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinlein, E. )

    1992-12-01

    An earlier developed system (FE9) for mechanodynamical testing of lubricating greases for ball and rolling bearings was used to assess, at temperatures between 100 and 200 C, grease lives of the following lubricating greases used in this test system: a standard grease, lithium soap, NLGI class 3 grease, a special grease for high temperatures, and a special grease not suitable for high temperatures. The paper describes the design of FE9 tester, the test rig, the test procedure, and the results of evaluation. It was found that lowering the test temperature led to a steeper increase of the grease life. Starved lubrication was found to be the major cause of failure at moderate temperatures, especially at the areas of sliding motion, such as betweeen cage and the rolling element. 9 refs.

  1. Ball Bearing (BB) Guns, Ease of Purchase and Potential for Significant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Grocock, C; McCarthy, R; Williams, DJ

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ball bearing guns are used in the UK for war games, but they have the potential to cause severe injury if used incorrectly. MATERIALS AND METHODS A search was made for availability of these weapons, the ease of purchase and the potential for tissue damage. RESULTS These weapons are widely available on the Internet and are easy to purchase with no security checks. Once fully charged, an electric BB gun is capable of penetrating a cadaveric animal model at distances up to 5 m (1 m = 25 mm penetration, 3 m = 20 mm penetration, 5 m = 15 mm penetration). CONCLUSIONS BB guns are not toys and have a significant potential to cause injury. PMID:16834864

  2. 75 FR 69402 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). Rescission of Reviews in Part In accordance with 19 CFR 351..., Final Results of Changed-Circumstances Review, and Revocation of an Order in Part, 75 FR 53661... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and...

  3. 77 FR 75973 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, and Italy: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, and Italy: Final... 0.00 NTN-SNR 0.00 Volkswagen AG 0.00 Volkswagen Zubehor GmbH 0.00 Germany: Bayerische Motoren...

  4. 75 FR 2108 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Revocation in Part, 74 FR 30052 (June 24, 2009), as corrected in Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Deferral of Administrative Review, 74 FR 37690 (July 29, 2009). The... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and...

  5. 76 FR 2647 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). The preliminary results of the reviews are currently due no... International Trade Administration Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the... France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom for the period May 1, 2009, through April 30,...

  6. 76 FR 22372 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... antidumping duty orders on ball bearings and parts thereof from France (54 FR 20902), Germany (54 FR 20900), Italy (54 FR 20903), Japan (54 FR 20904), and the United Kingdom (54 FR 20910) in the Federal Register... Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30,...

  7. 75 FR 22384 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... the antidumping duty orders on ball bearings and parts thereof from France (54 FR 20902), Germany (54 FR 20900), Italy (54 FR 20903), Japan (54 FR 20904), and the United Kingdom (54 FR 20910) in the... and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 74 FR 30052...

  8. 77 FR 16537 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France, Germany, and Italy: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June 28, 2011). See also Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Japan and the United Kingdom: Revocation of Antidumping Duty Orders, 76 FR 41761 (July 15, 2011), where we revoked the... of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Reviews, 77 FR 2511...

  9. 75 FR 53661 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom: Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... To Revoke Order In Part, 75 FR 22384 (April 28, 2010), and Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from... Administrative Reviews in Part, and Intent To Revoke Order In Part, 75 FR 26920 (May 13, 2010) (collectively... selection of the respondents for individual examination, see Preliminary Results, 75 FR at 22385. For...

  10. Failure Analysis and Recovery of a 50-mm Highly Elastic Intermetallic NiTi Ball Bearing for an ISS Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Moore, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Ball bearings used inside the ISS Distillation Assembly centrifuge require superior corrosion and shock resistance to withstand acidic wastewater exposure and heavy spacecraft launch related loads. These requirements challenge conventional steel bearings and provide an ideal pathfinder application for 50-mm bore, deep-groove ball bearings made from the corrosion immune and highly elastic intermetallic material 60NiTi. During early ground testing in 2014 one 60NiTi bearing unexpectedly and catastrophically failed after operating for only 200 hr. A second bearing running on the same shaft was completely unaffected. An investigation into the root cause of the failure determined that an excessively tight press fit of the bearing outer race coupled with NiTi's relatively low elastic modulus were key contributing factors. The proposed failure mode was successfully replicated by experiment. To further corroborate the root cause theory, a successful bearing life test using improved installation practices (selective fitting) was conducted. The results show that NiTi bearings are suitable for space applications provided that care is taken to accommodate their unique material characteristics.

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the thermal contact resistance of a space-use deep groove ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Katsuhiko

    The thermal contact resistance between the balls and the inner and outer rings of a space-use ball bearing is investigated assuming that heat transfer between smooth contacting elements occurs through the elastic contact areas. It is also assumed that the stationary bearing sustains axial, radial or combined loads under a steady-state temperature condition. The shapes and sizes of the contact areas are calculated using the Hertzian theory. In particular, the contact force for the axial load is derived with careful consideration of the changes in the contact angle induced by elastic deformation at the contact area. The correlation between the test data and the calculated values confirms the validity of the prediction method for the thermal contact resistances between the elements of a dry bearing with smooth contact surfaces.

  12. The influence of the lubricant film on the stiffness and damping characteristics of a deep groove ball bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the formation of a lubricant film in a deep groove ball bearing and its effect on the bearing dynamics. A novel test rig is introduced, which allows testing different types and sizes of bearings in real-life conditions. The test rig dynamics are optimised such that the dynamic properties of the bearing are measured in a frequency range below the resonances of the flexible modes. Two properties of the bearing, both its stiffness and damping value in the direction of the static bearing load, are identified. The behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is measured based on the electrical resistance through the bearing. For this purpose, the bearing housing is electrically isolated from the surrounding structure. The electrical resistance, stiffness and damping of the test bearing are identified during a speed run-up. The influence of the bearing temperature is analysed as well. During a run-up at constant bearing temperature, the measurement of the electrical resistance describes the formation of the lubricant film. Due to the formation of the lubricant film, the bearing stiffness increases by 3.2% while the damping increases by 24%. During a warm-up of the bearing, the viscosity of the lubricant film decreases strongly. A resulting decrease in electrical resistance, stiffness and damping is measured. Finally, the electrical resistance, stiffness and damping are identified at different speeds, after the bearing has reached a stable temperature at each speed. A combined effect of both rotation and temperature is observed and discussed.

  13. Lubrication of 35-millimeter-bore ball bearings of several designs at speeds to 2.5 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H. R.; Schuller, F. T.

    1982-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with 35mm bore, angular contact ball bearings with either a single or double-outer-land-guided cage. The bearings were either lubricated by oil jets or employed inner ring lubrication. Outer ring cooling was added in selected tests. Test conditions were a radial load of 222 N (50 lb) and/or a thrust load of 667 N (150 lb), shaft speeds to 72,000 rpm, and an oil inlet temperature of 394 K (250 F). Lubricant flow to the bearing ranged rom 300 to 1900 cc/min (0.08 to 0.50 gal/min). All bearings were successfully run at speeds to 2.5 million DN. Increasing the lubricant flow decreased bearing ring temperatures but increased bearing power loss. The power loss and race temperatures of a jet lubricated bearing with double-outer-land-guided cage were always higher than those of the single-land-guided-design at similar test conditions. The lowest bearing operating temperatures were achieved when inner ring lubrication and outer ring cooling were combined. Cage slip of a double-outer-land-guided cage was approximately twice that of a single-outer-land-guided cage.

  14. An approach for including the stiffness and damping of elastohydrodynamic point contacts in deep groove ball bearing equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonato, Fábio; Cavalca, Katia L.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for including the Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film effects to a lateral vibration model of a deep groove ball bearing by using a novel approximation for the EHD contacts by a set of equivalent nonlinear spring and viscous damper. The fitting of the equivalent contact model used the results of a transient multi-level finite difference EHD algorithm to adjust the dynamic parameters. The comparison between the approximated model and the finite difference simulated results showed a suitable representation of the stationary and dynamic contact behaviors. The linear damping hypothesis could be shown as a rough representation of the actual hysteretic behavior of the EHD contact. Nevertheless, the overall accuracy of the model was not impaired by the use of such approximation. Further on, the inclusion of the equivalent EHD contact model is equated for both the restoring and the dissipative components of the bearing's lateral dynamics. The derived model was used to investigate the effects of the rolling element bearing lubrication on the vibration response of a rotor's lumped parameter model. The fluid film stiffening effect, previously only observable by experimentation, could be quantified using the proposed model, as well as the portion of the bearing damping provided by the EHD fluid film. Results from a laboratory rotor-bearing test rig were used to indirectly validate the proposed contact approximation. A finite element model of the rotor accounting for the lubricated bearing formulation adequately portrayed the frequency content of the bearing orbits observed on the test rig.

  15. Correlation of asperity contact-time fraction with elastohydrodynamic film thickness in a 20-millimeter-bore ball bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic film thicknesses and asperity contact-time fractions were measured for a 20 mm bore ball bearing by using the capacitance and conductance techniques. The bearing was thrust loaded to 90, 445, and 778 N. The corresponding maximum stresses on the inner race were 1.28, 2.09, and 2.45 GPa. The test speed ranged from 400 to 15,000 rpm. The test bearing was mist lubricated with a MIL-L-23699A turbine oil. The temperature was 27 C. The experimental results were correlated to give the percent film (no-contact-time fraction) as a function of measured film thickness. Measurements were made for three test series that represented the test bearing in various conditions of run-in. The measurements show that the percent film changes with bearing run-in time. The experimental results agreed well with theoretical predictions based on surface trace analysis for a new bearing. For the run-in state, they agreed with previously reported experimental results. The results show that asperity contact existed at a film thickness-roughness ratio lambda of 6.0 or less for a new bearing. After run-in, no asperity contact occurred at a lambda of 3.5 or greater.

  16. Wear modes active in angular contact ball bearings operating in liquid oxygen environment of the Space Shuttle turbopumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Thaddeus J.

    1993-04-01

    Extensive experimental investigation has been carried out on used flight bearings of the high pressure oxidizer turbopumps (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) in order to determine the dominant wear modes, their extent, and causes. The paper presents the methodology, various surface analysis techniques used, results, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for premature bearing wear has been identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. This mode relies upon the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear rates appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are provided.

  17. Wear modes active in angular contact ball bearings operating in liquid oxygen environment of the Space Shuttle turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Thaddeus J.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive experimental investigation has been carried out on used flight bearings of the high pressure oxidizer turbopumps (HPOTP) of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) in order to determine the dominant wear modes, their extent, and causes. The paper presents the methodology, various surface analysis techniques used, results, and discussion. The mode largely responsible for premature bearing wear has been identified as adhesive/shear peeling of the upper layers of bearing balls and rings. This mode relies upon the mechanisms of scale formation, breakdown, and removal, all of which are greatly enhanced by the heavy oxidation environment of the HPOTP. Major causes of the high wear rates appear to be lubrication and cooling, both inadequate for the imposed conditions of operation. Numerous illustrations and evidence are provided.

  18. Ceramic bearing development. Volume 1. Fatigue and wear behavior of NBD-200 silicon nitride balls. Interim report, 1 August 1992-1 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Burrier, H.I.; Burk, C.

    1995-03-01

    These are the test results of the fatigue and wear performance of NBD-200, silicon nitride balls under conditions of rolling contact in ball bearings. Life testing was done under conditions of load and EHD film thickness equal to or more severe than those to be expected in turbine engine mainshaft applications. The actual temperatures and speeds of those applications were not simulated. No fatigue failures occurred in a sample of 556 `standard` NBD-200 balls within a test limit of five times the experimentally - determined L-10 life of the AISI 52100 steel balls. Ball failures did occur in a sample of balls identified by a Surface Acoustic Wave NDE technique as being flawed, but the correspondence between the estimated severity of the flaws and the specific ball failures was not good. A Thermal Proof Testing technique for eliminating balls with flaws may possibly have promoted failures of balls that otherwise would have performed satisfactorily. Wear tests, performed under moderate to severe boundary lubrication conditions showed no measurable, `conventional` wear. The life - limiting factor in these hybrid bearings was microspalling of the AISI 52100 and M-50 steel races.

  19. Self-lubricating performance and durability of ball bearings for the LE-7 liquid oxygen rocket-turbopump

    SciTech Connect

    Nosaka, Masataka; Oike, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Masataka; Kamijo, Kenjiro; Tajiri, Masanori National Aerospace Lab., Kakuda NTN Corp., Aerospace Bearing Engineering Dept., Kuwana )

    1993-09-01

    The durability of ball bearings, 32-mm- and 45-mm-bore, with a retainer or glass cloth-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) laminate was tested under a high radial load at a speed of 20,000 rpm in LOX or LN2. The retainers were characterized as good self-lubricators because the abrasive glass-cloth fiber tips exposed on the retainer were chemicaly etched away with hydrofluoric acid (HF). During testing, the bearing-cartridge-acceleration was monitored to detect bearing damage. Testing in LOX for about 2.2 hr showed that excellent lubricating conditions were obtained for all bearings. Testing in LN2 for about 5.1 hr detected that the fatigue life of the bearing was about the same as the calculated B10 fatigue life. The HF chemical treatment resulted in a reacted fluoride-oxide material which remained in the etched part of the glass fiber. Several chemical products, particularly MgO, CaO, and CaCO3, enhanced adhesion of PTFE transfer film to the counterface, resulting in the formation of a durable lubricating film and the reduction of the friction and wear in the bearing. 12 refs.

  20. Experiments on Ball and Roller Bearings Under Conditions of High Speed and Small Oil Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getzlaff, Gunter

    1940-01-01

    This report describes a testing machine on which 35 millimeter bearings (bore) can be run at speeds of the order of 21,000 rpm, while the following factors are recorded: 1) oil circulation through bearing and oil temperature. 2) maximum temperature of outer bearing ring, 3) radial and axial load on bearing, 4) radial, axial, and angular clearance of bearing, 5) power consumption of bearing. The experiments show that the lubrication was most reliable and oil consumption lowest when the oil was introduced through a hole in the outer or inner ring of the bearing.

  1. Superelastic Ball Bearings: Materials and Design to Avoid Mounting and Dismounting Brinell Damage in an Inaccessible Press-Fit Application-. I ; Design Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ball bearings require proper fit and installation into machinery structures (onto shafts and into bearing housings) to ensure optimal performance. For some applications, both the inner and outer race must be mounted with an interference fit and care must be taken during assembly and disassembly to avoid placing heavy static loads between the balls and races otherwise Brinell dent type damage can occur. In this paper, a highly dent resistant superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, is considered for rolling element bearing applications that encounter excessive static axial loading during assembly or disassembly. A small (R8) ball bearing is designed for an application in which access to the bearing races to apply disassembly tools is precluded. First Principles analyses show that by careful selection of materials, raceway curvature and land geometry, a bearing can be designed that allows blind assembly and disassembly without incurring raceway damage due to ball denting. Though such blind assembly applications are uncommon, the availability of bearings with unusually high static load capability may enable more such applications with additional benefits, especially for miniature bearings.

  2. Suomi-NPP Mission On-Orbit Experience with Toroid Ball Bearing Retainers Under Unidirectional and Reversing Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegman, Otto; Thakore, Kamal; Loewenthal, Stu; Cymerman, John

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instrument scan system on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft has experienced several randomly occurring increased torque 'events' since its on-orbit activation in November 2011. Based on a review of on-orbit telemetry data and data gathered from scan mechanism bearing life testing on the ground, the conclusion was drawn that some degradation of Teflon toroid ball retainers was occurring in the instrument Scan Drive Mechanism. A life extension program was developed and executed on-orbit with very good results to date. The life extension program consisted of reversing the mechanism for a limited number of consecutive scans every day.

  3. Determination of Lubricants on Ball Bearings by FT-IR using an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, K. W.; Pepper, S. V.; Wright, A.

    2003-01-01

    The lifetime determination of space lubricants is done at our facility by accelerated testing. Several micrograms of lubricant are deposited on the surface of a ball by syringing tens of micro liters of dilute lubricant solution. The solvent evaporates and the mass of lubricant is determined by twenty weighings near the balance reliability limit. This process is timely but does not produce a good correlation between the mass of lubricant and the volume of solution applied, as would be expected. The amount of lubricant deposited on a ball can be determined directly by Fourier Transform - Infrared Spectroscopy using an integrating sphere. In this paper, we discuss reasons for choosing this methodology, optimization of quantification conditions and potential applications for the technique. The volume of lubricant solution applied to the ball gives better correlation to the IR intensity than does the weight.

  4. Oil film thickness measurement and analysis for an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Scott D.

    1986-01-01

    The capacitance method is used to estimate the oil film thickness in the Hertzian contact zone of an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime is characterized by a transient film thickness and basic speed ratio (ball spin rate over combined race speed) and the formation of a friction polymer. The experimental apparatus tests 40 mm 108 H ball bearings in the counter rotating race mode at loads of 200 and 300 lb, a film parameter of 1.6 and nominal inner and outer race speeds of 38 and 26 rps, respectively. Experimental results are presented for the capacitance, thickness, and conductance of the oil film as functions of elapsed time and for the basic speed ratios as a function of elapsed time, load, and amount of lubricant applied to the test bearing. Results indicate that a friction polymer formed from the initial lubricant has an effect on the capacitance and basic speed ratio measurements.

  5. How to apply life adjustment factors for ball and roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crecelius, W. J.; Harris, T. A.; Moyer, C. A.; Parker, R. J.; Sherlock, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Practical problems applicable to the selection, design, and lubrication of rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed. Design and selection criteria are based upon materials and processing factors such as melting practice, metalworking, and heat treatment. Environmental factors are considered such as bearing misalignment and speed. Selection of a lubricant is based upon elastohydrodynamic lubrication principles in addition to lubricant type and chemistry.

  6. Experimental performance of 75-millimeter-bore arched outer-race ball bearings to 2.1 million DN. [thrust loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the operating characteristics of arched outer-race bearings and to compare the data with those for a similar, but conventional, deep-groove ball bearing. The bearings were tested over a range of shaft speeds up to 28,000 rpm at a thrust load of 2200 newtons (500 lb). One bearing was operated at 26,000 rpm with a range of thrust loads. The amounts of arching were 0.13, 0.25, and 0.51 millimeter (0.005, 0.010, and 0.020 in.). All bearings operated satisfactorily; the arched bearing outer-race temperatures and torques were consistently higher than those for the conventional bearing.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of rolling element bearings due to cage run-out and number of balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S. P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to investigate the nonlinear dynamic behavior due to cage run-out and number of balls in a rotating system supported by rolling element bearings. Due to run-out of the cage, the rolling elements no longer stay equally spaced. The mathematical model takes into account the sources of nonlinearity such as the Hertzian contact force and cage run-out resulting transition from no contact to contact state between rolling elements and races. The contact between the rolling elements and races is treated as nonlinear springs. The nonlinear stiffness is obtained by application of Hertzian contact deformation theory. The implicit-type numerical integration technique Newmark- β with Newton-Raphson method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equations iteratively. The results are presented in the form of fast Fourier transformations (FFT) and phase trajectories. It is implied from the obtained FFT that due to the non-uniform spacing the ball passage frequency is modulated with the cage frequency.

  8. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  9. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E.; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (100GPa) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7mm diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth vs. stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  10. The Effect of Indenter Ball Radius on the Static Load Capacity of the Superelastic 60NiTi for Rolling Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Moore, Lewis E., III; Clifton, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Static load capacity is a critical design parameter for rolling element bearings used in space mechanisms because of the potential for Brinell (surface dent) damage due to shock and vibration loading events during rocket launch. Brinell damage to bearing raceways can lead to torque variations (noise) and reduced bearing life. The growing use of ceramic rolling elements with high stiffness in hybrid bearings exacerbates the situation. A new family of hard yet resilient materials based upon nickel-titanium is emerging to address such bearing challenges. 60NiTi is a superelastic material that simultaneously exhibits high hardness and a relatively low elastic modulus (approx. 100 GigaPascals) and has been shown to endure higher indentation loads than conventional and high performance steel. Indentation load capacity has been reported for relatively large (12.7 millimeters diameter) ceramic (Si3N4) indenter balls pressed against flat plates of 60NiTi. In order to develop damage load threshold criteria applicable to a wide range of bearing designs and sizes, the effects of indenter ball radius and the accuracy of interpolation of the Hertz contact stress relations for 60NiTi must be ascertained. In this paper, results of indentation tests involving ceramic balls ranging from 6.4 to 12.7 mm in diameter and highly polished 60NiTi flat plates are presented. When the resulting dent depth data for all the indenter ball sizes are normalized using the Hertz equations, the data (dent depth versus stress) are comparable. Thus when designing bearings made from 60NiTi, the Hertz stress relations can be applied with relative confidence over a range of rolling element sizes and internal geometries.

  11. 75 FR 3444 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Germany: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... Republic of Germany, 54 FR 20900 (May 15, 1989). The orders on cylindrical roller bearings and spherical... Parts Thereof, From Germany; Final Results of New Shipper Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 61 FR... and Parts Thereof from Germany: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed-Circumstances Review, 73...

  12. 75 FR 62763 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Germany: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Reviews and Rescission of Reviews in Part, 73 FR 52823 (September 11, 2008). SKF USA Inc., SKF France S.A... International Trade (CIT) sustained the Department of Commerce's (the Department) results of redetermination on... bearings and parts thereof from Germany. See SKF USA Inc. v. United States, Slip Op. 10-76 (CIT 2010)....

  13. Superelastic Ball Bearings: Materials and Design to Avoid Mounting and Dismounting Brinell Damage in an Inaccessible Press-fit Application-. II; Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S. Adam; Dellacorte, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Rolling element bearings utilized in precision rotating machines require proper alignment, preload, and interference fits to ensure overall optimum performance. Hence, careful attention must be given to bearing installation and disassembly procedures to ensure the above conditions are met. Usually, machines are designed in such a way that bearings can be pressed into housings or onto shafts through the races without loading the rolling elements. However, in some instances, either due to limited size or access, a bearing must be installed or removed in such a way that the load path travels through the rolling elements. This can cause high contact stresses between the rolling elements and the races and introduces the potential for Brinell denting of the races. This paper is a companion to the Part I paper by the authors that discusses material selection and the general design philosophy for the bearing. Here, a more in-depth treatment is given to the design of a dent-resistant bearing utilizing a superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, for the races. A common bearing analysis tool based on rigid body dynamics is used in combination with finite element simulations to design the superelastic bearing. The primary design constraints are prevention of denting and avoiding the balls riding over the edge of the race groove during a blind disassembly process where the load passes through the rolling elements. Through an iterative process, the resulting bearing geometry is tailored to improve axial static load capability compared to a deep-groove ball bearing of the same size. The results suggest that careful selection of materials and bearing geometry can enable blind disassembly without damage to the raceways, which is necessary in the current application (a compressor in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System), and results in potential design flexibility for other applications, especially small machines with miniature bearings.

  14. Research report: User's manual for computer program AT81y003 SHABERTH. Steady state and transient thermal analysis of a shaft bearing system including ball, cylindrical and tapered roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, G. B.; Kleckner, R. J.; Ragen, M. A.; Sheynin, L.

    1981-01-01

    The SHABERTH program is capable of simulating the thermomechanical performance of a load support system consisting of a flexible shaft supported by up to five rolling element bearings. Any combination of ball, cylindrical, and tapered roller bearings can be used to support the shaft. The user can select models in calculating lubricant film thickness and traction forces. The formulation of the cage pocket/rolling element interaction model was revised to improve solution numerical convergence characteristics.

  15. An evaluation of grease type ball bearing lubricants operating in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Because many future spacecraft or space stations will require mechanisms to operate for long periods of time in environments which are adverse to most bearing lubricants, a series of tests has been completed to evaluate 38 grease type lubricants in R-4 size bearings in five different environments for a 1 year period. Four repetitions of each test were made to provide statistical samples. These tests were also used to select four lubricants for 5 year tests in selected environments with five repetitions of each test for statistical samples. In this completed program, 172 test sets have been completed. The three 5 year tests in: (1) continuous operation and (2) start stop operation, with both in vacuum at ambient temperatures, and (3) continuous vacuum operation at 93.3 C have been completed. In both the 1 year and 5 year tests, the best results in all environments have been obtained with a high viscosity index perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) grease.

  16. An evaluation of grease type ball bearing lubricants operating in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    Because many future spacecraft or space stations will require mechanisms to operate for long periods of time in environments which are adverse to most bearing lubricants, a series of tests is continuing to evaluate 38 grease type lubricants in R-4 size bearings in five different environments for a 1 year period. Four repetitions of each test are made to provide statistical samples. These tests were used to select four lubricants for 5 year tests in selected environments with five repetitions of each test for statistical samples. At the present time, 100 test sets are completed and 22 test sets are underway. Three 5 year tests were started in (1) continuous operation and (2) start-stop operation, with both in vacuum at ambient temperatures, and (3) continuous operation at 93.3 C. In the 1 year tests the best results to date in all environments were obtained with a high viscosity index perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) grease.

  17. An evaluation of grease type ball bearing lubricants operating in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Because many future spacecraft or space stations will require mechanisms to operate for long periods of time in environments which are adverse to most bearing lubricants, a series of tests is continuing to evaluate 29 grease type lubricants in R-4 size bearings in five different environments for a 1 year period. Four repetitions of each test are made to provide statistical samples. These tests have also been used to select four lubricants for 5 year tests in selected environments with five repetitions of each test for statistical samples. At the present time, 65 test sets have been completed and 23 test sets are underway. Two (5 year) tests have already been started in (1) continuous operation and (2) start-stop operation, with both in vacuum at ambient temperatures. To date, in the 1 year tests, the best results in all environments have been obtained with a high viscosity index perfluoroalkylpolyether grease.

  18. Ultrasonic acoustic health monitoring of ball bearings using neural network pattern classification of power spectral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, William; Southward, Steve; Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a generic passive non-contact based approach using ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) to facilitate the neural network classification of bearing health, and more specifically the bearing operating condition. The acoustic emission signals used in this study are in the ultrasonic range (20-120 kHz). A direct benefit of microphones capable of measurements in this frequency range is their inherent directionality. Using selected bands from the UAE power spectrum signature, it is possible to pose the health monitoring problem as a multi-class classification problem, and make use of a single neural network to classify the ultrasonic acoustic emission signatures. Artificial training data, based on statistical properties of a significantly smaller experimental data set is used to train the neural network. This specific approach is generic enough to suggest that it is applicable to a variety of systems and components where periodic acoustic emissions exist.

  19. An evaluation of grease type ball bearing lubricants operating in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    Grease type lubricants in bearings were evaluated in five different adverse environments for a one year period. Four repetitions of each test were made to provide statistical samples. These tests were then used to select four lubricants for five year tests in selected environments with five repetitions of each test for statistical samples. Three five year tests were started in (1) continuous operation; (2) start-stop operation, with both in vacuum at ambient temperatures; and (3) continuous operation at 93.3 C. To date, in the one year tests, the best results in all environments were obtained with a high viscosity index perfluoroalkylpolyether grease.

  20. Performance of high speed ball bearings with lead and lead alloy plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Scibbe, H. W.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 400 lb. Bearing lives were compared using different: (1) lead- and lead-alloy coatings, (2) coating thicknesses, (3) substrate materials, (4) retainer locating surfaces, and (5) plating techniques. Longer bearing run times were achieved using retainers with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating electroplated onto a leaded-bronze material and an aluminum-bronze alloy. Thirty percent of the bearings tested achieved the desired objective of 10 hours. All of the lead-alloy coated retainers exceeded this objective. A coating thickness of at least 0.0014 in. was used for all bearings exceeding the 10-hour goal.

  1. An evaluation of grease-type ball bearing lubricants operation in various environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    Because many future spacecraft or space stations will require mechanisms to operate for long periods of time in environments which are adverse to most bearing lubricants, a series of tests is continuing to evaluate 38 grease type lubricants in R-4 size bearings in five different environments for a 1 year period. Four repetitions of each test are made to provide statistical samples. These tests have also been used to select four lubricants for 5 year tests in selected environments with five repetitions of each test for statistical samples. At the present time, 142 test sets have been completed and 30 test sets are underway. The three 5 year tests in (1) continuous operation and (2) start stop operation, with both in vacuum at ambient temperatures, and (3) continuous vacuum operation at 93.3 C are now completed. To date, in both the 1 year and 5 year tests, the best results in all environments have been obtained with a high viscosity index perfluoroalkylpolyether (PFPE) grease.

  2. Ball bearings comprising nickel-titanium and methods of manufacture thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Glennon, Glenn N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a friction reducing nickel-titanium composition. The nickel-titanium composition includes a first phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.45:0.55 to about 0.55:0.45; a second phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.70:0.30 to about 0.80:0.20; and a third phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.52:0.48 to about 0.62:0.38. A bearing for reducing friction comprising a nickel-titanium composition comprising a first phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.45:0.55 to about 0.55:0.45; a second phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.70:0.30 to about 0.80:0.20; and a third phase that comprises nickel and titanium in an atomic ratio of about 0.52:0.48 to about 0.62:0.38; where the bearing is free from voids and pinholes.

  3. Comparison Between Oil-mist and Oil-jet Lubrication of High-speed, Small-bore, Angular-contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with an optimized 35-mm-bore-angular-contact ball bearing on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester. Results from both air-oil mist lubrication and oil-jet lubrication systems used to lubricate the bearing were compared to speeds of 2.5 x 10(exp 6) DN. The maximum obtainable speed with air-oil mist lubrication is 2.5 x 10(exp 6) DN. Lower bearing temperatures and higher power losses are obtained with oil-jet lubrication than with air-oil mist lubrication. Bearing power loss is a direct function of oil flow to the bearing and independent of oil delivery system. For a given oil-flow rate, bearing temperature and power loss increase with increases in speed. Bearing life is an inverse function of temperature, the difference in temperature between the individual bearing ring components, and the resultant elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thicknesses. Bearing life is independent of the oil delivery system except as it affects temperature. Cage slip increased with increases in speed. Cage slip as high as 7 percent was measured and was generally higher with air-oil mist lubrication than with oil-jet lubrication.

  4. Comparison Between Oil-Mist and Oil-Jet Lubrication of High-Speed, Small-Bore, Angular-Contact Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinel, Stanley I.; Signer, Hans R.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2001-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with an optimized 35-mm-bore-angular-contact ball bearing on a high-speed, high-temperature bearing tester. Results from both air-oil mist lubrication and oil-jet lubrication systems used to lubricate the bearing were compared to speeds of 2.5x10(exp 6) DN. The maximum obtainable speed with air-oil mist lubrication is 2.5x10(exp 6) DN. Lower bearing temperatures and higher power losses are obtained with oil-jet lubrication than with air-oil mist lubrication. Bearing power loss is a direct function of oil flow to the bearing and independent of oil delivery system. For a given oil-flow rate, bearing temperature and power loss increase with increases in speed. Bearing life is an inverse function of temperature, the difference in temperature between the individual bearing ring components, and the resultant elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thicknesses. Bearing life is independent of the oil delivery system except as it affects temperature. Cage slip increased with increases in speed. Cage slip as high as 7% was measured and was generally higher with air-oil mist lubrication than with oil-jet lubrication.

  5. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  6. Prediction of ball and roller bearing thermal and kinematic performance by computer analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirvics, J.; Kleckner, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of good computerized analysis software are suggested. These general remarks and an overview of representative software precede a more detailed discussion of load support system analysis program structure. Particular attention is directed at a recent cylindrical roller bearing analysis as an example of the available design tools. Selected software modules are then examined to reveal the detail inherent in contemporary analysis. This leads to a brief section on current design computation which seeks to suggest when and why computerized analysis is warranted. An example concludes the argument offered for such design methodology. Finally, remarks are made concerning needs for model development to address effects which are now considered to be secondary but are anticipated to emerge to primary status in the near future.

  7. Petrography and microanalysis of Pennsylvanian coal-ball concretions (Herrin Coal, Illinois Basin, USA): Bearing on fossil plant preservation and coal-ball origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewers, Fredrick D.; Phillips, Tom L.

    2015-11-01

    Petrographic analyses of 25 coal balls from well-studied paleobotanical profiles in the Middle Pennsylvanian Herrin Coal (Westphalian D, Illinois Basin) and five select coal balls from university collections, indicate that Herrin Coal-ball peats were permineralized by fibrous and non-fibrous carbonates. Fibrous carbonates occur in fan-like to spherulitic arrays in many intracellular (within tissue) pores, and are best developed in relatively open extracellular (between plant) pore spaces. Acid etched fibrous carbonates appear white under reflected light and possess a microcrystalline texture attributable to abundant microdolomite. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis demonstrate that individual fibers have a distinct trigonal prism morphology and are notable for their magnesium content (≈ 9-15 mol% MgCO3). Non-fibrous carbonates fill intercrystalline spaces among fibers and pores within the peat as primary precipitates and neomorphic replacements. In the immediate vicinity of plant cell walls, non-fibrous carbonates cut across fibrous carbonates as a secondary, neomorphic phase attributed to coalification of plant cell walls. Dolomite occurs as diagenetic microdolomite associated with the fibrous carbonate phase, as sparite replacements, and as void-filling cement. Maximum dolomite (50-59 wt.%) is in the top-of-seam coal-ball zone at the Sahara Mine, which is overlain by the marine Anna Shale. Coal-ball formation in the Herrin Coal began with the precipitation of fibrous high magnesium calcite. The trigonal prism morphology of the carbonate fibers suggests rapid precipitation from super-saturated, meteoric pore waters. Carbonate precipitation from marine waters is discounted on the basis of stratigraphic, paleobotanical, and stable isotopic evidence. Most non-fibrous carbonate is attributable to later diagenetic events, including void-fill replacements, recrystallization, and post-depositional fracture fills. Evidence

  8. Performance of 40-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Wisander, D. W.; Scribbe, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Forty-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 1780 N (400 lb.) Four different substrate materials were used for the retainer. Longer bearing run times were achieved with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating plated onto a leaded-bronze material (22.5 hr) and an aluminum-bronze alloy (19.3 hr). One bearing with a pure lead coating achieved the desired objective of 10 hr. This bearing had an aluminum - bronze substrate retainer and ran successfully for 12.4 hr. Additions of antimony to the lead provided an alloy coating with better wear resistance than pure lead; however, this coating was abrasive to the outer-race lands.

  9. The bounce of a ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    1999-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a bouncing ball is described for several common ball types having different bounce characteristics. Results are presented for a tennis ball, a baseball, a golf ball, a superball, a steel ball bearing, a plasticene ball, and a silly putty ball. The plasticene ball was studied as an extreme case of a ball with a low coefficient of restitution (in fact zero, since the collision is totally inelastic) and the silly putty ball was studied because it has unusual elastic properties. The first three balls were studied because of their significance in the physics of sports. For each ball, a dynamic hysteresis curve is presented to show how energy is lost during and after the collision. The measurement technique is quite simple, it is suited for undergraduate laboratory experiments, and it may provide a useful method to test and approve balls for major sporting events.

  10. Finite-Difference Solutions of the Alternate Turbopump Development High-Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump Pump-End Ball-Bearing Cavity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Theodore G.; Garcia, Roberto; Mcconnaughey, Paul K.; Wang, Ten-See; Vu, Bruce T.; Dakhoul, Youssef

    1993-01-01

    These analyses were undertaken to aid in the understanding of flow phenomena in the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High-pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) Pump-end ball bearing (PEBB) cavities and their roles in turbopump vibration initiation and bearing distress. This effort was being performed to provide timely support to the program in a decision as to whether or not the program should be continued. In the first case, it was determined that a change in bearing through flow had no significant effect on axial preload. This was a follow-on to a previous study which had resulted in a redesign of the bearing exit cavity which virtually eliminated bearing axial loading. In the second case, a three-dimensional analysis of the inner-race-guided cage configuration was performed so as to determine the pressure distribution on the outer race when the shaft is 0.0002 inches off-center. The results indicate that there is virtually no circumferential pressure difference caused by the offset to contribute to bearing tilt. In the third case, axisymmetric analyses were performed on an outer-race guided cage configuration to determine the magnitude of tangential flow entering the bearing. The removed-shoulder case was analyzed as was the static diverter case. A third analysis where the preload spring was shielded by a sheet of metal for the baseline case was also performed. It was determined that the swirl entering the bearing was acceptable and the project decided to use the outer-race-guided cage configuration. In the fourth case, more bearing configurations were analyzed. These analyses included thermal modeling so as to determine the added benefit of injecting colder fluid directly onto the bearing inner-race contact area. The results of these analyses contributed to a programmatic decision to include coolant injection in the design.

  11. ToF-SIMS analysis of anti-fretting films generated on the surface of ball bearings containing dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate grease additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, Ricardo G.; Wang, Zhiyu; Duell, Dave; Fowler, David E.

    2004-06-01

    During transport of hard drives from the factory to the end customer, vibrations can induce small repetitive displacements of the ball bearings giving rise to fretting corrosion at the metal surfaces. On the other hand, it has been found that some particular types of grease additives can form thin layers on steel surfaces and thus protect against fretting corrosion. ToF-SIMS has been used to study the chemical nature of layers formed on bearing surfaces containing greases with dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, and metal sulfonate additives. In cases where fretting was prevented, the presence of MoS 2-, FeS - and ion fragments containing Mo-Fe-S - were observed, whereas none of these ions were detected on the surfaces of fretted bearings. Finally, it is inferred that the action of metal sulfonates may have an antagonist effect on the anti-fretting activity of the dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate compounds studied.

  12. Model Specification for Rework of Aircraft Engine, Power Transmission, and Accessory/Auxiliary Ball and Roller Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Branzai, Emanuel V.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides a model specification for the rework and/or repair of bearings used in aircraft engines, helicopter main power train transmissions, and auxiliary bearings determined to be critical by virtue of performance, function, or availability. The rolling-element bearings to be processed under the provisions of this model specification may be used bearings removed after service, unused bearings returned from the field, or certain rejected bearings returned for reinspection and salvage. In commercial and military aircraft application, it has been a practice that rolling-element bearings removed at maintenance or overhaul be reworked and returned to service. Depending on the extent of rework and based upon theoretical analysis, representative life factors (LF) for bearings subject to rework ranged from 0.87 to 0.99 the lives of new bearings. Based on bearing endurance data, 92 percent of the bearing sets that would be subject to rework would result in L(sub 10) lives equaling and/or exceeding that predicted for new bearings. The remaining 8 percent of the bearings have the potential to achieve the analytically predicted life of new bearings when one of the rings is replaced at rework. The potential savings from bearing rework varies from 53 to 82 percent of that of new bearings depending on the cost, size, and complexity of the bearing

  13. 76 FR 35401 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Japan and the United Kingdom: Notice of Court Decision Not...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Kingdom. On April 20, ] 2011, the Court of International Trade (CIT) entered its final judgment sustaining... Bearings, and Spherical Plain Bearings, and Parts Thereof From Japan, 54 FR 20904 (May 15, 1989), and... Bearings, and Cylindrical Roller Bearings and Parts Thereof From the United Kingdom, 54 FR 20910 (May...

  14. Analysis of stresses at the bore of a drilled ball operating in a high-speed bearing. [with stiffening web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, H. H.; Lynch, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Three-dimensional stress distributions were calculated for both a regular drilled ball with a stiffening web. The balls were 20.6 mm (0.8125 in.) in diameter and had a 12.6 mm (0.496 in.) diameter concentric hole. The stiffening web was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) thick. The calculations showed that a large reversing tangential stress at the hole bore was reduced by one-half by the addition of the web.

  15. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (105/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (106/ml) and SRB (108/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  16. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (10(5)/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (10(6)/ml) and SRB (10(8)/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  17. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  18. A study of boiling heat transfer as applied to the cooling of ball bearings in the high pressure oxygen turbopump of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Will

    1986-01-01

    Two sets of ball bearings support the main shaft within the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). In operation, these bearings are cooled and lubricated with high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) flowing axially through the bearing assembly. Currently, modifications in the assembly design are being contemplated in order to enhance the lifetime of the bearings and to allow the HPOTP to operate under larger loads. An understanding of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of the flowing LOX is necessary for the implementation of these design changes. The proposed computational model of the LOX fluid dynamics, in addition to dealing with a turbulent flow in a complex geometry, must address the complication associated with boiling and two-phase flow. The feasibility of and possible methods for modeling boiling heat transfer are considered. The theory of boiling as pertains to this particular problem is reviewed. Recommendations are given for experiments which would be necessary to establish validity for correlations needed to model boiling.

  19. Effect of Ceramic Ball and Hybrid Stainless Steel Bearing/Wheel Combinations on the Lifetime of a Precision Translation Stage for the SIM Flight Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. John; Klein, Kerry; Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Wemhoner, Jens

    2009-01-01

    A study of hybrid material couples using the Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) was initiated to investigate both lubricated (Pennzane X2000 and Brayco 815Z) and unlubricated Si3N4, 440C SS, Rex 20, Cronidur X30 and X40 plates with Cerbec SN-101-C (Si3N4) and 440C balls. The hybrid wheel/bearing assembly will be used on the Linear Optical Delay Line (LODL) stage as an element of the NASA Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). SIM is an orbiting interferometer linking a pair of telescopes within the spacecraft and, by using an interferometry technique and several precision optical stages, is able to measure the motions of known stars much better than current ground or space based systems. This measurement will provide the data to "infer" the existence of any plants, undetectable by other methods, orbiting these known stars.

  20. Restoration of bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Hanau, H.

    1977-01-01

    Process consisting of grinding raceways to oversize but original quality condition and installing new oversize balls or bearings restores wornout ball and roller bearings to original quality, thereby doubling their operating life. Evaluations reveal process results in restoration of 90% of replaced bearings at less than 50% of new-bearing costs.

  1. 76 FR 41761 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof From Japan and the United Kingdom: Revocation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Plain Bearings, and Parts Thereof From Japan, 54 FR 20904 (May 15, 1989), and Antidumping Duty Orders..., Germany, Italy, Japan, Singapore, and the United Kingdom, 70 FR 31531 (June 1, 2005); see also 19 CFR 351... Japan and Singapore; Five-year Sunset Reviews of Antidumping Duty Orders; Final Results, 71 FR...

  2. 75 FR 34688 - Ball Bearings and Parts Thereof from France: Final Results of Changed-Circumstances Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... Bearings and Parts Thereof From France: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Changed-Circumstances Review, 74 FR...: Preliminary Results of Changed- Circumstances Review, 74 FR 60242 (November 20, 2009). We received case briefs... Reviews and Rescission of Review in Part, 72 FR 58053, 58054 (October 12, 2007). Notification This...

  3. Friction and oxidative wear of 440C ball bearing steels under high load and extreme bulk temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, Dilip K.; Slifka, Andrew J.; Siegwarth, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Unlubricated sliding friction and wear of 440C steels in an oxygen environment have been studied under a variety of load, speed, and temperature ranging from approximately -185 to 675 deg C. A specially designed test apparatus with a ball-on-flat geometry has been used for this purpose. The observed dependencies of the initial coefficient of friction, the average dynamic coefficient of friction, and the wear rate on load, speed, and test temperatures have been examined from the standpoint of existing theories of friction and wear. High contact temperatures are generated during the sliding friction, causing rapid oxidation and localized surface melting. A combination of fatigue, delamination, and loss of hardness due to tempering of the martensitic structure is responsible for the high wear rate observed and the coefficient of friction.

  4. Evaluation of rotating, incompressibly lubricated, pressurized thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Program evaluates a series hybrid, fluid film ball bearing consisting of an orifice compensated pressurized thrust bearing in conjunction with a self-acting journal bearing. Oil viscosities corresponding to experimentally measured ball bearing outer-race temperatures were used.

  5. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  6. Effect of two inner-ring oil-flow distribution schemes on the operating characteristics of a 35 millimeter bore ball bearing to 2.5 million DN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.; Pinel, S. I.; Signer, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted with a 35-mm-bore, split-inner-ring ball bearing with a double-inner-land-guided cage. Provisions were made for through-the-inner-ring lubrication. Test condictions were either a thrust load of 667 N (150 lb) or a combined load of 667 N (150 lb) thrust and 222 N (50 lb) radial, shaft speeds from 32000 to 72000 rpm, and an oil-inlet temperature of 394 K (250 deg F). Outer ring cooling was used in some tests. Tests were run with either 50 or 75 percent of the total oil flow distributed to the inner-ring raceway. Successful operation was experienced with both 50% and 75% flow patterns to 2.5 million DN. Cooling the outer ring had little effect on inner-ring temperature; however, the outer-ring temperature decreased as much as 7% at 2.5 million DN. Maximum recorded power loss was 3.1 kW (4.2 hp), and maximum cage slip was 8.7 percent. Both occurred at a shaft speed of 72000 rpm, a lubricant flow rate of 1900 cu/min (0.50 gal/min), a combined load, and no outer-ring cooling.

  7. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  8. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  9. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  10. Dual load path ball screw with rod end swivel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wngett, Paul (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A dual drive ball has a ball screw shaft coupled at one end to a gear train and coupled at the other end to a ball screw nut. The ball screw shaft and ball screw nut are connected through complementary helical grooves filled with ball bearing balls. The outer surface of the ball screw nut is plined and can be driven by a second gear train. An output tube is coupled at one end to the ball screw nut and at its opposite end has a connector portion with a groove on its inner surface. A rod end has a coupling member for coupling to a surface to be actuated and a shaft portion with a groobe on its outer surface. This shaft portion is received with in the outputtube portion and the corresponding grooves are coupled through the use of a plurality of ball bearing balls.

  11. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  12. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky.

  13. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the global ball clay mining industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It cites several firms that are involved in ball clay mining in the U.S., including HC Spins Clay Co. Inc., the Imerys Group and Old Hickory Clay Co. Among the products made from ball clay are ceramic tiles, sanitaryware, as well as fillers, extenders and binders.

  14. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  15. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  16. Experimental evaluation of stresses in spherically hollow balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis was undertaken to evaluate stresses within spherically hollow ball bearings proportioned for 40, 50, and 60% mass reductions. Strain gage rosettes were used to determine principal strains and stresses in the steel ball models statically loaded in various orientations. Dimensionless results are reported for the balls under flate plate contact loads. Similitude considerations permit these results to be applied to calculate stresses in hollow ball bearings proportioned to these mass reductions.

  17. Holy balls!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd; Belden, Jesse

    2011-11-01

    Why can some balls walk on water while others cannot? We investigate the rebound dynamics of elastic spheres impacting on a free-surface. Several variables determine whether or not a sphere will bounce when impacting a free-surface including velocity, impact angle, size and elasticity. Stiff elastic spheres, such as a racquetball, successfully skip at low impact angles and high velocities, but tend not to bounce when the impact angle becomes too large. However, the more compliant Waboba (WAter BOuncing BAll) bounces marvelously even at very high impact angles. Unlike a stiffer ball, the Waboba flattens out quickly as it is forming a cavity. The cavity lip forms a ramp and the flattened ball then skips off the water surface. We demonstrate how this phenomenon surprisingly resembles a skipping stone. Using high-speed video we explore the rebound dynamics for various values of elasticity, velocity, angle and size and determine when an object will bounce off the water surface.

  18. Golf Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  19. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    The article offers information on ball clay. Among the companies that mine ball clay in the U.S. are H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay and Old Hickory Clay. In 2006, an estimated 1.2 million tons of the mineral was sold or used domestically and exported. Forty-percent of the total sales is accounted for ceramic floor and wall tile followed by sanitaryware and miscellaneous ceramics. Its average value was $ 45 per ton in 2006.

  20. Series-hybrid bearing - An approach to extending bearing fatigue life at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Coe, H. H.; Fleming, D. P.; Parker, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid film bearing of hybrid device consists of orifice compensated annular thrust bearing and self-acting journal bearing. In series hybrid bearing, both ball bearing and annular thrust bearing carry full system thrust load, but two bearings share speed. Operation of system is stable and automatically fail-safe.

  1. Science of Ball Lightning (Fire Ball)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Yoshi-Hiko

    1989-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Organizing Committee * Preface * Ball Lightning -- The Continuing Challenge * Hungarian Ball Lightning Observations in 1987 * Nature of Ball Lightning in Japan * Phenomenological and Psychological Analysis of 150 Austrian Ball Lightning Reports * Physical Problems and Physical Properties of Ball Lightning * Statistical Analysis of the Ball Lightning Properties * A Fluid-Dynamical Model for Ball Lightning and Bead Lightning * The Lifetime of Hill's Vortex * Electrical and Radiative Properties of Ball Lightning * The Candle Flame as a Model of Ball Lightning * A Model for Ball Lightning * The High-Temperature Physico-Chemical Processes in the Lightning Storm Atmosphere (A Physico-Chemical Model of Ball Lightning) * New Approach to Ball Lightning * A Calculation of Electric Field of Ball Lightning * The Physical Explanation to the UFO over Xinjiang, Northern West China * Electric Reconnection, Critical Ionization Velocity, Ponderomotive Force, and Their Applications to Triggered and Ball Lightning * The PLASMAK™ Configuration and Ball Lightning * Experimental Research on Ball Lightning * Performance of High-Voltage Test Facility Designed for Investigation of Ball Lightning * List of Participants

  2. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  3. Optimal speed sharing characteristics of a series-hybrid bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    A series-hybrid bearing assembly consisting of a conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing and a ball bearing is described. Computer studies are used to predict friction torque and life characteristics of a 150-millimeter ball bearing. A conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing is designed for minimum friction and maximum speed reduction of the ball-bearing component of the series-hydrid bearing. At a thrust load of 4000 pounds and speeds corresponding to DN (bearing bore in millimeters times shaft speed in rpm) values of 3 and 4 million, ball-bearing speed may be reduced by 30 percent. This speed reduction corresponds to ball-bearing fatigue life improvement factors of 3.4 at 3 million DN and 5.9 at 4 million DN. An oil flow rate of 18.2 pounds per minute is required to maintain a fluid-film thickness of 0.001 inch in the hydrostatic bearing.

  4. Optimal speed sharing characteristics of a series-hybrid bearing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1972-01-01

    A series-hybrid bearing assembly consisting of a conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing and a ball bearing is described. Computer studies are used to predict friction torque and life characteristics of a 150-mm ball bearing. A conical hydrostatic fluid-film bearing is designed for minimum friction and maximum speed reduction of the ball-bearing component of the series-hybrid bearing. At a thrust load of 4000 lb and speeds corresponding to DN (bearing bore in millimeters times shaft speed in rpm) values of 3 and 4 million, ball-bearing speed may be reduced to 30%. This speed reduction corresponds to ball-bearing fatigue life improvement factors of 3.4 at 3 million DN and 5.9 at 4 million DN. An oil flow rate at 18.2 lb/min is required to maintain a fluid-film thickness of 0.001 in. in the hydrostatic bearing.

  5. Four Ball Best Ball 1

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Geoff; Pollard, Graham

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a four-ball-best-ball (4BBB) model for pairs of golf players is set up. The 4BBB match-play scoring system is seen to satisfy a basic requirement of fairness. It is shown that it is not strictly possible to rate individual players as 4BBB players. However, a (reasonably broad) class of individual players is identified such that it is possible to rate them individually as 4BBB players. The capacity of an individual to play birdies is seen to be a very important determinant in being a successful member of a 4BBB pair, but there are other minor factors as well. Consideration is given to equal and unequal 4BBB pairs. The transitive law is seen to apply for 4BBB pairs. Thus, if pair A is better than pair B, and pair B is better than pair C, then pair A must be better than pair C. Correspondingly, if pair A is equal to pair B, and pair B is equal to pair C, then pair A is equal to pair C. Consideration is given to some strategic issues in 4BBB match-play golf. For example, the conditions under which a player should take a greater risk and have a higher probability of obtaining a bogie in order to achieve a higher probability of scoring a birdie, are determined. Also, the conditions under which a player, noting that his partner is about to have a ‘bad’ hole and score only a par or a bogie, should ‘play safe’, are determined. Thirdly, players who can interact in certain ways are seen to have an advantage over those pairs that cannot do this. Finally, one pair’s optimal strategy when they see that their opponents are about to score a par or a bogie, but not a birdie, is analyzed. Key points A model for four-ball-best-ball match-play golf is established, and used to show that, although there can be other factors, the capacity of an individual to play birdies is a very important determinant in that player being a successful member of a four-ball-best-ball pair. Although it is not possible in general to rate play-ers individually as 4BBB players, a

  6. Four ball best ball 1.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Geoff; Pollard, Graham

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a four-ball-best-ball (4BBB) model for pairs of golf players is set up. The 4BBB match-play scoring system is seen to satisfy a basic requirement of fairness. It is shown that it is not strictly possible to rate individual players as 4BBB players. However, a (reasonably broad) class of individual players is identified such that it is possible to rate them individually as 4BBB players. The capacity of an individual to play birdies is seen to be a very important determinant in being a successful member of a 4BBB pair, but there are other minor factors as well. Consideration is given to equal and unequal 4BBB pairs. The transitive law is seen to apply for 4BBB pairs. Thus, if pair A is better than pair B, and pair B is better than pair C, then pair A must be better than pair C. Correspondingly, if pair A is equal to pair B, and pair B is equal to pair C, then pair A is equal to pair C. Consideration is given to some strategic issues in 4BBB match-play golf. For example, the conditions under which a player should take a greater risk and have a higher probability of obtaining a bogie in order to achieve a higher probability of scoring a birdie, are determined. Also, the conditions under which a player, noting that his partner is about to have a 'bad' hole and score only a par or a bogie, should 'play safe', are determined. Thirdly, players who can interact in certain ways are seen to have an advantage over those pairs that cannot do this. Finally, one pair's optimal strategy when they see that their opponents are about to score a par or a bogie, but not a birdie, is analyzed. Key pointsA model for four-ball-best-ball match-play golf is established, and used to show that, although there can be other factors, the capacity of an individual to play birdies is a very important determinant in that player being a successful member of a four-ball-best-ball pair.Although it is not possible in general to rate play-ers individually as 4BBB players, a class of indi

  7. Ball clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys Group, Old Hickory Clay Co., and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in four states in 2011. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 940 kt (1.04 million st) with an estimated value of $44.2 million. This is a 3-percent increase in tonnage from 912 kt (1.01 million st) with a value of $41.3 million that was produced in 2010. Tennessee was the leading producing state with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi and Kentucky. About 69 percent of production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  8. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  9. Bouncing Balls that Spin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipp, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When a ball bounces elastically against a floor, the vertical component (v[subscript y]) of the velocity of the ball's mass-center changes sign. This is a special case of the elastic collision of two balls (i.e., two objects, neither of which is much more massive than the other), in which case the balls' post-collision relative velocity (=…

  10. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  11. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  12. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  13. Ball valve extractor

    DOEpatents

    Herndon, Charles; Brown, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  14. The series hybrid bearing - A new high speed bearing concept.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Fleming, D. P.; Parker, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The series-hybrid bearing couples a fluid-film bearing with a rolling-element bearing such that the rolling-element bearing inner race runs at a fraction of shaft speed. A series-hybrid bearing was analyzed and experiments were run at thrust loads from 100 to 300 lb and speeds from 4000 to 30,000 rpm. Agreement between theoretical and experimental speed sharing was good. The lowest speed ratio (ratio of ball bearing inner-race speed to shaft speed) obtained was 0.67. This corresponds to an approximate reduction in DN value of 1/3. For a ball bearing in a 3 million DN application, fatigue life would theoretically be improved by a factor as great as 8.

  15. Single ball bearing lubricant and material evaluator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip B. (Inventor); Novak, Howard L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A test apparatus provides an applied load to a monoball through a trolley which moves along a loading axis. While applying the load to the monoball, the torque meter is in communication with the spherical monoball, and a load cell senses the application of applied force to the monoball. Meanwhile, a rotary actuary imports rotary oscillating motion to the monoball which is sensed by a position sensor and a torque meter. Accordingly, a processor can determine the coefficient of friction in substantially real time along with a cycles per second rate.

  16. Single Ball Bearing Lubricant and Material Evaluator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip B. (Inventor); Novak, Howard L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A test apparatus provides an applied load to a monoball through a trolley which moves along a loading axis. While applying the load to the monoball, the torque meter is in communication with the spherical monoball, and a load cell senses the application of applied force to the monoball. Meanwhile, a rotary actuary imports rotary oscillating motion to the monoball which is sensed by a position sensor and a torque meter. Accordingly, a processor can determine the coefficient of friction in substantially real time along with a cycles per second rate.

  17. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  18. The Goldenrod Ball Gall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1974-01-01

    The paper presents a generalized life history of the goldenrod ball gall, a ball-shaped swelling found almost exclusively on the Canada goldenrod, Solidago canadensis, and caused by a peacock fly know as Eurosta soldiaginis. (KM)

  19. Teflon lubrication of liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Ball bearings with glass fiber reinforced Teflon ball retainers from hot-fired liquid oxygen turbopumps were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the extent of Teflon transfer and/or chemical reaction at the bearing surface. No Teflon, but metal fluorides could be found on the metal surface. This indicates that Teflon decomposes and reacts with the bearing steel to form fluorides. Hence, Teflon does not appear to function directly as a lubricant under these operating conditions.

  20. Fizz-Ball Fizzics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moinester, Murray; Gerland, Lars; Liger-Belair, Gerard; Ocherashvili, Aharon

    2012-01-01

    We describe the fluid dynamics principles governing the up-down oscillatory cycling of a bubble-covered, low-density, low-mass ball of material (referred to henceforth as a "fizz-ball") immersed inside a glass of bubbling (super-saturated) carbonated liquid. The bubbles serve to desaturate the liquid of excess CO[subscript 2]. The fizz-ball acts…

  1. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  2. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  3. Effects of bearing cleaning and lube environment on bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Peter C.

    1995-01-01

    Running torque data of SR6 ball bearings are presented for different temperatures and speeds. The data are discussed in contrast to generally used torque prediction models and point out the need to obtain empirical data in critical applications. Also, the effects of changing bearing washing techniques from old, universally used CFC-based systems to CFC-free aqueous/alkaline solutions are discussed. Data on wettability, torque and lubricant life using SR3 ball bearings are presented. In general, performance is improved using the new aqueous washing techniques.

  4. Service Lives Of Restored Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1988-01-01

    Rebuilt units last almost as long as new ones. Report describes theoretical and experiemental studies of lifetimes of restored ball and cylindrical-roller bearings. Results of this and related studies have implications of economy and safety in modern high-speed machinery, especially in aircraft industry, where inspection and rejection or replacing of bearings are new standard practice.

  5. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising: a right flange; left flange; ball with an axis pin and two travel pins; ball seal on either side of the ball; guide sleeve with inner walls comprising two channels; cartridge guide holder; inner magnetic cartridge; and outer magnetic cartridge. The ball is situated inside of the guide sleeve, and a travel pin is located in each of the two channels. The guide sleeve is situated inside of the cartridge guide holder, which is located adjacent to and outside of the inner magnetic cartridge and secured to the inner magnetic cartridge such that when the inner magnetic cartridge rotates, the cartridge guide holder also rotates. The cartridge guide holder is secured to the guide sleeve such that when the cartridge guide holder rotates, the travel pins move within the channels in the inner walls of the guide sleeve, thereby causing the ball to rotate.

  6. Aerodynamics of Wiffle Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utvich, Alexis; Jemmott, Colin; Logan, Sheldon; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    A team of undergraduate students has performed experiments on Wiffle balls in the Harvey Mudd College wind tunnel facility. Wiffle balls are of particular interest because they can attain a curved trajectory with little or no pitcher-imparted spin. The reasons behind this have not previously been quantified formally. A strain gauge device was designed and constructed to measure the lift and drag forces on the Wiffle ball; a second device to measure lift and drag on a spinning ball was also developed. Experiments were conducted over a range of Reynolds numbers corresponding to speeds of roughly 0-40 mph. Lift forces of up to 0.2 N were measured for a Wiffle ball at 40 mph. This is believed to be due to air flowing into the holes on the Wiffle ball in addition to the effect of the holes on external boundary layer separation. A fog-based flow visualization system was developed in order to provide a deeper qualitative understanding of what occurred in the flowfield surrounding the ball. The data and observations obtained in this study support existing assumptions about Wiffle ball aerodynamics and begin to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Wiffle ball flight.

  7. Quartz ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A ball valve particularly suited for use in the handling of highly corrosive fluids is described. It is characterized by a valve housing formed of communicating segments of quartz tubing, a pair of communicating sockets disposed in coaxial alignment with selected segments of tubing for establishing a pair of inlet ports communicating with a common outlet port, a ball formed of quartz material supported for displacement between the sockets and configured to be received alternately thereby, and a valve actuator including a rod attached to the ball for selectively displacing the ball relative to each of the sockets for controlling fluid flow through the inlet ports.

  8. Large gauged Q balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Tetradis, N.

    2001-12-01

    We study Q balls associated with local U(1) symmetries. Such Q balls are expected to become unstable for large values of their charge because of the repulsion mediated by the gauge force. We consider the possibility that the repulsion is eliminated through the presence in the interior of the Q ball of fermions with charge opposite to that of the scalar condensate. Another possibility is that two scalar condensates of opposite charge form in the interior. We demonstrate that both these scenarios can lead to the existence of classically stable, large, gauged Q balls. We present numerical solutions, as well as an analytical treatment of the ``thin-wall'' limit.

  9. Birth of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, J. J.; Smith, D.; Nelson, K. E.; Crompton, R. W.; Murphy, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Many observations of ball lightning report a ball of light, about 10 cm in diameter, moving at about walking speed, lasting up to 20 s and frequently existing inside of houses and even aeroplanes. The present paper reports detailed observations of the initiation or birth of ball lightning. In two cases, navigation crew of aircraft saw ball lightning form at the windscreen inside the cockpit of their planes. In the first case, the ball lightning occurred during a thunderstorm, with much lightning activity outside of the plane. In the second case, large "horns" of electrical corona were seen outside of the plane at the surface of the radome, just prior to the formation of the ball lightning. A third case reports ball lightning formed inside of a house, during a thunderstorm, at a closed glass window. It is proposed, based on two-dimensional calculations of electron and ion transport, that ball lightning in these cases is driven and formed by atmospheric ions impinging and collecting on the insulating surface of the glass or Perspex windows. This surface charge can produce electric fields inside of the cockpit or room sufficient to sustain an electric discharge. Charges of opposite sign to those outside of the window accumulate on the inside surface of the glass, leaving a ball of net charge moving inside of the cockpit or room to produce a pulsed discharge on a microsecond time scale.

  10. Physics of ball sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Clanet, C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball sports have been part of human history for thousands of years [1]. Nowadays, 13 of them are part of the Olympic games (badminton, basketball, beach volley, football/soccer, golf, handball, hockey, rugby, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo, ice hockey). All these games differ by launcher (hand, club, racket, bat), ball (size, shape and mass), pitch size and number of players. These differences induce different ball velocities. Apart from the velocities and the way to maximize them, we discuss in this article the ball trajectories and their impact on the size of sports fields.

  11. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  12. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    On-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces was studied. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  13. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study showed that on-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings can be accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented, in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  14. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  15. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  16. Great balls of fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhoff, Mark; reader01; jjherrera

    2014-03-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Burning soil fuels ball lightning” (9 January, http://ow.ly/tl8aO) on evidence that a burning core of soil acts as an energy source for ball lightning.

  17. Stemless ball valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Kevin (Inventor); Yakos, David (Inventor); Walthall, Bryan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A stemless ball valve comprising two flanges and a ball with a channel, two axis pins and two travel pins. One end of each axis and travel pin is fixedly attached to the ball, and the other end of each axis pin is lodged into a notch in the first or second flange such that the axis pin is allowed to rotate in the notch. The guide sleeve comprises two channels, and one end of each travel pin is situated within one of the two channels in the guide sleeve. An outer magnetic cartridge causes the inner magnetic cartridge and guide sleeve to rotate, and when the guide sleeve rotates, the travel pins move up and down within the channels in the guide sleeve. The movement of the travel pins within the channels in the guide sleeve causes the ball to rotate, thereby opening and closing the ball valve.

  18. Tunguska dark matter ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 antitop quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  19. Monitoring Bearing Vibrations For Signs Of Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Carol L.

    1991-01-01

    Real-time spectral analysis of vibrations being developed for use in monitoring conditions of critical bearings in rotating machinery. Underlying concept simple and fairly well established: appearance and growth of vibrations at frequencies associated with rotations of various parts of bearing system indicate wear, damage, and imperfections of manufacture. Frequencies include fundamental and harmonics of frequency of rotation of ball cage, frequency of passage of balls, and frequency of rotation of shaft.

  20. Happy Balls, Unhappy Balls, and Newton's Cradle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The intricacies of Newton's Cradle are well covered in the literature going as far back as the time of Newton! These discussions generally center on the highly elastic collisions of metal spheres. Thanks to the invention of happy and unhappy balls, you can build and study the interaction of less elastic systems (see Fig. 1).

  1. Research In Diagnosing Bearing Defects From Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, T.; Earhart, E.; Fiorucci, T.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes research in bearing-defect signature analysis - use of vibration-signal analysis to diagnose defects in roller and ball bearings. Experiments performed on bearings in good condition and other bearings in which various parts scratched to provide known defects correlated with vibration signals. Experiments performed on highly instrumented motor-driven rotor assembly at speeds up to 10,050 r/min, using accelerometers, velocity probes, and proximity sensors mounted at various locations on assembly to measure vibrations.

  2. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  3. Spin bearing retainer design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.; Warner, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics behavior of spin bearings for momentum wheels (control-moment gyroscope, reaction wheel assembly) is critical to satellite stability and life. Repeated bearing retainer instabilities hasten lubricant deterioration and can lead to premature bearing failure and/or unacceptable vibration. These instabilities are typically distinguished by increases in torque, temperature, audible noise, and vibration induced by increases into the bearing cartridge. Ball retainer design can be optimized to minimize these occurrences. A retainer was designed using a previously successful smaller retainer as an example. Analytical methods were then employed to predict its behavior and optimize its configuration.

  4. Development of new materials for turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. E.; Pallini, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The life requirement for the angular contact ball bearings in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) is 7.5 hours. In actual operation, significantly shorter service life was experienced. The objective is to identify bearing materials and/or materials processing techniques offering signficant potential for extending HPOTP bearing performance life. Interactive thermomechanical analysis of the HPOTP bearing-shaft system was performed with the SHABERTH computer program. Bearing fatigue life, ball-race contact stress, heat generation rate, bulk ring temperatures and circumferential stress in the inner rings were quantified as functions of radial load, thrust load and ball-race contact friction. Criteria established from the output of this analysis are being used for material candidate selection.

  5. Quartz ball value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, C.; Ingle, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Quartz ball valve consisting of two quartz joints sealed back-to-back and seated in quartz sockets perform at temperatures of up to 1,250 C and in corrosive chemical environments without contamination or degradation.

  6. Super Ball Bot

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tensegrity Robot: Child's Play or Space Tech? Super Ball Bot is an all-in-one landing and mobility platform based on tensegrity structures, allowing for lower-cost, and more reliable planetary miss...

  7. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  8. Aerodynamics of sports balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research data on the aerodynamic behavior of baseballs and cricket and golf balls are summarized. Cricket balls and baseballs are roughly the same size and mass but have different stitch patterns. Both are thrown to follow paths that avoid a batter's swing, paths that can curve if aerodynamic forces on the balls' surfaces are asymmetric. Smoke tracer wind tunnel tests and pressure taps have revealed that the unbalanced side forces are induced by tripping the boundary layer on the seam side and producing turbulence. More particularly, the greater pressures are perpendicular to the seam plane and only appear when the balls travel at velocities high enough so that the roughness length matches the seam heigh. The side forces, once tripped, will increase with spin velocity up to a cut-off point. The enhanced lift coefficient is produced by the Magnus effect. The more complex stitching on a baseball permits greater variations in the flight path curve and, in the case of a knuckleball, the unsteady flow effects. For golf balls, the dimples trip the boundary layer and the high spin rate produces a lift coefficient maximum of 0.5, compared to a baseball's maximum of 0.3. Thus, a golf ball travels far enough for gravitational forces to become important.

  9. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  10. Silicon nitride hybrid bearing fatigue life comparisons. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.

    1999-01-15

    Research to improve high-speed ball bearings for spacecraft applications has led to development of ceramic materials for bearing components, and the need to acquire sufficient fatigue life data to show the merits of various ceramic materials and fabrication processes, in comparison with the vast amount of steel bearing fatigue data acquired over many decades. In order to eliminate bias from such evaluations it is best to conduct comparative fatigue tests with steel bearings that are geometrically similar and in the same type of test rig. This report addresses some recent fatigue tests of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) balls and Crucible Steel Company M62 steel raceways and a comparison set of all 52100 steel bearings. Results indicate that the bearings with ceramic (silicon nitride) balls are superior to the steel bearings.

  11. Gradient Tempering Of Bearing Races

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parr, Richardson A.

    1991-01-01

    Gradient-tempering process increases fracture toughness and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking of ball-bearing races made of hard, strong steels and subject to high installation stresses and operation in corrosive media. Also used in other applications in which local toughening of high-strength/low-toughness materials required.

  12. Long-wearing TFE/metal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brass, R. A.; Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method for making metal/polytetrafluoroethylene (TFE) bearing surfaces embeds long-wearing layer of TFE in microscopic pits in metal. Technique has potential applications in automotive gears, ball joints, and roller chain components. Other applications are in use of unlubricated bearings in chemical, pharmaceutical, and food-processing equipment.

  13. Evaluation of bearing configurations using the single bearing tester in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Hall, P.; Thom, R.

    1991-01-01

    Various bearing configurations were tested using the Marshall Space Flight Center single bearing tester with LN2 as the cryogenic coolant. The baseline was one Rocketdyne phase one high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) pump end 45-mm bore bearing. The bearing configurations that were tested included a Salox/M cage configuration, a silicon nitride ball configuration, an elongated cage configuration, and a Bray 601 grease configuration.

  14. Ball lightning burn.

    PubMed

    Selvaggi, Gennaro; Monstrey, Stan; von Heimburg, Dennis; Hamdi, Mustapha; Van Landuyt, Koen; Blondeel, Phillip

    2003-05-01

    Ball lightning is a rare physical phenomenon, which is not yet completely explained. It is similar to lightning but with different, peculiar characteristics. It can be considered a mix of fire and electricity, concentrated in a fireball with a diameter of 20-cm that most commonly appears suddenly, even in indoor conditions, during a thunderstorm. It moves quickly for several meters, can change direction, and ultimately disappears. During a great storm, a 28-year-old man and his 5-year-old daughter sustained burn wounds after ball lightning came from the outdoors through a chimney. These two patients demonstrated signs of fire and electrical injuries. The father, who lost consciousness, sustained superficial second-degree burn wounds bilaterally on the zygomatic area and deep second-degree burn wounds on his right hand (total body surface area, 4%). His daughter demonstrated superficial second-degree burn wounds on the left part of the face and deep second-degree and third-degree burn wounds (total body surface area, 30%) on the left neck, both upper arms, and the back. In this article, the authors report the first two cases of burn injuries resulting from ball lightning contact indoors. The literature on this rare phenomenon is reviewed to elucidate the nature of ball lightning. Emphasis is placed on the nature of injuries after ball lightning contact, the therapy used, and the long-term complications. PMID:12792547

  15. Analysis of bearing stiffness variations, contact forces and vibrations in radially loaded double row rolling element bearings with raceway defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Dick; Howard, Carl; Sawalhi, Nader; Moazen Ahmadi, Alireza; Singh, Sarabjeet

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating and analyzing the quasi-static load distribution and varying stiffness of a radially loaded double row bearing with a raceway defect of varying depth, length, and surface roughness. The method is applied to ball bearings on gearbox and fan test rigs seeded with line or extended outer raceway defects. When balls pass through the defect and lose all or part of their load carrying capacity, the load is redistributed between the loaded balls. This includes balls positioned outside the defect such that good raceway sections are subjected to increased loading when a defect is present. The defective bearing stiffness varies periodically at the ball spacing, and only differs from the good bearing case when balls are positioned in the defect. In this instance, the stiffness decreases in the loaded direction and increases in the unloaded direction. For an extended spall, which always has one or more balls positioned in the defect, this results in an average stiffness over the ball spacing period that is lower in the loaded direction in comparison to both the line spall and good bearing cases. The variation in bearing stiffness due to the defect produces parametric excitations of the bearing assembly. The qualitative character of the vibration response correlates to the character of the stiffness variations. Rapid stiffness changes at a defect exit produce impulses. Slower stiffness variations due to large wavelength waviness features in an extended spall produce low frequency excitation which results in defect components in the velocity spectra. The contact forces fluctuate around the quasi-static loads on the balls, with rapid stiffness changes producing high magnitude impulsive force fluctuations. Furthermore, it is shown that analyzing the properties of the dynamic model linearized at the quasi-static solutions provides greater insight into the time-frequency characteristics of the vibration response. This is demonstrated by relating

  16. Review and critical analysis: Rolling-element bearings for system life and reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, A. S.; Anderson, W. J.; Derner, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A ball and cylindrical roller bearing technical specification which incorporates the latest state-of-the-art advancements was prepared for the purpose of improving bearing reliability in U.S. Army aircraft. The current U.S. Army aviation bearing designs and applications, including life analyses, were analyzed. A bearing restoration and refurbishment specification was prepared to improve bearing availability.

  17. Hex ball torque test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. A.; Foster, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed on four flight-type hex ball universal joints in order to characterize and determine the actual load-carrying capability of this device. The universal joint is a part of manual actuation rods for scientific instruments within the Hubble Space Telescope. It was found that the hex ball will bind slightly during the initial load application. This binding did not affect the function of the universal joint, and the units would wear-in after a few additional loading cycles. The torsional yield load was approximately 50 ft-lb, and was consistent among the four test specimens. Also, the torque required to cause complete failure exceeded 80 ft-lb. It is concluded that the hex ball universal joint is suitable for its intended applications.

  18. Confinement of Coulomb balls

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Klindworth, M.; Piel, A.

    2005-12-15

    A model for the confinement of the recently discovered Coulomb balls is proposed. These spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals are trapped inside a rf discharge under gravity conditions and show an unusual structural order in complex plasmas. Measurements of the thermophoretic force acting on the trapped dust particles and simulations of the plasma properties of the discharge are presented. The proposed model of confinement considers thermophoretic, ion-drag, and electric field forces, and shows excellent agreement with the observations. The findings suggest that self-confinement does not significantly contribute to the structural properties of Coulomb balls.

  19. Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clauson, T.L.

    1999-08-31

    The Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment No.1 is a series of tests intended to further the understanding of rotational dynamics. A simple experimental assembly is rotated using the Horizontal Air Bearing and allowed to spin freely as the internal rotational damping is measured. The low friction of the bearing effectively isolates the test assembly, allowing the internal damping of the test object to be evaluated. The experimental assembly is composed of an aluminum ball within a spherical cavity. A flanged pipe section and an auxiliary adapter plate secure the assembly to the Air Bearing interface plate. Three aluminum balls are interchanged to vary test parameters. The aluminum balls are free to move independently as the entire assembly rotates. The aluminum balls vary in diameter and/or surface finish. While the diameter and surface finish is varied, the space between the ball and socket is dry. To examine the effect of viscosity, the space is filled with a lubricant while the ball diameter and surface finish is held constant.

  20. Evaluation of a series hybird thrust bearing at DN values to three million. 1: Analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, A.; Eusepi, M.; Winn, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The analysis and design are presented of a hybrid bearing consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid film bearing fitting an envelope with an outer radius of 86.4 mm (3.4 in.) and an inner radius of 71 mm (2.8 in.). The bearing analysis, combined with available torque data on ball bearings, indicates that an effective speed split between the ball and fluid-film bearings of 50 percent may be expected during operation at 20,000 rpm and under an axial load of 17,800 newtons (4000 lbs.). This speed split can result in a ten-fold increase in the life of the ball bearing when compared to a simple ball bearing system operating under similar conditions.

  1. Model Of Bearing With Hydrostatic Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Improved mathematical model of rotational and vibrational dynamics of bearing package in turbopump incorporates effects of hydrostatic damper. Part of larger finite-element model representing rotational and vibrational dynamics of rotor and housing of pump. Includes representations of deadband and nonlinear stiffness and damping of ball bearings, nonlinear stiffness and damping of hydrostatic film, and stiffness of bearing support. Enables incorporation of effects of hydrostatic damper into overall rotor-dynamic mathematical model without addition of mathematical submodel of major substructure.

  2. Balls and Spheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an art lesson that allows students to set up and collect sphere canvases. Spheres move art away from a rectangular canvas into a dimension that requires new planning and painting. From balls to many other spherical canvases that bounce, roll, float and fly, art experiences are envisioned by students. Even if adults recognize…

  3. Magnetic bearings for a high-performance optical disk buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Hawkey, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    An optical disk buffer concept can provide gigabit-per-second data rates and terabit capacity through the use of arrays of solid state lasers applied to a stack of erasable/reusable optical disks. The RCA optical disk buffer has evoked interest by NASA for space applications. The porous graphite air bearings in the rotary spindle as well as those used in the linear translation of the read/write head would be replaced by magnetic bearings or mechanical (ball or roller) bearings. Based upon past experience, roller or ball bearings for the translation stages are not feasible. Unsatisfactory, although limited experience exists with ball bearing spindles also. Magnetic bearings, however, appear ideally suited for both applications. The use of magnetic bearings is advantageous in the optical disk buffer because of the absence of physical contact between the rotating and stationary members. This frictionless operation leads to extended life and reduced drag. The manufacturing tolerances that are required to fabricate magnetic bearings would also be relaxed from those required for precision ball and gas bearings. Since magnetic bearings require no lubricant, they are inherently compatible with a space (vacuum) environment. Magnetic bearings also allow the dynamics of the rotor/bearing system to be altered through the use of active control. This provides the potential for reduced vibration, extended regions of stable operation, and more precise control of position.

  4. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  5. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOEpatents

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  6. Preliminary metallographic studies of ball fatigue under rolling-contact conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bear, H Robert; Butler, Robert H

    1957-01-01

    The metallurgical results produced on balls tested in the rolling-contact fatigue spin rig were studied by metallographic examination. Origin and progression of fatigue failures were observed. These evaluations were made on SAE 52100 and AISI M-1 balls fatigue tested at room temperature (80 F) and 200 to 250 F. Most failures originated subsurface in shear; inclusions, structure changes, and directionalism adversely affected ball fatigue life. Structures in the maximum-shear-stress region of the balls of both materials were stable at room temperature and unstable at 200 to 250 F. Failures were of the same type as those found in full-scale bearings.

  7. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls: Preliminary test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Hot pressed silicon nitride was evaluated as a rolling element bearing material. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to test 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) diameter balls at a maximum Hertz stress of 800,000 psi at a race temperature of 130 F. The fatigue spalls in the silicon nitride resembled those in typical bearing steels. The ten-percent fatigue life of the silicon nitride balls was approximately one-eighth to one-fifth that of typical bearing steels (52100 and M-50). The load capacity of the silicon nitride was approximately one-third that of typical bearing steels. The load capacity of the silicon nitride was significantly higher than previously tested ceramic materials for rolling element bearings.

  8. Stemless Ball Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Robert K.; Yakos, David; Walthall, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This invention utilizes a new method of opening and closing a ball valve. Instead of rotating the ball with a perpendicular stem (as is the case with standard ball valves), the ball is rotated around a fixed axis by two guide pins. This innovation eliminates the leak point that is present in all standard ball valves due to the penetration of an actuation stem through the valve body. The VOST (Venturi Off-Set-Technology) valve has been developed for commercial applications. The standard version of the valve consists of an off-set venturi flow path through the valve. This path is split at the narrowest portion of the venturi, allowing the section upstream from the venturi to be rotated. As this rotation takes place, the venturi becomes restricted as one face rotates with respect to the other, eventually closing off the flow path. A spring-loaded seal made of resilient material is embedded in the upstream face of the valve, making a leak-proof seal between the faces; thus a valve is formed. The spring-loaded lip seal is the only seal that can provide a class six, or bubble-tight, seal against the opposite face of the valve. Tearing action of the seal by high-velocity gas on this early design required relocation of the seal to the downstream face of the valve. In the stemless embodiment of this valve, inner and outer magnetic cartridges are employed to transfer mechanical torque from the outside of the valve to the inside without the use of a stem. This eliminates the leak path caused by the valve stems in standard valves because the stems penetrate through the bodies of these valves.

  9. Transfer Lubrication For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, S. A.; Kannel, J. W.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents evaluation of bronze-filled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), known as Salox M, as cage material for ball bearings in high-pressure turbopumps for liquid oxygen. Material evaluated as potentially longer-lived replacement for glass-filled PTFE, known as Armalon. Cage transfers PTFE to balls to form solid lubricant film. However, glass fibers in glass-filled material tend to interfere with transfer. Two cage-design concepts developed; one involves metal-reinforced cage of bronze-filled PTFE; other calls for bronze-filled PTFE inserts in metal structure.

  10. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, David H.; Greenhill, Lyn M.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the theoretical basis for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings; duplex angular contact ball bearings; and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the effects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program; and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. A companion report addresses the input instructions for and features of the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  11. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  12. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  13. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  14. Ball Lightning Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. L.; Nikitin, A. I.; Dijkhuis, G. C.

    Ball lightning (BL) researches' review and theoretical models of three different authors are presented. The general review covers investigations from 1838 until the present day, and includes a discussion on observation data, experimental modeling, and theoretical approaches. Section 6.1 is written by Bychkov and Nikitin; authors of the sections 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 are, respectively, Bychkov, Nikitin and Dijkhuis.

  15. Water ball collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    What happens if a stainless steel ball hits a water ball in the weightless space ot the Universe? In other words, it was the objective of our experiments in the Space to observe the surface tension of liquid by means of making a solid collide with a liquid. Place a small volume of water between 2 glass sheets to make a thin water membrane: the 2 glass sheets cannot be separated unless an enormous force is applied. It is obvious from this phenomenom that the surface tension of water is far greater than presumed. On Earth, however, it is impossible in most cases to observe only the surface tension of liquid, because gravity always acts on the surface tension. Water and stainless steel balls were chosen the liquid and solids for the experiments. Because water is the liquid most familiar to us, its properties are well known. And it is also of great interest to compare its properties on the Earth with those in the weightless space.

  16. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles from Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Gelencser, Andras; Simonics, Renata; Arato, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Tar balls are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (approximately 90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  17. Development of a high speed parallel hybrid boost bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis, design, and testing of the hybrid boost bearing are discussed. The hybrid boost bearing consists of a fluid film bearing coupled in parallel with a rolling element bearing. This coupling arrangement makes use of the inherent advantages of both the fluid film and rolling element bearing and at the same time minimizes their disadvantages and limitations. The analytical optimization studies that lead to the final fluid film bearing design are reported. The bearing consisted of a centrifugally-pressurized planar fluid film thrust bearing with oil feed through the shaft center. An analysis of the test ball bearing is also presented. The experimental determination of the hybrid bearing characteristics obtained on the basis of individual bearing component tests and a combined hybrid bearing assembly is discussed and compared to the analytically determined performance characteristics.

  18. Physics in a Glitter Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trikosko, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Maui Toys' Water Bouncer (Fig. 1) is a water-filled ball containing glitter. Buy one and put it on your desk and students can't keep their hands off of it. Pitch the ball in the air giving it a quick spin. When you catch it you will see a sparkling vortex. Twist the ball around different ways and the angular momentum of the fluid keeps the axis of…

  19. Rolling-element fatigue life of silicon nitride balls. [as compared to that of steel, ceramic, and cermet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate silicon nitride as a rolling-element bearing material. Results indicate that hot-pressed silicon nitride running against steel may be expected to yield fatigue lives comparable to or greater than those of bearing quality steel running against steel at stress levels typical rolling-element bearing application. The fatigue life of hot-pressed silicon nitride is considerably greater than that of any ceramic or cermet tested. Computer analysis indicates that there is no improvement in the lives of 120-mm-bore angular--contact ball bearings of the same geometry operating at DN values from 2 to 4 million where hot-pressed silicon nitride balls are used in place of steel balls.

  20. Current Status of Hybrid Bearing Damage Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Certo, Joseph M.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    Advances in material development and processing have led to the introduction of ceramic hybrid bearings for many applications. The introduction of silicon nitride hybrid bearings into the high pressure oxidizer turbopump, on the space shuttle main engine, led NASA to solve a highly persistent and troublesome bearing problem. Hybrid bearings consist of ceramic balls and steel races. The majority of hybrid bearings utilize Si3N4 balls. The aerospace industry is currently studying the use of hybrid bearings and naturally the failure modes of these bearings become an issue in light of the limited data available. In today s turbine engines and helicopter transmissions, the health of the bearings is detected by the properties of the debris found in the lubrication line when damage begins to occur. Current oil debris sensor technology relies on the magnetic properties of the debris to detect damage. Since the ceramic rolling elements of hybrid bearings have no metallic properties, a new sensing system must be developed to indicate the system health if ceramic components are to be safely implemented in aerospace applications. The ceramic oil debris sensor must be capable of detecting ceramic and metallic component damage with sufficient reliability and forewarning to prevent a catastrophic failure. The objective of this research is to provide a background summary on what is currently known about hybrid bearing failure modes and to report preliminary results on the detection of silicon nitride debris, in oil, using a commercial particle counter.

  1. The Floating Ball Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wente, Henry C.

    2008-11-01

    In capillary theory there are two kinds of surface tension. There is the surface tension at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Thomas Young [9] also allowed for there to be a surface tension associated with a liquid-solid interface. He proceeded to use a balance of forces argument to derive the well-known contact angle condition along a liquid-liquid-solid intersection. The validity of this argument has recently been called into question by R. Finn [6]. A floating ball experiment discussed in that paper leads to an apparent paradox. We address this issue.

  2. Rotary Ball Locking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Earl V.

    1990-01-01

    Ball locking mechanism links input drive shaft to output shaft and disengages two shafts from each other when it locks output shaft at either of two fixed angular positions. Part of drive system turning microwave antenna 143.5 degrees between stowage and employment orientations and holds it at either orientation without back-loading drive motor and gears. Angular interval and dimensions modified for use in robotic or other actuators in which desirable to "rest" drive trains while locking actuators at fixed positions.

  3. Atmospheric Ball Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurden, C. J. V.; Wurden, G. A.

    2008-11-01

    Free-floating atmospheric pressure copper hydroxyl ball plasmas have been studied in air and helium atmospheres, using still and high speed photography (up to 20,000 fps), collimated photodiodes, and spectroscopy. A fine boundary layer between the greenish Cu-OH cloud, and the air, is orange in color. However, when the discharge is initiated into a helium atmosphere, the boundary layer is no longer visible, suggesting that the visible boundary was caused by interactions with oxygen. We have studied scaling of the 10-cm diameter ball plasmas with both the size of the water bucket, and the applied discharge voltage, over the range of 500-5000 volts. When looking at the initial spider-leg breakdown above the water surface, the ratio of H-alpha to H-beta lines suggests a temperature of ˜0.3 eV. This is also consistent with the presence of molecular lines of OH, and perhaps CuOH2 in the rising cloud. The cloud is affected by, but can penetrate through an aluminum window screen mesh.

  4. Holy Balls!: Part Deux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Jandron, Michael; Truscott, Tadd

    2012-11-01

    A Waboba® (WAter BOuncing BAll) demonstrates remarkable water skipping behavior, even at relatively large impact angles. The highly compliant nature of these elastic spheres results in significant deformation into a disk-like shape upon impact. The increased wetted area and force coefficient generates a large hydrodynamic force that more readily lifts the ball off the water surface. However, elasticity introduces some surprising phenomena, such as material waves that propagate on the sphere and interact with the water cavity. Depending upon impact conditions, material waves may propagate in various directions combining to create multiple modes of deformation and complicated fluid-structure interactions. Furthermore, the timescales of deformation and wave propagation depend on the material properties and impact conditions. In this talk, we will discuss skipping regimes in terms of impact parameters and material properties and relate failed skipping behavior to the structure-fluid interaction caused by deformation. The critical timescales for deformation, wave propagation and collision will be related to the relevant physical parameters of the problem.

  5. Small, high-speed bearing technology for cryogenic turbo-pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M. W.; Smalley, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    The design of 20-mm bore ball bearings is described for cryogenic turbo-machinery applications, operating up to speeds of 120,000 rpm. A special section is included on the design of hybrid bearings. Each hybrid bearing is composed of a ball bearing in series with a conventional pressurized fluid-film journal bearing. Full details are presented on the design of a test vehicle which possesses the capability of testing the above named bearings within the given speed range under externally applied radial and axial loads.

  6. Lubrication of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for propulsion into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by four turbopumps on each engine. A main element in the turbopump is the bearings supporting the rotor that spins the turbine blades and the pump impeller. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. The liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellants flow through the bearings to cool the surfaces. The volatile nature of the propellants excludes any conventional means of lubrication. Lubrication for these bearings is provided by the ball separator inside the bearing. The separator is a composite material that supplies a transfer film of lubrication to the rings and balls. New separator materials and lubrication schemes have been investigated at Marshall Space Flight Center in a bearing test rig with promising results. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls have also been evaluated. The use of hybrid, silicon nitride ball bearings in conjunction -with better separator materials has shown excellent results. The work that Marshall has done is being utilized in turbopumps flying on the space shuttle fleet and will be utilized in future space travel. This result of this work is valuable for all aerospace and commercial applications where high-speed bearings are used.

  7. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  8. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  9. Pratt and Whitney cryogenic turbopump bearing experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, W. E.; Bursey, R. W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Successful, reusable bearings require lubrication, traditionally, a transfer film from sacrificial cage wear. Early testing included materials screening programs to identify suitable cryogenic cage materials. A specially developed element tester that simulated the function of a ball bearing cage was used. Suitable materials must provide lubrication with an acceptably low wear rate, without abrading contacting surfaces. The most promising materials were tested in full scale bearings at speeds up to 4 MDN. Teflon, filled with 40 percent bronze powder, was the best performing material. A variety of bearings were designed and successfully tested in LH2 and LOX. Bearings with bronze filled Teflon cages were successfully tested for 150 hrs. In overload tests, the same design was tested for 5 hrs at maximum Hertz stresses above 450 ksi and an additional 5 hrs with a maximum Hertz stress exceeding 500 ksi. Four bearings were tested in LOX for 25 hrs, with a maximum time per bearing of 10 hrs.

  10. Reflections on a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Jim; Lopez, Veronica; Rohr, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    While observing the bounce heights of various kinds of sports balls dropped from different heights onto a variety of surfaces, we thought of the following question: Could measurements of drop and bounce heights of balls of different diameters, but of the same material, falling from different heights, but on the same surface, be expressed by a…

  11. Behaviour of a Bouncing Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2015-01-01

    The bounce of a ball is a seemingly innocuous event that can be used to illustrate many aspects of elementary and even advanced mechanics. Both normal and oblique bounces on a rigid surface are considered in this article, emphasizing qualitative features of the bounce process. If the ball bounces at an oblique angle then it can slide throughout…

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  13. Structure of laboratory ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core.

  14. Structure of laboratory ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Tamura, Tomoya; Cappelli, Mark A; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Trajectories of self-sustained laboratory ball lightning, generated by arc discharges with silicon, are investigated for understanding the possibility of buoyant flight. Extremely low apparent densities are found, nearly approaching that of standard air. The freely buoyant balls are observed to survive for about 0.1 s, with significantly buoyant balls surviving for several seconds. These ball lightning objects are found to have a density and size that can easily allow them to be carried by a gentle breeze of a few meters per second. The results are interpreted by a model that is an extension of that first proposed by Abrahamson and Dinniss [J. Abrahamson and J. Dinniss, Nature (London) 403, 519 (2000)]. The buoyant behavior of ball lightning seen in our experiments is believed to arise as a result of the formation of a nanoparticle oxide network growing from a molten silicon core. PMID:20365306

  15. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  16. Hybrid bearings for LH2 and LO2 turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Lee, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid combinations of hydrostatic and ball bearings can improve bearing performance for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen turbopumps. Analytic studies were conducted to optimize hybrid bearing designs for the SSME-type turbopump conditions. A method to empirically determine damping coefficients was devised. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed, and three were fabricated. Six hybrid and hydrostatic-only bearing configurations will be tested for steady-state and transient performance, and quantification of damping coefficients. The initial tests were conducted with the liquid hydrogen bearing.

  17. Computing Operating Characteristics Of Bearing/Shaft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James D.

    1996-01-01

    SHABERTH computer program predicts operating characteristics of bearings in multibearing load-support system. Lubricated and nonlubricated bearings modeled. Calculates loads, torques, temperatures, and fatigue lives of ball and/or roller bearings on single shaft. Provides for analysis of reaction of system to termination of supply of lubricant to bearings and other lubricated mechanical elements. Valuable in design and analysis of shaft/bearing systems. Two versions of SHABERTH available. Cray version (LEW-14860), "Computing Thermal Performances Of Shafts and Bearings". IBM PC version (MFS-28818), written for IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS.

  18. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  19. Vibrations Caused By Cracked Turbopump Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggin, David G.; Dweck, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Expansion gives rise to eccentricity. Report presents analysis of dynamic effects caused by cracking of inner race of ball bearing in turbopump. Crack manifested itself via increase in vibrations synchronous with rotation and smaller increase at twice frequency of rotation. Analysis conducted to verify these increases were caused solely by crack and to understand implications for future such cracks.

  20. Ceramic bearings. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, fabrication, and evaluation of ceramic bearings. Citations discuss roller, ball, fuel-lubricated, and dry-lubricated bearings. Applications in machinery, automobiles, rails, and air transport are examined. References to surface hardness, wear, and fatigue tests are presented. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Silicon nitride used as a rolling-element bearing material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted with hot-pressed silicon nitride to determine its ability to withstand concentrated contacts in rolling-element bearings. If hot-pressed silicon nitride is used for both balls and races, attention must be paid to fitting both shaft and bearing housing.

  2. Fabrication and measurement of nanostructures on the micro ball surface using a modified atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X S; Geng, Y Q; Li, W B; Yan, Y D; Hu, Z J; Sun, T; Liang, Y C; Dong, S

    2012-11-01

    In order to machine and measure nanostructures on the micro ball surface, a modified atomic force microscope (AFM) combining a commercial AFM system with a home built precision air bearing spindle is established. Based on this system, motions of both the AFM scanner and the air bearing spindle are controlled to machine nanostructures on the micro ball based on the AFM tip-based nano mechanical machining approach. The eccentric error between the axis of the micro ball and the axis of the spindle is reduced to 3-4 μm by the provided fine adjusting method. A 1000 nano lines array, 36 square pits structure, 10 square pits structure, and a zig-zag structure on the circumference of the micro ball with the diameter of 1.5 mm are machined successfully. The measurement results achieved by the same system reveal that the profiles and mode-power spectra curves of the micro ball are influenced by the artificially machined nanostructures significantly according to their distributions. This work is an useful attempt for modifying the micro ball profile and manufacture of the spherical modulation targets to study the experimental performance of the micro ball in implosion. PMID:23206095

  3. Bearing tester data compilation analysis, and reporting and bearing math modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Integration of heat transfer coefficients, modified to account for local vapor quality, into the 45 mm bearing model has been completed. The model has been evaluated with two flow rates and subcooled and saturated coolant. The evaluation showed that by increasing the flow from 3.6 to 7.0 lbs/sec the average ball temperature was decreased by 102 F, using a coolant temperature of -230 F. The average ball temperature was decreased by 63 F by decreasing the inlet coolant temperature from saturated to -230 F at a flow rate of 7.0 lbs/sec. Since other factors such as friction, cage heating, etc., affect bearing temperatures, the above bearing temperature effects should be considered as trends and not absolute values. The two phase heat transfer modification has been installed in the 57 mm bearing model and the effects on bearing temperatures have been evaluated. The average ball temperature was decreased by 60 F by increasing the flow rate from 4.6 to 9.0 lbs/sec for the subcooled case. By decreasing the inlet coolant temperature from saturation to -24 F, the average ball temperature was decreased 57 F for a flow rate of 9.0 lbs/sec. The technique of relating the two phase heat transfer coefficient to local vapor quality will be applied to the tester model and compared with test data.

  4. Unsolved Mystery of Ball Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. L.

    Ball lightning is an unusual phenomenon always drawing attention of people. There are still questions about its origination, features, interaction with environment, and phenomena related to it. On a way of studying this phenomenon, there are a lot of difficulties, the basic of them is insufficiency of authentic, scientific data. The chapter sets as the purpose to interest the reader in the problem, to describe conditions of ball lightning occurrence, theories, and its hypotheses explanation, to include readers in a circle of experimental searches in creation of a ball lightning and its analogues, and to describe fascination of a problem and difficulty of its solution.

  5. SSME turbopump bearing analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T.

    1980-01-01

    Three shuttle pump bearings operating under severe overspeed and shut-down conditions are evaluated. The specific parameters investigated include outer race stresses, cage stresses, cage-race drag, bearing heating, and crush loading. A quasi-dynamic version of the BASDAP computer code was utilized which involved the calculation of ball-race forces (inner and outer), contact pressures, contact dimensions, and contact angles as a function of (1) axial load, (2) radial load, and (3) centrifugal load on the bearing. Generally, radial loads on the order of 13,300 N (3000 pounds) per bearing or 26,700 N (6000 pounds) per bearing pair, could be expected to cause severe problems to any of the bearings with a 17,800 N (4000 pounds) axial load. Further, when possible temperature excursions are considered, even a load of 8900 N (2000 pounds) may be excessive. However, high momentary radial loads with a 3800 N (850 pounds) axial load would not be anticipated to cause catastrophic failure of the fuel pump bearing.

  6. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  7. Analysis of ITT scan bearing package (bearing package S/N 7-1004)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelotte, Erik; Kauppinen, John

    1991-01-01

    A geostationary operational environments satellite (GOES) East-West scan-bearing assembly was examined after having completed two and one-half years of operation. The following results were found: (1) lubrication breakdown was found in both bearings; (2) patchy wear-bands running only approximately half-way around the races indicated a load distribution in the ball groups consistent with a very low preload; (3) contact angles of 31.2 deg (S/N 1004) and 28.7 deg (S/N 1004A) were found in bearings whose contact angles are supposed to be 20+/-2 deg; and (4) contamination was present in the bearings.

  8. The evaluation of corrosion resistant rod end rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Giuntoli, K.; Imundo, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Recent developments on carburizing grades of stainless steels have provided new materials to produce corrosion resistant airframe control bearings. This paper presents the application of one of these new carburizing grades of stainless steel to rod end ball bearings. The outer ring of the rod end bearing is made out of carburized stainless steel, while the inner ring and balls are made out of through-hardened stainless steel. The stainless steel rod end bearings were evaluated according to various ASTM and Military specifications for performance and corrosion resistance. The stainless steel rod end bearings exceeded the performance requirements of standard rod end bearings (which are comprised of a carburized 8620 steel outer ring and 52100 steel inner ring and balls) in accordance with MIL-B-6039. The rod end bearings were evaluated in the radial fracture load, axial fracture load, and radial dynamic load tests. Also, salt spray and alternate immersion corrosion tests (ASTM B 117-85 and G 44-88, respectively) were conducted on the stainless steel rod end bearings. The stainless steel rod end bearings exhibited superior corrosion resistance to the standard 8620/52100 steel rod end bearings.

  9. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2010-01-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of…

  10. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  11. Ball Aerospace AMSD Progress Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Mark; Brown, Robert; Chaney, David; Lightsey, Paul; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current status of the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator program being performed by Ball Aerospace is presented. The hexagonal low-areal density Beryllium mirror blank has been fabricated and undergoing polishing at the time of this presentation.

  12. Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Subsystem (OMS) Engine Propellant Leakage Ball-Valve Shaft Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kathy; Buntain, Nick; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of propellant leakage across ball-valve shaft seals has been noted during the disassembly of five flight engines and one test engine at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, White Sands Test Facility. Based on data collected during the disassembly of these five engines, the consequences of propellant leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals can be divided into four primary areas of concern: Damage to the ball-valve pinion shafts, damage to sleeved bearings inside the ball-valve and actuator assemblies, degradation of the synthetic rubber o-rings used in the actuator assemblies, and corrosion and degradation to the interior of the actuator assemblies. The exact time at which leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals occurs has not been determined, however, the leakage most likely occurs during engine firings when, depending on the specification used, ball-valve cavity pressures range as high as 453 to 550 psia. This potential pressure range for the ball-valve cavities greatly exceeds the acceptance leakage test pressure of 332 psia. Since redesign and replacement of the ball-valve shaft seals is unlikely, the near term solution to prevent damage that occurs from shaft-seal leakage is to implement a routine overhaul and maintenance program for engines in the fleet. Recommended repair, verification, and possible preventative maintenance measures are discussed in the paper.

  13. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  14. MODIFIED BALL AND SOCKET COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Kalen, D.D.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is described in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement. (AEC)

  15. Modified Ball and Socket Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Conley, Jr, W. R.; Pitman, R. W.

    1961-05-23

    A ball and socket coupling arrangement is given in which the male and female members may be engaged or disengaged without visual aid. The female member has an internal spherical seat through which slots are provided to accommodate appropriately arranged and shaped ribs in the male ball member. After engagement of the members, one or both are rotated to lock them together to prevent accidental disengagement.

  16. Determination of the SSME high pressure oxidizer turbopump bearing temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.; Lumsden, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    The SSME high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings sometimes wear and experience heating and oxidation of the ball and raceway surfaces. So far it has been impossible to measure the temperature of the bearings directly during operation of the turbopumps. However, a method was developed for determining the surface temperature of the bearings from the composition of the oxides using oxidation samples for calibration and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) for chemical analysis.

  17. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  18. Development of high-speed rolling-element bearings. A historical and technical perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Research on large-bore ball and roller bearings for aircraft engines is described. Tapered roller bearings and small-bore bearings are discussed. Temperature capabilities of rolling element bearings for aircraft engines have moved from 450 to 589 K (350 to 600 F) with increased reliability. High bearing speeds to 3 million DN can be achieved with a reliability exceeding that which was common in commercial aircraft. Capabilities of available bearing steels and lubricants were defined and established. Computer programs for the analysis and design of rolling element bearings were developed and experimentally verified. The reported work is a summary of NASA contributions to high performance engine and transmission bearing capabilities.

  19. SSME Long-life Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butner, M. F.; Murphy, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid hydrostatic/ball bearings for LH2 and LO2 service in turbopumps were studied as a means of improving speed and life capabilities. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed with emphasis on achieving maximum stiffness and damping. Parallel load bearings were tested at steady-state and transient conditions with LH2 (externally fed) and LN2 (internally fed). The hydrostatic elements were tested with Freon 113 for empirical determination of dynamic characteristics. Tests using an eccentric journal for loading showed the externally and internally fed hydrostatic bearings to have significant separated coefficients of direct stiffness and damping. For the internally fed bearing, the strongly speed-dependent cross-coupling stiffness arising from fluid swirl, along with significant cross-coupling damping, resulted in low net effective stiffness and damping. The test method used can produce separated coefficients with a sufficiently elliptic journal orbit; otherwise, only net effective coefficients combining direct and cross-coupling terms can be determined. Testing with nonsynchronous excitation is recommended to avoid this restriction. Investigation of hard materials, including ceramics, is recommended as a means of eliminating the need for the rolling bearing for startup and shutdown support. The testing was performed in 1984 (LH2), 1985 (LN2) and 1985-86 (Freon).

  20. A. Palmgren Revisited: A Basis for Bearing Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1997-01-01

    Bearing technology, as well as the bearing industry, began to develop with the invention of the bicycle in the 1850's. At the same time, high-quality steel was made possible by the Bessemer process. In 1881, H. Hertz published his contact stress analysis. By 1902, R. Stribeck had published his work based on Hertz theory to calculate the maximum load of a radially loaded ball bearing. By 1920, all of the rolling bearing types used today were being manufactured. AISI 52100 bearing steel became the material of choice for these bearings. Beginning in 1918, engineers directed their attention to predicting the lives of these bearings. In 1924, A. Palmgren published a paper outlining his approach to bearing life prediction. This paper was the basis for the Lundberg-Palmgren life theory published in 1947. A critical review of the 1924 Palmgren paper is presented here together with a discussion of its effect on bearing life prediction.

  1. Study of methods for applying and enhancing transfer film coatings of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTEE) to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbo Pump (HPOTP) bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Dufrane, K. F.; Zugaro, F. F.

    1981-01-01

    Machines were constructed and evaluated for burnishing polytetrafluoroethylene on balls for use in the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). The most positive performance was obtained with single-ball burnishing, but one technique for burnishing three balls simultaneously holds promise. Evaluations of the coatings in a HPOTP bearing of earlier design (employed smaller diameter balls) showed very little life enhancement before high torque and ball and race wear initiated. Other coating techniques, such as molybdenum disulfide combined with PTFE transfer films, hold promise for providing the more durable quantities of solid lubricant needed for the bearings.

  2. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  3. Enhancing the Bounce of a Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2010-10-01

    In sports such as baseball, softball, golf, and tennis, a common objective is to hit the ball as fast or as far as possible. Another common objective is to hit the ball so that it spins as fast as possible, since the trajectory of the ball through the air is strongly affected by ball spin. In an attempt to enhance both the coefficient of restitution (COR) and the spin of a golf ball, I conducted several experiments to see what would happen when a 45-g, 42.8-mm diameter golf ball bounced on: (a) a 58-mm diameter, 103-g Super Ball®; (b) an 8-mm thick, 56-mm diameter circular disk of Super Ball material cut from a large Super Ball and glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick; and (c) a 3-mm thick sheet of rubber glued to a 3.4-kg lead brick. (See Fig. 1.)

  4. Active magnetic bearing-supported rotor with misaligned cageless backup bearings: A dropdown event simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halminen, Oskari; Kärkkäinen, Antti; Sopanen, Jussi; Mikkola, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMB) offer considerable benefits compared to regular mechanical bearings. On the other hand, they require backup bearings to avoid damage resulting from a failure in the component itself, or in the power or control system. During a rotor-bearing contact event - when the magnetic field has disappeared and the rotor drops on the backup bearings - the structure of the backup bearings has an impact on the dynamic actions of the rotor. In this paper, the dynamics of an active magnetic bearing-supported rotor during contact with backup bearings is studied with a simulation model. Modeling of the backup bearings is done using a comprehensive cageless ball bearing model. The elasticity of the rotor is described using the finite element method (FEM) and the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the system are reduced using component mode synthesis. Verification of the misaligned cageless backup bearings model is done by comparing the simulation results against the measurement results. The verified model with misaligned cageless backup bearings is found to correspond to the features of a real system.

  5. Turbocharger bearing retention and lubrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes exhausts gas driven turbocharger. It comprises a housing, a shaft within the housing having a longitudinal axis of rotation and a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air to the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated to the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, a bearing locating aperture in the bearing outer ring, and an elongated bearing location pin having a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of the shaft.

  6. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  7. Transmission Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to rolling element bearings in an OH-58 main rotor transmission. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from tests performed in the NASA Glenn 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when two unanticipated bearing failures occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears duplex ball bearings and spiral bevel pinion triplex ball bearings in a main rotor transmission.

  8. Bearing endurance tests in vacuum for sputtered molybdenum disulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1975-01-01

    Angular-contact, 440C stainless steel, ball bearings with sputtered MoS2 films 0.0000006 x 10-7m (6000 A) thick were evaluated in a vacuum bearing chamber (1750 rpm, 137.9-N- (31-lbf-) thrust load) for endurance. Two types of sputtered films were evaluated: (1) MOS2 sputtered directly onto bearing components, and (2) a thin 0.0000001 x 10-7m (1000 A) underlayer of Cr3Si2 subsequently sputtered with MoS2. Bearing test evaluations in vacuum showed that endurance lives of more than 1000 hours (105,000,000 cycles) were obtained with bearings (cage, races, and balls) directly sputtered with MoS2. The same endurance lives were also obtained when only the races and cage were sputtered with an underlayer of Cr3Si2 and subsequently with MoS2.

  9. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  10. How balls roll off tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, M. E.

    2005-08-01

    The motion of a ball rolling off the edge of a table is studied theoretically and experimentally. A detailed analysis of the motion requires consideration of an initial no-slip phase followed by a brief slipping phase. To obtain quantitative predictions for comparison with experiment, the equations were solved numerically. Data are obtained using video recordings, and the experimentally determined angular velocity before and after the ball leaves the table is compared with the theoretical calculations. The inadequacy of a previous analysis is demonstrated. Suggestions for other experiments are made.

  11. Ball lightning risk to aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, R.; Keul, A.

    2009-04-01

    Lightning is a rare but regular phenomenon for air traffic. Aircraft are designed to withstand lightning strikes. Research on lightning and aircraft can be called detailed and effective. In the last 57 years, 18 reported lightning aviation disasters with a fatality figure of at least 714 persons occurred. For comparison, the last JACDEC ten-year average fatality figure was 857. The majority encountered lightning in the climb, descent, approach and/or landing phase. Ball lightning, a metastable, rare lightning type, is also seen from and even within aircraft, but former research only reported individual incidents and did not generate a more detailed picture to ascertain whether it constitutes a significant threat to passenger and aircraft safety. Lacking established incident report channels, observations were often only passed on as "air-travel lore". In an effort to change this unsatisfactory condition, the authors have collected a first international dataset of 38 documented ball lightning aircraft incidents from 1938 to 2001 involving 13 reports over Europe, 13 over USA/Canada, and 7 over Russia. 18 (47%) reported ball lightning outside the aircraft, 18 (47%) inside, 2 cases lacked data. 8 objects caused minor damage, 8 major damage (total: 42%), only one a crash. No damage was reported in 18 cases. 3 objects caused minor crew injury. In most cases, ball lightning lasted several seconds. 11 (29%) incidents ended with an explosion of the object. A cloud-aircraft lightning flash was seen in only 9 cases (24%) of the data set. From the detailed accounts of air personnel in the last 70 years, it is evident that ball lightning is rarely, but consistently observed in connection with aircraft and can also occur inside the airframe. Reports often came from multiple professional witnesses and in several cases, damages were investigated by civil or military authorities. Although ball lightning is no main air traffic risk, the authors suggest that incident and accident

  12. Design and evaluation of a 3 million DN series-hybrid thrust bearing. [stability tests and fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The bearing, consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid-film bearing, was fatigue tested. Test conditions were representative of a mainshaft ball bearing in a gas turbine engine operating at maximum thrust load to simulate aircraft takeoff conditions. Tests were conducted up to 16000 rpm and at this speed an axial load of 15568 newtons (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the series-hybrid bearing principle, the effective ball bearing speed was reduced to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. It was concluded that a speed reduction of this magnitude results in a ten-fold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful evaluation of fluid-film bearing lubricant supply failure was performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm. A complete and smooth changeover to full-scale ball bearing operation was effected when the oil supply to the fluid-film bearing was cut off. Reactivation of the fluid-film oil supply system resulted in a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  13. Non-destructive testing of ceramic balls using high frequency ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petit, S; Duquennoy, M; Ouaftouh, M; Deneuville, F; Ourak, M; Desvaux, S

    2005-12-01

    Although ceramic balls are used more and more for bearings in the aerospace and space industries, defects in this type of ceramic material could be dangerous, particularly if such defects are located close to the surface. In this paper, we propose a non-destructive testing method for silicon nitride balls, based on ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy. Through the theoretical study of their elastic vibrations, it is possible to characterize the balls using a vibration mode that is similar to surface wave propagation. The proposed methodology can both excite spheroidal vibrations in the ceramic balls and detect such vibrations over a large frequency range. Studying their resonance spectrums allows the balls' elastic parameters be characterized. Ours is an original method that can quickly estimate the velocity of surface waves using high frequency resonances, which permits surface and sub-surface areas to be tested specifically. Two applications are described in this paper. Both use velocity measurements to achieve their different goals, the first to differentiate between flawless balls from different manufacturing processes, and the second to detect small defects, such as cracks. Our method is rapid and permits the entire ceramic ball to be tested in an industrial context. PMID:16083931

  14. High capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) for laser scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Sean M.

    2005-08-01

    A high capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) has been developed for the laser scanning market. The need for increasing accuracies in the prepress and print plate-making market is causing a shift from ball bearing to air bearing scanners. Aerostatic air bearings are a good option to meet this demand for better performance however, these bearings tend to be expensive and require an additional air supply, filtering and drying system. Commercially available aerodynamic bearings have been typically limited to small mirrors, on the order of 3.5" diameter and less than 0.5" thick. A large optical facet, hence a larger mirror, is required to generate the high number of pixels needed for this type of application. The larger optic necessitated the development of a high capacity 'self-generating' or aerodynamic air bearing that would meet the needs of the optical scanning market. Its capacity is rated up to 6.0" diameter and 1.0" thick optics. The performance of an aerodynamic air bearing is better than a ball bearing and similar to an aerostatic air bearing. It retains the low costs while eliminating the need for ancillary equipment required by an aerostatic bearing.

  15. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  16. Estimation of bearing contact angle in-situ by X-ray kinematography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, P. H.; Manders, F.

    1982-01-01

    The mounted, preloaded contact angle of the structural bearings in the assembled design mechanical assembly was measured. A modification of the Turns method is presented, based upon the clarity and definition of moving parts achieved with X-ray technique and cinematic display. Contact angle is estimated by counting the number of bearings passing a given point as a function of number of turns of the shaft. Ball and pitch diameter variations are discussed. Ball train and shaft angle uncertainties are also discussed.

  17. Aligner for Elastic Collisions of Dropped Balls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellen, Walter Roy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an aligner that permits dropping a stack of any number of balls of different sizes, elasticities, hardnesses, or types to observe the rebound of the top ball. Experimental results allow a reasonable comparison with theory. (MVL)

  18. High pressure oxygen turbopump bearing cage stability analyses. [space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriman, T. L.; Kannel, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The low service life of the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings used in the space shuttle main engine was examined by use of the Battelle "BASDAP' bearing computer stability model. The dynamic instability of the bearing cage resulted in excessive wear and eventual failure of the unit. By maintaining a cage/race clearance of no more than 0.25 millimeters (0.010 inches), ball/pocket clearance of no less than 0.54 millimeters (0.025 inches), dynamic balancing of the cages, and maintaining adequate lubricant films between the balls and races, cage instability and subsequent bearing degradation can be reduced.

  19. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  20. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  1. Does Ease to Block a Ball Affect Perceived Ball Speed? Examination of Alternative Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Jessica K.; Sugovic, Mila

    2012-01-01

    According to an action-specific account of perception, the perceived speed of a ball can be a function of the ease to block the ball. Balls that are easier to stop look like they are moving slower than balls that are more difficult to stop. This was recently demonstrated with a modified version of the classic computer game Pong (Witt & Sugovic,…

  2. Secrets of the Crystal Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croucher, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a crystal ball known as "The Flash Mind Reader" is played. "The Flash Mind Reader" is a mathematics game in which the player is invited to select any-two digit number and then subtract the sum of these two digits from the original number. A chart is provided in which the (adjusted) number they obtained will have a symbol…

  3. Idea Bank: Wiffle Ball Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael

    2009-01-01

    Projectile motion, a cornerstone topic of introductory physics, is usually a student's first exposure to the problem-solving techniques used in this subject. Often, this is an inactive learning experience--students work with pencil and paper to read and solve projectile motion problems (e.g., diagrams and descriptions of balls being hit, kicked,…

  4. Laboratory-produced ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golka, Robert K., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    For 25 years I have actively been searching for the true nature of ball lightning and attempting to reproduce it at will in the laboratory. As one might expect, many unidentified lights in the atmosphere have been called ball lightning, including Texas Maffa lights (automobile headlights), flying saucers (UFOs), swamp gas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, etc. For 15 years I thought ball lightning was strictly a high-voltage phenomenon. It was not until 1984 when I was short-circuiting the electrical output of a diesel electric railroad locomotive that I realized that the phenomenon was related more to a high current. Although I am hoping for some other types of ball lightning to emerge such as strictly electrostatic-electromagnetic manifestations, I have been unlucky in finding laboratory provable evidence. Cavity-formed plasmodes can be made by putting a 2-inch burning candle in a home kitchen microwave oven. The plasmodes float around for as long as the microwave energy is present.

  5. Ball Aerospace Actuator Cryogenic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Lana; Lightsey, Paul; Quigley, Phil; Rutkowski, Joel; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ambient testing characterizing step size and repeatability for the Ball Aerospace Cryogenic Nano-Positioner actuators for the AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program has been completed and are presented. Current cryogenic testing is underway. Earlier cryogenic test results for a pre-cursor engineering model are presented.

  6. Design and evaluation of a 3 million DN series-hybrid thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and experimental evaluation of a series-hybrid thrust bearing, consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid-film bearing, is presented. Tests were conducted up to 16,000 rpm and at this speed an axial load of 15,600 N (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the series-hybrid bearing principle, the effective ball bearing speed was reduced to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. A speed reduction of this magnitude would result in a tenfold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful evaluation of fluid-film bearing lubricant supply failure was performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm. A complete and smooth changeover to full-scale ball bearing operation was effected when the oil supply to the fluid-film bearing was cut off. Reactivation of the fluid-film oil supply system produced a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  7. The Efficiency of Small Bearings in Instruments of the Type Used in Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1921-01-01

    This report deals with the construction and properties of bearings and pivots for use in instruments. The static and running friction for both thrust and radial loads was determined for a number of conical pivots and cylindrical and ball bearings. The static rocking friction was also measured for several conical and ball bearings under a heavy load, especially to determine their suitability for use in N. P. L. (National Physical Laboratory) type wind tunnel balance. In constructing conical pivots and sockets it was found that the pivots should be hardened and highly polished, preferably with a revolving lap, and that the sockets should be made by punching with a hardened and polished punch. It was found that for a light load the conical pivots give less friction than any other type, and their wearing qualities when hardened are excellent. Very small ball bearings are unsatisfactory because the proportional accuracy of the balls and races is not high enough to insure smooth running. For rocking pivots under heavy loads it was found that a ball-and-socket bearing, consisting of a hemispherical socket and a sphere of smaller diameter concentric with it, with a row of small balls resting between the two, was superior to a pivot resting in a socket. It was found that vibration such as occurs in an airplane will greatly reduce the static friction of a pivot or bearing, in some cases to as little as one-twentieth of its static value.

  8. Playing Ball in a Space Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    How does artificial gravity affect the path of a thrown ball? This paper contrasts ball trajectories on the Little Prince's asteroid planet B-612 and Arthur C. Clarke's rotating-drum spacecraft of 2001, and demonstrates curve balls with multiple loops in the latter environment.

  9. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  10. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  11. Extending the life of the SSME HPOTP through the use of annular hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, Joseph K.; Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Nolan, Steven A.; Tabibzadeh, Ramin

    1992-07-01

    A new fluid film bearing package is presented for incorporation into the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump. This fluid film element functions as both the pump end bearing and the preburner pump rear wear ring seal. Most importantly, it replaces the duplex ball bearing package which has been the primary life limiting component in the turbopump. The design constraints and solutions are presented along with the effects of the bearing package on the hydrodynamic and rotordynamic performance of the turbopump.

  12. Software Developed for Analyzing High- Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2005-01-01

    COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball & Roller Bearing Analysis--Advanced High Speed, J.V. Poplawski & Associates, Bethlehem, PA) is used for the design and analysis of rolling element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loading. The code estimates bearing fatigue life by calculating three-dimensional subsurface stress fields developed within the bearing raceways. It provides a state-of-the-art interactive design environment for bearing engineers within a single easy-to-use design-analysis package. The code analyzes flexible or rigid shaft systems containing up to five bearings acted upon by radial, thrust, and moment loads in 5 degrees of freedom. Bearing types include high-speed ball, cylindrical roller, and tapered roller bearings. COBRA-AHS is the first major upgrade in 30 years of such commercially available bearing software. The upgrade was developed under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from the NASA Glenn Research Center, and incorporates the results of 30 years of NASA and industry bearing research and technology.

  13. Aerodynamics of a golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Son, Kwangmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    It is well known that the drag on a dimpled ball is much lower than that on smooth ball. Choi et al. (Phys. Fluids, 2006) showed that turbulence is generated through the instability of shear layer separating from the edge of dimples and delays flow separation. Based on this mechanism, we devise a new golf ball with grooves on the surface but without any dimples. To investigate the aerodynamic performance of this new golf ball, an experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at the Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x10^5 - 2.7 x10^5 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of α=0 - 0.5, which are within the ranges of real golf-ball velocity and spin rate. We measure the drag and lift forces on the grooved ball and compare them with those of smooth ball. At zero spin, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball shows a rapid fall-off at a critical Reynolds number and maintains a minimum value which is lower by 50% than that on smooth ball. At non-zero α, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, but is still lower by 40% than that on smooth ball. The lift coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, and is 100% larger than that on smooth ball. The aerodynamic characteristics of grooved ball is in general quite similar to that of dimpled ball. Some more details will be discussed in the presentation.

  14. Evaluation of bearing mounting design and excessive wear phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of bearing thermal growth on the effectiveness of the bearing preload springs on the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (SSME HPTOP) were examined. The SSME HPTOP turbine end bearings, preload spring, and bearing mounting design were evaluated relative to spalling, excessive ball wear, possible thermal problems, and cage delamination. The magnitude of the thermal stresses required to cause high levels of ball wear were calculated. Plots of maximum sheer stress and maximum reversing shear versus the axial load for the 57 mm SSME HPTOP bearing were created. A plot of the bearing thermal growth versus preload spring deflection was generated. It was determined that metallic wear, rather than thermal growth, caused enlargement of the contact zone between ball and races, that high fatigue-inducing shear stresses are generated under increased loads, and that at temperatures between 100 and 150 deg C, the springs bottom out and very high loads are developed in the bearing. Allowance for adequate spring movement after assembly is recommended.

  15. Fate of thermal log type Q balls

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Kasuya, Shinta; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-11-15

    We study time evolution of the Q ball in thermal logarithmic potential using lattice simulations. As the temperature decreases due to the cosmic expansion, the thermal logarithmic term in the potential is eventually overcome by a mass term, and we confirm that the Q ball transforms from the thick-wall type to the thin-wall type for a positive coefficient of radiative corrections to the mass term, as recently suggested. Moreover, we find that the Q ball finally ''melts down'' when the Q-ball solution disappears. We also discuss the effects of this phenomenon on the detectability of gravitational waves from the Q-ball formation.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Space Suit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Ray, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 pounds per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing designs without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race: 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approximately 2 years), bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination around a maximum contact stress that will allow the bearing to survive the life of an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an exploration mission.

  17. Bearing tester data compilation, analysis and reporting and bearing math modeling, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. D.; Montgomery, E. E.; New, L. S.; Stone, M. A.; Tiller, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical models of high speed angular contact ball bearings operating in LOX and LN2 were developed and verified with limited test data in an effort to further understand the parameters that determine or effect the SSME turbopump bearing operational characteristics and service life. The SHABERTH bearing analysis program which was adapted to evaluate shaft bearing systems in cryogenics is not capable of accommodating varying thermal properties and two phase flow. A bearing model with this capability was developed using the SINDA thermal analyzer. Iteration between the SHABERTH and the SINDA models enable the establishment of preliminary bounds for stable operation in LN2. These limits were established in terms of fluid flow, fluid inlet temperature, and axial load for a shaft speed of 30,000 RPM.

  18. Analysis of coolant flow and heat transfer in the SSME HPOTP Number 4 bearing assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, S. F.; Costes, N. C.

    1990-01-01

    The PHOENICS code has been applied to simulate the flow of liquid oxygen through the number 4 ball bearing assembly of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High-Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump. The Body-Fitted Coordinate system capability of PHOENICS was utilized to create a geometrically accurate model. Effects accounted for by the model include the rotation rate of the calculation domain, viscous heating in the liquid oxygen and two-phase effects due to LOX boiling. A separation program was used to account for conduction within a ball bearing element which was coupled with the PHOENICS flow and heat transfer analysis. Solutions have been obtained for the velocity and temperature fields within the LOX coolant and the temperature within the ball element. The predicted ball temperatures indicate that the coolant is boiling in the region near the ball surface.

  19. Polymer-composite ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Bychkov, V L

    2002-01-15

    Investigations into the state of ball lightning (BL) have been made, and both theory and experiments, related to so-called "polymer-composite" ball lightning, are presented. The properties of such a polymeric BL have been described and are that of a long-lived object capable of storing high energy. Results of experiments, starting with polymeric components in erosive gas discharge experiments, are described and discussed. The model of BL as a highly charged polymer-dielectric structure is described. According to this model BL appears as the result of the aggregation of natural polymers, such as lignin and cellulose, soot, polymeric silica and other natural dust particles. Its ability to glow is explained by the appearance over its perimeter of gas discharges near the highly charged BL surface, and electrical breakdown of some regions on the surface, consisting of polymerized and aggregated threads. PMID:16210170

  20. Evaluation of SSME high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of the bearings produced conclusive evidence that a very high axial load was applied to bearing 8517903 during a significant portion of the service time. The high loads caused serious ball and race wear and surface fatigue pitting. In all likelihood, continued operation of this bearing with the high axial load would have caused increasing deterioration and catastrophic failure. In contrast, bearing 8517900 showed much less deterioration and probably had experienced only the axial loads deliberately applied by the preload spring. Bearing 8517900 represents the best-case operation with the loads controlled to the levels intended in the design. Fatigue life calculations on bearing 8517903 with an axial load of 27,000 N showed the intolerance of the bearing to such load levels.

  1. Keeping Your Eyes Continuously on the Ball While Running for Catchable and Uncatchable Fly Balls

    PubMed Central

    Postma, Dees B. W.; den Otter, A. Rob; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When faced with a fly ball approaching along the sagittal plane, fielders need information for the control of their running to the interception location. This information could be available in the initial part of the ball trajectory, such that the interception location can be predicted from its initial conditions. Alternatively, such predictive information is not available, and running to the interception location involves continuous visual guidance. The latter type of control would predict that fielders keep looking at the approaching ball for most of its flight, whereas the former type of control would fit with looking at the ball during the early part of the ball's flight; keeping the eyes on the ball during the remainder of its trajectory would not be necessary when the interception location can be inferred from the first part of the ball trajectory. The present contribution studied visual tracking of approaching fly balls. Participants were equipped with a mobile eye tracker. They were confronted with tennis balls approaching from about 20 m, and projected in such a way that some balls were catchable and others were not. In all situations, participants almost exclusively tracked the ball with their gaze until just before the catch or until they indicated that a ball was uncatchable. This continuous tracking of the ball, even when running close to their maximum speeds, suggests that participants employed continuous visual control rather than running to an interception location known from looking at the early part of the ball flight. PMID:24670972

  2. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Eric R.; Vigliano, Vincent C.; Weiss, Jeffrey R.; Moerlein, Alex W.; Vallance, R. Ryan

    2007-03-15

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  3. Ball Aerospace Hybrid Space Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, W.; Glaister, D. S.; Hendershott, P.; Kotsubo, V.; Lock, J. S.; Marquardt, E.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the design, development, testing, and performance at Ball Aerospace of a long-life hybrid (combination of Stirling and Joule-Thomson [J-T] thermodynamic cycles) space cryocooler. Hybrid coolers are synergistic combinations of two thermodynamic cycles that combine advantages of each cycle to yield overall improved performance. Hybrid cooler performance advantages include: 1) load leveling of large heat loads; 2) remote cryogenic cooling with very low to negligible induced vibration and jitter; 3) very low redundant (off state) cooler penalties; 4) high power efficiency, especially at low temperatures; and 5) simplified system integration with capability to cross gimbals and no need for thermal straps or switches. Ball Aerospace is currently developing several different hybrid cooler systems. The 35 K hybrid cooler provides 2.0 W at 35 K and 8.5 W at 85 K with an emphasis on load leveling of high transient heat loads and remote, low vibration cooling. The 10 K hybrid cooler provides 200 mW at 10 K, 700 mW at 15 K, and 10.7 W at 85 K with an emphasis on power efficiency. In addition, Ball Aerospace built and tested a complete hybrid cooler that met the requirements of the JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) cooler including providing 80 mW at 6 K and 100 mW at 18 K for a total system (28 V) power of 310 W.

  4. Friction in metal-on-metal total disc arthroplasty: effect of ball radius.

    PubMed

    Moghadas, Parshia; Mahomed, Aziza; Hukins, David W L; Shepherd, Duncan E T

    2012-02-01

    Total disc arthroplasty (TDA) can be used to replace a degenerated intervertebral disc in the spine. There are different designs of prosthetic discs, but one of the most common is a ball-and-socket combination. Contact between the bearing surfaces can result in high frictional torque, which can then result in wear and implant loosening. This study was designed to determine the effects of ball radius on friction. Generic models of metal-on-metal TDA were manufactured with ball radii of 10, 12, 14 and 16 mm, with a radial clearance of 0.015 mm. A simulator was used to test each sample in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation at frequencies of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75 and 2 Hz under loads of 50, 600, 1200 and 2000 N, in new born calf serum. Frictional torque was measured and Stribeck curves were plotted to illustrate the lubrication regime in each case. It was observed that implants with a smaller ball radius showed lower friction and showed boundary and mixed lubrication regimes, whereas implants with larger ball radius showed boundary lubrication only. This study suggests designing metal-on-metal TDAs with ball radius of 10 or 12 mm, in order to reduce wear and implant loosening. PMID:22177670

  5. Replacement bearing for Rocketdyne SSME HPOTPs using alternate self-lubricating retainer materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, J.; Dufrane, K.; Kannel, J.

    1992-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop replacement bearings for the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) high pressure oxidizer turbopumps (HPOTPs). The replacement bearings consisted of standard balls and races with a special Battelle Self-Lubricating Insert Configuration (BASIC) retainer. The BASIC retainer consists of a phosphor bronze housing with inserts consisting of a polytetrafluoretheylene (PTFE) and bronze compound. The PTFE contacts the balls and the land guiding surface on the outer race. A PTFE transfer film is formed on balls and races, which lubricates the critical interfaces. The BASIC retainer is a one-to-one replacement for the current Armalon retainer, but has superior lubricating properties and is stronger over the broad temperature range anticipated for the HPOTP bearings. As a part of the project 40 sets of balls and races (two sizes) and 52 BASIC retainers were shipped to NASA/MSFC.

  6. Replacement bearing for Rocketdyne SSME HPOTPs using alternate self-lubricating retainer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, J.; Dufrane, K.; Kannel, J.

    1992-04-01

    Research was conducted to develop replacement bearings for the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) high pressure oxidizer turbopumps (HPOTPs). The replacement bearings consisted of standard balls and races with a special Battelle Self-Lubricating Insert Configuration (BASIC) retainer. The BASIC retainer consists of a phosphor bronze housing with inserts consisting of a polytetrafluoretheylene (PTFE) and bronze compound. The PTFE contacts the balls and the land guiding surface on the outer race. A PTFE transfer film is formed on balls and races, which lubricates the critical interfaces. The BASIC retainer is a one-to-one replacement for the current Armalon retainer, but has superior lubricating properties and is stronger over the broad temperature range anticipated for the HPOTP bearings. As a part of the project 40 sets of balls and races (two sizes) and 52 BASIC retainers were shipped to NASA/MSFC.

  7. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  8. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Ball Failures Under Rolling-contact Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Robert H; Bear, H Robert; Carter, Thomas L

    1957-01-01

    The rolling-contact fatigue spin rig was used to test bails of a bearing steel at maximum Hertz stresses of 600,000 to 750,000 psi. The effect of fiber orientation was observed with the ball track restricted to passing directly over the poles, coincident with the equator, or randomly around the ball. The polar areas were found to be weaker in fatigue than the nonpolar areas. This resulted in a much greater portion of the failures occurring in the polar areas than would be expected from a homogeneous material. The early failures are discussed.

  9. Precise timing when hitting falling balls

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B. J.

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  10. Precise timing when hitting falling balls.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Eli; Driesen, Ben; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2014-01-01

    People are extremely good at hitting falling balls with a baseball bat. Despite the ball's constant acceleration, they have been reported to time hits with a standard deviation of only about 7 ms. To examine how people achieve such precision, we compared performance when there were no added restrictions, with performance when looking with one eye, when vision was blurred, and when various parts of the ball's trajectory were hidden from view. We also examined how the size of the ball and varying the height from which it was dropped influenced temporal precision. Temporal precision did not become worse when vision was blurred, when the ball was smaller, or when balls falling from different heights were randomly interleaved. The disadvantage of closing one eye did not exceed expectations from removing one of two independent estimates. Precision was higher for slower balls, but only if the ball being slower meant that one saw it longer before the hit. It was particularly important to see the ball while swinging the bat. Together, these findings suggest that people time their hits so precisely by using the changing elevation throughout the swing to adjust the bat's movement to that of the ball. PMID:24904380

  11. Lubrication and performance of high-speed rolling-element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Schuller, F. T.; Coe, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Trends in aircraft engine operating speeds have dictated the need for rolling-element bearings capable of speeds to 3 million DN. A review of high-speed rolling-element bearing state-of-the-art performance and lubrication is presented. Through the use of under-race lubrication and bearing thermal management bearing operation can be obtained to speeds of 3 million DN. Jet lubricated ball bearings are limited to 2.5 million DN for large bore sizes and to 3 million DN for small bore sizes. Current computer programs are able to predict bearing thermal performance.

  12. Evaluation of a series hybrid thrust bearing at DN values to three million. 2: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eusepi, M.; Winn, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of tests made to determine the experimental performance of a series hybrid bearing are reported. The bearing consists of a 150 mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid film bearing fitting an envelope with an outer radius of 86.4 mm (3.4 in.) and inner radius of 71 mm (2.8 in.). Tests were conducted up to 16,500 rpm, at which speed an axial load of 15,568 N (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the employment of the series hybrid bearing principle, it was possible to reduce the effective ball bearing speed to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. A reduction of this magnitude should result in a tenfold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful simulation of fluid film bearing lubricant supply failure, performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm, resulted in complete and smooth change over to full scale ball bearing operation when the oil supply to the fluid film bearing was discontinued. Reactivation of the fluid film supply system produced a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  13. System for testing bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, John C.

    1993-07-01

    Disclosed here is a system for testing bearings wherein a pair of spaced bearings provides support for a shaft on which is mounted a bearing to be tested, this bearing being mounted in a bearing holder spaced from and in alignment with the pair of bearings. The bearing holder is provided with an annular collar positioned in an opening in the bearing holder for holding the bearing to be tested. A screw threaded through the bearing holder into engagement with the annular collar can be turned to force the collar radially out of alignment with the pair of bearings to apply a radial load to the bearing.

  14. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  15. Grease Inhibits Stress-Corrosion Cracking In Bearing Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, Robert F.; Mcvey, Scott E.

    1991-01-01

    Coating with suitable grease found to inhibit stress-corrosion cracking in bore of inner race of ball-bearing assembly operating in liquid oxygen. Protects bore and its corner radii from corrosion-initiating and -accelerating substances like moisture and contaminants, which enter during assembly. Operating life extended at low cost, and involves very little extra assembly time.

  16. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  17. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  18. Adiabatic invariance of oscillons/I -balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Takeda, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    Real scalar fields are known to fragment into spatially localized and long-lived solitons called oscillons or I -balls. We prove the adiabatic invariance of the oscillons/I -balls for a potential that allows periodic motion even in the presence of non-negligible spatial gradient energy. We show that such a potential is uniquely determined to be the quadratic one with a logarithmic correction, for which the oscillons/I -balls are absolutely stable. For slightly different forms of the scalar potential dominated by the quadratic one, the oscillons/I -balls are only quasistable, because the adiabatic charge is only approximately conserved. We check the conservation of the adiabatic charge of the I -balls in numerical simulation by slowly varying the coefficient of logarithmic corrections. This unambiguously shows that the longevity of oscillons/I -balls is due to the adiabatic invariance.

  19. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOEpatents

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  20. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  1. Analysis of Space Station Centrifuge Rotor Bearing Systems: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, Joseph V.; Loewenthal, Stuart H.; Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Morales, Wilfredo; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    A team of NASA bearing and lubrication experts was assembled to assess the risk for the rolling-element bearings used in the International Space Station (ISS) centrifuge rotor (CR) to seize or otherwise fail to survive for the required 10-year life. The CR was designed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and their subcontractor, NEC Toshiba Space Systems, Ltd. (NTSpace). The NASA team performed a design audit for the most critical rolling-element bearing systems and reviewed the lubricant selected. There is uncertainty regarding the ability of the Braycote 601 grease (Castrol Limited) to reliably provide the 10-year continuous life required without relubrication of the system. The fatigue life of the Rotor Shaft Assembly (RSA) spring loaded face-to-face mount at a 99-percent probability of survival (L1 life) for the ball bearing set was estimated at 700 million hours and the single ball bearing (Row 3) at 58 million hours. These lives satisfy the mission requirements for fatigue. Rolling-element seizure tests on the RSA and fluid slip joint bearings were found unlikely to stop the centrifuge, which can cause damage to the ISS structure. The spin motor encoder duplex angular-contact ball bearings have a hard preload and a large number of small balls have the highest risk of failure. These bearings were not tested for seizure even though they are less tolerant to debris or internal clearance reductions.

  2. Multifractal properties of ball milling dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Budroni, M. A. Pilosu, V.; Rustici, M.; Delogu, F.

    2014-06-15

    This work focuses on the dynamics of a ball inside the reactor of a ball mill. We show that the distribution of collisions at the reactor walls exhibits multifractal properties in a wide region of the parameter space defining the geometrical characteristics of the reactor and the collision elasticity. This feature points to the presence of restricted self-organized zones of the reactor walls where the ball preferentially collides and the mechanical energy is mainly dissipated.

  3. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  4. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  5. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  6. I-ball formation with logarithmic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takeda, Naoyuki E-mail: takedan@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-07-01

    A coherently oscillating real scalar field with potential shallower than quadratic one fragments into spherical objects called I-balls. We study the I-ball formation for logarithmic potential which appears in many cosmological models. We perform lattice simulations and find that the I-balls are formed when the potential becomes dominated by the quadratic term. Furthermore, we estimate the I-ball profile assuming that the adiabatic invariant is conserved during formation and obtain the result that agrees to the numerical simulations.

  7. Past Performance analysis of HPOTP bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.; Dolan, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The past performance analysis conducted on three High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings from the Space Shuttle Main Engine is presented. Metallurgical analysis of failed bearing balls and races, and wear track and crack configuration analyses were carried out. In addition, one bearing was tested in laboratory at very high axial loads. The results showed that the cracks were surface initiated and propagated into subsurface locations at relatively small angles. Subsurface cracks were much more extensive than was appeared on the surface. The location of major cracks in the races corresponded to high radial loads rather than high axial loads. There was evidence to suggest that the inner races were heated to elevated temperatures. A failure scenario was developed based on the above findings. According to this scenario the HPOTP bearings are heated by a combination of high loads and high coefficient of friction (poor lubrication). Different methods of extending the HPOTP bearing life are also discussed. These include reduction of axial loads, improvements in bearing design, lubrication and cooling, and use of improved bearing materials.

  8. Effect of ball geometry on endurance limit in bending of drilled balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Four designs of drilled (cylindrically hollow) balls were tested for resistance to bending fatigue. Bending fatigue has been demonstrated to be a limiting factor in previous evaluations of the drilled ball concept. A web reinforced drilled ball was most successful in resisting bending fatigue. Another design of through drilled design, involving a heavier wall than the standard reference ball, also showed significant improvement in resistance to bending fatigue.

  9. The Soccer-Ball Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossenfelder, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    The idea that Lorentz-symmetry in momentum space could be modified but still remain observer-independent has received quite some attention in the recent years. This modified Lorentz-symmetry, which has been argued to arise in Loop Quantum Gravity, is being used as a phenomenological model to test possibly observable effects of quantum gravity. The most pressing problem in these models is the treatment of multi-particle states, known as the 'soccer-ball problem'. This article briefly reviews the problem and the status of existing solution attempts.

  10. The performance and application of high speed long life LH2 hybrid bearings for reusable rocket engine turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Nielson, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Data are presented for two different experimental programs which were conducted to investigate the characteristics of a hybrid (hydrostatic/ball) bearing operating in liquid hydrogen. The same bearing design was used in both programs. Analytical predictions were made of the bearing characteristics and are compared with the experimental results when possible. The first program used a bearing tester to determine the steady state, transient, and cyclic life characteristics of the bearing over a wide range of operating conditions. The second program demonstrated the feasibility of applying hybrid bearings to an actual high speed turbopump by retrofitting and then testing an existing liquid hydrogen turbopump with the bearings.

  11. Mechanical design problems associated with turbopump fluid film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evces, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Most high speed cryogenic turbopumps for liquid propulsion rocket engines currently use ball or roller contact bearings for rotor support. The operating speeds, loads, clearances, and environments of these pumps combine to make bearing wear a limiting factor on turbopump life. An example is the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) used in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Although the HPOTP design life is 27,000 seconds at 30,000 rpms, or approximately 50 missions, bearings must currently be replaced after 2 missions. One solution to the bearing wear problem in the HPOTP, as well as in future turbopump designs, is the utilization of fluid film bearings in lieu of continuous contact bearings. Hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, and damping seal bearings are all replacement candidates for contact bearings in rocket engine high speed turbomachinery. These three types of fluid film bearings have different operating characteristics, but they share a common set of mechanical design opportunities and difficulties. Results of research to define some of the mechanical design issues are given. Problems considered include transient strat/stop rub, non-operational rotor support, bearing wear inspection and measurement, and bearing fluid supply route. Emphasis is given to the HPOTP preburner pump (PBP) bearing, but the results are pertinent to high-speed cryogenic turbomachinery in general.

  12. Design and fabrication of prototype system for early warning of impending bearing failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meacher, J.; Chen, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    A test program was conducted with the objective of developing a method and equipment for on-line monitoring of installed ball bearings to detect deterioration or impending failure of the bearings. The program was directed at the spin-axis bearings of a control moment gyro. The bearings were tested at speeds of 6000 and 8000 rpm, thrust loads from 50 to 1000 pounds, with a wide range of lubrication conditions, with and without a simulated fatigue spall implanted in the inner race ball track. It was concluded that a bearing monitor system based on detection and analysis of modulations of a fault indicating bearing resonance frequency can provide a low threshold of sensitivity.

  13. Determination of Rolling-Element Fatigue Life From Computer Generated Bearing Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2003-01-01

    Two types of rolling-element bearings representing radial loaded and thrust loaded bearings were used for this study. Three hundred forty (340) virtual bearing sets totaling 31400 bearings were randomly assembled and tested by Monte Carlo (random) number generation. The Monte Carlo results were compared with endurance data from 51 bearing sets comprising 5321 bearings. A simple algebraic relation was established for the upper and lower L(sub 10) life limits as function of number of bearings failed for any bearing geometry. There is a fifty percent (50 percent) probability that the resultant bearing life will be less than that calculated. The maximum and minimum variation between the bearing resultant life and the calculated life correlate with the 90-percent confidence limits for a Weibull slope of 1.5. The calculated lives for bearings using a load-life exponent p of 4 for ball bearings and 5 for roller bearings correlated with the Monte Carlo generated bearing lives and the bearing data. STLE life factors for bearing steel and processing provide a reasonable accounting for differences between bearing life data and calculated life. Variations in Weibull slope from the Monte Carlo testing and bearing data correlated. There was excellent agreement between percent of individual components failed from Monte Carlo simulation and that predicted.

  14. Rolling Element Bearing Diagnostics in Run-To Lifetime Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Ribadeneira, X.; Billington, S.; Kurfess, T.

    2001-09-01

    Bearing failure is one of the foremost causes of breakdown in rotating machinery. Such failures can be catastrophic and can result in costly downtime. To date, most research has studied crack propagation resulting from artificial or 'seeded' damage. This damage has been induced in bearings by: scratching the surface, introducing debris into the lubricant or machined with an electrical discharge. The work presented here involves running new undamaged ball and roller bearings through to failure. Traditional vibration metrics such as: root mean square, peak value, kurtosis and crest factor are recorded through the test duration from accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors.

  15. Using Ruby Balls As Fiducial Marks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Nance M.

    1990-01-01

    Combination of basic and advanced techniques yields new capability for inspection. In new technique, surface first inspected with fluorescent penetrant dye to reveal flaws. Ruby ball of known diameter placed near flaw having to be measured. Flaw and ball observed through magnifying video system that can "freeze" image.

  16. NCI and Leidos Play Ball | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer The ping of an aluminum bat off a ball or the thump of a pop-up fly ball caught in a glove are two sounds familiar to baseball fans. Slow-pitch softball sounds—like those in the August game between mixed teams of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research (formerly SAIC-Frederick) players—are similar.

  17. Flicker Ball, Physical Education: 5551.34.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Paul L.

    This course outline is a guide for teaching skills of flicker ball in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, game situations, class tournaments, and tests that focus on mastery of skills, understanding of rules, and development of techniques in shooting and passing. Course content includes the following: (a) history of flicker ball, (b)…

  18. Some Mathematics and Physics of Ball Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Gives examples on the applications of arithmetic, geometry, and some calculus, vector algebra, and mechanics to ball games. Suggestions for further interesting investigations are provided together with references to other articles and books on applications of mathematics and physics to ball games and sports in general. (JN)

  19. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  20. Incorporating general race and housing flexibility and deadband in rolling element bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. R.; Vallance, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for including the effects of general race and housing compliance and outer race-to-housing deadband (clearance) in rolling element bearing mechanics analysis is presented. It is shown that these effects can cause significant changes in bearing stiffness characteristics, which are of major importance in rotordynamic response of turbomachinery and other rotating systems. Preloading analysis is demonstrated with the finite element/contact mechanics hybrid method applied to a 45 mm angular contact ball bearing.

  1. F-term inflation Q-balls

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2006-02-15

    A general analysis of Q-ball solutions of the supersymmetric F-term hybrid inflation field equations is given. The solutions consist of a complex inflaton field and a real symmetry-breaking field, with a conserved global charge associated with the inflaton. It is shown that the Q-ball solutions for any value of the superpotential coupling, {kappa}, may be obtained from those with {kappa}=1 by rescaling the space coordinates. The complete range of Q-ball solutions for the case {kappa}=1 is given, from which all possible F-term inflation Q-balls can be obtained. The possible role of F-term inflation Q-balls in cosmology is discussed.

  2. Self-dispersed crumpled graphene balls in oil for friction and wear reduction

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xuan; Koltonow, Andrew R.; He, Xingliang; Jang, Hee Dong; Wang, Qian; Chung, Yip-Wah; Huang, Jiaxing

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles are often used as lubricant additives because they are capable of entering tribological contacts to reduce friction and protect surfaces from wear. They tend to be more stable than molecular additives under high thermal and mechanical stresses during rubbing. It is highly desirable for these particles to remain well dispersed in oil without relying on molecular ligands. Borrowing from the analogy that pieces of paper that are crumpled do not readily stick to each other (unlike flat sheets), we expect that ultrafine particles resembling miniaturized crumpled paper balls should self-disperse in oil and could act like nanoscale ball bearings to reduce friction and wear. Here we report the use of crumpled graphene balls as a high-performance additive that can significantly improve the lubrication properties of polyalphaolefin base oil. The tribological performance of crumpled graphene balls is only weakly dependent on their concentration in oil and readily exceeds that of other carbon additives such as graphite, reduced graphene oxide, and carbon black. Notably, polyalphaolefin base oil with only 0.01–0.1 wt % of crumpled graphene balls outperforms a fully formulated commercial lubricant in terms of friction and wear reduction. PMID:26811466

  3. Self-dispersed crumpled graphene balls in oil for friction and wear reduction.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xuan; Koltonow, Andrew R; He, Xingliang; Jang, Hee Dong; Wang, Qian; Chung, Yip-Wah; Huang, Jiaxing

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafine particles are often used as lubricant additives because they are capable of entering tribological contacts to reduce friction and protect surfaces from wear. They tend to be more stable than molecular additives under high thermal and mechanical stresses during rubbing. It is highly desirable for these particles to remain well dispersed in oil without relying on molecular ligands. Borrowing from the analogy that pieces of paper that are crumpled do not readily stick to each other (unlike flat sheets), we expect that ultrafine particles resembling miniaturized crumpled paper balls should self-disperse in oil and could act like nanoscale ball bearings to reduce friction and wear. Here we report the use of crumpled graphene balls as a high-performance additive that can significantly improve the lubrication properties of polyalphaolefin base oil. The tribological performance of crumpled graphene balls is only weakly dependent on their concentration in oil and readily exceeds that of other carbon additives such as graphite, reduced graphene oxide, and carbon black. Notably, polyalphaolefin base oil with only 0.01-0.1 wt % of crumpled graphene balls outperforms a fully formulated commercial lubricant in terms of friction and wear reduction. PMID:26811466

  4. Surface modification of titanium using steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment for biomedical implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifvianto, Budi; Suyitno; Mahardika, Muslim

    2013-08-01

    Surface modification is often performed using grit or shot blasting treatment for improving the performances of biomedical implants. The effects of blasting treatments using steel slag balls and spherical shots on the surface and subsurface of titanium were studied in this paper. The treatments were conducted for 60-300 s using 2-5 mm steel slag balls and 3.18 mm spherical shots. The surface morphology, roughness, and elemental composition of titanium specimens were examined prior to and after the treatments. Irregular and rough titanium surfaces were formed after the treatment with the steel slag balls instead of the spherical shots. The former treatment also introduced some bioactive elements on the titanium surface, but the latter one yielded a harder surface layer. In conclusion, both steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment have their own specialization in modifying the surface of metallic biomaterials. Steel slag ball blasting is potential for improving the osseointegration quality of implants; but the shot blasting is more appropriate for improving the mechanical properties of temporary and load bearing implants, such as osteosynthesis plates.

  5. Wear of gamma-crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups against roughened femoral balls.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; DiMaio, W; Lancaster, J G

    1999-12-01

    Crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene has been shown to markedly improve its wear resistance in clinical studies and laboratory tests using hip joint simulators. However, because most of the laboratory studies have been done under clean conditions using prosthesis-quality, highly polished counterfaces, there is concern regarding how well an intentionally crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cup will resist abrasion by a femoral ball that has been damaged by third-body abrasion in vivo. To investigate this, conventional and radiation crosslinked-remelted acetabular cups of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene were tested in a hip joint simulator bearing against smooth femoral balls and against balls with moderate and severe roughening. Cups were tested with and without aging to accelerate any oxidative degradation. The crosslinked cups were produced by exposing extruded GUR 4150 bar stock of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene to 5 Mrad gamma radiation under a partial vacuum and then the bars were remelted to extinguish residual free radicals. Artificial aging at 70 degrees C under 5 atm oxygen for 14 days induced negligible oxidation in the crosslinked and remelted material. Against smooth balls, the wear of the crosslinked cups, with or without aging, averaged approximately 15% of that of the conventional cups. Against the moderately rough balls, the wear rate of the conventional cups was unchanged, whereas the wear rate increased slightly for the nonaged and aged crosslinked cups, but was still only 26% and 20% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. Against extremely rough balls, the mean wear rates increased markedly for each material such that during the final 1 million cycle interval, the average wear rates of the nonaged and the aged crosslinked cups were 72% and 47% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. That is, the crosslinked polyethylene showed substantially better wear resistance than conventional polyethylene

  6. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  7. NASA five-ball fatigue tester: Over 20 years of research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.; Parker, R. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect on rolling-element fatigue life of contact angle, material hardness, chemistry, heat treatment and processing, lubricant type and chemistry, elastohydrodynamic film thickness, deformation and wear, vacuum, and temperature as well as Hertzian and residual stresses. Correlation was established between the results obtained using the five-ball tester and those obtained with full scale rolling-element bearings.

  8. Misalignment in Gas Foil Journal Bearings: An Experimental Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    As gas foil journal bearings become more prevalent in production machines, such as small gas turbine propulsion systems and microturbines, system-level performance issues must be identified and quantified in order to provide for successful design practices. Several examples of system-level design parameters that are not fully understood in foil bearing systems are thermal management schemes, alignment requirements, balance requirements, thrust load balancing, and others. In order to address some of these deficiencies and begin to develop guidelines, this paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation of the misalignment tolerance of gas foil journal bearing systems. Using a notional gas foil bearing supported rotor and a laser-based shaft alignment system, increasing levels of misalignment are imparted to the bearing supports while monitoring temperature at the bearing edges. The amount of misalignment that induces bearing failure is identified and compared to other conventional bearing types such as cylindrical roller bearings and angular contact ball bearings. Additionally, the dynamic response of the rotor indicates that the gas foil bearing force coefficients may be affected by misalignment.

  9. Cryogenic turbopump bearing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1989-01-01

    Materials used for modern cryogenic turbopump bearings must withstand extreme conditions of loads and speeds under marginal lubrication. Naturally, these extreme conditions tend to limit the bearing life. It is possible to significantly improve the life of these bearings, however, by improving the fatigue and wear resistance of bearing alloys, and improving the strength, liquid oxygen compatibility and lubricating ability of the bearing cage materials. Improved cooling will also help to keep the bearing temperatures low and hence prolong the bearing life.

  10. Adaptive Spindle Balancing Using Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY,PATRICK S.; LAUFFER,JAMES P.; PETTEYS,REBECCA; REDMOND,JAMES M.; SULLIVAN,WILLIAM N.

    1999-09-20

    A technological break through for supporting rotating shafts is the active magnetic bearing (AMB). Active magnetic bearings offer some important advantages over conventional ball, roller or journal bearings such as reduced frictional drag, no physical contact in the bearing, no need for lubricants, compatibility with high vacuum and ultra-clean environments, and ability to control shaft position within the bearing. The disadvantages of the AMB system are the increased cost and complexity, reduced bearing stiffness and the need for a controller. Still, there are certain applications, such as high speed machining, biomedical devices, and gyroscopes, where the additional cost of an AMB system can be justified. The inherent actuator capabilities of the AMB offer the potential for active balancing of spindles and micro-shaping capabilities for machine tools, The work presented in this paper concentrates on an AMB test program that utilizes the actuator capability to dynamically balance a spindle. In this study, an unbalanced AMB spindle system was enhanced with an LMS (Least Mean Squares) algorithm combined with an existing PID (proportional, integral, differential) control. This enhanced controller significantly improved the concentricity of an intentionally unbalanced shaft. The study included dynamic system analysis, test validation, control design and simulation, as well as experimental implementation using a digital LMS controller.

  11. Bouncing steel balls on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The 'skimming' of stones on water is a subject of perennial fascination for children and adults alike. In this article I describe the construction of an apparatus for safely and reproducibly demonstrating a similar phenomenon: the bouncing of 25 mm diameter steel balls from a water surface. The 'bouncing' is technically known as a ricochet and the article recounts the use of the effect in the Second World War in the 'Dam Busting' air raids of 1943. A number of calculations are made which allow an estimate of the projectile speed and energy, and the use of simple experimental techniques for validating these estimates is suggested. The role of spin is discussed, and a literature review collates the available empirical and theoretical results concerning the incident angle and speed for successful ricochet of spinning and non-spinning projectiles.

  12. Ready for the Cosmic Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Something appears to be peering through a shiny red mask, in this new false-colored image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The mysterious blue eyes are actually starlight from the cores of two merging galaxies, called NGC 2207 and IC 2163. The mask is the galaxies' dusty spiral arms.

    NGC 2207 and IC 2163 recently met and began a sort of gravitational tango about 40 million years ago. The two galaxies are tugging at each other, stimulating new stars to form. Eventually, this cosmic ball will come to an end, when the galaxies meld into one. The dancing duo is located 140 million light-years away in the Canis Major constellation.

    The Spitzer image reveals that the galactic mask is adorned with strings of pearl-like beads. These dusty clusters of newborn stars, called 'beads on a string' by astronomers, appear as white balls throughout the arms of both galaxies. They were formed when the galaxies first interacted, forcing dust and gas to clump together into colonies of stars.

    This type of beading has been seen before in other galaxies, but it took Spitzer's infrared eyes to identify them in NGC 2207 and IC 2163. Spitzer was able to see the beads because the stars inside heat up surrounding dust, which then radiates with infrared light.

    The biggest bead lighting up the left side of the mask is also the densest. In fact, some of its central stars might have merged to form a black hole. (Now, that would be quite the Mardi Gras mask!)

    This picture, taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera, is a four-channel composite. It shows light with wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); and 5.8 and 8.0 microns (red). The contribution from starlight (measured at 3.6 microns) has been subtracted from the 5.8- and 8-micron channels to enhance the visibility of the dust features.

  13. Viscoelastic modelling of tennis ball properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissler, L.; Jones, R.; Leaney, P. G.; Harland, A.

    2010-06-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) tennis ball model which illustrates the effects of the viscoelastic materials of a tennis ball on ball deformation and bounce during normal impacts is presented. A tennis ball is composed of a rubber core and a fabric cover comprised of a wool-nylon mix which exhibit non-linear strain rate properties during high velocity impacts. The rubber core model was developed and validated using low strain rate tensile tests on rubber samples as well as high velocity normal impacts of pressurised cores at velocities ranging from 15 m/s to 50 m/s. The impacts were recorded using a high speed video (HSV) camera to determine deformation, impact time and coefficient of restitution (COR). The material properties of the core model were tuned to match the HSV results. A two component anisotropic fabric model was created which included artificial Rayleigh damping to account for hysteresis effects, and the core model 'tuning' process was used to refine the cloth layer. The ball model's parameters were in good agreement with experimental data at all velocities for both cores and complete balls, and a time sequenced comparison of HSV ball motion and FE model confirmed the validity of the model.

  14. BALL - biochemical algorithms library 1.3

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Biochemical Algorithms Library (BALL) is a comprehensive rapid application development framework for structural bioinformatics. It provides an extensive C++ class library of data structures and algorithms for molecular modeling and structural bioinformatics. Using BALL as a programming toolbox does not only allow to greatly reduce application development times but also helps in ensuring stability and correctness by avoiding the error-prone reimplementation of complex algorithms and replacing them with calls into the library that has been well-tested by a large number of developers. In the ten years since its original publication, BALL has seen a substantial increase in functionality and numerous other improvements. Results Here, we discuss BALL's current functionality and highlight the key additions and improvements: support for additional file formats, molecular edit-functionality, new molecular mechanics force fields, novel energy minimization techniques, docking algorithms, and support for cheminformatics. Conclusions BALL is available for all major operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and MacOS X. It is available free of charge under the Lesser GNU Public License (LPGL). Parts of the code are distributed under the GNU Public License (GPL). BALL is available as source code and binary packages from the project web site at http://www.ball-project.org. Recently, it has been accepted into the debian project; integration into further distributions is currently pursued. PMID:20973958

  15. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  16. Numerical simulation of ball-racket impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingpang

    The collision of a ball with a tennis racket is usually modeled in terms of rigid body dynamics or an elastic system involving only a few springs. In this paper, we study the impact between a tennis ball and racket, by modeling the tennis ball in two different yaws. One method models the tennis ball as a Hertz elastic body and the other one models the ball by a more accurate finite element analysis. In the first model, we assume that the elastic properties of the ball obeys Hertz's law. In the finite element model, we consider the tennis ball as a shell witch is a elastic system constructed out of many isotropic small linear flat, elements, witch have both elastic and damping properties. The damping in each way is approximated as viscous term. In both methods, we study the static condition of deformation against a rigid surface before applying these models to dynamical processes. We compare these two methods and eventually determine how the racket parameters effect the performance of the racket, using numerical simulations. Comparison with experiment are show to confirm the general conclusion of the model.

  17. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  18. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  19. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  20. Q-balls in flat potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Tsumagari, Mitsuo I.

    2009-07-15

    We study the classical and absolute stability of Q-balls in scalar field theories with flat potentials arising in both gravity-mediated and gauge-mediated models. We show that the associated Q-matter formed in gravity-mediated potentials can be stable against decay into their own free particles as long as the coupling constant of the nonrenormalizable term is small, and that all of the possible three-dimensional Q-ball configurations are classically stable against linear fluctuations. Three-dimensional gauge-mediated Q-balls can be absolutely stable in the thin-wall limit, but are completely unstable in the thick-wall limit.

  1. Improved Ball-and-Socket Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard; Bryan, Tom

    2004-01-01

    A proposed docking mechanism would form a ball-and-socket joint in the docked condition. The mechanism could tolerate significant initial misalignment because it would include an alignment cone that would guide the ball into the socket. Like other ball-and-socket joints, the joint would have three rotational degrees of freedom. This docking mechanism would be a successor to the one described in Passive Capture Joint With Three Degrees of Freedom (MFS-31146), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 1998), page 65. It would contain most of the components of the prior mechanism, plus some additional components that would expand its capabilities.

  2. Rotating boson stars and Q-balls

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; List, Meike

    2005-09-15

    We consider axially symmetric, rotating boson stars. Their flat-space limits represent spinning Q-balls. We discuss their properties and determine their domain of existence. Q-balls and boson stars are stationary solutions and exist only in a limited frequency range. The coupling to gravity gives rise to a spiral-like frequency dependence of the boson stars. We address the flat-space limit and the limit of strong gravitational coupling. For comparison we also determine the properties of spherically symmetric Q-balls and boson stars.

  3. Geometric optics and the "hairy ball theorem"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Kazachkov, Alexander

    Applications of the hairy ball theorem to the geometrical optics are discussed. When the ideal mirror, topologically equivalent to a sphere, is illuminated at every point, the "hairy ball theorem" prescribes the existence of at least one point at which the incident light will be normally reflected. For the more general case of the surface, topologically equivalent to a sphere, which is both reflecting and refracting the "hairy ball theorem" predicts the existence of at least one point, at which the incident light will be normally reflected and also normally refracted.

  4. Trajectory analysis of a soccer ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2009-11-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two cameras recorded portions of its trajectory. Drag coefficients were obtained from range measurements for no-spin trajectories, for which the drag coefficient does not vary appreciably during the ball's flight. Lift coefficients were obtained from the trajectories immediately following the ball's launch, in which Reynolds number and spin parameter do not vary much. We obtain two values of the lift coefficient for spin parameters that had not been obtained previously. Our codes for analyzing the trajectories are freely available to educators and students.

  5. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  6. Transfer film evaluation for shuttle engine turbopump bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1981-01-01

    A series of low speed experiments to evaluate the possible occurrence of transfer film lubrication and the effectiveness of burnished films in the shuttle spacecraft main engine thrust bearings were conducted. No evidence of transfer film lubrication was evident, although this could have been the result of the (used) condition of the bearing. Burnished films of either Teflon or Rulon were found to greatly enhance the performance of the bearing. Crush load experiments indicated that the bearing ultimate load capability is on the order of 489,000 N (110,000 pounds). The effect of ball (as well as race) burnishing techniques on bearing performance, different types of burnished films, and transfer film formation are suggested for further study.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of Sudden Death Bearing Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations combined with sudden death testing were used to compare resultant bearing lives to the calculated hearing life and the cumulative test time and calendar time relative to sequential and censored sequential testing. A total of 30 960 virtual 50-mm bore deep-groove ball bearings were evaluated in 33 different sudden death test configurations comprising 36, 72, and 144 bearings each. Variations in both life and Weibull slope were a function of the number of bearings failed independent of the test method used and not the total number of bearings tested. Variation in L10 life as a function of number of bearings failed were similar to variations in lift obtained from sequentially failed real bearings and from Monte Carlo (virtual) testing of entire populations. Reductions up to 40 percent in bearing test time and calendar time can be achieved by testing to failure or the L(sub 50) life and terminating all testing when the last of the predetermined bearing failures has occurred. Sudden death testing is not a more efficient method to reduce bearing test time or calendar time when compared to censored sequential testing.

  8. Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing for NASA Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy R.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Dube, Michael J.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuators found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing at 140 F has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions. Additional testing is underway to determine the lubricant life at various temperatures and stresses and to further understand the mechanism that caused the blacken balls. Initial results of this testing indicates that bearing life is shorten at room temperature possibly due fact that higher temperature (140 F) accelerates the flow of grease and oil into the wear surface

  9. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim; da Silva, Eronides Felisberto

    2007-01-26

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation. PMID:17358820

  10. Production of Ball-Lightning-Like Luminous Balls by Electrical Discharges in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Gerson Silva; Pavão, Antonio Carlos; Alpes de Vasconcelos, Elder; Mendes, Odim, Jr.; Felisberto da Silva, Eronides, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We performed electric arc discharges in pure Si to generate luminous balls with lifetime in the order of seconds and several properties usually reported for natural ball lightning. This simple experiment does not rely on energy sources and excitation mechanisms that are improbable in the natural phenomenon and clearly demonstrates the role of vaporization and oxidation of Si, as proposed by the Abrahamson-Dinniss theory for ball-lightning formation.

  11. Flexible timing of eye movements when catching a ball.

    PubMed

    López-Moliner, Joan; Brenner, Eli

    2016-01-01

    In ball games, one cannot direct ones gaze at the ball all the time because one must also judge other aspects of the game, such as other players' positions. We wanted to know whether there are times at which obtaining information about the ball is particularly beneficial for catching it. We recently found that people could catch successfully if they saw any part of the ball's flight except the very end, when sensory-motor delays make it impossible to use new information. Nevertheless, there may be a preferred time to see the ball. We examined when six catchers would choose to look at the ball if they had to both catch the ball and find out what to do with it while the ball was approaching. A catcher and a thrower continuously threw a ball back and forth. We recorded their hand movements, the catcher's eye movements, and the ball's path. While the ball was approaching the catcher, information was provided on a screen about how the catcher should throw the ball back to the thrower (its peak height). This information disappeared just before the catcher caught the ball. Initially there was a slight tendency to look at the ball before looking at the screen but, later, most catchers tended to look at the screen before looking at the ball. Rather than being particularly eager to see the ball at a certain time, people appear to adjust their eye movements to the combined requirements of the task. PMID:26982371

  12. Observations of Spacecraft Bearing Lubricant Redistribution Based on Thermal Conductance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshimi R.; Frantz, Peter P.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The performance and life of precision ball bearings are critically dependent on maintaining a quantity of oil at the ball/race interface that is sufficient to support a robust protective film. In space applications, where parched conditions are intentionally the norm, harsh operating conditions can displace the small reserves of oil, resulting in reduced film thickness and premature wear. In the past, these effects have proven difficult to model or to measure experimentally. This paper describes a study addressing this challenge, where bearing thermal conductance measurements are employed to infer changes in lubricant quantity at the critical rolling interfaces. In the first part of the paper, we explain how the lubricant's presence and its quantity impacts bearing thermal conductance measurements. For a stationary bearing, we show that conductance is directly related to the lubricant quantity in the ball/race contacts. Hence, aspects of bearing performance related to oil quantity can be understood and insights improved with thermal conductance data. For a moving bearing, a different mechanism of heat transfer dominates and is dependent on lubricant film thickness on the ball. In the second part of the report, we discuss lubricant quantity observations based on bearing thermal conductance measurements. Lubricant quantity, and thus bearing thermal conductance, depends on various initial and operating conditions and is impacted further by the run-in process. A significant effect of maximum run-in speed was also observed, with less oil remaining after obtaining higher speeds. Finally, we show that some of the lubricant that is displaced between the ball and race during run-in operation can be recovered during rest, and we measure the rate of recovery for one example.

  13. Rocketdyne LOX bearing tester program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, J. E.; Beatty, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The cause, or causes, for the Space Shuttle Main Engine ball wear were unknown, however, several mechanisms were suspected. Two testers were designed and built for operation in liquid oxygen to empirically gain insight into the problems and iterate solutions in a timely and cost efficient manner independent of engine testing. Schedules and test plans were developed that defined a test matrix consisting of parametric variations of loading, cooling or vapor margin, cage lubrication, material, and geometry studies. Initial test results indicated that the low pressure pump thrust bearing surface distress is a function of high axial load. Initial high pressure turbopump bearing tests produced the wear phenomenon observed in the turbopump and identified an inadequate vapor margin problem and a coolant flowrate sensitivity issue. These tests provided calibration data of analytical model predictions to give high confidence in the positive impact of future turbopump design modification for flight. Various modifications will be evaluated in these testers, since similar turbopump conditions can be produced and the benefit of the modification will be quantified in measured wear life comparisons.

  14. Gravitational waves from Q-ball formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kamada, Kohei; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2010-04-15

    We study the detectability of the gravitational waves (GWs) from the Q-ball formation associated with the Affleck-Dine (AD) mechanism, taking into account both the dilution effects due to Q-ball domination and to finite temperature. The AD mechanism predicts the formation of nontopological solitons, Q-balls, from which GWs are generated. Q-balls with large conserved charge Q can produce a large amount of GWs. On the other hand, the decay rate of such Q-balls is so small that they may dominate the energy density of the Universe, which implies that GWs are significantly diluted and that their frequencies are redshifted during the Q-ball dominated era. Thus, the detectability of the GWs associated with the formation of Q-balls is determined by these two competing effects. We find that there is a finite but small parameter region where such GWs may be detected by future detectors such as DECIGO or BBO, only in the case when the thermal logarithmic potential dominates the potential of the AD field. Otherwise GWs from Q-balls would not be detectable even by these futuristic detectors: {Omega}{sub GW}{sup 0}<10{sup -21}. Unfortunately, for such parameter region the present baryon asymmetry of the Universe can hardly be explained unless one fine-tunes A-terms in the potential. However the detection of such a GW background may give us an information about the early Universe, for example, it may suggest that the flat directions with B-L=0 are favored.

  15. Design of a compliant passive magnetic bearing for use in SIRTF's Tertiary Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, David M.; Brereton, Margot; Dill, Harry; Sullivan, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A proposed baseline design for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility includes a Tertiary Mirror Assembly (TMA) which selectively redirects the telescope's converging science beam to each of several instruments. The TMA's mirror rotates on an axis coincident with the beam's axis, and is held steady during observation by a kinematic mount. A bearing has been designed whose compliance causes minimal interference with the precision of the kinematic mount, and which is well suited to the particular requirements of a cryogenic satellite such as SIRTF. The bearing suspends its rotor by taking advantage of the repulsion between a superconductor and a magnet. It potentially eliminates problems associated with mechanical bearings that arise in similar applications, such as lubricant loss or failure, bearing wear, and sensitivity to particulates, and does so without imposing the thermal load of a bearing heater or active magnetic bearing. The bearing shows promise of offering an alternative to ball bearings in cryogenic applications where some compliance is acceptable or advantageous.

  16. Unbalance Response Prediction for Accelerating Rotors With Load-Dependent Nonlinear Bearing Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Sawicki, Jaezy T.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2005-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic analysis requires that bearing forces corresponding to the actual bearing deflection be utilized. Previous papers have explored the transient effect of suddenly applied imbalance and the steady-state unbalance response, using bearing forces calculated by the rolling-element bearing analysis code COBRA-AHS. The present work considers the acceleration of a rotor through one or more critical speeds. The rotordynamic analysis showed that for rapid acceleration rates the maximum response amplitude may be considerably less than predicted by steady-state analysis. Above the critical speed, transient vibration at the rotor natural frequency occurs, similar to that predicted for a Jeffcott rotor with constant-stiffness bearings. A moderate amount of damping will markedly reduce the vibration amplitude, but this damping is not inherent in ball bearings.

  17. Heated-Pressure-Ball Monopropellant Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D.

    2005-01-01

    A recent technology disclosure presents a concept for a monopropellant thermal spacecraft thruster that would feature both the simplicity of a typical prior pressure-fed propellant supply system and the smaller mass and relative compactness of a typical prior pump-fed system. The source of heat for this thruster would likely be a nuclear- fission reactor. The propellant would be a cryogenic fluid (a liquefied low-molecular-weight gas) stored in a tank at a low pressure. The propellant would flow from the tank, through a feedline, into three thick-walled spherical tanks, denoted pressure balls, that would be thermally connected to the reactor. Valves upstream and downstream of the pressure balls would be operated in a three-phase cycle in which propellant would flow into one pressure ball while the fluid underwent pressurization through heating in another ball and pressurized propellant was discharged from the remaining ball into the reactor. After flowing through the reactor, wherein it would be further heated, the propellant would be discharged through an exhaust nozzle to generate thrust. A fraction of the pressurized gas from the pressure balls would be diverted to maintain the desired pressure in the tank.

  18. Component test results from the bearing life improvement program for the Space Shuttle Main Engine oxidizer turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Interim results from a component test program to improve ball bearing life in the Space Shuttle Main Engine oxygen turbopumps are presented. Two specific bearing applications, using liquid oxygen as the bearing coolant, are addressed. The first, the thrust bearing of the low pressure pump, operates at relatively slow speed with predominantly axial load and little temperature rise in the bulk coolant. Testing has demonstrated a very significant reduction in bearing wear by increasing the bearing internal clearance. Heat generation data was obtained that indicates heavy, intermittent cage-to-ball contact occurs, providing a possible explanation for the observed wear. The second application is the turbine end bearings of the high pressure pump. These bearings operate at high speed and load with the possibility of significant coolant vaporization. Tests on production bearings and bearings having modified internal clearance and curvature yielded scattered but generally poor lives. A dramatic improvement was achieved by coating the standard cage with a thin film of fluorinated ethylene propylene and 15 percent molybdenum disulfide. Very promising results have also been obtained by replacing the standard balls with ones made of silicon nitride, especially in combination with the coated cage.

  19. Large deflection analysis of a tension-foil bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are as follows: rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's. CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contacts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exist for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. Recently, a new tension-foil bearing configuration has been proposed for turbomachinery applications.

  20. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  1. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  2. Rolling Bearing Life Prediction, Theory, and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2013-01-01

    A tutorial is presented outlining the evolution, theory, and application of rolling-element bearing life prediction from that of A. Palmgren, 1924; W. Weibull, 1939; G. Lundberg and A. Palmgren, 1947 and 1952; E. Ioannides and T. Harris, 1985; and E. Zaretsky, 1987. Comparisons are made between these life models. The Ioannides-Harris model without a fatigue limit is identical to the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The Weibull model is similar to that of Zaretsky if the exponents are chosen to be identical. Both the load-life and Hertz stress-life relations of Weibull, Lundberg and Palmgren, and Ioannides and Harris reflect a strong dependence on the Weibull slope. The Zaretsky model decouples the dependence of the critical shear stress-life relation from the Weibull slope. This results in a nominal variation of the Hertz stress-life exponent. For 9th- and 8th-power Hertz stress-life exponents for ball and roller bearings, respectively, the Lundberg- Palmgren model best predicts life. However, for 12th- and 10th-power relations reflected by modern bearing steels, the Zaretsky model based on the Weibull equation is superior. Under the range of stresses examined, the use of a fatigue limit would suggest that (for most operating conditions under which a rolling-element bearing will operate) the bearing will not fail from classical rolling-element fatigue. Realistically, this is not the case. The use of a fatigue limit will significantly overpredict life over a range of normal operating Hertz stresses. Since the predicted lives of rolling-element bearings are high, the problem can become one of undersizing a bearing for a particular application.

  3. Evaluation of a hybrid hydrostatic bearing for cryogenic turbopump application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spica, P. W.; Hannum, N. P.; Meyer, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid hydrostatic bearing was designed to operate in liquid hydrogen at speeds to 80,000 rpm and radial loads to 440 n (100 lbf). The bearing assembly consisted of a pair of 20-mm angular-contact ball bearings encased in a journal, which was in turn supported by a fluid film of liquid hydrogen. The size and operating conditions of the bearing were selected to be compatible with the operating requirements of an advanced technology turbopump. Several test parameters were varied to characterize the bearing's steady-state operation. The rotation of the tester shaft was varied between 0 and 80,000 rpm. Bearing inlet fluid pressure was varied between 2.07 and 4.48 MPa (300 and 650 psia), while the fluid sump pressure was independently varied between 0.34 and 2.07 MPa (50 and 300 psia). The maximum radial load applied to the bearing was 440 N (110 lbf). Measured hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing stiffness was 1.5 times greater than predicted, while the fluid flow rate through the bearing was 35 to 65 percent less than predicted. Under two-phase fluid conditions, the stiffness was even greater and the flow rate was less. The optimal pressure ratio for the bearing should be between 0.2 and 0.55 depending on the balance desired between bearing efficiency and stiffness. Startup and shutdown cyclic tests were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the hybrid-hydrostatic-bearing assembly to survive at least a 300-firing-duty cycle. For a typical cycle, the shaft was accelerated to 50,000 rpm in 1.8 sec. The bearing operated for 337 start-stop cycles without failure.

  4. Bearing diagnosis based on Mahalanobis-Taguchi-Gram-Schmidt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Piyush; Kulkarni, Makarand S.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology is developed for defect type identification in rolling element bearings using the integrated Mahalanobis-Taguchi-Gram-Schmidt (MTGS) method. Vibration data recorded from bearings with seeded defects on outer race, inner race and balls are processed in time, frequency, and time-frequency domains. Eleven damage identification parameters (RMS, Peak, Crest Factor, and Kurtosis in time domain, amplitude of outer race, inner race, and ball defect frequencies in FFT spectrum and HFRT spectrum in frequency domain and peak of HHT spectrum in time-frequency domain) are computed. Using MTGS, these damage identification parameters (DIPs) are fused into a single DIP, Mahalanobis distance (MD), and gain values for the presence of all DIPs are calculated. The gain value is used to identify the usefulness of DIP and the DIPs with positive gain are again fused into MD by using Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization process (GSP) in order to calculate Gram-Schmidt Vectors (GSVs). Among the remaining DIPs, sign of GSVs of frequency domain DIPs is checked to classify the probable defect. The approach uses MTGS method for combining the damage parameters and in conjunction with the GSV classifies the defect. A Defect Occurrence Index (DOI) is proposed to rank the probability of existence of a type of bearing damage (ball defect/inner race defect/outer race defect/other anomalies). The methodology is successfully validated on vibration data from a different machine, bearing type and shape/configuration of the defect. The proposed methodology is also applied on the vibration data acquired from the accelerated life test on the bearings, which established the applicability of the method on naturally induced and naturally progressed defect. It is observed that the methodology successfully identifies the correct type of bearing defect. The proposed methodology is also useful in identifying the time of initiation of a defect and has potential for implementation in a real time environment.

  5. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  6. Space Shuttle Body Flap Actuator Bearing Testing For NASA Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, Timothy R.; Thom, Robert L.; Moore, Lewis E.; Gibson, Howard G.; Hall, Phillip B.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle body flap is located beneath the main engine nozzles and is required for proper aerodynamic control during orbital descent. Routine inspection of one of four body flap actuatols found one of the actuator bearings had degraded and blackened balls. A test program was initiated to demonstrate that it is acceptable to operate bearings which are degraded from operation over several flights. This test exposed the bearing to predicted flight axial loads, speeds and temperatures. Testing has been completed, and results indicate the previously flown bearings are acceptable for up to 12 additional missions.

  7. Correlation of magnetic perturbation inspection data with rolling element bearing fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A magnetic perturbation technique was used to nondestructively detect subsurface nonmetallic inclusions in the inner races of 207-size, deep groove ball bearings. The bearings were fatigue tested at 2750 rpm under a radial load of. The inner races were subsequently sectioned at fatigue spall locations and at magnetic perturbation signal locations. Analyses of the data indicated good correlation between magnetic perturbation signals and inclusion size and location. Exclusion of those bearings that had significant magnetic perturbation signals did not alter the statistical life of the bearings.

  8. Ball Machine Usage in Tennis: Movement Initiation and Swing Timing While Returning Balls from a Ball Machine and from a Real Server

    PubMed Central

    Carboch, Jan; Süss, Vladimir; Kocib, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Practicing with the use of a ball machine could handicap a player compared to playing against an actual opponent. Recent studies have shown some differences in swing timing and movement coordination, when a player faces a ball projection machine as opposed to a human opponent. We focused on the time of movement initiation and on stroke timing during returning tennis serves (simulated by a ball machine or by a real server). Receivers’ movements were measured on a tennis court. In spite of using a serving ball speed from 90 kph to 135 kph, results showed significant differences in movement initiation and backswing duration between serves received from a ball machine and serves received from a real server. Players had shorter movement initiation when they faced a ball machine. Backswing duration was longer for the group using a ball machine. That demonstrates different movement timing of tennis returns when players face a ball machine. Use of ball machines in tennis practice should be limited as it may disrupt stroke timing. Key points Players have shorter initial move time when they are facing the ball machine. Using the ball machine results in different swing timing and movement coordination. The use of the ball machine should be limited. PMID:24790483

  9. Corrosion of simulated bearing components of three bearing steels in the presence of chloride-contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.; Nahm, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Corrosion tests were run with AISI 52100, AISI M-50 and AMS 5794 under conditions that simulate the crevice corrosion found in aircraft ball and roller bearings rejected at overhaul for corrosion. Test specimens were fabricated that simulated the contacts of balls or rollers and the raceways. Corrosion cells were assembled in the presence of a lubricant contaminated with water and chloride ions. The cell was then thermally cycled between 339 K (150 F) and 276 K (37 F). The corrosion observed after 14 cycles was that of crevice and pitting corrosion typically found in aircraft bearings. AMS 5749 showed a very slight amount of corrosion. No appreciable differences were noted between AISI 52100 and AISI M-50, but both showed much greater corrosion than AMS 5749. The corrosion pits observed in AISI M-50 appeared to be fewer in number but generally deeper and larger than in AISI 52100.

  10. Flight trajectory of a rotating golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Moonheum; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Dimples are known to reduce drag on a sphere by the amount of 50% as compared to a smooth surface. Despite the advantage of reducing drag, dimples deteriorate the putting accuracy owing to their sharp edges. To minimize this putting error but maintain the same flight distance, we have devised a grooved golf ball (called G ball hereafter) for several years. In this study, we modify the shape and pattern of grooves, and investigate the flow characteristics of the G ball by performing wind-tunnel experiments at the Reynolds numbers of 0 . 5 ×105 - 2 . 5 ×105 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 - 0.6 that include the real golf-ball velocity and rotational speed. We measure the drag and lift forces on the rotating G ball and compare them with those of a smooth ball and two well-known dimpled balls. The lift-to-drag ratio of the G ball is much higher than that of a smooth ball and is in between those of the two dimpled balls. The trajectories of flying golf balls are computed. The flight distance of G ball is almost the same as that of one dimpled ball but slightly shorter than that of the other dimpled ball. The fluid-dynamic aspects of these differences will be discussed at the talk. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  11. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  12. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  13. High temperature aircraft turbine engine bearing and lubrication system development

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.H.; Chin, H.A.; Klenke, C.; Galbato, A.T.; Ragen, M.A.; Spitzer, R.F.

    1998-12-31

    Results are reported for a project sponsored by the US Air Force Wright Laboratories. The major emphasis of this project was the evaluation of bearing materials with improved corrosion resistance, high hot hardness, and high fracture toughness, intended to meet the requirements of the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technologies (IHPTET) Phase 2 engine. The project included material property studies on candidate bearing materials and lubricants which formed the selection basis for subscale and full-scale bearing rig verification tests. The carburizing stainless steel alloy Pyrowear 675 demonstrated significant fatigue life, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance improvements relative to the M50 NiL baseline bearing material. The new Skylube 2 (MCS-2482) lubricant provided significant thermal degradation improvements with respect to the Skylube 600 (PWA-524, MIL-L-87100) lubricant. Two 130 mm bore Pyrowear 675 hybrid ball bearings with silicon nitride balls were run successfully for 231 hours with Skylube 2 lubricant at temperatures consistent with IHPTET 2 requirements.

  14. Rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5900 12.7-mm (1/2-in.) dia was determined in five-ball fatigue testers. The 10% life with the warm headed AMS 5900 balls was equivalent to that of AMS 5749 and over eight times that of AISI M-50. The AMS balls fabricated by cold heading had small surface cracks which initiated fatigue spalls where these cracks were crossed by running tracks. The cold-headed AMS 5900 balls had a 10% fatigue life an order of magnitude less than that of the warm headed balls even when failures on the cold headed balls at visible surface cracks were omitted.

  15. Hairy balls and flux lines in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laver, Mark; Forgan, Ted

    2011-03-01

    Many physical phenomena originate from geometrical effects rather than from local physics. For example, the hairy ball theorem --- a hairy sphere cannot be combed --- is fulfilled by the atmospheric circulation with the existence of stratospheric polar vortices, and the fact that there is always at least one place on Earth where the horizontal wind is still. We examine the consequences of the hairy ball theorem for the flux line lattice (FLL). We find that discontinuities must exist in lattice shape as a function of field direction relative to the crystal. The remarkable ways in which the hairy ball theorem is fulfilled are demonstrated for FLL's in superconducting niobium. We show that extraordinary, unconventional flux line lattice shapes that spontaneously break the underlying crystal symmetry are surprisingly likely across all Type-II superconductors, both conventional and unconventional.

  16. Ball stud inspection system using machine vision.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongik; Han, Changsoo; Moon, Young Shik

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a vision-based inspection system that measures the dimensions of a ball stud is designed and implemented. The system acquires silhouetted images by backlighting and extracts the outlines of the nearly dichotomized images in subpixel accuracy. The sets of boundary data are modeled with reasonable geometric primitives and the parameters of the models are estimated in a manner that minimizes error. Jig-fixtures and servo systems for the inspection are also contrived. The system rotates an inspected object to recognize the objects in space not on a plane. The system moves the object vertically so that it may take several pictures of different parts of the object, resulting in improvement of measuring resolution. The performance of the system is evaluated by measurement of the dimensions of a standard ball, a standard cylinder, and a ball stud. PMID:12014800

  17. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics. PMID:27328835

  18. The bouncing ball through a geometrical series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Sergio; Alfaro, Luis L.; Chavez, Juan E.; Bastarrachea, Aztlan; Hurtado, Jazmin

    2008-10-01

    The mathematical representation of the physical situation related to a bouncing ball on the floor is an important understanding difficulty for most of the students during the introductory mechanics and mathematics courses. The research group named Physics and mathematics in context from the University of Ciudad Juarez is concerned about the versatility in the change from a mathematical representation to the own physical context of any problem under a traditional instruction. In this case, the main idea is the association of the physical properties of the bouncing ball situation to the nearest mathematical model based on a geometrical series. The proposal of the cognitive development is based on a geometrical series that shows the time the ball takes to stop. In addition, we show the behavior of the ratio of the consecutive heights during the motion.

  19. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics.

  20. Relativistic-microwave theory of ball lightning.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C

    2016-01-01

    Ball lightning, a fireball sometimes observed during lightnings, has remained unexplained. Here we present a comprehensive theory for the phenomenon: At the tip of a lightning stroke reaching the ground, a relativistic electron bunch can be produced, which in turn excites intense microwave radiation. The latter ionizes the local air and the radiation pressure evacuates the resulting plasma, forming a spherical plasma bubble that stably traps the radiation. This mechanism is verified by particle simulations. The many known properties of ball lightning, such as the occurrence site, relation to the lightning channels, appearance in aircraft, its shape, size, sound, spark, spectrum, motion, as well as the resulting injuries and damages, are also explained. Our theory suggests that ball lighting can be created in the laboratory or triggered during thunderstorms. Our results should be useful for lightning protection and aviation safety, as well as stimulate research interest in the relativistic regime of microwave physics. PMID:27328835