Science.gov

Sample records for a-570-900 diamond sawblades

  1. 78 FR 36744 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ...: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009). \\2\\ In a previous changed circumstances review, the... Extension of Time Limit for Final Results, 76 FR 38357 (June 30, 2011), unchanged in Diamond Sawblades and... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review, 76 FR 64898 (October 19, 2011). \\3\\ See Diamond Sawblades...

  2. 76 FR 41759 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010). The preliminary... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts thereof from the People's Republic of China for...

  3. 77 FR 14733 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... Intent To Rescind Review in Part, 76 FR 76135 (December 6, 2011) (Preliminary Results). \\2\\ See Letters... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... of the first administrative review covering the antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and...

  4. 76 FR 50455 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Results, 76 FR 38357 (June 30, 2011) (``Preliminary Results''). Extension of Time Limit for the Final... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty changed circumstances review of diamond sawblades and parts thereof from the...

  5. 76 FR 40324 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation In Part, 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts thereof from the Republic...

  6. 78 FR 65289 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court Decision...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of China, 71 FR 29303 (May 22, 2006... Administrative Review; 2009-2010, 78 FR 11143 (February 15, 2013). Amended Final Determination Because there is.... United States, 626 F.3d 1374 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (``Diamond Sawblades''), the Department is notifying...

  7. 75 FR 60409 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... and the Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009) (``Order''). \\3... Critical Circumstances: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of China, 71 FR... Republic of China: Initiation of Changed Circumstances Review, 75 FR 51002 (August 18, 2010). \\9\\ See,...

  8. 78 FR 1200 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... People's Republic of China and the Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4... Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: 2010-2011, 77 FR 73417 (December 10, 2012), is... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  9. 77 FR 47362 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ...: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and Intent to Rescind Review in Part, 76 FR... and Request for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010). \\2\\ See Final Determination of...: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of China, 71 FR 29303 (May 22, 2006)....

  10. 76 FR 4634 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China (PRC): Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ...: Initiation of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 76 FR 775 (January 6, 2011). On January 10, 2011, Hanson... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China (PRC... Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: In response to a request from Hanson Diamond Tools (Danyang)...

  11. 75 FR 14126 - Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... International Trade Administration Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Diamond... the Republic of Korea, 71 FR 29310 (May 22, 2006) (``Final Determination''). On May 24, 2006, we... Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From China and Korea, 71 FR 39128 (July 11, 2006) (``ITC...

  12. 78 FR 11143 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Part, 76 FR 76135 (December 6, 2011) (Preliminary Results). On April 5, 2012, the Diamond Sawblades...: Extension of Time Limit for Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 14733 (March 13... FR 20788 (April 6, 2012). \\3\\ See Memorandum to Paul Piquado, Assistant Secretary for...

  13. 78 FR 18958 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China and Diamond Sawblades and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...On March 22, 2013, the U.S. Trade Representative (``USTR'') instructed the Department of Commerce (``Department'') to implement its determinations under section 129 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (``URAA'') regarding the antidumping investigations of certain frozen warmwater shrimp (``shrimp'') from the People's Republic of China (`PRC'') and diamond sawblades and parts thereof......

  14. 78 FR 46569 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Circumstances: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the Republic of Korea, 71 FR 29310 (May 22, 2006). For... Administrative Review, 2010-2011, 78 FR 36524 (June 18, 2013) (Final Results). DATES: Effective Date: August 1... Duty Proceedings; Final Modification, 77 FR 8101, 8102 (February 14, 2012). The Department...

  15. 76 FR 59111 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Changed Circumstances Review and Extension of Time Limit for Final Results, 76 FR 38357 (June 30, 2011... Results of the Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review, 76 FR 50455 (August 15, 2011). Extension of... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  16. 75 FR 75172 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limits...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009) (``Antidumping Duty Order''). On April 30, 2010, pursuant to... of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 75 FR 36632 (June 28, 2010). The preliminary results are... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  17. 76 FR 64896 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 81565...: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 41759 (July... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of...

  18. 77 FR 20788 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea and the People's Republic of China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 76 FR 76128 (December 6, 2011) (Preliminary Results--Korea) and Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof... Intent to Rescind Review in Part, 76 FR 76135 (December 6, 2011) (Preliminary Results-- PRC). On March 13... FR 14733 (March 13, 2012). The final results of the administrative reviews of the antidumping...

  19. 78 FR 11818 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 76128 (December 6, 2011) (Preliminary... Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Reviews, 77 FR 20788 (April 6, 2012). \\3\\ See Memorandum to... Determination of Critical Circumstances: Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the Republic of Korea, 71...

  20. 76 FR 775 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... FR 57145 (November 4, 2009) (``Antidumping Duty Order''). On November 30, 2010, pursuant to section...: Ricardo Martinez, AD/CVD Operations, Office 9, Import Administration, International Trade Administration... sawblades from the PRC produced and exported by Hanson. See ``Memorandum to The File from Ricardo...

  1. 75 FR 68618 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From China and Korea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ..., 2006. 71 FR 39128. The Commission transmitted its determinations to the Secretary of Commerce on June... of all appellate proceedings. Notice of Court Decision Not In Harmony, 74 FR 6570 (Feb. 10, 2009... Manufacturers Coalition (DSMC) and its individual members, which included Blackhawk Diamond, Inc., Fullerton,...

  2. 78 FR 48414 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ..., 78 FR 36744 (June 19, 2013) (Preliminary Results). DATES: Effective Date: August 8, 2013. FOR FURTHER... Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR... FR 42930 (July 18, 2013), in which we refer to this company as Hebei Husqvarna-Jikai Diamond Tools...

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic study on interfacial reaction and diamond graphitization of Cu—Fe-based diamond composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Hong-Feng; Chu, Ke; Wang, Shun-Cai; Liu, Yi; Li, Ya-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cu—Fe based diamond composites used for saw-blade segments are directly fabricated by vacuum and pressure-assisted sintering. The carbide forming elements Cr and Ti are added to improve interfacial bonding between diamond and the Cu—Fe matrix. The interfacial reactions between diamond/graphite and Cr or Ti, and diamond graphitization are investigated by thermodynamics/kinetics analyses and experimental methods. The results show that interfacial reactions and graphitization of diamond can automatically proceed thermodynamically. The Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and TiC are formed at the interfaces of composites by reactions between diamond and Cr or Ti; diamond graphitization does not occur because of the kinetic difficulty at 1093 K under the pressure of 13 MPa.

  4. 76 FR 76128 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... and the Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009) (``Order''). On...; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 75 FR 67079 (November 1, 2010). On November 30, 2010, the... Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010). On February 3, 2011,...

  5. 75 FR 36632 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009) (``Antidumping Duty Order''). On..., 71 FR 29303, (May 22, 2006) (``Final Determination''). Initiation of New Shipper Review Pursuant to.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alan Ray, AD/CVD Operations, Office 9, Import...

  6. 77 FR 73420 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR... Proceedings: Final Modification, 77 FR 8101 (February 14, 2012). We will instruct CBP to assess antidumping... Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003) (``Assessment...

  7. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  8. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  9. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  10. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  12. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  13. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  14. 76 FR 20317 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 75 FR 36632 (June 28, 2010..., but not limited to, iron, cobalt, nickel, tungsten carbide) that are formed together into a...

  15. 78 FR 77098 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... 77020. See 2nd Review Notices, 77 FR at 73419 n.15. \\16\\ Jiangsu Youhe Tool Manufacturer Co., Ltd., was... of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2009-2010, 78 FR 11143, 11144 (February 15, 2013) (1st... of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2010-2011, 78 FR 36166 (June 17, 2013) (2nd Review...

  16. 78 FR 36166 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: 2010-2011, 77 FR 73417 (December 10, 2012) (Preliminary... Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 76 FR 65694 (October 4, 2011) (Assessment Practice Refinement... Results, 77 FR at 73418-49, and accompanying Preliminary Decision Memorandum at 14. \\b\\ Weihai...

  17. 76 FR 62761 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Changed Circumstances Review and Extension of Time Limit for Final Results, 76 FR 38357 (June 30, 2011... Circumstances Review, 76 FR 50455 (August 15, 2011). On September 23, 2011, the Department published a notice in... ] Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review, 76 FR 59111 (September 23, 2011). Extension of Time Limit...

  18. 76 FR 38357 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review, 75 FR 60409 (September 30, 2010) (``Initiation''). Between...: Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review and New Shipper Reviews, 75 FR 12726 (March..., 64 FR 9979, 9980 (March 1, 1999). \\5\\ See Respondent's April 4, 2011, submission. Preliminary...

  19. 75 FR 969 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Korea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ...'s Republic of China and the Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4.... 06-247, 09-110, Slip Op. 09-107 (CIT Sept. 30, 2009). \\2\\ See DSMC v. US, No. 06-00247, Slip Op....

  20. 76 FR 64898 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Duty Changed Circumstances Review and Extension of Time Limit for Final Results, 76 FR 38357 (June 30... New Shipper Reviews, 75 FR 12726 (March 17, 2010) and accompanying Issues and Decision Memorandum at... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 64 FR 9979, 9980 (March 1, 1999). \\7\\ See Respondent's April 4,...

  1. 76 FR 76135 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... China and the Republic of Korea: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 57145 (November 4, 2009). On November 1... Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 75 FR 67079 (November 1, 2010). On December 28... Request for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 81565 (December 28, 2010) (Initiation Notice). Consistent with...

  2. 78 FR 36524 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Administrative Review; 2010-2011, 77 FR 73420 (December 10, 2012) (Preliminary Results). On April 5, 2012, the... conversions for expenses reported by Ehwa, adjusted certain programming language related to Ehwa's level of... Parts Thereof from the Republic of Korea, 71 FR 29310 (May 22, 2006). Pursuant to 19 CFR...

  3. 78 FR 42930 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... Administrative Review; 2010-2011, 78 FR 36166 (June 17, 2013) (Final Results). DATES: Effective Date: June 17... detailed discussion, see Decision Memorandum for Amended Final. \\3\\ See Final Results, 78 FR at 36167, and...; Final Modification, 77 FR 8101 (February 14, 2012) (Final Modification for Reviews). \\5\\ See, e.g.,...

  4. 77 FR 73417 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 76128 (December 6, 2011). Fraud Allegation The... from the People's Republic of China, 71 FR 29303, 29304, 29306-07 (May 22, 2006). \\4\\ For a full... Products From Brazil: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 75 FR 65453,...

  5. 78 FR 72116 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From China Institution of a Five-Year Review.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... and parts thereof from China (74 FR 57145, November 4, 2009). The Commission is conducting a review to...) (19 CFR 201.15(b)), 73 FR 24609 (May 5, 2008). This advice was developed in consultation with the... operating conditions (using equipment and machinery in place and ready to operate), normal operating...

  6. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  7. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  8. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  9. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  10. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  11. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  12. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  13. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  14. Diamond cutters' grinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, B. F.

    1985-03-01

    The development of diamond tool designs is determined by the development of the technology for the synthesis of artificial diamonds. The technology of syntehsizing artificial diamonds involves the production of mono and polycrystalline diamonds and composition diamond-containing materials. High strength and thermally stable monocrystalline diamonds brands AS30 to AS80 in a size of up to 800 micrometers, and polycrystalline diamonds: black diamonds, ballas (Synthetic Fiber) in a size up to 10mm, are manufactured. Production of single-layer and double-layer diamond plates used in cutting tools is organized. The raw materials base with the constant decrease in the use of natural diamonds is the basis for the development of the manufacture of a wide array of diamond tools. New areas of applications for tools using natural diamonds, such as diamond cutters for turning high-precision parts, straightening tools, hardness gages are outlined. Diamond cutters with natural diamonds are used to grind surfaces which have exceptionally high requirements with respect to the reflecting capacity and roughness.

  15. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  16. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  17. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  18. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions. PMID:19745488

  19. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  20. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  1. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  2. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  3. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  4. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  5. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  6. Multilayer diamond coated WC tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.D.; Jagannaham, K.; Narayan, J.

    1995-12-31

    To increase adhesion of diamond coatings, a multilayer structure was developed. The multilayer diamond coating consisted of a first discontinuous diamond layer, an interposing layer, and a top continuous diamond layer. The diamond layer was grown on WC substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition and the interposing layer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. Machining tests were used to characterize adhesion properties of the multilayer diamond coatings on WC(Co) substrates. Results indicate that diamond coatings exhibit good adhesion on the WC tool substrates. The wear resistance of the WC tool is improved significantly by the diamond coatings.

  7. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    DOEpatents

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  8. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  9. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  10. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  11. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  12. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  13. Diamond nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Tokano, Yuji; Miyamoto, Iwao; Komuro, Masanori; Hiroshima, Hiroshi

    2002-10-01

    Electron beam (EB) lithography using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and oxygen gas reactive ion etching (RIE) were used to fabricate fine patterns in a diamond mould. To prevent charge-up during EB lithography, thin conductive polymer was spin-coated over the PMMA resist, yielding dented line patterns 2 μ m wide and 270 nm deep. The diamond mould was pressed into PMMA on a silicon substrate heated to 130, 150 and 170ºC at 43.6, 65.4 and 87.2 MPa. All transferred PMMA convex line patterns were 2 μ m wide. Imprinted pattern depth increased with rising temperature and pressure. PMMA patterns on diamond were transferred by the diamond mould at 150ºC and 65.4 MPa, yielding convex line patterns 2 μ m wide and 200 nm high. Direct aluminium and copper patterns were obtained using the diamond mould at room temperature and 130.8 MPa. The diamond mould is thus useful for replicating patterns on PMMA and metals.

  14. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  15. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  16. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  17. Diamond Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175 deg.n C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin ({approx}1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  18. The Diamond Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1999-08-01

    Since time immemorial, we have treasured diamonds for their exquisite beauty and unrivaled hardness. Yet, most of the earth's diamonds lie deep underground and totally unaccessible to us--if only we knew how to fabricate them! In The Diamond Makers Robert Hazen vividly recounts the very human desire to exceed nature and create a synthetic diamond. Spanning centuries of ground-breaking science, instances of bitter rivalry, cases of outright fraud and self-delusion, Hazen blends drama and science to reveal the extraordinary technological advances and devastating failures of the diamond industry. Along the way, readers will be introduced to the brilliant, often eccentric and controversial, pioneers of high-pressure research who have harnessed crushing pressures and scorching temperatures to transform almost any carbon-rich material, from road tar to peanut butter, into the most prized of all gems. Robert M. Hazen is the author of fifteen books, including the bestseller, Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy, which he wrote with James Trefil. Dr. Hazen has won numerous awards for his research and scientific writing.

  19. Making Diamond in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the graphite to diamond transformation and a phase diagram for carbon. Describes high temperature-higher pressure experimental apparatus and growth of diamonds from seed crystals. Reviews properties of the diamond which suggest uses for the synthetic product. Illustrations with text. (GH)

  20. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  1. Diamond Measuring Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulic, J.F.

    2000-01-27

    The fundamental goal of this project was to develop additional capabilities to the diamond measuring prototype, work out technical difficulties associated with the original device, and perform automated measurements which are accurate and repeatable. For this project, FM and T was responsible for the overall system design, edge extraction, and defect extraction and identification. AccuGem provided a lab and computer equipment in Lawrence, 3D modeling, industry expertise, and sets of diamonds for testing. The system executive software which controls stone positioning, lighting, focusing, report generation, and data acquisition was written in Microsoft Visual Basic 6, while data analysis and modeling were compiled in C/C++ DLLs. All scanning parameters and extracted data are stored in a central database and available for automated analysis and reporting. The Phase 1 study showed that data can be extracted and measured from diamond scans, but most of the information had to be manually extracted. In this Phase 2 project, all data required for geometric modeling and defect identification were automatically extracted and passed to a 3D modeling module for analysis. Algorithms were developed which automatically adjusted both light levels and stone focus positioning for each diamond-under-test. After a diamond is analyzed and measurements are completed, a report is printed for the customer which shows carat weight, summarizes stone geometry information, lists defects and their size, displays a picture of the diamond, and shows a plot of defects on a top view drawing of the stone. Initial emphasis of defect extraction was on identification of feathers, pinpoints, and crystals. Defects were plotted color-coded by industry standards for inclusions (red), blemishes (green), and unknown defects (blue). Diamonds with a wide variety of cut quality, size, and number of defects were tested in the machine. Edge extraction, defect extraction, and modeling code were tested for

  2. Process for making diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasquin, J. R.; Estes, M. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of a device and process for making industrial diamonds. The device is composed of an exponential horn tapering from a large end to a small end, with a copper plate against the large end. A magnetic hammer abuts the copper plate. The copper plate and magnetic hammer function together to create a shock wave at the large end of the horn. As the wave propagates to the small end, the extreme pressure and temperature caused by the wave transforms the graphite, present in an anvil pocket at the small end, into diamonds.

  3. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  4. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  5. CVD diamond layers for electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, M.; Fabisiak, K.; Wrzyszczyński, A.; Banaszak, A.; Szybowicz, M.; Paprocki, K.; Bała, W.; Bylicki, F.

    2014-09-01

    Diamond electrodes of different morphologies and qualities were manufactured by hot filament chemical deposition (HF CVD) techniques by changing the parameters of diamond growth process. The estimation of diamond quality and identification of different carbon phases was performed by Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of diamond quality and amorphous carbon phase content on the electrochemical response of an obtained diamond electrode in 0.5 M H2SO4 as supporting electrolyte was investigated by cyclic voltammetry with [Fe(CN)6]4-/3- as a redox probe. The kinetic parameters such as catalytic reaction rate constant k0 and electron transfer coefficient α were determined. The obtained results show that the analytical performance of undoped diamond electrodes can be implemented just by the change of diamond layers quality.

  6. Carbonado: natural polycrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Trueb, L F; De Wys, E C

    1969-08-22

    Carbonados are porous aggregates of mostly xenomorphic diamond crystallites ranging in diameter from a fraction of a micron to over 20 microns. Crystalline inclusions (up to 3 percent) occur in the pores of the crystallites and consist mainly of orthoclase and small amounts of other igneous, metamorphic, and secondary minerals. PMID:17742270

  7. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  8. Diamond is on budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materlik, Gerhard

    2008-02-01

    Your editorial last month, entitled "The £80m black hole" (January p15), was accompanied by a picture of the Diamond Light Source, which some readers may have interpreted as being responsible for the current shortfall in funding for the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). This implication is totally inaccurate and misleading.

  9. ELECTRON AMPLIFICATION IN DIAMOND.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; WU, Q.

    2006-07-10

    We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission ''amplifiers'' for photocathodes. Secondary emission gain of over 300 has been achieved in transmission mode and emission mode for a variety of diamond samples. Techniques of sample preparation, including hydrogenation to achieve negative electron affinity (NEA), have been adapted to this application.

  10. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  11. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  12. Multiplying Electrons With Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As researchers in the Space Communications Division of NASA s Glenn Research Center in 1992, Dr. Gerald Mearini, Dr. Isay Krainsky, and Dr. James Dayton made a secondary electron emission discovery that became the foundation for Mearini s company, GENVAC AeroSpace Corporation. Even after Mearini departed Glenn, then known as Lewis Research Center, his contact with NASA remained strong as he was awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to further develop his work. Mearini s work for NASA began with the investigation of diamond as a material for the suppression of secondary electron emissions. The results of his research were the opposite of what was expected diamond proved to be an excellent emitter rather than absorber. Mearini, Krainsky, and Dayton discovered that laboratory-grown diamond films can produce up to 45 electrons from a single incident electron. Having built an electron multiplier prototype at NASA, Mearini decided to start his own company to develop diamond structures usable in electron beam devices.

  13. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  14. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  15. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  16. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  17. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  18. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  19. Most diamonds were created equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, Brooke Matat; Navon, Oded

    2016-06-01

    Diamonds crystallize deep in the mantle (>150 km), leaving their carbon sources and the mechanism of their crystallization debatable. They can form from elemental carbon, by oxidation of reduced species (e.g. methane) or reduction of oxidized ones (e.g. carbonate-bearing minerals or melts), in response to decreasing carbon solubility in melts or fluids or due to changes in pH. The mechanism of formation is clear for fibrous diamonds that grew from the carbonate-bearing fluids trapped in their microinclusions. However, these diamonds look different and, based on their lower level of nitrogen aggregation, are much younger than most monocrystalline (MC) diamonds. In the first systematic search for microinclusions in MC diamonds we examined twinned crystals (macles), assuming that during their growth, microinclusions were trapped along the twinning plane. Visible mineral inclusions (>10 μm) and nitrogen aggregation levels in these clear macles are similar to other MC diamonds. We found 32 microinclusions along the twinning planes in eight out of 30 diamonds. Eight inclusions are orthopyroxene; four contain >50% K2O (probably as K2(Mg, Ca)(CO3)2); but the major element compositions of the remaining 20 are similar to those of carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) found in fibrous diamonds. We conclude that the source of carbon for these macles and for most diamonds is carbonate-bearing HDFs similar to those found here and in fibrous diamonds. Combined with the old ages of MC diamonds (up to 3.5 Ga), our new findings suggest that carbonates have been introduced into the reduced lithospheric mantle since the Archaean and that the mechanism of diamond formation is the same for most diamonds.

  20. Raman investigation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li-Ming

    1993-12-31

    Extensive Raman investigations were conducted on a wide range of diamond films whose structures were dilineated by optical and confocal microscopy. The Raman Spectra from one extreme of this range indicates a very intense 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} line diagnostic of bulk crystalline diamond. Microscopy of the corresponding film shows the presence of many large true diamond crystallite. The 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} Raman line at the other extreme of the range, however, is virtually absent. It is replaced, at this extreme, by a very broad Raman contour whose maxima occur near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}. Optical microscopy now reveals a complete lack of diamond crystallites. The ratio of the integrated Raman intensity of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diamond line to the integral of the entire broad contour extending from {approx}1200 cm{sup {minus}1} to 1800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with maxima near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}, was determined. This ratio rises with increasing diamond crystallite size, and it decreases as true diamond crystallites are replaced by diamond-like, but amorphous, hard carbon, which produces the broad Raman contour. The measured intensity ratio was analyzed in terms of a differential equation related to phonon coupling. The increase of the intensity ratio of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diagnostic diamond peak is due to phono-phonon coupling between the diamond crystallites, as the concentration of the amorphous diamond-like carbon decreases. Confocal microscopy indicates many amorphous-like regions interspersed between diamond crystallites which account for the intensity loss, and agree with the Raman intensity measurements. These Raman measurements crystallinity versus amorphous hard-carbon character of thin diamond film.

  1. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  3. Nanocrystalline diamond for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitura, Stanislaw

    1997-06-01

    The unique properties of thin amorphous diamond layers make them perspective candidates for producing advanced micro- electronic devices, coatings for cutting tools and optics. Moreover, due to the highest bicompatibility of carbon resulting from the presence of this element in human body, it appears to be a potential biomaterial. Until present the amorphous diamond has found industrial applications in some areas. One of the applications of the carbon layers are coatings for medical implants. The studies of carbon films as coatings for implants in surgery were aimed on the investigations of biological resistance of implants, histopathological investigations on laboratory animals, tests of corrosion resistance, measurements of mechanical properties and a breakdown test in Tyrod solution. The current state of published work in the subject is reviewed in the paper together with a discussion concerning classification of this material.

  4. Hexagonal diamonds in meteorites: implications.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, R E; Strong, H M; Bundy, F P

    1967-02-24

    A new polymorph of carbon, hexagonal diamond, has been discovered in the Canyon Diablo and Goalpara meteorites. This phase had been synthesized recently under specific high-pressure conditions in the laboratory. Our results: provide strong evidence that diamonds found in these meteorites were produced by intense shock pressures acting on crystalline graphite inclusions present within the meteorite before impact, rather than by disintegration of larger, statically grown diamonds, as some theories propose. PMID:17830485

  5. Diamond films for laser hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Watkins, L.; Ravi, K.; Yokota, S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser-damage experiments were performed on free-standing polycrystalline diamond films prepared by plasma-enhanced CVD. The high laser-induced stress resistance found for this material makes it useful for thin-film coatings for laser optics. Results for diamond-coated silicon substrates demonstrate the enhanced damage threshold imparted by diamond thin-film coatings to materials susceptible to laser damage.

  6. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

  7. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

  8. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  9. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  10. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  11. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  12. Raman barometry of diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izraeli, E. S.; Harris, J. W.; Navon, O.

    1999-11-01

    Pressures and temperatures of the diamond source region are commonly estimated using chemical equilibria between coexisting mineral inclusions. Here we present another type of geobarometer, based on determination of the internal pressure in olivine inclusions and the stresses in the surrounding diamond. Using Raman spectroscopy, pressures of 0.13 to 0.65 GPa were measured inside olivine inclusions in three diamonds from the Udachnaya mine in Siberia. Stresses in the diamond surrounding the inclusions indicated similar pressures (0.11-0.41 GPa). Nitrogen concentration and aggregation state in two of the diamonds yielded mantle residence temperatures of ˜1200°C. Using this temperature and the bulk moduli and thermal expansion of olivine and diamond, we calculated source pressures of 4.4-5.2 GPa. We also derived a linear approximation for the general dependence of the source pressure ( P0, GPa) on source temperature ( T0, °C) and the measured internal pressure in the inclusion ( Pi): P0=(3.259×10 -4Pi+3.285×10 -3) T0+0.9246 Pi+0.319. Raman barometry may be applied to other inclusions in diamonds or other inclusion-host systems. If combined with IR determination of the mantle residence temperature of the diamond, it allows estimation of the pressure at the source based on a non-destructive examination of a single diamond containing a single inclusion.

  13. Conversion of fullerenes to diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond or diamond-like films on a substrate surface. The method involves the steps of providing a vapor selected from the group of fullerene molecules or an inert gas/fullerene molecule mixture, providing energy to the fullerene molecules consisting of carbon-carbon bonds, the energized fullerene molecules breaking down to form fragments of fullerene molecules including C.sub.2 molecules and depositing the energized fullerene molecules with C.sub.2 fragments onto the substrate with farther fragmentation occurring and forming a thickness of diamond or diamond-like films on the substrate surface.

  14. Diamonds in ophiolites: Contamination or a new diamond growth environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, J.; Gain, S.; Stern, R. A.; Huang, J.-X.; Jacob, D. E.; Xu, X.; Stokes, A. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Pearson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    For more than 20 years, the reported occurrence of diamonds in the chromites and peridotites of the Luobusa massif in Tibet (a complex described as an ophiolite) has been widely ignored by the diamond research community. This skepticism has persisted because the diamonds are similar in many respects to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic/industrial diamonds (grown from metal solvents), and the finding previously has not been independently replicated. We present a detailed examination of the Luobusa diamonds (recovered from both peridotites and chromitites), including morphology, size, color, impurity characteristics (by infrared spectroscopy), internal growth structures, trace-element patterns, and C and N isotopes. A detailed comparison with synthetic industrial diamonds shows many similarities. Cubo-octahedral morphology, yellow color due to unaggregated nitrogen (C centres only, Type Ib), metal-alloy inclusions and highly negative δ13C values are present in both sets of diamonds. The Tibetan diamonds (n = 3) show an exceptionally large range in δ15N (-5.6 to + 28.7 ‰) within individual crystals, and inconsistent fractionation between {111} and {100} growth sectors. This in contrast to large synthetic HPHT diamonds grown by the temperature gradient method, which have with δ15N = 0 ‰ in {111} sectors and + 30 ‰ in {100} sectors, as reported in the literature. This comparison is limited by the small sample set combined with the fact the diamonds probably grew by different processes. However, the Tibetan diamonds do have generally higher concentrations and different ratios of trace elements; most inclusions are a NiMnCo alloy, but there are also some small REE-rich phases never seen in HPHT synthetics. These characteristics indicate that the Tibetan diamonds grew in contact with a C-saturated Ni-Mn-Co-rich melt in a highly reduced environment. The stable isotopes indicate a major subduction-related contribution to the chemical environment. The

  15. Update on diamond and diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettington, Alan H.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviewed the infrared uses of diamond-like carbon thin films and the potential uses of synthetic diamond layers. Diamond-like carbon is used widely as a protective anti-reflection coating for exposed germanium infrared windows and lenses and as thin protective coatings for front surface aluminium mirrors. This material is also used in protective anti-reflective coatings for zinc sulphide as the outer thin film in multi-layer designs incorporating variable index intermediate layers of germanium carbide. The maximum thickness of diamond-like carbon that can be used is often limited by the stress induced in the layer through the method of deposition and by the absorption present in the basic material. This stress and absorption can be far lower in synthetic diamond layers but there are now problems associated with the high substrate temperatures, difficulties in coating large areas uniformly and problems arising from surface scattering and low deposition rates.

  16. Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

  17. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Winfree, William P.; Crews, B. Scott

    1990-01-01

    A laser pulse technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate is developed. The effective thermal diffusivity of diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by the laser pulses. An analytical model is developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamond/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film. Phase and amplitude measurements give similar results. The thermal conductivity of the films is found to be better than that of type 1a natural diamond.

  18. Electronic properties of CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, C. E.

    2003-03-01

    The electronic properties of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond are reviewed based on data measured by transient and spectrally resolved photoconductivity experiments, photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) where substitutional nitrogen (P1-centre) and carbon defects (H1-centre) are detected. The results show that nominally undoped high quality polycrystalline CVD diamond is a n-type semiconductor due to the presence of substitutional nitrogen. The sub-band-gap optical absorption is governed by amorphous graphite present at grain boundaries. Spectrally resolved photoconductivity experiments measured in the same regime are partially dominated by diamond bulk properties which are comparable to single crystalline Ib and IIa diamond and partially by grain boundaries. Mobilities and drift length of carriers are discussed and compared to properties of single crystalline diamond.

  19. High efficiency diamond solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2008-05-06

    A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

  20. 77 FR 46686 - Steel Nails From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... People's Republic of China, 73 FR 44961 (August 1, 2008) (``Order''). DATES: Effective Date: August 4... Diamond Sawblades Mfrs. Coalition v. United States, 626 F.3d 1374 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (``Diamond...

  1. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  2. Diamonds in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherton, M.

    2004-12-01

    My first science fiction novel, Star Dragon, just recently available in paperback from Tor, features a voyage to the cataclysmic variable star system SS Cygni. My second novel, Spider Star, to appear early in 2006, takes place in and around a dark matter ``planet'' orbiting a neutron star. Both novels are ``hard'' science fiction, relying on accurate physics to inform the tales. It's possible to bring to life abstract concepts like special relativity, and alien environments like accretion disks, by using science fiction. Novels are difficult to use in a science class, but short stories offer intriguing possibilities. I'm planning to edit an anthology of hard science fiction stories that contain accurate science and emphasize fundamental ideas in modern astronomy. The working title is Diamonds in the Sky. The collection will be a mix of original stories and reprints, highlighting challenging concepts covered in a typical introductory astronomy course. Larry Niven's classic story, ``Neutron Star," is an excellent demonstration of extreme tidal forces in an astronomical context. Diamonds in the Sky will include forewards and afterwards to the stories, including discussion questions and mathematical formulas/examples as appropriate. I envision this project will be published electronically or through a print-on-demand publisher, providing long-term availabilty and keeping low cost. I encourage interested parties to suggest previously published stories, or to suggest which topics must be included.

  3. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  4. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  5. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic hydrogen defect free diamond or diamond like films on a substrate. The method involves providing vapor containing fullerene molecules with or without an inert gas, providing a device to impart energy to the fullerene molecules, fragmenting at least in part some of the fullerene molecules in the vapor or energizing the molecules to incipient fragmentation, ionizing the fullerene molecules, impinging ionized fullerene molecules on the substrate to assist in causing fullerene fragmentation to obtain a thickness of diamond on the substrate.

  6. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond film properties

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; McCauley, Thomas G.; Zhou, Dan; Krauss, Alan R.

    2003-07-15

    A method for controlling the crystallite size and growth rate of plasma-deposited diamond films. A plasma is established at a pressure in excess of about 55 Torr with controlled concentrations of hydrogen up to about 98% by volume, of unsubstituted hydrocarbons up to about 3% by volume and an inert gas of one or more of the noble gases and nitrogen up to about 98% by volume. The volume ratio of inert gas to hydrogen is preferably maintained at greater than about 4, to deposit a diamond film on a suitable substrate. The diamond film is deposited with a predetermined crystallite size and at a predetermined growth rate.

  7. Diamond and Diamond-Like Materials as Hydrogen Isotope Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, L.R.; Barbero, R.S.; Carroll, D.W.; Archuleta, T.; Baker, J.; Devlin, D.; Duke, J.; Loemier, D.; Trukla, M.

    1999-07-10

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop diamond and diamond-like thin-films as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. Hydrogen embrittlement limits the life of boost systems which otherwise might be increased to 25 years with a successful non-reactive barrier. Applications in tritium processing such as bottle filling processes, tritium recovery processes, and target filling processes could benefit from an effective barrier. Diamond-like films used for low permeability shells for ICF and HEDP targets were also investigated. Unacceptable high permeabilities for hydrogen were obtained for plasma-CVD diamond-like-carbon films.

  8. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Diamond family of nanoparticle superlattices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyan; Tagawa, Miho; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Tong; Emamy, Hamed; Li, Huilin; Yager, Kevin G; Starr, Francis W; Tkachenko, Alexei V; Gang, Oleg

    2016-02-01

    Diamond lattices formed by atomic or colloidal elements exhibit remarkable functional properties. However, building such structures via self-assembly has proven to be challenging because of the low packing fraction, sensitivity to bond orientation, and local heterogeneity. We report a strategy for creating a diamond superlattice of nano-objects via self-assembly and demonstrate its experimental realization by assembling two variant diamond lattices, one with and one without atomic analogs. Our approach relies on the association between anisotropic particles with well-defined tetravalent binding topology and isotropic particles. The constrained packing of triangular binding footprints of truncated tetrahedra on a sphere defines a unique three-dimensional lattice. Hence, the diamond self-assembly problem is solved via its mapping onto two-dimensional triangular packing on the surface of isotropic spherical particles. PMID:26912698

  10. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  11. Diamond turning of optical crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.; Syn, C.K.; Fuchs, B.A.; Velsko, S.P.

    1990-03-01

    Diamond turning (DT) has proven to be a cost effective optical fabrication technique for both aspherical and spherical/flat figures when precise geometrical tolerances are important. We are interested in the DT of crystals for several reasons. DT has been very effective to insure requisite accurate geometrical orientation of optical surfaces to crystalline axes for frequency conversion applications. Also, DT can achieve figure up to the edge of the crystal. Another key DT benefit is enhanced laser damage threshold, which we feel in part is due to the freedom of the surface from polishing impurities. Several important issues for diamond turning optical crystals are the tool wear, associated surface finish, and laser damage properties. We have found that careful selection and control of diamond turning parameters can yield production techniques for crystals previously considered incompatible with diamond turning. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

    1999-02-26

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  13. Properties of interfaces of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanich, R. J.; Bergman, L.; Turner, K. F.; van der Weide, J.; Humphreys, T. P.

    1993-04-01

    Results related to two different interface aspects involving diamond are described: (1) the initial states of CVD diamond film growth, and (2) the negative electron affinity and formation of metal-diamond interfaces. The surface and interface properties are probed with STM, Raman scattering/photoluminescence and angle-resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS). STM measurements of diamond nuclei on Si after various plasma growth processes show both flat and hillocked structures characteristics of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional growth modes, respectively. STS measurements show distinct I- V characteristics of the nuclei and the substrate. The presence of optical defects and the diamond quality are studied with micro-Raman/photoluminescence measurements. The results indicate an increased density of impurity-related defects during the initial stages of growth. The interface properties of Ti on natural crystal (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) surfaces are studied with ARUPS using 21.2 eV HeI emission. Prior to deposition the diamond (1 1 1) is chemically cleaned, and a sharp (0.5 eV FWHM) peak is observed at the position of the conduction band minimum, indicating a negative electron affinity surface. After a subsequent argon plasma clean this peak disappears, while the spectrum shows a shift of 0.5 eV towards higher energies. Upon sub-monolayer titanium deposition on (1 1 1) diamond, the negative electron affinity peak reappears. Further titanium depositions causes this titanium-induced negative electron affinity peak to be attenuated, indicating that the emission originates from the interface. A similar experiment, done on the diamond (1 0 0) surface, however, does not result in a negative electron affinity. By determining the relative positions of the diamond valence band edge and the titanium Fermi level, the Schottky barrier height of titanium on diamond is measured. A model, based on the Schottky barrier height of titanium on diamond, and the work function of titanium, is

  14. Thermally induced alkylation of diamond.

    PubMed

    Hoeb, Marco; Auernhammer, Marianne; Schoell, Sebastian J; Brandt, Martin S; Garrido, Jose A; Stutzmann, Martin; Sharp, Ian D

    2010-12-21

    We present an approach for the thermally activated formation of alkene-derived self-assembled monolayers on oxygen-terminated single and polycrystalline diamond surfaces. Chemical modification of the oxygen and hydrogen plasma-treated samples was achieved by heating in 1-octadecene. The resulting layers were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. This investigation reveals that alkenes selectively attach to the oxygen-terminated sites via covalent C-O-C bonds. The hydrophilic oxygen-terminated diamond is rendered strongly hydrophobic following this reaction. The nature of the process limits the organic layer growth to a single monolayer, and FTIR measurements reveal that such monolayers are dense and well ordered. In contrast, hydrogen-terminated diamond sites remain unaffected by this process. This method is thus complementary to the UV-initiated reaction of alkenes with diamond, which exhibits the opposite reactivity contrast. Thermal alkylation increases the range of available diamond functionalization strategies and provides a means of straightforwardly forming single organic layers in order to engineer the surface properties of diamond. PMID:21090790

  15. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  16. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  17. Advance leads to new diamond coatings applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cederquist, S.C.

    1999-06-01

    a significant advance in producing wear-resistant coatings has been achieved by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) (Albuquerque, New Mexico) through the discovery of a stress-free amorphous (noncrystalline) diamond thin film material that has many of the same properties as its crystalline diamond cousin. The stress-free amorphous diamond coating is harder than any other known coating--with the exception of crystalline diamond. Crystalline diamond films are difficult to grow, and even harder to shape into parts. Thin films of amorphous diamond offer some flexibility, but are associated with problems like warping.

  18. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  19. Combined single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond substrates for diamond electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A. L. Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Muchnikov, A. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2012-02-15

    The fabrication of diamond substrates in which single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond form a single wafer, and the epitaxial growth of diamond films on such combined substrates containing polycrystalline and (100) single-crystalline CVD diamond regions are studied.

  20. 76 FR 37320 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ..., 74 FR 31242 (June 30, 2009) (Final Results) ] and accompanying Issues and Decision Memorandum. DATES... Review, 75 FR 27987 (May 19, 2010). Amended Final Results Because there is now a final court decision... Sawblades Mfrs. Coalition v. United States, 612 F.3d. 1348 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (Diamond Sawblades),...

  1. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  2. Nanocrystalline diamond synthesized from C60

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinskaia, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Langehorst, F.; Jacobsen, S.; Liebske, C.

    2010-11-30

    A bulk sample of nanocrystalline cubic diamond with crystallite sizes of 5-12 nm was synthesized from fullerene C{sub 60} at 20(1) GPa and 2000 C using a multi-anvil apparatus. The new material is at least as hard as single crystal diamond. It was found that nanocrystalline diamond at high temperature and ambient pressure kinetically is more stable with respect to graphitization than usual diamonds.

  3. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  4. Characterization of single-crystal diamond grown from the vapor phase on substrates of natural diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Altukhov, A. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Zemlyakov, V. E.; Ziablyuk, K. N.; Mitenkin, A. V.; Muchnikov, A. B. Radishev, D. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The results of studies of single-crystal diamond layers with orientation (100) grown on substrates of IIa-type natural diamond by chemical-vapor deposition and of semiconductor diamond obtained subsequently by doping by implantation of boron ions are reported. Optimal conditions of postimplantation annealing of diamond that provide the hole mobility of 1150 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} (the highest mobility obtained so far for semiconductor diamond after ion implantation) are given.

  5. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  6. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  7. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  8. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  9. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  10. Diamond device architectures for UV laser monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatori, S.; Girolami, M.; Oliva, P.; Conte, G.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper reviews the status of diamond detectors for UV laser monitoring and imaging. Single pixel detectors, position sensitive architectures, optically activated switches and sensor arrays for beam positioning and imaging are analyzed. The performances of natural diamond and synthetic diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition are compared to evaluate the suitability of such an outstanding material for the described applications.

  11. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  12. Diamond Drilling Specification Manual and Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This publication presents the standards required of a person practicing diamond drilling in western Canada and provides an outline for teaching the skills and knowledge. It is divided into two parts. The Diamond Drilling Specification Manual establishes the levels of skill and knowledge required in the four certified levels of diamond drilling.…

  13. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  14. Diamond Molecules Found in Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, R. M. K.; Dahl, J. E. P.; Liu, S. G.; Olmstead, M. M.; Buerki, P. R.; Gat, R.

    We recently reported [1,2] the discovery and isolation of new members of the hydrogen-terminated diamond series, ˜1 to ˜2 nm sized higher diamondoids from petroleum. Crystallographic studies [1,2] revealed a wealth of diamond molecules that are nanometer-sized rods, helices, discs, pyramids, etc. Highly rigid, well-defined, readily derivatizable structures make them valuable molecular building blocks for nanotechnology. We now produce certain higher diamondoids in gram quantities. Although more stable than graphite particles of comparable size, higher diamondoids are extraordinarily difficult to synthesize. Attempts to synthesize them were abandoned in the 1980's. We examined extracts of diamond-containing materials synthesized by CO2 laser-induced gas-phase synthesis [3] and commercial CVD in an attempt to detect diamantane to undecamantane. However, high-sensitivity GCMS detected no diamondoids in these materials.

  15. Underground at Black Diamond Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1989-10-01

    Although California is noted for its mining history and annually leads the nation in total monetary value of minerals produced, there a few opportunities for the public to tour underground mines. One reason is that nearly all mining in the state today is done above ground in open pits. Another reason is that active underground mines are not commonly favorable to public tours. There is one place, Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, where the public can safely tour a formerly active underground mine. Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve is a 3,600-acre parkland about 5 miles southwest of Antioch in Contra Costa County. The Preserve was established in the early 1970s and is administered by the East Bay Regional Park District. Black Diamond Mines Preserve is noteworthy for its mining history as well as its natural history, both of which are briefly described here.

  16. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  17. Diamond Quantum Devices in Biology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuzhou; Jelezko, Fedor; Plenio, Martin B; Weil, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    The currently available techniques for molecular imaging capable of reaching atomic resolution are limited to low temperatures, vacuum conditions, or large amounts of sample. Quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offer great potential to achieve single-molecule detection with atomic resolution under ambient conditions. Diamond nanoparticles could also be prepared with implanted NV centers, thereby generating unique nanosensors that are able to traffic into living biological systems. Therefore, this technique might provide unprecedented access and insight into the structure and function of individual biomolecules under physiological conditions as well as observation of biological processes down to the quantum level with atomic resolution. The theory of diamond quantum sensors and the current developments from their preparation to sensing techniques have been critically discussed in this Minireview. PMID:27120692

  18. Deep ultraviolet diamond Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Granados, Eduardo; Spence, David J; Mildren, Richard P

    2011-05-23

    We present a synchronously pumped diamond Raman laser operating at 275.7 nm pumped by the 4th harmonic of a mode locked Nd:YVO4 laser. The laser had a threshold pump pulse energy of 5.8 nJ and generated up to 0.96 nJ pulses at 10.3% conversion efficiency. The results agree well with a numerical model that includes two-photon absorption of the pump and Stokes beams and uses a Raman gain coefficient of diamond of 100 cm/GW. We also report on the observation of nanometer scale two-photon assisted etching of the diamond crystal surfaces. PMID:21643343

  19. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  20. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  1. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  2. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  3. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  4. CVD diamond film oxidation resistance research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Longwei; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Pan, Xiufang; Sun, Yiqing; Wang, Jinye; Sun, Hongtao

    2013-12-01

    Diamond films were deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system, and its oxidation experiments were carried out in atmospheric environmental condition by using a muffle furnace. Inatmospheric environment (the temperature is from 400°C to 900°C) the oxidation resistance of diamond thin films was investigated. The results indicate that under the atmospheric environment diamond thin film surface morphology did not change after 6 hours at 400°C. Diamond thin film surface morphology began to change after 2 hours at 600°C, and when time was extended to 4 hours, the diamond thin film surface morphology changed significantly. The surface morphology of diamond films began to change after 15 minutes at a 700°C condition and when time was extended to 6 hours diamond films were all destroyed. All the diamond films on the silicon substrate disappeared completely in 20 minutes at 900°C. The intact crystal face is the reason that natural diamond has stable chemical property. The crystal face of synthetic diamond film has a lot of defects, especially on the side. Oxidation of the diamond films begin with the grain boundary and defects.

  5. 'Diamond Jenness': Before the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was snapped on sol 177 before NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.'

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  6. 'Diamond Jenness': After the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock dubbed 'Diamond Jenness.' It was taken on sol 177 (July 23, 2004) after the rover first ground into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.' The rover later ground into the rock a second time. A sliced spherule, or 'blueberry,' is visible in the upper left corner of the hole.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  7. 'Diamond Jenness': A Tough Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the target area called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  8. Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Shwachman Diamond Syndrome Foundation Inc. Click the image below to ... more Your Help Can Directly Impact these Lives! Recent News 8th International Congress--Pictures and Presentation Abstracts 6th Annual Tough Mudder a Huge Success! Shop Amazon Smile for Father's Day Mother gives ...

  9. Saturation of CVD Diamond Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucile S. Dauffy; Richard A. Lerche; Greg J. Schmid; Jeffrey A. Koch; Christopher Silbernagel

    2005-01-01

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its surrounding electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 µJ, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (Ebandgap = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  10. High thermal conductivity of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Patrick M.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this educational exercise were to demonstrate the high rate of heat flow from a synthetic diamond coupon and to compare it to a commonly used thermal conductor, such as copper. The principles of heat transfer by conduction and convection may also be demonstrated. A list of equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  11. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  12. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  13. Multiple Diamond Anvil (MDA) apparatus using nano-polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irifune, T.; Kunimoto, T.; Tange, Y.; Shinmei, T.; Isobe, F.; Kurio, A.; Funakoshi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thanks to the great efforts by Dave Mao, Bill Bassett, Taro Takahashi, and their colleagues at the University of Rochester through 1960s-70s, diamond anvil cell (DAC) became a major tool to investigate the deep Earth after its invention by scientists at NBS in 1958. DAC can now cover almost the entire pressure and temperature regimes of the Earth's interior, which seems to have solved the longstanding debate on the crystal structure of iron under the P-T conditions of the Earth's inner core. In contrast, various types of static large-volume presses (LVP) have been invented, where tungsten carbide has conventionally been used as anvils. Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (MA), which utilize 6 first-stage harden steel and 8 tungsten carbide anvils, is the most successful LVP, and has been used for accurate measurements of phase transitions, physical properties, element partitioning, etc. at high pressure and temperature. However, pressures using tungsten carbide as the second-stage anvils have been limited to about 30 GPa due to significant plastic deformation of the anvils. Efforts have been made to expand this pressure limit by replacing tungsten carbide anvils with harder sintered diamond (SD) anvils over the last two decades, but the pressures available in KMA with SD anvils have still been limited to below 100 GPa. We succeeded to produce nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD or HIME-Diamond) in 2003, which is known to have ultrahigh hardness, very high toughness and elastic stiffness, high transmittance of light, relatively low thermal conductivity. These properties are feasible for its use as anvils, and some preliminary experiments of application of NPD anvils to laser heated DAC have successfully made in the last few years. We are now able to synthesize NPD rods with about 1cm in both diameter and length using a newly constructed 6000-ton KMA at Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, and have just started to apply this new polycrystalline diamond as anvils

  14. Medical applications of diamond particles and surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R. J.; Boehm, R. D.; Sumant, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    Diamond has been considered for use in several medical applications due to its unique mechanical, chemical, optical, and biological properties. In this paper, methods for preparing synthetic diamond surfaces and particles are described. In addition, recent developments involving the use of diamond in prostheses, sensing, imaging, and drug delivery applications are reviewed. These developments suggest that diamond-containing structures will provide significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions over the coming years. Diamond is an allotrope of carbon that is being considered for use in several medical applications. Ramachandran determined that the crystal structure of diamond consists of two close packed interpenetrating face centered cubic lattices; one lattice is shifted with respect to the other along the elemental cube space diagonal by one-quarter of its length. If one approximates carbon atoms as equal diameter rigid spheres, the filling of this construction is 34%. Due to the carbon-carbon distance (1.54 {angstrom}), diamond crystal exhibits the highest atomic density (1.76 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}) of any solid. The very high bond energy between two carbon atoms (83 kcal/mol) and the directionality of tetrahedral bonds are the main reasons for the high strength of diamond. Diamond demonstrates the highest Vickers hardness value of any material (10,000 kg/mm{sup 2}). The tribological properties of diamond are also impressive; the coefficient of friction of polished diamond is 0.07 in argon and 0.05 in humid air. Diamond is resistant to corrosion except in an oxygen atmosphere at temperatures over 800 C. In addition, type IIa diamond exhibits the highest thermal conductivity of all materials (20 W cm{sup -1} K{sup -1} at room temperature).

  15. Synthesizing Diamond from Liquid Feedstock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2005-01-01

    A relatively economical method of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been developed for synthesizing diamond crystals and films. Unlike prior CVD methods for synthesizing diamond, this method does not require precisely proportioned flows of compressed gas feedstocks or the use of electrical discharges to decompose the feedstocks to obtain free radicals needed for deposition chemical reactions. Instead, the feedstocks used in this method are mixtures of common organic liquids that can be prepared in advance, and decomposition of feedstock vapors is effected simply by heating. The feedstock used in this method is a solution comprising between 90 and 99 weight percent of methanol and the balance of one or more other oxyhydrocarbons that could include ethanol, isopropanol, and/or acetone. This mixture of compounds is chosen so that dissociation of molecules results in the desired proportions of carbon-containing radicals (principally, CH3) and of OH, H, and O radicals. Undesirably, the CVD temperature and pressure conditions thermodynamically favor the growth of graphite over the growth of diamond. The H radicals are desirable because they help to stabilize the growing surface of diamond by shifting the thermodynamic balance toward favoring the growth of diamond. The OH and O radicals are desirable because they preferentially etch graphite and other non-diamond carbon, thereby helping to ensure the net deposition of pure diamond. The non-methanol compounds are included in the solution because (1) methanol contains equal numbers of C and O atoms; (2) an excess of C over O is needed to obtain net deposition of diamond; and (3) the non-methanol molecules contain multiple carbon atoms for each oxygen atom and thus supply the needed excess carbon A typical apparatus used in this method includes a reservoir containing the feedstock liquid and a partially evacuated stainless-steel reaction chamber. The reservoir is connected to the chamber via tubing and a needle valve or

  16. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  17. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  18. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  19. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  20. 33 CFR 110.6 - Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). 110.6 Section 110.6 Navigation and Navigable... Areas § 110.6 Portland Harbor, Portland, Maine (between Little Diamond Island and Great Diamond Island). Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the wharf, at the most southerly point of Great Diamond Island...

  1. Optimizing the Growth of (111) Diamond for Diamond Based Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Eric; Godwin, Patrick; Samarth, Nitin; Snyder, David; de Las Casas, Charles; Awschalom, David D.

    Magnetometers based on nitrogen vacancy (NV) ensembles have recently achieved sub-picotesla sensitivities [Phys. Rev. X 5, 041001(2015)], putting the technique on par with SQUID and MFM magnetometry.Typically these sensors use (100) oriented diamond with NV centers forming along all four (111) crystal orientations.This allows for vector magnetometry, but is a hindrance to the absolute sensitivity. Diamond grown on (111) oriented substrates through microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition(MP-CVD) provides a promising route in this context since such films can exhibit preferential orientation greater than 99% [Appl. Phys. Lett.104, 102407 (2014)]. An important challenge though is to achieve sufficiently high NV center densities required for enhancing the sensitivity of an NV ensemble magnetometer.We report systematic studies of the MP-CVD growth and characterization of (111) oriented diamond, where we vary growth temperature, methane concentration, and nitrogen doping. For each film we study the Nitrogen to NV ratio, the NV- to NV0 ratio, and alignment percentage to minimize sources of decoherence and ensure preferential alignment. From these measurements we determine the optimal growth parameters for high sensitivity, NV center ensemble scalar magnetometry. Funded by NSF-DMR.

  2. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  3. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  4. Process for buried metallization in diamond film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Max L.; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lagounov, Alex; Tang, Chi

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate methods of combining chemical vapor deposition diamond growth techniques with state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition or ion beam enhanced deposition to produce buried metallization of polycrystalline diamond films. The mechanical and electrical integrity of both the insulating and conducting elements following metallization and diamond overgrowth was shown. Both methods were shown to have bonding strength sufficient to withstand tape lift-off, which is regarded to be a good indication of strength needed for die attachment and wire bonding. Diamond overgrowth was also shown, thus enabling buried metallized layers to be created. Electrical resistivity property measurements on metallized layers and between metallization separated by diamond films were shown to be sufficient to allow the use of diamond as an insulating inter-layer material for multi-layer circuit boards.

  5. Epitaxial growth of europium monoxide on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Melville, A.; Heeg, T.; Mairoser, T.; Schmehl, A.; Fischer, M.; Gsell, S.; Schreck, M.; Awschalom, D. D.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Schlom, D. G.

    2013-11-25

    We report the epitaxial integration of phase-pure EuO on both single-crystal diamond and on epitaxial diamond films grown on silicon utilizing reactive molecular-beam epitaxy. The epitaxial orientation relationship is (001) EuO ‖ (001) diamond and [110] EuO ‖[100] diamond. The EuO layer is nominally unstrained and ferromagnetic with a transition temperature of 68 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 5.5 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the single-crystal diamond, and a transition temperature of 67 ± 2 K and a saturation magnetization of 2.1 ± 0.1 Bohr magnetons per europium ion on the epitaxial diamond film.

  6. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-03-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  7. Diamond thermoluminescence properties of different chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Semjonova, L. F.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    It was found that thermoluminescence (TL) glows of diamonds depend on the origin of diamonds and the chondrite metamorphism degree. The investigation of TL of diamonds was continued and the results for diamonds from Murchison CM2, Krymka LL3.0, Kainsaz CO3, and Abee E4 were considered. The diamonds synthesized by CVD-process (samples 133, 159) and by detonation from soot (DDS-B14-89) were also analyzed for comparison. Before the TL measuring samples were annealed at approximately 350 C for a few seconds and then irradiated by gamma-rays of Cs-137 up to dose approximately 200 krad. TL-measurements were performed in the air atmosphere on the standard equipment. TL data for samples are shown. TL glow for some diamonds are also presented.

  8. Electronic properties of CVD and synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, C. E.; Müautnz, J.; Stutzmann, M.; Zachai, R.; Güautttler, H.

    1997-04-01

    Transport and contact properties of synthetic IIb- and intrinsic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) -diamond films are discussed. The samples have been investigated by time-of-flight and transient photoconductivity experiments using Cr/Au contacts. A hole depletion layer at the Cr/Au-IIb-diamond interface and an electron depletion layer at the Cr/Au-CVD-diamond interface is detected. The data indicate that our normally undoped CVD-diamond films are n-type semiconductors. In IIb diamond the mobilities of electrons and holes have been measured, while in CVD diamond no carrier transit can be detected due to the short Schubweg less than or equal to 1 μm. Two trap levels located approximately 190 meV below the conduction band and 670 meV above the valence band are deduced. Electron spin resonance experiments demonstrate that these CVD films are highly defective, containing about 1018 cm-3 carbon related defects (g=2.0029).

  9. The Toucan's Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    The Southern constellation Tucana (the Toucan) is probably best known as the home of the Small Magellanic Cloud, one of the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. But Tucana also hosts another famous object that shines thousands of lights, like a magnificent, oversized diamond in the sky: the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. More popularly known as 47 Tuc, it is surpassed in size and brightness by only one other globular cluster, Omega Centauri. Globular clusters are gigantic families of stars, comprising several tens of thousands of stars, all thought to be born at the same time from the same cloud of gas [1]. As such, they constitute unique laboratories for the study of how stars evolve and interact. This is even more so because they are located at the same distance, so the brightness of different types of stars, at different stages in their evolution can be directly compared. The stars in globular clusters are held together by their mutual gravity which gives them their spherical shape, hence their name. Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in our Milky Way galaxy, and contain therefore mostly old, low-mass stars. ESO PR Photo 20/06 ESO PR Photo 20/06 Globular Cluster 47 Tuc 47 Tucanae is an impressive globular cluster that is visible with the unaided eye from the southern hemisphere. It was discovered in 1751 by the French astronomer Nicholas Louis de Lacaille who cataloged it in his list of southern nebulous objects. Located about 16 000 light years away, it has a total mass of about 1 million times the mass of the Sun and is 120 light years across, making it appear on the sky as big as the full moon. The colour image of 47 Tucanae presented here was taken with FORS1 on ESO's Very Large Telescope in 2001. The image covers only the densest, very central part of the cluster. The globular cluster extends in reality four times further away! As can be seen however, the density of stars rapidly drops off when moving away from the centre. The red

  10. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  11. Enhanced adhesion of diamond coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhido

    Diamond coatings are of interest for a wide range of applications due to the unique properties of crystalline diamond. Many applications require that the coating adhere strongly to metallic substrates which may have a large difference in thermal expansion coefficient with diamond. These substrates may also have undesirable chemical interactions with carbon during the deposition of the coatings. Intermediate layers are a possible solution to both of these problems. Such layers can act as diffusion barriers preventing the deleterious chemical interactions, and may help to accommodate the thermal expansion mismatch strains. Several aspects of these issues are addressed in this work. The mechanics of the interface for a coating-substrate system loaded by thermal expansion mismatch is modeled. Both continuous coatings and coatings containing a through-thickness hole surrounded by an annular delamination crack are examined. Analytic expressions for the stress distribution in the film and in the substrate are derived by representing the thermal expansion mismatch loads as tractions and moments acting along the outer free edge of the specimen and along the tip of the annular crack. The loads near the center hole are found to vary with the size of the delamination crack, and hence constitute a driving force for growth of such a delamination. The strain energy release rate for the growth of the annular crack surrounding the central hole is derived, and expressed in terms of the thermal expansion misfit between film and substrate; their thickness, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios; and the characteristic dimensions of the film-substrate system. The crack driving force is found to decrease as the delamination crack surrounding the hole propagates, and hence a relationship between crack length and crack driving force is established. The requirements for an effective intermediate layer between diamond films and Fe-group containing substrate materials are described, and two

  12. Study of diamond film growth and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharial

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to study diamond film growth and its properties in order to enhance the laser damage threshold of substrate materials. Calculations were performed to evaluate laser induced thermal stress parameter, R(sub T) of diamond. It is found that diamond has several orders of magnitude higher in value for R(sub T) compared to other materials. Thus, the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of diamond is much higher. Diamond films were grown using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system at various conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and substrate materials. A 0.5 percent CH4 in H2 at 20 torr were ideal conditions for growing of high quality diamond films on substrates maintained at 900 C. The diamond films were polycrystalline which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The top surface of the growing film is always rough due to the facets of polycrystalline film while the back surface of the film replicates the substrate surface. An analytical model based on two dimensional periodic heat flow was developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The effective diffusivity of diamond/silicon samples was measured using a laser pulse technique. The thermal conductivity of the films was measured to be 13.5 W/cm K, which is better than that of a type Ia natural diamond. Laser induced damage experiments were performed on bare Si substrates, diamond film coated Si, and diamond film windows. Significant improvements in the LIDT were obtained for diamond film coated Si compared to the bare Si.

  13. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  14. Defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Zeren, Muzaffer . E-mail: zeren@kou.edu.tr; Karagoez, Sadi

    2006-08-15

    In this study, a general defect characterization in the diamond cutting tools used in natural stone cutting has been investigated. Transverse rupture tests were carried out with different matrix and diamond compositions. In these defect characterization studies on diamond cutting tool materials various microstructural analyses were performed using the techniques of light microscopy (LM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersed X-ray spectrography (EDX) and image analysis (IA)

  15. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ~3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ~5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ~200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  16. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, Seungjoo

    2016-07-01

    We study the dynamic nuclear polarization of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond through optical pumping. The polarization is enhanced due to the hyperfine interaction of nuclear spins as applied magnetic fields vary. This is a result of the averaging of excited states due to fast-phonon transitions in the excited states. The effect of dephasing, in the presence of a vibronic band, is shown to have little effect during the dynamic polarization.

  18. Electrical properties of diamond nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, M.

    Nanocrystalline diamond films (NCD) can potentially be used in a large variety of applications such as electrochemical electrodes, tribology, cold cathodes, and corrosion resistance. A thorough knowledge of the electrical properties of NCD films is therefore critical to understand and predict their performance in various applications. In the present work the electrical properties of NCD films were analysed using Impedance Spectroscopy and Hall Effect measurements. Impedance Spectroscopy permits to identify and single out the conduction paths within the films tested. Such conduction paths can be through grain interiors and/or grain boundaries. Hall measurements, carried out on Boron doped NCD, permits determination of the mobility of the films. Specific treatments were devised to enhance the properties of the NCD films studied. Detonation nanodiamond (DND) is becoming an increasingly interesting material. It is already used as abrasive material or component for coatings [1], but its potential applications can extend far beyond these. It is therefore essential to understand the structure and electrical properties of DND in order to exploit the full potential of this material. In the present work, electrical properties of DND were studied using Impedance Spectroscopy. The results obtained suggest that DND could be used to manufacture devices able to work as Ammonia detectors. Another major area of study in this work was ultra-violet diamond photodetectors. Using high quality CVD single-crystal diamond, UV photodetection devices were built using standard lithographic techniques. Following the application of heat treatments, the photoconductive properties of these devices were highly enhanced. The devices represent the state-of-the-art UV diamond photodetectors.

  19. Microwave Resonators Containing Diamond Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah; Wang, Rabi T.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic diamond dielectric bodies proposed for use in cylindrical resonators helping to stabilize frequencies of some microwave oscillators. Acting in conjunction with metal resonator cavities in which mounted, such dielectric bodies support "whispering-gallery" waveguide modes characterized by desired frequencies of resonance and by electro-magnetic-field configurations limiting dissipation of power on metal surfaces outside dielectric bodies. Performances at room temperature might exceed those of liquid-nitrogen-cooled sapphire-based resonators.

  20. Diamond Machining Applications And Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Roland J.

    1983-12-01

    Aspheric surface generation and precision machining have been important technologies at Hughes Optical Products, Inc. (formerly Optical Division, Bell & Howell Company) for over twenty years. Present machining capabilities and supporting services which are available on a custom basis are described. A variety of applications of diamond machining are illustrated, involving not only the usual reflective materials such as aluminum, copper, and electroless nickel but also such IR refractive materials as germanium, silicon, and chalcogenide glasses.

  1. (Chemically vapor deposited diamond films)

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L. Jr.

    1990-09-22

    The NATO-ASI on Diamond and Diamond-Like Films and Coatings'' was an opportunity for us to learn the latest research results from ongoing programs in the leading laboratories of the world and relate them to our work. Specific examples are given in the comprehensive report which follows. The meeting format provided an ideal environment to meet and interact with our international counterparts. It is clear that our studies are well regarded, and that we have established an excellent reputation in a short time. New opportunities for collaboration were identified. A panel discussion at the end of the meeting addressed the needs and opportunities in the synthesis of CVD diamond. The key scientific needs are those related to modeling the nucleation and growth processes and to elucidation of the critical roles of atomic hydrogen and the mechanisms of carbon addition to the growing surfaces. The development and more extensive use of in situ diagnostics for both surface and gas phases are important to solving these issues. The more immediate practical questions concern the identification of the growth-rate-limiting steps, the relation of growth parameters to the resulting film structure, and the dependence of properties on structure.

  2. Negative Electron Affinity Mechanism for Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    The energy distribution of the secondary electrons for chemical vacuum deposited diamond films with Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) was investigated. It was found that while for completely hydrogenated diamond surfaces the negative electron affinity peak in the energy spectrum of the secondary electrons is present for any energy of the primary electrons, for partially hydrogenated diamond surfaces there is a critical energy above which the peak is present in the spectrum. This critical energy increases sharply when hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface diminishes. This effect was explained by the change of the NEA from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surfaces.

  3. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lončar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310 nm and 632 nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300 pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  4. Superconductor-Diamond Hybrid Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semba, Kouichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Johansson, Jan E. S.; Zhu, Xiaobo; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Munro, William J.; Saito, Shiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro

    This chapter describes recent progress on research into superconducting flux qubit, NV diamond, and superconductor-diamond hybrid quantum systems. First, we describe important physical properties of superconducting macroscopic artificial atoms i.e., the tunability of the qubit energy level spacing, the coherence property, an example of strong coupling to another quantum system such as an LC harmonic oscillator, and qubit state readout through a Josephson bifurcation amplifier. We then introduce the NV center in diamond as an intriguing candidate for quantum information processing, which offers excellent multiple accessibility via visible light, microwaves and magnetic fields. Finally, we describe the superconducting flux qubit - NV centers in a diamond hybrid quantum system.

  5. Direct Coating of Nanocrystalline Diamond on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugawa, Kazuo; Kawaki, Shyunsuke; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2012-09-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films have been successfully deposited on stainless steel substrates without any substrate pretreatments to promote diamond nucleation, including the formation of interlayers. A low-temperature growth technique, 400 °C or lower, in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using a surface-wave plasma has cleared up problems in diamond growth on ferrous materials, such as the surface graphitization, long incubation time, substrate softening, and poor adhesion. The deposited nanocrystalline diamond films on stainless steel exhibit good adhesion and tribological properties, such as a high wear resistance, a low friction coefficient, and a low aggression strength, at room temperature in air without lubrication.

  6. Electrochemical patterning of amorphous carbon on diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Pehrsson, Pehr E.; Binari, Steven C.; Moses, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The ability to pattern ion-implantation damaged or other nondiamond carbon on a diamond substrate is useful for fabricating a variety of devices. We accomplished such patterning by an unmasked implantation into a diamond substrate followed by photolithography and a selective electrochemical etch. The use of a high resistivity medium coupled with applied biases over 50 V permitted etching without requiring contact between the substrate and an electrode. Many electrolytes gave etches that exhibit high selectivity for nondiamond carbon over both diamond and dielectrics such as photoresist. Optical, electrical, and Raman spectroscopic measurements elucidate the effects of the etch on the implanted diamond surface.

  7. 78 FR 14075 - Certain Steel Threaded Rod From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... FR 68400 (November 4, 2011) (``Final Results'') (review covering the period October 8, 2008, through... (Fed. Cir. 1990) (``Timken''). \\3\\ See Diamond Sawblades Mfrs. Coalition v. United States, 626...

  8. 76 FR 4633 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Republic of China, 57 FR 29702 (July 6, 1992) (``Order''). DATES: Effective Date: January 16, 2011. FOR.... United States, 626 F.3d 1374 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (``Diamond Sawblades''), the Department is notifying...

  9. 78 FR 58996 - Tapered Roller Bearings from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 74 FR 3987 (January 22, 2009) (``Final Results...) (``Timken''), as clarified by Diamond Sawblades Mfrs. Coalition v. United States, 626 F.3d 1374 (Fed....

  10. 78 FR 72862 - Wooden Bedroom Furniture From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court Decision Not in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ...: Final Results and Final Rescission in Part, 76 FR 49729 (August 11, 2011) (``Final Results''). DATES... F.3d 1374 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (``Diamond Sawblades''), the Department is notifying the public that...

  11. All diamond self-aligned thin film transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbi, Jennifer

    2008-07-01

    A substantially all diamond transistor with an electrically insulating substrate, an electrically conductive diamond layer on the substrate, and a source and a drain contact on the electrically conductive diamond layer. An electrically insulating diamond layer is in contact with the electrically conductive diamond layer, and a gate contact is on the electrically insulating diamond layer. The diamond layers may be homoepitaxial, polycrystalline, nanocrystalline or ultrananocrystalline in various combinations.A method of making a substantially all diamond self-aligned gate transistor is disclosed in which seeding and patterning can be avoided or minimized, if desired.

  12. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  13. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  14. Formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W

    2009-09-01

    The principal sources of natural diamonds are peridotitic (about 2/3 of diamonds) and eclogitic (1/3) domains located at 140-200 km depth in the subcratonic lithospheric mantle. There, diamonds probably form during redox reactions in the presence of melt (likely for eclogitic and lherzolitic diamonds) or under subsolidus conditions in the presence of CHO fluids (likely for harzburgitic diamonds). Co-variations of δ(13)C and the nitrogen content of diamonds suggest that two modes of formation may have been operational in peridotitic sources: (1) reduction of carbonates, that during closed system fractionation drives diamond compositions to higher δ(13)C values and lower nitrogen concentrations and (2) oxidation of methane, that in a closed system leads to a trend of decreasing δ(13)C with decreasing nitrogen. The present day redox state of subcratonic lithospheric mantle is generally too reduced to allow for methane oxidation to be a widespread process. Therefore, reduction of carbonate dissolved in melts and fluids is likely the dominant mode of diamond formation for the Phanerozoic (545 Ma-present) and Proterozoic (2.5 Ga-545 Ma). Model calculations indicate, however, that for predominantly Paleoarchean (3.6-3.2 Ga) to Mesoarchean (3.2-2.8 Ga) harzburgitic diamonds, methane reduction is the principal mode of precipitation. This suggests that the reduced present day character (oxygen fugacity below carbonate stability) of peridotitic diamond sources may be a secondary feature, possibly acquired during reducing Archean (>2.5 Ga) metasomatism. Recycling of biogenic carbonates back into the mantle through subduction only became an important process in the Paleoproterozoic (2.5-1.6 Ga) and diamonds forming during carbonate reduction, therefore, may predominantly be post-Archean in age. For eclogitic diamonds, open system fractionation processes involving separation of a CO(2) fluid appear to dominate, but in principal the same two modes of formation

  15. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  16. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of materials

  17. Diamond Growth in the Subduction Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, H.; Frost, D. J.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Leroy, C.; Estève, I.

    2014-12-01

    Natural diamonds are fabulous probes of the deep Earth Interior. They are the evidence of the deep storage of volatile elements, carbon at first, but also hydrogen and chlorine trapped as hydrous fluids in inclusions. The study of diamond growth processes in the lithosphere and mantle helps for our understanding of volatile elements cycling between deep reservoirs. We know now that inclusion-bearing diamonds similar to diamonds found in nature (i.e. polycrystalline, fibrous and coated diamonds) can grow in hydrous fluids or melts (Bureau et al., GCA 77, 202-214, 2012). Therefore, we propose that the best environment to promote such diamonds is the subduction factory, where highly hydrous fluids or melts are present. When oceanic plates are subducted in the lithosphere, they carry an oceanic crust soaked with seawater. While the slabs are traveling en route to the mantle, dehydration processes generate saline fluids highly concentrated in NaCl. In the present study we have experimentally shown that diamonds can grow from the saline fluids (up to 30 g/l NaCl in water) generated in subducted slabs. We have performed multi-anvil press experiments at 6-7 GPa and from 1300 to 1400°C during 6:00 hours to 30:00 hours. We observed large areas of new diamond grown in epitaxy on pure diamond seeds in salty hydrous carbonated melts, forming coated gems. The new rims are containing multi-component primary inclusions. Detailed characterizations of the diamonds and their inclusions have been performed and will be presented. These experimental results suggest that multi-component salty fluids of supercritical nature migrate with the slabs, down to the deep mantle. Such fluids may insure the first stage of the deep Earth's volatiles cycling (C, H, halogen elements) en route to the transition zone and the lower mantle. We suggest that the subduction factory may also be a diamond factory.

  18. The provenance of Borneo's enigmatic alluvial diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Lloyd; Graham, Ian; Tanner, Dominique; Hall, Robert; Armstrong, Richard; Yaxley, Greg; Barron, Larry; Spencer, Lee; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2016-04-01

    Gem-quality diamonds occur in several alluvial deposits across central and southern Borneo. Borneo has been a known source of diamonds for centuries, but the location of their primary igneous source remains enigmatic. Numerous geological models have been proposed to explain the distribution of Borneo's diamonds. To assess these models, we used a variety of techniques to examine heavy minerals from Kalimantan's Cempaka paleoalluvial diamond deposit. This involved collecting U-Pb isotopic data, fission track and trace element geochemistry of zircon as well as major element geochemical data of spinels and morphological descriptions of zircon and diamond. Our results indicate that the Cempaka diamonds were likely derived from at least two sources, one which was relatively local and/or involved little reworking, and the other more distal recording several periods of reworking. The distal diamond source is interpreted to be diamond-bearing pipes that intruded the basement of a block that: (1) rifted from northwest Australia (East Java or SW Borneo) and the diamonds were recycled into its sedimentary cover, or: (2) were emplaced elsewhere (e.g. NW Australia) and transported to a block (e.g. East Java or SW Borneo). Both of these scenarios require the diamonds to be transported with the block when it rifted from NW Australia in the Late Jurassic. The 'local' diamonds could be associated with ophiolitic rocks that are exposed in the nearby Meratus Mountains, or could be diamondiferous diatremes associated with eroded Miocene high-K alkaline intrusions north of the Barito Basin. If this were the case, these intrusions would indicate that the lithosphere beneath SW Borneo is thick (~150 km or greater).

  19. The World According to Jared Diamond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the book, "Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies" (Jared Diamond). Examines the strengths of the book, focusing on its distinctive aspects, while also offering criticism. States that the final chapter is the most problematic part of Diamond's work. (CMK)

  20. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    1988-01-01

    A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached.

  1. Double bevel construction of a diamond anvil

    DOEpatents

    Moss, W.C.

    1988-10-11

    A double or multiple bevel culet geometry is used on a diamond anvil in a high pressure cell apparatus to provide increased sample pressure and stability for a given force applied to the diamond tables. Double or multiple bevel culet geometries can also be used for sapphire or other hard crystal anvils. Pressures up to and above 5 Megabars can be reached. 8 figs.

  2. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, Alan R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  3. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  4. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; and platelets, which are necessary for normal blood clotting. In Shwachman-Diamond syndrome , the bone marrow malfunctions and does not ... 06349.x. Citation on PubMed Dror Y. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2005 Dec;45(7):892-901. Review. ...

  6. High mobility diamonds and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, H.

    2006-10-01

    The basic properties of high-quality CVD diamond film make them very interesting for a wide range of detectors: they are radiation hard, provide fast signals, show very low leakage current even in high radiation environments, have excellent thermal properties and can be manufactured as free-standing detectors. This paper will give an overview of recent test results on polycrystalline and single crystal CVD diamond detectors. Large polycrystalline CVD diamonds with a charge collection distance up to 300 m have been tested and are used to build prototype tracking detectors and beam monitors at the moment. Further irradiation studies have been carried out using a 24 GeV proton beam to test samples up to a total fluence of 1.8 × 1016 protons/cm2. Measurements on several samples of single-crystal CVD diamonds have shown full charge collection in the detector. Results of transient-current measurements on single crystal CVD diamonds, which are used to determine the charge carrier mobility and lifetime, show the excellent electrical properties of this material. The paper will present several different applications of CVD diamond detectors, which benefit from the recent improvements of detector-grade diamonds. They range from tracking in High Energy Physics experiments, to high-speed Beam Conditions Monitor at the collider experiments up to CVD diamond detectors as beam diagnostic in proton cancer therapy.

  7. High carrier mobilities in black diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Oliver A.; Jackman, Richard B.; Nebel, Christoph; Foord, John S.

    2003-03-01

    Hydrogen plasma treatment of diamond renders the surface p-type, with the carriers emerging with little thermal activation, in sharp contrast to the use of boron for the formation of p-type material. To date, it has been thought that only the highest quality 'white' polycrystalline material is useful for electronic device applications, with many regarding single-crystal diamond as ultimately the substrate material of choice. In this paper it is shown that when p-type material is produced through hydrogenation, this is not the case. 'Black' polycrystalline diamond, which can be grown much more rapidly than white, shows carrier concentrations and mobility values similar to both white polycrystalline diamond and single-crystal material. This result has important implications for the provision of low-cost black-diamond substrates for device applications.

  8. Early diamond making at General Electric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, H. M.

    1989-09-01

    This is an account of how GE's early interest in a new super-hard metal, cobalt cemented tungsten carbide, for drawing tungsten lamp filament wire, led to a broader interest in the realm of super pressure and to diamond synthesis. P. W. Bridgman at Harvard University had demonstrated the new metal's (``Carboloy'') ability to generate pressures of 100 000 atm (100 kbars). Armed with this new capability, GE initiated a diamond project in 1951. In December 1954 two synthesized diamonds emerged in a marginal experiment that for a while could not be reproduced. Nevertheless, that experiment gave the critical clue to the process that now provides 90% of the world's industrial diamond needs. The high-pressure high-temperature process (HPHT) together with the new carbon vapor deposition process (CVD) brings diamonds' unique and valuable properties to applications requiring crystals tailored to fit specific needs.

  9. Structures of diamond-like phases

    SciTech Connect

    Greshnyakov, V. A.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2011-07-15

    The diamond-like phases containing carbon atoms with the same degree of hybridization, which is close to sp{sup 3}, are classified. It is found that twenty such phases can exist, and ten of them are described for the first time. Molecular mechanics and semi-empirical quantum-mechanical methods are used to calculate the geometrically optimized structures of diamond-like phase clusters and to determine their structural parameters and properties, such as the density, the bulk modulus, and the sublimation energy. The difference between the properties of the diamond-like phases and those of diamond is found to be determined by the difference between the structures of these phases and diamond.

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarisation of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, Grant Lysle

    Chapter one reviews the reported literature on the NMR of diamond. This signal consists of a single line at 39 ppm from TMS and two hyperfine lines due to 13C interactions. The second chapter introduces the apparatus used in this study. The availability of this excellently equipped laboratory presented a unique opportunity to perform this investigation. Chapter three outlines the experimental techniques used as well as the manner in which the acquired data was processed. The fourth chapter presents an overview of the most common defects found in diamond. Proposed models of these defects are presented and the EPR spectra displayed. The methods developed to determine the paramagnetic impurity concentration, from the EPR line width and the spin-spin relaxation times are presented in the fifth chapter. The line width gives the total paramagnetic impurity concentration to about 10 ppm. The spin-spin relaxation time allows the determination of paramagnetic impurity concentrations, to much lower levels. This information was used in the explanation of the relaxation behaviour for the diamonds investigated. The temperature dependence of the paramagnetic electron relaxation times is reported in the sixth chapter. The results obtained are consistent with the findings in prior work that P1 impurities are typical, Jahn Teller centres. Two diamonds, however, display trends that depart from this theory. It was found in these experiments that, bar thermal expansion effects, the spin-spin relaxation time is independent of temperature. The seventh chapter deals with the solid state and thermal mixing effects. The relevant theory, results obtained and a discussion of these results, are presented. The effect of various parameters on the polarisation rates and the 13C signal enhancement are investigated. Finally the effect of applying the DNP treatment on the central and hyperfine lines is discussed. The pulsed DNP process is presented in the eighth chapter. The relevant theory, the

  11. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanya, John Cullen, Christopher Morris, Thomas Krchnavek, Robert R.; Holber, William Basnett, Andrew Basnett, Robert; Hettinger, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp{sup 3} peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm{sup −1}) and that negligible amounts of the sp{sup 2} band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films.

  12. Microstructure and thermal properties of copper–diamond composites with tungsten carbide coating on diamond particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qiping; He, Xinbo Ren, Shubin; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Wu, Mao; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-07-15

    An effective method for preparing tungsten carbide coating on diamond surfaces was proposed to improve the interface bonding between diamond and copper. The WC coating was formed on the diamond surfaces with a reaction medium of WO{sub 3} in mixed molten NaCl–KCl salts and the copper–diamond composites were obtained by vacuum pressure infiltration of WC-coated diamond particles with pure copper. The microstructure of interface bonding between diamond and copper was discussed. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the obtained copper–diamond composites were investigated. Results indicated that the thermal conductivity of as-fabricated composite reached 658 W m{sup −} {sup 1} K{sup −} {sup 1}. Significant reduction in coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite compared with that of pure copper was obtained. - Highlights: • WC coating was successfully synthesized on diamond particles in molten salts. • WC coating obviously promoted the wettability of diamond and copper matrix. • WC coating greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of Cu–diamond composite. • The composites are suitable candidates for heat sink applications.

  13. Diamonds in an Archean greenstone belt: Diamond suites in unconventional rocks of Wawa, Northern Ontario (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Ryder, John

    2010-05-01

    Diamonds typically are found on Archean cratons entrained by younger Phanerozoic kimberlites. In contrast, Wawa diamonds are hosted in "unconventional", non-kimberlitic rocks that formed contemporaneously with the mafic and sedimentary rocks of the Archean Michipicoten Greenstone Belt (MGB). We studied two diamond suites that occur within the 2.9-2.7 Ga greenschist facies rocks of MGB located in the southwest portion of the Superior Craton (E. Canada). The first diamond suite henceforth referred to as the Wawa breccia diamonds (384 stones), are hosted in the 2618-2744 Ma calc-alkaline lamprophyres and volcaniclastic breccias, contemporaneous with pillow basalts and felsic volcanics of MGB. The second suite, the Wawa conglomerate diamonds (80 crystals), are hosted in the 2697-2700 Ma poorly sorted sedimentary polymictic conglomerate which is interpreted as a proximal alluvial fan debris flow in a fan-delta environment. The majority of the diamonds was found within the matrix of the conglomerate. The diamondiferous breccia occurs 20 km north of the town of Wawa, whereas the conglomerate is found 12 km northeast of Wawa. Diamonds from the 2 occurrences were characterized and described for provenance studies. Both the breccia and conglomerate diamonds show similar crystal habits, with the predominance of octahedral single crystals and ~ 10% of cubes. The conglomerate diamonds are significantly less resorbed (no resorbtion in 43% of the stones) than the breccia diamonds (8% non-resorbed stones). In both suites, only 21-24% show high degrees of resorption. The majority of crystals in both suites are colourless, with some yellow, brown and grey stones. Conglomerate diamonds had a wider variety of colours that were not seen in the breccia diamonds, including green and pink. The breccia diamonds contain 0-740 ppm N and show two modes of N aggregation at 0-30 and 60-95%. Among the breccia diamonds, Type IaA stones comprise 17%, whereas IaAB stones make up 49% of the

  14. Diamonds and the african lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Boyd, F R; Gurney, J J

    1986-04-25

    Data and inferences drawn from studies of diamond inclusions, xenocrysts, and xenoliths in the kimberlites of southern Africa are combined to characterize the structure of that portion of the Kaapvaal craton that lies within the mantle. The craton has a root composed in large part of peridotites that are strongly depleted in basaltic components. The asthenosphere boundary shelves from depths of 170 to 190 kilometers beneath the craton to approximately 140 kilometers beneath the mobile belts bordering the craton on the south and west. The root formed earlier than 3 billion years ago, and at that time ambient temperatures in it were 900 degrees to 1200 degrees C; these temperatures are near those estimated from data for xenoliths erupted in the Late Cretaceous or from present-day heat-flow measurements. Many of the diamonds in southern Africa are believed to have crystallized in this root in Archean time and were xenocrysts in the kimberlites that brought them to the surface. PMID:17743571

  15. Diamond Detectors for Compton Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. W.; Dutta, D.; Narayan, A.; Wang, P.

    2009-12-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments aim to test the standard model of particle physics through precise low-energy determinations of the weak mixing angle. These experiments require determination of the polarization of the incident electron beam to the 1% level or better. An example of this type of experiment is the Q-weak experiment, which will be conducted in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2010 and beyond. We are constructing a Compton polarimeter in Hall C to provide continuous monitoring of the polarization with the goal of 1% absolute polarization determination. In our Compton polarimeter, circularly polarized laser light will impinge upon the electron beam. Electrons scattered by the Compton process will be momentum-analyzed in a dipole magnet downstream of the interaction point. A diamond strip tracker will be placed further downstream of the dipole to sense the Compton-scattered electrons and determine their momenta. The design of the polarimeter, focusing on electron detection, and our progress in prototyping and constructing the diamond strip tracker, are discussed.

  16. Diamond turning microstructure optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenda

    2009-05-01

    Microstructure optical components in the form of Fresnel, TIR, microgroove, micro lens array provide a lot design freedom for high compact optical systems. It is a key factor which enables the cutting edge technology for telecommunication, surveillance and high-definition display system. Therefore, the demand of manufacturing such element is rapidly increasing. These elements usually contain high precision, tiny structure and complex form, which have posed many new challenges for tooling, programming as well as ultra-precision machining. To cope with the fast development of the technology and meet the increasing demand of the market, we have developed our own manufacturing process to fabricate microstructure optical components by way of Diamond tuning, Shaping, Raster cutting, Slow Slide Servo (SSS), Diamond milling and Post polishing. This paper is to focus on how we employed these methods to produce complex prototype of microstructure optical components and precision mold inserts which either contains aspheric lens array or freeform V grooves. The high quality finish of these surfaces meets application requirements. Measurement results are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared and discussed in the paper.

  17. Comparison theorems for causal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthiere, Clément; Gibbons, Gary; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2015-09-01

    We formulate certain inequalities for the geometric quantities characterizing causal diamonds in curved and Minkowski spacetimes. These inequalities involve the redshift factor which, as we show explicitly in the spherically symmetric case, is monotonic in the radial direction, and it takes its maximal value at the center. As a by-product of our discussion we rederive Bishop's inequality without assuming the positivity of the spatial Ricci tensor. We then generalize our considerations to arbitrary, static and not necessarily spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the case of spacetimes with a horizon our generalization involves the so-called domain of dependence. The respective volume, expressed in terms of the duration measured by a distant observer compared with the volume of the domain in Minkowski spacetime, exhibits behaviors which differ if d =4 or d >4 . This peculiarity of four dimensions is due to the logarithmic subleading term in the asymptotic expansion of the metric near infinity. In terms of the invariant duration measured by a comoving observer associated with the diamond we establish an inequality which is universal for all d . We suggest some possible applications of our results including comparison theorems for entanglement entropy, causal set theory, and fundamental limits on computation.

  18. Infrared Optical Properties of Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Karstens, William

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a Taylor-series representation for the refractive index of intrinsic elemental semiconductors in a transparent region starting from the Kramers-Kronig relations. Cauchy proposed a similar expansion on the basis of aether theory, but the present formulation requires just causality and linear response. Only terms in even powers of energy occur; their coefficients are the inverse odd moments of the interband extinction coefficient. Inclusion of low-energy extrinsic absorptions yields a Laurent series; coefficients of the negative-power terms are the odd moments of the extrinsic absorption. We demonstrate this formulation for natural diamond over the energy range 0.05 - 5 eV. An index vs. photon-energy-squared plot is very nearly linear, corresponding to the first terms in a Taylor-series for interband absorption. However, the index dips sharply below 0.5 eV. Experience(D.Y. Smith, Mitio Inokuti, and W. Karstens, Physics Essays) (in press) with similar deviations in Si and Ge indicates this corresponds to Laurent-series terms for free-electron intraband or defect absorption. The coefficient of the ω-2 term is related to the f-sum rule and gives the plasma frequency for the extrinsic absorption. We find that, unlike nominally pure silicon where free-carriers account for the low-energy absorption, absorption by defects or impurities are the most likely extrinsic culprits in diamond.

  19. Diamond formation - Where, when and how?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2015-04-01

    Geothermobarometric calculations for a worldwide database of inclusions in diamond indicate that formation of the dominant harzburgitic diamond association occurred predominantly (90%) under subsolidus conditions. Diamonds in eclogitic and lherzolitic lithologies grew in the presence of a melt, unless their formation is related to strongly reducing CHO fluids that would increase the solidus temperature or occurred at pressure-temperature conditions below about 5 GPa and 1050 °C. Three quarters of peridotitic garnet inclusions in diamond classify as "depleted" due to their low Y and Zr contents but, based on LREEN-HREEN ratios invariably near or greater than one, they nevertheless reflect re-enrichment through either highly fractionated fluids or small amounts of melt. The trace element signatures of harzburgitic and lherzolitic garnet inclusions are broadly consistent with formation under subsolidus and supersolidus conditions, respectively. Diamond formation may be followed by cooling in the range of ~ 60-180 °C as a consequence of slow thermal relaxation or, in the case of the Kimberley area in South Africa, possibly uplift due to extension in the lithospheric mantle. In other cases, diamond formation and final residence took place at comparable temperatures or even associated with small temperature increases over time. Diamond formation in peridotitic substrates can only occur at conditions at least as reducing as the EMOD buffer. Evaluation of the redox state of 225 garnet peridotite xenoliths from cratons worldwide indicates that the vast majority of samples deriving from within the diamond stability field represent fO2 conditions below EMOD. Modeling reveals that less than 50 ppm fluid are required to completely reset the redox state of depleted cratonic peridotite to that of the fluid. Consequently, the overall reduced state of diamond stable peridotites implies that the last fluids to interact with the deep cratonic lithosphere were generally reducing in

  20. The Geopolitical Setting of Conflict Diamonds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2002-05-01

    September 11, 2001 will live in infamy. Ideological differences have also led to senseless atrocities in Angola, Congo Republic, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Hundreds of thousands have died, scores mutilated, and millions displaced. These have gone virtually unnoticed for decades. Unnoticed that is until it became evident that these barbaric acts were fueled by the sale or bartering of diamonds for arms, or by more ingenious ways that are less traceable. There is no end in sight. Industry has long recognized that about 20% of diamonds reaching the open market are smuggled from operating mines, and more recently that an additional 4% originates from conflict diamond sources. Diamond identification by laser inscription, ion implantation, or certification protocols are subject to fraudulent tampering. And these applied methods are thwarted if cutting and polishing centers are infiltrated, or if terrorist facilities are independently established. Mark ups are substantial (40-60%) from raw material to finished product. Tracking the paths of rough stones from mines to faceted gems is impractical because some 30-50 million cts of top quality material, or about 100 million stones, would require branding each year. Moreover, the long standing tradition of site-holdings and the bourse system of mixing or matching diamonds, inadvertently ensures regional anonymity. Conflict diamonds are mined in primary kimberlites and from widely dispersed alluvial fields in tropical jungle. Landscapes, eroded by 1-5 vertical km over 100 Ma, have transformed low grade primary deposits into unconsolidated sedimentary bonanzas. The current value of stones retrieved, by motivated diggers and skillful jiggers, in rebel held territories, is impossible to determine, but in 1993 amounted to tens of millions USD. Diamonds over 100 cts continue to surface at premier prices. Borders are porous, diamonds flow easily, and armed networks are permeable and mobile. Diamonds form at great depths (over 200 km

  1. Dislocation electrical conductivity of synthetic diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, S. N. Samsonenko, N. D.

    2009-05-15

    A relationship between the electric resistance of single-crystal homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films and their internal structure has been investigated. It is established that the electrical conductivity of undoped homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films is directly related to the dislocation density in them. A relation linking the resistivity {rho} ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} {omega} cm) with the dislocation density {gamma} ({approx}10{sup 14}-4 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -2}) is obtained. The character of this correlation is similar for both groups of homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films. Thin ({approx}1-8 {mu}m) homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films with small-angle dislocation boundaries between mosaic blocks exhibit dislocation conductivity. The activation energy of dislocation acceptor centers was calculated from the temperature dependence of the conductivity and was found to be {approx}0.3 eV. The conduction of thick diamond films (h > 10 {mu}m) with the resistivity {rho} {approx} 10{sup 8} {omega} cm is determined by the conduction of intercrystallite boundaries, which have a nondiamond hydrogenated structure. The electronic properties of the diamond films are compared with those of natural semiconductor diamonds of types IIb and Ic, in which dislocation acceptor centers have activation energies in the range 0.2-0.35 eV and are responsible for hole conduction.

  2. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  3. Patterned polycrystalline diamond microtip vacuum diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, W.P.; Davidson, J.L.; Kinser, D.L.

    1995-12-31

    Electron field emission from an array of patterned pyramids of polycrystalline diamond for vacuum diode applications has been investigated. High current emission from the patterned diamond microtip arrays are obtained at low electric fields. A current density from the diamond microtips of 14mA/cm{sup 2} was observed for a field of <10 V/{mu}m. Field emission for these diamond microtips exhibits significant enhancement both in total emission current and stability compared to pure silicon emitters. Moreover, field emission from patterned polycrystalline diamond pyramidal tip arrays is unique in that the applied field is found to be lower (2-3 order of magnitude lower) compared to that required for emission from Si, Ge, GaAs, and metal surfaces. The fabrication process utilizing silicon shaping and micromachining techniques for the fabrication of diamond diaphragms with diamond microtip arrays for vacuum microelectronic applications has been developed. The processing techniques are compatible with IC fabrication technology. The effect of temperature annealing on the current emission characteristics were also investigated.

  4. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Guizard, B.; Marshall, R. D.; Foulon, F.

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-industrial basis, CVD diamond detectors have been fabricated for nuclear industry applications in hostile environments. Such devices can operate in harsh environments and overcome limitations encountered with the standard semiconductor materials. Of these, this paper presents devices for the monitoring of the alpha activity in corrosive nuclear waste solutions, such as those encountered in nuclear fuel assembly reprocessing facilities, as well as diamond-based thermal neutron detectors exhibiting a high neutron to gamma selectivity. All these demonstrate the effectiveness of a demanding industrial need that relies on the remarkable resilience of CVD diamond.

  5. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond’s widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  6. Nanocrystalline diamond nanoelectrode arrays and ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hees, Jakob; Hoffmann, René; Kriele, Armin; Smirnov, Waldemar; Obloh, Harald; Glorer, Karlheinz; Raynor, Brian; Driad, Rachid; Yang, Nianjun; Williams, Oliver A; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-04-26

    In this report, the fabrication of all-nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) by e-beam lithography as well as of all-diamond nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) using nanosphere lithography is presented. In this way, nanostructuring techniques are combined with the excellent properties of diamond that are desirable for electrochemical sensor devices. Arrays and ensembles of recessed disk electrodes with radii ranging from 150 to 250 nm and a spacing of 10 μm have been fabricated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as well as cyclic voltammetry was conducted to characterize arrays and ensembles with respect to different diffusion regimes. One outstanding advantage of diamond as an electrode material is the stability of specific surface terminations influencing the electron transfer kinetics. On changing the termination from hydrogen- to oxygen-terminated diamond electrode surface, we observe a dependence of the electron transfer rate constant on the charge of the analyte molecule. Ru(NH(3))(6)(+2/+3) shows faster electron transfer on oxygen than on hydrogen-terminated surfaces, while the anion IrCl(6)(-2/-3) exhibits faster electron transfer on hydrogen-terminated surfaces correlating with the surface dipole layer. This effect cannot be observed on macroscopic planar diamond electrodes and emphasizes the sensitivity of the all-diamond NEAs and NEEs. Thus, the NEAs and NEEs in combination with the efficiency and suitability of the selective electrochemical surface termination offer a new versatile system for electrochemical sensing. PMID:21413786

  7. Phosphorylated nano-diamond/ Polyimide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Vezir Kahraman, Memet

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel route to synthesize polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond films with improved thermal and mechanical properties was developed. Surface phosphorylation of nano-diamond was performed in dichloromethane. Phosphorylation dramatically enhanced the thermal stability of nano-diamond. Poly(amic acid) (PAA), which is the precursor of PI, was successfully synthesized with 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-oxydianiline (4,4'-ODA) in the solution of N,N- dimethylformamide (DMF). Pure BTDA-ODA polyimide films and phosphorylated nanodiamond containing BTDA-ODA PI films were prepared. The PAA displayed good compatibility with phosphorylated nano-diamond. The morphology of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structure of polyimide and polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond was characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the phosphorylated nano-diamond was successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the polyimide (PI)/phosphorylated nanodiamond was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA results showed that the thermal stability of (PI)/phosphorylated nano-diamond film was increased.

  8. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2012-09-04

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  9. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  10. Artifact Diamond Its Allure And Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Max N.

    1989-01-01

    While the preponderance of the mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of natural diamond have been known for over a decade, only recently has artifact diamond in technologically useful form factors become an exciting possibility. The advent of sacrificial, lattice matched crystalline substrates provides the basis not only for semiconducting applications of diamond, but for optical mirrors, lenses, and windows as well. As a semiconductor, diamond has the highest resistivity, the highest saturated electron velocity, the highest thermal conductivity, the lowest dielectric constant, the highest dielectric strength, the greatest hardness, the largest bandgap and the smallest lattice constant of any material. It also has electron and hole mobilities greater than those of silicon. Its figure of merit as a microwave power amplifier is unexcelled and exceeds that of silicon by a multiplier of 8200. For integrated circuit potential, its thermal conductivity, saturated velocity, and dielectric constant also place it in the premier position (32 times that of silicon, 46 times that of GaAs). Although not verified, its radiation hardness should also be unmatched. Aside from its brilliant sparkle as a gemstone, there has been little use of diamond in the field of optics. Processing of the diamond surface now appears to be as simple as that of any other material --albeit with different techniques. In fact, it may be possible to etch diamond far more controllably (at economically viable rates) than any other material as the product of the etch is gaseous and the etched trough is self-cleaning. Other properties of diamond make it an ideal optical material. Among them are its unmatched thermal conductivity, its extremely low absorption loss above 228 nanometers, and unmatched Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, hardness, thermal shock, and modulus of elasticity. If the recently-found mechanisms by which erbium impurities in III-V junctions can be made to "lase

  11. Effects of initial crystal size of diamond powder on surface residual stress and morphology in polycrystalline diamond (PCD) layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, HongSheng; Jia, XiaoPeng; Xu, Yue; Wan, LianRu; Jie, KaiKai; Ma, HongAn

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts (PDC) were synthesized using diamond powder of average crystal size 3-20 μm by the Ni70Mn25Co5 alloy infiltration technique at high temperature and high pressure (HPHT). The surface residual stress of polycrystalline diamond (PCD) layer was measured using micro-Raman spectroscopy with hydrostatic stress model and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Measurements of the stress levels of PCDs show that the residual compressive stresses range from 0.12 to 0.22 GPa, which increase with the crystal size of diamond. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology of initial diamond grains and PCD cross-section. The results indicate that PCD has a dense and interlaced microstructure with diamond-diamond (D-D) direct bonding. And the smaller the crystal size of diamond, the better the growth of diamond direct bonding and the smaller the binder metal between diamond boundaries will be.

  12. Charge multiplication effect in thin diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skukan, N.; Grilj, V.; Sudić, I.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Makino, T.; Kambayashi, Y.; Andoh, Y.; Onoda, S.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.; Kamiya, T.; Jakšić, M.

    2016-07-01

    Herein, we report on the enhanced sensitivity for the detection of charged particles in single crystal chemical vapour deposition (scCVD) diamond radiation detectors. The experimental results demonstrate charge multiplication in thin planar diamond membrane detectors, upon impact of 18 MeV O ions, under high electric field conditions. Avalanche multiplication is widely exploited in devices such as avalanche photo diodes, but has never before been reproducibly observed in intrinsic CVD diamond. Because enhanced sensitivity for charged particle detection is obtained for short charge drift lengths without dark counts, this effect could be further exploited in the development of sensors based on avalanche multiplication and radiation detectors with extreme radiation hardness.

  13. Photoinduced laser etching of a diamond surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Komlenok, M S; Pimenov, S M; Konov, V I

    2007-11-30

    Nongraphitising ablation of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by nanosecond UV laser pulses is studied experimentally. For laser fluences below the diamond graphitisation threshold, extremely low diamond etching rates (less than 1nm/1000 pulses) are obtained and the term nanoablation is used just for this process. The dependence of the nanoablation rate on the laser fluence is studied for samples irradiated both in air and in oxygen-free atmosphere. The effect of external heating on the nanoablation rate is analysed and a photochemical mechanism is proposed for describing it. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  14. Supernovae as sources of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Small hydrocarbon grains in the vicinity of a supernova could be annealed by the absorption of several far-ultraviolet photons to produce the tiny diamonds found in meteorites. These freshly-synthesized diamond grains would be bombarded by the heavy ions and neutrals in the supernovae outflow and would thereby acquire the distinctive noble-gas isotopic signature by which they were first isolated. Only diamonds formed relatively close to supernovae would acquire such a signature, since grains formed farther out would be subjected to a much diluted and less energetic plasma environment.

  15. Bonding Diamond To Metal In Electronic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacquez, Andrew E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved technique for bonding diamond to metal evolved from older technique of soldering or brazing and more suitable for fabrication of delicate electronic circuits. Involves diffusion bonding, developed to take advantage of electrically insulating, heat-conducting properties of diamond, using small diamond bars as supports for slow-wave transmission-line structures in traveling-wave-tube microwave amplifiers. No fillets or side coats formed because metal bonding strips not melted. Technique also used to mount such devices as transistors and diodes electrically insulated from, but thermally connected to, heat sinks.

  16. Observation of twinning in diamond CVD films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, W.; Fabisiak, K.; Orzeszko, S.; Rozploch, F.

    1992-10-01

    Diamond particles prepared by dc-glow-discharge enhanced HF-CVD hybrid method, from a mixture of acetone vapor and hydrogen gas have been examined by TEM, RHEED and dark field method of observation. Results suggest the presence of twinned diamond particles, which can be reconstructed by a sequence of twinning operations. Contrary to the 'stick model' of the lattice, very common five-fold symmetry of diamond microcrystals may be obtained by applying a number of edge dislocations rather than the continuous deformation of many tetrahedral C-C bonds.

  17. Trace element compositions of submicroscopic inclusions in coated diamond: A tool for understanding diamond petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, Emma; De Schrijver, Isabel; De Corte, Katrien; Jones, Adrian P.; Moens, Luc; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2005-10-01

    Trace element compositions of submicroscopic inclusions in both the core and the coat of five coated diamonds from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, formerly Zaire) have been analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Mass Plasma Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Both the diamond core and coat inclusions show a general 2-4-fold enrichment in incompatible elements relative to major elements. This level of enrichment is unlikely to be explained by the entrapment of silicate mantle minerals (olivine, garnet, clinopyroxene, phlogopite) alone and thus submicroscopic fluid or glass inclusions are inferred in both the diamond coat and in the gem quality diamond core. The diamond core fluids have elevated High Field Strength Element (Ti, Ta, Zr, Nb) concentrations and are enriched in U relative to inclusions in the diamond coats and relative to chondrite. The core fluids are also moderately enriched in LILE (Ba, Sr, K). Therefore, we suggest that the diamond cores contain inclusions of silicate melt. However, the Ni content and Ni/Fe ratio of the trapped fluid are very high for a silicate melt in equilibrium with mantle minerals; high Ni and Co concentrations in the diamond cores are attributed to the presence of a sulfide phase coexisting with silicate melt in the diamond core inclusions. Inclusions in the diamond coat are enriched in LILE (U, Ba, Sr, K) and La over the diamond core fluids and to chondrite. The coats have incompatible element ratios similar to natural carbonatite (coat fluid: Na/Ba ≈0.66, La/Ta≈130). The coat fluid is also moderately enriched in HFSE (Ta, Nb, Zr) when normalized to chondritic Al. LILE and La enrichment is related to the presence of a carbonatitic fluid in the diamond coat inclusions, which is mixed with a HFSE-rich hydrous silicate fluid similar to that in the core. The composition of the coat fluid is consistent with a genetic link to group 1 kimberlite.

  18. Sources of carbon in inclusion bearing diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2009-11-01

    The carbon isotopic composition ( δ13C) of diamonds containing peridotitic, eclogitic, websteritic and ultra-deep inclusions is re-evaluated on a detailed level. Applying a binning interval of 0.25‰, the previously recognized mode of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds at about - 5‰ is shown to reflect at least two subpopulations with abundance peaks at ˜ - 5.75 to - 4.75‰ and ˜ - 4.50 to - 3.50‰. Within the peridotitic suite, diamonds with lherzolitic inclusions overall show higher δ13C values. Evolution away from a δ13C value of ˜ - 5‰, towards both 13C depleted and enriched compositions, is accompanied by decreasing maximum nitrogen contents of peridotitic diamonds. In combination with data on diamonds synthesized under reducing (metal melts) and more oxidizing conditions (carbonate-silicate interactions), this is taken to indicate that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond that becomes depleted in the growth medium during progressive diamond precipitation. The observed co-variations of nitrogen content and δ13C around - 5‰ can then be modelled as reflecting closed system Rayleigh fractionation during crystallization of diamond from fluids/melts that are both reducing (i.e. methane bearing; evolution from ˜ - 5 to - 10‰) and oxidizing (i.e. CO 32- bearing; evolution from starting points varying between ˜ - 9 to - 5‰ and extending to about 0‰). Lherzolitic diamonds are believed to be mainly derived from diamond forming events subsequent to precipitation of predominantly Mesoarchean harzburgitic diamonds. The shift of lherzolitic diamonds towards higher δ13C values thus may relate to a temporal evolution, with carbonate bearing fluids with an initial isotopic composition ranging between about - 5.5 and - 1.5‰, derived from subducting oceanic crust, becoming increasingly important subsequent to the Mesoarchean. Devolatilization of marine carbonates ( δ13C ˜ 0‰) drives their isotopic composition towards mantle like values and

  19. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Sasama, Y; Fujioka, M; Irifune, T; Tanaka, M; Yamaguchi, T; Takeya, H; Takano, Y

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression. PMID:27475610

  20. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Sasama, Y.; Fujioka, M.; Irifune, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeya, H.; Takano, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression.

  1. Part Fixturing For Diamond Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloux, Leonard E.

    1984-12-01

    Successful production of diamond turned components can be extremely dependent on the fixturing used to support the workpiece during the machining operation. Typical fixturing methods include vacuum chucking, air chucking and mechanical clamping. Depending on the type of part to be machined, suggested fixturing methods can vary widely. For example, a part requiring a flycut surface is not subject to the centrifugal forces and balance requirements of a part that must be turned about an axis of rotation. Therefore, in many cases the fixturing required for flycutting may be much simpler than that required for turning. In all cases, there are general guidelines that should be followed to determine the best method of fixturing.

  2. Electronic Impact of Inclusions in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, E.M.; Smedley, J.; Raghothamachar, B.; Gaowei, M.; Keister, J.W.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dudley, M.; Wu, Q.

    2010-04-07

    X-ray topography data are compared with photodiode responsivity maps to identify potential candidates for electron trapping in high purity, single crystal diamond. X-ray topography data reveal the defects that exist in the diamond material, which are dominated by non-electrically active linear dislocations. However, many diamonds also contain defects configurations (groups of threading dislocations originating from a secondary phase region or inclusion) in the bulk of the wafer which map well to regions of photoconductive gain, indicating that these inclusions are a source of electron trapping which affect the performance of diamond X-ray detectors. It was determined that photoconductive gain is only possible with the combination of an injecting contact and charge trapping in the near surface region. Typical photoconductive gain regions are 0.2 mm across; away from these near-surface inclusions the device yields the expected diode responsivity.

  3. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  4. Diamond switches for high temperature electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.R.; Rondeau, G.; Qi, Niansheng

    1996-04-25

    Diamond switches are well suited for use in high temperature electronics. Laboratory feasibility of diamond switching at 1 kV and 18 A was demonstrated. DC blocking voltages up to 1 kV were demonstrated. A 50 {Omega} load line was switched using a diamond switch, with switch on-state resistivity {approx}7 {Omega}-cm. An electron beam, {approx}150 keV energy, {approx}2 {mu}s full width at half maximum was used to control the 5 mm x 5 mm x 100 {mu}m thick diamond switch. The conduction current temporal history mimics that of the electron beam. These data were taken at room temperature.

  5. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  6. Films Composed Of Diamond And Diamondlike Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han

    1995-01-01

    Proposed films composed of diamond and diamondlike carbon useful as wear-resistant and self-lubricating protective and tribological coats at extreme temperatures and in corrosive and oxidizing environments. Films have wide variety of industrial applications.

  7. Ion-beam-assisted etching of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efremow, N. N.; Geis, M. W.; Flanders, D. C.; Lincoln, G. A.; Economou, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, low RF loss, and inertness of diamond make it useful in traveling wave tubes operating in excess of 500 GHz. Such use requires the controlled etching of type IIA diamond to produce grating like structures tens of micrometers deep. Previous work on reactive ion etching with O2 gave etching rates on the order of 20 nm/min and poor etch selectivity between the masking material (Ni or Cr) and the diamond. An alternative approach which uses a Xe(+) beam and a reactive gas flux of NO2 in an ion-beam-assisted etching system is reported. An etching rate of 200 nm/min was obtained with an etching rate ratio of 20 between the diamond and an aluminum mask.

  8. Diamond: An erosion resistant aerospace material

    SciTech Connect

    Jilbert, G.H.; Pickles, C.S.J.; Coad, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamond growth technology has improved to the point where complete diamond infrared domes are now a possibility. However there are still considerable barriers to be overcome to ensure that the erosion resistance of the synthetic material is comparable to that of natural diamond. The Cavendish laboratory uses two systems to assess the erosion resistance of materials. The sand erosion rig uses compressed air to accelerate 300-600 {mu}m sand particles to velocities up to ca. 250 m s{sup -1}. The rain erosion resistance of a sample is evaluated using high velocity jets designed to simulate the effects of spherical raindrop impact. Both techniques have revealed the unique erosion characteristics of CVD diamond.

  9. Picosecond photoconductivity of natural and CVD diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnov, Serge V.; Pimenov, Sergej M.; Ralchenko, Victor G.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Konov, Vitali I.; Korotoushenko, K. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Plotnikova, S. P.; Sagatelyan, D. M.; Holly, Sandor

    1995-07-01

    Photoexcitation and recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers in both natural gemstone diamonds and CVD (chemical vapor deposition) polycrystalline diamond films in UV spectrum regions have been investigated. Transient picosecond photoconductivity technique applied permitted to conduct measurements with the time resolution better than 200 picoseconds and to register a charge carrier concentration value as low as 1020 - 1013 cm-3. The dependencies of photocurrent amplitude as a function of incident laser radiation intensity in the range from 103 to 1010 W/cm2 have been obtained. Charge carrier lifetimes had been measured and charge carrier drift mobility were estimated. It is shown that the electronic properties of high quality thick CVD diamond films are comparable to those of the most perfect natural type IIa crystals. Investigation of Raman and luminescence spectra of diamonds have been performed along with scanning electron microscopy studies to characterize bulk and surface structure of tested specimens.

  10. Astronomers debate diamonds in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    This is not the first time the intriguing carbonaceous compound has been detected in space. A peculiar elite of twelve stars are known to produce it. The star now added by ISO to this elite is one of the best representatives of this exclusive family, since it emits a very strong signal of the compound. Additionally ISO found a second new member of the group with weaker emission, and also observed with a spectral resolution never achieved before other already known stars in this class. Astronomers think these ISO results will help solve the mystery of the true nature of the compound. Their publication by two different groups, from Spain and Canada, has triggered a debate on the topic, both in astronomy institutes and in chemistry laboratories. At present, mixed teams of astrophysicists and chemists are investigating in the lab compounds whose chemical signature or "fingerprint" matches that detected by ISO. Neither diamonds nor fullerenes have ever been detected in space, but their presence has been predicted. Tiny diamonds of pre-solar origin --older than the Solar System-- have been found in meteorites, which supports the as yet unconfirmed theory of their presence in interstellar space. The fullerene molecule, made of 60 carbon atoms linked to form a sphere (hence the name "buckyball"), has also been extensively searched for in space but never found. If the carbonaceous compound detected by ISO is a fullerene or a diamond, there will be new data on the production of these industrially interesting materials. Fullerenes are being investigated as "capsules" to deliver new pharmaceuticals to the body. Diamonds are commonly used in the electronics industry and for the development of new materials; if they are formed in the dust surrounding some stars, at relatively low temperatures and conditions of low pressure, companies could learn more about the ideal physical conditions to produce them. A textbook case The latest star in which the compound has been found is

  11. A Optical Study of Defects in Diamond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Darren R.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The one-phonon defect-induced infrared absorption in Type I diamonds has been studied. The previously reported spectral forms of the F and G spectra have been altered. Three components labelled J, K and L, are presented. A data base of 75 infrared spectra has been decomposed and classified. New computer programs have been produced to cope with up to 12 components in the one-phonon region simultaneously. Black diamond surfaces have been examined using photoluminescence spectroscopy. Laser cutting in air is found to result in black surfaces. Diamonds were examined both before and after cutting and changes in the spectra monitored. In Type Ib and Type IIb diamonds, the typical diamond spectrum was changed into a broad band spectrum. The first order diamond Raman was not detectable after laser cutting. Type Ia and Type IIa diamonds did not show any changes due to being cut. To investigate the graphitization process further, diamonds were heated to 850^circC in gas flows at 0.38 torr (50.7 Pa). Using oxygen, it was found that the intensity of H3 luminescence was reduced and that a broad band spectrum was produced. The spectral changes were reversed by treating with hydrogen. Two types of thin carbonaceous films have been examined, those grown by vapour deposition and those produced by scanning a high energy density laser beam across an amorphous carbon sample. The photoluminescence spectra obtained from the two sample types were different. Discs of sintered diamond have also been examined with a view to determining the strain distribution within the samples. Finally, the production mechanism of the H3 defect has been considered. A grown-in theory is developed. It is supported quantitatively with experimental results and explains the ubiquity of H3, even in synthetic crystals. The C centre is thought to be incorporated equally on all of the low index faces of diamond. Consideration of the A centre showed that it

  12. Polycrystalline Diamond Schottky Diodes and Their Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ganming

    In this work, four-hot-filament CVD techniques for in situ boron doped diamond synthesis on silicon substrates were extensively studied. A novel tungsten filament shape and arrangement used to obtain large-area, uniform, boron doped polycrystalline diamond thin films. Both the experimental results and radiative heat transfer analysis showed that this technique improved the uniformity of the substrate temperature. XRD, Raman and SEM studies indicate that large area, uniform, high quality polycrystalline diamond films were obtained. Schottky diodes were fabricated by either sputter deposition of silver or thermal evaporation of aluminum or gold, on boron doped diamond thin films. High forward current density and a high forward-to-reverse current ratio were exhibited by silver on diamond Schottky diodes. Schottky barrier heights and the majority carrier concentrations of both aluminum and gold contacted diodes were determined from the C-V measurements. Furthermore, a novel theoretical C-V-f analysis of deep level boron doped diamond Schottky diodes was performed. The analytical results agree well with the experimental results. Compressive stress was found to have a large effect on the forward biased I-V characteristics of the diamond Schottky diodes, whereas the effect on the reverse biased characteristics was relatively small. The stress effect on the forward biased diamond Schottky diode was attributed to piezojunction and piezoresistance effects. The measured force sensitivity of the diode was as high as 0.75 V/N at 1 mA forward bias. This result shows that CVD diamond device has potential for mechanical transducer applications. The quantitative photoresponse characteristics of the diodes were studied in the spectral range of 300 -1050 nm. Semi-transparent gold contacts were used for better photoresponse. Quantum efficiency as high as 50% was obtained at 500 nm, when a reverse bias of over 1 volt was applied. The Schottky barrier heights between either gold or

  13. CVD diamond as an optical material for adverse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snail, Keith A.

    A status report is presented on the obstacles and current research related to using CVD diamond as an optical material. Problems discussed include properties of CVD carbon deposits, including structure, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance, which are relevant to the optical uses of diamond; absorption coefficient measurements on CVD diamond in the visible and IR; and a review of various aspects of the synthesis of CVD diamond, including the growth of transparent and translucent diamond, efforts to grow diamond at low substrate temperatures, and approches to reducing the optical scatter of as grown polycrystalline diamond films and windows. Particular attention is given to techniques for reducing optical scatter which involve modifying materials morphologies during the growth process by controlling nucleation density, renucleaton frequency, and/or the orientation of crystal faces at film surfaces; techniques for postdeposition polishing of the surface of CVD diamond films and windows; and optical applications for CVD diamond.

  14. CVD diamond as an optical material for adverse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snail, Keith A.

    1991-01-01

    A status report is presented on the obstacles and current research related to using CVD diamond as an optical material. Problems discussed include properties of CVD carbon deposits, including structure, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance, which are relevant to the optical uses of diamond; absorption coefficient measurements on CVD diamond in the visible and IR; and a review of various aspects of the synthesis of CVD diamond, including the growth of transparent and translucent diamond, efforts to grow diamond at low substrate temperatures, and approches to reducing the optical scatter of as grown polycrystalline diamond films and windows. Particular attention is given to techniques for reducing optical scatter which involve modifying materials morphologies during the growth process by controlling nucleation density, renucleaton frequency, and/or the orientation of crystal faces at film surfaces; techniques for postdeposition polishing of the surface of CVD diamond films and windows; and optical applications for CVD diamond.

  15. Boron doped polycrystalline diamond films for strain sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wur, D.; Davidson, J.L.; Kang, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    It has been recently established in our work and others that boron-doped polycrystalline diamond films (PDF) have piezoresistivity (PZR). This property opens PDF to the field of sensor applications using strain sensing. Polycrystalline diamond films have been prepared with microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and boron-doped to p-type semiconductors. In addition, by combining the piezoresistive effect in doped PDF and the insulating property of undoped PDF, whereby doped diamond resistors reside on a dielectric diamond substrate diaphragm, a monolithic all-diamond microstructure for examining the strain response of patterned p-doped diamond PZRs was fabricated and characterized. This work examines some critical issues of diamond for strain sensing applications such as its rupture stress and edge stress of diamond diaphragm and the high temperature responses of a diamond strain sensor.

  16. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, X.

    1997-04-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 10 figs.

  17. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  18. DNA attachment to nanocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenmackers, S.; Christiaens, P.; Daenen, M.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; van Deven, M.; Vermeeren, V.; Michiels, L.; Ameloot, M.; Wagner, P.

    2005-09-01

    A biochemical method to immobilize DNA on synthetic diamond for biosensor applications is developed. Nanocrystalline diamond is grown using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. On the hydrogen-terminated surface 10-undecenoic acid is tethered photochemically under 254 nm illumination, followed by 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide crosslinker-mediated attachment of amino modified DNA. The attachment is functionally confirmed by comparison of supernatant fluorescence and gel electrophoresis. The linking procedure allowed for 35 denaturation and rehybridisation steps.

  19. Deposition Of Cubic BN On Diamond Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline, pure, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) formed on various substrates, according to proposal, by chemical vapor deposition onto interlayers of polycrystalline diamond. Substrate materials include metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Typical substrates include metal-cutting tools: polycrystalline c-BN coats advantageous for cutting ferrous materials and for use in highly oxidizing environments-applications in which diamond coats tend to dissolve in iron or be oxidized, respectively.

  20. Detection and analysis of diamond fingerprinting feature and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Huang, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Shengyi

    2011-01-01

    Before becoming a jewelry diamonds need to be carved artistically with some special geometric features as the structure of the polyhedron. There are subtle differences in the structure of this polyhedron in each diamond. With the spatial frequency spectrum analysis of diamond surface structure, we can obtain the diamond fingerprint information which represents the "Diamond ID" and has good specificity. Based on the optical Fourier Transform spatial spectrum analysis, the fingerprinting identification of surface structure of diamond in spatial frequency domain was studied in this paper. We constructed both the completely coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by laser and the partially coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by led, and analyzed the effect of the coherence of light source to the diamond fingerprinting feature. We studied rotation invariance and translation invariance of the diamond fingerprinting and verified the feasibility of real-time and accurate identification of diamond fingerprint. With the profit of this work, we can provide customs, jewelers and consumers with a real-time and reliable diamonds identification instrument, which will curb diamond smuggling, theft and other crimes, and ensure the healthy development of the diamond industry.

  1. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  2. Composite and diamond cold cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, M.S.; Wheeland, C.L.; Ramacher, K.; Doyle, E.

    1996-12-31

    Cold-cathode technology for Crossed-Field Amplifiers (CFAs) has not changed significantly over the last thirty years. The material typically used for cold cathode CFAs is either platinum (Pt) or beryllium (Be), although numerous other materials with higher secondary electron emission ratios have been tested. Beryllium cathodes display higher secondary emission ratios, {approximately} 3.4, than Pt, but require a partial pressure of oxygen to maintain a beryllium oxide (BeO) surface layer. These dispensers limit the life of the CFA, both directly, due to oxygen-source filament burnout, and indirectly, by the production of undesirable gases which adversely affect the performance of the CFA. In an attempt to reduce or eliminate the required oxygen dispenser output level, cathodes were constructed from three varieties of Be/BeO composite material and tested in L-4808s, standard forward-wave AEGIS CFAs. Diamond and diamond-like carbons are desirable as cathode materials because of their extremely high secondary electron emission ratio, greater than 20, but their use has previously been prohibitive because of cost, available, and physical characteristics. Because of recent advances in diamond growth technology it is now possible to deposit thin layers of diamond on a variety of geometric objects. In coordination with Penn State University four annular diamond emitters have been fabricated. The diamond emitters will be tested in a standard AEGIS CFA, both under vacuum and with a partial pressure of hydrogen.

  3. High-density fluids and the growth of monocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Kiflawi, I.; Davies, N.; Navon, O.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical nature and composition of the growth medium of monocrystalline (MC) diamonds is still a matter of debate, partially because carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) that are common in fibrous diamonds have not been found in MC diamonds. Here we report the first finding of HDF microinclusions in a MC octahedral diamond from Finsch, South Africa and in the MC octahedral core of a coated diamond from Kankan, Guinea; both diamonds carry nitrogen in B-centers. Numerous microinclusions in diamond Finsch_2a_cap1 are restricted to two thin layers parallel to the (1 1 1) face, ∼20 and 200 μm from the diamond rim. Low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs are found along the inner layer while the outer layer trapped saline compositions. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusions and their infrared spectra are highly similar to those of microinclusions found in fibrous diamonds. A few isolated microinclusions of saline compositions are scattered around a sulfide inclusion in the center of the octahedral core of diamond ON-KAN-383. This evidence for the involvement of oxidized fluids in the formation of MC diamonds adds to previous reports on the antiquity of HDFs in fibrous diamonds, the presence of carbonate and halide phases in inclusions in MC diamonds and the similarity of trace element pattern of a MC diamond to those of low-Mg carbonatitic HDF in fibrous diamonds. In addition, we show that the interaction of HDFs with depleted garnets can produce sinusoidal REE patterns which are one of the primary features of lherzolitic and harzburgitic garnet inclusions in MC diamonds. Together, these observations suggest that HDFs are involved in the formation of many types of diamonds from the Archaean to the Phanerozoic. HDFs are trapped in large quantities during rapid, fibrous growth, but must also be present during the growth of many MC diamonds.

  4. Raman spectroscopic investigation of graphitization of diamond during spark plasma sintering of UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhichao; Subhash, Ghatu; Tulenko, James S.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) was utilized to investigate the graphitization of diamond particles within a UO2-diamond composite processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). While pure diamond gives a sharp Raman peak at 1331.6 cm-1, the graphitized diamond shows broad peaks either at 1350 cm-1 (G-peak) or 1580 cm-1 (D-peak). The degree of graphitization was quantified by calculating the area beneath the diamond and graphite peaks. It was found that more than 20% of diamond was graphitized on the surface of the UO2-diamond pellet and only around 10% diamond was graphitized in the interior regions of the pellet. This current study highlights the necessity to review the implications of these results carefully while implementing UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel.

  5. Germanium: a new catalyst for diamond synthesis and a new optically active impurity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Palyanov, Yuri N; Kupriyanov, Igor N; Borzdov, Yuri M; Surovtsev, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01

    Diamond attracts considerable attention as a versatile and technologically useful material. For many demanding applications, such as recently emerged quantum optics and sensing, it is important to develop new routes for fabrication of diamond containing defects with specific optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Here we report on successful synthesis of diamond from a germanium-carbon system at conditions of 7 GPa and 1,500-1,800 °C. Both spontaneously nucleated diamond crystals and diamond growth layers on seeds were produced in experiments with reaction time up to 60 h. We found that diamonds synthesized in the Ge-C system contain a new optical centre with a ZPL system at 2.059 eV, which is assigned to germanium impurities. Photoluminescence from this centre is dominated by zero-phonon optical transitions even at room temperature. Our results have widened the family of non-metallic elemental catalysts for diamond synthesis and demonstrated the creation of germanium-related optical centres in diamond. PMID:26435400

  6. Electrical Resistivity of Natural Diamond and Diamond Films Between Room Temperature and 1200 C: Status Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, L. D.

    1993-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of diamond films has been measured between room temperature and 1200 C. The films were grown by either microwave Plasma CVD or combustion flame at three different places. The resistivities of the current films are compared to those measured for both natural IIa diamond and films grown only one to two years ago.

  7. Homoepitaxial Boron Doped Diamond Anvils as Heating Elements in a Diamond Anvil Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeffrey; Samudrala, Gopi; Smith, Spencer; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in designer-diamond technology have allowed for the use of electrically and thermally conducting homoepitaxially-grown layers of boron-doped diamond (grown at 1200 °C with a 2% mixture of CH4 in H, resulting in extremely high doping levels ~ 1020/cm3) to be used as heating elements in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). These diamonds allow for precise control of the temperature inside of the diamond anvil itself, particularly when coupled with a cryostat. Furthermore, the unmatched thermally conducting nature of diamond ensures that no significant lateral gradient in temperature occurs across the culet area. Since a thermocouple can easily be attached anywhere on the diamond surface, we can also measure diamond temperatures directly. With two such heaters, one can raise sample temperatures uniformly, or with any desired gradient along the pressure axis while preserving optical access. In our continuing set of benchmark experiments, we use two newly created matching heater anvils with 500 μm culets to analyze the various fluorescence emission lines of ruby microspheres, which show more complicated behavior than traditional ruby chips. We also report on the temperature dependence of the high-pressure Raman modes of paracetamol (C8H9NO2) up to 20 GPa.

  8. EXELFS analysis of natural diamond and diamond films on Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, A.D.; Araiza, L.C.; Borja, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    In this work, we report the EXELFS results obtained from a polycrystalline diamond film grown on smooth silicon substrates using the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HF-CVD) technique in a two-step deposition process published elsewhere. In order to evaluate the quality of the thin film obtained, these results were compared with results obtained from natural diamond.

  9. Properties of Diamond and Diamond-Like Clusters in Nanometric Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halicioglu, Timur; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Variations in materials properties of small clusters of nanometric dimensions were investigated. Investigations were carried out for diamond and diamond-like particles in spherical shapes. Calculations were performed for clusters containing over 1000 carbon atoms. Results indicate that as the cluster size diminishes, (i) the average cohesive energy becomes weaker, (ii) the excess surface energy increases, and (iii) the value for stiffness decreases.

  10. Toward deep blue nano hope diamonds: heavily boron-doped diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Steffen; Janssen, Wiebke; Turner, Stuart; Lu, Ying-Gang; Yeap, Weng Siang; Verbeeck, Jo; Haenen, Ken; Krueger, Anke

    2014-06-24

    The production of boron-doped diamond nanoparticles enables the application of this material for a broad range of fields, such as electrochemistry, thermal management, and fundamental superconductivity research. Here we present the production of highly boron-doped diamond nanoparticles using boron-doped CVD diamond films as a starting material. In a multistep milling process followed by purification and surface oxidation we obtained diamond nanoparticles of 10-60 nm with a boron content of approximately 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3). Aberration-corrected HRTEM reveals the presence of defects within individual diamond grains, as well as a very thin nondiamond carbon layer at the particle surface. The boron K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure demonstrates that the B atoms are tetrahedrally embedded into the diamond lattice. The boron-doped diamond nanoparticles have been used to nucleate growth of a boron-doped diamond film by CVD that does not contain an insulating seeding layer. PMID:24738731

  11. Germanium: a new catalyst for diamond synthesis and a new optically active impurity in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Surovtsev, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond attracts considerable attention as a versatile and technologically useful material. For many demanding applications, such as recently emerged quantum optics and sensing, it is important to develop new routes for fabrication of diamond containing defects with specific optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Here we report on successful synthesis of diamond from a germanium-carbon system at conditions of 7 GPa and 1,500–1,800 °C. Both spontaneously nucleated diamond crystals and diamond growth layers on seeds were produced in experiments with reaction time up to 60 h. We found that diamonds synthesized in the Ge-C system contain a new optical centre with a ZPL system at 2.059 eV, which is assigned to germanium impurities. Photoluminescence from this centre is dominated by zero-phonon optical transitions even at room temperature. Our results have widened the family of non-metallic elemental catalysts for diamond synthesis and demonstrated the creation of germanium-related optical centres in diamond. PMID:26435400

  12. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.; Price, R. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  13. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

    1997-06-03

    A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

  14. Status and applications of diamond and diamond-like materials: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Recent discoveries that make possible the growth of crystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition offer the potential for a wide variety of new applications. This report takes a broad look at the state of the technology following from these discoveries in relation to other allied materials, such as high-pressure diamond and cubic boron nitride. Most of the potential defense, space, and commercial applications are related to diamond's hardness, but some utilize other aspects such as optical or electronic properties. The growth processes are reviewed, and techniques for characterizing the resulting materials' properties are discussed. Crystalline diamond is emphasized, but other diamond-like materials (silicon carbide, amorphous carbon containing hydrogen) are also examined. Scientific, technical, and economic problem areas that could impede the rapid exploitation of these materials are identified. Recommendations are presented covering broad areas of research and development.

  15. Metal films on the surfaces and within diamond crystals from Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, A. B.; Kriulina, G. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Representative samples of diamonds from five kimberlite pipes (Lomonosovskaya, Archangel'sk, Snegurochka, XXIII Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), and Internationalnaya) of the Arkhangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces in Russia have been studied. Thirty-three varieties of metal films have been identified as syngenetic associated minerals. The films consist of 15 chemical elements that occur in the form of native metals and their natural alloys. Remnants of metal films were detected within diamond crystals. The metal films coating diamonds are a worldwide phenomenon. To date, these films have been described from Europe, Asia, South America, and Africa. Native metals, their alloys, and intermetallides are actual companion minerals of diamond.

  16. Simulating Ramp Compression of Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, B. K.; Gonzàlez-Cataldo, F. J.; Jeanloz, R.

    2014-12-01

    We model ramp compression, shock-free dynamic loading, intended to generate a well-defined equation of state that achieves higher densities and lower temperatures than the corresponding shock Hugoniot. Ramp loading ideally approaches isentropic compression for a fluid sample, so is useful for simulating the states deep inside convecting planets. Our model explicitly evaluates the deviation of ramp from "quasi-isentropic" compression. Motivated by recent ramp-compression experiments to 5 TPa (50 Mbar), we calculate the room-temperature isotherm of diamond using first-principles density functional theory and molecular dynamics, from which we derive a principal isentrope and Hugoniot by way of the Mie-Grüneisen formulation and the Hugoniot conservation relations. We simulate ramp compression by imposing a uniaxial strain that then relaxes to an isotropic state, evaluating the change in internal energy and stress components as the sample relaxes toward isotropic strain at constant volume; temperature is well defined for the resulting hydrostatic state. Finally, we evaluate multiple shock- and ramp-loading steps to compare with single-step loading to a given final compression. Temperatures calculated for single-step ramp compression are less than Hugoniot temperatures only above 500 GPa, the two being close to each other at lower pressures. We obtain temperatures of 5095 K and 6815 K for single-step ramp loading to 600 and 800 GPa, for example, which compares well with values of ~5100 K and ~6300 K estimated from previous experiments [PRL,102, 075503, 2009]. At 800 GPa, diamond is calculated to have a temperature of 500 K along the isentrope; 900 K under multi-shock compression (asymptotic result after 8-10 steps); and 3400 K under 3-step ramp loading (200-400-800 GPa). Asymptotic multi-step shock and ramp loading are indistinguishable from the isentrope, within present uncertainties. Our simulations quantify the manner in which current experiments can simulate the

  17. Kimberlite emplacement record in diamond morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchouk, Y.; Chinn, I.

    2015-12-01

    Diamond resorption morphology reflects conditions and events in the host kimberlite magma and in diamond sources in subcratonic mantle. Recent experimental studies on diamond dissolution enable us now to use surface features of diamonds to examine magmatic fluid in kimberlites. This study uses optical and scanning electron microscopy examination of ~750 macro-diamonds from two kimberlites in Orapa cluster, Botswana. Kimberlite A is a simple body filled with coherent kimberlite facies (CK); kimberlite B is a complex body with two facies of coherent kimberlite and a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite facies (MVK). Distinction between kimberlite-induced and mantle-derived resorption was based on: the type of the most abundant resorption style, morphology of crystals with attached kimberlite fragments, and the study of pseudohemimorphic diamonds. Kimberlite-induced resorption is the focus of this work. The three facies in the pipe B show three contrasting diamond resorption types. Resorption in MVK facies leads to glossy rounded surfaces with fine striation and hillocks, and is identical to the resorption style in CK facies of pipe A. This type of resorption is typical for volcaniclastic facies and indicates emplacement in the presence of abundant COH fluid with high H2O:CO2 ratio (>50mol% of H2O). We propose that pipe A is a root zone supplying material to a larger kimberlite body filled with VK. The two CK in pipe B have very different resorption style. One forms similar glossy surfaces but with regular small cavities of rounded outline, while the other seems more corrosive and develops extremely rough features and deep cavities. Comparison to the experimental data suggests that the former had almost pure H2O fluid at low pressure (where solubility of SiO2 is low). The later CK facies was emplaced in the absence or very low abundance of a free fluid, and possibly in melt closer to carbonatitic composition.

  18. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csáki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron.

  19. Black diamonds at brane junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chamblin, Andrew; Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea, SA2 8PP,

    2000-08-15

    We discuss the properties of black holes in brane-world scenarios where our Universe is viewed as a four-dimensional sub-manifold of some higher-dimensional spacetime. We consider in detail such a model where four-dimensional spacetime lies at the junction of several domain walls in a higher dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. In this model there may be any number p of infinitely large extra dimensions transverse to the brane-world. We present an exact solution describing a black p-brane which will induce on the brane-world the Schwarzschild solution. This exact solution is unstable to the Gregory-Laflamme instability, whereby long-wavelength perturbations cause the extended horizon to fragment. We therefore argue that at late times a non-rotating uncharged black hole in the brane-world is described by a deformed event horizon in p+4 dimensions which will induce, to good approximation, the Schwarzschild solution in the four-dimensional brane world. When p=2, this deformed horizon resembles a black diamond and more generally for p>2, a polyhedron. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  20. Diamonds, Eclogites, and the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle.

    PubMed

    Luth, R W

    1993-07-01

    The reaction dolomite + 2 coesite --><-- diopside + 2 diamond + 2O(2) defines the coexistence of diamond and carbonate in mantle eclogites. The oxygen fugacity of this reaction is approximately 1 log unit higher at a given temperature and pressure than the oxygen fugacities of the analogous reactions that govern the stability of diamond in peridotite. This difference allows diamond-bearing eclogite to coexist with peridotite containing carbonate or carbonate + diamond. This potential coexistence of diamond-bearing eclogite and carbonate-bearing peridotite can explain the presence of carbon-free peridotite interlayered with garnet pyroxenites that contain graphitized diamond in the Moroccan Beni Bousera massif at the Earth's surface and the preferential preservation of diamond-bearing eclogitic relative to peridotitic xenoliths in the Roberts Victor kimberlite. PMID:17750546

  1. 17. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE DRIES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE DRIES ARE ON THE LEFT, WITH THE TAR HOUSE, TOILET, AND ROPE CLAMP CLEANING BUILDING TO THE RIGHT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  2. FRONT ELEVATION, HOUSE AT NORTHWEST CORNER OF SEVENTEENTH AND DIAMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT ELEVATION, HOUSE AT NORTHWEST CORNER OF SEVENTEENTH AND DIAMOND STREETS AND THE ATTACHED INTERIOR UNIT (NOS. 1701 AND 1703). - 1700 Block Diamond Street (Houses), North & south sides between Seventeenth & Eighteenth Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE DIAMOND MINEYARD LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING THE DRIES ON THE LEFT, TAR STORAGE AND TOILET FACILITIES IN THE CENTER, AND A ROPE CLEANING HOUSE ON THE RIGHT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  4. n-Type diamond and method for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

  5. The Petrography of Meteoritic Nano-Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    At least some meteoritic nanodiamonds are likely of presolar origin because of their association with anomalous Xe-HL and Te isotopic components indicative of a supernova (SN) origin. But the abundance of Xe is such that only approx. 1 in 10(exp 6) nano-diamonds contains a Xe atom, and the bulk C-13/C-12 composition of nano-diamond acid residues is chondritic (solar). Therefore, it is possible that a significant fraction of meteoritic nano-diamonds formed within the solar nebula. Nano-diamonds have recently been detected for the first time within the accretion discs of young stars by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). No comparable evidence of nanodiamonds in the interstellar medium has yet been found. We have identified nano-diamonds in acid etched thin-sections of meteorites, polar micrometeorites, and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with the goal of determining their distribution as a function of heliocentric distance. (It is assumed the meteorites and the polar micrometeorites are from asteroids at 2-4 AU and at least some of the IDPs are from comets at >50AU). We found that nano-diamonds are heterogeneously distributed throughout carbon-rich meteoritic materials (we identified them in some IDPs and not in others), and that their abundance may actually decrease with heliocentric distance, consistent with the hypothesis that some of them formed within the inner solar system and not in a presolar (SN) environment. In order to gain further insight about the origins of meteoritic nano-diamonds we are currently investigating their distribution in unetched thin-sections. We have examined a chondritic cluster IDP (U220GCA), fragments of the Tagish Lake (CM1) meteorite, and a SN graphite spherule (KE3d8) isolated from the Murchison (CM) meteorite. We selected U220GCA because its nano-diamond abundance (in acid etched thin-sections) appears to be as much as approx. 10X higher than in Murchison matrix, Tagish Lake because it has a higher reported nano-diamond

  6. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  7. Auger Spectroscopy of Hydrogenated Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Petukhov, A. G.; Foygel, M.

    1997-01-01

    An energy shift and a change of the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence Auger spectra are observed for diamond surfaces after their exposure to an electron beam, or annealing at temperatures higher then 950 C. The effect is studied for both natural diamond crystals and chemical-vapor-deposited diamond films. A theoretical model is proposed for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces. The observed changes of the carbon Auger line shape are shown to be related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by the hydrogen desorption from the surface. One-electron calculation of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces with various hydrogen coverages are presented. They are based on self-consistent wave functions and matrix elements calculated in the framework of the local-density approximation and the self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital method with static core-hole effects taken into account. The major features of experimental spectra are explained.

  8. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  9. Investigation of applications of diamond film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassowski, D. M.

    1989-11-01

    The unique properties of synthetic diamond prepared by chemical vapor deposition suggest potential aerospace applications of interest to the Air Force. The status of the rapidly developing technology of low-pressure diamond film synthesis has been determined by contacts with 76 research groups active in the field. Information on six synthetic techniques and a list of 112 active groups are included. Updated diamond film properties are presented based on the survey, literature data, and the measurements made in this program. Measurements were made of hydrogen diffusion resistance, hardness, thermal shock resistance, rupture strength, and propellant compatibility. A comprehensive screen of 200 potential Air Force applications is presented. These were reduced to a 4 high-value applications: bearing surfaces, barriers for hydrogen diffusion, barriers for propellant corrosion protection, and thermal protection for surfaces with localized high heat flux. Initial reports of unusually high tensile strength for diamond films cannot be supported by detailed analysis of test data, eliminating some structural applications. Technology development plans are presented for obtaining better properties data for demonstrating the application of diamond films to bearings.

  10. Ultradispersity of diamond at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Galli, Giulia

    2003-12-01

    Nanometre-sized diamond has been found in meteorites, protoplanetary nebulae and interstellar dusts, as well as in residues of detonation and in diamond films. Remarkably, the size distribution of diamond nanoparticles seems to be peaked around 2-5 nm, and to be largely independent of preparation conditions. We have carried out ab initio calculations of the stability of nanodiamond as a function of surface hydrogen coverage and of size. We have found that at about 3 nm, and for a broad range of pressures and temperatures, particles with bare, reconstructed surfaces become thermodynamically more stable than those with hydrogenated surfaces, thus preventing the formation of larger grains. Our findings provide an explanation of the size distribution of extraterrestrial and of terrestrial nanodiamond found in ultradispersed and ultracrystalline diamond films. They also provide an atomistic structural model of these films, based on the topology and structure of 2-3-nm dimond clusters consisting of a diamond core surrounded by a fullerene-like carbon network. PMID:14634641

  11. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  12. The Mysteries of Diamonds: Bizarre History, Amazing Properties, Unique Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Harris

    2008-06-24

    Diamonds have been a prized material throughout history. They are scarce and beautiful, wars have been fought over them, and they remain today a symbol of wealth and power. Diamonds also have exceptional physical properties which can lead to unique applications in science. There are now techniques to artificially synthesize diamonds of extraordinarily high quality. In this talk, Professor Kagan will discuss the history of diamonds, their bizarre properties, and their manufacture and use for 21st century science.

  13. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  14. Study of Electron Transport and Amplification in Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Erik M.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-03-31

    As a successful completion of this award, my group has demonstrated world-leading electron gain from diamond for use in a diamond-amplified photocathode. Also, using high-resolution photoemission measurements we were able to uncover exciting new physics of the electron emission mechanisms from hydrogen terminated diamond. Our work, through the continued support of HEP, has resulted in a greater understanding of the diamond material science, including current limits, charge transport modeling, and spatial uniformity.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet transmission of a synthetic diamond thin film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John V.; Gibson, J. L.; Knowles, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a thin film of synthetic diamond at various wavelengths in the extreme ultraviolet. The synthetic diamond combines the transmission properties of carbon with the strength, density, and ruggedness of a natural diamond. The Extreme Ultraviolet Transmission (EUV) of a film of the synthetic diamond has shown the existence of a thin surface layer of silicon, probably in the form of silicon carbide, which is not a contaminant layer.

  16. Effect of diamond on structure and properties of confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsanov, Stepan S.; Batsanov, Andrei S.

    2016-05-01

    The molar volume of water adsorbed on the surface of micro- and nano-powders of diamond was determined from the measured densities of dry and variously hydrated diamond powders. This volume decreases near the diamond surface and in the first adsorbed monolayer can be as low as half that of bulk water. This effect can be attributed to breakdown of the hydrogen bond network, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy and calorimetrical data for crystal hydrates of diamond.

  17. Alluvial Diamond Resource Potential and Production Capacity Assessment of Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Anum, Solomon; Phillips, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by both diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in 'conflict' diamonds while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was to assess the alluvial diamond resource endowment and current production capacity of the alluvial diamond-mining sector in Ghana. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields. The production capacity of the sector was estimated using a formulaic expression of the number of workers reported in the sector, their productivity, and the average grade of deposits mined. This study estimates that there are approximately 91,600,000 carats of alluvial diamonds remaining in both the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields: 89,000,000 carats in the Birim and 2,600,000 carats in the Bonsa. Production capacity is calculated to be 765,000 carats per year, based on the formula used and available data on the number of workers and worker productivity. Annual production is highly dependent on the international diamond market and prices, the numbers of seasonal workers actively mining in the sector, and

  18. In situ observation of quasimelting of diamond and reversible graphite-diamond phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y

    2007-08-01

    Because of technique difficulties in achieving the extreme high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) simultaneously, direct observation of the structures of carbon at extreme HPHT conditions has not been possible. Banhart and Ajayan discovered remarkably that carbon onions can act as nanoscopic pressure cells to generate high pressures. By heating carbon onions to approximately 700 degrees C and under electron beam irradiation, the graphite-to-diamond transformation was observed in situ by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the highest achievable temperature in a TEM heating holder is less than 1000 degrees C. Here we report that, by using carbon nanotubes as heaters and carbon onions as high-pressure cells, temperatures higher than 2000 degrees C and pressures higher than 40 GPa were achieved simultaneously in carbon onions. At such HPHT conditions and facilitated by electron beam irradiation, the diamond formed in the carbon onion cores frequently changed its shape, size, orientation, and internal structure and moved like a fluid, implying that it was in a quasimelting state. The fluctuation between the solid phase of diamond and the fluid/amorphous phase of diamond-like carbon, and the changes of the shape, size, and orientation of the solid diamond, were attributed to the dynamic crystallization of diamond crystal from the quasimolten state and the dynamic graphite-diamond phase transformations. Our discovery offers unprecedented opportunities to studying the nanostructures of carbon at extreme conditions in situ and at an atomic scale. PMID:17628113

  19. Inclusions of Hydrocarbons and Fullerenes in Diamond: Implications for Origin of Colors in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I.; Winston, R.; Tsao, C.

    2001-12-01

    Diamonds from primary deposits of worldwide localities are mostly of industrial grade, i.e., they are flawed and non-transparent, not suitable for use as gems. Because of their overwhelming abundance and multi-faceted characteristics, they make superb samples for scientific research. Compared with perfect stones, they are more likely to yield usefu; information on how diamonds form in nature, and physicochemical states of Earth's interior. Diamonds of Pipe 50 in Fuxian, Liaoning, China come in various colors: grey, colorless, black, brown, pink, buff, yellow, green, approximately in decending order of abundance. The rarest are red and magenta diamonds, but a few of the latter emerge regularly on a yearly basis. We report here results of our research on magenta diamonds. By infrared spectroscopy, we identified liquid and gas inclusions of a complex mixture of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes), saturated carbonyl hydrocarbons (alkyl ketones), as well as C-60 fullerene molecules. The origin of magenta color is possibly linked to the inclusions, because C-60 in an organic solvent gives a megenta solution. When C-60 in solution is exposed to light, ultraviolet radiation, or heat (200° C), it degrades in a matter of days, and precipitates reddish, brown, buff materials, and amorphous carbon. In natural diamonds, progressive degradation of fullerene inclusions might yield pink, brown, buff, grey, and black diamonds, dependent on annealing temperatures and residence time in Earth's mantle.

  20. Fast bolometer built in an artificial HPHT diamond matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klokov, A Yu; Sharkov, A I; Galkina, T I; Khmelnitskii, R A; Dravin, V A; Gippius, Aleksei A

    2010-05-26

    A fast bolometer built in a plate of diamond grown at high pressure by the gradient growth method is developed and fabricated. The parameters of this structure are compared with these of the structures investigated earlier, which were fabricated based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond and natural type IIa diamond.

  1. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  2. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13 Section 23.13 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond...

  3. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds 23.13 Section 23.13 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds A diamond...

  4. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13 Section 23.13 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond...

  5. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds 23.13 Section 23.13 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds A diamond...

  6. 16 CFR 23.13 - Disclosure of treatments to diamonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. 23.13 Section 23.13 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE JEWELRY, PRECIOUS METALS, AND PEWTER INDUSTRIES § 23.13 Disclosure of treatments to diamonds. A diamond...

  7. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  8. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  9. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  10. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  11. 9 CFR 311.6 - Diamond-skin disease.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diamond-skin disease. 311.6 Section... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.6 Diamond-skin disease. Carcasses of hogs affected with diamond-skin disease when localized and not associated with systemic...

  12. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  15. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  16. 21 CFR 872.4535 - Dental diamond instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental diamond instrument. 872.4535 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4535 Dental diamond instrument. (a) Identification. A dental diamond instrument is an abrasive device intended to smooth tooth surfaces during...

  17. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  18. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  19. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  20. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  1. 27 CFR 9.166 - Diamond Mountain District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diamond Mountain District... Diamond Mountain District. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Diamond Mountain District.” (b) Approved map. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of...

  2. Sulfide inclusion chemistry and carbon isotopes of African diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deines, Peter; Harris, J. W.

    1995-08-01

    Significant differences in the composition of sulfide mineral inclusions among diamond suites from Koffiefontein, Orapa, Premier, Roberts Victor, Jagersfontein, Sierra Leone, Star, and Mwadui have been found. The mode of the Ni content of the monosulfide (mss) inclusions lies between 8 and 10 wt%, i.e., between the means for mss from Siberian diamonds with inclusion of the eclogitic (3 wt% Ni) and peridotitic (23 wt% Ni) paragenesis. Considering the Ni/Fe ratios of the diamond mss inclusions and mantle olivines, together with experimental and naturally observed Ni/Fe distribution coefficients, we conclude that less than 20% of the mss inclusions of the African diamonds (mostly from Koffiefontein) could have been in chemical equilibrium with mantle olivine. This observation is in sharp contrast with the reported relative abundance of silicate inclusions in Koffiefontein diamonds (93% peridotitic, 7% eclogitic) and lends support to the proposal that a separate sulfide diamond paragenesis should be recognized. The δ 13C distributions of sulfide containing diamonds differs among kimberlites, however, for each kimberlite sulfide and silicate inclusion containing diamonds cover the same δ 13C range. Sulfides with high Ni concentrations can occur in diamonds of low as well as high 13C content. The current observations, in conjunction with other chemical properties of diamonds suggest that fluid reactions rather than silica melt equilibria may be important in diamond formation. A dominance of fluid processes would have significant implications for the interpretation of the chemical and geochronological record of diamond inclusions.

  3. First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2013-12-14

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0 μ{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33 meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

  4. Electrical Characterization of Diamond/Boron Doped Diamond Nanostructures for Use in Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuński, Ł.; Zwolski, K.; Płotka, P.

    2016-01-01

    The polycrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) shows stable electrical properties and high tolerance for harsh environments (e.g. high temperature or aggressive chemical compounds) comparing to other materials used in semiconductor devices. In this study authors have designed electronic devices fabricated from non-intentionally (NiD) films and highly boron doped diamond structures. Presented semiconductor devices consist of highly boron doped structures grown on NiD diamond films. Fabricated structures were analyzed by electrical measurements for use in harsh environment applications. Moreover, the boron-doping level and influence of oxygen content on chemical composition of diamond films were particularly investigated. Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MW PE CVD) has been used for thin diamond films growth. Non-intentionally doped diamond (0 ppm [B]/[C]) films have been deposited on the Si/SiO2 wafers with different content of carbon, boron and oxygen in the gas phase. Then, the shape of the highly doped diamond structures were obtained by pyrolysis of SiO2 on NiD film and standard lithography process. The highly doped structures were obtained for different growth time and [B]/[C] ratio (4000 - 10000 ppm). The narrowest distance between two highly doped structures was 5pm. The standard Ti/Au ohmic contacts were deposited using physical vapour deposition for electrical characterization of NiD/BDD devices. The influence of diffusion boron from highly doped diamond into non-doped/low-doped diamond film was investigated. Surface morphology of designed structures was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope and optical microscope. The resistivity of the NiD and film was studied using four-point probe measurements also DC studies were done.

  5. Filament-assisted growth of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Fu, T. D.; Chen, Y. F.

    1993-01-01

    Filament-assisted pyrolytic growth of diamond films on (100) Si wafers was investigated in an attempt to grow quality layers for semiconductor applications. The work was carried out in hydrogen ambient under a reduced pressure condition of about 100 torr. Using isopropanol and methanol as carbon source chemicals, the growth process and film properties were characterized as functions of reactant concentration, filament and substrate temperature, reaction pressure and the total gas flow rate. Diamond films of good quality were grown under condition of low source concentration and small flow rate. However, the growth rates were generally slow. The films were polycrystalline. The filament and substrate temperatures were fairly critical to the nucleation and growth processes. The substrate surface finishing from diamond paste polishing predominated the nucleation site and grain size of the deposits.

  6. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  7. The failure strengths of perfect diamond crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, J.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Finite elasticity analysis is extended to the 110 direction, where off axis strain symmetry is not present, and the third order elastic data are obtained for diamond. The compressive yield strengths of perfect diamond crystals loaded in the 100, 110, and 111 directions are predicted to be 2.2, 5.6, and 2.8 Mbars, respectively, while the corresponding tensile fracture strengths are 1.0, 0.5, and 0.5 Mbars. From these results and from Hertz theory it is predicted that ring fracture of spherically tipped diamonds pressed against a flat will occur at pressures of 1.8-1.9 Mbars, substantially below the yield pressure (above 3 Mbars). Modification of the tip shape leads to a predicted increase in the pressure at which fracture occurs.

  8. Morphological analysis and cell viability on diamond-like carbon films containing nanocrystalline diamond particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. N.; Ramos, B. C.; Da-Silva, N. S.; Pacheco-Soares, C.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Lobo, A. O.; Marciano, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    The coating of orthopedic prostheses with diamond like-carbon (DLC) has been actively studied in the past years, in order to improve mechanical, tribological properties and promote the material's biocompatibility. Recently, the incorporation of crystalline diamond nanoparticles into the DLC film has shown effective in combating electrochemical corrosion in acidic medias. This study examines the material's biocompatibility through testing by LDH release and MTT, on in vitro fibroblasts; using different concentrations of diamond nanoparticles incorporated into the DLC film. Propounding its potential use in orthopedics in order to increase the corrosion resistance of prostheses and improve their relationship with the biological environment.

  9. Deep Mantle Fluids Bottled Up in Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Pearson, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many mantle xenoliths and mineral inclusions in diamonds reflect refertilisation and enrichment by mantle metasomatism, a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) globally. However, the nature of the fluids involved can normally only be constrained indirectly from geochemical proxies or calculated using mineral/melt partition coefficients. Direct samples of mantle metasomatic fluids, shielded from any late stage alteration, are encased as microinclusions in fast-growing diamonds - "fibrous diamonds". These trapped high-density fluids (HDFs) provide a unique chemical and physical record for tracing the sources of deep mantle fluids and constraining the processes that shape their nature.Diamond HDFs vary between four major compositional types: saline, silicic and high-Mg plus low-Mg carbonatitic. A strong connection has been established between high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs and a carbonated peridotite source. In addition, the silicic and low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs have been related to hydrous eclogite (±carbonate). However, the compositionally extreme saline fluid endmember remained enigmatic and its source in the deep lithosphere has remained ambiguous. Our new data on fluid-rich diamonds show the geochemical fingerprints of a subducting slab as the source of deep mantle fluids of saline composition. In addition, for the first time, we show that these deep saline fluids are parental, via fluid rock interaction, to in-situ forming carbonatitic and silicic melts in the lithosphere. This model provides a strong platform for resolving the effects of the compositional spectrum of mantle fluids, which alter the deep lithosphere globally and play key roles in diamond formation.

  10. Origin of surface conductivity in diamond

    PubMed

    Maier; Riedel; Mantel; Ristein; Ley

    2000-10-16

    Hydrogen-terminated diamond exhibits a high surface conductivity (SC) that is commonly attributed to the direct action of hydrogen-related acceptors. We give experimental evidence that hydrogen is only a necessary requirement for SC; exposure to air is also essential. We propose a mechanism in which a redox reaction in an adsorbed water layer provides the electron sink for the subsurface hole accumulation layer. The model explains the experimental findings including the fact that hydrogenated diamond is unique among all semiconductors in this respect. PMID:11030924

  11. Entangling Macroscopic Diamonds at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sprague, M. R.; Sussman, B. J.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Jin, X.-M.; Champion, T.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; England, D.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum entanglement in the motion of macroscopic solid bodies has implications both for quantum technologies and foundational studies of the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. Entanglement is usually fragile in room-temperature solids, owing to strong interactions both internally and with the noisy environment. We generated motional entanglement between vibrational states of two spatially separated, millimeter-sized diamonds at room temperature. By measuring strong nonclassical correlations between Raman-scattered photons, we showed that the quantum state of the diamonds has positive concurrence with 98% probability. Our results show that entanglement can persist in the classical context of moving macroscopic solids in ambient conditions.

  12. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300{degree}K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm{sup 2}/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/{degree}K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (diamond switch. Electron beam control offers much higher efficiency and flexibility than laser control. We obtained experimental results with electron beam activated diamond films which were CVD grown on an n-type silicon substrate. With the substrate biased positive, the switch current was found to follow the electron beam pulse up to fields of about 0.9 MV/cm where ``lock-on`` occurred, i.e., the switch current continued to flow even after the electron beam was turned off. This effect, most likely due to double charge injection, was suppressed by biasing the n-silicon substrate negatively. The switch current then followed the electron beam pulse up to electric fields of 1.8 MV/cm, limited by our electrical circuit, with no evidence of ``lock-on.`` The predictable response of the switch current to the electron beam pulse at extreme,applied fields make electron beam controlled diamond switch a promising candidate for a high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  13. High average power switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, W.W. ); Schoenbach, K.H. )

    1992-06-01

    Diamond has many properties which make it ideal for a high power solid-state switch. The crystal structure of diamond is relatively well characterized. It is a semiconductor with a band-gap of 5.5 eV at 300[degree]K. The high band-gap of diamond results in a small dark current compared to Si or GaAs. As a result the breakdown field or holding voltage is very high, 1--10 MV/cm. The electron and hole mobility are approximately 2000 cm[sup 2]/v-sec. At room temperature, diamond has the highest thermal conductivity of any solid, 20 W/[degree]K -cm, about five times that of copper. This is ideal for switching because heat dissipation and thermal runaway problems are greatly mitigated. Our switch concept uses a low current (diamond switch. Electron beam control offers much higher efficiency and flexibility than laser control. We obtained experimental results with electron beam activated diamond films which were CVD grown on an n-type silicon substrate. With the substrate biased positive, the switch current was found to follow the electron beam pulse up to fields of about 0.9 MV/cm where lock-on'' occurred, i.e., the switch current continued to flow even after the electron beam was turned off. This effect, most likely due to double charge injection, was suppressed by biasing the n-silicon substrate negatively. The switch current then followed the electron beam pulse up to electric fields of 1.8 MV/cm, limited by our electrical circuit, with no evidence of lock-on.'' The predictable response of the switch current to the electron beam pulse at extreme,applied fields make electron beam controlled diamond switch a promising candidate for a high power on-off switch. Steady advancements in CVD polycrystalline and single crystal diamond help make this possible.

  14. Shock Compressing Diamond to a Conducting Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Moon, S J; Cauble, R C; Collins, G W

    2004-07-29

    Laser generated shock reflectance data show that diamond undergoes a continuous transition from optically absorbing to reflecting between Hugoniot pressures 600diamond having a thermal population of carriers at P{sub H}{approx}600 GPa, undergoing band overlap metallization at P{sub H}{approx}1000 GPa and melting at 800

  15. STATUS OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMISSION ENHANCED PHOTOCATHODE

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; SMEDLEY, J.; TODD, R.; WARREN, J.; WU, Q.

    2007-05-25

    The diamond secondary emission enhanced photocathode (SEEP) provides an attractive alternative for simple photo cathodes in high average current electron injectors. It reduces the laser power required to drive the cathode, simultaneously isolating the cathode and the FW cavity from each other, thereby protecting them from contamination and increasing their life time. In this paper, we present the latest results on the secondary electron yield using pulsed thermionic and photo cathodes as primary electron sources, shaping the diamond using laser ablation and reactive ion etching as well as the theoretical underpinning of secondary electron generation and preliminary results of modeling.

  16. Fabrication of freestanding heteroepitaxial diamond substrate via micropatterns and microneedles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Hideo; Kim, Seong-Woo; Ikejiri, Kenjiro; Kawamata, Yuki; Koyama, Koji; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of a high-quality freestanding diamond substrate was successfully demonstrated via heteroepitaxy by introducing diamond micropatterns and microneedles in the early stage of growth. Micropatterns contributed to a marked reduction in the number of dislocations induced by epitaxial lateral overgrowth, and microneedles relaxed heteroepitaxial strain. Raman spectroscopy indicated the absence of nondiamond carbon inclusions in the obtained freestanding substrate. The full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curve for diamond (004) reflections was 0.07°, the lowest value for heteroepitaxial diamond that has been reported so far. The results provide novel insights toward realizing large-diameter single-crystalline diamond substrates.

  17. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1999-01-01

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

  18. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1999-05-11

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties is disclosed. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display. 3 figs.

  19. Ambiguous fluidity and rigidity and diamonds that ooze!

    PubMed

    Meyer, G E; Dougherty, T J

    1990-01-01

    If white hemicircles rotate over the edges of a black diamond, there occurs an ambiguity of rigidity and motion. As the hemicircles obscure the vertices of the diamond, the figure transforms from a diamond to a rotating, nonrigid cross made of a tar-like fluid. When the corners reappear, the stimulus again becomes a rigid, solid diamond. Visibility of the vertices implies rigidity. If white squares are rotated, fluidity is not perceived. If the diamond has sawtooth edges and the hemicircles are rotated, no fluidity is perceived. Similarly, if illusory contours suggest the amodal completion of the vertices, rigidity is maintained. PMID:2096367

  20. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  1. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called “wave-like buckling and slipping” mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition. PMID:25088720

  2. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    Natural diamond has been valued for its appearance and mechanical properties for at least two thousand years. As a gem stone diamond is unsurpassed. However, scientific work, especially in the last 20 years, has demonstrated that diamond has numerous surprising properties and many unique ones. Some of the extreme properties have been known for many years, but the true scale of diamond's other highly desirable features is still only coming to light as control in the synthesis of diamond, and hence material perfection, improves. The ultimate prize for man-made diamond is surely not in the synthesis of gem stones, but in delivering technological solutions enabled by diamond to the challenges facing our society today. If the special properties are to be exploited to their full potential, at least four crucial factors must be considered. First, there must be sufficient scientific understanding of diamond to make applications effective, efficient and economical. Secondly, the means of fabrication and control of properties have to be achieved so that diamond's role can be optimised. Thirdly, it is not enough that its properties are superior to existing materials: they must be so much better that it is worth initiating new technologies to exploit them. Finally, any substantial applications will have to address the society's major needs worldwide. The clear technology drivers for the 21st century come from the biomedical technologies, the demand for energy subject to global constraints, and the information technologies, where perhaps diamond will provide the major enabling technology [1]. The papers in this volume concern the solid state physics of diamond, and primarily concern the first two factors: understanding, and control of properties. They address many of the outstanding basic problems, such as the identification of existing defects, which affect the material's properties, both desirable and less so. Regarding future substantial applications, one paper discusses

  3. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  4. X-ray topographic study of diamonds: implications for the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrosì, Giovanna; Nestola, Fabrizio; Tempesta, Gioacchino; Bruno, Marco; Scandale, Eugenio; Harris, Jeff W.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, several studies have focused on the growth conditions of the diamonds through the analysis of the mineral inclusions trapped in them (Howell, 2012 and references therein). Nevertheless, to obtain rigorous information about chemical and physical conditions of diamond formation, it is crucial to determine if the crystallization of the inclusions occurred before (protogenetic nature), during (syngenetic nature) or after (epigenetic nature) the growth of diamond (Wiggers de Vries et al., 2011). X-ray topography (XRDT) can be a helpful tool to verify the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond. This technique characterizes the extended defects and reconstructs the growth history of the samples (Agrosì et al., 2013 and references therein) and, consequently contributes to elucidation of the relationship between the inclusions and the host-diamond. With this aim a diamond from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Siberia, was investigated. The diamond crystal was the one previously studied by Nestola et al. (2011) who performed in-situ crystal structure refinement of the inclusions to obtain data about the formation pressure. The inclusions were iso-oriented olivines that did not show evident cracks and subsequently could not be considered epigenetic. Optical observations revealed an anomalous birefringence in the adjacent diamond and the inclusions had typical "diamond-imposed cubo-octahedral" shape for the largest olivine. The diffraction contrast study shows that the diamond exhibits significant deformation fields related to plastic post growth deformation. The crystallographic direction of strains was established applying the extinction criterion. Section topographs were taken to minimize the overlapping of the strain field associate with the different defects and revealed that no dislocations nucleated from the olivine inclusions. Generally, when a solid inclusion has been incorporated in the growing crystal, the associated volume distortion can be minimized by

  5. On possibility of diamond formations in radiation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Bolsheva, L. N.; Grachjova, T. V.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes was checked by studying diamond contents in carburanium sample. The diamonds were not found and this result is discussed. At present one possible process of formation of nanometer-size diamond crystals in some meteorites and Earth's diamonds (carbonado), the radiation mechanism, is suggested: the formation of diamonds from carbonaceous matter in tracks of U fragment fissions and heavy fragmentation due to the action of energetic particles of cosmic rays. Bjakov et. al. have carried out the calculations and shown that the volume of formed diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites by radiation processes corresponds to discovery of diamond volume in chondrites. The discovery by Ozima et. al. of the unsupported fission of Xe and Kr in carbonado supports the supposition that carbonado could be formed by radiation processes. The possibility of diamond formation in radiation processes leads to the study of diamond contents in Earth's samples enriched by uranium and carbon. The attempt to release the diamonds from carburanium was undertaken.

  6. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  7. Characterization of diamond thin films: Diamond phase identification, surface morphology, and defect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.E.; Glass, J.T.

    1989-03-01

    Thin carbon films grown from a low pressure methane-hydrogen gas mixture by microwave plasma enhanced CVD have been examined by Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron and x-ray diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. They were determined to be similar to natural diamond in terms of composition, structure, and bonding. The surface morphology of the diamond films was a function of position on the sample surface and the methane concentration in the feedgas. Well-faceted diamond crystals were observed near the center of the sample whereas a less faceted, cauliflower texture was observed near the edge of the sample, presumably due to variations in temperature across the surface of the sample. Regarding methane concentration effects, threefold /111/ faceted diamond crystals were predominant on a film grown at 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while fourfold /100/ facets were observed on films grown in 1.0% and 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/. Transmission electron microscopy of the diamond films has shown that the majority of diamond crystals have a very high defect density comprised of /111/ twins, /111/ stacking faults, and dislocations. In addition, cross-sectional TEM has revealed a 50 A epitaxial layer of ..beta..--SiC at the diamond-silicon interface of a film grown with 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while no such layer was observed on a diamond film grown in 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/.

  8. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  10. Diamond technology for Endo-KEW seeker windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, K. V.

    1992-05-01

    The attractions of low pressure synthesized diamond films and thick diamond slabs for Endo-KEW seeker window applications are presented. The use of diamond in two forms, as thin films in combination with silicon windows and as thick, free standing windows are discussed. A novel concept of internally cooled silicon/diamond windows that can withstand the rigors of high velocity, endo-atmospheric flight, that do not suffer from window irradiation resulting from aero-optic effects and have the potential for application as multispectral windows is discussed. The synthesis and processing aspects of thin diamond films and free standing diamond windows are presented with an analysis of the significant advantages of silicon and diamond for the fabrication of Endo-KEW seeker windows.

  11. Degassing mechanisms of noble gases from carbonado diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zashu, S.; Hiyagon, H.

    1994-01-01

    Diamonds are unique samples for inferring ancient mantle conditions, because of their enormous stability, antiquity and also of mantle origin. However, as temperatures in the mantle where diamonds have existed are very high (greater than 1000 C) and residence time of some diamonds could be more than a few billion years, it is imperative to examine whether or not diamonds have retained their pristine characteristics, especially those of noble gases, under such extreme conditions. As discussed in a review article by Ozima, there are rather large variations in the diffusivity of helium in diamonds obtained in the early determinations. The data are also limited to temperatures higher than 1200 C. In the present study, we conducted more refined diffusion experiments for He using carbonado diamonds, which have large amounts of radiogenic (4)He approximately 10(exp -2) cu cm STP/g. On the basis of the experimentally estimated diffusion coefficients, we will discuss retentivity of He in diamonds in the mantle condition.

  12. Diamond-bearing Rocks among Mantle Xenoliths in Kimberlites as Indicatory for the Chambers of Diamond-parental Carbonatite Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2014-05-01

    Origin of diamond-bearing peridotite and eclogite rocks in kimberlites is cleared up using mantle-carbonatite model of diamond genesis (Litvin, 2007, 2009, 2013). Data of analytical mineralogy of primary inclusions in diamonds and results of physicochemical experiments on syngenetic diamond and inclusion phase relations are co-ordinated in this model (Litvin et al., 2012). It proved that diamond-parental media are presented by changeable carbon-saturated peridotite-carbonatite and eclogite-carbonatite melts. The melts are capable to form not diamonds only but their major and minor inclusions. The upper mantle is mainly composed of diamond-free peridotites which dominate over eclogites as 9 to 5 % (Mathias et al., 1970). Howewer diamond-bearing peridotites and eclogites occur rarely as demonstrated for S.Africa and Yakutia (Sobolev N., 1977). Nevertheless, origin of diamond-bearing rocks belongs to key problems of genetic mineralogy of diamond and mantle petrology due to dissimilar physicochemical and environmental conditions of formation of comparatively diamond-free rocks. Symptomatic that garnets included in diamond and these of diamond-bearing eclogite are compositionally similar (Sobolev V. et al., 1972). Garnets of diamond-bearing eclogites, inclusions in diamonds and intergrowths with them are marked by increased Na2O content (0.10-0.22%) because of Na-majorite component Na2MgSi5O12 (Bobrov & Litvin, 2011). Peridotitic garnets of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths are indicated by high Cr2O3 and low CaO content over diamond-free ones. This compositional dissimilarity is compatible with formation of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths in chambers of partially melted peridotite-eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-carbon system of changeable composition. However, diamond-free rocks are products of upper-mantle magmatism based on carbonatite-free peridotite-eclogite-sulphide-carbon system. Chambers of diamond-parental carbonatite magma

  13. Diamond and diamond-like carbon films for advanced electronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, M.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Aim of this laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project was to develop diamond and/or diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for electronic applications. Quality of diamond and DLC films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is not adequate for electronic applications. Nucleation of diamond grains during growth typically results in coarse films that must be very thick in order to be physically continuous. DLC films grown by CVD are heavily hydrogenated and are stable to temperatures {le} 400{degrees}C. However, diamond and DLC`s exceptional electronic properties make them candidates for integration into a variety of microelectronic structures. This work studied new techniques for the growth of both materials. Template layers have been developed for the growth of CVD diamond films resulting in a significantly higher nucleation density on unscratched or unprepared Si surfaces. Hydrogen-free DLC with temperature stability {le} 800{degrees}C has been developed using energetic growth methods such as high-energy pulsed-laser deposition. Applications with the largest system impact include electron-emitting materials for flat-panel displays, dielectrics for interconnects, diffusion barriers, encapsulants, and nonvolatile memories, and tribological coatings that reduce wear and friction in integrated micro-electro-mechanical devices.

  14. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  15. Chrome pyrope: an inclusion in natural diamond.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H O

    1968-06-28

    Electron probe analyses of garnets that are rich in magnesium and that occur as inclusions in natural diamonds show that the chrome-garnet end member, Mg(3)Cr(2)Si(3)O(12), is a major constituent (30 percent). PMID:17817353

  16. Diamond Light Source: status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Materlik, Gerhard; Rayment, Trevor; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facility in the UK, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2012. A private limited company was set up in April 2002 to plan, construct and operate the new user-oriented SR facility, called in brief Diamond. It succeeded the Synchrotron Radiation Source in Daresbury, a second-generation synchrotron that opened in 1980 as the world's first dedicated X-ray-providing facility, closing finally in 2008, by which time Diamond's accelerators and first beamlines were operating and user experiments were under way. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A gives some examples of the rich diversity of research done in the initial five years, with some glimpses of activity up to 2014. Speakers at the 10 year anniversary symposium were drawn from a small number of major thematic areas and each theme was elaborated by a few speakers whose contributions were placed into a broader context by a leading member of the UK academic community in the role of rapporteur. This introduction gives a summary of the design choices and strategic planning of Diamond as a coherent user facility, a snapshot of its present status and some consideration of future perspectives. PMID:25624517

  17. Panel focuses on diamond shear bit care

    SciTech Connect

    Park, A.

    1982-10-04

    This article examines drilling parameters and marketability of Stratapax bits. Finds that core bits drill from 2 to 3 times faster than conventional diamond bits, thereby reducing filtrate invasion. Predicts that high speed drilling, downhole motors, deeper wells and slim hole drilling will mean greater Stratapax use.

  18. Sintered diamond compacts using metallic cobalt binders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libby, W. F.; Katzman, H.

    1972-01-01

    Method is developed for sintering diamond powder which uses metallic cobalt as binder. Present samples show maximum microhardness of over 3000 kg/sq mm on Knoop scale. Material may be used as hard surface coating or may compete with cubic boron nitride as abrasive grain.

  19. Diamond film by hot filament CVD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Diamond synthesis by the hot filament CVD method is discussed. A hot filament decomposes gas mixtures and oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols. which are carbon sources. The resulting thin films, growth mechanisms, and characteristics and problems associated with the hot filament CVD method are analyzed and evaluated.

  20. DIAMONDS: a new Bayesian nested sampling tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, Enrico; De Ridder, Joris

    2015-09-01

    In the context of high-quality asteroseismic data provided by the NASA Kepler Mission, we developed a new code, termed DIAMONDS (high-DImensional And multi-MOdal NesteD Sampling), for fast Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the Nested Sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional problems (like the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations) and multi-modal problems (i.e. problems that show multiple solutions). We applied the code to the peak bagging analysis of solar-like oscillations observed in a challenging F-type star. By means of DIAMONDS one is able to detect the different backgrounds in the power spectrum of the star (e.g. stellar granulation and faculae activity) and to understand whether one or two oscillation peaks can be identified or not. In addition, we demonstrate a novel approach to peak bagging based on multi-modality, which is able to reduce significantly the number of free parameters involved in the peak bagging model. This novel approach is therefore of great interest for possible future automatization of the entire analysis technique. Software package available at the DIAMONDS code website: http://https://fys.kuleuven.be/ster/Software/Diamonds/.

  1. Diamond Turning Of Infra-Red Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, B.; Lettington, A. H.; Stillwell, P. F. T. C.

    1986-05-01

    Single point diamond machining of infra-red optical components such as aluminium mirrors, germanium lenses and zinc sulphide domes is potentially the most cost effective method for their manufacture since components may be machined from the blanks to a high surface finish, requiring no subsequent polishing, in a few minutes. Machines for the production of flat surfaces are well established. Diamond turning lathes for curved surfaces however require a high capital investment which can be justified only for research purposes or high volume production. The present paper describes the development of a low cost production machine based on a Bryant Symons diamond turning lathe which is able to machine spherical components to the required form and finish. It employs two horizontal spindles one for the workpiece the other for the tool. The machined radius of curvature is set by the alignment of the axes and the radius of the tool motion, as in conventional generation. The diamond tool is always normal to the workpiece and does not need to be accurately profiled. There are two variants of this basic machine. For machining hemispherical domes the axes are at right angles while for lenses with positive or negative curvature these axes are adjustable. An aspherical machine is under development, based on the all mechanical spherical machine, but in which a ± 2 mm aspherecity may be imposed on the best fit sphere by moving the work spindle under numerical control.

  2. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  3. Micrometer-scale cavities in fibrous and cloudy diamonds — A glance into diamond dissolution events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Wirth, Richard; Navon, Oded

    2007-12-01

    Micrometer sized internal cavities in diamonds preserve evidence of diamond dissolution events. Combining the methods of focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables these features to be studied in detail. Micrometer-scale cavities are found in the inner parts of fibrous and cloudy kimberlitic diamonds. Their filling consists of amorphous matrix, secondary nano-crystals, volatiles and in some cases larger resorbed crystals. Trapped minerals include corundum, Kappa-alumina, quartz, olivine, moissanite-6H and Ca-Mg carbonates. This is the first observation of Kappa-alumina in nature. Secondary nano-minerals are observed within the amorphous matrix and include carbonates, Al-oxide, fluorite, ilmenite and secondary diamond crystals. The amorphous matrix is spongy and its composition is dominated by amorphous carbon, nitrogen, chlorine and also contains water. When no crystalline phases are observed, the matrix is also enriched in alumina, silica and in some cases calcium. We propose that micrometer scale cavities in diamonds form during dissolution events induced by the introduction of oxidizing hydrous fluids into the diamond growth area. Hydrous fluids are the main dissolving agents for most kimberlitic diamonds [Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Semenets, E., 2007. Mechanisms of diamond oxidation and their bearing on the fluid composition in kimberlite magmas. Am. Mineral. 92, 1200-1212]. At diamond forming conditions silica and alumina are enriched in hydrous fluids that are in equilibrium with eclogites [Kessel, R., Ulmer, P., Pettke, T., Schmidt, M.W., Thompson, A.B., 2005. The water-basalt system at 4 to 6 GPa: Phase relations and second critical endpoint in a K-free eclogite at 700 to 1400 °C. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 237, 873-892]; this is consistent with the increased solubility of alumina with increased pressure and temperature in the Na-Cl bearing fluids [Manning, C.E., 2006. Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and

  4. The Influence of Volcanological and Sedimentological Processes on Diamond Grade Distribution: Examples From the Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Cas, R. A.; Ailleres, L.; Oshust, P.

    2009-05-01

    The study of the diamond distribution within two kimberlite pipes, Fox and Koala, from the Ekati Diamond Mine, NWT, Canada, in conjunction with detailed facies models has shown several distinct relationships of deposit type and grade distribution. In both pipes the lithological facies represent grade units which can be distinguished from each other in terms of relative size and abundance of diamonds. Positive correlation of olivine grain size and abundance with diamond grade is seen, indicating that density sorting of fragmental kimberlites occurs both in pyroclastic and resedimented deposits. Though surface geological processes do not control the diamond potential of the erupting magma, they can be responsible for concentrating diamonds into economically significant proportions. A good understanding of the eruption, transport and depositional processes responsible for the individual lithological units and the diamond distribution within them is important for successful resource estimation and may lead to recognition of areas suitable for selective mining, making a marginal deposit economic.

  5. Applications of diamond films and related materials; Proceedings of the 1st International Conference, Auburn, AL, Aug. 17-22, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Editor); Yoshikawa, Manasori (Editor); Murakawa, Masao (Editor); Feldman, Albert (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses the nucleation and growth of diamond from hydrocarbons, the cutting tool performance of CVD thick-film diamond, the characterization of CVD diamond grinding powder, industrial applications of crystalline diamond-coated tools, standardized SEM tribometry of diamond-coated substrates, residual stress in CVD diamond films, the optical properties of CVD diamond films, polycrystalline diamond films for optical applications, and diamond growth on ferrous metals. Also discussed are ion beam-irradiation smoothing of diamond films, electronic circuits on diamond substrates, diamond-laminated surfaces for evaporative spray cooling, electron devices based on the unique properties of diamond, diamond cold cathodes, thin-film diamond microstructure applications, Schottky diodes from flame-grown diamond, diamond films for thermionic applications, methods of diamond nucleation and selective deposition, high-rate/large-area diamond film production, halogen-assisted diamond growth, the economics of diamond technology, and the optical and mechanical properties of diamondlike films.

  6. Grade-tonnage and other models for diamond kimberlite pipes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Grade-tonnage and other quantitative models help give reasonable answers to questions about diamond kimberlite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes are those diamondiferous kimberlite pipes that either have been worked or are expected to be worked for diamonds. These models are not applicable to kimberlite dikes and sills or to lamproite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes contain a median 26 million metric tons (mt); the median diamond grade is 0.25 carat/metric ton (ct/mt). Deposit-specific models suggest that the median of the average diamond size is 0.07 ct and the median percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality is 67 percent. The percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality can be predicted from deposit grade using a regression model (log[industrial diamonds (percent)]=1.9+0.2 log[grade (ct/mt)]). The largest diamond in a diamond kimberlite pipe can be predicted from deposit tonnage using a regression model (log[largest diamond (ct)]=-1.5+0.54 log[size (mt]). The median outcrop area of diamond pipes is 12 hectares (ha). Because the pipes have similar forms, the tonnage of the deposits can be predicted by the outcrop area (log[size (mt)]=6.5+1.0 log[outcrop area (ha)]). Once a kimberlite pipe is identified, the probability is approximately .005 that it can be worked for diamonds. If a newly discovered pipe is a member of a cluster that contains a known diamond kimberlite pipe, the probability that the new discovery can be mined for diamonds is 56 times that for a newly discovered kimberlite pipe in a cluster without a diamond kimberlite pipe. About 30 percent of pipes with worked residual caps at the surface will be worked at depth. Based on the number of discovered deposits and the area of stable craton rocks thought to be well explored in South Africa, about 10-5 diamond kimberlite pipes are present per square kilometer. If this density is applicable to the South American Precambrian Shield, more than 70 undiscovered kimberlite pipes are predicted to

  7. Discovery of carbonatitic microinclusions in diamonds with highly aggregated nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, B. M.; Navon, O.

    2014-12-01

    It is accepted that fibrous diamonds grew from the high-density fluids (HDFs) they trapped as microinclusions. Such fluids are not found in monocrystalline (MC) diamonds, leaving their source of carbon a mystery. Fibrous diamonds carry nitrogen in A centers and are young (106 years), while most MC diamonds carry aggregated nitrogen in both A and B centers and are older (109 years). Weiss et al. (2014) found saline HDFs in the core of a coated diamond from Guinea and carbonatitic and saline fluids in a South African diamond, both with low concentrations of B centers (5-27%). Here we report finding microinclusions with high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs in MC diamonds. The infrared spectrum of these diamonds confirms their highly aggregated nature (>60%). We studied a suite of twinned diamonds, macles, from the Venetia mine in South Africa. The diamonds were polished perpendicular to their twinning plane and cleaned in HF and HNO3. We identified the twinning planes in cathodoluminescence images and methodically searched along and next to these planes, assuming that inclusions were preferentially trapped there. Shallow, sub-surface inclusions were analyzed using a JEOL JXA-8230 EPMA and an EDS detector. In two out of 11 diamonds we found inclusions with high concentrations of MgO (26-31 wt%), CaO (21-34%), K2O (9-16%), FeO (7-12%) and SiO2 (8-13%). These compositions are similar to those of HDFs in fibrous diamonds from Guinea and Yakutia (Weiss et al., 2009; Klein-BenDavid et al., 2009; Zedgenizov et al., 2009). Eight carbonatitic inclusions were found in diamond ON-VNT-608 and three in ON-VNT-605. Five microinclusions in 608 and one in 605 carry high concentrations of SiO2, MgO and FeO, with little else. Their compositions fall close to that of orthopyroxene, suggesting that both diamonds belong to the peridotitic paragenesis. Other inclusions, rich in SiO2 and Al2O3 in variable proportions were found in 8 of the 11 diamonds. The nature of these inclusions is not yet clear

  8. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  9. Inclusions of Hydrocarbon Fluids in Diamonds From Wafangdian, Liaoning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2015-12-01

    We studied a large number of industrial-grade diamonds from Pipe 50 of Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not suitable for polishing into gems or making cutting tools. They are usually crushed to form abrasives, without much scientific scrutiny. We report here fluid inclusions in dozens of diamonds. The first type of fluids occur in the outer rim of diamonds, just below the surface, while their interior is free of visible fluids. Under UV radiation, when a non-fluorescent diamond appeared dim, bubbles of included fluids became visible as yellow and blue spherules. Such diamonds are sometimes encrusted with euhedral micro-diamonds resembling those on thin films grown by CVD. The second type of fluid-rich diamonds display iridescence of pink, blue, green and yellow colors. They show lamellar, filamentous, or tubular structures, some of the tubes are filled with granules, probably grown from fluids in the tubes. An FT-IR investigation of both types yielded similar results. Apart from absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations, we found an outstanding group of bands just below wavenumber 3000. This indicates the presence of a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons of long chain length. Our results seem to implicate that hydrocarbons might be an important component in Earth's mantle, which might even have provided carbon from which diamonds crystllized.

  10. Diamond Shaving of Contaminated Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, Lisa K.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning and decontamination of existing facilities presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of surface contamination from concrete floors and walls while eliminating the spread of contamination and volumetric reduction of the waste stream. Numerous methods have been tried with a varying degree of success. Recent technology has made this goal achievable and has been used successfully. This new technology is the Diamond Floor Shaver and Diamond Wall shaver. The Diamond Floor Shaver is a self-propelled, walk behind machine that literally shaves the contaminated concrete surface to specified depths. This is accomplished by using a patented system of 100 dry cutting diamond blades with offset diamond segments that interlock to provide complete shaving of the concrete surface. Grooves are eliminated which allows for a direct frisk reading to analyze results. When attached to an appropriate size vacuum, the dust produced is 100% contained. Dust is collected in drums ready for disposition and disposal. The waste produced in shaving 7,500 square feet at 1/8 inch thickness would fill a single 55 gallon drum. Production is dependent on depth of shaving but averages 100 square feet per hour. The wall shaver uses the same patented diamond drum and blades but is hydraulically driven and is deployed using a robotic arm allowing its operation to be to totally remote. It can reach ceilings as high as 20 feet. Numerous small projects were successfully completed using this technology. Large scale deployment came in 2003. Bluegrass, in conjunction with Bartlett Services, deployed this technology to support decontamination activities for closing of the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons site. Up to six floor shavers and one wall shaver were deployed in buildings B371 and B374. These buildings had up to one half-inch, fixed plutonium and beryllium contamination. Hundred-thousands of square feet of floors and walls were shaved successfully to depths of up to

  11. The evaluation of chemical wear on single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning a binary Cu-Ni alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browy, Eric Calmer

    The current work describes the evaluation of chemical wear on diamond tools while diamond turning copper nickel alloys of varying composition. The primary goal of my project is to quantify the chemical wear of single crystal diamond tools while diamond turning Cu-Ni alloys of different compositions. Pure copper is commonly understood to give negligible tool wear, while pure nickel is reported to give rapid wear. The Cu-Ni equilibrium phase diagram shows a single phase at all compositions. The development and testing of a method to evaluate and quantify diamond tool wear is also described within the current work. The method chosen for development is the metrology of the progressive edge recession of the diamond. A procedure of progressive plunge cuts into an ultra-bright acid copper before and after diamond turning of the workpiece takes a snapshot of the edge of the diamond tool as the cutting distance increases. An algorithm executed in MatLabRTM displays the residual tool wear after removal of the initial diamond tool geometry. A theoretical model has been developed to predict the chemical diamond tool wear and the results will be shown within the body of work.

  12. One step deposition of highly adhesive diamond films on cemented carbide substrates via diamond/β-SiC composite interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Hao; Jiang, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of adherent diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrates has been realized by application of diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite interlayers. Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Two different kinds of interlayers have been employed, namely, gradient interlayer and interlayer with constant composition. The distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide phases was precisely controlled by manipulating the gas phase composition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the existence of diamond, beta-silicon carbide and cobalt silicides (Co2Si, CoSi) phases, as well as the quality of diamond crystal and the residual stress in the films. Rockwell-C indentation tests were carried out to evaluate the film adhesion. It is revealed that the adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. This is mainly influenced by the residual stress in the diamond top layer, which is induced by the different thermal expansion coefficient of the film and the substrate. It is even possible to further suppress the stress by manipulating the distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide in the interlayer. The most adhesive diamond film on cemented carbide is thus obtained by employing a gradient composite interlayer.

  13. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  14. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, A.

    2015-04-01

    With the first three years of the LHC running complete, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. The lessons learned in constructing the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM), Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) and the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) all of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detector systems. The first beam test results of prototype diamond devices with 3D detector geometry should further enhance the radiation tolerance of this material.

  15. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  16. A study on the diamond lapping direction determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Zong, WenJun; Li, ZengQiang; Sun, Tao

    2014-08-01

    The anisotropy of material removal rate for diamond gives a method to control the lapping rate of diamond specimen, i.e. changing the lapping direction. This requires comprehension on the relationship of the material removal rate and the lapping direction for diamond. This paper provides a method to figure out the diamond lapping direction. By preprocessing a straight edge formed by lapping a surface intersects with the required machining surface, the diamond lapping direction can be figured out under the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope only if the crystal directions of the two surfaces are determined at first. The advantage of our method is that there is no need to consider the position and posture of the diamond specimen fixed on the holder.

  17. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

  18. Diamond optics V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 20, 21, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Albert; Sandor, Holly

    Attention is given to unconventional diamond and DLC deposition processes, deposition characterization; diamond characterization, and structural, thermal, and optical properties. Particular attention is given to diamond CVD growth chemistry; a synthesis technique of diamondlike carbon films by a laser ablation ion source in the atmosphere; mass spectrometry studies of diamond deposition; characterization of electron cyclotron resonance plasmas for diamond deposition; thinning and polishing of diamond films by a diffusional reaction with metals; twin quituplets in a CVD diamond; characterization of diamond films deposited by hot-filament CVD using CF4 as a doping gas by Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy; properties of optically smooth diamond thin films produced by ECR-PACVD; calculations of energy barriers to CVD diamon growth; thermal properties of optical-quality diamond films; attenuated total reflectance infrared absorption in CVD diamond films; and optical properties of boron-doped diamond films. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  19. Potassium in clinopyroxene inclusions from diamonds.

    PubMed

    Harlow, G E; Veblen, D R

    1991-02-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe analyses, and singlecrystal x-ray diffraction data support the conclusion that high potassium contents, up to 1.5 weight percent K(2)O, of some diopside and omphacite inclusions from diamonds represent valid clinopyroxene compositions with K in solid solution. This conclusion contradicts the traditional view of pyroxene crystal chemistry, which holds that K is too large to be incorporated in the pyroxene structure. These diopside and omphacite inclusions have a high degree of crystal perfection and anomalously large unit-cell volumes, and a defect-free structure is observed in K-bearing regions when imaged by transmission electron microscopy. These observations imply that clinopyroxene can be a significant host for K in the mantle and that some clinopyroxene inclusions and their diamond hosts may have grown in a highly K-enriched environment. PMID:17741381

  20. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  1. Precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Paul, H.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the effect of machine parameters and material properties on precision diamond grinding of ceramics and glass. The critical grinding depth to initiate the plastic flow-to-brittle fracture regime will be directly measured using plunge-grind tests. This information will be correlated with machine parameters such as wheel bonding and diamond grain size. Multiaxis grinding tests will then be made to provide data more closely coupled with production technology. One important aspect of the material property studies involves measuring fracture toughness at the very short crack sizes commensurate with grinding damage. Short crack toughness value`s can be much less than the long-crack toughness values measured in conventional fracture tests.

  2. Charge state manipulation of qubits in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Grotz, Bernhard; Hauf, Moritz V.; Dankerl, Markus; Naydenov, Boris; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Stutzmann, Martin; Reinhard, Friedemann; Garrido, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond is a promising candidate for a solid-state qubit. However, its charge state is known to be unstable, discharging from the qubit state NV− into the neutral state NV0 under various circumstances. Here we demonstrate that the charge state can be controlled by an electrolytic gate electrode. This way, single centres can be switched from an unknown non-fluorescent state into the neutral charge state NV0, and the population of an ensemble of centres can be shifted from NV0 to NV−. Numerical simulations confirm the manipulation of the charge state to be induced by the gate-controlled shift of the Fermi level at the diamond surface. This result opens the way to a dynamic control of transitions between charge states and to explore hitherto inaccessible states, such as NV+. PMID:22395620

  3. Stability of polarized states for diamond valleytronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersberg, J.; Majdi, S.; Kovi, K. K.; Suntornwipat, N.; Gabrysch, M.; Isberg, J.; Twitchen, D. J.

    2014-06-09

    The stability of valley polarized electron states is crucial for the development of valleytronics. A long relaxation time of the valley polarization is required to enable operations to be performed on the polarized states. Here, we investigate the stability of valley polarized states in diamond, expressed as relaxation time. We have found that the stability of the states can be extremely long when we consider the electron-phonon scattering processes allowed by symmetry considerations. We determine electron-phonon coupling constants by Time-of-Flight measurements and Monte Carlo simulations and use these data to map out the relaxation time temperature dependency. The relaxation time for diamond can be microseconds or longer below 100 K and 100 V/cm due to the strong covalent bond, which is highly encouraging for future use in valleytronic applications.

  4. Latent laser-induced graphitization of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Basic features and mechanism of femtosecond laser graphitization of diamond surface were studied in the two regimes of irradiation: (1) by an intensive (>10 J/cm2) single shot and (2) by a train of pulses with near-threshold intensity (~1-10 J/cm2). Special attention was paid to the so-called accumulative regime, when multipulse laser treatment results in prolonged delay of an appearance of crystal modification of the crystal. The light absorption mechanisms dominating in each regime are discussed. The experiments with fundamental (800 nm), second (400 nm) and third (266 nm) harmonics of Ti-sapphire laser (100 fs) have revealed that thermally stimulated processes play an essential role in latent diamond graphitization.

  5. Isotopic homojunction band engineering from diamond.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Nebel, C E; Shikata, S

    2009-06-12

    Confinement of charge carriers in semiconductors by quantum wells is usually accomplished with layers that vary in elemental composition, such as aluminum gallium arsenide and gallium arsenide. We fabricated diamond superlattices by creating multilayer structures of isotopically pure carbon isotopes carbon-12 (12C) and carbon-13 (13C), which confine electrons by a difference in band-gap energy of 17 millielectron volts. Cathodoluminescence experiments performed at 80 kelvin showed that excitonic recombination in the higher-energy band of 13C vanishes in favor of increased recombination in the lower-energy 12C material. Carrier confinement was achieved in diamond superlattices made up of both thinner (30 nanometers) and thicker (up to 350 nanometers) layers. PMID:19520955

  6. Carbon stardust: From soot to diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1990-01-01

    The formation of carbon dust in the outflow from stars and the subsequent evolution of this so called stardust in the interstellar medium is reviewed. The chemical and physical processes that play a role in carbon stardust formation are very similar to those occurring in sooting flames. Based upon extensive laboratory studies of the latter, the structure and physical and chemical properties of carbon soot are reviewed and possible chemical pathways towards carbon stardust are discussed. Grain-grain collisions behind strong interstellar shocks provide the high pressures required to transform graphite and amorphous carbon grains into diamond. This process is examined and the properties of shock-synthesized diamonds are reviewed. Finally, the interrelationship between carbon stardust and carbonaceous meteorites is briefly discussed.

  7. Quantum diamond chip under network optical control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, Alexander V.; Kateev, Igor Yu.; Orlikovsky, Nikolay A.; Orlikovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a structure and elements of the diamond chip fabrication technology, which could be used for an experimental study of spectral and dynamic properties of a quantum register prototype formed by a chain of microresonators (disks and rings) containing NV-centers. Making use of the parameters of NV-systems today exist, we simulate the dissipative population dynamics of two NV-centers located in different parts of the two-qubit register. As follows from our numerical results, high probability of controlled indirect qubit interaction via photon transfer from one center to another can be already achieved at the current diamond photonics technology level. The calculated operating parameters of the resonators and measuring structure (grating) are in good agreement with those that have been used in devices created by leading world science groups. The fabrication technique of lithographic mask is discussed and its roughness is estimated.

  8. Nanocrystalline diamond coatings for mechanical seals applications.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A; Neto, V F; Ruch, D; Grácio, J

    2012-08-01

    A mechanical seal is a type of seal used in rotating equipment, such as pumps and compressors. It consists of a mechanism that assists the connection of the rotating shaft to the housings of the equipments, preventing leakage or avoiding contamination. A common cause of failure of these devices is end face wear out, thus the use of a hard, smooth and wear resistant coating such as nanocrystalline diamond would be of great importance to improve their working performance and increase their lifetime. In this paper, different diamond coatings were deposited by the HFCVD process, using different deposition conditions. Additionally, the as-grown films were characterized for, quality, morphology and microstructure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The topography and the roughness of the films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). PMID:22962831

  9. Electron spectroscopy of the diamond surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    The diamond surface is studied by ionization loss spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. For surfaces heated to temperatures not exceeding 900 C, the band gap was found to be devoid of empty states in the absence of electron beam effects. The incident electron beam generates empty states in the band gap and loss of structure in the valence band for these surfaces. A cross section of 1.4 x 10 to the -19th sq cm was obtained for this effect. For surfaces heated to temperatures exceeding 900 C the spectra were identical to those from surfaces modified by the electron beam. The diamond surface undergoes a thermal conversion in its electronic structure at about 900 C.

  10. Transformation of the diamond /110/ surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The diamond surface undergoes a transformation in its electronic structure by a vacuum anneal at approximately 900 C. This transformation is characterized by the appearance of a feature in the band gap region of the energy loss spectrum. The kinetics of the transformation on the (110) surface is studied by observing the growth of this feature with time and temperature. The transformation is found to be consistent with first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 4.8 eV. It is also found that the band gap feature could be removed by exposure of the transformed surface to excited hydrogen. The results are consistent with the polished diamond (110) surface being covered with hydrogen which removes the band gap states and can be thermally desorbed at approximately 900 C.

  11. Testing of nonlinear diamond-turned reflaxicons.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Underwood, K L; Loomis, J S; Parks, R E; Wyant, J C

    1981-01-15

    The extreme alignment sensitivity of nonlinear diamond-turned reflaxicons makes them difficult to test and analyze. To evaluate the wave front it is necessary to know what portion results from alignment errors. This paper describes the setup, alignment, and testing of a nonlinear diamond-turned independent-element reflaxicon manufactured at the Union Carbide, Oak Ridge Y-12 plant. Interferograms taken with the center cone misaligned a known amount are analyzed using the axicon preprocessing option in FRINGE [J. S. Loomis (ASTM Report STP 666 and Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 171, 64 (1979)]. The results show that FRINGE correctly removes the cone and decenter errors introduced by the misalignments. It is also shown how the resulting interferograms are unfolded to give the OPD errors as seen on the outer cone. PMID:20309096

  12. Single crystal diamond for infrared sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Majdi, S. Kovi, K. K.; Isberg, J.; Kolahdouz, M.; Moeen, M.; Radamson, H. H.; Balmer, R. S.

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of new materials for thermal infrared (IR) detection has been an intensive research area in recent years. Among new semiconductor materials, synthetic diamond has the ability to function even under very high temperature and high radiation conditions. In the present work, diamond Schottky diodes with boron concentrations in the range of 10{sup 14 }< B < 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} are presented as candidates for IR thermal sensors with an excellent temperature coefficient of resistance (−8.42%/K) and very low noise levels around 6.6 × 10{sup −15} V{sup 2}/Hz. This enables huge performance enhancements for a wide variety of systems, e.g., automotive and space applications.

  13. GENERAL VIEW FROM CENTER OF DIAMOND STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW FROM CENTER OF DIAMOND STREET LOOKING WEST TOWARDS THIRTY-SECOND STREET. AN AUGUST 30, 1886 ISSUE OF THE PHILADELPHIA REAL ESTATE RECORD AND BUILDERS’ GUIDE RECORDED THAT REAL ESTATE AGENT F. A. FLOOD KEPT HIS OFFICES AT 3118 DIAMOND STREET, INDICATING THAT THE ROW OF ATTACHED DWELLINGS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE BLOCK HAD BEEN CONSTRUCTED BY THAT TIME. - 3100 Block Diamond Street (Houses), North & south sides between Thirty-first & Thirty-second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Method to fabricate micro and nano diamond devices

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M; Anderson, Richard J; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Skinner, Jack L; Rye, Michael J

    2014-10-07

    A method including forming a diamond material on the surface of a substrate; forming a first contact and a separate second contact; and patterning the diamond material to form a nanowire between the first contact and the second contact. An apparatus including a first contact and a separate second contact on a substrate; and a nanowire including a single crystalline or polycrystalline diamond material on the substrate and connected to each of the first contact and the second contact.

  15. Ion implantation of diamond: Damage, doping, and lift-off

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, N.R.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L.; Hunn, J.D.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1993-09-01

    In order to make good quality economical diamond electronic devices, it is essential to grow films and to dope these films to obtain n- and p- type conductivity. This review talk discuss first doping by ion implantation plus annealing of the implantation damage, and second flow to make large area single crystal diamonds. C implantation damage below an estimated Frenkel defect concentration of 7% could be recovered almost completely by annealing at 950C. For a defect concentration between 7 and 10%, a stable damage form of diamond (``green diamond``) was formed by annealing. At still higher damage levels, the diamond graphitized. To introduce p-type doping, we have co-implanted B and C into natural diamond at 77K, followed by annealing up to 1100C. The resulting semiconducting material has electrical properties similar to those of natural B-doped diamond. To create n-type diamond, we have implanted Na{sup +}, P+ and As{sup +} ions and have observed semiconducting behavior. This has been compared with carbon or noble element implantation, in an attempt to isolate the effect of radiation damage. Recently, in order to obtain large area signal crystals, we have developed a novel technique for removing thin layers of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial films. This method consists of ion implantation, followed by selective etching. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond buried at a controlled depth. This layer is graphitized and selectivity etched either by heating at 550C in an oxygen ambient or by electrolysis. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. The lift-off method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has potential for fabrication of large area single-crystal diamond sheets.

  16. Manufacturing Diamond Under Very High Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    A process for manufacturing bulk diamond has been made practical by the invention of the High Pressure and Temperature Apparatus capable of applying the combination of very high temperature and high pressure needed to melt carbon in a sufficiently large volume. The apparatus includes a reaction cell wherein a controlled static pressure as high as 20 GPa and a controlled temperature as high as 5,000 C can be maintained.

  17. Unusual inclusions found in a national diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, I.S.

    1985-01-01

    Three pale yellow minerals, 100-200 microns in their longest dimension, were extracted from a diamond 2.5 mm in size and examined in an SEM equipped with an X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer. These inclusions were found to be two grains of garnet and a coesite, all of which contain a microscopic grain of Ti-rich biotite, a small amount of sanidine and a number of other minerals. (1) Garnet-biotite-apatite-rutile-sanidine-(Fe,Ca) melt. Attached to one end of this garnet inclusion is a crystal of biotite (50 x 30 ..mu..m) in which an apatite and a rutile are embedded. A thin lamella of sanidine occurs in the biotite near the garnet boundary. (2) Garnet-biotite-apatite-sanidine-rutile-pyrrhotite-(Fe,Ca,K) phase (unidentified). This garnet inclusion partially encased a biotite crystal while all other phases occur as minute prismatic needles or irregular and globular masses on the inclusion surface. (3) Coesite-biotite-sanidine-calcite. They are considered primary phases because the diamond host contains neither internal nor external fractures. Garnet, coesite, biotite and apatite are syngenetic inclusions in this diamond based on their relatively large sizes and their intergrown relationships. All other phases may also be primary or derived from biotite which, in the presence of sulfur, may produce phlogopite + sanidine + pyrrhotite + rutile. The droplets of melt and thin lamella of sanidine in inclusion (1) seem to be products of incongruent melting of biotite during the emplacement of kimberlite.

  18. Mitigation of initial imprinting with diamond ablator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichirou; Terasaki, Hidenori; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Hosogi, Ryouta; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    In direct drive inertial confinement fusion, where laser light directly irradiates the target, surface perturbations on the target are seeded by initial imprint due to laser irradiation nonuniformity. It is the initial imprint that become the seed of the hydrodynamic instability, and decisive solutions for the mitigation of initial imprinting is required. We focused on material stiffness of ablator as an idea that was effective for mitigation of imprinting and adopted the diamond with low compressibility as an ablator material. In the imprint experiments, the diamond foils were irradiated with a foot pulse at an intensity of ~ 4.0 × 1012W/cm2 with 1.3 ns width, on which a stationary spatial nonuniformity with sinusoidal shape of 100 μm wavelength was imposed by implementing a grid mask. The foils were subsequently accelerated by a uniform main laser pulse of ~ 1.0 × 1014 W/cm2 and imprinted perturbation were observed to be amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor instability through face-on x-ray backlight measurements. We deduced the equivalent initial surface roughness for the imprinted foil. We verified the mitigation of initial imprinting with diamond from the quantitative evaluation.

  19. Demonstrating diamond wire cutting of the TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, K.; Perry, E.; Larson, S.; Viola, M.

    2000-02-24

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ceased operation in April 1997 and decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The deuterium-tritium fusion experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the Tokamak (100 cubic meters) present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Plasma arc cutting is the current baseline technology for the dismantlement of fission reactors. This technology is typically used because of its faster cutting times. Alternatively, an innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR is the use of diamond wire cutting technology. Recent improvements in diamond wire technology have allowed the cutting of carbon steel components such as pipe, plate, and tube bundles in heat exchangers. Some expected benefits of this technology include: significantly reduction in airborne contaminates, reduced personnel exposure, a reduced risk of spread of tritium contamination, and reduced overall costs as compared to using plasma arc cutting. This paper will provide detailed results of the diamond wire cutting demonstration that was completed in September of 1999, on a mock-up of this complex reactor. The results will identify cost, safety, industrial and engineering parameters, and the related performance of each situation.

  20. Fluid/melt inclusions in alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds: new approach on diamond formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, Alla M.; Wirth, Richard; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    2010-05-01

    The origin of alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds is still a subject of controversy. Fluid/melt inclusions in diamonds are the deepest available samples of mantle fluids and provide the unique information on the medium in which diamonds have grown. These inclusions carry high-density fluids (HDFs), the compositional variability is in the range of hydrous-silicic, carbonatitic (high-Mg and low-Mg) and saline end-members. Previous studies of the bulk composition and internal morphology of microinclusions in alluvial Northeast Siberian diamonds suggested that they contain fluids, but distribution and structure of their constitutional phases could not be determined. We investigated two populations of diamonds from Northeast Siberian Platform placers (Ebelyakh area) using TEM, FTIR, EPMA methods: (I) rounded single-crystals (dodecahedrons, octahedrons and irregular stones with a black central zone rich in microinclusions. Some of them frequently exhibit growth twinning; (II) rounded dark crystals, related to variety V according to the classification by Orlov (1977). This group of stones has their own typical features: dark color due to abundant black microinclusions and high dislocation density; mosaic-block internal structure; very light carbon isotopic composition; the high degree of nitrogen aggregation and nearly total absence of mineral inclusions. Diamonds of the first population are characterized by two types of fluid/melt nanoinclusions:1) multi-phase high- Mg assemblages, which include solid phases (magnesite, dolomite, clinohumite, Fe-spinel, graphite) and fluid bubbles; 2) oriented sulfide melt nanoinclusions in association with halides (KCl, NaCl), high-Si mica and fluid bubbles. All of them ranging between 5 and 200 nm in diameter are reflecting the diamond habit. Sulfides are homogeneous in composition. The Ni/(Ni+Fe) ratio of the inclusions is 0.037±0.04. Still closed fluid bubbles were identified in TEM studies as changing absorption contrast due to

  1. Mechanical properties of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond foils

    PubMed Central

    Lodes, M. A.; Kachold, F. S.; Rosiwal, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond coating of suitable template materials and subsequent delamination allows for the manufacturing of free-standing diamond foil. The evolution of the microstructure can be influenced by secondary nucleation via control of process conditions in the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process. Bending tests show extraordinarily high strength (more than 8 GPa), especially for diamond foils with nanocrystalline structure. A detailed fractographic analysis is conducted in order to correlate measured strength values with crack-initiating defects. The size of the failure causing flaw can vary from tens of micrometres to tens of nanometres, depending on the diamond foil microstructure as well as the loading conditions. PMID:25713455

  2. Discrimination of metamorphic diamond populations by Raman spectroscopy (Kokchetav, Kazakhstan).

    PubMed

    Korsakov, Andrey V; Vandenabeele, Peter; Theunissen, Karel

    2005-08-01

    Metamorphic diamond is a powerful but frequently debated indicator for ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) conditions. Because of their small size, their optical identification needs confirmation. Characteristics of chemically extracted microdiamonds from Kokchetav, identified by different analytical methods, are used here for unambiguous in situ identification by Raman microspectroscopy. Differences appear in the diamond spectra and the Raman analytical method is explored as a helpful tool in the discrimination between diamond populations from four different UHPM lithologies of Kokchetav. Not considering the graphite-coated diamond, out of the reach of the laser wavelength used here, the comparison of these Kokchetav Raman spectra may provide additional information in other UHPM studies. PMID:16029860

  3. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  4. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  5. Amino-terminated diamond surfaces: Photoelectron emission and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di; Bandy, Jason A.; Li, Shuo; Hamers, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new approach to making stable negative electron-affinity diamond surfaces by terminating diamond with amino groups (also known as amine groups, -NH2). Previous studies have shown that negative electron affinity can be induced by terminating diamond surfaces with hydrogen, creating a surface dipole favorable toward electron emission. Here, we demonstrate that covalent tethering of positive charges in the form of protonated amino groups, -NH3+, also leads to negative electron affinity (NEA) and facile electron emission into vacuum and into water. Amino-terminated diamond was prepared using a very mild plasma discharge. Valence-band photoemission studies of the amino-terminated diamond samples show a characteristic "NEA" peak, demonstrating that the amino-terminated surface has NEA. Diamond's ability to emit electrons into water was evaluated using photochemical conversion of N2 to NH3. Time-resolved surface photovoltage studies were used to characterize charge separation at the diamond interface, and Mott-Schottky measurements were performed to characterize band-bending at the diamond-water interface. XPS studies show that the amino-terminated surfaces provide increased chemical resistance to oxidation compared with H-terminated diamond when illuminated with ultraviolet light.

  6. Novel diamond-coated tools for dental drilling applications.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W; Woodwards, R

    2007-01-01

    The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life in orthodontic applications. WC-Co tools containing 6% Co metal and 94% WC substrate with an average grain size of 1 - 3 microm were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates it is necessary to etch cobalt from the surface and prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Alternatively, a titanium nitride (TiN) interlayer can be used prior to diamond deposition. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films to TiN and etched WC substrates. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro Raman spectroscopy. The performances of diamond-coated WC-Co tools, uncoated WC-Co tools, and diamond embedded (sintered) tools have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human tooth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic tooth materials. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the tools when machining biomedical materials such as those described above. It is shown that using an interlayer such as TiN prior to diamond deposition provides the best surface preparation for producing dental tools. PMID:17365432

  7. Positron beam investigations of natural cubic and coated diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaev, A. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Kruseman, A. C.; Zakharchenko, O. D.

    2000-06-01

    Positron beam and 2D-ACAR investigation of cubic and coated diamonds are reported. In type IIA diamonds, positrons are mostly trapped in vacancies in the carbon lattice; in type Ia diamonds, two main defect-related annihilation sites are nitrogen-vacancy complexes (H2, H3) and the vicinity of split interstitial atoms. No correlation between principal nitrogen defects and annihilation rate was found. PAS data indicate the presence of a significant amount of vacancies in all studied diamonds, which increases the rate of nitrogen aggregation. It is shown that pressurised fluid inclusions may serve as a positron trap, giving rise to the long component in the lifetime spectra.

  8. Mechanical properties of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond foils.

    PubMed

    Lodes, M A; Kachold, F S; Rosiwal, S M

    2015-03-28

    Diamond coating of suitable template materials and subsequent delamination allows for the manufacturing of free-standing diamond foil. The evolution of the microstructure can be influenced by secondary nucleation via control of process conditions in the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process. Bending tests show extraordinarily high strength (more than 8 GPa), especially for diamond foils with nanocrystalline structure. A detailed fractographic analysis is conducted in order to correlate measured strength values with crack-initiating defects. The size of the failure causing flaw can vary from tens of micrometres to tens of nanometres, depending on the diamond foil microstructure as well as the loading conditions. PMID:25713455

  9. Bases of the Mantle-Carbonatite Conception of Diamond Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    In the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis, the results of physic-chemical experiments are coordinated with the data of analytic mineralogy of primary inclusions in natural diamonds. Generalization of the solutions of principal genetic problems constitutes the bases of the conception. The solutions are following: (1) it is grounded that diamond-parental melts of the upper mantle have peridotite/eclogite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, of the transition zone - (wadsleite↔ringwoodite) - majorite - stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, and of the lower mantle - periclase/wustite - bridgmanite - Ca-perovskite -stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions; (2) a construction of generalized diagrams for the diamond-parental media, which reveal changeable compositions of the growth melts of diamonds and associated phases, their genetic relations to the mantle substance, and classification connections of the primary inclusions in natural diamonds; (3) experimental equilibrium phase diagrams of syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions, which characterize the nucleation and growth conditions of diamonds and a capture of paragenetic and xenogenetic minerals by the growing diamonds; (4) a determination of the phase diagrams of diamonds and inclusions syngenesis under the regime of fractional crystallization, which discover the regularities of ultrabasic-basic evolution and paragenesis transitions in the diamond-forming systems of the upper and lower mantle. The evidence of the physic-chemically united mode of diamond genesis at the mantle depths with different mineralogy is obtained. References. Litvin Yu.A. (2007). High-pressure mineralogy of diamond genesis. In: Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (edited by Eiji Ohtani), Geological Society of America Special paper 421, 83-103. Litvin Yu.A. (2012). Experimental study of physic-chemical conditions of natural diamond formation on an example of the eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-diamond

  10. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Yan, Chih-shiue

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  11. Diamond network: template-free fabrication and properties.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Nianjun; Fu, Haiyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Chun; Huang, Nan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-03-11

    A porous diamond network with three-dimensionally interconnected pores is of technical importance but difficult to be produced. In this contribution, we demonstrate a simple, controllable, and "template-free" approach to fabricate diamond networks. It combines the deposition of diamond/β-SiC nanocomposite film with a wet-chemical selective etching of the β-SiC phase. The porosity of these networks was tuned from 15 to 68%, determined by the ratio of the β-SiC phase in the composite films. The electrochemical working potential and the reactivity of redox probes on the diamond networks are similar to those of a flat nanocrystalline diamond film, while their surface areas are hundreds of times larger than that of a flat diamond film (e.g., 490-fold enhancement for a 3 μm thick diamond network). The marriage of the unprecedented physical/chemical features of diamond with inherent advantages of the porous structure makes the diamond network a potential candidate for various applications such as water treatment, energy conversion (batteries or fuel cells), and storage (capacitors), as well as electrochemical and biochemical sensing. PMID:25697278

  12. Diamond/aluminium nitride composites for efficient thermal management applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cervenka, J.; Dontschuk, N.; Prawer, S.; Ladouceur, F.; Duvall, S. G.

    2012-07-30

    Synthetic diamond/AlN composite materials have been fabricated by a combination of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. These wide band gap semiconductor heterojunctions show promises for many applications, including thermal management, deep ultraviolet light emitting devices, and high power and high temperature electronics. Here, we report results of an interface study of polycrystalline diamond layers grown on single crystal AlN(0001). High resolution transmission microscopy revealed atomically sharp interfaces between diamond and AlN. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy measurements showed reduced thermal resistance on diamond-coated AlN substrates compared to uncoated AlN at temperatures above 330 K.

  13. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  14. Diamond/aluminium nitride composites for efficient thermal management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenka, J.; Dontschuk, N.; Ladouceur, F.; Duvall, S. G.; Prawer, S.

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic diamond/AlN composite materials have been fabricated by a combination of microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. These wide band gap semiconductor heterojunctions show promises for many applications, including thermal management, deep ultraviolet light emitting devices, and high power and high temperature electronics. Here, we report results of an interface study of polycrystalline diamond layers grown on single crystal AlN(0001). High resolution transmission microscopy revealed atomically sharp interfaces between diamond and AlN. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy measurements showed reduced thermal resistance on diamond-coated AlN substrates compared to uncoated AlN at temperatures above 330 K.

  15. Catalysis by diamonds and other forms of carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Kaufman, P.B.; Lavin, J.G.

    1996-10-01

    Some activated carbons and carbon blacks are known to be good catalysts for a variety of liquid phase reactions such as selective carbon-carbon cleavage and dehalogenation of halogenated hydrocarbons. We will present data on the catalytic activity of well characterized, relatively simple forms of carbons such as diamonds and diamond-graphite composites. Both industrial and natural diamonds have been used. TEM provided detailed information on the nature of the carbons at the surface of the carbon materials used as catalysts. Clean surfaces of natural diamond particles are active catalysts in reactions such as debromination of 1-Br-naphthalene and 1-Br-adamantane.

  16. Radiation-Induced Transformation of Graphite to Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zaiser, M.; Banhart, F.

    1997-11-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that particle irradiation may lead to a destabilization of graphitic structures with respect to low-pressure growth of diamond. This is due to the large difference in the cross sections for irradiation-induced displacements of carbon atoms in diamond and graphite. A nonequilibrium phase diagram is calculated that shows the stability of graphite and diamond as a function of the displacement rate of atoms. The theoretical results are related to the experimentally observed transformation of spherical graphitic onions to diamond under electron irradiation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Alluvial diamond resource potential and production capacity assessment of Mali

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Barthelemy, Francis; Kone, Fatiaga

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members of the KPCS at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in "conflict diamonds" while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was (1) to assess the naturally occurring endowment of diamonds in Mali (potential resources) based on geological evidence, previous studies, and recent field data and (2) to assess the diamond-production capacity and measure the intensity of mining activity. Several possible methods can be used to estimate the potential diamond resource. However, because there is generally a lack of sufficient and consistent data recording all diamond mining in Mali and because time to conduct fieldwork and accessibility to the diamond mining areas are limited, four different methodologies were used: the cylindrical calculation of the primary kimberlitic deposits, the surface area methodology, the volume and grade approach, and the content per kilometer approach. Approximately 700,000 carats are estimated to be in the alluvial deposits of the Kenieba region, with 540,000 carats calculated to lie within the concentration grade deposits. Additionally, 580,000 carats are estimated to have

  18. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  19. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond coated on titanium for osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Pareta, Rajesh; Yang, Lei; Kothari, Abhishek; Sirinrath, Sirivisoot; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian W; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-10-01

    Diamond coatings with superior chemical stability, antiwear, and cytocompatibility properties have been considered for lengthening the lifetime of metallic orthopedic implants for over a decade. In this study, an attempt to tailor the surface properties of diamond films on titanium to promote osteoblast (bone forming cell) adhesion was reported. The surface properties investigated here included the size of diamond surface features, topography, wettability, and surface chemistry, all of which were controlled during microwave plasma enhanced chemical-vapor-deposition (MPCVD) processes using CH4-Ar-H2 gas mixtures. The hardness and elastic modulus of the diamond films were also determined. H2 concentration in the plasma was altered to control the crystallinity, grain size, and topography of the diamond coatings, and specific plasma gases (O2 and NH3) were introduced to change the surface chemistry of the diamond coatings. To understand the impact of the altered surface properties on osteoblast responses, cell adhesion tests were performed on the various diamond-coated titanium. The results revealed that nanocrystalline diamond (grain sizes <100 nm) coated titanium dramatically increased surface hardness, and the introduction of O2 and NH3 during the MPCVD process promoted osteoblast adhesion on diamond and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic applications. PMID:20540097

  20. Effect of Thermally Softened Bronze Matrix on the Fracturing Behavior of Diamond Particles in Hybrid Sprayed Bronze/Diamond Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntaek; Bae, Gyuyeol; Kang, Kicheol; Kim, Hyungjun; Kim, Jay-Jung; Lee, Changhee

    2010-09-01

    In our previous study (Na et al., Compos Sci Technol 69:463-468, 2009), optimized thickness of protective nickel film was proposed for smaller diamond feedstock to obtain reduced impact stress and uniform flight behavior of particles during kinetic (or cold) spraying. However, in this study, nickel-coated diamond particles were severely fractured with increasing particle size due to high kinetic energy. Hence, an innovative hybrid spraying technique (a combination of kinetic and thermal spraying) was introduced to embed relatively large diamond particles into the bronze matrix. Size distributions of the diamond particles in the composite coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro analyzer, and image analysis methods. In addition, impact behaviors of diamond particles in kinetic and hybrid gas flows were simulated through finite element analysis (ABAQUS/Explicit 6.7-2). Diamond fracturing was significantly minimized by the reduced impact energy afforded by the thermally softened bronze matrix through hybrid spraying.

  1. Plasma, photon, and beam synthesis of diamond films and multilayered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.P.H.

    1992-09-01

    In the area of nucleation, it was discovered that C{sub 70} thin films are perfect substitutes for diamond seeds in the growth of diamond films. This research, along with a careful study of diamond growth on carbon ion implanted single crystal copper, have clearly demonstrated that structured carbon is the best precursor for nucleation and growth of diamond films on non-diamond surfaces. In addition, by using fluorine chemistry during diamond growth, it has been shown that diamond films can grow on carbide substrates without the pretreatment of diamond seeding. The growth rates are higher and the film adhesion is much improved.

  2. Patterning of nanocrystalline diamond films for diamond microstructures useful in MEMS and other devices

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Busmann, Hans-Gerd; Meyer, Eva-Maria; Auciello, Orlando; Krauss, Alan R.; Krauss, Julie R.

    2004-11-02

    MEMS structure and a method of fabricating them from ultrananocrystalline diamond films having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm and feature resolution of less than about one micron . The MEMS structures are made by contacting carbon dimer species with an oxide substrate forming a carbide layer on the surface onto which ultrananocrystalline diamond having average grain sizes of less than about 10 nm is deposited. Thereafter, microfabrication process are used to form a structure of predetermined shape having a feature resolution of less than about one micron.

  3. Panel 2 - properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Clausing, R.E.; Ajayi, O.O.; Liu, Y.Y.; Purohit, A.; Bartelt, P.F.; Baughman, R.H.; Bhushan, B.; Cooper, C.V.; Dugger, M.T.; Freedman, A.; Larsen-Basse, J.; McGuire, N.R.; Messier, R.F.; Noble, G.L.; Ostrowki, M.H.; Sartwell, B.D.; Wei, R.

    1993-01-01

    This panel attempted to identify and prioritize research and development needs in determining the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond and diamond-like-carbon films (D/DLCF). Three specific goals were established. They were: (1) To identify problem areas which produce concern and require a better knowledge of D/DLCF properties. (2) To identify and prioritize key properties of D/DLCF to promote transportation applications. (3) To identify needs for improvement in properties-measurement methods. Each of these goals is addressed subsequently.

  4. Diamond nanoelectromechanical resonators: Dissipation and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) have become a viable commercial technology and are becoming more and more prevalent in research applications. Through miniaturization, the mechanical response to external sources becomes ever more sensitive. This transduction, coupled to an electrical readout circuit, results in unprecedented sensitivity. This thesis examines dissipation in diamond NEMS resonators in the MHz to GHz range. NCD (Nano-crystalline diamond) has extraordinary properties that make it an intriguing material to study. To begin with, the mechanical hardness allows for a boost in resonance frequency, but beyond that, boron-doped diamond also shows extraordinary electrical behavior. Although scaling benefits speed and sensitivity, dissipation increases dramatically with miniaturization, negating some of the gains in sensitivity. The dissipative mechanisms at play in the MHz range are identified at high temperatures. It is found that extrinsic dissipation mechanisms, mainly circuit and clamping losses, can limit the quality factor (inverse of the dissipation). Furthermore, due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of NEMS, surface defects become significant at the nano-scale. For the first time, quantum dissipation due to assisted phonon tunneling of two level systems is observed in diamond NEMS resonators at millikelvin temperatures. Through scaling, it is shown that the low temperature behavior is universal for a broad range of MHz resonators, including silicon and gallium arsenide, as well as graphene and carbon-nanotubes. Beyond the mechanical response, the superconducting properties of highly boron-doped diamond (BDD) are studied. It is found that the critical temperature of 3.3 K for the thin-film is maintained at the nano-scale. The high critical field, on the order of 3 T for thin-films, is strongly suppressed, already at the micro-scale. The zero resistance state is compromised with fields as low as 0.1 T for submicron wide constrictions. It is known

  5. Nitrogen isotope systematics and origins of mixed-habit diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Stern, R. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Southworth, R.; Mikhail, S.; Stachel, T.

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen isotope values from mantle diamonds are a commonly used tracer in the quest to track volatiles within the Earth's mantle through deep time. Interpretations of this isotope data are valid so long as stable isotope fractionation processes in the mantle are understood. The fractionation of nitrogen isotopes between {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} growth sectors is well documented for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamonds, but there is little data on whether it also occurs in natural mixed-habit diamonds. We present 91 in-situ nitrogen isotope (δ15N) measurements, along with carbon isotope (δ13C) values and nitrogen abundances [N], obtained from three mixed-habit diamonds by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). While the well-documented enrichment of nitrogen concentrations in octahedral sectors compared to contemporaneous cuboid sectors is observed, a similarly clear disparity is not obvious in the δ15N data. Whereas HPHT synthetic diamonds exhibit 15N enrichment in the {1 0 0} sectors by ∼+30‰, the mixed-habit diamonds studied here show enrichment of the octahedral sectors in 15N by only 0.4-1‰. This major difference between HPHT synthetic and natural mixed-habit diamonds is proposed to be the result of different physical properties of the growth interfaces. The smooth interfaces of the octahedral sectors are the same in both types of crystal, but the outermost atoms on the smooth cube interfaces of an HPHT synthetic diamond behave differently to those on the rough cuboid interfaces of the natural mixed-habit diamonds, resulting in different δ15N values. Both the δ13C (average of ∼-8.7‰) and δ15N (average of ∼0‰) data show only minor offsets from the typical mantle values (δ13C = -5 ± 3‰, δ15N = -5 ± 4‰). This may indicate diamond formation from a mantle derived fluid/melt containing a minor subducted component (lowering δ13C values and elevating δ15N) or relate to moderate degrees of isotopic fractionation of a pure

  6. Diamonds from the V. Grib pipe, Arkhangelsk kimberlite province, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubanova, E. V.; Palazhchenko, O. V.; Garanin, V. K.

    2009-11-01

    A large collection (717 samples) of diamonds from the V. Grib deposit, discovered in 1996 in the Verhotinskoe field of the Arkhangelsk kimberlite province, was studied. The diamond crystals are characterized by high transparency and preservation. The collection consists of complete crystals (71%), chipped and damaged crystals (preservation > 50%; 14%), and fragments (preservation < 50%; 15%). Resorption is generally moderate resulting in a dominance of octahedral and mixed octahedral-dodecahedral shapes. Moderate resorption points to rapid ascent of the transporting kimberlite magma. A characteristic feature of V. Grib is a large number of green diamonds. This may relate to the close proximity of radioactive deposits. Microscopic green surface spots have no cathodoluminescence. The internal diamond morphology was studied by UV- and cathodoluminescence. The main typomorphic feature of diamond crystals from the V. Grib pipe is a high percentage of crystals without UV-luminescence. Presence of sectorial growth was also identified by luminescence. Analysis of mineral inclusions, carbon isotopic composition, nitrogen content and nitrogen aggregation state provided important genetic information. Peridotitic inclusions (olivine, chromian spinel and pyrope) predominate, sulfides are almost completely absent. The carbon isotopic composition of the host diamonds is typical for peridotitic diamonds worldwide. IR-spectroscopy suggests the presence of two diamond populations with low and high nitrogen concentrations. Three sub-populations may be identified based on a combination of morphology, nitrogen and hydrogen defects. Residence temperatures ( TNitrogen), based on a mantle residence time of 3 Ga, fall between 1050 and 1170 °C. Diamond crystallization in V. Grib occurred in multiple stages. This is documented through luminescence patterns, data on nitrogen concentration and aggregation state, and the presence of "diamond-in-diamond" inclusions.

  7. Measurement of barrier height of Pd on diamond (100) surface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F. N.; Liu, J. W.; Zhang, J. W.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, W.; Liu, Z. C.; Wang, H. X.

    2016-05-01

    Barrier height (ФBH) values for Pd/hydrogen-terminated diamond (H-diamond) and Pd/oxygen-terminated diamond (O-diamond) have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. H-diamond and O-diamond have been formed on the same diamond (100) layer grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition,on which Pd layers have been evaporated. The ФBH values for Pd/H-diamond and Pd/O-diamond are determined to be -0.27 eV and 1.73 eV, respectively. It indicates that Pd is a suitable metal for ohmic and Schottky contacts on H-diamond and O-diamond, respectively. The experimental ΦBH values are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation results.

  8. Cathodoluminescence of diamond as an indicator of its metamorphic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Longo, Micaela; Ryder, John; Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa

    2010-05-01

    Diamond displays a supreme resistance to chemical and mechanical weathering, ensuring its survival through complex and prolonged crustal processes, including metamorphism and exhumation. For these reasons, volcanic sources and secondary and tertiary collectors for detrital placer diamonds, like Ural or Bingara diamonds, may be difficult to determine. If metamorphic processes leave their marks on diamond, they can be used to reconstruct crustal geologic processes and ages of primary diamondiferous volcanics. Four diamond suites extracted from metamorphic rocks have been characterized using optical CL, infrared and CL spectroscopy, and photoluminescence at the liquid nitrogen temperature. The studied diamonds are from the ~2.7 Ga sedimentary conglomerate and lamprophyric breccia metamorphosed in the greenschist facies (Wawa, Northern Ontario, Canada) during the 2.67 Ga Kenoran orogeny, and from the ultra-high pressure (UHP) terranes of Kokchetav (Kazakhstan) and Erzgebirge (Germany) exhumated in the Paleozoic. Wawa diamonds (Type IaAB and Type II) displayed green, yellow, orange, and red CL colours controlled by the CL emittance at 520, 576 nm, and between 586 and 664 nm. The UHP terranes diamonds show much weaker CL; few luminescent stones display CL peaks at 395, 498, 528 nm and a broad band at 580-668 nm. In contrast, most common diamonds found in unmetamorphosed rocks, i.e. octahedrally grown Type IaAB stones, luminescence blue emitting light at ~415-440 nm and 480-490 nm. There is a noticeable difference between cathodoluminescence of these diamonds and diamonds in metamorphic rocks. The studied diamonds that experienced metamorphism show a shift of CL emission to longer wavelengths (above 520 nm) and to green, yellow and red CL colours. Photoluminescence has the high resolution necessary to assign luminescence to specific optical centers of diamond. Diamonds in metamorphic rocks contain H3 (pairs of substitutional nitrogen atoms separated by a vacancy) and NVo

  9. Diamond nanowires and the insulator-metal transition in ultrananocrystalline diamond films.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, R.; Bruno, P.; Miller, D. J.; Bleuel, M.; Lai, J.; Gruen, D. M.

    2007-05-01

    Further progress in the development of the remarkable electrochemical, electron field emission, high-temperature diode, and optical properties of n-type ultrananocrystalline diamond films requires a better understanding of electron transport in this material. Of particular interest is the origin of the transition to the metallic regime observed when about 10% by volume of nitrogen has been added to the synthesis gas. Here, we present data showing that the transition to the metallic state is due to the formation of partially oriented diamond nanowires surrounded by an sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon sheath. These have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy techniques (high-resolution mode, selected area electron diffraction, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle neutron scattering. The nanowires are 80-100 nm in length and consist of {approx}5 nm wide and 6-10 nm long segments of diamond crystallites exhibiting atomically sharp interfaces. Each nanowire is enveloped in a sheath of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon that provides the conductive path for electrons. Raman spectroscopy on the films coupled with a consideration of plasma chemical and physical processes reveals that the sheath is likely composed of a nanocarbon material resembling in some respects a polymer-like mixture of polyacetylene and polynitrile. The complex interactions governing the simultaneous growth of the diamond core and the sp{sup 2} sheath responsible for electrical conductivity are discussed as are attempts at a better theoretical understanding of the transport mechanism.

  10. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  11. Infrared Absorption Investigations Confirm the Extraterrestrial Origin of Carbonado Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Garai,J.; Haggerty, S.; Rekhi, S.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    The first complete infrared FTIR absorption spectra for carbonado-diamond confirm the interstellar origin for the most enigmatic diamonds known as carbonado. All previous attempts failed to measure the absorption of carbonado-diamond in the most important IR-range of 1000-1300 cm{sup -1} (10.00-7.69 {mu}m) because of silica inclusions. In our investigation, KBr pellets were made from crushed silica-free carbonado-diamond and thin sections were also prepared. The 100 to 1000 times brighter synchrotron infrared radiation permits a greater spatial resolution. Inclusions and pore spaces were avoided and/or sources of chemical contamination were removed. The FTIR spectra of carbonado-diamond mostly depict the presence of single nitrogen impurities, and hydrogen. The lack of identifiable nitrogen aggregates in the infrared spectra, the presence of features related to hydrocarbon stretch bonds, and the resemblance of the spectra to CVD and presolar diamonds indicate that carbonado-diamonds formed in a hydrogen-rich interstellar environment. This is consistent with carbonado-diamond being sintered and porous, with extremely reduced metals, metal alloys, carbides and nitrides, light carbon isotopes, surfaces with glassy melt-like patinas, deformation lamellae, and a complete absence of primary, terrestrial mineral inclusions. The 2.6-3.8 billion year old fragmented body was of asteroidal proportions.

  12. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  13. Registration of 3-D holograms of diamond crystals (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. N.; Smirnova, S. N.

    1991-02-01

    Registration of 3D ho1orarns broadens the possibility of using single-crystal tool for imagining and investigating inner inhomogeneities and dynamic stresses in top area of gem diamond, study of which by other techniques,e.g. polarization optics, is difficult or impossible. The difficulty is that the diamond with significant refractive index of 2.42 has comparatively small angle of total internal reflection of 24°50. As a result, with random illumination of the tops of octahedron diamond crystals, both smooth- faceted and with polycentric facets, illuminating light is successively reflected from different farets and absorbed in the crystal or comes out of it in a spot and direction that are difficult to calculate. Optimal schemes of illuminating crystals for recording 3D holograms of smooth faceted octahedron diamonds are given. Analysis of illumination of the crystal with polycentric facets shows that correction of light in the diamond is determined by directivity diagram the width of which depends in inhomogeneity size of the diamond. 3D holograms of diamonds with different reflectivity were produced. For the first time the possibility is shown for registration of holograms for studying stresses in diamond top using single-crystal tool.

  14. Enhancing the mechanical properties of single-crystal CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qi; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Meng, Yufei; Lai, Joseph; Krasnicki, Szczesny; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2009-09-01

    Approaches for enhancing the strength and toughness of single-crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high growth rates are described. CVD processes used to grow single-crystal diamond in high density plasmas were modified to incorporate boron and nitrogen. Semi-quantitative studies of mechanical properties were carried out using Vickers indentation techniques. The introduction of boron in single-crystal CVD diamond can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of this material without sacrificing its high hardness (∼78 GPa). Growth conditions were varied to investigate its effect on boron incorporation and optical properties by means of photoluminescence, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Boron can be readily incorporated into single-crystal diamond by the methods used, but with nitrogen addition, the incorporation of boron was hindered. The spectroscopic measurements indicate that nitrogen and boron coexist in the diamond structure, which helps explain the origin of the enhanced fracture toughness of this material. Further, low pressure/high temperature annealing can enhance the intrinsic hardness of single-crystal CVD diamond by a factor of two without appreciable loss in fracture toughness. This doping and post-growth treatment of diamond may lead to new technological applications that require enhanced mechanical properties of diamond. PMID:21832321

  15. 10. DIAMOND MINE YARD FROM THE NORTH SHOWING A COMPRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DIAMOND MINE YARD FROM THE NORTH SHOWING A COMPRESSED AIR PIPE AND TRESTLE IN THE LOWER LEFT, AND THE LORRY HOUSE. A PART OF A RETAINING WALL IS VISIBLE ABOVE THE RAILROAD CUT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  16. Electrically conductive polycrystalline diamond and particulate metal based electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg M.; Wang, Jian

    2005-04-26

    An electrically conducting and dimensionally stable diamond (12, 14) and metal particle (13) electrode produced by electrodepositing the metal on the diamond is described. The electrode is particularly useful in harsh chemical environments and at high current densities and potentials. The electrode is particularly useful for generating hydrogen, and for reducing oxygen and oxidizing methanol in reactions which are of importance in fuel cells.

  17. GENERAL VIEW, DIAMOND STREET LOOKING EAST FROM A POINT JUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW, DIAMOND STREET LOOKING EAST FROM A POINT JUST WEST OF ITS INTERSECTION WITH NATRONA STREET. THE HOUSES AND STOREFRONT DOCUMENTED IN THIS RECORD ARE ON THE LEFT OF THIS VIEW. - 3200 Block Diamond Street (Houses & Storefront), North side, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. 2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ENGINE ROOM AND CHIPPY ENGINE ROOM OF THE DIAMOND MINE, LOOKING NORTH. THE MAIN HOIST USED A FLAT CABLE, WHICH WAS SCRAPPED IN THE 1950s. THE ORIGINAL DIXON CABLE STILL EXISTS IN THE CHIPPY HOIST HOUSE. - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  19. 19. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND HEADFRAME LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE DIAMOND HEADFRAME LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE TOP OF BUTTE HILL. THE DRIES ARE ON THE LEFT, WITH THE TAR HOUSE, TOILET, AND ROPE CLAMP CLEANING TO THE RIGHT - Butte Mineyards, Diamond Mine, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  20. First result on biased CMOS MAPs-on-diamond devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanxheri, K.; Citroni, M.; Fanetti, S.; Lagomarsino, S.; Morozzi, A.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Sciortino, S.; Servoli, L.

    2015-10-01

    Recently a new type of device, the MAPS-on-diamond, obtained bonding a thinned to 25 μm CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor to a standard 500 μm pCVD diamond substrate, has been proposed and fabricated, allowing a highly segmented readout (10×10 μm pixel size) of the signal produced in the diamond substrate. The bonding between the two materials has been obtained using a new laser technique to deliver the needed energy at the interface. A biasing scheme has been adopted to polarize the diamond substrate to allow the charge transport inside the diamond without disrupting the functionalities of the CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor. The main concept of this class of devices is the capability of the charges generated in the diamond by ionizing radiation to cross the silicon-diamond interface and to be collected by the MAPS photodiodes. In this work we demonstrate that such passage occurs and measure its overall efficiency. This study has been carried out first calibrating the CMOS MAPS with monochromatic X-rays, and then testing the device with charged particles (electrons) either with and without biasing the diamond substrate, to compare the amount of signal collected.

  1. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  2. Three generations of diamonds from old continental mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, S. H.; Harris, J. W.; Gurney, J. J.

    1993-11-01

    INCLUSION-BEARING diamonds erupted by kimberlites are time capsules from the sub-continental mantle. Diamonds with peridotitic mineral inclusions ('peridotitic diamonds') from Cretaceous kimberlites in southern Africa have resided in stable mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton since the Archaean1. Diamonds with eclogitic inclusions ('eclogitic diamonds') reflect episodic mantle events during the Proterozoic2-3. Here we discuss and present isotope data for a further category of diamonds from the Proterozoic Premier kimberlite, in which peridotitic inclusion minerals have compositions reflecting an origin in both harzburgitic (clinopyroxene-free) and Iherzolitic (clinopyroxene-bearing) assemblages. The harzburgitic garnet inclusions and their counterparts found as isolated minerals ('macrocrysts') in the kimberlite host rock4 have neodym-ium and strontium isotope signatures consistent with an Archaean age (>3,000 Myr) and metasomatized mantle source. Lherzolitic garnet and clinopyroxene inclusions yield a preferred Sm-Nd isochron age of 1,930 Myr, which is ~100 Myr less than that of the adjacent Bushveld Complex5, suggesting a link analogous to that between harzburgitic diamond formation and komatiitic magma tism in the Archaean1. The final generation of diamonds, those with eclogitic inclusions, were formed ~1,150 Myr ago, just before kimberlite emplacement6.

  3. Fabrication of diamond based sensors for use in extreme environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-04-23

    Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This methodmore » can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. Here, we demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.« less

  4. Fabrication of diamond based sensors for use in extreme environments

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-04-23

    Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This method can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. Here, we demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.

  5. Diamonds in the Rough: Identifying and Serving Low Income Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donna Y.; Grantham, Tarek C.; Frazier-Trotman, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Children who live in poverty are frequently at risk for underachievement. This is not to say that poverty automatically causes lack of achievement, but being poor can certainly take its toll. Gifted low income students can be compared to diamonds, which can only be formed under conditions of extreme heat and pressure. Both diamonds and…

  6. Diamond-coated cutting tools for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. J.; Hyde, L. J.; Ahmed, W.; Sein, H.; Flaxman, R. P.

    2004-08-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high-hardness, low-friction coefficient; excellent wear resistance, and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented, tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years as a method to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC substrate, with an average grain size of 1 3 µm, were used in this study. To improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates, it is necessary to etch away the surface Co and prepare the surface for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD), with a modified vertical filament arrangement, has been used for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond-coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond-embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic teeth. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining biomedical materials such as those just described.

  7. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng; Xiong, Lun; Liu, Jing

    2015-09-07

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. High-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  8. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Xiong, Lun; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. High-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  9. 76 FR 48047 - Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft Industries Powered Sailplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Diamond Aircraft... directive (AD) for Diamond Aircraft Industries Model H-36 ``DIMONA'' powered sailplanes. This proposed...

  10. Impact Diamonds in the Craters of the Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurov, E. P.; Gurova, E. P.; Rakitskaya, R. B.

    1995-09-01

    The impact diamonds discovery and investigations in the rocks of the Popigay crater [1,2] stimulated the search of the carbon high pressure phases in the craters of the Ukrainian shield. Seven impact craters are located on the territory of the Ukrainian Shield and its North-Eastern slope. Impact diamonds were discovered in the rocks of the Ilyinets, Zapadnaya, Obolon craters and some other impact structures. The highest concentration of impact diamonds was determined in the Zapadnaya crater. The Zapadnaya impact crater, about 3 km in diameter, is located in the Western part of the Ukrainian shield. The target of the crater is presented by granites and gneisses of the Precambrian crystalline basement. The Zapadnaya crater is represented the intensively eroded astrobleme of a complex structure. The inner crater with the conelike central uplift preserves only at the recent erosional level [3,4]. The allochthonous rocks complex in the crater is presented by the suevites, breccia and impactites. The allochthonous breccia forms the lowermost layer in the crater. The suevites with the glass content from 10-15 to 40-50% compose the upper annular layer around the central uplift. The massive impactites form the dykelike veins in the brecciated rocks of the subcrater basement. The impact diamonds occur in suevites and massive impactites of the crater. The diamonds are represented with the tabular grains from tens of micron up to 0.4-0.5 mm in diameter. The colour of the diamond grains changes from colourless, white and yellowish to grey, dark grey and black. The diamonds are anisotropic, their birefringence is up to 0.015. The impact diamonds phase composition was investigated with X-ray methods. The diamond grains are represented by the submicroscopic aggregates of cubic and hexagonal phases. The cubic phase prevalents in all investigated diamonds; the hexagonal phase content in the diamonds from the Zapadnaya crater changes from 5-10 to 40-50%. The direct dependence of the

  11. Conditions of origin of natural diamonds of peridotite affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, F. R.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of mineral inclusions in natural diamonds and rare diamondiferous xenoliths from kimberlites show that most diamonds are associated with a dunite or harzburgite paragenesis. The diamondiferous periodites and dunites have predominantly coarse or tabular textures that suggest low-temperature (less than 1100 C) equilibration. Application of the K(D) Fe/Mg(Ga/Ol) geothermometer of O'Neill and Wood to analytical data for the minerals in these rocks shows that most have equilibrated below 1100 C. Application of this thermometer to pairs of olivine and garnet crystals included in individual diamonds indicates that the diamonds have crystallized in the range 900-1300 C, with a majority of estimated equilibration temperatures falling in the range below 1150 C. Comparison of these estimates of equilibration temperature with the zone of invariant vapor composition solidus for kimberlite and garnet lherzolite determined by Eggler and Wendlandt (1979) suggests that many diamonds may have formed in subsolidus events.

  12. Towards magnetic imaging of neurons using NV diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John; Turner, Matthew; Glenn, David; Song, Yuyu; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic field imaging based on optically detected magnetic resonances (ODMR) in NV diamond offers an unmatched combination of sensitivity, resolution and field-of-view. For certain biological applications NV diamond imaging is particularly useful; in contrast to traditional fluorescent markers, NV diamond imaging is label-free and does not suffer from bleaching. Additionally the solid-state nature of NV diamond imaging allows for various fast modulation techniques to be employed to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we present progress towards creating an NV diamond imager with sensitivity and resolution appropriate for imaging neural activity within a living neural network. When integrating over our detector, we demonstrate a DC magnetic field sensitivity of better than 50 pT/Hz1/2, which we demonstrate is suitable for detecting the action potentials in invertebrate giants axons.

  13. Secondary-electron emission from hydrogen-terminated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wang E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Dimitrov, D.A.; T. Xin, T.

    2012-05-20

    Diamond amplifiers demonstrably are an electron source with the potential to support high-brightness, high-average-current emission into a vacuum. We recently developed a reliable hydrogenation procedure for the diamond amplifier. The systematic study of hydrogenation resulted in the reproducible fabrication of high gain diamond amplifier. Furthermore, we measured the emission probability of diamond amplifier as a function of the external field and modelled the process with resulting changes in the vacuum level due to the Schottky effect. We demonstrated that the decrease in the secondary electrons average emission gain was a function of the pulse width and related this to the trapping of electrons by the effective NEA surface. The findings from the model agree well with our experimental measurements. As an application of the model, the energy spread of secondary electrons inside the diamond was estimated from the measured emission.

  14. Studies on synthesis of diamond at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailath, Ansu J.

    Diamond is an essential material of modern industry and probably the most versatile abrasive available today. It also has many other industrial applications attributable to its unique mechanical, optical, thermal and electrical properties. Its usage has grown to the extent that there is hardly a production process in modern industry in which industrial diamond does not play a part. Bulk diamond production today is a major industry. Diamonds can be produced in its thermodynamically stable regions either by direct static conversion, or shock-wave conversion. The pressures and temperatures required for direct static conversion are very high. In the catalyst-solvent method, the material used establishes a reaction path with lower activation energy than for direct transformation. This helps in a quicker transformation under more benign conditions. Hence, catalyst-solvent synthesis is readily accomplished and is now a viable and successful industrial process. Diamonds produced by shock wave are very small (approximately 60mu). Therefore this diamond is limited to applications such as polishing compounds only. The quality, quantity, size and morphology of the crystals synthesized by catalyst-solvent process depend on different conditions employed for synthesis. These details, because of commercial reasons are not disclosed in published literature. Hence, systematic studies have been planned to investigate the effect of various growth parameters on the synthesized crystals. During the growth of synthetic diamond crystals, some catalyst-solvent is retained into the crystals in some form and behaves like an impurity. Several physico-mechanical properties of the crystals are found to depend on the total quantity and distribution of these inclusions. Thus, detailed investigation of the crystallization medium and inclusions in synthesized diamonds was also undertaken in the present work. The work incorporated in this thesis has been divided into seven chapters. The first

  15. Method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures

    DOEpatents

    Parsells, Robert; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Perry, Erik; Rule, Keith

    2005-04-19

    A method and apparatus for diamond wire cutting of metal structures, such as nuclear reactor vessels, is provided. A diamond wire saw having a plurality of diamond beads with beveled or chamfered edges is provided for sawing into the walls of the metal structure. The diamond wire is guided by a plurality of support structures allowing for a multitude of different cuts. The diamond wire is cleaned and cooled by CO.sub.2 during the cutting process to prevent breakage of the wire and provide efficient cutting. Concrete can be provided within the metal structure to enhance cutting efficiency and reduce airborne contaminants. The invention can be remotely controlled to reduce exposure of workers to radioactivity and other hazards.

  16. Electroplated mounting of diamond anvils for use in cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, E.; Haselwimmer, R. K. W.

    2006-08-01

    The mounting of diamonds using the electroplated deposition of copper was originally developed to hold diamonds in place during polishing. This article describes the extension and application of this method for the mounting of diamonds inside diamond anvil cells. The novel method described, unlike more traditional gluing or clamping methods, can withstand both continual thermal cycling and provide a small profile such that it can be used in miniature cells to permit ample space for fitting electrical feed throughs or external coils around the anvils. The method is developed such that it can be used to attach the diamond to nonmetallic backing plates such as sapphire. Details of precautions to reduce the production of eddy currents in the deposited copper when performing ac-susceptibility measurements are also described.

  17. Thermal characterization of diamond films through modulated photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Thomas; Kusiak, Andrzej; Fan, Lisha; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Chandra, Namas; Zhou, Yunshen; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng; Battaglia, Jean-Luc

    2014-02-12

    Diamond (Dia) films are promising heat-dissipative materials for electronic packages because they combine high thermal conductivity with high electrical resistivity. However, precise knowledge of the thermal properties of the diamond films is crucial to their potential application as passive thermal management substrates in electronics. In this study, modulated photothermal radiometry in a front-face configuration was employed to thermally characterize polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto silicon (Si) substrates through laser-assisted combustion synthesis. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of diamond films and the thermal boundary resistance at the interface between the diamond film and the Si substrate were investigated. The results enlighten the correlation between the deposition process, film purity, film transverse thermal conductivity, and interface thermal resistance. PMID:24422442

  18. Nanofluidics of Single-Crystal Diamond Nanomechanical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Kara, V; Sohn, Y-I; Atikian, H; Yakhot, V; Lončar, M; Ekinci, K L

    2015-12-01

    Single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators are being developed for countless applications. A number of these applications require that the resonator be operated in a fluid, that is, a gas or a liquid. Here, we investigate the fluid dynamics of single-crystal diamond nanomechanical resonators in the form of nanocantilevers. First, we measure the pressure-dependent dissipation of diamond nanocantilevers with different linear dimensions and frequencies in three gases, He, N2, and Ar. We observe that a subtle interplay between the length scale and the frequency governs the scaling of the fluidic dissipation. Second, we obtain a comparison of the surface accommodation of different gases on the diamond surface by analyzing the dissipation in the molecular flow regime. Finally, we measure the thermal fluctuations of the nanocantilevers in water and compare the observed dissipation and frequency shifts with theoretical predictions. These findings set the stage for developing diamond nanomechanical resonators operable in fluids. PMID:26509332

  19. Nanostructuring of diamond films using self-assembled nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babchenko, Oleg; Kromka, Alexander; Hruska, Karel; Michalka, Miroslav; Potmesil, Jiri; Vanecek, Milan

    2009-06-01

    We report the use of gold, nickel and diamond nanoparticles as a masking material for realization of diamond nano-structures by applying the dry plasma etching process. Applying low power plasma (100 W) in a gas mixture of CF4/O2 for 5 minutes results in a formation of three different types of diamond nanostructures, depending on the mask type material and particle size. Using of the Ni mask results in realization of diamond nano-rods, applying of the Au mask brings cauliflower-like structures, and using the diamond powder allows the production of irregular nano-structures. The main advance of the presented etching procedure is use of a self-assembly strategy where no lithographic steps are implemented.

  20. Chemical vapour deposition synthetic diamond: materials, technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, R. S.; Brandon, J. R.; Clewes, S. L.; Dhillon, H. K.; Dodson, J. M.; Friel, I.; Inglis, P. N.; Madgwick, T. D.; Markham, M. L.; Mollart, T. P.; Perkins, N.; Scarsbrook, G. A.; Twitchen, D. J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Wilman, J. J.; Woollard, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Substantial developments have been achieved in the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond in recent years, providing engineers and designers with access to a large range of new diamond materials. CVD diamond has a number of outstanding material properties that can enable exceptional performance in applications as diverse as medical diagnostics, water treatment, radiation detection, high power electronics, consumer audio, magnetometry and novel lasers. Often the material is synthesized in planar form; however, non-planar geometries are also possible and enable a number of key applications. This paper reviews the material properties and characteristics of single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond, and how these can be utilized, focusing particularly on optics, electronics and electrochemistry. It also summarizes how CVD diamond can be tailored for specific applications, on the basis of the ability to synthesize a consistent and engineered high performance product.

  1. Chemical vapour deposition synthetic diamond: materials, technology and applications.

    PubMed

    Balmer, R S; Brandon, J R; Clewes, S L; Dhillon, H K; Dodson, J M; Friel, I; Inglis, P N; Madgwick, T D; Markham, M L; Mollart, T P; Perkins, N; Scarsbrook, G A; Twitchen, D J; Whitehead, A J; Wilman, J J; Woollard, S M

    2009-09-01

    Substantial developments have been achieved in the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond in recent years, providing engineers and designers with access to a large range of new diamond materials. CVD diamond has a number of outstanding material properties that can enable exceptional performance in applications as diverse as medical diagnostics, water treatment, radiation detection, high power electronics, consumer audio, magnetometry and novel lasers. Often the material is synthesized in planar form; however, non-planar geometries are also possible and enable a number of key applications. This paper reviews the material properties and characteristics of single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond, and how these can be utilized, focusing particularly on optics, electronics and electrochemistry. It also summarizes how CVD diamond can be tailored for specific applications, on the basis of the ability to synthesize a consistent and engineered high performance product. PMID:21832327

  2. The transformation of graphitic onions to diamond under electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Banhart, F.

    1997-04-01

    Diamond crystals nucleate in the centers of spherical concentric-shell graphitic particles where high pressure prevails under electron irradiation at specimen temperatures above 900 K. The diamond crystals grow under further irradiation until the graphitic particles have wholly transformed to diamond. Hence, the conversion of the graphitic structure to diamond starts at high pressure and proceeds at decreasing, possibly even at zero, pressure. The experiment is carried out in a transmission electron microscope which enables us to monitor this phase transformation {ital in situ} on an atomic scale. It is shown that the graphite/diamond system under electron irradiation is highly dissipative. This suggests that the phase transformation at low pressure occurs via self-organization under nonequilibrium conditions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Influence of diamond surface termination on thermal boundary conductance between Al and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Monachon, Christian; Weber, Ludger

    2013-05-14

    The effect of diamond surface treatment on the Thermal Boundary Conductance (TBC) between Al and diamond is investigated. The treatments consist in either of the following: exposition to a plasma of pure Ar, Ar:H and Ar:O, and HNO{sub 3}:H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} acid dip for various times. The surface of diamond after treatment is analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, revealing hydrogen termination for the as-received and Ar:H plasma treated samples, pure sp{sup 2} termination for Ar treated ones and oxygen (keton-like) termination for the other treatments. At ambient, all the specific treatments improve the TBC between Al and diamond from 23 {+-} 2 MW m{sup -2} K{sup -1} for the as-received to 65 {+-} 5, 125 {+-} 20, 150 {+-} 20, 180 {+-} 20 MW m{sup -2} K{sup -1} for the ones treated by Ar:H plasma, acid, pure Ar plasma, and Ar:O plasma with an evaporated Al layer on top, respectively. The effect of these treatments on temperature dependence are also observed and compared with the most common models available in the literature as well as experimental values in the same system. The results obtained show that the values measured for an Ar:O plasma treated diamond with Al sputtered on top stay consistently higher than the values existing in the literature over a temperature range from 78 to 290 K, probably due a lower sample surface roughness. Around ambient, the TBC values measured lay close to or even somewhat above the radiation limit, suggesting that inelastic or electronic processes may influence the transfer of heat at this metal/dielectric interface.

  4. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  5. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, R.P.

    1995-04-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

  6. Origins of Majoritic Inclusions in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseeva, K.; Wood, B. J.; Ghosh, S. K.; Stachel, T.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral inclusions in diamonds are the only available samples from the transition zone and the lower mantle. The dominant type of inclusions for the range of transition zone (410-660 km) pressures is majoritic garnet, a high-pressure Si-rich tetragonal garnet which crystallises when pyroxene breaks down and dissolves in the garnet structure. Two majoritic garnet endmembers: Na2MgSi5O12 and Mg4Si4O12 can be distinguished for eclogitic and peridotitic parageneses, respectively. In our recent study [1] we used these idealised substitutions to show that the majority of majoritic garnets reported in the literature belong to neither eclogitic nor peridotitic lithologies and rather crystallised from a wide range of intermediate compositions, referred to as pyroxenites [1]. Here we elaborate on the origin and composition of the pyroxenite lithology. According to Si geobarometry most majoritic garnet inclusions formed at mantle transition zone pressures, predominantly within the stability field of clinopyroxene + garnet. Using experimental partition coefficients for Na, Al, Mg and Fe between garnet and clinopyroxene, we have calculated the compositions of clinopyroxene in equilibrium with majoritic garnet, which allows us to estimate the locus of possible bulk rock compositions. These lie in the field of upper mantle pyroxenites as defined by Hirschmann and Stolper [2]. We also find that occasional clinopyroxene inclusions in diamond actually coexisting with majoritic garnet inclusions are all close in composition to those predicted by our study. Additionally, we show experimentally that the pyroxenite-diamond association is probably a consequence of the interaction between basaltic and peridotitic compositions in the presence of carbonate melt and that layering of pyroxenites is a natural consequence of this interaction. Reduction of carbonate to carbon at high pressures is responsible for the genetic connection between pyroxenite and diamond and the abundance of

  7. Nanofluids with plasma treated diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qingsong; Kim, Young Jo; Ma, Hongbin

    2008-03-01

    In this study, diamond nanoparticles were plasma treated by glow discharges of methane and oxygen with an aim of improving their dispersion characteristics in a base fluid of water and enhancing the thermal conductivity of the resulting nanofluids. It was found that, after plasma treatment, stable nanofluids with improved thermal conductivity were obtained without using any stabilizing agents. With <0.15vol% addition of plasma treated nanoparticles into water, a 20% increase in thermal conductivity was achieved and a 5%-10% increase in both fluid density and viscosity was observed.

  8. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  9. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  10. Nanofluids with plasma treated diamond nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Qingsong; Kim, Young Jo; Ma Hongbin

    2008-03-10

    In this study, diamond nanoparticles were plasma treated by glow discharges of methane and oxygen with an aim of improving their dispersion characteristics in a base fluid of water and enhancing the thermal conductivity of the resulting nanofluids. It was found that, after plasma treatment, stable nanofluids with improved thermal conductivity were obtained without using any stabilizing agents. With <0.15 vol % addition of plasma treated nanoparticles into water, a 20% increase in thermal conductivity was achieved and a 5%-10% increase in both fluid density and viscosity was observed.

  11. Photoinduced conductivity changes in polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.

    1996-02-01

    We report that the dark electrical properties of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films are modified after exposure to UV light. UV illumination gives rise to an increase in the dark conductivity and to a change in the I-V characteristic from Iα exp (aV) for the as-grown material to IαV2 following UV irradiation. Thermally stimulated currents corresponding to an activation energy of about 1.9 eV are observed after UV illumination. The effects of UV irradiation can be totally reversed by thermal annealing and partially reversed by exposing the samples to white light.

  12. Poole-Frenkel conduction in polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Boiko, Y.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.

    1996-04-01

    High-field electrical conduction has been studied in undoped polycrystalline diamond over a wide temperature range. The current increases exponentially with the electric field with an exponential factor which increases linearly with the inverse of temperature. The activation energy of the conductivity is found to be strongly field dependent and to decrease linearly with the electric field. The experimental data support a Poole-Frenkel conduction with overlapping centers. The centers are found to be located at around 1.1 eV from the band edge with a density of about 2×1017 cm-3.

  13. Alternative growth mechanisms in the natural diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gafitullina, D.S.; Ashurov, M.Kh.; Oksengendler, B.L.

    1995-12-31

    On the base of autoradiography method including digital treatment it was investigated the impurity distribution in natural diamonds. It was established the alternation of zonal and fibruilar distribution of several impurities. This phenomenon treatment may be realized on the base of combaing of Cahn-Routburd-Shklowskii growth theory with Prigogine` like synergetic idea. According to the type of crystallization mechanisms depends on relation between crystallization moviting force and value of combaine parameter, depending of boundary wide A lot of regimes of crystallization including the alternation of normal and tangential mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Hyperthermal oxidation of graphite and diamond.

    PubMed

    Paci, Jeffrey T; Minton, Timothy K; Schatz, George C

    2012-11-20

    Carbon materials have mechanical, electrical, optical, and tribological properties that make them attractive for use in a wide range of applications. Two properties that make them attractive, their hardness and inertness in many chemical environments, also make them difficult to process into useful forms. The use of atomic oxygen and other forms of oxidation has become a popular option for processing of these materials (etching, erosion, chemical functionalization, etc.). This Account provides an overview of the use of theory to describe the mechanisms of oxidation of diamond and graphite using hyperthermal (few electronvolts) oxygen atoms. The theoretical studies involve the use of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics calculations in which on-the-fly electronic structure calculations have been performed using either density functional theory or density-functional-tight-binding semiempirical methods to simulate collisions of atomic oxygen with diamond or graphite. Comparisons with molecular-beam scattering on surfaces provide indirect verification of the results. Graphite surfaces become oxidized when exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, and the calculations have revealed the mechanisms for formation of both CO and CO(2). These species arise when epoxide groups form and diffuse to holes on the surface where carbonyls are already present. CO and CO(2) form when these carbonyl groups dissociate from the surface, resulting in larger holes. We also discuss mechanisms for forming holes in graphite surfaces that were previously hole-free. For diamond, the (111) and (100) surfaces are oxidized by the oxygen atoms, forming mostly oxy radicals and ketones on the respective surfaces. The oxy-covered (111) surface can then react with hyperthermal oxygen to give gaseous CO(2), or it can become graphitized leading to carbon removal as with graphite. The (100) surface is largely unreactive to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, undergoing large amounts of inelastic scattering and

  15. Single point diamond crushing of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Clouser, R.W.; Thompson, S.L.

    1984-05-23

    Single point diamond crushing of glass was originally developed by Dr. R.E. Reason of Taylor and Hobson in England 34 years ago as a means of shaping glass aspheres prior to polishing. It has recently been tried at LLNL. A surface finish of 50 microinches peak-to-valley with occasional deeper pits has been achieved on Zerodur and BK-7 glass. A depth of cut of 0.008 inch or more can be taken at a surface speed of 900 feet per minute. Tool wear is on the order of 10 microinches after removal of one cubic inch of Zerodur. The tool's cost is $5.45 each.

  16. Buckled diamond-like carbon nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Matti; Isacsson, Andreas; Oksanen, Mika; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2015-09-21

    We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp(2)-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators. PMID:26284626

  17. Manufacturing of diamond windows for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schildkamp, W.; Nikitina, L.

    2012-09-15

    A new diamond window construction is presented and explicit manufacturing details are given. This window will increase the power dissipation by about a factor of 4 over present day state of the art windows to absorb 600 W of power. This power will be generated by in-vacuum undulators with the storage ring ALBA operating at a design current of 400 mA. Extensive finite element (FE) calculations are included to predict the windows behavior accompanied by explanations for the chosen boundary conditions. A simple linear model was used to cross-check the FE calculations.

  18. Fiber-integrated diamond-based magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodi; Cui, Jinming; Sun, Fangwen; Song, Xuerui; Feng, Fupan; Wang, Junfeng; Zhu, Wei; Lou, Liren; Wang, Guanzhong

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated a fiber-integrated diamond-based magnetometer in this paper. In the system, the fluorescence of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds deposited on a tapered fiber was coupled to the tapered fiber effectively and detected at the output end of the fiber. By using this scheme, optically detected electron spin resonance spectra were recorded for single NV centers. The results confirmed that such a tapered fiber-nanodiamond system can act as a magnetometer. Featured with excellent portability, convenient fabrication, and potential for further integration, the constructed system has been demonstrated to be a practical magnetometer prototype.

  19. Psychogenic Purpura (Gardner-Diamond Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura, also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome or autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, is a rare condition characterized by spontaneous development of painful edematous skin lesions progressing to ecchymosis over the next 24 hours. Severe stress and emotional trauma always precede the skin lesions. The condition is most commonly seen in women, but isolated cases have been reported in adolescents and in males. Psychodermatologic evaluation and dermatology and psychiatry liaison have been successful in the treatment of these patients. This report provides an overview of psychogenic purpura and presents the case of a 15-year-old girl. PMID:26137346

  20. Stable metallization for diamond and other materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachli, Andreas (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc-Aurele (Inventor); Vandersande, Jan W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An adherent and metallurgically stable metallization system for diamond is presented. The big improvement in metallurgical stability is attributed to the use of a ternary, amorphous Ti--Si--N diffusion barrier. No diffusion between the layers and no delamination of the metallization was observed after annealing the schemes at 400.degree. C. for 100 hours and at 900.degree. C. for 30 minutes. Thermal cycling experiments in air from -65 to 155.degree. C. and adhesion tests were performed. Various embodiments are disclosed.