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Sample records for a-570-929 small diameter

  1. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  2. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  3. The truth about small-diameter implants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-05-01

    SDIs that are treatment planned correctly, placed and loaded properly, and are within a well-adjusted occlusion, are working in an excellent manner for the patients described in this article. It is time for those practitioners unfamiliar with SDIs and their uses to discontinue their discouragement of this technique. SDIs are easily placed, minimally invasive, and a true service to those patients described. They do not replace conventional diameter implants; however, they are a significant and important augmentation to the original root-form implant concept. There is obvious evidence of the growing acceptance of small-diameter implants by both general practitioners and specialists.

  4. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90.degree. to minimize optical distortion in examining the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable of examining 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4 inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and right angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  5. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Petrini, R.R.; Carter, G.W.

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores is described. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90/sup 0/ to minimize optical distortion in examing the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable if examing 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4-inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and righ angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  6. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    A. Poerschke and A. Rudd

    2016-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.

  7. Small diameter symmetric networks from linear groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Lowell; Carlsson, Gunnar E.; Dinneen, Michael J.; Faber, Vance; Fellows, Michael R.; Langston, Michael A.; Moore, James W.; Multihaupt, Andrew P.; Sexton, Harlan B.

    1992-01-01

    In this note is reported a collection of constructions of symmetric networks that provide the largest known values for the number of nodes that can be placed in a network of a given degree and diameter. Some of the constructions are in the range of current potential engineering significance. The constructions are Cayley graphs of linear groups obtained by experimental computation.

  8. Fire protection covering for small diameter missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Sawko, P. M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Flexible intumescent protection sheeting of unusually uniform thickness were prepared from epoxy-polysulfide compositions, containing microfibers and the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid, as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,663,464, except that an ammonium salt particle size in the order of 5 to 8 microns and a fiber size of about 1/128th inch in length and 3 to 5 microns in diameter were found critical to obtain the required density of 1.46 to 1.50 g/cc. The insulation sheeting was prepared by a continuous process involving vacuum mixing, calendering, and curing under very strict conditions which depend to some extent upon the thickness of the sheet produced.

  9. Extrusion of small-diameter, thin-wall tungsten tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, C. P.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Small-diameter, thin-wall seamless tubing of tungsten has been fabricated in lengths of up to 10 feet by hot extrusion over a floating mandrel. Extrusion of 0.50-inch-diameter tubing over 0.4-inch-diameter mandrels was accomplished at temperatures ranging from 3000 degrees to 4000 degrees F.

  10. SMALL DIAMETER PRECEMENT LINING FROM CATWALK ABOVE. United States ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER PRE-CEMENT LINING FROM CATWALK ABOVE. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. SMALL DIAMETER CEMENT LINING FROM STAIRWAY. United States Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER CEMENT LINING FROM STAIRWAY. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. SMALL DIAMETER STENCILING, ROLLING OVER STAMP. United States Pipe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SMALL DIAMETER STENCILING, ROLLING OVER STAMP. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Coating, Painting, Lining & Packaging Building, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  13. Reconstruction of small diameter arteries using decellularized vascular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Yuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kishida, Akio; Fujisato, Toshia; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2014-03-19

    Although artificial vessels are available for large diameter arteries, there are no artificial vessels for small diameter arteries of < 4 mm. We created a decellularized vascular scaffold (length, 10 mm; outer diameter, 1.5 mm; inner diameter, 1.3 mm) from rat abdominal arteries. We measured the biomechanical characteristics of the scaffolds, implanted them to defects made in rat carotid arteries, and evaluated their patency and the endothelial cell linings. Silastic grafts were implanted as controls. The decellularized scaffolds demonstrated similar mechanical characteristics to normal arteries. All of the control grafts were occluded. Fibroblast-like cells were discovered in the thrombus, and fibrous organization was apparent. In contrast, patency of the grafts in 10 of 12 animals was observed 4 weeks after implantation. The internal cavity of the patent scaffold was completely lined by endotheliallike cells. Thus, the possibility of small artery reconstruction using decellularized scaffolds was demonstrated.

  14. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  15. Downhole pumps for water sampling in small diameter wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopman, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The relatively high cost and difficulty in locating a source of pumps for use in obtaining ground-water samples from small-diameter wells has demonstrated a need for this report. Criteria for selection of a pump and pumping equipment to meet specific requirements has been tabulated to assist field personnel in making a selection from commercial sources. (Kosco-USGS)

  16. Hardfacing takes the inside track in coating small diameter pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    A Canadian company has adapted a standard hardfacing method to solve the problem of coating smaller pipe sizes. Small diameter piping and valves are hardfaced using a custom-designed plasma transferred arc (PTA) system. With an arrangement of automatically controlled mechanical arms, the firm is able to operate a PTA torch inside piping 6 to 12 inches in diameter and as long as 13 feet. Recently, the company improved the system so it can automatically hardface elbows up to 24 in. as well as straight runs of pipe.

  17. Directional Solidification and Convection in Small Diameter Crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Sung, P. K.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.; DeGroh, H. C., III

    2003-01-01

    Pb-2.2 wt% Sb alloy was directionally solidified in 1, 2, 3 and 7 mm diameter crucibles. Pb-Sb alloy presents a solutally unstable case. Under plane-front conditions, the resulting macrosegregation along the solidified length indicates that convection persists even in the 1 mm diameter crucible. Al-2 wt% Cu alloy was directionally solidified because this alloy was expected to be stable with respect to convection. Nevertheless, the resulting macrosegregation pattern and the microstructure in solidified examples indicated the presence of convection. Simulations performed for both alloys show that convection persists for crucibles as small as 0.6 mm of diameter. For the solutally stable alloy, Al-2 wt% Cu, the simulations indicate that the convection arises from a lateral temperature gradient.

  18. Experimental study on strain sensing by small-diameter FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong-mei; Li, Qiufeng; Zhu, Lujia; Liang, Dakai

    2016-11-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were attractive in various fields for structural health monitoring. Because of their accurate performance and real time response, embedded FBG sensors are promising for strain monitoring in composite materials. As an optical fiber sensor was embedded inside a composite, interface would form around the embedded optical fiber and the host polymer composite. In order to study the influence of the embedded optical fiber to the mechanical character, finite elemental analysis was applied to study the stress distribution inside the composite. Keeping the resin rich area the same size, laminates with optical fibers in different diameters, which were 250 and 125 micrometers, were analyzed. The simulation results represent that stress singularity would occur around the embedded optical fiber. The singularity value for the laminate with optical fiber at 250 micrometer was higher than that with optical fiber at 125 micrometer. Micro- cracks would arise at the stress singularity point. Therefore, the optical fiber in smaller diameter was preferred since the mechanical strength could be higher. Four points bending test was carried out on a steel beam with a small-diameter FBG on the bottom surface. Besides, a strain gauge was stuck on bottom to validate the monitoring results by FBG sensor. The tested results indicated that the strain monitoring results by the small-diameter FBG sensor almost identical with the theoretical ones and what recorded by strain gauge. The maximum testing error for the designed FBG is less than 2% compared with the theoretical one.

  19. Nanofiber alignment of a small diameter elastic electrospun scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Jignesh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in western countries with coronary heart disease making up 50% of these deaths. As a treatment option, tissue engineered grafts have great potential. Elastic scaffolds that mimic arterial extracellular matrix (ECM) may hold the key to creating viable vascular grafts. Electrospinning is a widely used scaffold fabrication technique to engineer tubular scaffolds. In this study, we investigated how the collector rotation speed altered the nanofiber alignment which may improve mechanical characteristics making the scaffold more suitable for arterial grafts. The scaffold was fabricated from a blend of PCL/Elastin. 2D Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) image processing tool and MatLab were used to quantitatively analyze nanofiber orientation at different collector speeds (13500 to 15500 rpm). Both Image J and MatLab showed graphical peaks indicating predominant fiber orientation angles. A collector speed of 15000 rpm was found to produce the best nanofiber alignment with narrow peaks at 90 and 270 degrees, and a relative amplitude of 200. This indicates a narrow distribution of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. Collector speeds below and above 15000 rpm caused a decrease in fiber alignment with a broader orientation distribution. Uniformity of fiber diameter was also measured. Of 600 measures from the 15000 rpm scaffolds, the fiber diameter range from 500 nm to 899 nm was most prevalent. This diameter range was slightly larger than native ECM which ranges from 50 nm to 500 nm. The second most prevalent diameter range had an average of 404 nm which is within the diameter range of collagen. This study concluded that with proper electrospinning technique and collector speed, it is possible to fabricate highly aligned small diameter elastic scaffolds. Image J 2D FFT results confirmed MatLab findings for the analyses of circumferentially aligned nanofibers. In addition, MatLab analyses simplified the FFT orientation data

  20. Ultra-small diameter coils for treatment of intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Timothy; Beaty, Narlin; Puri, Ajit; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    This study reports our initial clinical experience treating very small intracranial aneurysms using only Target® Nano™ coils. Retrospective angiographic and clinical analysis was performed on a non-randomized single arm registry of all intracranial aneurysms treated with only Target® Nano™ coils (1 mm and 1.5 mm diameter only) during a 12 month period at two academic hospitals. Fourteen patients with 14 intracranial aneurysms were treated. The maximum diameter of saccular aneurysms treated ranged from 1.5 to 3.5 mm; minimum aneurysm diameter was 1.1 to 2 mm. The immediate complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 86% (12/14), and a small residual within the aneurysm was seen in 14% (2/14) of cases. Packing density from coils ranged between 24% and 83% (mean 51%). The immediate complication rate was 0% (0/14). The angiographic/MR angiography follow-up period was 22 to 70 weeks (mean 37 weeks) with an overall complete occlusion rate of 9/11 (81%), recurrence in 18% (2/11), and lack of follow-up in three cases, two due to death during hospitalization and one procedure not yet due for imaging follow-up. Both patients who died presented with brain aneurysm ruptures prior to treatment. Both recurrences were retreated with repeat coiling procedures. Our initial results using only Target® Nano™ coils for the endovascular treatment of very small intracranial aneurysms have demonstrated initial good safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:25934775

  1. Ultrasonic wave based pressure measurement in small diameter pipeline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Song, Zhengxiang; Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    An effective non-intrusive method of ultrasound-based technique that allows monitoring liquid pressure in small diameter pipeline (less than 10mm) is presented in this paper. Ultrasonic wave could penetrate medium, through the acquisition of representative information from the echoes, properties of medium can be reflected. This pressure measurement is difficult due to that echoes' information is not easy to obtain in small diameter pipeline. The proposed method is a study on pipeline with Kneser liquid and is based on the principle that the transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid correlates with liquid pressure and transmission speed of ultrasonic wave in pipeline liquid is reflected through ultrasonic propagation time providing that acoustic distance is fixed. Therefore, variation of ultrasonic propagation time can reflect variation of pressure in pipeline. Ultrasonic propagation time is obtained by electric processing approach and is accurately measured to nanosecond through high resolution time measurement module. We used ultrasonic propagation time difference to reflect actual pressure in this paper to reduce the environmental influences. The corresponding pressure values are finally obtained by acquiring the relationship between variation of ultrasonic propagation time difference and pressure with the use of neural network analysis method, the results show that this method is accurate and can be used in practice.

  2. Laser microwelding of small diameter wire to a contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, M.A.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    This work is an attempt to evaluate feasibility of the laser welding process of small diameter wire to a contact. In particular, the paper addresses characterization of laser spot welded 32 AWG solid copper/silver plated wires to contacts on 0.050 in. centers. The copper alloy contacts were provided on strips in two lots, one unplated, and the other with 75 {mu}in. of plated Nickel. An industrial type IR, Nd:YAG, pulsed laser was used to produce welds, in order to simulate manufacturing environment. Metallurgical analysis, SEM, and nanoindentation characterization have been used in setting up the welding process and in final evaluation. Quality of welds was also evaluated by a tensile test and the results are presented in a statistical format. The test results indicate that the tensile strength of the laser welded wire, relative to the bare (unwelded) wire, yielded 95.47% for joints on unplated contacts, and 98.25% for Nickel plated contacts. Microscope examination of samples, after pull test, shows that all wires broke behind the weld area. These results significantly exceed the required minimum tensile of a welded joint, which is 60% of the tensile strength of a bare wire. They also indicate that laser welding of small diameter wires to high density contacts can be considered as a valuable process alternative.

  3. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidarčič, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn

  4. High reliability bond program using small diameter aluminum wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.; Thiel, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The program was undertaken to characterize the performance of small diameter aluminum wire ultrasonically bonded to conductors commonly encountered in hybrid assemblies, and to recommend guidelines for improving this performance. Wire, 25.4, 38.1 and 50.8 um (1, 1.5 and 2 mil), was used with bonding metallization consisting of thick film gold, thin film gold and aluminum as well as conventional aluminum pads on semiconductor chips. The chief tool for evaluating the performance was the double bond pull test in conjunction with a 72 hour - 150 C heat soak and -65 C to +150 C thermal cycling. In practice the thermal cycling was found to have relatively little effect compared to the heat soak. Pull strength will decrease after heat soak as a result of annealing of the aluminum wire; when bonded to thick film gold, the pull strength decreased by about 50% (weakening of the bond interface was the major cause of the reduction). Bonds to thin film gold lost about 30 - 40% of their initial pull strenth; weakening of the wire itself at the bond heel was the predominant cause. Bonds to aluminum substrate metallization lost only about 22%. Bonds between thick and thin film gold substrate metallization and semiconductor chips substantiated the previous conclusions but also showed that in about 20 to 25% of the cases, bond interface failure occurred at the semiconductor chip.

  5. Modular Small Diameter Vascular Grafts with Bioactive Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Neufurth, Meik; Wang, Xiaohong; Tolba, Emad; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Schröder, Heinz C.; Link, Thorben; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a novel type of artificial small diameter blood vessels, termed biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels (bTEBV), with a modular composition. They are composed of a hydrogel scaffold consisting of two negatively charged natural polymers, alginate and a modified chitosan, N,O-carboxymethyl chitosan (N,O-CMC). Into this biologically inert scaffold two biofunctionally active biopolymers are embedded, inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) and silica, as well as gelatin which exposes the cell recognition signal, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). These materials can be hardened by exposure to Ca2+ through formation of Ca2+ bridges between the polyanions, alginate, N,O-CMC, and polyP (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP). The bTEBV are formed by pressing the hydrogel through an extruder into a hardening solution, containing Ca2+. In this universal scaffold of the bTEBV biomaterial, polycations such as poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys) or a His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide (three RGD units) were incorporated, which promote the adhesion of endothelial cells to the vessel surface. The mechanical properties of the biopolymer material (alginate-Ca2+-N,O-CMC-polyP-silica) revealed a hardness (elastic modulus) of 475 kPa even after a short incubation period in CaCl2 solution. The material of the artificial vascular grafts (bTEBVs with an outer size 6 mm and 1.8 mm, and an inner diameter 4 mm and 0.8 mm, respectively) turned out to be durable in 4-week pulsatile flow experiments at an alternating pressure between 25 and 100 mbar (18.7 and 75.0 mm Hg). The burst pressure of the larger (smaller) vessels was 850 mbar (145 mbar). Incorporation of polycationic poly(l-Lys), poly(d-Lys), and especially the His/Gly-tagged RGD peptide, markedly increased the adhesion of human, umbilical vein/vascular endothelial cells, EA.HY926 cells, to the surface of the hydrogel. No significant effect of the polyP samples on the clotting of human plasma is measured. We propose that the metabolically degradable

  6. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  7. Synthesis of very small diameter silica nanofibers using sound waves.

    PubMed

    Datskos, Panos; Chen, Jihua; Sharma, Jaswinder

    2014-07-14

    Silica nanofibers of an average diameter ≈30 nm and length ≈100 μm have been synthesized using an unprecedented strategy: sound waves. A new phenomenon, spinning off the nanofibers at silica rod tips, is also observed.

  8. Thermal resistance of ultra-small-diameter disk microlasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. E. Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Maximov, M. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Savelyev, A. V.; Shostak, I. I.; Moiseev, E. I.; Kudashova, Yu. V.; Kulagina, M. M.; Troshkov, S. I.

    2015-05-15

    The thermal resistance of AlGaAs/GaAs microlasers of the suspended-disk type with a diameter of 1.7–4 μm and InAs/InGaAs quantum dots in the active region is inversely proportional to the squared diameter of the microdisk. The proportionality factor is 3.2 × 10{sup −3} (K cm{sup 2})/W, and the thermal resistance is 120–20°C/mW.

  9. Nuclear criticality safety calculational analysis for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect

    LeTellier, M.S.; Smallwood, D.J.; Henkel, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents calculations performed to establish a technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of favorable geometry containers, sometimes referred to as 5-inch containers, in use at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. A list of containers currently used in the plant is shown in Table 1.0-1. These containers are currently used throughout the plant with no mass limits. The use of containers with geometries or material types other than those addressed in this evaluation must be bounded by this analysis or have an additional analysis performed. The following five basic container geometries were modeled and bound all container geometries in Table 1.0-1: (1) 4.32-inch-diameter by 50-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (2) 5.0-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high polyethylene bottle; (3) 5.25-inch-diameter by 24-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}F-can{close_quotes}); (4) 5.25-inch-diameter by 15-inch-high steel can ({open_quotes}Z-can{close_quotes}); and (5) 5.0-inch-diameter by 9-inch-high polybottle ({open_quotes}CO-4{close_quotes}). Each container type is evaluated using five basic reflection and interaction models that include single containers and multiple containers in normal and in credible abnormal conditions. The uranium materials evaluated are UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O and UF{sub 4}+oil materials at 100% and 10% enrichments and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and H{sub 2}O at 100% enrichment. The design basis safe criticality limit for the Portsmouth facility is k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} < 0.95. The KENO study results may be used as the basis for evaluating general use of these containers in the plant.

  10. Aharonov—Bohm Oscillations in Small Diameter Bi Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopko, L.

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect (AB) exists in cylindrical wires as the magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations with a period ΔB that is proportional to Φ0 / S, where Φ0 = h / e is the flux quantum and S is the wire cross section. The AB-type longitudinal MR oscillations with period ΔB = Φ0 / S caused by electrons undergoing continuous grazing incidence at the wire wall have been observed previously at 4.2 K in single bismuth nanowires with a diameter 0. 2 < d < 0. 8 μm grown by the Ulitovsky technique. We present here our results of the observation of AB oscillations with period ΔB = h / e and ΔB = h / 2e on single Bi nanowires with a diameter d = 45-73 nm. The single nanowire samples were prepared by improved Ulitovsky technique and represented cylindrical single crystals with (1011) orientation along the wire axis. Due to very low effective masses of electrons and holes, electronic quantum confinement effects induce a semimetal-to-semiconductor transformation (SMSC) for wires with diameters below 50 nm. Our estimation of thermal energy gap from R(T) dependence for 50 nm Bi wire gives the value of 14 meV. The surface of Bi nanowire supports surface states, with carrier densities of around 5 ×1012 cm- 2 with strong spin-orbit interactions. From B ˜ 8 T down to B = 0, the extremums of h/2e oscillations are shifted up to 3π at B = 0, which is the manifestation of Berry phase shift. We connect the existence of h / 2e oscillations with weak localizations on surface states of Bi nanowires according to the Altshuller-Aronov-Spivak theory.

  11. Structure Optimization and Evaluation of Small Adjustable Diameter Grinding Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yiyong; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Liping; Zhao, Hu

    Focus on the uneven deformation of conventional adjustable diameter grinding wheel (ADGW), a structure optimization and evaluation method of ADGW was proposed in this paper. Firstly, the evaluation index system and structure optimization framework of ADGW was established to obtain the optimization objective of ADGW. Then a simulated experiment was provided. The flexible units of ADGW with different structures and geometries were selected to analyze the unevenness of deformation. The comparison results showed that the proposed method can improve the ADGW structures effectively and provide a technical approach for evaluating the structure design of ADGW.

  12. [Small-diameter portosystemic shunts: indications and limitations].

    PubMed

    Angel Mercado, M; Granados-García, J; Barradas, F; Chan, C; Contreras, J L; Orozco, H; Angel-Mercado, M

    1998-01-01

    Low diameter porto-systemic shunts for the treatment of portal hypertension bleeding have emerged as a consequence of the technical development of vascular grafts (PTFE) that allow the use of a narrow lumen. The experience with this kind of operation at the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City during a 6-year period is reported. There were twenty-seven patients with good liver function (Child-Pugh A-B) were operated or electively, average Age 47.5 years (range 17-71), twenty three patients with liver cirrhosis, one with portal fibrosis and three with idiopathic portal hypertension. Operative mortality: 4%. Rebleeding: 14%. Postoperative encephalopathy was observed in 14 of 27, three of them being grade III-IV (11%). In the remaining 11 cases, it was mild and easily controlled. Postoperative angiography showed shunt patency in 81% of the cases; in 33% of the cases, portal vein diameter reduction was shown, as well as two cases with portal vein thrombosis. In 77% of the cases, adequate postoperative quality of life was observed. Survival (Kaplan-Meier): 86% at 12 months and 56% at 60 months. These kinds of shunts are a good alternate choice for patients considered for surgery, in which other portal blood flow preserving procedures (selective shunts, devascularization with transection) are not feasible.

  13. Numerical investigations of small diameter two-phase closed thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naresh, Y.; Balaji, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a CFD model is developed to simulate the working of a 6mm diameter two-phase closed thermosyphon using water as the working fluid. At each section (evaporator, condenser, adiabatic) of the thermosyphon, lumped equations have been developed to calculate the temperatures at corresponding sections. In order to process two phase flow inside the system, a user-defined function (UDF) has been developed and integrated with the CFD model. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to carry out the simulations in Ansys FLUENT 15 and the lumped equations are solved in MATLAB 2013a. Volume fractions and temperature profiles obtained from CFD simulations and the lumped parametric estimations are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results available in literature.

  14. Evaluation of small diameter coreholes for reservoir information

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Susan; Adair, Richard G.; Livesay, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Geothermal exploration has been highly successful to date in locating targets for drilling. However, the requirements for an economically successful geothermal well are both high flow rate and high temperature. Most geophysical and geochemical exploration methods have not been highly accurate in predicting the depth and actual temperature of a reservoir, nor have they been able to locate high permeability zones. The result is that most geothermal exploration is conducted by drilling core holes to better understand the heat flow in an area followed by drilling of production diameter exploration wells which can be flow tested to ascertain the permeability. The goal of any exploration program is to determine reservoir economics. The cost of wells makes up between one quarter and one half the total cost of producing geothermal power. The number, design, depth of wells and placement of injectors are important to the optimal exploitation of the reservoir. Although early efforts at development have focused on rapid plant construction to begin cash flow, the history of producing fields emphasizes that understanding reservoirs can reduce the risk of rapid temperature or pressure declines and increase the success of step out drilling following initial exploitation. The high cost of large diameter production wells makes the collecting of exploration data on the reservoir through some less expensive method desirable. Geothermal developers are still drilling resources with surface expression, hot springs and surface mappable fractures and faults. As these obvious resources are developed and as the obvious targets in productive fields are exhausted, new exploration tools are needed. One possibility is the use of deep core holes drilled for temperature gradient data to provide more reservoir information. Two methods not previously applied to geothermal reservoir assessment are suggested to augment other data obtained from coreholes.

  15. Selective control of small versus large diameter axons using infrared laser light (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothet, Emilie H.; Shaw, Kendrick M.; Horn, Charles C.; Lu, Hui; Wang, Yves T.; Jansen, E. Duco; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    Sensory information is conveyed to the central nervous system via small diameter unmyelinated fibers. In general, smaller diameter axons have slower conduction velocities. Selective control of such fibers could create new clinical treatments for chronic pain, nausea in response to chemo-therapeutic agents, or hypertension. Electrical stimulation can control axonal activity, but induced axonal current is proportional to cross-sectional area, so that large diameter fibers are affected first. Physiologically, however, synaptic inputs generally affect small diameter fibers before large diameter fibers (the size principle). A more physiological modality that first affected small diameter fibers could have fewer side effects (e.g., not recruiting motor axons). A novel mathematical analysis of the cable equation demonstrates that the minimum length along the axon for inducing block scales with the square root of axon diameter. This implies that the minimum length along an axon for inhibition will scale as the square root of axon diameter, so that lower radiant exposures of infrared light will selectively affect small diameter, slower conducting fibers before those of large diameter. This prediction was tested in identified neurons from the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Radiant exposure to block a neuron with a slower conduction velocity (B43) was consistently lower than that needed to block a faster conduction velocity neuron (B3). Furthermore, in the vagus nerve of the musk shrew, lower radiant exposure blocked slow conducting fibers before blocking faster conducting fibers. Infrared light can selectively control smaller diameter fibers, suggesting many novel clinical treatments.

  16. 78 FR 22843 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Affirmative Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China... determines that imports from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') of ] certain graphite electrodes... Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the People's Republic of China, 74 FR 8775 (February 26, 2009)...

  17. Economic feasibility of products from inland west small-diameter timber. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Spelter, H.; Wang, R.; Ince, P.

    1996-05-01

    A large part of the forests located in the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. West (inland West) is characterized by densely packed, small-diameter stands. The purpose of this study was to examine the economic feasibility of using small-diameter material from this resource to manufacture various wood products: oriented strandboard (OSB), stud lumber, random-length dimension lumber, machine-stress-rated random-length lumber, laminated veneer lumber (LVL), and market pulp.

  18. 77 FR 59374 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe (Under 41/2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ...] Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe (Under 4\\1/2\\ Inches... and pressure pipe (under 4\\1/2\\ inches) (hereinafter, ``small diameter pipe'') from Japan for...

  19. Biosensing using plasmonic nanohole arrays with small, homogenous and tunable aperture diameters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kunli; Emilsson, Gustav; Dahlin, Andreas B

    2016-06-21

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are widely used for optical label-free molecular detection. An important factor for many applications is the diameter of the apertures. So far nanohole arrays with controllable diameters below 100 nm have not been demonstrated and it has not been systematically investigated how the diameter influences the optical properties. In this work we fine-tune the diameter in short range ordered nanohole arrays down to 50 nm. The experimental far field spectra show how the wavelength of maximum extinction remains unaffected while the transmission maximum blue shifts with smaller diameters. The near field is visualized by numerical simulations, showing a homogenous enhancement throughout the cylindrical void at the transmission maximum for diameters between 50 and 100 nm. For diameters below 50 nm plasmon excitation is no longer possible experimentally or by simulations. Further, we investigate the refractive index sensing capabilities of the smaller holes. As the diameter was reduced, the sensitivity in terms of resonance shift with bulk liquid refractive index was found to be unaltered. However, for the transmission maximum the sensitivity becomes more strongly localized to the hole interior. By directing molecular binding to the bottom of the holes we demonstrate how smaller holes enhance the sensitivity in terms of signal per molecule. A real-time detection limit well below one protein per nanohole is demonstrated. The smaller plasmonic nanoholes should be suitable for studies of molecules confined in small volumes and as mimics of biological nanopores.

  20. Hyaluronic acid enhancement of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene for small diameter vascular grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicole R.

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States and other developed countries. In the United States alone, 8 million people are diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease per year and over 250,000 patients have coronary bypass surgery each year. Autologous blood vessels are the standard graft used in small diameter (<6mm) arterial bypass procedures. Synthetic small diameter grafts have had limited success. While polyethylene (Dacron) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) are the most commonly used small diameter synthetic vascular graft materials, there are significant limitations that make these materials unfavorable for use in the low blood flow conditions of the small diameter arteries. Specifically, Dacron and ePTFE grafts display failure due to early thrombosis or late intimal hyperplasia. With the shortage of tissue donors and the limited supply of autologous blood vessels available, there is a need for a small diameter synthetic vascular graft alternative. The aim of this research is to create and characterize ePTFE grafts prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA), evaluate thrombogenic potential of ePTFE-HA grafts, and evaluate graft mechanical properties and coating durability. The results in this work indicate the successful production of ePTFE-HA materials using a solvent infiltration technique. Surface interactions with blood show increased platelet adhesion on HA-modified surfaces, though evidence may suggest less platelet activation and erythrocyte lysis. Significant changes in mechanical properties of HA-modified ePTFE materials were observed. Further investigation into solvent selection, uniformity of HA, endothelialization, and dynamic flow testing would be beneficial in the evaluation of these materials for use in small diameter vascular graft bypass procedures.

  1. 78 FR 63164 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Romania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure... antidumping duty order on certain small diameter carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe... small diameter carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe from Romania.\\1\\ We...

  2. 78 FR 41369 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Romania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure... on certain small diameter carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe (small diameter... Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe from Romania,'' dated concurrently with this notice (Preliminary...

  3. 76 FR 36092 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China... Department'') initiated the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on small diameter graphite... March 7, 2011. See Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China:...

  4. 77 FR 6060 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on small diameter graphite electrodes from the People's Republic of China (PRC) for the... February 3, 2012. See Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the People's Republic of China: Extension...

  5. Influence of focal spot on characteristics of very small diameter radiosurgical beams.

    PubMed

    Sham, Edwin; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2008-07-01

    Percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and beam profiles of very small diameter (1.5-5 mm) megavoltage radiosurgical beams calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) technique critically depend on the diameter of the circular focal spot used in the simulation: The smaller is the field diameter, the larger is the effect. Thus, in simulations of radiosurgical fields that have diameters of the order of the focal spot size, an accurate focal spot geometry should be used. We used a simplified moving slit technique in conjunction with a diode detector for evaluation of the focal spot size and shape of a megavoltage 6 MV linac as well as for determination of the equivalent focal spot diameter of the linac for use in MC simulations. The measured total diode signal contains three components: A direct focal spot signal, a background signal, and an extra-focal radiation signal. A single profile scan of the focal spot signal is Gaussian like in shape, and its full width at half maximum is used to define the focal spot dimension for this scan. The focal spot of our 6 MV linac is approximated with a Gaussian circle, and when the geometry of the effective focal spot circle is used in MC simulations, the agreement between MC-calculated and measured PDD distributions as well as beam profiles is good even for radiosurgical fields as small as 1.5 mm in diameter. Our results also confirm that matching the penumbral areas of accurately measured large-field beam profiles to the same areas of the MC-calculated beam profiles reliably leads to a realistic effective focal spot size for use in MC simulations of very small diameter beams.

  6. Fabrication techniques developed for small- diameter, thin-wall tungsten and tungsten alloy tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillhart, D. C.; Burt, W. R.; Karasek, F. J.; Mayfield, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Report describes methods for the fabrication of tungsten and tungsten alloys into small-diameter, thin-wall tubing of nuclear quality. The tungsten, or tungsten alloy tube blanks are produced by double extrusion. Plug-drawing has emerged as an excellent secondary fabrication technique for the reduction of the overall tube dimensions.

  7. Production of small diameter high-temperature-strength refractory metal wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.; King, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Special thermomechanical techniques (schedules) have been developed to produce small diameter wire from three refractory metal alloys: colombian base alloy, tantalum base alloy, and tungsten base alloy. High strengths of these wires indicate their potential for contributing increased strength to metallic composites.

  8. Depth-to-Diameter Ratio and Slopes in Small Lunar Highland Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanti, P.; Robinson, M. S.; Stelling, R.

    2012-12-01

    Geomorphology of small lunar highland craters is quantified with digital elevation models (DEM) that cover 540 craters. From these new data we measured apparent depth (Ra), apparent diameter (Da) and wall slopes. While photogrammetric studies exist from Apollo era data [2,3], the lower end of the crater size spectrum is not well represented and the statistics for craters with diameters 150 meters or less is sparse. The slope of log-scale depth-vs.-diameter fit was ~0.9 (Figure 1). Previous studies [3] with both mare and highland craters (Da >330m) had slopes of ~1, so this result was somewhat expected, although the highland data density was poor in this size regime in the earlier works. However, it was found that a straight line represented the depth-vs.-diameter data better than a power law relation (goodness-of-fit 0.97 compared to 0.6) which is interesting since larger craters are found to change shape allometrically [4]. The median value of the depth-to-diameter ratio was ~0.13 which is also unexpected for small craters (usually ~0.2). Wall slopes were relatively shallow (median ~ 8°) with ~95% of the data at slopes less than 18°. Slopes decreased with crater size (Figure 2), with a sharp drop at diameters more than 35m after which the rate of change was small. Decrease in slope with size was observed earlier with Apollo data [2], but for larger craters (Da >1Km). References: [1] Robinson, M.S. et al (2010),Space Sci. Rev.,150,81-124;[2] Pike, R.J.(1977) Proceedings of the Symposium on Planetary Cratering Mechanics, Arizona, Pergamon Press.,489-509;[3] Pike, R.J.(1977) Lunar Science Conference,3, 3427-3436;[4] Pike, R.J(1967) J. Geophys. Res. 72, 8, 2099-2106

  9. 77 FR 67336 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Romania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure... order on certain small diameter carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe from Romania... diameter carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe from Romania. See Certain...

  10. 77 FR 40854 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Final... diameter graphite electrodes (SDGEs) from the People's Republic of China (PRC). The review covers 25...: Background On March 6, 2012, the Department published Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the...

  11. Interlayer locking and atomic-scale friction in commensurate small-diameter boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Kim, Keun Su; Simard, Benoit; Klug, Dennis D.

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory applied to small-diameter boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) finds out-of-plane structural buckling in contrast to large-diameter tubes that exhibit faceting. Buckling significantly affects interlayer interactions in commensurate double-walled BNNTs. Energy corrugation amplitudes in relative motions of BNNT walls change up to fourfold, depending on interlayer registry relaxation, in marked contrast to carbon nanotubes. Large differences between relaxed and unrelaxed energy corrugations of BNNTs could yield energy dissipation via the strain-induced anelastic relaxation of interlayer locking (or "lattice kinks"), which can be exploited for mechanical damping applications.

  12. Dynamic Characteristics in The Cutting Operations with Small Diameter End Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takashi; Miyahara, Yasuaki; Ono, Takenori

    The dynamic response in the cutting operations with the small diameter tools is measured to simulate the cutting process in micro-scale milling. The inclined ball end mills are excited with measuring the exciting force on the vibration generator. Then, the compliance of the tool-spindle system is measured with changing the excitation frequency. The modal parameters are estimated with changing the cutter axis inclination and the overhang of the tool. A vibration model is presented to show that the vibration is subjected in the radial direction of the small diameter tool. A dynamic cutting process is simulated to show the effect of the spindle speed on the tool displacement based on the estimated modal parameters.

  13. Numerical assessment of ASR recharge using small-diameter wells and surface basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Falk; Liu, Gaisheng; Dietrich, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf; Butler, James J.

    2014-09-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) methods are increasingly used to overcome the temporal imbalance between water demand and availability. Common ASR recharge methods utilize large-diameter injection wells or surface infiltration basins and trenches, and can be costly to implement. A new low-cost ASR recharge method is currently being developed. This approach is based on recharge via gravity in small-diameter wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. Numerical modeling is used here to assess the potential of this new approach under conditions commonly faced in field settings. The primary objective is to investigate if a battery of small-diameter DP wells can serve as a viable alternative to a surface basin under typical field conditions, while the secondary objective is to assess which subsurface parameters have the greatest control on DP well performance. Simulation results indicate that gravity recharge via small-diameter wells appears to have a distinct advantage over recharge via surface infiltration basins. For example, two 0.05-m shallow vadose-zone wells with 9-m screens can recharge water at a greater rate than a 60 m2 basin. Also, results reveal that, contrary to an infiltration basin, the recharge rate in a DP well has a much stronger dependence on the horizontal component of hydraulic conductivity than on the vertical component. Moreover, near-surface layers of low hydraulic conductivity, which can significantly reduce the recharge capacity of a surface basin, have a relatively small impact on the recharge capacity of a well as long as a significant portion of the well screen is installed below those layers. Given that installation and operation costs can be low in comparison to common ASR recharge methods, this new approach appears to have great potential for recharging good quality water in shallow unconsolidated aquifers. A field investigation has recently been initiated to follow up the findings of this simulation assessment.

  14. Small Diameter Blood Vessels Bioengineered From Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renpeng; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Shibo; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Danru; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Bioengineering of small-diameter blood vessels offers a promising approach to reduce the morbidity associated with coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease. The aim of this study was to construct a two-layered small-diameter blood vessel using smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). The outer layer was constructed with biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL)-gelatin mesh seeded with SMCs, and this complex was then rolled around a silicone tube under pulsatile stimulation. After incubation for 6 to 8 weeks, the PCL-gelatin degraded and the luminal supporting silicone tube was removed. The smooth muscle layer was subsequently lined with ECs differentiated from hASCs after stimulation with VEGF and BMP4 in combination hypoxia. The phenotype of differentiated SMCs and ECs, and the cytotoxicity of the scaffold and biomechanical assessment were analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the two-layered bioengineered vessels exhibited biomechanical properties similar to normal human saphenous veins (HSV). Therefore, hASCs provide SMCs and ECs for bioengineering of small-diameter blood vessels. PMID:27739487

  15. Development of very small-diameter, inductively coupled magnetized plasma device.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Mishio, A; Nakagawa, T; Shinohara, S

    2013-10-01

    In order to miniaturize a high-density, inductively coupled magnetized plasma or helicon plasma to be applied to, e.g., an industrial application and an electric propulsion field, small helicon device has been developed. The specifications of this device along with the experimental results are described. We have succeeded in generating high-density (~10(19) m(-3)) plasmas using quartz tubes with very small diameters of 10 and 20 mm, with a radio frequency power ~1200 and 700 W, respectively, in the presence of the magnetic field less than 1 kG.

  16. Volume versus diameter assessment of small pulmonary nodules in CT lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Han, Daiwei; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose chest CT is implemented in the United States for high-risk persons. A disadvantage of lung cancer screening is the large number of small-to-intermediate sized lung nodules, detected in around 50% of all participants, the large majority being benign. Accurate estimation of nodule size and growth is essential in the classification of lung nodules. Currently, manual diameter measurements are the standard for lung cancer screening programs and routine clinical care. However, European screening studies using semi-automated volume measurements have shown higher accuracy and reproducibility compared to diameter measurements. In addition to this, with the optimization of CT scan techniques and reconstruction parameters, as well as advances in segmentation software, the accuracy of nodule volume measurement can be improved even further. The positive results of previous studies on volume and diameter measurements of lung nodules suggest that manual measurements of nodule diameter may be replaced by semi-automated volume measurements in the (near) future. PMID:28331824

  17. A High-Resolution Endoscope of Small Diameter Using Electromagnetically Vibration of Single Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Tadao; Hino, Ryunosuke; Makishi, Wataru; Esashi, Masayoshi; Haga, Yoichi

    For high resolution visual inspection in the narrow space of the human body, small diameter endoscope has been developed which utilize electromagnetically vibration of single fiber. Thin endoscopes are effective for inspection in the narrow space of the human body, for example, in the blood vessel, lactiferous duct for detection infiltration of breast cancer, and periodontal gap between gingiva and tooth. This endoscope consists of single optical fiber and photofabricated driving coils. A collimator lens and a cylindrical permanent magnet are fixed on the optical fiber, and the tilted driving coils have been patterned on a 1.08 mm outer diameter thin tube. The fiber is positioned at the center of the tube which is patterned the coils. When an electrical alternating current at the resonance frequency is supplied to the coils, the permanent magnet which is fixed to the fiber is vibrated electromagnetically and scanned one or two dimensionally. This paper reports small diameter endoscope by using electromagnetically vibration of single fiber. Optical coherence tomography imaging has also been carried out with the fabricated endoscope and cross-section image of sub-surface skin of thumb was observed.

  18. Electrical Stimulation of Mammalian Retinal Ganglion Cells Using Dense Arrays of Small-Diameter Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekirnjak, Chris; Hottowy, Pawel; Sher, Alexander; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Litke, Alan M.; Chichilnisky, E. J.

    Current epiretinal implants contain a small number of electrodes with diameters of a few hundred microns. Smaller electrodes are desirable to increase the spatial resolution of artificial sight. To lay the foundation for the next generation of retinal prostheses, we assessed the stimulation efficacy of micro-fabricated arrays of 61 platinum disk electrodes with diameters 8-12 μm, spaced 60 μm apart. Isolated pieces of rat, guinea pig, and monkey retina were placed on the multi-electrode array ganglion cell side down and stimulated through individual electrodes with biphasic, charge-balanced current pulses. Spike responses from retinal ganglion cells were recorded either from the same or a neighboring electrode. Most pulses evoked only 1-2 spikes with short latencies (0.3-10 ms), and rarely was more than one recorded ganglion cell stimulated. Threshold charge densities for eliciting spikes in ganglion cells were typically below 0.15 mC/cm2 for pulse durations between 50 and 200 μs, corresponding to charge thresholds of ˜ 100 pC. Stimulation remained effective after several hours and at frequencies up to 100 Hz. Application of cadmium chloride did not abolish evoked spikes, implying direct activation. Thus, electrical stimulation of mammalian retina with small-diameter electrodes is achievable, providing high temporal and spatial precision with low charge densities.

  19. Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Obermiller, Josef; Uchida, Barry T.; Van Alstine, William; Edwards, James M.; Landry, Gregory J.; Kaufman, John A.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

  20. A small diameter, flexible, all attitude, self-contained germanium spectrometer. Operator`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bordzindki, R.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Reeves, J.H.; Kohli, R.

    1997-05-01

    The end of the Cold War has brought about tremendous changes in the nuclear complex of the Department of Energy. One of the many changes has been the shutdown or decommissioning of many facilities that performed nuclear work. One of the steps in the process of decommissioning a facility involves the decontamination or removal of drain lines or pipes that may have carried radioactive materials at one time. The removal of all these pipes and drain lines to a nuclear disposal facility could be quite costly. It was suggested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that a germanium spectrometer could be built that could fit through straight pipes with a diameter as small as 5.08 cm (2 inches) and pass through curved pipes with a diameter as small as 7.6 cm (3 inches) such as that of a 3-inch p-trap in a drain line. The germanium spectrometer could then be used to simultaneously determine all gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in or surrounding the pipe. By showing the absence of any gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, the pipes could then be reused in place or disposed of as non-radioactive material, thus saving significantly in disposal costs. A germanium spectrometer system has been designed by PNNL and fabricated by Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) that consists of three segments, each 4.84 cm in diameter and about 10 cm in length. Flexible stainless steel bellows were used to connect the segments. Segment 1 is a small liquid nitrogen reservoir. The reservoir is filled with a sponge-like material which enables the detector to be used in any orientation. A Stirling cycle refrigerator is under development which can replace the liquid nitrogen reservoir to provide continuous cooling and operation.

  1. Cryogenic Thermal Absorptance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 Kelvin operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  2. Performance Analysis of a Modular Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Poerschke, Andrew; Rudd, Armin

    2016-03-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space-conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to easily be brought within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air handling unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives a similar amount of airflow—regardless of its position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions each duct continues to receive similar airflow.

  3. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Magni, Giulia; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (<30 µm) exhibited increased excitability that was associated with decreased membrane threshold and rheobase, whereas responses in large diameter neurons (>30 µm) were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainic acid (KA), or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR) agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  4. Detection of delamination in composite laminates using small-diameter FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin-ichi; Okabe, Yoji; Takeda, Nobuo

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents delamination monitoring techniques in composite laminates using small-diameter fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors that was developed for embedding in the laminates without inducing any structural defects. First, this FBG sensor was embedded in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminates. The reflection spectra from the FBG sensor were measured at various delamination sizes through a static four-point bending test. From experimental results, the spectrum was found to have two peaks due to the initiation of the delamination. The intensity ratio of these two peaks changed as the delamination size increased. In order to confirm the deformation of the measured spectra, the spectra were calculated theoretically. The calculated result reproduced the change in the measured spectrum very well. Thus, we proposed the intensity ratio of the two peaks as an effective indicator for evaluation of the delamination size. Secondly, detection of the edge delamination in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates was conducted using the FBG sensor. The reflection spectra were measured at various delamination sizes through fatigue test. The form of the spectrum changed sensitively by growth of the edge delamination. Hence the small-diameter FBG sensor could also be applied to detect the edge delamination in quasi-isotropic composite laminates under cyclic loading.

  5. Electrospinning thermoplastic polyurethane/graphene oxide scaffolds for small diameter vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Cordie, Travis M; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-04-01

    Fabrication of small diameter vascular grafts plays an important role in vascular tissue engineering. In this study, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/graphene oxide (GO) scaffolds were fabricated via electrospinning at different GO contents as potential candidates for small diameter vascular grafts. In terms of mechanical and surface properties, the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and hydrophilicity of the scaffolds increased with an increase of GO content while plasma treatment dramatically improved the scaffold hydrophilicity. Mouse fibroblast (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on the scaffolds separately to study their biocompatibility and potential to be used as vascular grafts. It was found that cell viability for both types of cells, fibroblast proliferation, and HUVEC attachment were the highest at a 0.5wt.% GO loading whereas oxygen plasma treatment also enhanced HUVEC viability and attachment significantly. In addition, the suture retention strength and burst pressure of tubular TPU/GO scaffolds containing 0.5wt.% GO were found to meet the requirements of human blood vessels, and endothelial cells were able to attach to the inner surface of the tubular scaffolds. Platelet adhesion tests using mice blood indicated that vascular scaffolds containing 0.5% GO had low platelet adhesion and activation. Therefore, the electrospun TPU/GO tubular scaffolds have the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering.

  6. Development and evaluation of elastomeric hollow fiber membranes as small diameter vascular graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Kang, Yunqing; Findlay, Michael W; Yang, Yunzhi

    2015-04-01

    Engineering of small diameter (<6mm) vascular grafts (SDVGs) for clinical use remains a significant challenge. Here, elastomeric polyester urethane (PEU)-based hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are presented as an SDVG candidate to target the limitations of current technologies and improve tissue engineering designs. HFMs are fabricated by a simple phase inversion method. HFM dimensions are tailored through adjustments to fabrication parameters. The walls of HFMs are highly porous. The HFMs are very elastic, with moduli ranging from 1-4MPa, strengths from 1-5MPa, and max strains from 300-500%. Permeability of the HFMs varies from 0.5-3.5×10(-6)cm/s, while burst pressure varies from 25 to 35psi. The suture retention forces of HFMs are in the range of 0.8 to 1.2N. These properties match those of blood vessels. A slow degradation profile is observed for all HFMs, with 71 to 78% of the original mass remaining after 8weeks, providing a suitable profile for potential cellular incorporation and tissue replacement. Both human endothelial cells and human mesenchymal stem cells proliferate well in the presence of HFMs up to 7days. These results demonstrate a promising customizable PEU HFMs for small diameter vascular repair and tissue engineering applications.

  7. Axially aligned 3D nanofibrous grafts of PLA-PCL for small diameter cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Krishna Kumar; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    Axially aligned nanofibrous matrices were evaluated as small diameter cardiovascular grafts. Grafts were prepared using the poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) physical blends in the ratios of 75:25 and 25:75 with the dimension of (40 × 0.2 × 4) millimeter by electrospinning using dynamic collector (1500 RPM). Hydrophobicity and tensile stress were significantly higher in PLA-PCL (75:25), whereas tensile strain and fiber density were significantly higher in PLA-PCL (25:75). Properties such as anastomatic strength porosity, average pore size, degradation with retained fiber orientation, and thromboresistivity were comparable between blends. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) adhesion on the scaffolds was observed within 24 h. Cell viability and proliferation were rationally influenced by the aligned nanofibers. Gene expression reveals the grafts thromboresistivity, elasticity, and aided neovascularization. Thus, these scaffolds could be an ideal candidate for small diameter blood vessel engineering.

  8. Stress shielding of patellar tendon: effect on small-diameter collagen fibrils in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Majima, Tokifumi; Yasuda, Kazunori; Tsuchida, Takamasa; Tanaka, Kunio; Miyakawa, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akio; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of stress shielding on the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon using 40 mature female Japanese white rabbits. The patellar tendon was completely released from stress by drawing the patella toward the tibial tubercle with a stainless steel wire installed between them. Microstructurally, stress shielding for 3 and 6 weeks increased the number of cells approximately fivefold, to that of the control tendon. Collagen bundles were less well oriented in the stress-shielded tendon than in the control. Ultrastructurally, small collagen fibrils with a diameter of less than 90 nm increased in the stress-shielded tendon. The median collagen fibril diameter in 6-week stress-shielded tendon was significantly smaller ( P < 0.05) than in the control tendon (58.8% of control). The ratio of the total area of collagen fibrils to the whole visualized area in the stress-shielded patellar tendon was significantly smaller at 3 and 6 weeks than that in the control. This study demonstrated that complete stress shielding significantly affects the microstructure and ultrastructure of the patellar tendon

  9. Vascular tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels: reviewing the electrospinning approach.

    PubMed

    Ercolani, Enrico; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bianco, Alessandra

    2015-08-01

    Vascular tissue engineering is a relevant research field aimed at elaborating and proposing innovative solutions to overcome the drawbacks related to the use of conventional blood vessel substitutes, especially referring to small-diameter grafts. For this aim, electrospinning can be regarded as a valuable technique to produce novel scaffolds with several functional characteristics that can be usefully tailored for the application discussed here. The reproduction of the natural extracellular matrix obtained by processing bioresorbable polymers, either functionalized or not, is driving the biomedical research towards technical solutions that can lead to an actual therapeutic improvement. In this context, this paper reviews those studies focused on the selection of suitable biomaterials for vascular applications, their microstructure, the cell response to polymeric fibres and the strategies considered so far to modify and therefore enhance the performance of final electrospun scaffolds.

  10. Demonstration of the BioBaler harvesting system for collection of small-diameter woody biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Langholtz, Matthew H; Caffrey, Kevin R; Barnett, Elliott J; Webb, Erin; Brummette, Mark W; Downing, Mark

    2011-12-01

    As part of a project to investigate sustainable forest management practices for producing wood chips on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the ORNL steam plant, the BioBaler was tested in various Oak Ridge locations in August of 2011. The purpose of these tests and the subsequent economic analysis was to determine the potential of this novel woody biomass harvesting method for collection of small-diameter, low value woody biomass. Results suggest that opportunities may exist for economical harvest of low-value and liability or negative-cost biomass. (e.g., invasives). This could provide the ORR and area land managers with a tool to produce feedstock while improving forest health, controlling problem vegetation, and generating local employment.

  11. 75 FR 64250 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China... diameter graphite electrodes from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') for the period August 21,...

  12. Cuff electrodes for very small diameter nerves -- prototyping and first recordings in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Juan S; Pikov, Victor; Wiggins, Harvey; Patten, Craig; Stieglitz, Thomas; Rickert, J; Schuettler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication method for cuff electrodes to interface small nerves was developed. Medical grade silicone rubber conforms the body of the cuff and insulation of the wires, platinum was used as metal for the embedded wiring and contacts. Planar electrode arrays where fabricated using a picosecond laser and then positioned into a carrying tube to provide the third dimension with the desired inner diameter (Ø 0.3-0.5 mm). The post preparation of the cuffs after structuring allows the fabrication of a stable self-closing flap that insulates the opening slit of the cuff without the need of extra sutures. Basic for the success of the cuff is the laser-based local thinning of both the silicone rubber and the metal at defined sections. This is critical to permit the PDMS' body to dominate the mechanical properties. Finite element modeling was applied to optimize the displacement ability of the cuff, leading to design capable of withstanding multiple implantation procedures without wire damage. Furthermore, the contact's surface was roughened by laser patterning to increase the charge injection capacity of Pt to 285 μC/cm(2) measured by voltage transient detection during pulse testing. The cuff electrodes were placed on a small sympathetic nerve of an adult female Sprague-Dawley rat for recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity in vivo.

  13. Electrospun Polycaprolactone Scaffolds for Small-Diameter Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Carol Hsiu-Yueh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States with many patients requiring coronary artery bypass grafting. The current standard is using autografts such as the saphenous vein or intimal mammary artery, however creating a synthetic graft could eliminate this painful and inconvenient procedure. Large diameter grafts have long been established with materials such as DacronRTM and TeflonRTM, however these materials have not proved successful in small-diameter (< 6 mm) grafts where thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia are common in graft failure. With the use of a synthetic biodegradable polymer (polycaprolactone) we utilize our expertise in electrospinning and femtosecond laser ablation to create a novel tri-layered tissue engineered blood vessel containing microchannels. The benefits of creating a tri-layer is to mimic native arteries that contain an endothelium to prevent thrombosis in the inner layer, aligned smooth muscle cells in the middle to control vasodilation and constriction, and a mechanically robust outer layer. The following work evaluates the mechanical properties of such a graft (tensile, fatigue, burst pressure, and suture retention strength), the ability to rapidly align cells in laser ablated microchannels in PCL scaffolds, and the biological integration (co-culture of endothelial and smooth muscle cells) with electrospun PCL scaffolds. The conclusions from this work establish that the electrospun tri-layers provide adequate mechanical strength as a tissue engineered blood vessel, that laser ablated microchannels are able to contain the smooth muscle cells, and that cells are able to adhere to PCL fibers. However, future work includes adjusting microchannel dimensions to properly align smooth muscle cells along with perfect co-cultures of endothelial and smooth muscle cells on the electrospun tri-layer.

  14. Effect of fibroin sponge coating on in vivo performance of knitted silk small diameter vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, Toshiharu; Ozai, Yusuke; Shimokawadoko, Haruka; Aytemiz, Derya; Tanaka, Ryou; Machida, Noboru; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular grafts under 5 mm or less in diameter are not developed due to a problem caused by early thrombus formation, neointimal hyperplasia, etc. Bombyx mori silk fibroin (SF) which has biodegradability and tissue infiltration is focused as tube and coating material of vascular grafts. Coating is an important factor to maintain the strength of the anastomotic region of vascular grafts, and to prevent the blood leak from the vascular grafts after implantation. Therefore, in this research, we focused on the SF concentration of the coating solution, and tissue infiltration and remodeling were compared among each SF concentration. Silk poly (-ethylene) glycol diglycidyl ether (PGDE) coating with concentrations of 1.0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5% SF were applied for the double-raschel knitted small-sized vessel with 1.5 mm diameter and 1cm in length. The grafts were implanted in the rat abdominal aorta and removed after 3 weeks or 3 months. Vascular grafts patency was monitored by ultrasound, and morphological evaluation was performed by histopathological examination. SF concentration had no significant effects on the patency rate. However, tissue infiltration was significantly higher in the sample of 2.5% SF in 3 weeks, and 1.0% and 2.5% SF in 3 months. Also, in comparison of length inside of the graft, stenosis were not found in 3 weeks, however, found with 5.0% and 7.5% in 3 months. From these results, it is clear that 2.5% SF coating is the most suitable concentration, based on the characteristics of less stenosis, early tissue infiltration, and less neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:26496652

  15. Polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate/polycaprolactone small-diameter vascular graft: Experimental study of integration into organism

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, L. V. Burago, A. Yu.; Matveeva, V. G.; Velikanova, E. A.; Mukhamadiyarov, R. A.; Glushkova, T. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.; Mironov, A. V.

    2015-10-27

    We prepared polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate (PHBV)/polylcaprolactone (PCL) small-diameter vascular grafts using electrospinning. Surface structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy whilst physicomechanical properties were investigated by longitudinal uniaxial tension testing. Patency of grafts implanted into the rat abdominal aorta was evaluated using a Doppler ultrasonography at 2 week, 1 month and 12 month postimplantation. In addition, we assessed local histological features, along with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, TNFa, TGF-β1, and VEGF serum levels. We revealed that only 2 (25%) grafts were not thrombosed at 2 week and 1 month postimplantation. However, at 12 month postimplantation a satisfactory histological pattern was observed in 50% of all cases, and we detected a monolayer of endothelial cells on the inner graft surface in half the cases. Regarding other grafts, we revealed minor connective tissue hyperplasia in 41.7% of the grafts and an inflammatory infiltrate in the part of the arterial wall in 8.3% of the grafts. We found that the IL-1β serum level was 3.5-fold higher in the group of experimental rats at 12 month postimplantation (p < 0.01). In addition, the IL-2 and IL-4 serum levels at 12 month postimplantation were 2- and 2.8-fold higher as compared to short-term implantation (2 weeks and 1 month) and control rats (p < 0.05) whilst the IL-10 serum level at 1 and 12 month postimplantation was more than 100-fold higher in comparison with 2 week postimplantation and control rats (p < 0.001). Serum VEGF was detected only at 12 month postimplantation. All in all, we created a biocompatible PHBV/PCL small-diameter vascular graft with a high surface area to volume ratio. A long-term patency of biodegradable vascular grafts after implantation into the rat abdominal aorta and the absence of a considerable immune response confirmed a high biocompatibility of such construct and the possibility of its use as a vascular graft.

  16. Polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate/polycaprolactone small-diameter vascular graft: Experimental study of integration into organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, L. V.; Burago, A. Yu.; Mironov, A. V.; Matveeva, V. G.; Velikanova, E. A.; Mukhamadiyarov, R. A.; Glushkova, T. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    We prepared polyhydroxybutyrate/valerate (PHBV)/polylcaprolactone (PCL) small-diameter vascular grafts using electrospinning. Surface structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy whilst physicomechanical properties were investigated by longitudinal uniaxial tension testing. Patency of grafts implanted into the rat abdominal aorta was evaluated using a Doppler ultrasonography at 2 week, 1 month and 12 month postimplantation. In addition, we assessed local histological features, along with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, TNFa, TGF-β1, and VEGF serum levels. We revealed that only 2 (25%) grafts were not thrombosed at 2 week and 1 month postimplantation. However, at 12 month postimplantation a satisfactory histological pattern was observed in 50% of all cases, and we detected a monolayer of endothelial cells on the inner graft surface in half the cases. Regarding other grafts, we revealed minor connective tissue hyperplasia in 41.7% of the grafts and an inflammatory infiltrate in the part of the arterial wall in 8.3% of the grafts. We found that the IL-1β serum level was 3.5-fold higher in the group of experimental rats at 12 month postimplantation (p < 0.01). In addition, the IL-2 and IL-4 serum levels at 12 month postimplantation were 2- and 2.8-fold higher as compared to short-term implantation (2 weeks and 1 month) and control rats (p < 0.05) whilst the IL-10 serum level at 1 and 12 month postimplantation was more than 100-fold higher in comparison with 2 week postimplantation and control rats (p < 0.001). Serum VEGF was detected only at 12 month postimplantation. All in all, we created a biocompatible PHBV/PCL small-diameter vascular graft with a high surface area to volume ratio. A long-term patency of biodegradable vascular grafts after implantation into the rat abdominal aorta and the absence of a considerable immune response confirmed a high biocompatibility of such construct and the possibility of its use as a vascular graft.

  17. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  18. Study on the role of active radicals on plasma sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mstsuura, Hiroto; Fujiyama, Takatomo; Okuno, Yasuki; Furuta, Masakazu; Okuda, Shuichi; Takemura, Yuichiro

    2015-09-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure discharge plasma has gathered attention in various fields. Among them, plasma sterilization with many types of plasma source has studied for decades and its mechanism is still an open question. If active radicals produced in plasma has main contribution of killing bacterias, direct contact of the so-called plasma flame might not be necessary. To confirm this, sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes is studied in present work. DBD type plasma jet is produce by flowing helium gas in a glass tube. A long polymeric tube is connected and plasma jet is introduced into it. Plasma flame length depends on helium gas flow rate, but limited to about 10 cm in our experimental condition. E.colis set at the exit plasma source is easily killed during 10 min irradiation. At the tube end (about 20 cm away from plasma source exit), sterilization is possible with 30 min operation. This result shows that active radical is produced with helium plasma and mist contained in sample, and it can be transferred more than 20 cm during it life time. More plasma diagnostic data will also be shown at the conference. This work was partially supported by the ''ZE Research Program, IAE(ZE27B-4).

  19. Versatile device for in-situ discharge cleaning and multiple coatings of long, small diameter tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Custer, A.; Erickson, M.; Liaw, C.J.; Fischer, Jamshidi, N.; W.; Meng, W.; Poole, H.J.; Sochugov, N.

    2010-05-23

    Electron clouds, which can limit machine performance, have been observed in many accelerators including RHIC at BNL. Additional concern for the RHIC machine, whose vacuum chamber is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel, is high wall resistivity that can result in unacceptably high ohmic heating for superconducting magnets. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a TiN or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We have been developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprising of staged magnetrons mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 ?m of Cu followed by about 0.1 ?m of a-C. As a first step, a 15-cm Cu cathode magnetron was designed, fabricated, and 30-cm long samples of the RHIC pipe have been coated with 2 ?m to 5.6 ?m of copper. Deposition rates of up to 92 A/sec with an average coating rate of 30 A/sec were measured. Effects on RF resistivity is also to be measured.

  20. Application of small-diameter inertial grade gyroscopes significantly reduces borehole position uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Uttecht, G.W.; de Wardt, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    Initial tests with a new directional survey tool show a significant enhancement in attainable accuracy over conventional instrumentation. Two prototype systems, developed over the last two years by Gyrodata, Inc., have recently been tested in a well in West Texas. Although many more tests are required, preliminary results indicate that the original design objective for borehole position uncertainty less than 1.7 feet per 1,000 feet of hole--has been met. The Gyrodata Wellbore Surveyor employs an inertial grade rate gyro adapted from the aerospace industry. In combination with its other sensors and electronics, the device can sense the orientation of the earth's spin vector at each independent survey station. As a result, the major systematic errors associated with conventional gyros--geographical reference and unaccountable drift--are eliminated. Other sources of inaccuracy are minimized by the system's measuring techniques and operational procedures, and additional benefits should arise from faster survey speed and increased reliability. A true north reference device can also employ a small outside diameter since it requires only one gyro and one accelerometer, rather than the two or three of each needed in an inertial navigation system.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of polycaprolactone urethane hollow fiber membranes as small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E; Stahl, Alexander M; Ramseier, Michelle L; Behn, Anthony W; Yang, Yunzhi

    2016-07-01

    The design of bioresorbable synthetic small diameter (<6mm) vascular grafts (SDVGs) capable of sustaining long-term patency and endothelialization is a daunting challenge in vascular tissue engineering. Here, we synthesized a family of biocompatible and biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) urethane macromers to fabricate hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) as SDVG candidates, and characterized their mechanical properties, degradability, hemocompatibility, and endothelial development. The HFMs had smooth surfaces and porous internal structures. Their tensile stiffness ranged from 0.09 to 0.11N/mm and their maximum tensile force from 0.86 to 1.03N, with minimum failure strains of approximately 130%. Permeability varied from 1 to 14×10(-6)cm/s, burst pressures from 1158 to 1468mmHg, and compliance from 0.52 to 1.48%/100mmHg. The suture retention forces ranged from 0.55 to 0.81N. HFMs had slow degradation profiles, with 15 to 30% degradation after 8weeks. Human endothelial cells proliferated well on the HFMs, creating stable cell layer coverage. Hemocompatibility studies demonstrated low hemolysis (<2%), platelet activation, and protein adsorption. There were no significant differences in the hemocompatibility of HFMs in the absence and presence of endothelial layers. These encouraging results suggest great promise of our newly developed materials and biodegradable elastomeric HFMs as SDVG candidates.

  2. Building America Case Study: Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.

  3. Structural Analysis of Pressurized Small Diameter Lines in a Random Vibration Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mark; Ridnour, Andrew; Brethen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The pressurization and propellant feed lines for the Ares 1 Upper Stage Reaction and Roll Control Systems (ReCS and RoCS) were required to be in a high g-load random vibration flight environment. The lines connected the system components and were filled with both liquid hydrazine and gaseous helium. They are considered small and varied between one fourth to one inch in diameter. The random vibration of the lines was considered to be base excitation through the mating components and mounting hardware. It was found that reducing the amount of support structure for the lines added flexibility to the system and improved the line stresses from random vibration, but caused higher stresses from the static g-loads. The locations and number of brackets were optimized by analyzing the mode shapes of the lines causing high stresses. The use of brackets that only constrain motion in the direction of concern further reduced the stresses in the lines. Finite element analysis was used to perform the analysis. The lines were pre-stressed by temperature and internal pressure with fluid and insulation included as non-structural mass. Base excitation was added to the model using Power Spectral Density (PSD) data for the expected flight loads. The random vibration and static g-load cases were combined to obtain the total stress in the lines. This approach advances the state of the art in line analysis by using FEA to predict the stresses in the lines and to optimize the entire system based on the expected flight environment. Adding flexibility to lines has been used in piping system for temperature loads, but in flight environments flexibility has been limited for the static stresses. Adding flexibility to the system in a flight environment by reducing brackets has the benefit of reducing stresses and weight

  4. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (p< 0.05). The 8mm single bore technique removed a significantly larger volume of bone compared to the 3mm multiple drilling technique (p< 0.001). However, total fracture energy was similar between the two core decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  5. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejurikar, S.; Casterman, D.; Pillai, P. B.; Petrenko, O.; De Souza, M. M.; Tahraoui, A.; Durkan, C.; Milne, W. I.

    2010-05-01

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of ~ 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  6. Anomalous n-type electrical behaviour of Pd-contacted CNTFET fabricated on small-diameter nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jejurikar, S; Casterman, D; Pillai, P B; Petrenko, O; De Souza, M M; Tahraoui, A; Durkan, C; Milne, W I

    2010-05-28

    A Pd-contacted dopant-free CNTFET with small-diameter (0.57 nm) carbon nanotube showing an anomalous n-type electrical characteristic is reported for the first time. This observed behaviour is attributed to a carbon nanotube work function higher than (or close to) palladium as well as a large hole-to-electron effective mass ratio of approximately 2.5 predicted by hybridization in small-diameter nanotubes. A variation of the conduction type with temperature is also observed and is attributed to an increase of the palladium work function and decrease of the CNT work function with increasing temperature.

  7. Integrated spectral properties of 22 small angular diameter galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.

    2007-10-01

    Aims:Flux-calibrated integrated spectra of a sample of 22 Galactic open clusters of small angular diameter are presented. With one exception (ESO 429-SC2), all objects have Galactic longitudes in the range 208° < l < 33°. The spectra cover the range ≈3600-6800 Å, with a resolution of ≈14 Å. The properties of the present cluster sample are compared with those of well-studied clusters located in two 90° sectors, centred at l = 257° and l = 347°. The dissolution rate of Galactic open clusters in these two sectors is examined. Methods: Using the equivalent widths of the Balmer lines and comparing line intensities and continuum distribution of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known properties, we derive both foreground reddening values and ages. Thus, we provide information independent of that determined through colour-magnitude diagrams. Results: The derived E(B-V) values for the whole sample vary from 0.0 in ESO 445-SC74 to 1.90 in Pismis 24, while the ages range from ~3 Myr (NGC 6604 and BH 151) to ~3.5 Gyr (Ruprecht 2). For six clusters (Dolidze 34, ESO 429-SC2, ESO 445-SC74, Ruprecht 2, BH 151 and Hogg 9) the foreground E(B-V) colour excesses and ages are determined for the first time. The results obtained for the remaining clusters show, in general terms, good agreement with previous photometric results. Conclusions: The age and reddening distributions of the present sample match those of known clusters in the two selected Galactic sectors. The present results would favour a major dissolution rate of star clusters in these two sectors. Two new solar-metallicity templates are defined corresponding to the age groups of (4-5) Myr and 30 Myr among those of Piatti et al. (2002, MNRAS, 335, 233). The Piatti et al. templates of 20 Myr and (3-4) Gyr are here redefined. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y T

  8. Living heart valve and small-diameter artery substitutes--an emerging field for intellectual property development.

    PubMed

    Mol, Anita; Rubbens, Mirjam P; Stekelenburg, Maria; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, such as heart valve dysfunction and coronary artery stenosis, are next to cancer the leading cause of death in the US. Treatments involve replacement of the heart valve or bypassing the obstructed coronary artery with a small-diameter vascular graft. The major limitation of currently used replacements is their inability to grow, adapt and repair in the patient. Considering the increasing age of the population and the subsequent increase in cardiovascular disease incidence, efforts to improve existing replacements and unraveling novel types of replacements are of paramount importance. Cardiovascular tissue engineering represents a rapid evolving field of research, providing living heart valve and small-diameter vascular substitutes with the ability to grow, adapt and repair after implantation. Various tissue engineering approaches are being employed, based on in vivo and/or in vitro tissue formation. This review provides an overview of the current heart valve and small-diameter vascular replacements and presents the status and future developments within the various tissue engineering approaches. The potential of tissue engineering for the development of living heart valve and small-diameter vascular substitutes is reflected in the numerous patents related to this emerging field of research.

  9. 77 FR 21734 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Romania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line, and Pressure... and pressure pipe from Romania for the period August 1, 2010, through July 31, 2011. See Initiation...

  10. 76 FR 67411 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International...

  11. Production of vertical arrays of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong

    2013-08-13

    A hot filament chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to grow at least one vertical single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). In general, various embodiments of the present invention disclose novel processes for growing and/or producing enhanced nanotube carpets with decreased diameters as compared to the prior art.

  12. 78 FR 56864 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Affirmative Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Jilin Carbon Co., Ltd. and Jilin Carbon Import & Export Company (collectively, Jilin Carbon), with an... that graphite electrodes produced and/or exported by Jilin Carbon, with an actual or nominal diameter... 17, 2013) (Preliminary Determination). On May 15, 2013, and May 17, 2013, SGL Carbon LLC and...

  13. Assessment of small-diameter shallow wells for managed aquifer recharge at a site in southern Styria, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Falk; Liu, Gaisheng; Fank, Johann; Friedl, Franz; Liedl, Rudolf; Dietrich, Peter

    2016-12-01

    An approach to establish the recharge component of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has recently been proposed that uses small-diameter shallow wells installed using relatively inexpensive drilling methods such as direct push. As part of further development of that approach, a generalized procedure is presented for a technical and economic assessment of the approach's potential in comparison to other systems. Following this procedure, the use of small-diameter wells was evaluated both experimentally and numerically for a site located in southern Styria, Austria. MAR is currently done at the site using a horizontal pipe infiltration system, and system expansion has been proposed with a target rate of 12 l/s using small-diameter wells as one possible option. A short-duration single-well field recharge experiment (recharge rate 1.3-3.5 l/s) was performed (recharge by gravity only). Numerical modeling of the injection test was used to estimate hydraulic conductivity ( K). Quasi-steady-state, single-well recharge simulations for different locations, as well as a long-term transient simulation, were performed using the K value calibrated from the field injection test. Results indicate that a recharge capacity of 4.1 l/s was achievable with a maximum head rise of 0.2 m at the injection well. Finally, simulations were performed for three different well fields (4, 6 and 8 wells, respectively) designed to infiltrate a target rate of 12 l/s. The experimental and numerical assessments, supported by a cost analysis of the small-diameter wells, indicate that the small-diameter wells are a viable, cost-effective recharge approach at this and other similar sites.

  14. Performance of and Pressure Elevation Formed by Small-diameter Microtubes Used in Constant-flow Sets

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sae Woon; Noh, Myounggyu D.; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Nam; Ahn, Byung Heon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We explored the performance of and pressure elevation caused by small-diameter microtubes used to reduce overfiltration. Methods Using a syringe pump-driven constant-flow setting (2 µL/min), pressures were measured for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microtubes 5 mm in length with inner diameters of 51, 64, and 76 µm and for polyether block amide (PEBAX) microtubes with an inner diameter of 76 µm. Experiments (using microtubes only) were initially performed in air, water, and enucleated pig eyes and were repeated under the same conditions using intraluminal 9/0 nylon stents. Results The pressures measured in air in 51-, 64-, and 76-µm-diameter PTFE microtubes differed significantly (22.1, 16.9, and 12.2 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.001), and that of the 76-µm-diameter PEBAX microtube was 15.8 mmHg (p < 0.001 compared to the 12.2 mmHg of the 76-µm-diameter PTFE microtube). The pressures measured in water also differed significantly among the three microtubes at 3.9, 3.0, and 1.4 mmHg, respectively, while that in the PEBAX microtube was 2.6 mmHg (all p < 0.001). Using the intraluminal stent, the pressure in water of the three different PTFE microtubes increased to 22.6, 18.0, and 4.1 mmHg, respectively, and that in the PEBAX microtube increased to 10.5 mmHg (all p < 0.001). Similar trends were evident when measurements were performed in pig eyes. Conclusions Although microtubes of smaller diameter experienced higher pressure in air, reduction of the inner diameter to 51 µm did not adequately increase the pressure attained in water or pig eyes. Insertion of an intraluminal stent effectively elevated the latter pressures. PEBAX microtubes created higher pressures than did PTFE microtubes. PMID:27247522

  15. Measuring helium bubble diameter distributions in tungsten with grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Kluth, P.; Doerner, R. P.; Kirby, N.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering was performed on tungsten samples exposed to helium plasma in the MAGPIE and Pisces-A linear plasma devices to measure the size distributions of resulting helium nano-bubbles. Nano-bubbles were fitted assuming spheroidal particles and an exponential diameter distribution. These particles had mean diameters between 0.36 and 0.62 nm. Pisces-A exposed samples showed more complex patterns, which may suggest the formation of faceted nano-bubbles or nano-scale surface structures.

  16. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  17. Fabrication of microporous polyurethane by spray phase inversion method as small diameter vascular grafts material.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M T; Shorgashti, S

    2006-05-01

    Microporous polyurethane vascular prostheses with a 4 mm diameter and 0.3-0.4 mm wall thickness were fabricated by a spray phase inversion technique. In this study, the effect of distance between spray guns (SG) and rotating mandrel (RM), the effect of rate of rotating mandrel (RRM), and the type of nonsolvent on pore morphology of PU films were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. It was observed that when the distance between SG and RM was increased or the rate of RM was decreased, the porosity of PU films increased and consequently the tensile strength decreased and compliance value increased. Compliance was measured in vitro by volume and vessel diameter changes. Furthermore, when the coagulant (water) was changed to the water/methanol, the porosity of PU film increased and porous morphology changed to filamentous morphology. Attachment of anchorage dependent cells, namely L929 fibroblast cells, were investigated in stationary culture conditions. The cells adhesion and cells growth were studied using optical photomicrographs. The results show that by increasing the porosity content of PU films would consequently increase the cell ingrowths.

  18. Growth of small diameter multi-walled carbon nanotubes by arc discharge process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T. Chaudhary, K.; J., Ali; P. Yupapin, P.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are grown by arc discharge method in a controlled methane environment. The arc discharge is produced between two graphite electrodes at the ambient pressures of 100 torr, 300 torr, and 500 torr. Arc plasma parameters such as temperature and density are estimated to investigate the influences of the ambient pressure and the contributions of the ambient pressure to the growth and the structure of the nanotubes. The plasma temperature and density are observed to increase with the increase in the methane ambient pressure. The samples of MWCNT synthesized at different ambient pressures are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. An increase in the growth of MWCNT and a decrease in the inner tube diameter are observed with the increase in the methane ambient pressure.

  19. Magnetic domain structure in small diameter magnetic nanowire arrays [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-Huan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Xu, Cai-Ling; Xu, Tao; Li, Hu-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Fe 0.3Co 0.7 alloy nanowire arrays were prepared by ac electrodepositing Fe 2+ and Co 2+ into a porous anodic aluminum oxide (PAO) template with diameter about 50 nm. The surface of the samples were polished by 100 nm diamond particle then chemical polishing to give a very smooth surface (below ±10 nm/μm 2). The morphology properties were characterized by SEM and AFM. The bulk magnetic properties and domain structure of nanowire arrays were investigated by VSM and MFM respectively. We found that such alloy arrays showed strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with easy axis parallel to nanowire arrays. Each nanowire was in single domain structure with several opposite single domains surrounding it. Additionally, we investigated the domain structure with a variable external magnetic field applied parallel to the nanowire arrays. The MFM results showed a good agreement with our magnetic hysteresis loop.

  20. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2007-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried stress corrosion cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite and boundary element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of stress corrosion cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters.

  1. Plasma Sputtering Robotic Device for In-Situ Thick Coatings of Long, Small Diameter Vacuum Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-10-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated & operated. Reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes and of electron clouds, due to high secondary electron yield (SEY), in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced SEY to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel RHIC tube has conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Device detail and experimental results will be presented. Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under

  2. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Fischer, W.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Poole, H. J.; Todd, R.

    2015-05-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  3. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A. Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J.

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  4. New approach towards mini dental implants and small-diameter implants: an option for long-term prostheses.

    PubMed

    Gleiznys, Alvydas; Skirbutis, Gediminas; Harb, Ali; Barzdziukaite, Ingrida; Grinyte, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Mini dental implants (MDI) and small diameter implants (SDI) have been extensively used as temporary or orthodontic anchorage; however there have been studies that proved their availability as a mean for long term prosthodontics. Our aim was to review the indications, advantages of MDI and SDI, and their long-term survival. METHODS. Computerized searches were conducted for clinical studies between year 2000 and 2011 that involved either implants with 3.3 mm diameter or less, used in prosthodontics; or provided a follow up of MDI or SDI duration of at least 4 months following implant placement including survival rate data. All studies about implants used in orthodontics were excluded. The range of available MDI and SDI has been found in cataloges of the companies: 3M ESPE IMTEC, Bicon Dental, Zimmer, Implant Direct, Intra lock, Hiossen, Simpler Implant, KAT Implants, OCO Biomedical, American Dental Implant. RESULTS. 41 studies meeting the above criteria were selected, 22 out of them reviewed survival rates of MDI and SDI. The follow up duration varried from 4 months to 8 years with survival rates between 91.17 and 100%. Nevertheless, the companies showed a big variety of MDI and SDI provided in the market for long term prostheses. CONCLUSIONS. Implants with small diameters can be used successfully in a variety of clinical situations. Less surgical time, less postoperative pain, ability of direct loading after surgery with no harm to bone and cost effectiveness are the advantages. The reduced surface implants require correct treatment planning so that the loading force would not cause bone loss or implant failure. MDI and SDI show high survival rates, but special cautions for bone quality and good oral hygiene should be maintained.

  5. Degradable/non-degradable polymer composites for in-situ tissue engineering small diameter vascular prosthesis application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fujun; Mohammed, Abedalwafa; Li, Chaojing; Ge, Peng; Wang, Lu; King, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Various tissue-engineered vascular grafts have been studied in order to overcome the clinical disadvantages associated with conventional prostheses. However, previous tissue-engineered vascular grafts have possessed insufficient mechanical properties and thus have generally required either preoperative cellular manipulation or the use of bioreactors to improve their performance. In this study, we focused on the concept of in situ cellularization and developed a tissue-engineered vascular graft with degradable/non-degradable polymer composites for arterial reconstruction that would facilitate the renewal of autologous tissue without any pretreatment. Additionally, these composites are designed to improve the mechanical performance of a small-diameter vascular prosthesis scaffold that is made from a flexible membrane of poly(e-caprolactone) (PCL). The PCL scaffold was reinforced by embedding a tubular fabric that was knitted from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) yarns within the freeze-dried composite structure. Adding this knitted fabric component significantly improved the mechanical properties of the composite scaffold, such as its tensile strength and initial modulus, radial compliance, compression recovery, and suture retention force. Finally, this reinforced composite structure is a promising candidate for use as a tissue-engineered scaffold for a future small diameter vascular prosthesis.

  6. Heparinized PLLA/PLCL nanofibrous scaffold for potential engineering of small-diameter blood vessel: tunable elasticity and anticoagulation property.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhong; Hu, Jinwei; He, Chuanglong; Nie, Wei; Feng, Wei; Qiu, Kexin; Zhou, Xiaojun; Gao, Yu; Wang, Guoqing

    2015-05-01

    The success of tissue engineered vascular grafts depends greatly on the synthetic tubular scaffold, which can mimic the architecture, mechanical, and anticoagulation properties of native blood vessels. In this study, small-diameter tubular scaffolds were fabricated with different weight ratios of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PLCL) by means of thermally induced phase separation technique. To improve the anticoagulation property of materials, heparin was covalently linked to the tubular scaffolds by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling chemistry. The as-prepared PLLA/PLCL scaffolds retained microporous nanofibrous structure as observed in the neat PLLA scaffolds, and their structural and mechanical properties can be fine-tuned by changing the ratio of two components. The scaffold containing 60% PLCL content was found to be the most promising scaffold for engineering small-diameter blood vessel in terms of elastic properties and structural integrity. The heparinized scaffolds showed higher hydrophilicity, lower protein adsorption ability, and better in vitro anticoagulation property than their untreated counterparts. Pig iliac endothelial cells seeded on the heparinized scaffold showed good cellular attachment, spreading, proliferation, and phenotypic maintenance. Furthermore, the heparinized scaffolds exhibited neovascularization after subcutaneous implantation into the New Zealand white rabbits for 1 and 2 months. Taken together, the heparinized PLLA/PLCL nanofibrous scaffolds have the great potential for vascular tissue engineering application.

  7. Platform technologies for decellularization, tunic-specific cell seeding, and in vitro conditioning of extended length, small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Fercana, George; Bowser, Devon; Portilla, Margarita; Langan, Eugene M; Carsten, Christopher G; Cull, David L; Sierad, Leslie N; Simionescu, Dan T

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to generate extended length, small diameter vascular scaffolds that could serve as potential grafts for treatment of acute ischemia. Biological tissues are considered excellent scaffolds, which exhibit adequate biological, mechanical, and handling properties; however, they tend to degenerate, dilate, and calcify after implantation. We hypothesized that chemically stabilized acellular arteries would be ideal scaffolds for development of vascular grafts for peripheral surgery applications. Based on promising historical data from our laboratory and others, we chose to decellularize bovine mammary and femoral arteries and test them as scaffolds for vascular grafting. Decellularization of such long structures required development of a novel "bioprocessing" system and a sequence of detergents and enzymes that generated completely acellular, galactose-(α1,3)-galactose (α-Gal) xenoantigen-free scaffolds with preserved collagen, elastin, and basement membrane components. Acellular arteries exhibited excellent mechanical properties, including burst pressure, suture holding strength, and elastic recoil. To reduce elastin degeneration, we treated the scaffolds with penta-galloyl glucose and then revitalized them in vitro using a tunic-specific cell approach. A novel atraumatic endothelialization protocol using an external stent was also developed for the long grafts and cell-seeded constructs were conditioned in a flow bioreactor. Both decellularization and revitalization are feasible but cell retention in vitro continues to pose challenges. These studies support further efforts toward clinical use of small diameter acellular arteries as vascular grafts.

  8. Triamcinolone Acetonide Selectively Inhibits Angiogenesis in Small Blood Vessels and Decreases Vessel Diameter within the Vascular Tree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Terri L.; Gredeon, Dan J.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Hylton, alan G.; Ribita, Daniela; Olar, Harry H.; Kaiser, Peter K.; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The steroid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent anti-angiogenesis drug used to treat retinal vascular diseases that include diabetic retinopathy, vascular occlusions and choroidal neovascularization. To quantify the effects of TA on branching morphology within the angiogenic microvascular tree of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryos. Increasing concentrations of TA (0-16 ng/ml) were applied topically on embryonic day 7 (E7) to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of quail embryos cultured in Petri dishes, and incubated for an additional 24 or 48 hours until fixation. Binary (black/white) microscopic images of arterial end points were quantified by VESGEN software (for Generational Analysis of Vessel Branching) to obtain major vascular parameters that include vessel diameter (Dv), fractal dimension (Df), tortuosity (Tv) and densities of vessel area, length, number and branch point (Av, Lv, Nv and Brv). For assessment of specific changes in vascular morphology induced by TA, the VESGEN software automatically segmented the vascular tree into branching generations (G1...G10) according to changes in vessel diameter and branching. Vessel density decreased significantly up to 34% as the function of increasing concentration of TA according to Av, Lv, Brv, Nv and Df. TA selectively inhibited the growth of new, small vessels, because Lv decreased from 13.14plus or minus 0.61 cm/cm2 for controls to 8.012 plus or minus 0.82 cm/cm2 at 16 ng TA/ml in smaller branching generations (G7-G10), and for Nv from 473.83 plus or minus 29.85 cm(-)2 to 302.32 plus or minus 33.09 cm-()2. In contrast, vessel diameter (Dv) decreased throughout the vascular tree (G1-G10).

  9. Influence of endothelial cell seeding on platelet deposition and patency in small-diameter Dacron arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.T.; Long, J.A.; Clark, R.E.; Sicard, G.A.; Hopkins, K.T.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Serial platelet deposition, surface topography, and patency were evaluated in control (N . 28) and endothelial cell-seeded (N . 28) small-diameter (4 mm inner diameter) USCI Dacron grafts implanted in the carotid and femoral arteries of dogs. All dogs received aspirin (325 mg) daily for 2 weeks starting 24 hours prior to graft implantation. Endothelial cell seeding was performed by mixing suspensions of autologous endothelial cells that had been enzymatically harvested from segments of external jugular vein with blood that was used to preclot the prostheses. The platelet deposition on each graft was quantitated by means of indium 111-labeled platelets and technetium 99m-labeled red cells in a dual-isotope platelet-imaging technique. Platelet deposition on seeded grafts 24 hours after implantation was significantly higher than on the controls (p less than 0.05). Two weeks after implantation platelet deposition on seeded prostheses had decreased to a level significantly lower than that on the controls and continued to decline on serial studies up to 7 months. In contrast to seeded grafts, platelet accumulation on control grafts dramatically increased after the withdrawal of aspirin therapy and was associated with a sharp rise in control graft thromboses. Cumulative 7-month patency for seeded prostheses was significantly higher than for the controls (96% and 29%, respectively; p less than 0.001). We conclude that endothelial cell seeding in combination with short-term aspirin therapy is a simple, reliable diameter Dacron prostheses. Abrupt withdrawal of aspirin therapy may be contraindicated in nonseeded control grafts because it results in increased platelet deposition and thrombosis.

  10. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    SciTech Connect

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I.; Susi, T.; Nasibulin, A. G.

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  11. Ultralong, small-diameter TiOTiO₂ nanotubes achieved by an optimized two-step anodization for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Lidong; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiu

    2014-02-12

    An optimized two-step anodization is developed to fabricate ultralong, small-diameter TiO2 nanotubes, that is, with tube length of up to 31 μm and pore diameter of about 35 nm in this work. This overcomes the length limitation of small diameter tubes that usually presents in conventional one-step anodization. The small tubes with lengths of 23 μm yield a conversion efficiency of 5.02% in dye-sensitized solar cells under nonoptimized conditions.

  12. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  13. Strategies and techniques to enhance the in situ endothelialization of small-diameter biodegradable polymeric vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Melchiorri, Anthony J; Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P

    2013-08-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding.

  14. Strategies and Techniques to Enhance the In Situ Endothelialization of Small-Diameter Biodegradable Polymeric Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding. PMID:23252992

  15. Optimization of the Energy Window for PETbox4, a Preclinical PET Tomograph With a Small Inner Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z.; Bao, Q.; Taschereau, R.; Wang, H.; Bai, B.; Chatziioannou, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems are often designed by employing close geometry configurations. Due to the different characteristics caused by geometrical factors, these tomographs require data acquisition protocols that differ from those optimized for conventional large diameter ring systems. In this work we optimized the energy window for data acquisitions with PETbox4, a 50 mm detector separation (box-like geometry) pre-clinical PET scanner, using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE). The fractions of different types of events were estimated using a voxelized phantom including a mouse as well as its supporting chamber, mimicking a realistic mouse imaging environment. Separate code was developed to extract additional information about the gamma interactions for more accurate event type classification. Three types of detector backscatter events were identified in addition to the trues, phantom scatters and randoms. The energy window was optimized based on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and scatter fraction (SF) with lower-level discriminators (LLD) corresponding to energies from 150 keV to 450 keV. The results were validated based on the calculated image uniformity, spillover ratio (SOR) and recovery coefficient (RC) from physical measurements using the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-4 image quality phantom. These results indicate that when PETbox4 is operated with a more narrow energy window (350-650 keV), detector backscatter rejection is unnecessary. For the NEMA NU-4 image quality phantom, the SOR for the water chamber decreases by about 45% from 15.1% to 8.3%, and the SOR for the air chamber decreases by 31% from 12.0% to 8.3% at the LLDs of 150 and 350 keV, without obvious change in uniformity, further supporting the simulation based optimization. The optimization described in this work is not limited to PETbox4, but also applicable or helpful to other small inner diameter geometry

  16. Salt-dependent DNA superhelix diameter studied by small angle neutron scattering measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Hammermann, M; Brun, N; Klenin, K V; May, R; Tóth, K; Langowski, J

    1998-01-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering we have measured the static form factor of two different superhelical DNAs, p1868 (1868 bp) and pUC18 (2686 bp), in dilute aqueous solution at salt concentrations between 0 and 1.5 M Na+ in 10 mM Tris at 0% and 100% D2O. For both DNA molecules, the theoretical static form factor was also calculated from an ensemble of Monte Carlo configurations generated by a previously described model. Simulated and measured form factors of both DNAs showed the same behavior between 10 and 100 mM salt concentration: An undulation in the scattering curve at a momentum transfer q = 0.5 nm-1 present at lower concentration disappears above 100 mM. The position of the undulation corresponds to a distance of approximately 10-20 nm. This indicated a change in the DNA superhelix diameter, as the undulation is not present in the scattering curve of the relaxed DNA. From the measured scattering curves of superhelical DNA we estimated the superhelix diameter as a function of Na+ concentration by a quantitative comparison with the scattering curve of relaxed DNA. The ratio of the scattering curves of superhelical and relaxed DNA is very similar to the form factor of a pair of point scatterers. We concluded that the distance of this pair corresponds to the interstrand separation in the superhelix. The computed superhelix diameter of 16.0 +/- 0.9 nm at 10 mM decreased to 9.0 +/- 0.7 nm at 100 mM salt concentration. Measured and simulated scattering curves agreed almost quantitatively, therefore we also calculated the superhelix diameter from the simulated conformations. It decreased from 18.0 +/- 1.5 nm at 10 mM to 9.4 +/- 1.5 nm at 100 mM salt concentration. This value did not significantly change to lower values at higher Na+ concentration, in agreement with results obtained by electron microscopy, scanning force microscopy imaging in aqueous solution, and recent MC simulations, but in contrast to the observation of a lateral collapse of the DNA superhelix

  17. Aortic Intima-Media Thickness and Aortic Diameter in Small for Gestational Age and Growth Restricted Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Roig, M. Dolores; Mazarico, Edurne; Valladares, Esther; Guirado, Laura; Fernandez-Arias, Mireia; Vela, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to measure aortic intima-media thickness (aIMT) and aortic diameter (AD) in appropriate for gestational age (AGA) fetuses, small for gestational age (SGA) fetuses, and intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) fetuses. Methods Case-control study performed between June 2011 and June 2012. Forty-nine AGA fetuses, 40 SGA fetuses, and 35 IUGR fetuses underwent concomitant measurement of aIMT and AD at a mean gestational age of 34.4 weeks. Results Median aIMT was higher in fetuses with IUGR (0.504 mm [95%CI: 0.477-0.530 mm]), than in SGA fetuses (0.466 mm [95% CI: 0.447–0.485 mm]), and AGA fetuses (0.471 mm [95% CI: 0.454-0.488 mm]) (p = 0.023). Mean AD was significantly lower in fetuses with IUGR (4.451 mm [95% CI: 4.258–4.655 mm]), than in AGA fetuses (4.74 mm [95% CI: 4.63-4.843 mm]) (p = 0.028). Conclusions Growth restricted fetuses have a thicker aortic wall than AGA and SGA fetuses, which possibly represents preclinical atherosclerosis and a predisposition to later cardiovascular disease. PMID:26017141

  18. Production of Human Endothelial Cells Free from Soluble Xenogeneic Antigens for Bioartificial Small Diameter Vascular Graft Endothelization

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Juliana Lott; Zonari, Alessandra; de Paula, Ana Cláudia Chagas; Martins, Thaís Maria da Mata; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Goes, Alfredo Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Arterial bypass graft implantation remains the primary therapy for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease, but most lack adequate saphenous vein or other conduits for bypass procedures and would benefit from a bioartificial conduit. This study aimed to produce human endothelial cells (hECs) in large scale, free from xenogeneic antigens, to develop a small diameter, compatible vessel for potential use as a vascular graft. Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hASCs) were isolated, cultured, and differentiated in the presence of human serum and used for the reendothelization of a decellularized rat aorta. hASC derived ECs (hASC-ECs) expressed VEGFR2, vWf and CD31 endothelial cell markers, the latter in higher levels than hASCs and HUVECs, and were shown to be functional. Decellularization protocol yielded aortas devoid of cell nuclei, with preserved structure, including a preserved basement membrane. When seeded with hASC-ECs, the decellularized aorta was completely reendothelized, and the hASC-ECs maintained their phenotype in this new condition. hASCs can be differentiated into functional hECs without the use of animal supplements and are capable of reendothelizing a decellularized rat aorta while maintaining their phenotype. The preservation of the basement membrane following decellularization supported the complete reendothelization of the scaffold with no cell migration towards other layers. This approach is potentially useful for rapid obtention of compatible, xenogeneic-free conduit. PMID:26146626

  19. Robotic gas metal arc welding of small diameter saddle type joints using multi-stripe structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonser, Gary R.; Parker, Graham A.

    1999-11-01

    Single-stripe structured light sensors are widely used in conjunction with arc welding robots for seam-tracking purposes. The interaction of the projected light with the weld joint and component surfaces produces characteristic line shapes with feature points that can be recognized at high speed by an underlying vision system. Unfortunately they are suitable only for the major classes of weld joint typically encountered within industry--long, straight, or gently curving fillet or butt joints. We present a multistripe structured light sensor that detects and measures the position of the saddle type weld joint formed by two small (< 50-mm)-diameter intersecting tubes. The underlying image processing algorithms detect the weld feature points from each stripe along with four calibration points to generate the entire weld path in the robot workcell base coordinate system before welding commences. The system is validated within an existing welding application; detecting 93% of the weld feature points within +/- 0.4 mm when used on 30-mm-diam tubes.

  20. On the decellularization of fresh or frozen human umbilical arteries: implications for small-diameter tissue engineered vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Tuan-Mu, Ho-Yi; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Hu, Jin-Jia

    2014-06-01

    Most tissues, including those to be decellularized for tissue engineering applications, are frozen for long term preservation. Such conventional cryopreservation has been shown to alter the structure and mechanical properties of tissues. Little is known, however, how freezing affects decellularization of tissues. The purpose of this study was two-fold: to examine the effects of freezing on decellularization of human umbilical arteries (HUAs), which represent a potential scaffolding material for small-diameter tissue-engineered vascular grafts, and to examine how decellularization affects the mechanical properties of frozen HUAs. Among many decellularization methods, hypotonic sodium dodecyl sulfate solution was selected as the decellularizing agent and tested on fresh HUAs to optimize decellularization conditions. The efficiency of decellularization was evaluated by DNA assay and histology every 12 up to 48 h. The optimized decellularization protocol was then performed on frozen HUAs. The stiffness, burst pressure, and suture retention strength of fresh HUAs and frozen HUAs before and after decellularization were also examined. It appeared that freezing decreased the efficiency of decellularization, which may be attributed to the condensed extracellular matrix caused by freezing. While the stiffness of fresh HUAs did not change significantly after decellularization, decellularization reduced the compliance of frozen HUAs. Interestingly, the stiffness of decellularized frozen HUAs was similar to that of decellularized fresh HUAs. Although little difference in stiffness was observed, we suggest avoiding freezing if more efficient and complete decellularization is desired.

  1. An ultrasound-based liquid pressure measurement method in small diameter pipelines considering the installation and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Song, Zhengxiang

    2015-04-09

    Liquid pressure is a key parameter for detecting and judging faults in hydraulic mechanisms, but traditional measurement methods have many deficiencies. An effective non-intrusive method using an ultrasound-based technique to measure liquid pressure in small diameter (less than 15 mm) pipelines is presented in this paper. The proposed method is based on the principle that the transmission speed of an ultrasonic wave in a Kneser liquid correlates with liquid pressure. Liquid pressure was calculated using the variation of ultrasonic propagation time in a liquid under different pressures: 0 Pa and X Pa. In this research the time difference was obtained by an electrical processing approach and was accurately measured to the nanosecond level through a high-resolution time measurement module. Because installation differences and liquid temperatures could influence the measurement accuracy, a special type of circuit called automatic gain control (AGC) circuit and a new back propagation network (BPN) model accounting for liquid temperature were employed to improve the measurement results. The corresponding pressure values were finally obtained by utilizing the relationship between time difference, transient temperature and liquid pressure. An experimental pressure measurement platform was built and the experimental results confirm that the proposed method has good measurement accuracy.

  2. An Ultrasound-Based Liquid Pressure Measurement Method in Small Diameter Pipelines Considering the Installation and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Song, Zhengxiang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid pressure is a key parameter for detecting and judging faults in hydraulic mechanisms, but traditional measurement methods have many deficiencies. An effective non-intrusive method using an ultrasound-based technique to measure liquid pressure in small diameter (less than 15 mm) pipelines is presented in this paper. The proposed method is based on the principle that the transmission speed of an ultrasonic wave in a Kneser liquid correlates with liquid pressure. Liquid pressure was calculated using the variation of ultrasonic propagation time in a liquid under different pressures: 0 Pa and X Pa. In this research the time difference was obtained by an electrical processing approach and was accurately measured to the nanosecond level through a high-resolution time measurement module. Because installation differences and liquid temperatures could influence the measurement accuracy, a special type of circuit called automatic gain control (AGC) circuit and a new back propagation network (BPN) model accounting for liquid temperature were employed to improve the measurement results. The corresponding pressure values were finally obtained by utilizing the relationship between time difference, transient temperature and liquid pressure. An experimental pressure measurement platform was built and the experimental results confirm that the proposed method has good measurement accuracy. PMID:25860069

  3. The Effects of Losartan in Preserving the Structural Integrity of Decellularized Small Diameter Vascular Allograft Conduit Implants In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Byoung Wook; Kim, Seong Who; Choo, Suk Jung

    2017-01-01

    Decellularization is a proposed method of preparing nonautologous biological arterial vascular scaffolding; however, the fate of the supporting medial elastic fiber, which is important in preserving the vascular structural integrity, is uncertain. The influence of losartan on preserving the medial elastic fiber integrity in decellularized small diameter vascular conduits (SDVC) was investigated. Decellularized infrarenal abdominal aortic allografts were implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats treated either with (study rats, n = 6) or without oral losartan (control rats, n = 6) and graded 8 weeks later according to a remodeling scoring system (1-mild, 2-moderate, 3-severe) which we devised based on the intimal hyperplasia degree, morphologic changes, and elastic fiber fragmentation of the conduits. DAPI immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 47 (25 decellularization only and 22 losartan treatment) cross-sectional slide specimens. The losartan versus decellularization only SDVC showed a significantly lower medial elastic fragmentation score (1.32 vs. 2.24, P < 0.001), superior medial layer preservation, and relatively more normal appearing intimal cellular morphology. The results suggested rats receiving decellularized SDVCs treated with losartan may yield superior medial layer elastic fiber preservation.

  4. Final Report: DoE SBIR Phase 2 Low-Cost Small Diameter NMR Technologies for In-Situ Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David Oliver

    2010-09-03

    In this Phase 2 SBIR program, Vista Clara successfully developed and field-tested small diameter NNR logging tools for subsurface characterization and monitoring. This effort involved the design and development surface electronics, a winch with 470ft cable, and three interchangeable downhole probes: a 3.5â diameter borehole NMR probe, a 1.67â diameter borehole NMR probe, and a 2.5â diameter NMR probe that can be deployed using a Geoprobe direct push machine. The 3.5â probe was tested extensively over a 6 week period including 4â to 8â boreholes in Washington, Idaho, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Connecticut and Massachusetts. The field test campaign was highly successful. The 1.67â probe was assembled, tested and calibrated in the laboratory. The 2.5â Geoprobe probe is in final assembly and testing at the time of this report. The completed Phase 2 R&D program has resulted in the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes of 4â diameter, the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed in boreholes on 2â diameter, and the first NMR logging tool that can be deployed by a direct push machine. These small diameter tools make NMR logging technically and economically feasible, for the first time. Previously available NMR logging tools were developed for oilfield applications and are prohibitively large and expensive for the majority of near surface groundwater characterization problems.

  5. The production of W-0.35HfC (Mol %) wirebar by arc melting and high energy rate extrusion of small diameter ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, R. William; Begg, Lester L.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten alloy fiber reinforced tungsten is a candidate emitter material for space nuclear thermionic multi-kilowatt power systems. Fuel swelling which results in emitter deformation has been a primary concern for being able to achieve long lived (7 years or greater) thermionic fuel elements (TFE) operating at temperatures at or above 1900 K. The tungsten alloy (W-0.35 mo/%HfC) has extremely attractive mechanical properties above 1900 K and is a candidate reinforcement of tungsten for emitters. Because of its high strength, processing of the W-035HfC alloy to small diameter (0.38mm) wire has been difficult and the yield of useable product has been low. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that by vacuum arc melting 38mm diameter ingots and high energy rate extrusions, small diameter (18mm) rod could be produced which is more compatible with swaging equipment used in tungsten wire production. Six 38 mm diameter ingots of W-0.35 HfC were produced by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The ingots were clad in 46 mm diameter molybdenum heated to 2270K and successfully extruded through a zirconia coated die at a reduction ratio of 7:1. The microstructure of the as-extruded bars is highly worked and should be amenable to processing to small diameter wire.

  6. The production of W-0. 35HfC (Mol %) wirebar by arc melting and high energy rate extrusion of small diameter ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr. ); Begg, L.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten alloy fiber reinforced tungsten is a candidate emitter material for space nuclear thermionic multi-kilowatt power systems. Fuel swelling which results in emitter deformation has been a primary concern for being able to achieve long lived (7 years or greater) thermionic fuel elements (TFE) operating at temperatures at or above 1900 K. The tungsten alloy (W-0.35 mo/%HfC) has extremely attractive mechanical properties above 1900 K and is a candidate reinforcement of tungsten for emitters. Because of its high strength, processing of the W-035HfC alloy to small diameter (0.38mm) wire has been difficult and the yield of useable product has been low. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that by vacuum arc melting 38mm diameter ingots and high energy rate extrusions, small diameter (18mm) rod could be produced which is more compatible with swaging equipment used in tungsten wire production. Six 38 mm diameter ingots of W-0.35 HfC were produced by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The ingots were clad in 46 mm diameter molybdenum heated to 2270K and successfully extruded through a zirconia coated die at a reduction ratio of 7:1. The microstructure of the as-extruded bars is highly worked and should be amenable to processing to small diameter wire.

  7. Ultra-stable small diameter hybrid transition metal dichalcogenide nanotubes X-M-Y (X, Y = S, Se, Te; M = Mo, W, Nb, Ta): a computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Yuanchang; Duan, Wenhui; Ding, Feng

    2015-08-28

    Similar to graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) can be rolled into one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes. While, owing to their three-atom-thick structure, the large energy penalty greatly hinders the synthesis of small diameter TMD nanotubes. Here we propose the synthesis of hybrid TMD nanotubes with different chalcogens on each side (X-TM-Y) by self-assembly rolling up. Our calculations indicate that the tube formation can be driven by the relaxation of the intrinsic strain in X-TM-Y and the synthesis of the small hybrid nanotubes with diameter of ∼2.0 nm is possible. The rich variety of polymorphs exhibit unique and tunable electronic properties. Our finding opens a door synthesize hybrid small diameter TMD nanotubes for various applications.

  8. Ultra-stable small diameter hybrid transition metal dichalcogenide nanotubes X-M-Y (X, Y = S, Se, Te; M = Mo, W, Nb, Ta): a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wen; Li, Yuanchang; Duan, Wenhui; Ding, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Similar to graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) can be rolled into one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes. While, owing to their three-atom-thick structure, the large energy penalty greatly hinders the synthesis of small diameter TMD nanotubes. Here we propose the synthesis of hybrid TMD nanotubes with different chalcogens on each side (X-TM-Y) by self-assembly rolling up. Our calculations indicate that the tube formation can be driven by the relaxation of the intrinsic strain in X-TM-Y and the synthesis of the small hybrid nanotubes with diameter of ~2.0 nm is possible. The rich variety of polymorphs exhibit unique and tunable electronic properties. Our finding opens a door synthesize hybrid small diameter TMD nanotubes for various applications.Similar to graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) can be rolled into one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes. While, owing to their three-atom-thick structure, the large energy penalty greatly hinders the synthesis of small diameter TMD nanotubes. Here we propose the synthesis of hybrid TMD nanotubes with different chalcogens on each side (X-TM-Y) by self-assembly rolling up. Our calculations indicate that the tube formation can be driven by the relaxation of the intrinsic strain in X-TM-Y and the synthesis of the small hybrid nanotubes with diameter of ~2.0 nm is possible. The rich variety of polymorphs exhibit unique and tunable electronic properties. Our finding opens a door synthesize hybrid small diameter TMD nanotubes for various applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02812d

  9. Ecological Importance of Small-Diameter Trees to the Structure, Diversity and Biomass of a Tropical Evergreen Forest at Rabi, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Memiaghe, Hervé R.; Lutz, James A.; Korte, Lisa; Alonso, Alfonso; Kenfack, David

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests have long been recognized for their biodiversity and ecosystem services. Despite their importance, tropical forests, and particularly those of central Africa, remain understudied. Until recently, most forest inventories in Central Africa have focused on trees ≥10 cm in diameter, even though several studies have shown that small-diameter tree population may be important to demographic rates and nutrient cycling. To determine the ecological importance of small-diameter trees in central African forests, we used data from a 25-ha permanent plot that we established in the rainforest of Gabon to study the diversity and dynamics of these forests. Within the plot, we censused 175,830 trees ≥1 cm dbh from 54 families, 192 genera, and 345 species. Average tree density was 7,026 trees/ha, basal area 31.64 m2/ha, and above-ground biomass 369.40 Mg/ha. Fabaceae, Ebenaceae and Euphorbiaceae were the most important families by basal area, density and above-ground biomass. Small-diameter trees (1 cm ≥ dbh <10 cm) comprised 93.7% of the total tree population, 16.5% of basal area, and 4.8% of the above-ground biomass. They also had diversity 18% higher at family level, 34% higher at genus level, and 42% higher at species level than trees ≥10 cm dbh. Although the relative contribution of small-diameter trees to biomass was comparable to other forests globally, their contribution to forest density, and diversity was disproportionately higher. The high levels of diversity within small-diameter classes may give these forests high levels of structural resilience to anthropogenic/natural disturbance and a changing climate. PMID:27186658

  10. Ecological Importance of Small-Diameter Trees to the Structure, Diversity and Biomass of a Tropical Evergreen Forest at Rabi, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Memiaghe, Hervé R; Lutz, James A; Korte, Lisa; Alonso, Alfonso; Kenfack, David

    2016-01-01

    Tropical forests have long been recognized for their biodiversity and ecosystem services. Despite their importance, tropical forests, and particularly those of central Africa, remain understudied. Until recently, most forest inventories in Central Africa have focused on trees ≥10 cm in diameter, even though several studies have shown that small-diameter tree population may be important to demographic rates and nutrient cycling. To determine the ecological importance of small-diameter trees in central African forests, we used data from a 25-ha permanent plot that we established in the rainforest of Gabon to study the diversity and dynamics of these forests. Within the plot, we censused 175,830 trees ≥1 cm dbh from 54 families, 192 genera, and 345 species. Average tree density was 7,026 trees/ha, basal area 31.64 m2/ha, and above-ground biomass 369.40 Mg/ha. Fabaceae, Ebenaceae and Euphorbiaceae were the most important families by basal area, density and above-ground biomass. Small-diameter trees (1 cm ≥ dbh <10 cm) comprised 93.7% of the total tree population, 16.5% of basal area, and 4.8% of the above-ground biomass. They also had diversity 18% higher at family level, 34% higher at genus level, and 42% higher at species level than trees ≥10 cm dbh. Although the relative contribution of small-diameter trees to biomass was comparable to other forests globally, their contribution to forest density, and diversity was disproportionately higher. The high levels of diversity within small-diameter classes may give these forests high levels of structural resilience to anthropogenic/natural disturbance and a changing climate.

  11. 77 FR 46385 - Certain Small Diameter Seamless Carbon and Alloy Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From Germany...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... circular cross-section, not more than 114.3 mm (4.5 inches) in outside diameter, regardless of wall... applications. Pipes produced in non- standard wall thicknesses are commonly referred to as tubes. The seamless..., Characteristics and Uses: Seamless pressure pipes are intended for the conveyance of water, steam,...

  12. 77 FR 56809 - Certain Small Diameter Seamless Carbon and Alloy Steel Standard, Line, and Pressure Pipe From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ..., not more than 114.3 mm (4.5 inches) in outside diameter, regardless of wall thickness, manufacturing... produced in non- standard wall thicknesses are commonly referred to as tubes. The seamless pipes subject to... Uses: Seamless pressure pipes are intended for the conveyance of water, steam,...

  13. Electrical transport properties of small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes aligned on ST-cut quartz substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A method is introduced to isolate and measure the electrical transport properties of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) aligned on an ST-cut quartz, from room temperature down to 2 K. The diameter and chirality of the measured SWNTs are accurately defined from Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A significant up-shift in the G-band of the resonance Raman spectra of the SWNTs is observed, which increases with increasing SWNTs diameter, and indicates a strong interaction with the quartz substrate. A semiconducting SWNT, with diameter 0.84 nm, shows Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and Coulomb blockade behaviors at low temperatures. Another semiconducting SWNT, with a thinner diameter of 0.68 nm, exhibits a transition from the semiconducting state to an insulating state at low temperatures. These results elucidate some of the electrical properties of SWNTs in this unique configuration and help pave the way towards prospective device applications. PMID:25170326

  14. Diameter-dependent release of a cisplatin pro-drug from small and large functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Muzi, Laura; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Russier, Julie; Li, Jian; Chin, Chee Fei; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-03-12

    The use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy still suffers from severe disadvantages, such as lack of appropriate selectivity for tumor tissues and insurgence of multi-drug resistance. Moreover, drug efficacy can be attenuated by several mechanisms such as premature drug inactivation, reduced drug uptake inside cells and increased drug efflux once internalized. The use of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as chemotherapeutic drug delivery systems is a promising strategy to overcome such limitations due to their ability to enhance cellular internalization of poorly permeable drugs and thus increase the drug bioavailability at the diseased site, compared to the free drug. Furthermore, the possibility to encapsulate agents in the nanotubes' inner cavity can protect the drug from early inactivation and their external functionalizable surface is useful for selective targeting. In this study, a hydrophobic platinum(IV) complex was encapsulated within the inner space of two different diameter functionalized multi-walled CNTs (Pt(IV)@CNTs). The behavior of the complexes, compared to the free drug, was investigated on both HeLa human cancer cells and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Both CNT samples efficiently induced cell death in HeLa cancer cells 72 hours after the end of exposure to CNTs. Although the larger diameter CNTs were more cytotoxic on HeLa cells compared to both the free drug and the smaller diameter nanotubes, the latter allowed a prolonged release of the encapsulated drug, thus increasing its anticancer efficacy. In contrast, both Pt(IV)@CNT constructs were poorly cytotoxic on macrophages and induced negligible cell activation and no pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Both CNT samples were efficiently internalized by the two types of cells, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, the platinum levels found in the cells after Pt(IV)@CNT exposure demonstrate that they can

  15. Size-dependent photoconductivity and dark conductivity of m-axial GaN nanowires with small critical diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Reui-San; Chang, Fu-Chieh; Chen, Li-Chyong; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Yang, Ying-Jay

    2009-10-01

    The size effects on both the photoconductivity and dark conductivity have been observed in m-axial GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For these nanowires with diameters at 50-130 nm, the products of carrier lifetime (τ) and mobility (μ) derived from the photocurrent measurements are typically at (2-8)×10-1 cm2/V, which are over two orders of magnitude higher than the maximal reported values [τμ=(1-5)×10-4 cm2/V] for their thin film counterparts. A significant decrease of τμ value at diameter below the critical values (dcrt) at 30-40 nm is observed. Similar size dependence is also found from the dark conductivity study. The temperature-dependent measurements further indicate two different thermal activation mechanisms in GaN nanowires with sizes above and below the dcrt. These results suggest a surface-dominant transport property in GaN nanowires both in dark and under light illumination due to the presence of surface depletion and band bending. Probable reasons leading to the smaller dcrt of the CVD-grown m-axial GaN nanowires, compared to the c-axial ones grown by molecular beam epitaxy are discussed as well.

  16. Diameter-dependent release of a cisplatin pro-drug from small and large functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzi, Laura; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Russier, Julie; Li, Jian; Chin, Chee Fei; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy still suffers from severe disadvantages, such as lack of appropriate selectivity for tumor tissues and insurgence of multi-drug resistance. Moreover, drug efficacy can be attenuated by several mechanisms such as premature drug inactivation, reduced drug uptake inside cells and increased drug efflux once internalized. The use of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as chemotherapeutic drug delivery systems is a promising strategy to overcome such limitations due to their ability to enhance cellular internalization of poorly permeable drugs and thus increase the drug bioavailability at the diseased site, compared to the free drug. Furthermore, the possibility to encapsulate agents in the nanotubes' inner cavity can protect the drug from early inactivation and their external functionalizable surface is useful for selective targeting. In this study, a hydrophobic platinum(iv) complex was encapsulated within the inner space of two different diameter functionalized multi-walled CNTs (Pt(iv)@CNTs). The behavior of the complexes, compared to the free drug, was investigated on both HeLa human cancer cells and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Both CNT samples efficiently induced cell death in HeLa cancer cells 72 hours after the end of exposure to CNTs. Although the larger diameter CNTs were more cytotoxic on HeLa cells compared to both the free drug and the smaller diameter nanotubes, the latter allowed a prolonged release of the encapsulated drug, thus increasing its anticancer efficacy. In contrast, both Pt(iv)@CNT constructs were poorly cytotoxic on macrophages and induced negligible cell activation and no pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Both CNT samples were efficiently internalized by the two types of cells, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, the platinum levels found in the cells after Pt(iv)@CNT exposure demonstrate that they can

  17. Evidence that interfibrillar load transfer in tendon is supported by small diameter fibrils and not extrafibrillar tissue components.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Fetchko, Kristen L; Dodge, George R; Elliott, Dawn M

    2017-01-10

    Collagen fibrils in tendon are believed to be discontinuous and transfer tensile loads through shear forces generated during interfibrillar sliding. However, the structures that transmit these interfibrillar forces are unknown. Various extrafibrillar tissue components (e.g., glycosaminoglycans, collagens XII and XIV) have been suggested to transmit interfibrillar loads by bridging collagen fibrils. Alternatively, collagen fibrils may interact directly through physical fusions and interfibrillar branching. The objective of this study was to test whether extrafibrillar proteins are necessary to transmit load between collagen fibrils or if interfibrillar load transfer is accomplished directly by the fibrils themselves. Trypsin digestions were used to remove a broad spectrum of extrafibrillar proteins and measure their contribution to the multiscale mechanics of rat tail tendon fascicles. Additionally, images obtained from serial block-face scanning electron microscopy were used to determine the three-dimensional fibrillar organization in tendon fascicles and identify any potential interfibrillar interactions. While trypsin successfully removed several extrafibrillar tissue components, there was no change in the macroscale fascicle mechanics or fibril:tissue strain ratio. Furthermore, the imaging data suggested that a network of smaller diameter fibrils (<150 nm) wind around and fuse with their neighboring larger diameter fibrils. These findings demonstrate that interfibrillar load transfer is not supported by extrafibrillar tissue components and support the hypothesis that collagen fibrils are capable of transmitting loads themselves. Conclusively determining how fibrils bear load within tendon is critical for identifying the mechanisms that impair tissue function with degeneration and for restoring tissue properties via cell-mediated regeneration or engineered tissue replacements. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop

  18. The use of high-resolution digital imaging technology for small diameter K-file length determination in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Bart; Bud, Marius; Sutanto, Asti; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2010-04-01

    To assess the reliability of high resolution intra-oral photostimulable storage phosphor (PSP) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imaging systems for working length (WL) assessment of small K-files in narrow and curved root canals. Eleven narrow and curved canals from extracted molars were used as pre-test for sample-size calculation. Nineteen canals from four cadavers were used for endodontic length assessment in the final study. Small K-files (ISO size 6, 8, and 10) were introduced into the canals at prepared length. Digital intra-oral radiographs were obtained using high-resolution Vistascan PSP plates and Sigma M CMOS active pixel sensor with a DC X-ray tube at 70 kV, 7 mA, and 0.16 s. Both image series were assessed with and without use of a dedicated endodontic filter. Three observers measured WLs for comparison to the gold standards of a digital millimeter ruler. Multiple regression analysis of the dependent measurements revealed no significant influence of imaging sensor (PSP or CMOS, p = 0.34) and image processing (p = 0.97). For ISO file size, however, there was a significant difference (p = 0.08) at a level of 10%. Observers mostly underestimated lengths using PSP but overestimated them on CMOS. Almost all radiographic measurements (96-98%) were within 2-mm deviation, while 71% to 82% deviated within 1 mm. Dedicated filtering and sensor type did not influence the outcome of WL determination of small file sizes when using high-resolution imaging sensors. WL determination with ISO file 6 did show a significant difference compared to ISO 8 and 10 but mostly for deviations <1.5 mm.

  19. Harvesting Overstocked Stands of Small Diameter Trees. Report No. 4: Cost and Productivity of New Felling and Forwarding Equipment.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michael B.; Howard, James O.; Biomass and Energy Project

    1987-07-01

    This report describes the felling, bunching, and forwarding operations now working in the doghair stands on the Quilcene District. The felling was done with a Washington Logging Company FB-1 steep slope feller/buncher. The forwarding was done with a Timberjack 520A rubber-tired forwarder. Productivity and cost studies were required by the service contract between the Forest Service and the logging company. The intent of the studies was to capture the comprehensive technical and economic information provided by early operation of the total small tree harvesting and utilization system. This report focuses on the felling and delivery of the trees to the central processing system. 7 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. The Decellularized Vascular Allograft as an Experimental Platform for Developing a Biocompatible Small-Diameter Graft Conduit in a Rat Surgical Model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seong-Jun; Kim, Seong Who; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Byoung Wook; Im, I-rang; Yun, Hye Joo; Lee, Sang Kwon; Song, Hyun; Cho, Won Chul

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was aimed to assess the feasibility of using decellularized aortic allograft in a rat small animal surgical model for conducting small diameter vascular tissue engineering research. Materials and Methods Decellularized aortic allografts were infra-renally implanted in 12 Sprague-Dawley (SD) adult rats. The conduits were harvested at 2 (n = 6) and 8 weeks (n = 6), and assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), van Gieson, Masson Trichrome staining, and immunohistochemistry for von Willebrand factor, CD 31+, and actin. Results Consistent, predictable, and reproducible results were produced by means of a standardized surgical procedure. All animals survived without major complications. Inflammatory immune reaction was minimal, and there was no evidence of aneurysmal degeneration or rupture of the decellularized vascular implants. However, the aortic wall appeared thinner and the elastic fibers in the medial layer showed decreased undulation compared to the normal aorta. There was also minimal cellular repopulation of the vascular media. The remodeling appeared progressive from 2 to 8 weeks with increased intimal thickening and accumulation of both collagen and cells staining for actin. Although the endothelial like cells appeared largely confluent at 8 weeks, they were not as concentrated in appearance as in the normal aorta. Conclusion The results showed the present rat animal model using decellularized vascular allograft implants to be a potentially durable and effective experimental platform for conducting further research on small diameter vascular tissue engineering. PMID:21319339

  1. Surface modification of silk fibroin fabric using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition and heparin immobilization for small-diameter vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Elahi, M Fazley; Guan, Guoping; Wang, Lu; Zhao, Xinzhe; Wang, Fujun; King, Martin W

    2015-03-03

    There is an urgent need to develop a biologically active implantable small-diameter vascular prosthesis with long-term patency. Silk-fibroin-based small-diameter vascular prosthesis is a promising candidate having higher patency rate; however, the surface modification is indeed required to improve its further hemocompatibility. In this study, silk fibroin fabric was modified by a two-stage process. First, the surface of silk fibroin fabric was coated using a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition technique by stepwise dipping the silk fibroin fabric into a solution of cationic poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and anionic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) solution. The dipping procedure was repeated to obtain the PAH/PAA multilayers deposited on the silk fibroin fabrics. Second, the polyelectrolyte-deposited silk fibroin fabrics were treated in EDC/NHS-activated low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) solution at 4 °C for 24 h, resulting in immobilization of LMWH on the silk fibroin fabrics surface. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray data revealed the accomplishment of LMWH immobilization on the polyelectrolyte-deposited silk fibroin fabric surface. The higher the number of PAH/PAA coating layers on the silk fibroin fabric, the more surface hydrophilicity could be obtained, resulting in a higher fetal bovine serum protein and platelets adhesion resistance properties when tested in vitro. In addition, compared with untreated sample, the surface-modified silk fibroin fabrics showed negligible loss of bursting strength and thus reveal the acceptability of polyelectrolytes deposition and heparin immobilization approach for silk-fibroin-based small-diameter vascular prostheses modification.

  2. Successful Endothelialization and Remodeling of a Cell-Free Small-Diameter Arterial Graft in a Large Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Row, Sindhu; Smith, Randall; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The large number of coronary artery bypass procedures necessitates development of off-the-shelf vascular grafts that do not require cell or tissue harvest from patients. However, immediate thrombus formation after implantation due to the absence of a healthy endothelium is very likely. Here we present the successful development of an Acellular Tissue Engineered Vessel (A-TEV) based on small intestinal submucosa that was functionalized sequentially with heparin and VEGF. A-TEVs were implanted into the carotid artery of an ovine model demonstrating high patency rates and significant host cell infiltration as early as one week post-implantation. At one month, a confluent and functional endothelium was present and the vascular wall showed significant infiltration of host smooth muscle cells exhibiting vascular contractility in response to vaso-agonists. After three months the endothelium aligned in the direction of flow and the medial layer comprised of circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells. A-TEVs demonstrated high elastin and collagen content as well as impressive mechanical properties and vascular contractility comparable to native arteries. This is the first demonstration of successful endothelialization, remodeling, and development of vascular function of a cell-free vascular graft that was implanted in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model. PMID:26561932

  3. Suitability of live and fire-killed small-diameter ponderosa and lodgepole pine trees for manufacturing a new structural wood composite.

    PubMed

    Linton, J M; Barnes, H M; Seale, R D; Jones, P D; Lowell, E C; Hummel, S S

    2010-08-01

    Finding alternative uses for raw material from small-diameter trees is a critical problem throughout the United States. In western states, a lack of markets for small-diameter ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) can contribute to problems associated with overstocking. To test the feasibility of producing structural composite lumber (SCL) beams from these two western species, we used a new technology called steam-pressed scrim lumber (SPSL) based on scrimming technology developed in Australia. Both standing green and fire-killed ponderosa and lodgepole pine logs were used in an initial test. Fire-killed logs of both species were found to be unsuitable for producing SPSL but green logs were suitable for producing SPSL. For SPSL from green material, ponderosa pine had significantly higher modulus of rupture and work-to-maximum load values than did SPSL from lodgepole pine. Modulus of elasticity was higher for lodgepole pine. The presence of blows was greater with lodgepole pine than with ponderosa. Blows had a negative effect on the mechanical properties of ponderosa pine but no significant effect on the mechanical properties of SPSL from lodgepole pine. An evaluation of non-destructive testing methods showed that X-ray could be used to determine low density areas in parent beams. The use of a sonic compression wave tester for NDE evaluation of modulus of rupture showed some promise with SPSL but requires further research.

  4. Development and In Vivo Evaluation of Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts Engineered by Outgrowth Endothelial Cells and Electrospun Chitosan/Poly(ɛ-Caprolactone) Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Qiao, Wei; Liu, Zhao; Shang, Tao; Qiao, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Successful engineering of a small-diameter vascular graft is still a challenge despite numerous attempts for decades. The present study aimed at developing a tissue-engineered vascular graft (TEVG) using autologous outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) and a hybrid biodegradable polymer scaffold. OECs were harvested from canine peripheral blood and proliferated in vitro, as well as identified by immunofluorescent staining. Electrospun hybrid chitosan/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (CS/PCL) nanofibers were fabricated and served as vascular scaffolds. TEVGs were constructed in vitro by seeding OECs onto CS/PCL scaffolds, and then implanted into carotid arteries of cell-donor dogs (n=6). After 3 months of implantation, 5 out of 6 of TEVGs remained patent as compared with 1 out of 6 of unseeded grafts kept patent. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the TEVGs retrieved at 3 months revealed the regeneration of endothelium, and the presence of collagen and elastin. OECs labeled with fluorescent dye before implantation were detected in the retrieved TEVGs, indicating that the OECs participated in the vascular tissue regeneration. Biomechanical testing of TEVGs showed good mechanical properties that were closer to native carotid arteries. RT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that TEVGs had favorable biological functional properties resembling native arteries. Overall, this study provided a new strategy to develop small-diameter TEVGs with excellent biocompatibility and regeneration ability. PMID:23902162

  5. Tissue-Engineered Small Diameter Arterial Vascular Grafts from Cell-Free Nanofiber PCL/Chitosan Scaffolds in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Takuma; Best, Cameron A.; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Shoji, Toshihiro; Yi, Tai; Udelsman, Brooks; Ohst, Devan; Ong, Chin Siang; Zhang, Huaitao; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.; Johnson, Jed; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) have the potential to overcome the issues faced by existing small diameter prosthetic grafts by providing a biodegradable scaffold where the patient’s own cells can engraft and form functional neotissue. However, applying classical approaches to create arterial TEVGs using slow degrading materials with supraphysiological mechanical properties, typically results in limited host cell infiltration, poor remodeling, stenosis, and calcification. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of novel small diameter arterial TEVGs created using fast degrading material. A 1.0mm and 5.0mm diameter TEVGs were fabricated with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CS) blend nanofibers. The 1.0mm TEVGs were implanted in mice (n = 3) as an unseeded infrarenal abdominal aorta interposition conduit., The 5.0mm TEVGs were implanted in sheep (n = 6) as an unseeded carotid artery (CA) interposition conduit. Mice were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months. All 1.0mm TEVGs remained patent without evidence of thrombosis or aneurysm formation. Based on small animal outcomes, sheep were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months for histological and mechanical analysis. There was no aneurysm formation or calcification in the TEVGs. 4 out of 6 grafts (67%) were patent. After 6 months in vivo, 9.1 ± 5.4% remained of the original scaffold. Histological analysis of patent grafts demonstrated deposition of extracellular matrix constituents including elastin and collagen production, as well as endothelialization and organized contractile smooth muscle cells, similar to that of native CA. The mechanical properties of TEVGs were comparable to native CA. There was a significant positive correlation between TEVG wall thickness and CD68+ macrophage infiltration into the scaffold (R2 = 0.95, p = 0.001). The fast degradation of CS in our novel TEVG promoted excellent cellular infiltration and neotissue formation

  6. Optimization of poly(L-lactic acid)/segmented polyurethane electrospinning process for the production of bilayered small-diameter nanofibrous tubular structures.

    PubMed

    Montini Ballarin, F; Caracciolo, P C; Blotta, E; Ballarin, V L; Abraham, G A

    2014-09-01

    The present study is focused on the electrospinning process as a versatile technique to obtain nanofibrous tubular structures for potential applications in vascular tissue engineering. A bilayered scaffolding structure composed of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)/bioresorbable segmented polyurethane (SPEU) blends for small-diameter (5mm) vascular bypass grafts was obtained by multilayering electrospinning. Polymer blend ratios were chosen to mimic the media and adventitia layers. The influence of the different electrospinning parameters into the fiber formation, fiber morphology and fiber mean diameter for PLLA, SPEU and two PLLA/SPEU blends were studied. Flat and two-parallel plate collectors were used to analyze the effect of the electrostatic field on the PLLA nanofiber alignment in the rotating mandrel. Membrane topography resulted in random or aligned nanofibrous structures depending on the auxiliary collector setup used. Finally, composition, surface hydrophilicity, thermal properties and morphology of nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized and discussed. Since the development of tissue engineered microvascular prostheses is still a challenge, the prepared scaffolding tubular structures are promising candidates for vascular tissue engineering.

  7. Renal Artery Embolization Combined With Radiofrequency Ablation in a Porcine Kidney Model: Effect of Small and Narrowly Calibrated Microparticles as Embolization Material on Coagulation Diameter, Volume, and Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Kortes, N.; Zelzer, S.; Arnegger, F. U.; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Gehrig, T.; Nickel, F.; Kenngott, H. G.; Mogler, C.; Longerich, T.; Meinzer, H. P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles on the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) in porcine kidneys. Forty-eight RFAs were performed in 24 kidneys of 12 pigs. In 6 animals, bilateral renal artery embolization was performed with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles. Upper and lower kidney poles were ablated with identical system parameters. Applying three-dimensional segmentation software, RFAs were segmented on registered 2 mm-thin macroscopic slices. Length, depth, width, volume{sub s}egmented, and volume{sub c}alculated were determined to describe the size of the RFAs. To evaluate the shape of the RFAs, depth-to-width ratio (perfect symmetry-to-lesion length was indicated by a ratio of 1), sphericity ratio (perfect sphere was indicated by a sphericity ratio of 1), eccentricity (perfect sphere was indicated by an eccentricity of 0), and circularity (perfect circle was indicated by a circularity of 1) were determined. Embolized compared with nonembolized RFAs showed significantly greater depth (23.4 {+-} 3.6 vs. 17.2 {+-} 1.8 mm; p < 0.001) and width (20.1 {+-} 2.9 vs. 12.6 {+-} 3.7 mm; p < 0.001); significantly larger volume{sub s}egmented (8.6 {+-} 3.2 vs. 3.0 {+-} 0.7 ml; p < 0.001) and volume{sub c}alculated (8.4 {+-} 3.0 ml vs. 3.3 {+-} 1.1 ml; p < 0.001); significantly lower depth-to-width (1.17 {+-} 0.10 vs. 1.48 {+-} 0.44; p < 0.05), sphericity (1.55 {+-} 0.44 vs. 1.96 {+-} 0.43; p < 0.01), and eccentricity (0.84 {+-} 0.61 vs. 1.73 {+-} 0.91; p < 0.01) ratios; and significantly greater circularity (0.62 {+-} 0.14 vs. 0.45 {+-} 0.16; p < 0.01). Renal artery embolization with small and narrowly calibrated microparticles affected the coagulation diameter, volume, and shape of RFAs in porcine kidneys. Embolized RFAs were significantly larger and more spherical compared with nonembolized RFAs.

  8. Effects of antiplatelet agents in combination with endothelial cell seeding on small-diameter Dacron vascular graft performance in the canine carotid artery model.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S P; Hunter, T J; Falkow, L J; Evancho, M M; Sharp, W V

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success of endothelial cell-seeded and non-seeded small-diameter vascular grafts in dogs medicated with antiplatelet agents. Eighty dogs underwent bilateral carotid artery replacements with 6 cm lengths of 4 mm I.D. double-velour Dacron grafts. In each dog one graft was seeded with enzymatically derived autologous endothelial cells; the contralateral graft was nonseeded. The following anti-platelet medications were administered beginning 4 days preoperatively: aspirin (5 grains every day); dipyridamole (50 mg twice a day); aspirin plus dipyridamole (5 grains each day plus 50 mg twice a day); aspirin (1.25 grains every other day); ibuprofen (10 mg/kg/day); U-53,059, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (3 mg/kg/day); and U-63557A, a thromboxane synthase inhibitor (10 mg/kg/day). Grafts were harvested 5 weeks postoperatively. Graft success was evaluated by patency, thrombus-free surface area, area endothelialized, and graft production of prostacyclin. None of the medications prevented neoendothelialization of seeded grafts. Mean patencies of endothelial cell-seeded grafts from medicated dogs were significantly greater than mean patencies of endothelial cell-seeded grafts from nonmedicated dogs. The cyclooxygenase inhibitors best maintained patency in nonseeded grafts. Thrombus-free surface areas of endothelial cell-seeded grafts from medicated dogs were significantly greater than from nonseeded control grafts from the medicated dogs. All medications impaired prostacyclin synthesis. We conclude that the combination of endothelial cell seeding plus antiplatelet medication is most efficacious in small-vessel grafting success and that high levels of prostacyclin production by vascular grafts are not necessary to maintain patency in dogs medicated with antiplatelet agents.

  9. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    DOE PAGES

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; ...

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assemblymore » containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal

  10. Novel techniques and devices for in-situ film coatings of long, small diameter tubes or elliptical and other surface contours

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph Michael; Fischer, Wolfram; Liaw, Chong -Jer; Meng, Wuzhang; Todd, Robert; Custer, Art; Dingus, Aaron; Erikson, Mark; Jamshidi, Nader; Poole, Henry Joe

    2015-07-30

    In this study, devices and techniques that can, via physical vapor deposition,coat various surface contours or very long small aperture pipes, are described. Recently, a magnetron mole was developed in order to in-situ coat accelerator tube sections of the Brookhaven National Lab relativistic heavy ion collider that have 7.1 cm diameter with access points that are 500 m apart, for copper coat the accelerator vacuum tube in order to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating and of electron clouds. A magnetron with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated and successfully operated to copper coat a whole assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, of the accelerator magnet tubing connected to two types bellows, to which two additional pipes made of accelerator tubing were connected. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system, which is enclosed in a flexible braided metal sleeve, is driven by a motorized spool. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate distance of less than 1.5 cm. Optimized process to ensure excellent adhesion was developed. Coating thickness of 10 μm Cu passed all industrial tests and even exceeded maximum capability of a 12 kg pull test fixture. Room temperature radio frequency (RF) resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel accelerator tube has conductivity close to copper tubing. Work is in progress to repeat the RF resistivity measurement at cryogenic temperatures. Over 20 years ago, a device using multi axis robotic manipulators controlling separate robotic assemblies resulted in nine-axes of motion combined with conformal shape of the

  11. N-type calcium current, Cav2.2, is enhanced in small-diameter sensory neurons isolated from Nf1+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Duan, J-H; Hodgdon, K E; Hingtgen, C M; Nicol, G D

    2014-06-13

    Major aspects of neuronal function are regulated by Ca(2+) including neurotransmitter release, excitability, developmental plasticity, and gene expression. We reported previously that sensory neurons isolated from a mouse model with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene (Nf1+/-) exhibited both greater excitability and evoked release of neuropeptides compared to wildtype mice. Furthermore, augmented voltage-dependent sodium currents but not potassium currents contribute to the enhanced excitability. To determine the mechanisms giving rise to the enhanced release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in the Nf1+/- sensory neurons, the potential differences in the total voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa) as well as the contributions of individual Ca(2+) channel subtypes were assessed. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from small-diameter capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons demonstrated that the average peak ICa densities were not different between the two genotypes. However, by using selective blockers of channel subtypes, the current density of N-type (Cav2.2) ICa was significantly larger in Nf1+/- neurons compared to wildtype neurons. In contrast, there were no significant differences in L-, P/Q- and R-type currents between the two genotypes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction measurements made from the isolated but intact dorsal root ganglia indicated that N-type (Cav2.2) and P/Q-type (Cav2.1) Ca(2+) channels exhibited the highest mRNA expression levels although there were no significant differences in the levels of mRNA expression between the genotypes. These results suggest that the augmented N-type (Cav2.2) ICa observed in the Nf1+/- sensory neurons does not result from genomic differences but may reflect post-translational or some other non-genomic modifications. Thus, our results demonstrate that sensory neurons from Nf1+/- mice, exhibit increased N-type ICa and likely account for the increased release of substance P and

  12. A fast synthesis of near-infrared emitting CdTe/CdSe quantum dots with small hydrodynamic diameter for in vivo imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Pengfei; Gong, Ping; Lian, Shuhong; Lu, Yangyang; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2011-11-01

    Highly luminescent near-infrared (NIR) emitting CdTe/CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared through a fast and convenient method, and a new type of multivalent polymer ligands was used as the surface substituents to prepare highly stable hydrophilic QDs with small sizes. The well-defined CdTe/CdSe QDs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, respectively. The as-prepared CdTe/CdSe QDs were photostable with high PL quantum yields (QYs) (up to 66% at room temperature), low toxicity to cells at experimental dosages, and the QDs' fluorescence emissions were tunable between 700 and 820 nm. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging using CdTe/CdSe QDs conjugated with the AS1411 aptamer (targeting nucleolin) probe in cancer cells was reported, and the CdTe/CdSe QDs were also successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of living animals. Our preliminary results illustrated that the CdTe/CdSe NIR-QDs with small sizes would be an alternative probe for ultrasensitive, multicolor, and multiplex applications, especially for in vivo imaging applications.

  13. Inflammation enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced suppression of the voltage-gated potassium currents in small-diameter trigeminal ganglion neurons projecting to the trigeminal nucleus interpolaris/caudalis transition zone.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Takahashi, M; Matsumoto, S

    2014-03-07

    We recently indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances the excitability of small-diameter trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons projecting onto the trigeminal nucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition zone via a paracrine mechanism following masetter muscle (MM) inflammation. The present study investigated whether modulation of voltage-gated potassium (K) channels by BDNF contributes to this hyperexcitability effect. To induce inflammation we injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the MM. The escape threshold from mechanical stimulation applied to skin above the inflamed MM was significantly lower than in naïve rats. TRG neurons innervating the site of inflammation were subsequently identified by fluorogold (FG) labeling, and microbeads (MB) were used to label neurons projecting specifically to the Vi/Vc region. BDNF significantly decreased the total, transient (IA), and sustained (IK) currents in FG-/MB-labeled small-diameter TRG neurons under voltage-clamp conditions in naïve and inflamed rats. The magnitude of inhibition of IA and IK currents by BDNF in FG-/MB-labeled TRG neurons was significantly greater in inflamed rats than in naïve rats, and BDNF inhibited IA to a significantly greater extent than IK. Furthermore, co-administration of K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, abolished the suppression of IA and IK currents by BDNF. These results suggested that the inhibitory effects of BDNF on IA and IK currents in small-diameter TRG neurons projecting onto the Vi/Vc potentiate neuronal excitability, and in turn, contribute to MM inflammatory hyperalgesia. These findings support the development of voltage-gated K(+) channel openers and tyrosine kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of trigeminal inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  14. Interpreting stem diameter changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölttä, T.; Sevanto, S.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2009-12-01

    Detecting phloem transport in stem diameter changes Teemu Hölttä1, Sanna Sevanto2, Eero Nikinmaa1 1Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland 2Department of Physics, P.O. Box 48, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland Introduction The volume of living cells and xylem conduits vary according to pressures they are subjected to. Our proposition is that the behavior of the inner bark diameter variation which cannot be explained by changes in xylem water status arise from changes in the osmotic concentration of the phloem and cambial growth. Materials and methods Simultaneous xylem and stem diameter measurements were conducted between June 28th to October 4th 2006 in Southern Finland on a 47-year old, 15 meter tall, Scots pine tree (DBH 15 cm) at heights of 1.5 and 10 meters. The difference between the measured inner bark diameter and the inner bark diameter predicted from xylem diameter change with a simple model (assuming there was no change in the osmotic concentration of the phloem) is hypothesized to give the changes in the osmotic concentration of the inner bark. The simple model calculates the radial water exchange between the xylem and phloem driven by the water potential changes in the xylem. Results and Discussion The major signal in the inner bark diameter was the transpiration rate as assumed, but also a signal arising from the change in the osmotic concentration (Fig 1a). The predicted osmotic concentration of the phloem typically increased during the afternoon due to the loading of photosynthesized sugars to the phloem. Inner bark osmotic concentration followed the photosynthesis rate with a 3 and 4 hour time-lag at the top and base, respectively (Fig 1b). The connection between photosynthesis and the predicted change in phloem osmotic concentration was stronger in the upper part of the tree compared to lower part. The changes in the predicted osmotic concentration were not similar every day, indicating that

  15. A painful neuropathy-associated Nav1.7 mutant leads to time-dependent degeneration of small-diameter axons associated with intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation and decrease in ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Liu, Shujun; Hoeijmakers, Janneke Gj; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar Sj; Lauria, Giuseppe; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a painful sensory nervous system disorder characterized by damage to unmyelinated C- and thinly myelinated Aδ- nerve fibers, clinically manifested by burning pain in the distal extremities and dysautonomia. The clinical onset in adulthood suggests a time-dependent process. The mechanisms that underlie nerve fiber injury in small fiber neuropathy are incompletely understood, although roles for energetic stress have been suggested. In the present study, we report time-dependent degeneration of neurites from dorsal root ganglia neurons in culture expressing small fiber neuropathy-associated G856D mutant Nav1.7 channels and demonstrate a time-dependent increase in intracellular calcium levels [Ca(2+)]i and reactive oxygen species, together with a decrease in ATP levels. Together with a previous clinical report of burning pain in the feet and hands associated with reduced levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in humans with high altitude sickness, the present results link energetic stress and reactive oxygen species production with the development of a painful neuropathy that preferentially affects small-diameter axons.

  16. A painful neuropathy-associated Nav1.7 mutant leads to time-dependent degeneration of small-diameter axons associated with intracellular Ca2+ dysregulation and decrease in ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Liu, Shujun; Hoeijmakers, Janneke GJ; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar SJ; Lauria, Giuseppe; Black, Joel A

    2016-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy is a painful sensory nervous system disorder characterized by damage to unmyelinated C- and thinly myelinated Aδ- nerve fibers, clinically manifested by burning pain in the distal extremities and dysautonomia. The clinical onset in adulthood suggests a time-dependent process. The mechanisms that underlie nerve fiber injury in small fiber neuropathy are incompletely understood, although roles for energetic stress have been suggested. In the present study, we report time-dependent degeneration of neurites from dorsal root ganglia neurons in culture expressing small fiber neuropathy-associated G856D mutant Nav1.7 channels and demonstrate a time-dependent increase in intracellular calcium levels [Ca2+]i and reactive oxygen species, together with a decrease in ATP levels. Together with a previous clinical report of burning pain in the feet and hands associated with reduced levels of Na+/K+-ATPase in humans with high altitude sickness, the present results link energetic stress and reactive oxygen species production with the development of a painful neuropathy that preferentially affects small-diameter axons. PMID:27821467

  17. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    weather . The threshold aircraft for the USAF is the F-15E and the threshold aircraft for the DoN are the F-35B and F-35C. Objective aircraft include... acoustic noise, vibration, fluid contamination, corrosive atmosphere, fungus, humidity, ice, and rain environments of aircraft carrier and...and handling shock), acoustic noise, vibration, fluid contamination, corrosive atmosphere, fungus, humidity, ice, and rain environments of

  18. Long term performance evaluation of small-diameter vascular grafts based on polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel and dextran and MSCs-based therapies using the ovine pre-clinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Nuno; Amorim, Irina; Caseiro, Ana Rita; Pereira, Tiago; Alvites, Rui; Rêma, Alexandra; Gonçalves, Ana; Valadares, Guilherme; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rodrigues, Miguel; Lopes, Maria Ascensão; Almeida, André; Santos, José Domingos; Maurício, Ana Colette; Luís, Ana Lúcia

    2017-03-07

    The functional and structural performance of a 5cm synthetic small diameter vascular graft (SDVG) produced by the copolymerization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with low molecular weight dextran (PVA/Dx graft) associated to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies and anticoagulant treatment with heparin, clopidogrel and warfarin was tested using the ovine model during the healing period of 24 weeks. The results were compared to the ones obtained with standard expanded polyetetrafluoroethylene grafts (ePTFE graft). Blood flow, vessel and graft diameter measurements, graft appearance and patency rate (PR), thrombus, stenosis and collateral vessel formation were evaluated by B-mode ultrasound, audio and color flow Doppler. Graft and regenerated vessels morphologic evaluation was performed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. All PVA/Dx grafts could maintain a similar or higher PR and systolic/diastolic laminar blood flow velocities were similar to ePTFE grafts. CD14 (macrophages) and α-actin (smooth muscle) staining presented similar results in PVA/Dx/MSCs and ePTFE graft groups. Fibrosis layer was lower and endothelial cells were only detected at graft-artery transitions where it was added the MSCs. In conclusion, PVA/Dx graft can be an excellent scaffold candidate for vascular reconstruction, including clinic mechanically challenging applications, such as SDVGs, especially when associated to MSCs-based therapies to promote higher endothelialization and lower fibrosis of the vascular prosthesis, but also higher PR values.

  19. Long term performance evaluation of small-diameter vascular grafts based on polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel and dextran and MSCs-based therapies using the ovine pre-clinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Nuno; Amorim, Irina; Caseiro, Ana Rita; Pereira, Tiago; Alvites, Rui; Rêma, Alexandra; Gonçalves, Ana; Valadares, Guilherme; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rodrigues, Miguel; Lopes, Maria Ascensão; Almeida, André; Santos, José Domingos; Maurício, Ana Colette; Luís, Ana Lúcia

    2016-11-20

    The functional and structural performance of a 5cm synthetic small diameter vascular graft (SDVG) produced by the copolymerization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with low molecular weight dextran (PVA/Dx graft) associated to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies and anticoagulant treatment with heparin, clopidogrel and warfarin was tested using the ovine model during the healing period of 24 weeks. The results were compared to the ones obtained with standard expanded polyetetrafluoroethylene grafts (ePTFE graft). Blood flow, vessel and graft diameter measurements, graft appearance and patency rate (PR), thrombus, stenosis and collateral vessel formation were evaluated by B-mode ultrasound, audio and color flow Doppler. Graft and regenerated vessels morphologic evaluation was performed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis. All PVA/Dx grafts could maintain a similar or higher PR and systolic/diastolic laminar blood flow velocities were similar to ePTFE grafts. CD14 (macrophages) and α-actin (smooth muscle) staining presented similar results in PVA/Dx/MSCs and ePTFE graft groups. Fibrosis layer was lower and endothelial cells were only detected at graft-artery transitions where it was added the MSCs. In conclusion, PVA/Dx graft can be an excellent scaffold candidate for vascular reconstruction, including clinic mechanically challenging applications, such as SDVGs, especially when associated to MSCs-based therapies to promote higher endothelialization and lower fibrosis of the vascular prosthesis, but also higher PR values.

  20. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Improves Physico-Mechanical Properties and Enhances Endothelialization of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antonova, Larisa V.; Sevostyanova, Victoria V.; Kutikhin, Anton G.; Mironov, Andrey V.; Krivkina, Evgeniya O.; Shabaev, Amin R.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.; Burago, Andrey Y.; Vasyukov, Georgiy Y.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a natural polymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and a synthetic hydrophobic polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is promising for the preparation of biodegradable and biocompatible small-diameter vascular grafts for bypass surgery. However, physico-mechanical properties and endothelialization rate of PHBV/PCL grafts are poor. We suggested that incorporation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into PHBV/PCL grafts may improve their physico-mechanical properties and enhance endothelialization. Here we compared morphology, physico-mechanical properties, and in vivo performance of electrospun small-diameter vascular grafts prepared from PHBV/PCL with and without VEGF. Structure of the graft surface and physico-mechanical properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy and universal testing machine, respectively. Grafts were implanted into rat abdominal aorta for 1, 3, and 6 months with the further histological, immunohistochemical, and immunofluorescence examination. PHBV/PCL grafts with and without VEGF were highly porous and consisted mostly of nanoscale and microscale fibers, respectively. Mean pore diameter and mean pore area were significantly lower in PHBV/PCL/VEGF compared to PHBV/PCL grafts (1.47 μm and 10.05 μm2; 2.63 μm and 47.13 μm2, respectively). Durability, elasticity, and stiffness of PHBV/PCL grafts with VEGF were more similar to internal mammary artery compared to those without, particularly 6 months postimplantation. Both qualitative examination and quantitative image analysis showed that three-fourths of PHBV/PCL grafts with VEGF were patent and had many CD31-, CD34-, and vWF-positive cells at their inner surface. However, all PHBV/PCL grafts without VEGF were occluded and had no or a few CD31-positive cells at the inner surface. Therefore, VEGF enhanced endothelialization and improved graft patency at all the time points in a rat abdominal aorta replacement model. In conclusion, PHBV

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Improves Physico-Mechanical Properties and Enhances Endothelialization of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts In vivo.

    PubMed

    Antonova, Larisa V; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Kutikhin, Anton G; Mironov, Andrey V; Krivkina, Evgeniya O; Shabaev, Amin R; Matveeva, Vera G; Velikanova, Elena A; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A; Burago, Andrey Y; Vasyukov, Georgiy Y; Glushkova, Tatiana V; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A; Barbarash, Olga L; Barbarash, Leonid S

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a natural polymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and a synthetic hydrophobic polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is promising for the preparation of biodegradable and biocompatible small-diameter vascular grafts for bypass surgery. However, physico-mechanical properties and endothelialization rate of PHBV/PCL grafts are poor. We suggested that incorporation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into PHBV/PCL grafts may improve their physico-mechanical properties and enhance endothelialization. Here we compared morphology, physico-mechanical properties, and in vivo performance of electrospun small-diameter vascular grafts prepared from PHBV/PCL with and without VEGF. Structure of the graft surface and physico-mechanical properties were examined by scanning electron microscopy and universal testing machine, respectively. Grafts were implanted into rat abdominal aorta for 1, 3, and 6 months with the further histological, immunohistochemical, and immunofluorescence examination. PHBV/PCL grafts with and without VEGF were highly porous and consisted mostly of nanoscale and microscale fibers, respectively. Mean pore diameter and mean pore area were significantly lower in PHBV/PCL/VEGF compared to PHBV/PCL grafts (1.47 μm and 10.05 μm(2); 2.63 μm and 47.13 μm(2), respectively). Durability, elasticity, and stiffness of PHBV/PCL grafts with VEGF were more similar to internal mammary artery compared to those without, particularly 6 months postimplantation. Both qualitative examination and quantitative image analysis showed that three-fourths of PHBV/PCL grafts with VEGF were patent and had many CD31-, CD34-, and vWF-positive cells at their inner surface. However, all PHBV/PCL grafts without VEGF were occluded and had no or a few CD31-positive cells at the inner surface. Therefore, VEGF enhanced endothelialization and improved graft patency at all the time points in a rat abdominal aorta replacement model. In conclusion, PHBV

  2. Diameter Effect In Initiating Explosives, Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Benterou, J.; Roeske, F.; Roos, E.

    2006-02-10

    The ability to safely machine small pieces of HE with the femtosecond laser allows diameter effect experiments to be performed in initiating explosives in order to study the failure diameter, the reduction of the detonation velocity and curvature versus the diameter. The reduced diameter configuration needs to be optimized, so that the detonation products of the first cylinder will not affect the measurement of the detonation velocity of the second cylinder with a streak camera. Different 2D axi-symmetrical configurations have been calculated to identify the best solution using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX16 Pellet with Ls-Dyna.

  3. Pupil Diameter Tracks Lapses of Attention

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter R.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to sustain attention for prolonged periods of time is limited. Studies on the relationship between lapses of attention and psychophysiological markers of attentional state, such as pupil diameter, have yielded contradicting results. Here, we investigated the relationship between tonic fluctuations in pupil diameter and performance on a demanding sustained attention task. We found robust linear relationships between baseline pupil diameter and several measures of task performance, suggesting that attentional lapses tended to occur when pupil diameter was small. However, these observations were primarily driven by the joint effects of time-on-task on baseline pupil diameter and task performance. The linear relationships disappeared when we statistically controlled for time-on-task effects and were replaced by consistent inverted U-shaped relationships between baseline pupil diameter and each of the task performance measures, such that most false alarms and the longest and most variable response times occurred when pupil diameter was both relatively small and large. Finally, we observed strong linear relationships between the temporal derivative of pupil diameter and task performance measures, which were largely independent of time-on-task. Our results help to reconcile contradicting findings in the literature on pupil-linked changes in attentional state, and are consistent with the adaptive gain theory of locus coeruleus-norepinephrine function. Moreover, they suggest that the derivative of baseline pupil diameter is a potentially useful psychophysiological marker that could be used in the on-line prediction and prevention of attentional lapses. PMID:27768778

  4. Measurement of wire diameter by optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodier, Soraya A.

    2004-02-01

    A combined interference and diffraction pattern, in the form of equidistant interference fringes, resulting from illuminating a vertical metallic wire by a laser beam is analyzed to measure the diameter of four standard wires. The diameters range from 170 to 450 μm. It is found that the error in the diameter measurements increases for small metallic wires and for small distances between the wire and the screen due to scattering effects. The intensity of the incident laser beam was controlled by a pair of sheet polaroids to minimize the scattered radiation. The used technique is highly sensitive, but requires controlled environmental conditions and absence of vibration effects. The expanded uncertainty for k=2 is calculated and found to decrease from U(D)=±1.45 μm for the wire of nominal diameter 170 μm to ±0.57 μm for the diameter 450 μm.

  5. Solar Diameter Latitude Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Leister, N. V.; Laclare, F.

    The observing programs of the Sun for determining the fundamental system of reference enable, as a by-product, to measure the apparent solar diameter (Poppe, P.C.R. et al. 1996; Leister et al. 1996; Laclare et al. 1991). The diameter obtained at the Calern Observatory (φ = 43-circ 44' 55''.9; λ = -0h 27m 42s.44) and at Abrahao de Moraes Observatory (OAM) (φ = -23-circ 00'6''.0; λ = 3h 07m 52s.22) was analyzed searching for periodicity evidences. For this we utilized the temporal methods CLEAN and CLEANEST. The analysis in function of heliographic latitude shows a dependence that may be correlated to mode of pulsation non-radial gravity. A discussion is made in terms of physical parameters like temperature luminosity and magnetic field involving the solar radius (Emilio M. 1997; Laclare et al. 1996).

  6. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, Fred N.; Murry, Kenneth R.

    1988-12-27

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting edges formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first cutting edge tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  7. Double diameter boring tool

    DOEpatents

    Ashbaugh, F.A.; Murry, K.R.

    1986-02-10

    A boring tool and a method of operation are provided for boring two concentric holes of precision diameters and depths in a single operation. The boring tool includes an elongated tool body, a shank for attachment to a standard adjustable boring head which is used on a manual or numerical control milling machine and first and second diametrically opposed cutting flutes formed for cutting in opposite directions. The diameter of the elongated tool body is substantially equal to the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation plus the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation. The axis of rotation of the tool is spaced from the tool centerline a distance substantially equal to one-half the distance from the second flute tip to the axis of rotation minus one-half the distance from the first flute tip to the axis of rotation. The method includes the step of inserting the boring tool into the boring head, adjusting the distance between the tool centerline and the tool axis of rotation as described above and boring the two concentric holes.

  8. The DIAMET campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.

    2012-04-01

    DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExTratropical storms) is a joint project between the UK academic community and the Met Office. Its focus is on understanding and predicting mesoscale structures in synoptic-scale storms, and in particular on the role of diabatic processes in generating and maintaining them. Such structures include fronts, rain bands, secondary cyclones, sting jets etc, and are important because much of the extreme weather we experience (e.g. strong winds, heavy rain) comes from such regions. The project conducted two field campaigns in the autumn of 2011, from September 14 - 30 and November 24 - December 14, based around the FAAM BAe146 aircraft with support from ground-based radar and radiosonde measurements. Detailed modelling, mainly using the Met Office Unified model, supported the planning and interpretation of these campaigns. This presentation will give a brief overview of the campaigns. Both in September and November-December the weather regime was westerly, with a strong jet stream directed across the Atlantic. Three IOPs were conducted in September, to observe a convective band ahead of an upper-level trough, waves on a long trailing cold front, and a warm conveyor belt associated with a secondary cyclone. In November-December six IOPs were conducted, to observe frontal passages and high winds. This period was notable for a number of very strong windstorms passing across the north of the UK, and gave us an opportunity to examine bent-back warm fronts in the southern quadrant of these storms where the strongest winds are found. The case studies fell into two basic patterns. In the majority of cases, dropsonde legs at high level were used to obtain a cross-section of winds and thermodynamic structure (e.g. across a front), followed by in situ legs at lower levels (generally where the temperature was between 0 and -10°) to examine microphysical processes, especially ice multiplication and the extent of supercooled water

  9. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-01-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it…

  10. Fiber diameter control in electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyan, R.; Subbotin, A.; Cuperus, L.; Boonen, P.; Dorschu, M.; Oosterlinck, F.; Bulters, M.

    2014-10-01

    A simple model is proposed to predict the fiber diameter in electrospinning. We show that the terminal diameter is determined by the kinetics of the jet elongation—under the influence of the electric and viscous forces—and the solvent evaporation. Numerical and simple scaling analyses are performed, predicting the fiber diameter to scale as a power 1/3 of viscosity and 2/3 of polymer solution throughput divided by electrical current. Model predictions show a good agreement to our own electrospinning experiments on polyamide-6 solutions as well as to the data available in the literature.

  11. Wheel Diameter and Speedometer Reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Clifton

    2010-09-01

    Most introductory physics students have seen vehicles with nonstandard wheel diameters; some may themselves drive "low-rider" cars or "big-wheel" pickup trucks. But how does changing wheel diameter affect speedometer readout for a given speed? Deriving the answer can be followed readily by students who have been introduced to rotation, and it makes a good illustration of how reasoning in physics can lead to a result that is useful outside the classroom.

  12. Stellar diameters and temperatures. IV. Predicting stellar angular diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Van Belle, Gerard; Von Braun, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    The number of stellar angular diameter measurements has greatly increased over the past few years due to innovations and developments in the field of long baseline optical interferometry. We use a collection of high-precision angular diameter measurements for nearby, main-sequence stars to develop empirical relations that allow the prediction of stellar angular sizes as a function of observed photometric color. These relations are presented for a combination of 48 broadband color indices. We empirically show for the first time a dependence on metallicity of these relations using Johnson (B – V) and Sloan (g – r) colors. Our relations are capable of predicting diameters with a random error of less than 5% and represent the most robust and empirical determinations of stellar angular sizes to date.

  13. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  14. Estimation of genetic parameters for wool fiber diameter measures.

    PubMed

    Iman, N Y; Johnson, C L; Russell, W C; Stobart, R H

    1992-04-01

    Genetic and phenotypic correlations and heritability estimates of side, britch, and core diameters; side and britch CV; side and britch diameter difference; and clean fleece weight were investigated using 385 western white-faced ewes produced by 50 sires and maintained at two locations on a selection study. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance procedures, and effects in the final model included breed of sire-selection line combination, sire within breed-selection line, and location. Heritabilities were estimated by paternal half-sib analysis. Sires within breed-selection line represented a significant source of variation for all traits studied. Location had a significant effect on side diameter, side and britch diameter difference, and clean fleece weight. Age of ewe only affected clean fleece weight. Phenotypic and genetic correlations among side, britch, and core diameter measures were high and positive. Phenotypic correlations ranged from .68 to .75 and genetic correlations ranged from .74 to .89. The genetic correlations between side and britch diameter difference and side diameter or core diameter were small (-.16 and .28, respectively). However, there was a stronger genetic correlation between side and britch diameter difference and britch diameter (.55). Heritability of the difference between side and britch diameter was high (.46 +/- .16) and similar to heritability estimates reported for other wool traits. Results of this study indicate that relatively rapid genetic progress through selection for fiber diameter should be possible. In addition, increased uniformity in fiber diameter should be possible through selection for either side and britch diameter difference or side or britch CV.

  15. Large-diameter astromast development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The 15-m-long by 0.75-diameter deployable supermast was delivered. The performance characteristics, design parameters, and developmental work associated with this mast are described. The main differences, besides the length of these two mast sections, are a change in the longeron material (the principal structural member) to a circular cross section and the incorporation of a lanyard-bridle system which makes unaided deployment and retraction possible in zero gravity.

  16. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  17. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a line running from the stem to the...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2934 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Definitions § 51.2934 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest diameter, measured through the center of the apricot, at right angles to a...

  2. Diameter Control and Photoluminescence of ZnO Nanorods from Trialkylamines

    DOE PAGES

    Andelman, Tamar; Gong, Yinyan; Neumark, Gertrude; ...

    2007-01-01

    A novel solution method to control the diameter of ZnO nanorods is reported. Small diameter (2-3 nm) nanorods were synthesized from trihexylamine, and large diameter (50–80 nm) nanorods were synthesized by increasing the alkyl chain length to tridodecylamine. The defect (green) emission of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the nanorods varies with diameter, and can thus be controlled by the diameter control. The small ZnO nanorods have strong green emission, while the large diameter nanorods exhibit a remarkably suppressed green band. We show that this observation supports surface oxygen vacancies as the defect that gives rise to the green emission.

  3. Stress-rupture behavior of small diameter polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Goldsby, Jon C.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous length polycrystalline alumina fibers are candidates as reinforcement in high temperature composite materials. Interest therefore exists in characterizing the thermomechanical behavior of these materials, obtaining possible insights into underlying mechanisms, and understanding fiber performance under long term use. Results are reported on the time-temperature dependent strength behavior of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Below 1000 C and 100 hours, Nextel 610 with the smaller grain size had a greater fast fracture and rupture strength than Fiber FP. The time exponents for stress-rupture of these fibers were found to decrease from approximately 13 at 900 C to below 3 near 1050 C, suggesting a transition from slow crack growth to creep rupture as the controlling fracture mechanism. For both fiber types, an effective activation energy of 690 kJ/mol was measured for rupture. This allowed stress-rupture predictions to be made for extended times at use temperatures below 1000 C.

  4. Development of small diameter hydraulic coiled tubing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfill, K. E.; Olsen, R. R.

    1981-06-01

    The objective of this program was to develop design equations for coiled tubing as a helical extension or compression spring which has the capability of acting as a flexible fluid connector in aircraft hydraulic systems. The purpose of the coiled tube is to replace hose, swivels, or extension units on moving hydraulic actuator barrels which have linear or limited angle rotary motion. The use of 3A1-2.5V titanium cold worked stress relieved tubing is recommended for coiled tubing applications. Also recommendations are made for wall thickness for three titanium tube alloys for operating pressures of 1500, 3000, and 8000 psig. Design nomographs are provided to allow use in establishing coil tube design parameters such as number of coils and force at maximum deflection. Four coiled tube assemblies in tow configurations were subjected to a 100,000 cycle endurance test at 100% deflection of the coils. There were no failures. A vibration survey was made to determine natural frequencies and transmissibility with a random input vibration spectrum.

  5. Biodegradable, thermoplastic polyurethane grafts for small diameter vascular replacements.

    PubMed

    Bergmeister, Helga; Seyidova, Nargiz; Schreiber, Catharina; Strobl, Magdalena; Grasl, Christian; Walter, Ingrid; Messner, Barbara; Baudis, Stefan; Fröhlich, Sophie; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Griesser, Markus; di Franco, Matt; Krssak, Martin; Liska, Robert; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable vascular grafts with sufficient in vivo performance would be more advantageous than permanent non-degradable prostheses. These constructs would be continuously replaced by host tissue, leading to an endogenous functional implant which would adapt to the need of the patient and exhibit only limited risk of microbiological graft contamination. Adequate biomechanical strength and a wall structure which promotes rapid host remodeling are prerequisites for biodegradable approaches. Current approaches often reveal limited tensile strength and therefore require thicker or reinforced graft walls. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of thin host-vessel-matched grafts (n=34) formed from hard-block biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) conduits (n=34) served as control grafts. Grafts were analyzed by various techniques after retrieval at different time points (1 week; 1, 6, 12 months). TPU grafts showed significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.001). Population by host cells increased significantly in the TPU conduits within 1 month of implantation (P=0.01). After long-term implantation, TPU implants showed 100% patency (ePTFE: 93%) with no signs of aneurysmal dilatation. Substantial remodeling of the degradable grafts was observed but varied between subjects. Intimal hyperplasia was limited to ePTFE conduits (29%). Thin-walled TPU grafts offer a new and desirable form of biodegradable vascular implant. Degradable grafts showed equivalent long-term performance characteristics compared to the clinically used, non-degradable material with improvements in intimal hyperplasia and ingrowth of host cells.

  6. 7 CFR 51.2656 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2656 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from the stem to the blossom end of the cherry....

  7. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means... lowest outer branch to the base....

  8. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means... lowest outer branch to the base....

  9. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension of the stalk measured at a point 2 inches above the point of attachment of the lowest outer branch to the base....

  10. 7 CFR 51.587 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Diameter. 51.587 Section 51.587 Agriculture... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.587 Diameter. Diameter means the greatest dimension of the stalk measured at a point 2 inches above the point of attachment of the lowest outer branch to the base....

  11. Behavior of large diameter wire ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Raoof, M.; Kraincanic, I.

    1995-12-31

    The paper reviews the recent theoretical work of the present authors as regards the prediction of the 2 {times} 2 stiffness matrix describing axial/torsional coupling of large diameter wire ropes. The theoretical analysis is based on results from a previously reported orthotropic sheet model which enables one to obtain estimates of the coefficients in the 2 {times} 2 stiffness matrix describing the axial/torsional coupling of the constituent spiral strands. The proposed model can (unlike previously available theories for wire ropes) cater for the presence of interwire friction and the various wire rope stiffness coefficients corresponding to both no-slip and full-slip regimes can be calculated. The no-slip regime corresponds to cases when an axially preloaded wire rope experiences cyclic variations of external load which are small enough not to induce initiation of gross interwire slippage within the constituent spiral strands. For sufficiently large values of range/mean axial load ratios, on the other hand, gross interwire slippage takes place and the effects of interwire friction on wire rope stiffness coefficients will be negligibly small compared with the effects due to the force changes in the wires themselves. Theoretical models have been developed for two types of wire ropes, i.e., those with an independent wire rope core (IWRC) or the types with a fiber core: the salient features for both approaches are reviewed with an emphasis on the characteristics of various wire rope constructions. In addition, experimental results from other sources are found to provide encouraging support for the theoretical predictions in a number of areas.

  12. Interferometric Measurement of the Diameters of Fused Quartz Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Shoichi

    1981-12-01

    This paper describes a method for the interferometric measurement of the diameter of a fused quartz sphere with Fabry-Perot etalon. Interference fringes are produced by laser radiation reflected from each surface of the etalon and the adjacent surface of the sphere and then their gaps are measured. The diameter of the sphere is derived by subtracting the two gaps from the plate separation of the etalon. Several lines from a free-running He-Se laser are used as the light sources for the exact fraction method together with the 633 nm line of a Lamb-dip stabilized He-Ne laser. The effects of fringe distortion, caused by laser radiation reflected from the other surface of the transparent sphere, are eliminated by placing a small circular stop at the image point of the light source. Experiments have shown that the precision of measurement of the diameter is about ± 0.16 ppm at 95% confidence interval.

  13. Stellar angular diameters from occultation observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, B.-C.

    This paper reviews the history of measuring stellar angular diameters from lunar occultation observations and the techniques of data analysis. Several effects which can affect the results of measurement are discussed. The author finds that there may be systematic errors in angular diameters measured by various observatories for Aldebaran.

  14. Impact Structures: What Does Crater Diameter Mean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Pierazzo, E.; Collins, G. S.; Osinski, G. R.; Melosh, H. J.; Morgan, J. V.; Reimold, W. U.; Spray, J. G.

    2004-03-01

    Crater diameter is an important parameter in energy scaling and impact simulations. However, disparate types of data make the use of consistent metrics difficult. We suggest a consistent terminology and discuss it in the context of several examples.

  15. Growth of nanostructures with controlled diameter

    DOEpatents

    Pfefferle, Lisa; Haller, Gary; Ciuparu, Dragos

    2009-02-03

    Transition metal-substituted MCM-41 framework structures with a high degree of structural order and a narrow pore diameter distribution were reproducibly synthesized by a hydrothermal method using a surfactant and an anti-foaming agent. The pore size and the mesoporous volume depend linearly on the surfactant chain length. The transition metals, such as cobalt, are incorporated substitutionally and highly dispersed in the silica framework. Single wall carbon nanotubes with a narrow diameter distribution that correlates with the pore diameter of the catalytic framework structure were prepared by a Boudouard reaction. Nanostructures with a specified diameter or cross-sectional area can therefore be predictably prepared by selecting a suitable pore size of the framework structure.

  16. Controlling the Fiber Diameter during Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridrikh, Sergey V.; Yu, Jian H.; Brenner, Michael P.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2003-04-01

    We present a simple analytical model for the forces that determine jet diameter during electrospinning as a function of surface tension, flow rate, and electric current in the jet. The model predicts the existence of a terminal jet diameter, beyond which further thinning of the jet due to growth of the whipping instability does not occur. Experimental data for various electrospun fibers attest to the accuracy of the model.

  17. Making Jointless Dual-Diameter Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Kathleen E.

    1989-01-01

    Welds between sections having different diameters eliminated. Single tube made with integral tapered transition section between straight sections of different diameters and wall thicknesses. Made from single piece; contains no joints, welded or otherwise. Not prone to such weld defects as voids and need not be inspected for them. Tube fabricated by either of two methods: drawing or reduction. Both methods used to fabricate tubes of 316L corrosion-resistant stainless steel for use as heat-exchanger coil.

  18. Large diameter carbon-boron fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veltri, R. D.; Jacob, B. A.; Galasso, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations concerned with a development of large-diameter carbon fibers are considered, taking into account the employment of vapor deposition techniques. In the experiments a carbon monofilament substrate is used together with reacting gases which consist of combinations of hydrogen, methane, and boron trichloride. It is found that the described approach can be used to obtain a large-diameter carbon filament containing boron. The filament has reasonable strength and modulus properties.

  19. Fiber diameters control osteoblastic cell migration and differentiation in electrospun gelatin.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Kristin; Zhang, Chu; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Chase, D Bruce; Rabolt, John F

    2010-09-15

    Defined electrospinning conditions were used to create scaffolds with different fiber diameters to investigate their interactions with osteoblastic MG63 cells. Nonwoven gelatin scaffolds were electrospun with varied fiber diameters to investigate the effect of fiber size and resultant porosity on cell proliferation, viability, migration, and differentiation. The low toxicity solvent acetic acid:ethyl acetate:water ratio and gelatin concentrations were optimized to create small and large diameter fibers. The fiber diameters obtained by this procedure were 110 +/- 40 nm for the small and 600 +/- 110 nm for the large fibers. Cell viability assays showed that MG63 cells grew similarly on both fibers at the early time point (day 3) but preferred the scaffold with large diameter fibers by the later time points (day 5 and day 7). Confocal microscopic imaging showed that MG63 cells migrated poorly (maximum depth of 18 microm) into the scaffold of small diameter fibers, but readily penetrated (maximum depth of 50 microm) into the scaffold of large diameter fibers. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays showed that MG63 cells differentiated on scaffolds made from both diameter fibers. In longer term experiments, MG63 cells differentiated to a greater extent on scaffolds made from small diameter fibers compared to large diameter fibers at days 3 and 7, but the ALP levels were the same for both diameter fibers by day 14. These results indicate that cells can perceive differences in the diameter and resultant pore size of electrospun gelatin fibers and that they process this information to alter their behavior.

  20. Ultra-efficient Engine Diameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Brown, Stephen T.; Kawai, Ron T.

    2003-01-01

    Engine fan diameter and Bypass Ratio (BPR) optimization studies have been conducted since the beginning of the turbofan age with the recognition that reducing the engine core jet velocity and increasing fan mass flow rate generally increases propulsive efficiency. However, performance tradeoffs limit the amount of fan flow achievable without reducing airplane efficiency. This study identifies the optimum engine fan diameter and BPR, given the advanced Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) powerplant efficiencies, for use on an advanced subsonic airframe. Engine diameter studies have historically focused on specific engine size options, and were limited by existing technology and transportation infrastructure (e.g., ability to fit bare engines through aircraft doors and into cargo holds). This study is unique in defining the optimum fan diameter and drivers for future 2015 (UEET) powerplants while not limiting engine fan diameter by external constraints. This report follows on to a study identifying the system integration issues of UEET engines. This Engine Diameter study was managed by Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington through the NASA Glenn Revolutionary Aero Space Engine Research (RASER) contract under task order 10. Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, completed the engine/airplane sizing optimization, while the Boeing Commercial Airplane group (BCA) provided design oversight. A separate subcontract to support the overall project was issued to Tuskegee University.

  1. Pupil Diameter May Reflect Motor Control and Learning.

    PubMed

    White, Olivier; French, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Non-luminance-mediated changes in pupil diameter have been used since the first studies by Darwin in 1872 as indicators of clinical, cognitive, and arousal states. However, the relation between processes involved in motor control and changes in pupil diameter remains largely unknown. Twenty participants attempted to compensate random walks of a cursor with a computer mouse to restrain its trajectory within a target circle while the authors recorded their pupil diameters. Two conditions allowed the authors to experimentally manipulate the motor and cognitive components of the task. First, the step size of the cursor's random walk was either large or small leading to 2 task difficulties (difficult or easy). Second, they instructed participants to imagine controlling the cursor by moving the mouse, but without actually moving it (task modality: imagined movement or real movement condition). Task difficulty and modality allowed the authors to show that pupil diameters reflect processes involved in motor control and in the processing of feedback, respectively. Furthermore, the authors also demonstrate that motor learning can be quantified by pupil size. This noninvasive approach provides a promising method for investigating not only motor control, but also motor imagery, a research field of growing importance in sports and rehabilitation.

  2. 76 FR 62762 - Certain Large Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Japan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Large Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Japan; Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From... alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe (``large diameter pipe'') from Japan and certain...

  3. 76 FR 47555 - Certain Large Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Japan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Large Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Japan; Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From... carbon and alloy seamless standard, line and pressure pipe (``large diameter pipe'') from Japan...

  4. DiameterJ: A validated open source nanofiber diameter measurement tool.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, Nathan A; Bharti, Kapil; Kriel, Haydn; Simon, Carl G

    2015-08-01

    Despite the growing use of nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, there is not a validated, readily available, free solution for rapid, automated analysis of nanofiber diameter from scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. Thus, the goal of this study was to create a user friendly ImageJ/FIJI plugin that would analyze SEM micrographs of nanofibers to determine nanofiber diameter on a desktop computer within 60 s. Additional design goals included 1) compatibility with a variety of existing segmentation algorithms, and 2) an open source code to enable further improvement of the plugin. Using existing algorithms for centerline determination, Euclidean distance transforms and a novel pixel transformation technique, a plugin called "DiameterJ" was created for ImageJ/FIJI. The plugin was validated using 1) digital synthetic images of white lines on a black background and 2) SEM images of nominally monodispersed steel wires of known diameters. DiameterJ analyzed SEM micrographs in 20 s, produced diameters not statistically different from known values, was over 10-times closer to known diameter values than other open source software, provided hundreds of times the sampling of manual measurement, and was hundreds of times faster than manual assessment of nanofiber diameter. DiameterJ enables users to rapidly and thoroughly determine the structural features of nanofiber scaffolds and could potentially allow new insights to be formed into fiber diameter distribution and cell response.

  5. Large diameter astromast development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preiswerk, P. R.; Finley, L. A.; Knapp, K.

    1983-01-01

    Coilable-longeron lattice columns called Astromasts (trademark) were manufactured for a variety of spacecraft missions. These flight structures varied in diameter from 0.2 to 0.5 meter (9 to 19 in.), and the longest Astromast of this type deploys to a length of 30 meters (100 feet). A double-laced diagonal Astromast design referred to as the Supermast (trademark) which, because it has shorter baylengths than an Astromast, is approximately four times as strong. The longeron cross section and composite material selection for these structures are limited by the maximum strain associated with stowage and deployment. As a result, future requirements for deployable columns with high stiffness and strength require the development of both structures in larger diameters. The design, development, and manufacture of a 6.1-m-long (20-ft), 0.75-m-diameter (30-in.), double-laced diagonal version of the Astromast is described.

  6. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; ...

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers ismore » the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.« less

  7. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers is the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.

  8. Systematic biases in radiometric diameter determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, John R.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Sykes, Mark V.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric diameter determinations are presently shown to often be significantly affected by the effect of rotation. This thermal effect of rotation depends not only on the object's thermal inertia, rotation rate, and pole orientation, but also on its temperature, since colder objects having constant rotation rate and thermal inertia will radiate less of their heat on the diurnal than on the nocturnal hemisphere. A disk-integrated beaming parameter of 0.72 is determined for the moon, and used to correct empirically for the roughness effects in thermophysical models; the standard thermal model is found to systematically underestimate cold object diameters, while overstating their albedos.

  9. Shaft Diameter Measurement Using Structured Light Vision.

    PubMed

    Liu, Siyuan; Tan, Qingchang; Zhang, Yachao

    2015-08-12

    A method for measuring shaft diameters is presented using structured light vision measurement. After calibrating a model of the structured light measurement, a virtual plane is established perpendicular to the measured shaft axis and the image of the light stripe on the shaft is projected to the virtual plane. On the virtual plane, the center of the measured shaft is determined by fitting the projected image under the geometrical constraints of the light stripe, and the shaft diameter is measured by the determined center and the projected image. Experiments evaluated the measuring accuracy of the method and the effects of some factors on the measurement are analyzed.

  10. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT DRIFT DIAMETER SIZES

    SciTech Connect

    H.M. Wade

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the thermal response of a repository-emplaced waste package and its corresponding drift wall surface temperature with different drift diameters. The case examined is that of a 21 pressurized water reactor (PWR) uncanistered fuel (UCF) waste package loaded with design basis spent nuclear fuel assemblies. This calculation evaluates a 3.5 meter to 6.5 meter drift diameter range in increments of 1.0 meters. The time-dependent temperatures of interest, as determined by this calculation, are the spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature, the waste package surface temperature, and the drift wall surface temperature.

  11. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  12. No link between the solar activity cycle and the diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Cugnet, D.

    We do not understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the solar irradiance cycle. Measurements of small variations in the solar diameter could have been a critical probe of the Sun 's interior stratification, telling us how and where the solar luminosity is gated or stored. We have reanalyzed the 7 years of filtregrams data (150 000 photograms and magnetograms) of the SOHO/MDI experiment. We used the maximum possible sampling compatible with full frame recording, carefully avoiding any suspicious filtregram. Going further than the previous analysis of 2 years of data by Emilio et al. (Ap. J. 543,1007, 2000), we better corrected for changes in optical aberrations and, along Turmon et al. (Ap. J., 568, 396, 2002), we reduced radius measurement errors by identifying active regions and avoiding radius measurements herein. We found that, within the limit of our noise level uncertainties (2 mas), the solar diameter could be constant over the half cycle investigated. Our results confirm the recent reanalysis of the 7 years of MDI data made by Antia (Ap. J. 590, 567, 2003), with a completely different method since using the ultra-precise frequency variation of the f-modes (fundamental modes linked to the diameter). He found (carefully removing the yearly Earth induced variations and avoiding the SOHO data gap of 1999) that the diameter is constant over the half solar cycle (radius variation are less than 0.6 km, 0.8 mas - nothing over noise level). Along Antia, we can conclude that: "If a careful analysis is performed, then it turns out that there is no evidence for any variation in the solar radius." There were no theoretical reasons for large solar radius variations and there is no observational evidence for them with consistent space observations. If changes exit, they are to be very small.

  13. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  14. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to... dimension of the apple determined by passing the apple through a round opening in any position....

  15. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  16. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. When measuring for maximum size, “diameter” means the smallest dimension of the apple determined...

  17. 7 CFR 51.320 - Diameter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Definitions § 51.320 Diameter. When measuring for minimum size, “diameter” means the greatest dimension of the apple measured at right angles to... dimension of the apple determined by passing the apple through a round opening in any position....

  18. Reducing the diameters of computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, S. H.; Raza, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    Three methods of reducing the diameters of computer networks by adding additional processor to processor links under the constraint that no more than one I/O port be added to each processor are discussed. This is equivalent to adding edges to a given graph under the constraint that the degree of any node be increased, at most, by one.

  19. Reduced artery diameters in Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Caretta, N; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Zuccarello, D; Lenzi, A; Selice, R

    2012-10-01

    Various epidemiological studies in relatively large cohorts of patients with Klinefelter syndrome (KS) described the increased morbidity and mortality in these subjects. Our aim was to study the structure and function of arteries in different districts to investigate in these subjects possible alterations. A total of 92 patients having non-mosaic KS, diagnosed in Centre for Human Reproduction Pathology at the University of Padova, and 50 age-matched healthy male controls were studied. Klinefelter syndrome subjects and controls evaluation included complete medical history, physical examination, measurement of concentrations of the reproductive hormones, lipidic and glycidic metabolism, AR function and sensitivity, ultrasound examinations (diameters, carotid intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilation) of brachial, common carotid and common femoral artery and abdominal aorta. Klinefelter syndrome patients showed significantly reduced artery diameters in all districts evaluated. On the contrary no statistically significant difference was found in cIMT and brachial FMD values between KS patients and controls. Furthermore, we found no statistically significant correlation of artery diameters with reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures and weighted CAG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study finding a reduced artery diameter in several districts in KS patients compared with that of normal male subjects and overlapping to that of female subjects. We have not an explanation for this phenomenon, even if a possible involvement of genes controlling the development of vascular system might be hypothesized, and further research is required to verify this hypothesis.

  20. Precision distances with spiral galaxy apparent diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Spiral galaxy diameters offer the oldest extragalactic distance indicator known. Although outdated and hitherto imprecise, two spiral diameter-based distance indicators applied in the 1980s can be tested, calibrated, and re-established for precision era use, based on abundant redshift-independent distances data available in NED-D. Indicator one employs the largest Giant Spiral Galaxies, which have an absolute isophotal major diameter of ~70 +/- 10 kpc, offering standard ruler-based distances with <10% precision. Indicator two employs the diameter-magnitude relation for spirals in general, as a secondary indicator, offering ~20% precision. The ruler-based indicator is the only indicator with <10% precision able to independently calibrate type Ia supernovae-based distances at cosmological distances. The secondary-based indicator is the only indicator with 20% precision applicable to more galaxies than in current Tully-Fisher surveys. The primary indicator gives researchers a new tool to confirm or refute if, as currently believed, universal expansion is accelerating. The secondary indicator gives researchers a new path toward acquiring a more complete 3D picture of the local universe and potentially, because the majority of galaxies in the universe are spirals, the distant universe.

  1. Solar diameter with 2012 Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, C.

    2012-06-01

    The role of Venus and Mercury transits is crucial to know the past history of the solar diameter. Through the W parameter, the logarithmic derivative of the radius with respect to the luminosity, the past values of the solar luminosity can be recovered. The black drop phenomenon affects the evaluation of the instants of internal and external contacts between the planetary disk and the solar limb. With these observed instants compared with the ephemerides the value of the solar diameter is recovered. The black drop and seeing effects are overcome with two fitting circles, to Venus and to the Sun, drawn in the undistorted part of the image. The corrections of ephemerides due to the atmospheric refraction will also be taken into account. The forthcoming transit of Venus will allow an accuracy on the diameter of the Sun better than 0.01 arcsec, with good images of the ingress and of the egress taken each second. Chinese solar observatories are in the optimal conditions to obtain valuable data for the measurement of the solar diameter with the Venus transit of 5/6 June 2012 with an unprecedented accuracy, and with absolute calibration given by the ephemerides.

  2. Measuring Solar Diameter with 2012 Venus Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The role of Venus and Mercury transits is crucial to know the past history of the solar diameter. Through the W parameter, the logarithmic derivative of the radius with respect to the luminosity, the past values of the solar luminosity can be recovered. The black drop phenomenon affects the evaluation of the instants of internal and external contacts between the planetary disk and the solar limb. With these observed instants compared with the ephemerides the value of the solar diameter is recovered. The black drop and seeing effects are overcome with two fitting circles, to Venus and to the Sun, drawn in the undistorted part of the image. The corrections of ephemerides due to the atmospheric refraction will also be taken into account. The forthcoming transit of Venus will allow an accuracy on the diameter of the Sun better than 0.01 arcsec, with good images of the ingress and of the egress taken each second. Chinese solar observatories are in the optimal conditions to obtain valuable data for the measurement of the solar diameter with the Venus transit of 5/6 June 2012 with an unprecedented accuracy, and with absolute calibration given by the ephemerides.

  3. Trace of totally positive algebraic integers and integer transfinite diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammang, V.

    2009-06-01

    Explicit auxiliary functions can be used in the ``Schur-Siegel- Smyth trace problem''. In the previous works, these functions were constructed only with polynomials having all their roots positive. Here, we use several polynomials with complex roots, which are found with Wu's algorithm, and we improve the known lower bounds for the absolute trace of totally positive algebraic integers. This improvement has a consequence for the search of Salem numbers that have a negative trace. The same method also gives a small improvement of the upper bound for the integer transfinite diameter of [0,1].

  4. Diameters and albedos of satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Morrison, D.

    1982-01-01

    Products of the masses of the five known satellites of Uranus, and estimates of their bulk densities and surface albedos, are used to infer their probable dimensions. Spectrophotometry has established the presence of water ice on the surfaces of all save Rhea, and the brightnesses of the satellites have been measured photoelectrically. The diameter measurements presented were made using a photometric/radiometric technique, whose recent recalibration, using independent solar system object measurements, has yielded absolute accuracies better than 5 per cent. The new albedo measurements show that Umbriel, Titania and Oberon are similar to the Jupiter moon Callisto, while Ariel resembles the Saturn moon Hyperion. The diameters of all four are similar to those of the large, icy Saturn satellites Rhea and Iapetus.

  5. European Projects of Solar Diameter Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Bianda, Michele; Arnaud, Jean

    2008-10-01

    Three projects dealing with solar diameter evolution are presently in development. Historical and contemporary eclipses and planetary transits data collection and analysis, to cover potentially the last 5 centuries with an accuracy of few hundreds of arcsecond on diameter's measurements. The French space mission PICARD with a few milliarcseconds accuray. With PICARD-SOL instruments located at the plateau of Calern the role of the atmosphere in ground-based measurements will be clarified. CLAVIUS is a Swiss-Italian project based on drift-scan method, free from optical distortions, where hourly circles transits will be monitored with fast CMOS sensors in different wavebands. The will run at IRSOL Gregory-Coudé telescope.

  6. On finding minimum-diameter clique trees

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.R.S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Peyton, B.W. )

    1991-08-01

    It is well-known that any chordal graph can be represented as a clique tree (acyclic hypergraph, join tree). Since some chordal graphs have many distinct clique tree representations, it is interesting to consider which one is most desirable under various circumstances. A clique tree of minimum diameter (or height) is sometimes a natural candidate when choosing clique trees to be processed in a parallel computing environment. This paper introduces a linear time algorithm for computing a minimum-diameter clique tree. The new algorithm is an analogue of the natural greedy algorithm for rooting an ordinary tree in order to minimize its height. It has potential application in the development of parallel algorithms for both knowledge-based systems and the solution of sparse linear systems of equations. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Ultrasound guided percutaneous EVAR success is predicted by vessel diameter

    PubMed Central

    Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Huang, Zhen; Pomposelli, Frank; Hamdan, Allen; Wyers, Mark; Chaikof, Elliot; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound guided access allows for direct visualization of the access artery during percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. We hypothesize that the use of ultrasound guidance allowed us to safely increase the utilization of percutaneous endovascular aortic aneurysm repair to almost all patients and decrease access complications. Methods A retrospective chart review of all elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs, both abdominal and descending thoracic, from 2005-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using ICD9 codes and stratified based on access type: percutaneous vs. cutdown. We examined the success rate of percutaneous access and the cause of failure. Sheath size was large (18-24 Fr) or small (12-16 Fr). Minimum access vessel diameter was also measured. Outcomes were wound complications (infections or clinically significant hematomas that delayed discharge or required transfusion), operative and incision time, length of stay, and discharge disposition. Predictors of percutaneous failure were identified. Results 168 patients (296 arteries) had percutaneous access (P-EVAR) while 131 patients (226 arteries) had femoral cutdown access (C-EVAR). Ultrasound guided access was introduced in 2007. P-EVAR increased from zero cases in 2005 to 92.3% of all elective cases in 2010. The success rate with percutaneous access was 96%. Failures requiring open surgical repair of the artery included 7 for hemorrhage and 6 for flow limiting stenosis or occlusion of the femoral artery. P-EVAR had fewer wound complications (0.7% vs. 7.4%, P = .001) shorter operative time (153.3 vs. 201.5 minutes, P < .001) and larger minimal access vessel diameter (6.7 mm vs. 6.1 mm, P < .01). Patients with failed percutaneous access had smaller minimal access vessel diameters when compared to successful P-EVAR (4.9 mm vs. 6.8 mm, P < .001). More failures occurred in small sheaths than large ones (7.4% vs. 1.9%, P = .02). Access vessel diameter < 5 mm is predictive

  8. New Large Diameter RF Complex Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, John; Nosenko, Volodymyr; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-10-01

    The Complex Plasma Research Group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen has built a new large diameter rf plasma setup for dusty plasma experiments. The vacuum chamber is a stainless steel cylinder 0.90 m in diameter and 0.34 m in height with ports for viewing and measurement. A 0.85 m diameter plate in about the center serves as a powered electrode (13.56 MHz) with the chamber walls as the ground. It is pumped on by one of two Oerlikon turbo pumps with a pumping rate of 1100 l/s or 270 l/s. Argon gas is admitted into the chamber by an MKS mass flow meter and pumping is regulated by a butterfly valve to set pressure for experiments. A manual dropper is used to insert dust into the plasma. The dust is illuminated horizontally by a 660 nm 100 mW laser sheet and viewed from above by a Photron FASTCAM 1024 PCI camera. A vertical laser sheet of 635 nm will be used for side imaging. So far, single-layer plasma crystals of up to 15000 particles have been suspended. The particle velocity fluctuation spectra were measured and from these, the particle charge and screening length were calculated. Future experiments will explore the system-size dependence of the plasma crystal properties.

  9. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  10. 29 mm Diameter Test Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard; Naranjo, Angela Carol; Romero, Frank Patrick

    2016-08-15

    The Northstar target for Mo99 production is made up of Mo100 disks in a stack separated by coolant gaps for helium flow. A number of targets have been tested at ANL for both production of Mo99 and for thermal-hydraulic performance. These have all been with a 12 mm diameter target, even while the production goals have increased the diameter to now 29 mm. A 29 mm diameter target has been designed that is consistent with the ANL beam capabilities and the capabilities of the helium circulation system currently in use at ANL. This target is designed for 500 μA at 35 MeV electrons. While the plant design calls for 42 MeV, the chosen design point is more favorable and higher power given the limits of the ANL accelerator. The intended beam spot size is 12 mm FWHM, but the thermal analysis presented herein conservatively assumed a 10 mm FWHM beam, which results in a 44% higher beam current density at beam center.

  11. Variable diameter wind turbine rotor blades

    DOEpatents

    Jamieson, Peter McKeich; Hornzee-Jones, Chris; Moroz, Emilian M.; Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-12-06

    A system and method for changing wind turbine rotor diameters to meet changing wind speeds and control system loads is disclosed. The rotor blades on the wind turbine are able to adjust length by extensions nested within or containing the base blade. The blades can have more than one extension in a variety of configurations. A cable winching system, a hydraulic system, a pneumatic system, inflatable or elastic extensions, and a spring-loaded jack knife deployment are some of the methods of adjustment. The extension is also protected from lightning by a grounding system.

  12. The diameter and albedo of 1943 Anteros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Tholen, D. J.; Tokunaga, A.; Matthews, K.; Neugebauer, G.; Soifer, B. T.; Kowal, C.

    1981-01-01

    The results of broadband visual and infrared photometry of the Apollo-Amor asteroid 1943 Anteros during its 1980 apparition are reported. By means of a radiometric model, a diameter of 2.3 + or - 0.2 km and a visual geometric albedo of 0.13 + or - 0.03 is calculated. The albedo and reflectance spectrum of Anteros imply that it is a type S asteroid. Thus, Anteros may have a silicate surface similar to other Apollo-Amor asteroids as well as some stony-iron meteorites.

  13. A Variable Diameter Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James M.; Jones, Christopher T.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1999-01-01

    The Short-Haul-Civil-tiltrotor (SHCT) component of the NASA Aviation System Capacity Program is an effort to develop the technologies needed for a potential 40-passenger civil tiltrotor. The variable diameter tiltrotor (VDTR) is a Sikorsky concept aimed at improving tiltrotor hover and cruise performance currently limited by disk loading that is much higher in hover than conventional helicopter, and much lower in cruise than turbo-prop systems. This paper describes the technical merits of using a VDTR on a SHCT aircraft. The focus will be the rotor design.

  14. A 30-cm diameter argon ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

  15. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, A.L.

    1985-11-19

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts is disclosed. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade. 2 figs.

  16. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOEpatents

    Brewster, Albert L.

    1985-01-01

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade.

  17. Measurement of Diameter Changes during Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Crepeau, J. C.; Solstad, S.

    2015-03-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in advanced and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant dimensional and physical changes during irradiation. Currently in the US, such changes are measured by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and handling may disturb the phenomena of interest. In-pile detection of changes in geometry is sorely needed to understand real-time behavior during irradiation testing of fuels and materials in high flux US Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). This paper presents development results of an advanced Linear Variable Differential Transformer-based test rig capable of detecting real-time changes in diameter of fuel rods or material samples during irradiation in US MTRs. This test rig is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory and will provide experimenters with a unique capability to measure diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  18. Handling state-of-the-art large-diameter coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Courville, P.

    1994-12-31

    Completion and workover demands placed on coiled tubing technology in the last 10 years have shown the limitations of small-diameter (1- to 1{1/2}-in.) coiled tubing. The small tubing tends to buckle when used at lengths greater than 1,500 ft in most horizontal applications. Large-diameter coiled tubing (up to 3{1/2} in.) provides greater flexibility of job design and increases horizontal reach possibilities for drilling, completion, and workover activities. Transportation and handling equipment to accommodate the larger, heavier tubing is naturally a critical component of the system. This paper will present the benefits of large-diameter coiled tubing including completion and workover for greater depth and more extended horizontal reach. It will also discuss the unique concerns of transportation and handling of large diameter tubing and associated equipment.

  19. Large-diameter glory-hole drilling: Evolution from 12- to 20-ft diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, R.

    1994-06-01

    To drill for oil and gas in shallow, ice-infested waters, a hole needs to be excavated in the seafloor to protect subsea blowout preventers (BOP's) from ice-scour damage. Canadian Marine Drilling pioneered the use of large-diameter glory-hole drilling systems by designing, building, and patenting a 12-ft (3.7-m)-diameter prototype bit system, a 17-ft (5.2-m)-diameter upgrade, a 20-ft (6.1-m)-diameter standard system, and a 20-ft (6.1-m)-diameter enhanced system. The enhanced bit design incorporates high-pressure jetting, boulder storage, pilot-hole centering, and other features that allow a 36-in (0.91-m) hole to be drilled through the body of the bit. An optional feature is the ability to drill and case the glory hole simultaneously. To date, penetration rates up to 4.5 ft/hr (1.37 m/h) in soils with a shear strength 5,000 lbf/ft[sup 2] (239 kPa) have been obtained. Glory-hole drilling times have been reduced from more than 20 days in 1978 to approximately 1[1/2] days since 1986.

  20. Twentieth-century decline of large-diameter trees in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lutz, J.A.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Franklin, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of forest change in western North America often focus on increased densities of small-diameter trees rather than on changes in the large tree component. Large trees generally have lower rates of mortality than small trees and are more resilient to climate change, but these assumptions have rarely been examined in long-term studies. We combined data from 655 historical (1932-1936) and 210 modern (1988-1999) vegetation plots to examine changes in density of large-diameter trees in Yosemite National Park (3027 km2). We tested the assumption of stability for large-diameter trees, as both individual species and communities of large-diameter trees. Between the 1930s and 1990s, large-diameter tree density in Yosemite declined 24%. Although the decrease was apparent in all forest types, declines were greatest in subalpine and upper montane forests (57.0% of park area), and least in lower montane forests (15.3% of park area). Large-diameter tree densities of 11 species declined while only 3 species increased. Four general patterns emerged: (1) Pinus albicaulis, Quercus chrysolepis, and Quercus kelloggii had increases in density of large-diameter trees occur throughout their ranges; (2) Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus lambertiana, and Pinus ponderosa, had disproportionately larger decreases in large-diameter tree densities in lower-elevation portions of their ranges; (3) Abies concolor and Pinus contorta, had approximately uniform decreases in large-diameter trees throughout their elevational ranges; and (4) Abies magnifica, Calocedrus decurrens, Juniperus occidentalis, Pinus monticola, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Tsuga mertensiana displayed little or no change in large-diameter tree densities. In Pinus ponderosa-Calocedrus decurrens forests, modern large-diameter tree densities were equivalent whether or not plots had burned since 1936. However, in unburned plots, the large-diameter trees were predominantly A. concolor, C. decurrens, and Q. chrysolepis, whereas P. ponderosa

  1. Development of fine diameter mullite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a program to develop and evaluate mullite fiber with a mean diameter under two microns. The two micron fiber is produced by a blowing process at room temperature from a low viscosity (10-25 poise) solution. The blown fiber was evaluated for dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C, and was equivalent to the 5 micron spun B and W mullite fiber. An additive study was conducted to evaluate substitutes for the boron. Three levels of chromium, lithium fluoride, and magnesium were added to the standard composition in place of boron and the fiber produced was evaluated for chemical and dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C. The magnesium was the most chemically stable, but the chrome additive imparted the best dimensional stability.

  2. Five meter diameter conical furlable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J. W.; Freeland, R. E.; Moore, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made to demonstrate that a 5-meter-diameter, furlable, conical reflector antenna utilizing a line source feed can be fabricated utilizing composite materials and to prove that the antenna can function mechanically and electrically as prototype flight hardware. The design, analysis, and testing of the antenna are described. An RF efficiency of 55% at 8.5 GHz and a surface error of 0.64 mm rms were chosen as basic design requirements. Actual test measurements yielded an efficiency of 53% (49.77 dB gain) and a surface error of 0.61 mm rms. Atmospherically induced corrosion of the reflector mesh resulted in the RF performance degradation. An assessment of the antenna as compared to the current state of the art technology was made. This assessment included cost, surface accuracy and RF performance, structural and mechanical characteristics, and possible applications.

  3. Thirty-centimeter-diameter ion milling source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A 30-cm beam diameter ion source has been designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. An argon ion current density of 1 mA/cu cm at 500 eV ion energy was selected as a design operating condition. The completed ion source met the design criteria at this operating condition with a uniform and well-collimated beam having an average variation in current density of + or - 5% over the center of 20 cm of the beam. This ion source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. Langmuir probe surveys of the source plasma support the design concepts of a multipole field and a circumferential cathode to enhance plasma uniformity.

  4. Stemming selection for large-diameter blastholes

    SciTech Connect

    Eloranta, J.

    1994-12-31

    Proper selection of stemming has a profound effect on blast performance. This paper describes several methods of evaluating stemming performance in 16-inch blastholes. Tests are done on stemming ranging in size from nominal 1/4 inch crushed rock up to railroad ballast size rock (2 1/2 inch > diameter < 3/4 inch). Concrete plugs (both pre-cast and poured) are evaluated as well as air decking. A Red lake Lo-cam and a velocity of detonation recorder (VODR) are used to estimate stemming retention time and stemming ejection velocities. Downstream productivity rates including: shovel digging rates, crusher speed and crusher hangup counts are used to estimate fragmentation results. Digital image analysis is used to estimate size distributions.

  5. Ecological importance of large-diameter trees in a temperate mixed-conifer forest.

    PubMed

    Lutz, James A; Larson, Andrew J; Swanson, Mark E; Freund, James A

    2012-01-01

    Large-diameter trees dominate the structure, dynamics and function of many temperate and tropical forests. Although both scaling theory and competition theory make predictions about the relative composition and spatial patterns of large-diameter trees compared to smaller diameter trees, these predictions are rarely tested. We established a 25.6 ha permanent plot within which we tagged and mapped all trees ≥1 cm dbh, all snags ≥10 cm dbh, and all shrub patches ≥2 m(2). We sampled downed woody debris, litter, and duff with line intercept transects. Aboveground live biomass of the 23 woody species was 507.9 Mg/ha, of which 503.8 Mg/ha was trees (SD = 114.3 Mg/ha) and 4.1 Mg/ha was shrubs. Aboveground live and dead biomass was 652.0 Mg/ha. Large-diameter trees comprised 1.4% of individuals but 49.4% of biomass, with biomass dominated by Abies concolor and Pinus lambertiana (93.0% of tree biomass). The large-diameter component dominated the biomass of snags (59.5%) and contributed significantly to that of woody debris (36.6%). Traditional scaling theory was not a good model for either the relationship between tree radii and tree abundance or tree biomass. Spatial patterning of large-diameter trees of the three most abundant species differed from that of small-diameter conspecifics. For A. concolor and P. lambertiana, as well as all trees pooled, large-diameter and small-diameter trees were spatially segregated through inter-tree distances <10 m. Competition alone was insufficient to explain the spatial patterns of large-diameter trees and spatial relationships between large-diameter and small-diameter trees. Long-term observations may reveal regulation of forest biomass and spatial structure by fire, wind, pathogens, and insects in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests. Sustaining ecosystem functions such as carbon storage or provision of specialist species habitat will likely require different management strategies when the functions are performed primarily by

  6. Ecological Importance of Large-Diameter Trees in a Temperate Mixed-Conifer Forest

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, James A.; Larson, Andrew J.; Swanson, Mark E.; Freund, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Large-diameter trees dominate the structure, dynamics and function of many temperate and tropical forests. Although both scaling theory and competition theory make predictions about the relative composition and spatial patterns of large-diameter trees compared to smaller diameter trees, these predictions are rarely tested. We established a 25.6 ha permanent plot within which we tagged and mapped all trees ≥1 cm dbh, all snags ≥10 cm dbh, and all shrub patches ≥2 m2. We sampled downed woody debris, litter, and duff with line intercept transects. Aboveground live biomass of the 23 woody species was 507.9 Mg/ha, of which 503.8 Mg/ha was trees (SD = 114.3 Mg/ha) and 4.1 Mg/ha was shrubs. Aboveground live and dead biomass was 652.0 Mg/ha. Large-diameter trees comprised 1.4% of individuals but 49.4% of biomass, with biomass dominated by Abies concolor and Pinus lambertiana (93.0% of tree biomass). The large-diameter component dominated the biomass of snags (59.5%) and contributed significantly to that of woody debris (36.6%). Traditional scaling theory was not a good model for either the relationship between tree radii and tree abundance or tree biomass. Spatial patterning of large-diameter trees of the three most abundant species differed from that of small-diameter conspecifics. For A. concolor and P. lambertiana, as well as all trees pooled, large-diameter and small-diameter trees were spatially segregated through inter-tree distances <10 m. Competition alone was insufficient to explain the spatial patterns of large-diameter trees and spatial relationships between large-diameter and small-diameter trees. Long-term observations may reveal regulation of forest biomass and spatial structure by fire, wind, pathogens, and insects in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forests. Sustaining ecosystem functions such as carbon storage or provision of specialist species habitat will likely require different management strategies when the functions are performed primarily by a

  7. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C

    2014-12-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. >20ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter<2μm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1-5ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter of ~1.27-5.54μm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (<2.5μm). This study establishes a framework for the quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons.

  8. Mapping mean axon diameter and axonal volume fraction by MRI using temporal diffusion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Harkins, Kevin D.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping mean axon diameter and intra-axonal volume fraction may have significant clinical potential because nerve conduction velocity is directly dependent on axon diameter, and several neurodegenerative diseases affect axons of specific sizes and alter axon counts. Diffusion-weighted MRI methods based on the pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) sequence have been reported to be able to assess axon diameter and volume fraction non-invasively. However, due to the relatively long diffusion times used, e.g. > 20 ms, the sensitivity to small axons (diameter < 2 µm) is low, and the derived mean axon diameter has been reported to be overestimated. In the current study, oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) diffusion sequences with variable frequency gradients were used to assess rat spinal white matter tracts with relatively short effective diffusion times (1 – 5 ms). In contrast to previous PGSE-based methods, the extra-axonal diffusion cannot be modeled as hindered (Gaussian) diffusion when short diffusion times are used. Appropriate frequency-dependent rates are therefore incorporated into our analysis and validated by histology-based computer simulation of water diffusion. OGSE data were analyzed to derive mean axon diameters and intra-axonal volume fractions of rat spinal white matter tracts (mean axon diameter ~ 1.27 – 5.54 µm). The estimated values were in good agreement with histology, including the small axon diameters (< 2.5 µm). This study establishes a framework for quantification of nerve morphology using the OGSE method with high sensitivity to small axons. PMID:25225002

  9. [Relationships between coefficient of variation of diameter and height and competition index of main coniferous trees in Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Kang, Xin-Gang; Zhang, Hui-Dong; Liu, Yan

    2009-08-01

    A total of 1139 trees from 8 clear-cut stands dominated by fir, spruce, and pine in the Changbai Mountains were selected to study the relationships between the coefficient of variation of diameter and height and the competition index of the three main coniferous tree species in the Mountains. For the test tree species, the variation of height vs. diameter class was relatively small, while the variations of diameter and height vs. age class were larger, with the largest coefficient of variation of diameter vs. age class. The traditional height-diameter models could better reflect the real growth of trees, whereas the diameter-age or height-age models were not good enough. Competition was the main factor inducing the variations of tree diameter and height, suggesting that incorporating the competition index to the traditional models of tree growth and height could improve the model accuracy significantly.

  10. Development of large diameter carbon monofilament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, B.; Neltri, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A process for preparing large diameter carbon-boron monofilament was developed. The process involves chemical vapor depositing a carbon-boron alloy monofilament from a BCl3, CH4, and H2 gas mixture onto a carbon substrate. Amorphous alloys were formed when gaseous mixtures containing greater than 20 percent methane (80 percent BCl3) were used. The longest uninterrupted lengths of carbon-boron monofilament were produced using a CH4/BCl3 gas ratio of 2.34. It was found that the properties of the carbon-boron alloy monofilament improved when the carbon substrate was precleaned in chlorine. The highest strength monofilament was attained when a CH4/BCl3 gas volume ratio of 0.44 was 28 million N/sq cm (40 million psi). While the highest strengths were attained in this run, the 0.44 gas ratio and other CH4/BCl3 ratios less than 2.34 would not yield long runs. Runs using these ratios were usually terminated because of a break in the monofilament within the reactor. It is felt better process control could probably be achieved by varying the amount of hydrogen; the BCl3/H2 ratio was kept constant in these studies.

  11. The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

  12. Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The smaller of two nearby companions of the Milky Way Galaxy that can be seen with the naked eye in the southern hemisphere sky and which are named after the Portuguese navigator, Ferdinand Magellan. Located in the constellation of Tucana, at a distance of about 190 000 light-years, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) has an angular diameter of about three degrees, about half the apparent diameter o...

  13. Effects of pellet diameter during and after lactation on feed intake of piglets pre- and postweaning.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, H; Wamsteeker, D; Oostindjer, M; van Enckevort, L C M; van der Poel, A F B; Kemp, B; Bolhuis, J E

    2014-09-01

    had no effect on BW gain or feed intake. Behavior was not affected by pellet diameter pre- and postweaning. We conclude that young piglets (<18 d of age) prefer pellets with a large diameter compared to very small pellets, as currently used in practice. Feed intake and BW gain after weaning were higher in piglets provided with a large pellet diameter during lactation, possibly due to the higher creep feed intake in early lactation.

  14. Fast and simplified mapping of mean axon diameter using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Hua; Li, Ke; Harkins, Kevin D; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Kang, Hakmook; Dortch, Richard D; Anderson, Adam W; Does, Mark D; Gore, John C

    2016-04-01

    Mapping axon diameter is of interest for the potential diagnosis and monitoring of various neuronal pathologies. Advanced diffusion-weighted MRI methods have been developed to measure mean axon diameters non-invasively, but suffer major drawbacks that prevent their direct translation into clinical practice, such as complex non-linear data fitting and, more importantly, long scanning times that are usually not tolerable for most human subjects. In the current study, temporal diffusion spectroscopy using oscillating diffusion gradients was used to measure mean axon diameters with high sensitivity to small axons in the central nervous system. Axon diameters have been found to be correlated with a novel metric, DDR⊥ (the rate of dispersion of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient with gradient frequency), which is a model-free quantity that does not require complex data analyses and can be obtained from two diffusion coefficient measurements in clinically relevant times with conventional MRI machines. A comprehensive investigation including computer simulations and animal experiments ex vivo showed that measurements of DDR⊥ agree closely with histological data. In humans in vivo, DDR⊥ was also found to correlate well with reported mean axon diameters in human corpus callosum, and the total scan time was only about 8 min. In conclusion, DDR⊥ may have potential to serve as a fast, simple and model-free approach to map the mean axon diameter of white matter in clinics for assessing axon diameter changes.

  15. Instability of Reference Diameter in the Evaluation of Stenosis After Coronary Angioplasty: Percent Diameter Stenosis Overestimates Dilative Effects Due to Reference Diameter Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hirami, Ryouichi; Iwasaki, Kohichiro; Kusachi, Shozo; Murakami, Takashi; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Matano, Shigeru; Murakami, Masaaki; Kita, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Noburu; Tsuji, Takao

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To examine changes in the reference segment luminal diameter after coronary angioplasty.Methods: Sixty-one patients with stable angina pectoris or old myocardial infarction were examined. Coronary angiograms were recorded before coronary angioplasty (pre-angioplasty) and immediately after (post-angioplasty), as well as 3 months after. Artery diameters were measured on cine-film using quantitative coronary angiographic analysis.Results: The diameters of the proximal segment not involved in the balloon inflation and segments in the other artery did not change significantly after angioplasty, but the reference segment diameter significantly decreased (4.7%). More than 10% luminal reduction was observed in seven patients (11%) and more than 5% reduction was observed in 25 patients (41%). More than 5% underestimation of the stenosis was observed in 22 patients (36%) when the post-angioplasty reference diameter was used as the reference diameter, compared with when the pre-angioplasty measurement was used and more than 10% underestimation was observed in five patients (8%).Conclusion: This study indicated that evaluation by percent diameter stenosis, with the reference diameter from immediately after angioplasty, overestimates the dilative effects of coronary angioplasty, and that it is thus better to evaluate the efficacy of angioplasty using the absolute diameter in addition to percent luminal stenosis.

  16. Solar Diameter Measurements from Eclipses as a Solar Variability Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring Dunham, David; Sofia, Sabatino; Guhl, Konrad; Herald, David Russell

    2015-08-01

    Since thermal relaxation times for the Sun are thousands of years, small variations of the Solar intensity are proportional to small variations of the Solar diameter on decadal time scales. In a combination between observations and theory, reliable values of the relation constant W are known, that allow transformation of historical variations of radius into variations of the solar luminosity. During the past 45 years, members of the International Occultation Timing Association (IOTA) have observed 20 annular and total solar eclipses from locations near the path edges. Baily’s beads, whose occurrence and duration are considerably prolonged as seen from path edge locations, were first timed visually, mostly using projection techniques, but since about 1980, they have been timed mainly from analysis of video recordings. The edge locations have the advantage that most of the beads are defined by the same features in the lunar polar regions that cause the phenomena at each eclipse. Some of the best-observed modern eclipses can be used to assess the accuracy of the results, which are limited mainly by the intensity drop at the Sun’s edge, and the consequent uncertainty in defining the edge. In addition, direct visual contact timings made near the path edges during earlier eclipses, back to 1715, have been found in the literature, and analyzed. Although the observations seem to show small variations, they are only a little larger than the assessed accuracies. The results can be improved with a consistent re-analysis of the observations using the much more accurate lunar profile data that is now available from the Japanese Kaguya and NASA’s LRO lunar orbiter observations. Also, IOTA has plans to observe future eclipses with a variety of techniques that were used in the past, to better assess the accuracies of the different observational methods that have been used, and determine any systematic differences between them.

  17. Relationship between myelin sheath diameter and internodal length in axons of the anterior medullary velum of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Butt, A M; Berry, M

    1995-11-01

    Relations between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths were measured in whole mounts of osmium stained intact anterior medullary velum (AMV) from glutaraldehyde perfused adult rats. The AMV is a sheet of CNS tissue which roofs the IVth ventricle and contains fascicles of myelinated fibres which arise mainly from the nucleus of the IVth cranial nerve. These fibers displayed a broad range of myelin sheath external diameters and internodal lengths, from < 1-12 microns and 50-750 microns, respectively. Myelin sheath external diameter was a measurement of the axonal diameter plus the thickness of its myelin sheath, while internodal length was measured as the distance between consecutive nodes. There was a broadly linear relationship between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths, with the smaller diameter sheaths tending to have shorter internodes than the larger. However, the correlation was weak and for any given diameter myelin sheaths displayed considerable variation in their internodal lengths. The smallest diameter myelin sheaths, < 4 microns, consistently had shorter internodes than predicted by a linear regression and, in an analysis of consecutive internodes in single fibres, the slope was flattened in fibres with a diameter > 4 microns. Our results indicated that small and large calibre fibres may have different myelin sheath diameter-internodal length interrelations.

  18. Crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Dung, S Z; Yang, Y H

    2000-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to characterize the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth of Taiwanese; (2) to compare the differences in the deciduous crown diameters between different populations. The results might provide odontometric information in making preformed stainless steel crowns of the Chinese population. Study casts of 90 children (51 boys and 39 girls) of aged 3 to 6 years were used in this study. The maximum mesiodistal crown diameter (the greatest distance between the contact points of the approximal surfaces) and the buccolingual crown diameter (the greatest distance at a right angle to the mesiodistal measurement) were obtained by using an electronic digital caliper. Significant differences between antimeres were found in the mesiodistal diameters of maxillary canine and maxillary molars (p < 0.001) as well as in the buccolingual diameters of mandibular molars (p < 0.05). Excellent correlations between the antimeres of the corresponding teeth were found (r = 0.70 to 0.96). Boys generally had larger crown diameters than girls with the exception of mesiodistal diameters of maxillary and mandibular canines, and mandibular lateral incisor, whereas the statistically significant gender difference was only found in the buccolingual diameter of mandibular second molar (p < 0.05). The higher the percentage of sexual dimorphism, the larger the gender differences. The percentage of sexual dimorphism ranged from 0.09 to 1.94 for mesiodistal diameters and 0.04 to 2.86 for buccolingual diameters. The mandibular second molar was the most dimorphic tooth. Variations in the crown diameters of the deciduous teeth existed among and within different populations. Deciduous mesiodistal crown diameters of Taiwanese were, in general, smaller than those of Australian aborigines, Taiwan Chinese aborigines, and Hong Kong Chinese, but larger than those of American whites. When considering the buccolingual crown diameters, our data were significantly smaller than those

  19. The importance of large-diameter trees to forest structural heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lutz, James A; Larson, Andrew J; Freund, James A; Swanson, Mark E; Bible, Kenneth J

    2013-01-01

    Large-diameter trees dominate the structure, dynamics and function of many temperate and tropical forests. However, their attendant contributions to forest heterogeneity are rarely addressed. We established the Wind River Forest Dynamics Plot, a 25.6 ha permanent plot within which we tagged and mapped all 30,973 woody stems ≥ 1 cm dbh, all 1,966 snags ≥ 10 cm dbh, and all shrub patches ≥ 2 m(2). Basal area of the 26 woody species was 62.18 m(2)/ha, of which 61.60 m(2)/ha was trees and 0.58 m(2)/ha was tall shrubs. Large-diameter trees (≥ 100 cm dbh) comprised 1.5% of stems, 31.8% of basal area, and 17.6% of the heterogeneity of basal area, with basal area dominated by Tsuga heterophylla and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Small-diameter subpopulations of Pseudotsuga menziesii, Tsuga heterophylla and Thuja plicata, as well as all tree species combined, exhibited significant aggregation relative to the null model of complete spatial randomness (CSR) up to 9 m (P ≤ 0.001). Patterns of large-diameter trees were either not different from CSR (Tsuga heterophylla), or exhibited slight aggregation (Pseudotsuga menziesii and Thuja plicata). Significant spatial repulsion between large-diameter and small-diameter Tsuga heterophylla suggests that large-diameter Tsuga heterophylla function as organizers of tree demography over decadal timescales through competitive interactions. Comparison among two forest dynamics plots suggests that forest structural diversity responds to intermediate-scale environmental heterogeneity and disturbances, similar to hypotheses about patterns of species richness, and richness- ecosystem function. Large mapped plots with detailed within-plot environmental spatial covariates will be required to test these hypotheses.

  20. The Importance of Large-Diameter Trees to Forest Structural Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, James A.; Larson, Andrew J.; Freund, James A.; Swanson, Mark E.; Bible, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Large-diameter trees dominate the structure, dynamics and function of many temperate and tropical forests. However, their attendant contributions to forest heterogeneity are rarely addressed. We established the Wind River Forest Dynamics Plot, a 25.6 ha permanent plot within which we tagged and mapped all 30,973 woody stems ≥1 cm dbh, all 1,966 snags ≥10 cm dbh, and all shrub patches ≥2 m2. Basal area of the 26 woody species was 62.18 m2/ha, of which 61.60 m2/ha was trees and 0.58 m2/ha was tall shrubs. Large-diameter trees (≥100 cm dbh) comprised 1.5% of stems, 31.8% of basal area, and 17.6% of the heterogeneity of basal area, with basal area dominated by Tsuga heterophylla and Pseudotsuga menziesii. Small-diameter subpopulations of Pseudotsuga menziesii, Tsuga heterophylla and Thuja plicata, as well as all tree species combined, exhibited significant aggregation relative to the null model of complete spatial randomness (CSR) up to 9 m (P≤0.001). Patterns of large-diameter trees were either not different from CSR (Tsuga heterophylla), or exhibited slight aggregation (Pseudotsuga menziesii and Thuja plicata). Significant spatial repulsion between large-diameter and small-diameter Tsuga heterophylla suggests that large-diameter Tsuga heterophylla function as organizers of tree demography over decadal timescales through competitive interactions. Comparison among two forest dynamics plots suggests that forest structural diversity responds to intermediate-scale environmental heterogeneity and disturbances, similar to hypotheses about patterns of species richness, and richness- ecosystem function. Large mapped plots with detailed within-plot environmental spatial covariates will be required to test these hypotheses. PMID:24376579

  1. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  2. Optimization of post-column reactor radius in capillary high performance liquid chromatography Effect of chromatographic column diameter and particle diameter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongjuan; Weber, Stephen G

    2006-04-28

    A post-column reactor consisting of a simple open tube (Capillary Taylor Reactor) affects the performance of a capillary LC in two ways: stealing pressure from the column and adding band spreading. The former is a problem for very small radius reactors, while the latter shows itself for large reactor diameters. We derived an equation that defines the observed number of theoretical plates (N(obs)) taking into account the two effects stated above. Making some assumptions and asserting certain conditions led to a final equation with a limited number of variables, namely chromatographic column radius, reactor radius and chromatographic particle diameter. The assumptions and conditions are that the van Deemter equation applies, the mass transfer limitation is for intraparticle diffusion in spherical particles, the velocity is at the optimum, the analyte's retention factor, k', is zero, the post-column reactor is only long enough to allow complete mixing of reagents and analytes and the maximum operating pressure of the pumping system is used. Optimal ranges of the reactor radius (a(r)) are obtained by comparing the number of observed theoretical plates (and theoretical plates per time) with and without a reactor. Results show that the acceptable reactor radii depend on column diameter, particle diameter, and maximum available pressure. Optimal ranges of a(r) become narrower as column diameter increases, particle diameter decreases or the maximum pressure is decreased. When the available pressure is 4000 psi, a Capillary Taylor Reactor with 12 microm radius is suitable for all columns smaller than 150 microm (radius) packed with 2-5 microm particles. For 1 microm packing particles, only columns smaller than 42.5 microm (radius) can be used and the reactor radius needs to be 5 microm.

  3. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (right)   The structure of tightly packed "closed cells" in a layer of marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific Ocean ... into interesting structures such as those shown here. These cells are notably small, with diameters ranging from 10-15 kilometers, instead ...

  4. Arterial diameter measurement using high resolution ultrasonography: in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Brum, Javier; Bia, Daniel; Benech, Nicolas; Balay, Guillermo; Armentano, Ricardo L; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of pressure and diameter in blood vessels or vascular prosthesis is of great importance in cardiovascular research. Knowledge of diameter changes as response to intravascular pressure is the basis to estimate the biomechanical properties of blood vessel. In this work a new method to quantify arterial diameter based in high resolution ultrasonography is proposed. Measurements on an arterial phantom placed on a cardiovascular simulator were performed. The results were compared to sonomicrometry measurements considered as gold standard technique. The obtained results indicate that the new method ensure an optimal diameter quantification. This method presents two main advantages respect to sonomicrometry: is noninvasive and the vessel wall strain can be measured directly.

  5. Diameter Controlled of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized on Nanoporous Silicon Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asli, N. A.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Maryam, M.; Yusop, S. F. M.; Suriani, A. B.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully synthesized on nanoporous silicon template (NPSiT) using botanical source, camphor oil. Diameter of CNTs synthesized was controlled by pore size of NPSiT prepared by photo-electrochemical anodization method. The diameter of CNTs grown on different NPSiT corresponded to the pore diameter of NPSiT. FESEM images showed self-organized bundles of fiber-like structures of CNTs with diameter of around 20nm which were successfully grown directly on nanoporous silicon while raman spectra obtained ratio of ID/IG at 0.67.

  6. Research on fiber diameter automatic measurement based on image detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaogang; Jiang, Yu; Shen, Wen; Han, Guangjie

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method of Fiber Diameter Automatic Measurement(FDAM). This design is based on image detection technology in order to provide a rapid and accurate measurement of average fiber diameter. Firstly, a preprocessing mechanism is proposed to the sample fiber image by using improved median filtering algorithm, then we introduce edge detection with Sobel operator to detect target fiber, finally diameter of random point and average diameter of the fiber can be measured precisely with searching shortest path algorithm. Experiments are conducted to prove the accuracy of the measurement, and simulations show that measurement errors caused by human factors could be eliminated to a desirable level.

  7. Microbes make average 2 nanometer diameter crystalline UO2 particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    It is well known that phylogenetically diverse groups of microorganisms are capable of catalyzing the reduction of highly soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV), which rapidly precipitates as uraninite (UO2). Because biological uraninite is highly insoluble, microbial uranyl reduction is being intensively studied as the basis for a cost-effective in-situ bioremediation strategy. Previous studies have described UO2 biomineralization products as amorphous or poorly crystalline. The objective of this study is to characterize the nanocrystalline uraninite in detail in order to determine the particle size, crystallinity, and size-related structural characteristics, and to examine the implications of these for reoxidation and transport. In this study, we obtained U-contaminated sediment and water from an inactive U mine and incubated them anaerobically with nutrients to stimulate reductive precipitation of UO2 by indigenous anaerobic bacteria, mainly Gram-positive spore-forming Desulfosporosinus and Clostridium spp. as revealed by RNA-based phylogenetic analysis. Desulfosporosinus sp. was isolated from the sediment and UO2 was precipitated by this isolate from a simple solution that contains only U and electron donors. We characterized UO2 formed in both of the experiments by high resolution-TEM (HRTEM) and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (XAFS). The results from HRTEM showed that both the pure and the mixed cultures of microorganisms precipitated around 1.5 - 3 nm crystalline UO2 particles. Some particles as small as around 1 nm could be imaged. Rare particles around 10 nm in diameter were also present. Particles adhere to cells and form colloidal aggregates with low fractal dimension. In some cases, coarsening by oriented attachment on \\{111\\} is evident. Our preliminary results from XAFS for the incubated U-contaminated sample also indicated an average diameter of UO2 of 2 nm. In nanoparticles, the U-U distance obtained by XAFS was 0.373 nm, 0.012 nm

  8. Effects of solution properties on the morphology and diameters of nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hongjun; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, four different series of polymer solutions were presented to study the effects of solution properties on the morphology and diameters of nanofibers, including the polyethersulfone (PES) dissolving in N, N-dimethylformamide, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in ethanol, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in water and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) in N, Ndimethyl acetamide. These solutions revealed different conditions of the formation of beads, the spatial structures and the diameter of fibers. The PVDF nanofibers had plenty of small beads on the fibers, while the other three were uniform fibers without beads. The nanofibers of PES, PVP and PVDF showed good three dimensional structures except the PAA fibrous membranes. The change of fiber diameters of PVDF was much larger than that of PVP.

  9. Estimation of the diameter of and iodine concentration within blood vessels using digital radiography devices.

    PubMed

    Kruger, R A

    1981-01-01

    A variety of digital radiographic and fluoroscopic devices have been developed which can isolate small concentrations of iodine within the cardiovascular system. Using these devices, time dependent subtraction images have been formed which only display opacified vasculature. Theory is presented and simple methods have been developed for determining vessel diameters and iodine concentration from such subtraction images. The methods have been verified using plexiglass and aluminum vessel phantoms imaged with a computerized radiography device. Using this device the diameter of a 5 mm diameter vessel could be determined to within 6% (0.28 mm) even though the pixel width in the digitized image corresponded to 1.34 mm. In the same vessel, it is estimated that an iodine concentration of 46 mg/cm3 could be determined with 10% accuracy.

  10. Mean particle diameters. From statistical definition to physical understanding.

    PubMed

    Alderliesten, Maarten

    2005-01-01

    Mean particle diameters may be used to describe and to model physical, chemical, or physiological properties of products or materials containing dispersed phases. There are different notation systems for these mean diameters, which may cause much confusion. This equally applies to their nomenclature. This article introduces the Moment-Ratio definition system and evaluates briefly the ISO definition system. The ISO system appears to have serious drawbacks. Mean particle diameters can be estimated from histograms of size distributions by Summation (M-R system) and by Integration (ISO system) over the histogram intervals. Summation tends to be more accurate than Integration and is less sensitive to low values of the lower limit of size distributions. The Summation method equations are straightforward and generally applicable. The mathematical formulas of the Integration method are difficult to apply in daily practice, and their complexity may easily hide the physical background of a mean particle diameter. A coherent nomenclature system for denoting mean particle diameters is recommended. This nomenclature system does not contain any ambiguities and clearly conveys the physical meanings of mean particle diameters. This article deals also with an empirical method to select the proper type of mean diameter to describe a physical, chemical, or physiological property of a product or material containing dispersed phases. After calculation of the mean diameters from experimental data, the relationships between the product property and these mean diameters are investigated statistically. The selection method has been illustrated by two examples. The dataset of each example consists of a set of particle size distributions and the corresponding physical product properties that are influenced by the particle sizes. Hypotheses are formulated to explain the types of selected mean diameters. Sharing results from all over the world of applications of the developed selection method

  11. Method for applying pyrolytic carbon coatings to small particles

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.; Kiplinger, Dale V.; Chilcoat, Bill R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for coating small diameter, low density particles with pyrolytic carbon is provided by fluidizing a bed of particles wherein at least 50 per cent of the particles have a density and diameter of at least two times the remainder of the particles and thereafter recovering the small diameter and coated particles.

  12. Dataset for the validation and use of DiameterJ an open source nanofiber diameter measurement tool

    PubMed Central

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Bharti, Kapil; Kriel, Haydn; Simon, Carl G.

    2015-01-01

    DiameterJ is an open source image analysis plugin for ImageJ. DiameterJ produces ten files for every image that it analyzes. These files include the images that were analyzed, the data to create histograms of fiber radius, pore size, fiber orientation, and summary statistics, as well as images to check the output of DiameterJ. DiameterJ was validated with 130 in silico-derived, digital, synthetic images and 24 scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of steel wire samples with a known diameter distribution. Once validated, DiameterJ was used to analyze SEM images of electrospun polymeric nanofibers, including a comparison of different segmentation algorithms. In this article, all digital synthetic images, SEM images, and their segmentations are included. Additionally, DiameterJ’s raw output files, and processed data is included for the reader. The data provided herein was used to generate the figures in DiameterJ: A Validated Open Source Nanofiber Diameter Measurement Tool[1], where more discussion can be found. PMID:26380840

  13. The Measurements of the Solar Diameter at the Kepler's Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino; Fraschetti, Federico

    2002-12-01

    We examine five measurements of the solar disk diameter made with a pinhole instrument by Tycho in 1591 and Kepler in 1600-1602 [1]. Those are the first accurate measurements of the solar disk diameter available in literature, even if Ptolemy and Copernicus already did such measurements [2].

  14. Method accurately measures mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Photomicrographic method determines mean particle diameters of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Many diameters are measured simultaneously by measuring row lengths of particles in a triangular array at a glass-oil interface. The method provides size standards for electronic particle counters and prevents distortions, softening, and flattening.

  15. PHOS Experiment: Thermal Response of a Large Diameter Pulsating Heat Pipe on Board REXUS-18 Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Guidi, G. M.; Belfi, F.; Cicero, G.; Fioriti, D.; Di Prizio, D.; Piacquadio, S.; Becatti, G.; Orlandini, G.; Frigerio, A.; Fontanesi, S.; Nannipieri, P.; Rognini, M.; Morganti, N.; Filippeschi, S.; Di Marco, P.; Fanucci, L.; Baronti, F.; Mameli, M.; Marengo, M.; Manzoni, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present work, the results of two Closed Loop Pulsating Heat Pipes (CLPHPs) tested on board REXUS-1 8 sounding rocket in order to get experimental data over a relatively broad reduced gravity period (about 90 s) are thoroughly discussed. The CLPHPs are partially filled with refrigerant FC-72 and have, respectively, an inner tube diameter larger (3 .0 mm) and slightly smaller (1 .6 mm) than a critical diameter defined on Earth gravity conditions. On ground, the small diameter CLPHP works as a real Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP): the typical capillary slug flow pattern forms inside the device and the heat exchange is triggered by self-sustained thermally driven oscillations of the working fluid. Conversely, the large diameter CLPHP behaves like a two-phase thermosyphon in vertical position while does not operate in horizontal position as the working fluid stratifies within the tube and surface tension is not able to balance buoyancy. Then, the idea to test the CLPHPs under reduced gravity conditions: as soon as gravity reduces, buoyancy becomes less intense and the typical capillary slug flow pattern can also forms within a tube with a larger diameter. Moreover, this allows to increase the heat transfer rate and, consequently, to decrease the overall thermal resistance. Even though it was not possible to experience the expected reduced gravity conditions due to a failure of the yo-yo de-spin system, the thermal response to the peculiar acceleration field (hyper-gravity) experienced on board are thoroughly described.

  16. Reliable Diameter Control of Carbon Nanotube Nanobundles Using Withdrawal Velocity.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hwal; Kim, Kanghyun; An, Taechang; Choi, WooSeok; Lim, Geunbae

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) nanobundles are widely used in nanoscale imaging, fabrication, and electrochemical and biological sensing. The diameter of CNT nanobundles should be controlled precisely, because it is an important factor in determining electrode performance. Here, we fabricated CNT nanobundles on tungsten tips using dielectrophoresis (DEP) force and controlled their diameters by varying the withdrawal velocity of the tungsten tips. Withdrawal velocity pulling away from the liquid-air interface could be an important, reliable parameter to control the diameter of CNT nanobundles. The withdrawal velocity was controlled automatically and precisely with a one-dimensional motorized stage. The effect of the withdrawal velocity on the diameter of CNT nanobundles was analyzed theoretically and compared with the experimental results. Based on the attachment efficiency, the withdrawal velocity is inversely proportional to the diameter of the CNT nanobundles; this has been demonstrated experimentally. Control of the withdrawal velocity will play an important role in fabricating CNT nanobundles using DEP phenomena.

  17. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  18. Characterization of very-low density lipoprotein particle diameter dynamics in relation to egg production in a passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Salvante, Katrina G; Lin, Gina; Walzem, Rosemary L; Williams, Tony D

    2007-03-01

    During avian egg production, oestrogen mediates marked increases in hepatic lipid production and changes in the diameter of assembled very-low density lipoprotein (VLDL). A nearly complete shift from generic VLDL ( approximately 70 nm in diameter), which transports lipids to peripheral tissues, to yolk-targeted VLDL (VLDLy) ( approximately 30 nm), which supplies the yolk with energy-rich lipid, has been observed in the plasma of laying domestic fowl. We validated an established dynamic laser scattering technique for a passerine songbird Taeniopygia guttata, the zebra finch, to characterize the dynamics of VLDL particle diameter distribution in relation to egg production. We predicted that non-gallinaceous avian species that have not been selected for maximum egg production would exhibit less dramatic shifts in lipid metabolism during egg production. As predicted, there was considerable overlap between the VLDL particle diameter distributions of laying and non-laying zebra finches. But unexpectedly, non-laying zebra finches had VLDL diameter distributions that peaked at small particles and had relatively few large VLDL particles. As a result, laying zebra finches, in comparison, had diameter distributions that were shifted towards larger VLDL particles. Nevertheless, laying zebra finches, like laying chickens, had larger proportions of particles within proposed VLDLy particle diameter ranges than non-laying zebra finches (e.g. sVLDLy: 50% vs 37%). Furthermore, zebra finches and chickens had similar modal (29.7 nm in both species) and median (32.7 nm vs 29.6 nm) VLDL particle diameters during egg production. Therefore, although zebra finches and chickens exhibited opposing directional shifts in VLDL particle diameter distribution during egg production, the modifications to VLDL particle structure in both species resulted in the realization of a common goal, i.e. to produce and maintain a large proportion of small VLDL particles of specific diameters that are capable

  19. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  20. Regulation of electrospun scaffold stiffness via coaxial core diameter.

    PubMed

    Drexler, J W; Powell, H M

    2011-03-01

    Scaffold mechanics influence cellular behavior, including migration, phenotype and viability. Scaffold stiffness is commonly modulated through cross-linking, polymer density, or bioactive coatings on stiff substrates. These approaches provide useful information about cellular response to substrate stiffness; however, they are not ideal as the processing can change substrate morphology, density or chemistry. Coaxial electrospinning was investigated as a fabrication method to produce scaffolds with tunable stiffness and strength without changing architecture or surface chemistry. Core solution concentration, solvent and feed rate were utilized to control core diameter with higher solution concentration and feed rate positively correlating with increased fiber diameter and stiffness. Coaxial scaffolds electrospun with an 8 wt./vol.% polycaprolactone (PCL)-HFP solution at 1 ml h(-1) formed scaffolds with an average core diameter of 1.1±0.2 μm and stiffness of 0.027±3.3×10(-3) N mm(-1). In contrast, fibers which were 2.6±0.1 μm in core diameter yielded scaffolds with a stiffness of 0.065±4.7×10(-3) N mm(-1). Strength and stiffness positively correlated with core diameter with no significant difference in total fiber diameter and interfiber distance observed in as-spun scaffolds. These data indicate that coaxial core diameter can be utilized to tailor mechanical properties of three-dimensional scaffolds and would provide an ideal scaffold for assessing the effect of scaffold mechanics on cell behavior.

  1. Effect of diameter of poly(lactic acid) fiber on the physical properties of poly(ɛ-caprolactone).

    PubMed

    Ju, Dandan; Han, Lijing; Guo, Ziqi; Bian, Junjia; Li, Fan; Chen, Shan; Dong, Lisong

    2015-05-01

    Biodegradable polymer composites based on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers with diameters of 18, 26, 180 μm were prepared by melt compounding. The PLA fiber content in the composites was constant at 20% by weight. The effects of fibers with different diameters on the physical properties and enzymatic degradation of PCL were investigated. The morphological analysis indicated good interfacial adhesion between PCL and PLA fiber, which was beneficial to improve the physical properties of PCL. With increasing PLA fiber diameter, the complex viscosity and modulus of PCL were significantly increased, especially at low frequencies, indicating that the hindered effect of the fiber on the mobility of the PCL molecular chains was more obvious when PLA fiber diameter was thicker. However, as for the mechanical properties, the reinforcement was more obvious to PCL with the smaller PLA fiber diameter. This was because increasing efficient load transfer may be appeared due to the larger surface area and better interface bonding force of the fiber with thinner diameters. The enzymatic degradation of PCL was accelerated with the addition of large PLA fiber diameter of 26 and 180 μm, and hardly changed with the small PLA fiber diameter of 18 μm.

  2. Laser direct writing using submicron-diameter fibers.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Guoguang; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Hou, Changlun; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei

    2009-10-26

    In this paper, a novel direct writing technique using submicron-diameter fibers is presented. The submicron-diameter fiber probe serves as a tightly confined point source and it adopts micro touch mode in the process of writing. The energy distribution of direct writing model is analyzed by Three-Dimension Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. Experiments demonstrate that submicron-diameter fiber direct writing has some advantages: simple process, 350-nm-resolution (lower than 442-nm-wavelength), large writing area, and controllable width of lines. In addition, by altering writing direction of lines, complex submicron patterns can be fabricated.

  3. Measurement of fetal biparietal diameter in owl monkeys (Aotus nancymaae).

    PubMed

    Schuler, A Michele; Brady, Alan G; Tustin, George W; Parks, Virginia L; Morris, Chris G; Abee, Christian R

    2010-09-01

    Owl monkeys are New World primates frequently used in biomedical research. Despite the historical difficulty of breeding owl monkeys in captivity, several productive owl monkey breeding colonies exist currently. The animals in the colony we describe here are not timed-pregnant, and determination of gestational age is an important factor in prenatal care. Gestational age of human fetuses is often determined by using transabdominal measurements of fetal biparietal diameter. The purpose of this study was to correlate biparietal diameter measurements with gestational age in owl monkeys. We found that biparietal diameter can be used to accurately predict gestational age in owl monkeys.

  4. 76 FR 12325 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... to comment on the Department's respondent selection process.\\9\\ \\9\\ See the Department's March 30... examination of relevant accounting and production records, as well as original source documents provided by..., in our ] respondent selection process, we released CBP data covering POR imports of SDGE from the...

  5. 77 FR 13284 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... NV, in most cases, on the NME producer's factors of production (FOP), valued in a surrogate ME... Surrogate Country Selection Process,'' (March 1, 2004), available on the Department's Web site at http://ia.... The petitioners also comment that Ukraine is a major importer of the inputs consumed in the...

  6. Explosive Tube-to-fitting Joining of Small-diameter Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    An effort is currently under way by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to upgrade the space shuttle main engine through the use of improved materials and processes. Under consideration is the use of the Langley Research Center explosive seam welding process. The objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of joining space shuttle main engine tube to fitting components in an oxygen heat exchanger, using the NASA LaRC explosive seam welding process. It was concluded that LaRC explosive joining is viable for this application; that there is no incompatability of materials; that ultrasonic inspection is the best nondestructive testing method; and that the .500 DIA joint experiences interface problems.

  7. Non-Newtonian Liquid Flow through Small Diameter Piping Components: CFD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Tarun Kanti; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis have been carried out to evaluate the frictional pressure drop across the horizontal pipeline and different piping components, like elbows, orifices, gate and globe valves for non-Newtonian liquid through 0.0127 m pipe line. The mesh generation is done using GAMBIT 6.3 and FLUENT 6.3 is used for CFD analysis. The CFD results are verified with our earlier published experimental data. The CFD results show the very good agreement with the experimental values.

  8. 77 FR 37873 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... less, and whether or not attached to a graphite pin joining system or any other type of joining system or hardware. The merchandise covered by the order also includes graphite pin joining systems for..., and whether or not the graphite pin joining system is attached to, sold with, or sold separately...

  9. 77 FR 33405 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Affirmative Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ...; (C) the nature of the production process in the third country; (D) the extent of production...)(2)(C): the nature of the production process in the third country; 781(b)(2)(D): the extent of the... and production records, as well as original source documents provided by UKCG.\\27\\ \\27\\ See...

  10. 76 FR 14910 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Anti...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... a result of increased global marketing on behalf of the company, and (c) draws incorrect conclusions... efforts to obtain a larger global market share, which predate the SDGE Order.\\58\\ \\58\\ See UKCG's...

  11. Development of a precision wire feeder for small-diameter wire

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, E.D.

    1995-03-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, the author designed and fabricated a precision wire feeder to be used with high energy density (electron beam and laser beam) welding for weld joints where filler wire might be needed to fill a gap or to adjust the chemical composition so that a crack-free weld could be made. The wire feeder incorporates a 25,000 step-per-revolution motor to power a urethane-coated drive roll. A microprocessor-based controller provides precise control of the motor and allows both continuous and pulsed feeding of the wire. A unidirectional 0.75-in.-dia ball bearing is used to press the wire against the drive roll. A slight constant backward tension is maintained on the wire spool by a Bodine torque motor. A Teflon tube is used to guide the wire from the drive roll to the vicinity of the weld, where a hypodermic needle is used to aim the wire into the weld pool. The operation of the wire feeder was demonstrated by feeding a 10-mil-dia, Type 304 stainless steel wire into a variety of CO{sub 2} laser beam welds. The resulting welds are smooth and continuous, and the welds are considered to be completely satisfactory for a variety of applications.

  12. Non-intrusive ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for small diameter tubes

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.

    1982-01-01

    An arrangement for deleting liquid in a line, using non-intrusive ultrasonic techniques is disclosed. In this arrangement, four piezoelectric crystals are arranged in pairs about a 0.072 inch o.d. pipe. An ultrasonic tone burst is transmitted along the pipe, between crystal pairs, and the amplitude of the received tone burst indicates the absence/presence of liquid in the pipe.

  13. 78 FR 14964 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    .... Jinneng Group Co., Ltd. 53. Jinyu Thermo-Electric Material Co., Ltd. 54. Kaifeng Carbon Company Ltd. 55.... 125. Youth Industry Co., Ltd. 126. Zhengzhou Jinyu Thermo-Electric Material Co., Ltd. 127....

  14. 78 FR 55680 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Co., Ltd. 53. Jinyu Thermo-Electric Material Co., Ltd. 54. Kaifeng Carbon Company Ltd. 55. KASY.... 125. Zhengzhou Jinyu Thermo-Electric Material Co., Ltd. 126. Zibo Continent Carbon Factory 127....

  15. Calibration of a Neutron Hydroprobe for Moisture Measurements in Small-Diameter Steel-Cased Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2009-08-01

    Computation of soil moisture content from thermalized neutron counts for the T-Farm Interim cover requires a calibration relationship but none exists for 2-in tubes. A number of calibration options are available for the neutron probe, including vendor calibration, field calibration, but none of these methods were deemed appropriate for the configuration of interest. The objective of this work was to develop a calibration relation for converting neutron counts measured in 2-in access tubes to soil water content. The calibration method chosen for this study was a computational approach using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). Model calibration was performed using field measurements in the Hanford calibration models with 6-in access tubes, in air and in the probe shield. The bet-fit model relating known water content to measured neutron counts was an exponential model that was essentially equivalent to that currently being used for 6-in steel cased wells. The MCNP simulations successfully predicted the neutron count rate for the neutron shield and the three calibration models for which data were collected in the field. However, predictions for air were about 65% lower than the measured counts . This discrepancy can be attributed to uncertainties in the configuration used for the air measurements. MCNP-simulated counts for the physical models were essentially equal to the measured counts with values. Accurate prediction of the response in 6-in casings in the three calibration models was motivation to predict the response in 2-in access tubes. Simulations were performed for six of the seven calibration models as well as 4 virtual models with the entire set covering a moisture range of 0 to 40%. Predicted counts for the calibration models with 2-in access tubes were 40 to 50% higher than in the 6-inch tubes. Predicted counts for water were about 60% higher in the 2-in tube than in the 6-in tube. The discrepancy between the 2-in and 6-in tube can be attributed to the smaller air gap between the probe and the 2-in access tube. The best-fit model relating volumetric water content to count ratio (CR) is of the form e^A x CR^B with A=0.3596 ± 0.0216 and B=0.4629 ± 0.0629 and r^2= 0.9998. It is recommended that the calibration function based on the count ratio, rather than raw counts, be used to avoid the effects of electronic noise in the probe that may arise due to the conditions at the time of measurement. These results suggest that the MCNP code can be used to extend calibrations for the neutron probe to different conditions including access tube size as well as composition without the need to construct additional physical models.

  16. Anisotropic Electroless Deposition on DNA Origami Templates To Form Small Diameter Conductive Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Bibek; Westover, Tyler; Stoddard, Michael; Brinkerhoff, Kamron; Jensen, John; Davis, Robert C; Woolley, Adam T; Harb, John N

    2017-01-24

    An improved method for the metallization of DNA origami is examined in this work. DNA origami, a simple and robust method for creating a wide variety of nanostructured shapes and patterns, provides an enabling template for bottom-up fabrication of next-generation nanodevices. Selective metallization of these DNA templates is needed to make nanoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate a metallization process that uses gold nanorod seeds followed by anisotropic plating to provide improved morphology and greater control of the final metallized width of the structure. In our approach, gold nanorods are attached to an origami template to create a seed layer. Electroless gold deposition is then used to fill the gaps between seeds in order to create continuous, conductive nanowires. Importantly, growth during electroless deposition occurs preferentially in the length direction at a rate that is approximately 4 times the growth rate in the width direction, which enables fabrication of narrow, continuous wires. The electrical properties of 49 nanowires with widths ranging from 13 to 29 nm were characterized, and resistivity values as low as 8.9 × 10(-7) Ω·m were measured. The anisotropic metallization process presented here represents important progress toward the creation of nanoelectronic devices by molecularly directed placement of functional components onto self-assembled biological templates.

  17. 77 FR 47596 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Affirmative Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... exported from the United Kingdom (``U.K.'') to the United States by UK Carbon and Graphite Co., Ltd... this criterion supports finding that the process of completion in the UK is minor.\\18\\ \\17\\ See... Graphitization Confers Country of Origin Appendix II Certification of UK Carbon and Graphite Co., Ltd. for...

  18. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  19. The philosophies of dowel diameter preparation: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P M; Palik, J F

    1993-01-01

    This article reviewed the literature regarding the diameter of dowels and identified three distinct philosophies of dowel space preparation. One group advocated the narrowest diameter for fabrication of a dowel to a desired length. Another recommended a dowel space with an apical diameter equal to one third of the narrowest dimension of the root at the terminus of the dowel. A third group advised that at least 1 mm of sound dentin should surround the entire surface of the dowel. A combination of the one third and 1 mm minimal philosophies yielded a practical guideline for dowel space preparation, particularly in aged teeth. Requiring a definite amount of tooth structure surrounding the dowel, while adhering to the one third proportion, indicated upper limits on both the diameter and length of the dowel. These calculated limits served as convenient starting points in selecting a specific style of dowel and assisted in determining whether additional measures are warranted to enhance dowel retention.

  20. LARGE DIAMETER WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LARGE DIAMETER - WATER TEST MACHINE, TEST FINISHED, PIPE ON CAR. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe Casting & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Diameter estimation of cylinders by the rigorous diffraction model.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2005-07-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction formula is commonly used for estimating the diameter of thin cylinders by far field diffractometry. However, an experimental systematic overestimation of the value of the cylinder diameter by this diffraction model and other three-dimensional models has been reported when this estimation is compared with those obtained from interferometric techniques. In this work, a rigorous electromagnetic diffraction model is analyzed to determine the cylinder diameter by using the envelope minima of the far field diffraction pattern. The results of this rigorous model are compared with those from the Fraunhofer diffraction formula. The overestimation by the Fraunhofer model is predicted theoretically, presenting a dependence on the wavelength, the polarization state of the incident wave, and the cylinder diameter. The discrepancies are shown to be due to the three-dimensional geometry.

  2. Northern view of inside diameter welding station of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Northern view of inside diameter welding station of the saw line in bay9 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  3. Development of welded metal bellows having minimum effective diameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henschel, J. K.; Stevens, J. B.; Harvey, A. C.; Howland, J. S.; Rhee, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, and fabrication was conducted to develop welded metal bellows having a minimum change in effective diameter for cryogenic turbomachinery face seal applications. Linear analysis of the principle types of bellows provided identification of concepts capable of meeting basic operation requirements. For the 6-inch (.152 m) mean diameter, 1.5-inch free length bellows studied, nonlinear analysis showed that opposed and nested toroidal bellows plates stiffened by means of alternating stiffener rings were capable of maintaining constant effective diameter within 0.3% and 0.1% respectively under the operating conditions of interest. Changes in effective diameter were due principally to bellows axial deflection with pressure differential having a lesser influence. Fabrication problems associated with joining the thin bellows plates to the relatively heavy stiffener rings were encountered and precluded assembly and testing of a bellows core. Fabrication problems are summarized and recommended fabrication methods for future effort are presented.

  4. Acoustic fill factors for a 120 inch diameter fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. Albert

    1992-01-01

    Data from the acoustic test of a 120-inch diameter payload fairing were collected and an analysis of acoustic fill factors were performed. Correction factors for obtaining a weighted spatial average of the interior sound pressure level (SPL) were derived based on this database and a normalized 200-inch diameter fairing database. The weighted fill factors were determined and compared with statistical energy analysis (VAPEPS code) derived fill factors. The comparison is found to be reasonable.

  5. Aldebaran's angular diameter: How well do we know it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richichi, A.; Roccatagliata, V.

    2005-04-01

    The bright, well-known K5 giant Aldebaran, α Tau, is probably the star with the largest number of direct angular diameter determinations, achieved over a long time by several authors using various techniques. In spite of this wealth of data, or perhaps as a direct result of it, there is not a very good agreement on a single angular diameter value. This is particularly unsettling if one considers that Aldebaran is also used as a primary calibrator for some angular resolution methods, notably for optical and infrared long baseline interferometry. Directly connected to Aldebaran's angular diameter and its uncertainties is its effective temperature, which also has been used for several empirical calibrations. Among the proposed explanations for the elusiveness of an accurate determination of the angular diameter of Aldebaran are the possibility of temporal variations as well as a possible dependence of the angular diameter on the wavelength. We present here a few, very accurate new determinations obtained by means of lunar occultations and long baseline interferometry. We derive an average value of 19.96±0.03 milliarcsec for the uniform disk diameter. The corresponding limb-darkened value is 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, or 44.2±0.9 R⊙. We discuss this result, in connection with previous determinations and with possible problems that may affect such measurements. Based on observations collected at TIRGO (Gornergrat, Switzerland). TIRGO is operated by CNR - CAISMI Arcetri, Italy.

  6. Understanding the effect of carbon status on stem diameter variations

    PubMed Central

    De Swaef, Tom; Driever, Steven M.; Van Meulebroek, Lieven; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Marcelis, Leo F. M.; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon assimilation and leaf-to-fruit sugar transport are, along with plant water status, the driving mechanisms for fruit growth. An integrated comprehension of the plant water and carbon relationships is therefore essential to better understand water and dry matter accumulation. Variations in stem diameter result from an integrated response to plant water and carbon status and are as such a valuable source of information. Methods A mechanistic water flow and storage model was used to relate variations in stem diameter to phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration dynamics in tomato. The simulation results were compared with an independent model, simulating phloem sucrose loading at the leaf level based on photosynthesis and sugar metabolism kinetics and enabled a mechanistic interpretation of the ‘one common assimilate pool’ concept for tomato. Key Results Combining stem diameter variation measurements and mechanistic modelling allowed us to distinguish instantaneous dynamics in the plant water relations and gradual variations in plant carbon status. Additionally, the model combined with stem diameter measurements enabled prediction of dynamic variables which are difficult to measure in a continuous and non-destructive way, such as xylem water potential and phloem hydrostatic potential. Finally, dynamics in phloem sugar loading and sugar concentration were distilled from stem diameter variations. Conclusions Stem diameter variations, when used in mechanistic models, have great potential to continuously monitor and interpret plant water and carbon relations under natural growing conditions. PMID:23186836

  7. Streamer velocity and diameter observed in sprites and laboratory discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; Kammae, T.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.

    2012-12-01

    Analysis of the relation between the reduced diameter (scaled with atmospheric density) and velocity of sprite streamers has found a roughly linear dependence (Kanmae et al., J. Phys. D, 45, 275203, 2012). This linear dependence agrees with modeling by Naidis (Phys. Rev. E, 79,057401, 2009). Comparing observations of diameters in sprites with those of laboratory streamers (Briels et al., J. Phys. D, 39, 5201, 2006) show that the laboratory streamers, while following the linear diameter-velocity relation, have smaller diameters (and velocities) than what we observe in sprite streamers. We suggest that this may be an artifact of the smaller reduced scale sizes of the laboratory experimental setup where the streamers are observed much earlier relative to streamer onset. Another systematic difference between laboratory and sprite streamers is that while sprite streamers often split into many sub-streamers, laboratory streamers only rarely split into more than two. There have been several studies of streamer stability against splitting. Lui & Pasko (J. Geophys. Res. 109, A04301, 2004) found that the streamer radius limit of 97 m at 70 km altitude for stability. Sprite streamers are often significantly larger, suggesting that the relatively larger streamer diameter in sprites compared to laboratory streamers is responsible for the larger number of sub streamers. However, we note that the distance sprite streamers travel between splitting is highly varying between events and seemingly not related to the sprite diameter.

  8. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  9. SAXS structural study of PrPSc reveals ~11 nm diameter of basic double intertwined fibers

    PubMed Central

    Amenitsch, Heinz; Benetti, Federico; Ramos, Adriana; Legname, Giuseppe; Requena, Jesús R

    2013-01-01

    A sample of purified Syrian hamster PrP27–30 prion fibers was analyzed by synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The SAXS pattern obtained was fitted to a model based on infinitely long cylinders with a log-normal intensity distribution, a hard-sphere structure factor and a general Porod term for larger aggregates. The diameter calculated for the cylinders determined from the fit was 11.0 ± 0.2 nm. This measurement offers an estimation of the diameter of PrPSc fibers in suspension, i.e., free of errors derived from estimations based on 2D projections in transmission electron microscopy images, subjected to further possible distortions from the negative stain. This diameter, which corresponds to a maximum diameter of approximately 5.5 nm for each of the two intertwined protofilaments making up the fibers, rules out the possibility that PrPSc conforms to a stack of in-register, single-rung flat PrPSc monomers; rather, PrPSc subunits must necessarily coil, most likely several times, into themselves. PMID:24247356

  10. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles’ performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  11. Design of measuring system for wire diameter based on sub-pixel edge detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yudong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-09-01

    Light projection method is often used in measuring system for wire diameter, which is relatively simpler structure and lower cost, and the measuring accuracy is limited by the pixel size of CCD. Using a CCD with small pixel size can improve the measuring accuracy, but will increase the cost and difficulty of making. In this paper, through the comparative analysis of a variety of sub-pixel edge detection algorithms, polynomial fitting method is applied for data processing in measuring system for wire diameter, to improve the measuring accuracy and enhance the ability of anti-noise. In the design of system structure, light projection method with orthogonal structure is used for the detection optical part, which can effectively reduce the error caused by line jitter in the measuring process. For the electrical part, ARM Cortex-M4 microprocessor is used as the core of the circuit module, which can not only drive double channel linear CCD but also complete the sampling, processing and storage of the CCD video signal. In addition, ARM microprocessor can complete the high speed operation of the whole measuring system for wire diameter in the case of no additional chip. The experimental results show that sub-pixel edge detection algorithm based on polynomial fitting can make up for the lack of single pixel size and improve the precision of measuring system for wire diameter significantly, without increasing hardware complexity of the entire system.

  12. Large Diameter, Radiative Extinction Experiments with Decane Droplets in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John; Tien, James; Dietrich, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The extinction of a diffusion flame is of fundamental interest in combustion science. Linan, Law, and Chung and Law analytically and experimentally determined an extinction boundary in terms of droplet diameter and pressure for a single droplet due to Damkohler, or blowoff, extinction. More recently, other researchers demonstrated extinction due to finite rate kinetics in reduced gravity for free droplets of heptane. Chao modeled the effect of radiative heat loss on a quasi-steady spherically symmetric single droplet burning in the absence of buoyancy. They determined that for increasing droplet diameter, a second limit can be reached such that combustion is no longer possible. This second, larger droplet diameter limit arises due to radiative heat loss, which increases with increasing droplet and flame diameter. This increase in radiative heat loss arises due to an increase in the surface area of the flame. Recently, Marchese modeled fuel droplets with detailed chemistry and radiative effects, and compared the results to other work. The modeling also showed the importance of radiative loss and radiative extinction Experiments examined the behavior of a large droplet of decane burning in reduced gravity onboard the NASA Lewis DC-9 aircraft, but did not show a radiative extinction boundary due to g-jitter (Variations in gravitational level and direction) effects. Dietrich conducted experiments in the reduced gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. This work showed that the extinction diameter of methanol droplets increased when the initial diameter of the droplets was large (in this case, approximately 5 mm). Theoretical results agreed with these experimental results only when the theory included radiative effects . Radiative extinction was experimentally verified by Nayagam in a later Shuttle mission. The following work focuses on the combustion and extinction of a single fuel droplet. The goal is to experimentally determine a large droplet diameter limit that

  13. Aerodynamic diameter measurement of cellulose acetate fibers from cigarette filters: what is the potential for human exposure?

    PubMed

    Collazo, Humberto; Crow, W Andrew; Gardner, Lonnie; Phillips, Brenda L; Dyer, W Mills; Marple, Virgil A; Utell, Mark J

    2002-03-01

    Aerodynamic diameter is a major determinant of particle and fiber deposition and toxicity in the respiratory tract. To characterize cellulose acetate fibers released from the filter end of cigarettes puffed under conditions approximating smoking, we designed multistage impactors to determine the aerodynamic diameters of large fibers with circumscribed diameters between 20 and 35 microm and aspect ratios ranging from subfiber ratios up to 40. This range of diameters encompasses all of the cellulose acetate fiber sizes that are commercially manufactured. When commercially available cigarettes with filters made from acetate fibers in this circumscribed diameter range were puffed directly into the impactor, on average 10 fibers/cigarette were released and their aerodynamic diameters were determined. In our studies, we found that the aerodynamic diameters of the cellulose acetate fibers were always greater than 23 microm. Using standard lung deposition models, we concluded that the fibers are nonrespirable with a very low probability of penetration to the distal lung. Our findings, which demonstrate release of only a small number of these large fibers with an extremely low likelihood of reaching the distal lung, indicate that these fibers are not a risk for human lung disease.

  14. Compositional Variation in Large-Diameter Low-Albedo asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.

    2000-12-01

    Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, 124) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. The larger diameter group should be individually homogenous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of 36 rotationally-resolved spectra of larger-diameter low-albedo asteroids of the C class (and subclasses B, F, G) and P class in the visible and Near-IR spectral regions. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy program.

  15. Memory, emotion, and pupil diameter: Repetition of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pupil diameter, like the "old-new" ERP, may be a measure of memory. Because the amplitude of the old-new ERP is enhanced for items encoded in the context of repetitions that are distributed (spaced), compared to massed (contiguous), we investigated whether pupil diameter is similarly sensitive to repetition. Emotional and neutral pictures of natural scenes were viewed once or repeated with massed (contiguous) or distributed (spaced) repetition during incidental free viewing and then tested on an explicit recognition test. Although an old-new difference in pupil diameter was found during successful recognition, pupil diameter was not enhanced for distributed, compared to massed, repetitions during either recognition or initial free viewing. Moreover, whereas a significant old-new difference was found for erotic scenes that had been seen only once during encoding, this difference was absent when erotic scenes were repeated. Taken together, the data suggest that pupil diameter is not a straightforward index of prior occurrence for natural scenes.

  16. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum.

    PubMed

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Alexander, Daniel C; Clark, Kristi A; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Yang, Zhengyi; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy), or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI). The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach) because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions.

  17. Two-dimensional wakes of a variable diameter cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Stremler, Mark

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that periodic variations in the position of a circular cylinder can produce a variety of complex vortex wake patterns. We will discuss what we believe is the first investigation of the wake patterns produced by a stationary circular cylinder undergoing periodic variations in the cylinder diameter. In our experiments, cylinder variations are produced by oscillating a cone perpendicularly through a flowing soap film. The wake flow generates thickness variations in the thin soap film, allowing direct observation of wake patterns through visualization of interference fringes. We consider diameter variations ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 times the mean diameter, with the Reynolds number varying from 50 to 150. The frequency of the diameter's variation influences the wake patterns. When the variation frequency is negligible compared to the vortex shedding frequency, the wake is a quasi-steady representation of fixed cylinder shedding. We will discuss wake pattern bifurcations that occur as the variation frequency becomes comparable to the vortex shedding frequency. Comparisons will be made with the wake patterns generated by a constant-diameter circular cylinder forced to oscillate transverse to the free stream.

  18. Parametric Probability Distribution Functions for Axon Diameters of Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Alexander, Daniel C.; Clark, Kristi A.; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Yang, Zhengyi; Reutens, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Axon diameter is an important neuroanatomical characteristic of the nervous system that alters in the course of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Axon diameters vary, even within a fiber bundle, and are not normally distributed. An accurate distribution function is therefore beneficial, either to describe axon diameters that are obtained from a direct measurement technique (e.g., microscopy), or to infer them indirectly (e.g., using diffusion-weighted MRI). The gamma distribution is a common choice for this purpose (particularly for the inferential approach) because it resembles the distribution profile of measured axon diameters which has been consistently shown to be non-negative and right-skewed. In this study we compared a wide range of parametric probability distribution functions against empirical data obtained from electron microscopy images. We observed that the gamma distribution fails to accurately describe the main characteristics of the axon diameter distribution, such as location and scale of the mode and the profile of distribution tails. We also found that the generalized extreme value distribution consistently fitted the measured distribution better than other distribution functions. This suggests that there may be distinct subpopulations of axons in the corpus callosum, each with their own distribution profiles. In addition, we observed that several other distributions outperformed the gamma distribution, yet had the same number of unknown parameters; these were the inverse Gaussian, log normal, log logistic and Birnbaum-Saunders distributions. PMID:27303273

  19. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Carolyn; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J. R.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Wright, E.

    2015-11-01

    The infrared NEOWISE project (Mainzer et al. 2011a) has measured diameters and albedos for ˜20% of the known asteroid population, the majority of these measurements to date (Mainzer et al. 2011b, 2012, 2015; Masiero et al. 2011, 2012; Grav et al. 2011, 2012a; Bauer et al. 2013). Here, we expand the number of asteroids characterized by NEOWISE, deriving diameters and albedos for 7,959 asteroids detected between December 13, 2013, and December 13, 2014 during the first year of the Reactivation mission. 7,758 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using WISE or NEOWISE thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ~20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ~40% or better.

  20. Diameter of basalt columns derived from fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bahr, H-A; Hofmann, M; Weiss, H-J; Bahr, U; Fischer, G; Balke, H

    2009-05-01

    The diameter of columnar joints forming in cooling basalt and drying starch increases with decreasing growth rate. This observation can be reproduced with a linear-elastic three-dimensional fracture mechanics bifurcation analysis, which has been done for a periodic array of hexagonal columnar joints by considering a bifurcation mode compatible with observations on drying starch. In order to be applicable to basalt columns, the analysis has been carried out with simplified stationary temperature fields. The critical diameter differs from the one derived with a two-dimensional model by a mere factor of 1/2. By taking into account the latent heat released at the solidification front, the results agree fairly well with observed column diameters.

  1. Ultrasonographic measurement of thoracic diameters of the early gestating fetus.

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Hata, K; Yamane, Y; Osamu, T; Kitao, M

    1989-08-01

    Eighty-two ultrasonographic examinations were performed on 60 of our pregnant patients with regular menstrual cycles and no complications. The pregnancies ranged from 7 to 13 weeks of gestation. Thoracic anteroposterior diameter (ETAPD), transverse diameter (ETTD), cross-sectional area (ETA) and crown-rump length (CRL) were measured on each ultrasonogram. A high correlation between CRL and gestational age was firstly confirmed in this study. ETAPD, ETTD and ETA correlated well with the gestational age and CRL, respectively. Correlations between ETAPD/CRL and ETTD/CRL ratios with the gestational age were negative. A positive correlation of ETA/CRL ratio with the gestational age was evident. Ultrasonographic measurement of the thoracic diameters of the fetus in utero should be a useful parameter to evaluate the gestational age and for early detection of growth retardation in utero.

  2. A 2.5-mm diameter probe for photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Chen, Ruimin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Chiye; Hu, Zhilin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have created a 2.5-mm outer diameter integrated photo-acoustic and ultrasonic mini-probe which can be inserted into a standard video endoscope’s instrument channel. A small-diameter focused ultrasonic transducer made of PMN-PT provides adequate signal sensitivity, and enables miniaturization of the probe. Additionally, this new endoscopic probe utilizes the same scanning mirror and micromotor-based built-in actuator described in our previous reports; however, the length of the rigid distal section of the new probe has been further reduced to ~35 mm. This paper describes the technical details of the mini-probe and presents experimental results that both quantify the imaging performance and demonstrate its in vivo imaging capability, which suggests that it could work as a mini-probe for certain clinical applications. PMID:23188360

  3. Solar diameter measurements from eclipses as a solar variability proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, David W.; Sofia, Sabatino; Guhl, Konrad; Herald, David

    The widths of total solar eclipse paths depends on the diameter of the Sun, so if observations are obtained near both the northern and southern limits of the eclipse path, in principle, the angular diameter of the Sun can be measured. Concerted efforts have been made to obtain contact timings from locations near total solar eclipse path edges since the mid 19th century, and Edmund Halley organized a rather successful first effort in 1715. Members of IOTA have been making increasingly sophisticated observations of the Baily's bead phenomena near central solar eclipse path edges since 1970.

  4. NEOWISE REACTIVATION MISSION YEAR ONE: PRELIMINARY ASTEROID DIAMETERS AND ALBEDOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, C. R.; Cutri, R. M.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S.; Stevenson, R.; Grav, T.; Wright, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7956 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. Of those, 201 are near-Earth asteroids and 7755 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using the Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or “NEOWISE” thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ∼20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ∼40% or better.

  5. Nanopore Diameters Tune Strain in Extruded Fibronectin Fibers.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammad; Das, Tamal; Schoen, Ingmar; Vogel, Viola; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-10-14

    Fibronectin is present in the extracellular matrix and can be assembled into nanofibers in vivo by undergoing conformational changes. Here, we present a novel approach to prepare fibronectin nanofibers under physiological conditions using an extrusion approach through nanoporous aluminum oxide membranes. This one-step process can prepare nanofiber bundles up to a millimeter in length and with uniform fiber diameters in the nanometer range. Most importantly, by using different pore diameters and protein concentrations in the extrusion process, we could induce varying lasting structural changes in the fibers, which were monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer and should impose different physiological functions.

  6. Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi nov. gen., nov. sp.: variable-diameter composite spirochete from microbial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Ashen, J.; Sole, M.; Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Large (up to 100 micrometers long), loosely coiled, free-living spirochetes with variable diameters (from 0.4 to 3 micrometers in the same cell) were seen at least 40 times between August 1990 and January 1993. These spirochetes were observed in mud water and enrichment media from highly specific habitats in intertidal evaporite flats at three disjunct localities, one in Spain and two in Mexico. All three are sites of commercial saltworks. Associated with Microcoleus chthonoplastes the large spirochetes from Spain display phototaxis and a composite organization. Shorter and smaller-diameter spirochetes are seen inside both healthy and spent periplasm of larger ones. Small spirochetes attached to large ones have been observed live. From two to twelve spirochete protoplasmic cylinders were seen inside a single common outer membrane. A distinctive granulated cytoplasm in which the granules are of similar diameter (20-32 nanometers) to that of the flagella (26 nanometers) was present. Granule diameters were measured in thin section and in negatively-stained whole-mount preparations. Based on their ultrastructure, large size, variable diameter, number of flagella (3 to 6), and phototactic behavior these unique spirochetes are formally named Spirosymplokos deltaeiberi. Under anoxic (or low oxygen) conditions they formed blooms in mixed culture in media selective for spirochetes. Cellobiose was the major carbon source in 80% seawater, the antibiotic rifampicin was added, mat from the original field site was present and tubes were incubated in the light at from 18-31 degrees C. Within 1-2 weeks populations of the large spirochete developed at 25 degrees C but they could not be transferred to fresh medium.

  7. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Holmes, William; Sosa, Edward; Boul, Peter; Arepalli, Sivaram; Yowell, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.). However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydispersed, with many (n,m) types present and typical approximate 1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. It has been recognized that production of SWCNTs with narrow 'tube type populations' is beneficial for their use in applications, as well as for the subsequent sorting efforts. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The nanotube type populations were studied with respect to the production temperature with two catalyst compositions: Co/Ni and Rh/Pd. The nanotube type populations were measured via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that in the case of Co/Ni catalyst, decreased production temperature leads to smaller average diameter, exceptionally narrow diameter distribution, and strong preference toward (8,7) nanotubes. The other nanotubes present are distributed evenly in the 7-30 deg chiral angle range. In the case of Rh/Pd catalyst, a decrease in the temperature leads to a small decrease in the average diameter, with the chiral angle distribution skewed towards 30 o and a preference toward (7,6), (8,6) and (8,7) nanotubes. However, the diameter distribution remains rather broad. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) populations. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  8. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-01-01

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors’ distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ±25 μm to ±15 μm and the relative error was not more than 0.011%. PMID:28165432

  9. Measuring the Diameter of a Hair with a Steel Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, John; O'Leary, Sean V.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a technique that uses a helium neon laser, a steel rule, a wooden rule, and a piece of paper to measure the diameter of a hair using the diffraction of light. Details on technique, mathematics, and sources of error are provided. (DDR)

  10. Compositional Variegation of Large-Diameter Low-Albedo Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Jarvis, K. S.; Anz-Meador, T. D.; Thibault, C. A.; Sawyer, S. R.; Fitzsimmons, A.

    1997-07-01

    Asteroids showing signs of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in visible/near IR spectroscopy and photometry (C, G, F, B, and P classes) ranging from 0.37 - 0.90mu m dominate the asteroid population at heliocentric distances of 2.6 - 3.5 AU. Age dating of meteorites indicates that the Solar System was subjected to a major heating event 4.5 Gyr ago. Recent meteoritic research has produced evidence of a carbonaceous chondrite subjected to two separate aqueous alteration events with a metamorphic heating inbetween (Krot et al., 1997, submitted). Models of the effects of heating by electromagnetic induction or decay of short-lived radionuclides combined with models of the early collisional history of the Solar System after Jupiter's formation indicate that asteroids observed today can be divided into two groups by diameter. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km were mixed by multiple collisions but remain as gravitationally bound rubble piles. Asteroids with diameters less than 100 km should show more compositional diversity. Vilas and Sykes (1996, Icarus, v. 124, 483) have shown using ECAS photometry that this compositional difference exists. Those asteroids having diameters greater than 100 km should be individually homogeneous, with spectral differences showing the combined effects of a primordial compositional gradient in the asteroid belt with thermal metamorphism. We address the significance of spatially-resolved spectra of 42 asteroids to the collective origin of these asteroids.

  11. 5. 30 DIAMETER ACCESS MANHOLE IN THE CENTER OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. 30 DIAMETER ACCESS MANHOLE IN THE CENTER OF THE GATE HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH. - Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates & Gate-Lifting Mechanisms, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  12. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  13. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  14. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Burgardt, Paul; Pierce, Stanley W.; Dvornak, Matthew John

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  15. Solar diameter measurements for study of Sun climate coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in solar shape and diameter were detected as a possible probe of variability in solar luminosity, an important climatic driving function. A technique was designed which will allow the calibration of the telescope field, providing a scale for long-term comparison of these and future measurements.

  16. Non-Contact EDDY Current Hole Eccentricity and Diameter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Precision holes are among the most critical features of a mechanical component. Deviations from permissible tolerances can impede operation and result in unexpected failure. We have developed an automated non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measuring system. The operating principle is based on the eddy current lift-off effect, which is the coil impedance as a function of the distance between the coil and the test object. An absolute eddy current probe rotates in the hole. The impedance of each angular position is acquired and input to the computer for integration and analysis. The eccentricity of the hole is the profile of the impedance as a function of angular position as compared to a straight line, an ideal hole. The diameter of the hole is the sum of the diameter of the probe and twice the distance-calibrated impedance. An eddy current image is generated by integrating angular scans for a plurality of depths between the top and bottom to display the eccentricity profile. This system can also detect and image defects in the hole. The method for non-contact eddy current hole diameter and eccentricity measurement has been granted a patent by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  17. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongyu; Wang, Zhong; Wu, Zhengang; Li, Xingqiang; Wang, Lei; Liu, Changjie

    2017-02-05

    The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors' distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ± 25 μ m to ± 15 μ m and the relative error was not more than 0.011%.

  18. Sex discrimination potential of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, P J

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the potential usefulness of permanent maxillary molar cusp diameters for sex discrimination of poorly preserved skeletal remains. Cusp diameters were measured from standardized occlusal view photographs in a sample of black South Africans consisting of 130 males and 105 females. Results demonstrated that all cusp dimensions for both first and second maxillary molars exhibited significant sexual dimorphism (p < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate discriminant function equations permitted low to moderate classification accuracy in discriminating sex (58.3%-73.6%). The allocation accuracies for cusp diameter measurements were as high as, and even surpassed, those observed for conventional crown length and breadth dimensions of the same teeth. The most accurate result (73.6%, with a sex bias of only 0.5%) was obtained when all cusp diameters from both maxillary molars were used concurrently. However, only slightly less accurate results (~70.0%) were achieved when selected dimensions from only one of the molars, or even a single cusp, were utilized. Although not as reliable at predicting sex as other skeletal elements in black South Africans, the derived odontometric standards can be used with highly fragmentary skeletal material, as well as immature remains in which crown formation of the maxillary molars is complete.

  19. General view of outside diameter welding stations of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of outside diameter welding stations of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building looking northwest. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  20. No. 2 outside diameter submerged arc welder of the saw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    No. 2 outside diameter submerged arc welder of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building looking south. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast view of the no. 1 outside diameter submerged arch welder of the saw line in bay 8 of the main pipe mill building. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Combined position and diameter measures for lunar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, D.W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The note addresses the problem of simultaneously measuring positions and diameters of circular impact craters on wide-angle photographs of approximately spherical planets such as the Moon and Mercury. The method allows for situations in which the camera is not aligned on the planet's center. ?? 1977.

  3. Assessment of vessel diameters for MR brain angiography processed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Obreja, Cristian-Dragos; Moldovanu, Simona

    2015-12-01

    The motivation was to develop an assessment method to measure (in)visible differences between the original and the processed images in MR brain angiography as a method of evaluation of the status of the vessel segments (i.e. the existence of the occlusion or intracerebral vessels damaged as aneurysms). Generally, the image quality is limited, so we improve the performance of the evaluation through digital image processing. The goal is to determine the best processing method that allows an accurate assessment of patients with cerebrovascular diseases. A total of 10 MR brain angiography images were processed by the following techniques: histogram equalization, Wiener filter, linear contrast adjustment, contrastlimited adaptive histogram equalization, bias correction and Marr-Hildreth filter. Each original image and their processed images were analyzed into the stacking procedure so that the same vessel and its corresponding diameter have been measured. Original and processed images were evaluated by measuring the vessel diameter (in pixels) on an established direction and for the precise anatomic location. The vessel diameter is calculated using the plugin ImageJ. Mean diameter measurements differ significantly across the same segment and for different processing techniques. The best results are provided by the Wiener filter and linear contrast adjustment methods and the worst by Marr-Hildreth filter.

  4. Rowlinson’s concept of an effective hard sphere diameter

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Attention is drawn to John Rowlinson’s idea that the repulsive portion of the intermolecular interaction may be replaced by a temperature-dependent hard sphere diameter. It is this approximation that made the development of perturbation theory possible for realistic fluids whose intermolecular interactions have a steep, but finite, repulsion at short separations. PMID:20953320

  5. View of wood stave penstocks (four feet in diameter) with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of wood stave penstocks (four feet in diameter) with steel bands, wood and steel frames; standing on top of penstocks is Doug Hamilton (right), Nooksack Falls hydro-plant operator for puget power, and Ken Rose (left) HAER Historian. - Nooksack Falls Hydroelectric Plant, Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

  6. Changes in retinal microvascular diameter in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa Vasconcellos Batista; Gouvea, Sonia Alves; da Silva, Aurélio Paulo Batista; Bortolon, Saulo; Rodrigues, Anabel Nunes; Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues; Herkenhoff, Fernando Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Diabetic retinopathy is the main microvascular complication in diabetes mellitus and needs to be diagnosed early to prevent severe sight-threatening retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to quantify the retinal microvasculature pattern and analyze the influence of blood glucose level and the duration of diabetes mellitus on the retinal microvasculature. Methods Two groups were analyzed: patients with diabetes (N=26) and patients without diabetes, ie, controls (N=26). A quantitative semiautomated method analyzed retinal microvasculature. The diameters of arterioles and venules were measured. The total numbers of arterioles and venules were counted. The ratio of arteriole diameter to venule diameter was calculated. The retinal microvasculature pattern was related to clinical and biochemical parameters. Results Patients with diabetes exhibited larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant of the retina compared to the lower temporal quadrant (124.85±38.03 µm vs 102.92±15.69 µm; P<0.01). Patients with diabetes for 5 or more years had larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant than patients without diabetes (141.62±44.44 vs 112.58±32.11 µm; P<0.05). The degree of venodilation in the upper temporal quadrant was positively correlated with blood glucose level and the estimated duration of diabetes mellitus. Interpretation and conclusion The employed quantitative method demonstrated that patients with diabetes exhibited venule dilation in the upper temporal quadrant, and the duration of diabetes mellitus was positively correlated with blood glucose level. Therefore, the early assessment of retinal microvascular changes is possible prior to the onset of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26345217

  7. Prediction of moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension by main pulmonary artery diameter and main pulmonary artery diameter/ascending aorta diameter in pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Shirin; Aronow, Wilbert S; Ravipati, Gautham; Maguire, George P; Belkin, Robert N; Lehrman, Stuart G

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy of computed tomographic measurements of main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD) and of MPAD/ascending aorta diameter (AAD) in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension in 190 patients with acute pulmonary embolism. A pulmonary artery systolic pressure of > or = 50 mm Hg measured by Doppler echocardiography was considered moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm and a MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 measured by computed tomography were considered abnormal. A MPAD of > 28.6 mm had a 75% sensitivity and specificity, a 52% positive predictive value, a 89% negative predictive value, a 3.0 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.33 likelihood ratio for a negative test in predicting moderate or severe pulmonary hypertension. A MPAD/AAD ratio of > or = 1.00 had a 59% sensitivity, a 82% specificity, a 55% positive predictive value, a 84% negative predictive value, a 3.3 likelihood ratio for a positive test, and a 0.50 likelihood ratio for a negative test.

  8. Advances in large-diameter liquid encapsulated Czochralski GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.; Holmes, D. E.; Kirkpatrick, C. G.

    1982-01-01

    The purity, crystalline perfection, and electrical properties of n- and p-type GaAs crystals grown by the liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) technique are evaluated. The determination of the dislocation density, incidence of twinning, microstructure, background purity, mobility, and minority carrier diffusion length is included. The properties of the LEC GaAs crystals are generally comparable to, if not superior to those of small-diameter GaAs material grown by conventional bulk growth techniques. As a result, LEC GaAs is suitable for application to minority carrier devices requiring high-quality and large-area substrates.

  9. Sub-Kilometer Asteroid Diameter Survey (SKADS) V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladman, B. J.; Davis, D. R.; Neese, C.; Jedicke, R.; Williams, G.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Scholl, H.; Holman, M.; Warrington, B.; Esquerdo, G.; Tricarico, P.

    2010-05-01

    The Sub-Kilometer Asteroid Diameter Survey (SKADS) (Gladman et al. 2009) acquired good-quality orbital and absolute magnitude (H) determinations for a sample of small main-belt asteroids in order to study the orbital and size distribution beyond H = 15, down to sub-kilometer sizes (H > 18). Based on six observing nights over an 11-night baseline, SKADS detected, measured photometry for, and linked observations of 1087 asteroids which have one-week time baselines or more. This data set contains the astrometry, photometry, and orbits of the 1087 asteroids detected by SKADS.

  10. Unraveling the 13C NMR chemical shifts in single-walled carbon nanotubes: dependence on diameter and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Irurzun, Veronica M; Gjersing, Erica L; Holt, Josh M; Larsen, Brian A; Resasco, Daniel E; Blackburn, Jeffrey L

    2012-03-14

    The atomic specificity afforded by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could enable detailed mechanistic information about single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization as well as the noncovalent molecular interactions that dictate ground-state charge transfer and separation by electronic structure and diameter. However, to date, the polydispersity present in as-synthesized SWCNT populations has obscured the dependence of the SWCNT (13)C chemical shift on intrinsic parameters such as diameter and electronic structure, meaning that no information is gleaned for specific SWCNTs with unique chiral indices. In this article, we utilize a combination of (13)C labeling and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) to produce an array of (13)C-labeled SWCNT populations with varying diameter, electronic structure, and chiral angle. We find that the SWCNT isotropic (13)C chemical shift decreases systematically with increasing diameter for semiconducting SWCNTs, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions that have heretofore gone unaddressed. Furthermore, we find that the (13)C chemical shifts for small diameter metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs differ significantly, and that the full-width of the isotropic peak for metallic SWCNTs is much larger than that of semiconducting nanotubes, irrespective of diameter.

  11. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-21

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  12. Effects of fiber orientation and diameter on the behavior of human dermal fibroblasts on electrospun PMMA scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ji, Yuan; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Clark, Richard A F; Huang, Lei; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2009-09-15

    We used the electrospinning technique to produce fibrous scaffolds of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Using a rotating drum, we aligned the fibers and formed multilayered structures where both the fiber spacing and pore size could be varied. We then plated adult human dermal fibroblasts and studied the effect of fiber diameter and orientation on the cell conformation, integrin receptor expression, proliferation, and migration. We found that a critical diameter minimum diameter existed, D0 = 0.97 microm for cell orientation to occur. For D < D0, no big difference in aspect ratio was observed relative to the control samples on PMMA thin film. Hence, we could fabricate substrate patterned with fibers of different diameters where different cell conformations coexisted on the same scaffold. On the other hand, staining for vinculin proteins in the cells indicated that on large diameter fibers and on flat surfaces, the integrin receptors followed the cell perimeter. On the very small diameter surfaces, the receptors were distributed uniformly along the cell. Cell dynamics studies indicated that the proliferation and migration were also affected by the fiber orientation.

  13. Ultrafast proton transport in sub-1-nm diameter carbon nanotube porins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya H.; Allen, Frances I.; Kim, Kyunghoon; Belliveau, Allison; Noy, Aleksandr

    2016-07-01

    Proton transport plays an important role in many biological processes due to the ability of protons to rapidly translocate along chains of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations have predicted that confinement in hydrophobic nanochannels should enhance the rate of proton transport. Here, we show that 0.8-nm-diameter carbon nanotube porins, which promote the formation of one-dimensional water wires, can support proton transport rates exceeding those of bulk water by an order of magnitude. The transport rates in these narrow nanotube pores also exceed those of biological channels and Nafion. With larger 1.5-nm-diameter nanotube porins, proton transport rates comparable to bulk water are observed. We also show that the proton conductance of these channels can be modulated by the presence of Ca2+ ions. Our results illustrate the potential of small-diameter carbon nanotube porins as a proton conductor material and suggest that strong spatial confinement is a key factor in enabling efficient proton transport.

  14. Ultra-Compact Multitip Scanning Probe Microscope with an Outer Diameter of 50 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Vasily; Zubkov, Evgeny; Junker, Hubertus; Korte, Stefan; Blab, Marcus; Coenen, Peter; Voigtländer, Bert

    We present a multitip scanning tunneling microscope (STM) where four independent STM units are integrated on a diameter of 50 mm. The coarse positioning of the tips is done under the control of an optical microscope or an SEM in vacuum. The heart of this STM is a new type of piezoelectric coarse approach called Koala Drive which can have a diameter greater than 2.5 mm and a length smaller than 10 mm. Alternating movements of springs move a central tube which holds the STM tip or AFM sensor. This new operating principle provides a smooth travel sequence and avoids shaking which is intrinsically present for nanopositioners based on inertial motion with saw tooth driving signals. Inserting the Koala Drive in a piezo tube for xyz-scanning integrates a complete STM inside a 4 mm outer diameter piezo tube of <10 mm length. The use of the Koala Drive makes the scanning probe microscopy design ultra-compact and accordingly leads to a high mechanical stability. The drive is UHV, low temperature, and magnetic field compatible. The compactness of the Koala Drive allows building a four-tip STM as small as a single-tip STM with a drift of <0.2 nm/min and lowest resonance frequencies of 2.5 (xy) and 5.5 kHz (z). We present examples of the performance of the multitip STM designed using the Koala Drive.

  15. Critical behavior of the Widom-Rowlinson mixture: coexistence diameter and order parameter.

    PubMed

    Vink, R L C

    2006-03-07

    The critical behavior of the Widom-Rowlinson [J. Chem. Phys. 52, 1670 (1970)] is studied in d = 3 dimensions by means of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The finite-size scaling approach of Kim et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 065701 (2003)] is used to extract the order parameter and the coexistence diameter. It is demonstrated that the critical behavior of the diameter is dominated by a singular term proportional to t(1-alpha), with t the relative distance from the critical point, and alpha the critical exponent of the specific heat. No sign of a term proportional to t(2beta) could be detected, with beta the critical exponent of the order parameter, indicating that pressure mixing in this model is small. The critical density is measured to be rhosigma3 = 0.7486 +/- 0.0002, with sigma the particle diameter. The critical exponents alpha and beta, as well as the correlation length exponent nu, are also measured and shown to comply with d = 3 Ising criticality.

  16. Large Diameter Shuttle Launched-AEM (LDSL-AEM) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A technical description of a Large Diameter Shuttle Launched-AEM (LDSL-AEM), an AEM base module adapted to carry 5 ft diameter payloads in the shuttle with propulsion for carrying payloads to higher altitude orbits from a 150 NM shuttle orbit, is described. The AEM is designed for launch on the scout launch vehicle. Onboard equipment provides capability to despin, acquire the earth, and control the vehicle in an earth pointing mode using reaction wheels for torque with magnets for all attitude acquisition, wheel desaturation, and nutation damping. Earth sensors in the wheels provide pitch and roll attitude. This system provides autonomous control capability to 1 degree in pitch and roll and 2 degrees in yaw. The attitude can be determined to .5 degrees in pitch and roll and 2 degrees in yaw.

  17. Constraints on the diameter and albedo of 2060 Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Walker, Russell G.

    1991-01-01

    Asteroid 2060 Chiron is the largest known object exhibiting cometary activity. Radiometric observations made in 1983 from a ground-based telescope and the IRAS are used to examine the limits on Chiron's diameter and albedo. It is argued that Chiron's surface temperature distribution at that time is best described by an 'isothermal latitude' or 'rapid-rotator' model. Consequently, Chiron has a maximum diameter of 372 kilometers and a minimum geometric albedo of 2.7 percent. This is much bigger and darker than previous estimates, and suggests that gravity may play a significant role in the evolution of gas and dust emissions. It is also found that for large obliquities, surface temperatures can vary dramatically on time scales of a decade, and that such geometry may play a critical role in explaining Chiron's observed photometric behavior since its discovery in 1977.

  18. Magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic manganite nanotubes of different diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiale, J.; Sánchez, R. D.; Troiani, H. E.; Leyva, A. G.; Levy, P.

    2007-10-01

    In this work we present a magnetic study of La 0.67Sr 0.33MnO 3 (LSMO) and La 0.67Ca 0.33MnO 3 (LCMO) nanotubes with nominal external diameters ( ϕ) of 100, 200, 600 and 800 nm. The 800 nm diameter nanotubes have walls of around 50 nm thickness in all the cases. The walls are constituted by an assembly of nanoparticles with a non-Gaussian size distribution presenting a maximum at 24 ± 6 nm (LSMO) and 25 ± 8 nm (LCMO). We carried out isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and dc demagnetization (DCD) experiments. We determined that the crystallites are single magnetic domains with a magnetic dead layer on the surface which avoids exchange interactions among grains. We conclude that the dominating interactions are of dipolar type of the same magnitude for all the samples.

  19. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-03-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for the amount of bending. For the diameter of the coiled DNA we obtain the relatively accurate numerical estimate of 2R=82Å.

  20. Angular diameter distances reconsidered in the Newman and Penrose formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Thomas P.; Aly, Aly

    2016-02-01

    Using the Newman and Penrose spin coefficient (NP) formalism, we provide a derivation of the Dyer-Roeder equation for the angular diameter distance in cosmological space-times. We show that the geodesic deviation equation written in NP formalism is precisely the Dyer-Roeder equation for a general Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time, and then we examine the angular diameter distance to redshift relation in the case that a flat FRW metric is perturbed by a gravitational potential. We examine the perturbation in the case that the gravitational potential exhibits the properties of a thin gravitational lens, demonstrating how the weak lensing shear and convergence act as source terms for the perturbed Dyer-Roeder equation.

  1. Thin boron nitride nanotubes with unusual large inner diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Renzhi; Bando, Yoshio; Sato, Tadao; Kurashima, Keiji

    2001-12-01

    BN nanotubes, displaying the characteristics of few concentric layers (2-6 layers) but unusual large inner diameters (ranging from 8 to more than 10 nm), are synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method on α-Al 2O 3 micrometer-range particles. The inner diameters are at least 5 nm larger than the previously reported BN nanotubes of similar layers. Some BN nanotubes are observed to be filled with B-N-O-based amorphous materials. Crystalline core fillings (in the form of boron carbide nanorods) were also discovered. The discussions suggested that the CVD growth behavior of BN nanotubes may be closely dependent on the underlying substrates, which may be helpful to the possible rational synthesis of BN nanotubes.

  2. Behavior of large-diameter pipelines at fault crossings

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, T.P.; Power, M.S.; Taylor, C.L.; Lau, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    An evaluation of large diameter pipes which cross earthquake faults in the San Francisco Bay Area is summarized. Pipe response due to fault movement is evaluated by estimating the likely fault offset and then determining pipe strain induced by soil-pipe interaction. Probabilistic models are used to predict fault offsets associated with a Maximum Credible Earthquake. These ground movements are related to pipe strains; then, pipe damage is characterized in probabilistic terms. These analyses form the basis for recommending pipeline modifications.

  3. Developing high coercivity in large diameter cobalt nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazer, A. H.; Ramazani, A.; Almasi Kashi, M.; Zavašnik, J.

    2016-11-01

    Regardless of the synthetic method, developing high magnetic coercivity in ferromagnetic nanowires (NWs) with large diameters has been a challenge over the past two decades. Here, we report on the synthesis of highly coercive cobalt NW arrays with diameters of 65 and 80 nm, which are embedded in porous anodic alumina templates with high-aspect-ratio pores. Using a modified electrochemical deposition method enabled us to reach room temperature coercivity and remanent ratio up to 3000 Oe and 0.70, respectively, for highly crystalline as-synthesized hcp cobalt NW arrays with a length of 8 μm. The first-order reversal curve (FORC) analysis showed the presence of both soft and hard magnetic phases along the length of the resulting NWs. To develop higher coercive fields, the length of the NWs was then gradually reduced in order from bottom to top, thereby reaching NW sections governed by the hard phase. Consequently, this resulted in record high coercivities of 4200 and 3850 Oe at NW diameters of 65 and 80 nm, respectively. In this case, the FORC diagrams confirmed a significant reduction in interactions between the magnetic phases of the remaining sections of NWs. At this stage, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and dark-field transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated the formation of highly crystalline bamboo-like sections along the [0 0 2] direction during a progressive pulse-controlled electrochemical growth of NW arrays under optimized parameters. Our results both provide new insights into the growth process, crystalline characteristics and magnetic phases along the length of large diameter NW arrays and, furthermore, develop the performance of pure 3d transition magnetic NWs.

  4. Optical Fiber Geometry: Accurate Measurement of Cladding Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matt; Hale, Paul D.; Mechels, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed three instruments for accurate measurement of optieal fiber cladding diameter: a contact micrometer, a scanning confocal microscope, and a white-light interference microscope. Each instrument has an estimated uncertainty (3 standard deviations) of 50 nm or less, but the confocal microscope may display a 20 nm systematic error as well. The micrometer is used to generate Standard Reference Materials that are commercially available. PMID:28053467

  5. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (zL=0.6304) and RXJ1131-1231 (zL=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ2, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in DA per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ2 at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ2 with 5% precision.

  6. NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; Kramer, E. A.; Masiero, J. R.; Nugent, C. R.; Sonnett, S. M.; Stevenson, R. A.; Wright, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    This PDS data set represents a compilation of published diameters, optical albedos, near-infrared albedos, and beaming parameters for minor planets detected by NEOWISE during the fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, post-cryo and NEOWISE-Reactivation Year 1 operations. It contains data covering near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, active Main Belt objects, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, and Jovian and Saturnian irregular satellites. Methodology for physical property determination is described in the referenced articles.

  7. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S.H. E-mail: komatsu@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (z{sub L}=0.6304) and RXJ1131−1231 (z{sub L}=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ{sup 2}, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in D{sub A} per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ{sup 2} at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ{sup 2} with 5% precision.

  8. On the influence that the ground electrode diameter has in the propulsion efficiency of an asymmetric capacitor in nitrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Alexandre A.; Pinheiro, Mario J.

    2011-03-15

    In this work, the propulsion force developed in an asymmetric capacitor will be calculated for three different diameters of the ground electrode. The used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories, all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to provide a physical insight on the force mechanism that acts on the asymmetrical capacitors, and also to understand how to increase the efficiency of propulsion.

  9. Detection of tree roots and determination of root diameters by ground penetrating radar under optimal conditions.

    PubMed

    Barton, Craig V M; Montagu, Kelvin D

    2004-12-01

    , allowing detection and quantification of roots as small as 1 cm in diameter. An advantage of this processing technique is that it produces results independently of signal strength. These waveform parameters represent a major advance in the processing of GPR profiles for estimating root diameters. We conclude that enhanced data analysis routines combined with improvements in GPR hardware design could make GPR a valuable tool for studying tree root systems.

  10. The method for detecting diffusion ring diameter in Hemagglutinin measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wenbo; Liu, Xue; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiao-man

    2014-11-01

    The diffuser ring diameter measurement is the most critical in hemagglutinin Measuring. The traditional methods, such as a vernier caliper or high-definition scanned images are subjective and low for the measurement data reliability. Propose high-resolution diffusion ring image for drop-resolution processing, adaptive Canny operator and local detection method to extract complete and clear diffusion ring boundaries, and finally make use of polynomial interpolation algorithm to make diffusion ring outer boundary pixel coordinates achieve sub-pixel accuracy and the least-squares fitting circle algorithm to calculate the precise center of the circle and the diameter of the diffuser ring. Experimental results show that the method detection time is only 63.61ms, which is a faster speed; diffuser ring diameter estimation error can achieve 0.55 pixel, high stability in experimental data. This method is adapted to the various types of influenza vaccine hemagglutinin content measurements, and has important value in the influenza vaccine quality detection.

  11. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters ranging from ~ 218 to ~ 913 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from ~ 913 nm to ~more » 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. Lastly, temperature dependent figure of merit ZT was determined for individual nanowires and the achieved maximum value at room temperature is about three times higher than that in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  12. Stellar Diameters in the Beta Pic Moving Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, M.; Schaefer, G. H.

    2014-09-01

    Members of the Beta Pic Moving Group (BPMG) are young enough (10-20 MY) and near enough (< 50 pc) that some are resolvable with the CHARA Interferometric Array in the H and K bands. The capability to measure the radius of a star as it contracts is important because it provides a new way to measure the stars age by reference to models of its evolution. We measured the angular diameters of the BPMG members HIP 560 (F3V) and HIP 21547 (F0V) using the interferometer with the CLASSIC beam combiner. Our observing assignment was in the time the CHARA administration made publicly available through the NOAO application process. The limb-darkened angular diameters of HIP 560 and 21547 are 0.492±0.032 and 0.518±0.009 mas, respectively. The corresponding stellar radii are 2.1 (HIP 560) and 1.6 Rsun (HIP 21547). These values indicate that HIP 560 and 21547 are truly young. Comparison to theoretical evolutionary models indicates their age is 13±2 MY. We describe our observations and results briefly here and discuss the studies that will become possible in the near future. A more detailed account is given in our paper “Measured Diameters of 2 F-stars in the Beta Pic Moving Group,” submitted to the Astrophysical Journal.

  13. Tree height–diameter allometry across the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hulshof, Catherine M; Swenson, Nathan G; Weiser, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between tree height and diameter is fundamental in determining community and ecosystem structure as well as estimates of biomass and carbon storage. Yet our understanding of how tree allometry relates to climate and whole organismal function is limited. We used the Forest Inventory and Analysis National Program database to determine height–diameter allometries of 2,976,937 individuals of 293 tree species across the United States. The shape of the allometric relationship was determined by comparing linear and nonlinear functional forms. Mixed-effects models were used to test for allometric differences due to climate and floristic (between angiosperms and gymnosperms) and functional groups (leaf habit and shade tolerance). Tree allometry significantly differed across the United States largely because of climate. Temperature, and to some extent precipitation, in part explained tree allometric variation. The magnitude of allometric variation due to climate, however, had a phylogenetic signal. Specifically, angiosperm allometry was more sensitive to differences in temperature compared to gymnosperms. Most notably, angiosperm height was more negatively influenced by increasing temperature variability, whereas gymnosperm height was negatively influenced by decreasing precipitation and increasing altitude. There was little evidence to suggest that shade tolerance influenced tree allometry except for very shade-intolerant trees which were taller for any given diameter. Tree allometry is plastic rather than fixed and scaling parameters vary around predicted central tendencies. This allometric variation provides insight into life-history strategies, phylogenetic history, and environmental limitations at biogeographical scales. PMID:25859325

  14. J-integral of circumferential crack in large diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Chao, Yuh J.; Sutton, M. A.; Lam, P. S.; Mertz, G. E.

    Large diameter thin-walled pipes are encountered in a low pressure nuclear power piping system. Fracture parameters such as K and J, associated with postulated cracks, are needed to assess the safety of the structure, for example, prediction of the onset of tile crack growth and the stability of the crack. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a comprehensive study of cracks in pipes and handbook-type data is available. However, for some large diameter, thin-walled pipes the needed information is not included in the handbook. This paper reports our study of circumferential cracks in large diameter, thin-walled pipes (R/t=30 to 40) under remote bending or tension loads. Elastic-Plastic analyses using the finite element method were performed to determine the elastic and fully plastic J values for various pipe/crack geometries. A non-linear Ramberg-Osgood material model is used with strain hardening exponents (n) that range from 3 to 10. A number of circumferential, through thickness cracks were studied with half crack angles ranging from 0.063(pi) to 0.5(pi). Results are tabulated for use with the EPRI estimation scheme.

  15. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, Nan; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters ranging from ~ 218 to ~ 913 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from ~ 913 nm to ~ 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. Lastly, temperature dependent figure of merit ZT was determined for individual nanowires and the achieved maximum value at room temperature is about three times higher than that in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.

  16. Diameter dependent thermoelectric properties of individual SnTe nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J. A.; ...

    2015-01-15

    The lead-free compound tin telluride (SnTe) has recently been suggested to be a potentially promising thermoelectric material because of its similar electronic band structure as the well-known lead telluride. Here we report on the first thermoelectric study of individual single crystalline SnTe nanowires (NWs) with different diameters ranging from ~200 to ~1000 nm. Measurements of thermopower S, electrical conductivity σ, and thermal conductivity κ were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While σ does not show a strong diameter dependence, the thermopower increases by a factor of 2 when the nanowiremore » diameter is decreased from 1000 nm to 200 nm. The thermal conductivities of the measured NWs are only about half of that of the bulk SnTe, which may arise from the enhanced phonon-grain boundary and phonon-defect scatterings. Temperature dependent figure-of-merit ZT was determined and the maximum value at room temperature is ~3 times higher than what was obtained in bulk samples of comparable carrier density.« less

  17. Effect of Periradial Administration of Papaverine on Radial Artery Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, P. S.; Singh, Naveen G.; Manjunatha, N.; Desai, Rushikesh Chintamanrao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radial artery cannulation is a skillful procedure. An experienced anesthesiologist might also face difficulty in cannulating a feeble radial pulse. Aim: The purpose of the study was to determine whether periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine results in effective vasodilation and improvement in the palpability score of radial artery. Settings and Design: Prospective, double-blinded trial. Methodology: Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were enrolled in the study. 30 mg of papaverine with 1 ml of 2% lignocaine and 3 ml of normal saline were injected subcutaneously 1–2 cm proximal to styloid process of the radius. Radial artery diameter before and after 20 min of injection papaverine was measured using ultrasonography. The palpability of the radial pulse was also determined before the injection of papaverine and 20 min later. Patients were monitored for hemodynamics and any complications were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired data. Results: Radial artery diameter increased significantly (P < 0.0001), and the pulse palpability score also showed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.0001) after periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine. There was no statistically significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure before and after papaverine injection. No complications were noted in 24 h of follow-up. Conclusion: Periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine significantly increased the radial artery diameter and pulse palpability score, which had an impact on ease of radial artery cannulation essential for hemodynamic monitoring in cardiac surgical patients. PMID:28298790

  18. Real-time diameter measurement using diffuse light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaohe; Hui, Mei; Zhu, Qiudong; Wang, Shanshan

    2016-09-01

    A method for on-line rapid determination of the diameter of metallic cylinder is introduced in this paper. Under the radiation of diffuse light, there is a bright area close to the margin of metallic cylinder, and the method of this paper is based on the intensity distribution of the bright area. In this paper, with the radiation by a diffuse plane light with special shape, we present the relation expression of the distance between the peak point and the real edge of the cylinder and the distance between the diffuse light and the pinhole aperture of the camera. With the expression, the diameter of the cylinder to be measured can be calculated. In the experiments, monochromatic LED uniting with ground glass forms the diffuse light source, then the light irradiates the tested cylinder. After the cylinder, we use a lens with a front pinhole stop to choose the light into CMOS, then a computer is used to analyze images and export the measurement results. The measuring system using this method is very easily implemented, so it can realize the on-line rapid measurement. Experimental results are presented for six metallic cylinders with the diameter in 5 18mm range and roughness in Ra- 0.02um, and the precision reaches 3um.

  19. Electrospun polystyrene fiber diameter influencing bacterial attachment, proliferation, and growth.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-04-15

    Electrospun materials have been widely investigated in the past few decades as candidates for tissue engineering applications. However, there is little available data on the mechanisms of interaction of bacteria with electrospun wound dressings of different morphology and surface chemistry. This knowledge could allow the development of effective devices against bacterial infections in chronic wounds. In this paper, the interactions of three bacterial species (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus) with electrospun polystyrene meshes were investigated. Bacterial response to meshes with different fiber diameters was assessed through a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Experiments included attachment studies in liquid medium but also directly onto agar plates; the latter was aimed at mimicking a chronic wound environment. Fiber diameter was shown to affect the ability of bacteria to proliferate within the fibrous networks, depending on cell size and shape. The highest proliferation rates occurred when fiber diameter was close to the bacterial size. Nanofibers were found to induce conformational changes of rod shaped bacteria, limiting the colonization process and inducing cell death. The data suggest that simply tuning the morphological properties of electrospun fibers may be one strategy used to control biofilm formation within wound dressings.

  20. Diameter Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Individual SnTe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, N.; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-03-01

    Tin telluride (SnTe), a newly discovered topological crystalline insulator, has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on a systematic study of the thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters. Measurements of thermopower, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, we found that the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 913 nm to 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may be attributed to the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. We further calculated the temperature dependent figure of merit ZT for each individual nanowire. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science by Los Alamos National Laboratory (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Sandia National Laboratories (Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000). We acknowledge support by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  1. Large diameter propellers of reduced weight. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadler, J.B.; Neilson, R.; Rowen, A.; Sedat, R.; Zubaly, R.

    1982-04-01

    A study of the design and economic analysis of large diameter, slow-turning marine propellers to improve the fuel economy of merchant ships. Detailed designs of several lightweight propellers were made. It was determined that the best combination for weight reduction is a cast hollow blade with 1 1/4 inch wall thickness and a hollow hub. Other investigations made were: fabrication techniques, resonant frequency effects, hydrodynamic characteristics, cascading effects and tip emersion effects. Costs and benefits as applied to a 120,000 DWT Tanker are discussed allowing for both strict adherence to IMCO Rules of tip submersion and with a relaxing of IMCO Rules. Strict adherence shows a maximum propeller diameter of about 30.2 feet with a resulting annual fuel savings of 1/4 million dollars over the 27.5' propeller. Relaxing these rules allows for a 42.5 diameter propeller turning at 30.8 RPM which would result in an annual fuel savings of one million dollars per year over the 27.5 propeller.

  2. SEGREGATION IN SMALL STEEL CASTINGS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Carbon segregation in small castings often occurs near riser necks. Systematic studies were continued to determine effect on segregation of such...intensity of carbon segregation under ’neck-down’ risers varies directly as the neck length and inversely as the neck diameter. The degree of segregation

  3. Influence of coronary artery diameter on eNOS protein content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. H.; Turk, J. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Woodman, C. R.; Price, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the content of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein (eNOS protein/g total artery protein) increases with decreasing artery diameter in the coronary arterial tree. Content of eNOS protein was determined in porcine coronary arteries with immunoblot analysis. Arteries were isolated in six size categories from each heart: large arteries [301- to 2,500-microm internal diameter (ID)], small arteries (201- to 300-microm ID), resistance arteries (151- to 200-microm ID), large arterioles (101- to 150-microm ID), intermediate arterioles (51- to 100-microm ID), and small arterioles(<50-microm ID). To obtain sufficient protein for analysis from small- and intermediate-sized arterioles, five to seven arterioles 1-2 mm in length were pooled into one sample for each animal. Results establish that the number of smooth muscle cells per endothelial cell decreases from a number of 10 to 15 in large coronary arteries to 1 in the smallest arterioles. Immunohistochemistry revealed that eNOS is located only in endothelial cells in all sizes of coronary artery and in coronary capillaries. Contrary to our hypothesis, eNOS protein content did not increase with decreasing size of coronary artery. Indeed, the smallest coronary arterioles had less eNOS protein per gram of total protein than the large coronary arteries. These results indicate that eNOS protein content is greater in the endothelial cells of conduit arteries, resistance arteries, and large arterioles than in small coronary arterioles.

  4. Geometric interpretation of the ratio of overall diameter to rim crest diameter for lunar and terrestrial craters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegal, B. S.; Wickman, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    An empirical linear relationship has been established by Pike (1967) between the overall diameter and the rim crest diameter for rimmed, flat-floored as well as bowl-shaped, lunar and terrestrial craters formed by impact and explosion. A similar relationship for experimentally formed fluidization craters has been established by Siegal (1971). This relationship is examined in terms of the geometry of the crater and the slope angles of loose materials. The parameter varies from 1.40 to 1.65 and is found to be dependent on mean interior flat floor radius, exterior and interior rim slope angles, angle of aperture of the crater cone, and the volume fraction of crater void accounted for in the rim. The range of the observed parameter can be understood in terms of simple crater geometry by realistic values of the five parameters.

  5. Correlation of axial blood velocity to venular and arteriolar diameter in the human eye in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koutsiaris, Aristotle G

    2015-01-01

    The axial blood velocity (Vax) association with microvessel diameter (D) was studied at 104 different postcapillary venules (4 μm <  D <  24 μm) and 30 different precapillary arterioles (6 μm≤D≤12 μm) in the human conjunctiva of normal healthy humans. Venular diameter sizes were classified as "very small" (Group 1, 4.4 μm≤D <  8.9 μm), "small" (Group 2, 8.9 μm≤D <  13.8 μm), "medium" (Group 3, 13.8 μm≤D <  19.1 μm) and "large" (Group 4, 19.1 μm≤D≤23.5). The Spearman's correlation coefficient (rs) in all 4 venular groups was less than 0.36 and not statistically significant (n = 26, p≥0.08). Similar correlation results were observed for the arteriolar group (rs) ≈ 0) for the peak systolic, the average and the end systolic axial velocities. Vax was significantly (p <  0.001) lower in Group 1 in comparison to that in Group 2 and significantly (p <  0.01) lower in Group 2 in comparison to that in Group 3. However, Vax was not significantly lower in Group 3 in comparison to that in Group 4. Average Vax and standard deviation was 0.48 ± 0.13, 0.64 ± 0.16, 0.82 ± 0.25 and 0.88 ± 0.32 mm/s for Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. The above results reinforce the importance of measuring D in microvascular hemodynamics. Higher diameters suggest higher axial velocities but Vax does not change significantly within the limits of each of the aforementioned groups.

  6. Non-variation of the solar diameter with the cycle: the end of a possible link between activity and diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Cugnet, D.

    We have reanalyzed the 7 years of filtregrams data (150 000 photograms and magnetograms) of the SOHO/MDI experiment. We used the maximum possible sampling compatible with full frame recording, carefully avoiding any suspicious filtregram. Going further than the previous analysis of 2 years of data by Emilio et al. (Ap. J. 543,1007, 2000), we better corrected for changes in optical aberrations and, along Turmon et al. (Ap. J., 568, 396, 2002), we reduced radius measurement errors by identifying active regions and avoiding radius measurements herein. We found that, within the limit of our noise level uncertainties (2 mas), the solar diameter could be constant over the half cycle investigated. Our results confirm the recent reanalysis of the 7 years of MDI data made by Antia (Ap. J. 590, 567, 2003), with a completely different method since using the ultra-precise frequency variation of the f-modes (fundamental modes linked to the diameter). He found (carefully removing the yearly Earth induced variations and avoiding the SOHO data gap of 1999) that the diameter is constant over the half solar cycle (radius variation are less than 0.6 km, 0.8 mas - nothing over noise level). Along Antia, we can conclude that: "If a careful analysis is performed, then it turns out that there is no evidence for any variation in the solar radius." There were no theoretical reasons for large solar radius variations and there is no observational evidence for them with consistent space observations.

  7. Selection of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube with Narrow Diameter Distribution by Using a PPE PPV Copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Kelly A; Chen, Yusheng; Malkovskiy, Andrey; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Sokolov, Alexei P; More, Karren Leslie; Pang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Electronic and mechanic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are uniquely dependent on the tube's chiralities and diameters. Isolation of different type SWNTs remains one of the fundamental and challenging issues in nanotube science. Herein, we demonstrate that SWNTs can be effectively enriched to a narrow diameter range by sequential treatment of the HiPco sample with nitric acid and a {pi}-conjugated copolymer poly(phenyleneethynylene) (PPE)-co-poly(phenylenevinylene) (PPV). On the basis of Raman, fluorescence, and microscopic evidence, the nitric acid is found to selectively remove the SWNTs of small diameter. The polymer not only effectively dispersed carbon nanotubes but also exhibited a good selectivity toward a few SWNTs. The reported approach thus offers a new methodology to isolate SWNTs, which has the potential to operate in a relatively large scale.

  8. Effect of Cover Thickness on the Relationship of Surface Relief to Diameter of Northern Lowland QCDs on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buczkowski, D. L.; Frey, H. V.; McGill, G. E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous work has established that there is a relationship of surface relief to diameter for quasi-circular depressions (QCDs) around the Utopia Basin [1]. This relationship has been used to support the contention that the QCDs represent impact craters buried beneath a differentially compacting cover material. For any given regional cover thickness, total cover thickness is greater over the centers of completely buried craters than over their rims; thus total compaction is greater over the center of craters than their rims and topographic depressions will form. Since large craters are deeper than small craters, differential compaction models also predict that surface relief will be proportional to the diameter of the buried crater [2]. It is highly unlikely, however, that the material covering the QCD impact craters is a consistent thickness throughout the entire northern lowlands of Mars. We explore the effects that changes in cover thickness would have on the surface relief vs. diameter relationship of QCDs.

  9. Second-harmonic generation of single BaTiO3 nanoparticles down to 22 nm diameter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene; Steinbrück, Andrea; Buscaglia, Maria Teresa; Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Pertsch, Thomas; Grange, Rachel

    2013-06-25

    We investigate the second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from single BaTiO3 nanoparticles of diameters varying from 70 nm down to 22 nm with a far-field optical microscope coupled to an infrared femtosecond laser. An atomic force microscope is first used to localize the individual particles and to accurately determine their sizes. Power and polarization-dependent measurements on the individual nanoparticles reveal a diameter range between 30 and 20 nm, where deviations from bulk nonlinear optical properties occur. For 22 nm diameter particles, the tetragonal crystal structure is not applicable anymore and competing effects due to the surface to volume ratio or crystallographic modifications are taking place. The demonstration of SHG from such small nanoparticles opens up the possibilities of using them as bright coherent biomarkers. Moreover, our work shows that measuring the SHG of individual nanoparticles reveals critical material properties, opening up new possibilities to investigate ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  10. Fabricated nano-fiber diameter as liquid concentration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyad, Radhi M.; Mat Jafri, Mohd Zubir; Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi

    Nanofiber is characterized by thin, long, and very soft silica. Taper fibers are made using an easy and low cost chemical method. Etching is conducted with a HF solution to remove cladding and then a low molarity HF solution to reduce the fiber core diameter. One approach to on-line monitoring of the etching process uses spectrophotometer with a white light source. In the aforementioned technique, this method aims to determine the diameter of the reduced core and show the evolution of the two different processes from the nanofiber regime to the fixed regime in which the mode was remote from the surrounding evanescent field, intensity can propagate outside the segment fiber when the core diameter is less than 500 nm. Manufacturing technologies of nano-fiber sensors offer a number of approved properties of optical fiber sensors utilized in various sensory applications. The nano-fiber sensor is utilized to sense the difference in the concentration of D-glucose in double-distilled deionized water and to measure the refractive index (RI) of a sugar solution. Our proposed method exhibited satisfactory capability based on bimolecular interactions in the biological system. The response of the nano-fiber sensors indicates a different kind of interaction among various groups of AAs. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and the structure making or breaking ability of solutes in the given solution. This study utilized spectra photonics to measure the transmission of light through different concentrations of sugar solution, employing cell cumber and nano-optical fibers as sensors.

  11. Note: Computer controlled rotation mount for large diameter optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakonjac, Ana; Roberts, Kris O.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-02-01

    We describe the construction of a motorized optical rotation mount with a 40 mm clear aperture. The device is used to remotely control the power of large diameter laser beams for a magneto-optical trap. A piezo-electric ultrasonic motor on a printed circuit board provides rotation with a precision better than 0.03° and allows for a very compact design. The rotation unit is controlled from a computer via serial communication, making integration into most software control platforms straightforward.

  12. Base metal thermocouples drift rate dependence from thermoelement diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlasek, P.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.

    2015-02-01

    Temperature measurements are one of the key factors in many industrial applications that directly affect the quality, effectiveness and safety of manufacturing processes. In many industrial applications these temperature measurements are realized by thermocouples. Accuracy of thermocouples directly affects the quality of the final product of manufacturing and their durability determines the safety margins required. One of the significant effects that affect the precision of the thermocouples is short and long term stability of their voltage output. This stability issue occurs in every type of thermocouples and is caused by multiple factors. In general these factors affect the Seebeck coefficient which is a material constant, which determines the level of generated voltage when exposed to a temperature gradient. Changes of this constant result in the change of the thermocouples voltage output thus indicated temperature which can result in production quality issues, safety and health hazards. These alternations can be caused by physical and chemical changes within the thermocouple lead material. Modification of this material constant can be of temporary nature or permanent. This paper concentrates on the permanent, or irreversible changes of the Seebeck coefficient that occur in commonly used swaged MIMS Type N thermocouples. These permanent changes can be seen as systematic change of the EMF of the thermocouple when it is exposed to a high temperature over a period of time. This change of EMF by time is commonly known as the drift of the thermocouple. This work deals with the time instability of thermocouples EMF at temperatures above 1200 °C. Instability of the output voltage was taken into relation with the lead diameter of the tested thermocouples. This paper concentrates in detail on the change of voltage output of thermocouples of different diameters which were tested at high temperatures for the overall period of more than 210 hours. The gather data from this

  13. SERS Raman Sensor Based on Diameter-Modulated Sapphire Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoji, Yutaka

    2010-08-09

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been observed using a sapphire fiber coated with gold nano-islands for the first time. The effect was found to be much weaker than what was observed with a similar fiber coated with silver nanoparticles. Diameter-modulated sapphire fibers have been successfully fabricated on a laser heated pedestal growth system. Such fibers have been found to give a modest increase in the collection efficiency of induced emission. However, the slow response of the SERS effect makes it unsuitable for process control applications.

  14. Detachable shoe plates for large diameter drill bits

    SciTech Connect

    Bardwell, A.E.

    1984-08-21

    Shoe members and drill shank members for large diameter cable drilling bits are provided with a tongue on one of the members that projects axially relative to the drill shank member and with an arcuate lip and projecting stop on the other of the members to trap the tongue and prevent radial movement of the shoe member in response to radially directed forces caused by the spinning of the bit in drilling operations. Such forces would impose shear stresses on the fastening members that extend through the shoe member and axially into the drill shank. Four embodiments are disclosed: a spudding bit, two star bits and a scow bit.

  15. Diameter and density control of single-walled carbon nanotube forests by modulating Ostwald ripening through decoupling the catalyst formation and growth processes.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shunsuke; Inaguma, Masayasu; Futaba, Don N; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-11

    A continuous and wide range control of the diameter (1.9-3.2 nm) and density (0.03-0.11 g cm(-3) ) of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) forests is demonstrated by decoupling the catalyst formation and SWNT growth processes. Specifically, by managing the catalyst formation temperature and H2 exposure, the redistribution of the Fe catalyst thin film into nanoparticles is controlled while a fixed growth condition preserved the growth yield. The diameter and density are inversely correlated, where low/high density forests would consist of large/small diameter SWNTs, which is proposed as a general rule for the structural control of SWNT forests. The catalyst formation process is modeled by considering the competing processes, Ostwald ripening, and subsurface diffusion, where the dominant mechanism is found to be Ostwald ripening. Specifically, H2 exposure increases catalyst surface energy and decreases diameter, while increased temperature leads to increased diffusion on the surface and an increase in diameter.

  16. Selective dispersion of large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with pyridine-containing copolymers.

    PubMed

    Berton, Nicolas; Lemasson, Fabien; Poschlad, Angela; Meded, Velimir; Tristram, Frank; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M; Mayor, Marcel

    2014-01-29

    The purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a key parameter for their integration in electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices. Samples of pristine SWNTs are inhomogeneous in terms of electric behavior and diameter and contain a variety of amorphous carbon and catalyst residues. To obtain high performance devices, purification of SWNTs is required. Conjugated polymers have emerged as efficient solubilizing and sorting agents for small diameter SWNTs (HiPco tubes, 0.7 nm<Ø<1.1 nm). Nevertheless, reports on polymers able to efficiently sort large diameter SWNTs with Ø>1.1 nm are lacking. Several pyridine-containing copolymers were synthesized for this purpose and showed efficient and selective extraction of semiconducting large diameter SWNTs (PLV tubes, Ø>1.1 nm). High concentration and high purity suspensions are obtained without the use of ultracentrifugation, which gives an up-scaling potential of the method. The emission wavelength is in near infrared region around 1550 nm and fits with broadly used telecommunication wavelength window. The processes taking place at the interface were simulated by a newly designed hybrid coarse-grain model combining density functional theory and geometrical calculation to yield insights into the wrapping processes with an unprecedented level of details for such large diameter SWNTs.

  17. Large diameter femoral heads: is bigger always better?

    PubMed

    Cooper, H J; Della Valle, C J

    2014-11-01

    Dislocation remains among the most common complications of, and reasons for, revision of both primary and revision total hip replacements (THR). Hence, there is great interest in maximising stability to prevent this complication. Head size has been recognised to have a strong influence on the risk of dislocation post-operatively. As femoral head size increases, stability is augmented, secondary to an increase in impingement-free range of movement. Larger head sizes also greatly increase the 'jump distance' required for the head to dislocate in an appropriately positioned cup. Level-one studies support the use of larger diameter heads as they decrease the risk of dislocation following primary and revision THR. Highly cross-linked polyethylene has allowed us to increase femoral head size, without a marked increase in wear. However, the thin polyethylene liners necessary to accommodate larger heads may increase the risk of liner fracture and larger heads have also been implicated in causing soft-tissue impingement resulting in groin pain. Larger diameter heads also impart larger forces on the femoral trunnion, which may contribute to corrosion, metal release, and adverse local tissue reactions. Alternative large bearings including large ceramic heads and dual mobility bearings may mitigate some of these risks, and several of these devices have been used with clinical success.

  18. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, SenPo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y. B.; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of “bottom-up” InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications. PMID:27616584

  19. Diameter of titanium nanotubes influences anti-bacterial efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, Batur; Taylor, Erik; Alpaslan, Ece; Webster, Thomas J.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial infection of in-dwelling medical devices is a growing problem that cannot be treated by traditional antibiotics due to the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation. Here, due to changes in surface parameters, it is proposed that bacterial adhesion can be prevented through nanosurface modifications of the medical device alone. Toward this goal, titanium was created to possess nanotubular surface topographies of highly controlled diameters of 20, 40, 60, or 80 nm, sometimes followed by heat treatment to control chemistry and crystallinity, through a novel anodization process. For the first time it was found that through the control of Ti surface parameters including chemistry, crystallinity, nanotube size, and hydrophilicity, significantly changed responses of both Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus (pathogens relevant for orthopaedic and other medical device related infections) were measured. Specifically, heat treatment of 80 nm diameter titanium tubes produced the most robust antimicrobial effect of all surface treatment parameters tested. This study provides the first step toward understanding the surface properties of nano-structured titanium that improve tissue growth (as has been previously observed with nanotubular titanium), while simultaneously reducing infection without the use of pharmaceutical drugs.

  20. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, Senpo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y. B.; Ho, Johnny C.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of “bottom-up” InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications.

  1. Research on high accuracy diameter measurement system with CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Duan, Guoteng

    2011-08-01

    Non-touch measurement is an important technology in many domains such as the monitoring of tool breakage and tool wear, et al. Based on the method of curve fitting and demanding inflection point, we present a high accuracy non-touch diameter measurement system. The measurement system comprise linear array CCD, CCD driving circuit, power supply, workseat, light source, data acquisition card and so on. The picture element of the linear array CCD is 2048, and the size of every pixel and the spacing of adjacent pixels have the same size of 14μmx14μm. The stabilized voltage supply has a constant voltage output of 3V. The light is generated by a halogen tungsten lamp, which does not represent any risk to the health of the whole system. The data acquisition card converts the analog signal to digital signal with the accuracy of 12 bit. The error of non-uniform of the CCD pixels in sensitivity and the electrical noise error are indicated in detail. The measurement system has a simple structure, high measuring precision, and can be carried out automatically. Experiment proves that the diameter measurement of the system is within the range of Φ0.5~Φ10mm, and the total measuring unstability of the system is within the range of +/- 1.4μm.

  2. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  3. The Use of Narrow Diameter Implants in the Molar Area

    PubMed Central

    Saad, M.; Assaf, A.; Gerges, E.

    2016-01-01

    Implant rehabilitations in the posterior jaw are influenced by many factors such as the condition of the remaining teeth, the force factors related to the patient, the quality of the bone, the maintenance of the hygiene, the limited bone height, the type and extent of edentulism, and the nature of the opposing arch. The gold standard is to place a regular diameter implant (>3.7 mm) or a wide one to replace every missing molar. Unfortunately, due to horizontal bone resorption, this option is not possible without lateral bone augmentation. In this situation, narrow diameter implant (NDI < 3.5 mm) could be the alternative to lateral bone augmentation procedures. This paper presents a clinical study where NDIs were used for the replacement of missing molars. They were followed up to 11 years. Special considerations were observed and many parameters were evaluated. NDI could be used to replace missing molar in case of moderate horizontal bone resorption if strict guidelines are respected. Yet, future controlled prospective clinical trials are required to admit their use as scientific evidence. PMID:27293436

  4. Tunable Engineered Skin Mechanics via Coaxial Electrospun Fiber Core Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Blackstone, Britani Nicole; Drexler, Jason William

    2014-01-01

    Autologous engineered skin (ES) offers promise as a treatment for massive full thickness burns. Unfortunately, ES is orders of magnitude weaker than normal human skin causing it to be difficult to apply surgically and subject to damage by mechanical shear in the early phases of engraftment. In addition, no manufacturing strategy has been developed to tune ES biomechanics to approximate the native biomechanics at different anatomic locations. To enhance and tune ES biomechanics, a coaxial (CoA) electrospun scaffold platform was developed from polycaprolactone (PCL, core) and gelatin (shell). The ability of the coaxial fiber core diameter to control both scaffold and tissue mechanics was investigated along with the ability of the gelatin shell to facilitate cell adhesion and skin development compared to pure gelatin, pure PCL, and a gelatin-PCL blended fiber scaffold. CoA ES exhibited increased cellular adhesion and metabolism versus PCL alone or gelatin-PCL blend and promoted the development of well stratified skin with a dense dermal layer and a differentiated epidermal layer. Biomechanics of the scaffold and ES scaled linearly with core diameter suggesting that this scaffold platform could be utilized to tailor ES mechanics for their intended grafting site and reduce graft damage in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24712409

  5. Verification of the FBR fuel bundle-duct interaction analysis code BAMBOO by the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Nemoto, Junichi; Ichikawa, Shoichi; Katsuyama, Kozo

    2014-09-01

    The BAMBOO computer code was verified by results for the out-of-pile bundle compression test with large diameter pin bundle deformation under the bundle-duct interaction (BDI) condition. The pin diameters of the examined test bundles were 8.5 mm and 10.4 mm, which are targeted as preliminary fuel pin diameters for the upgraded core of the prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR) and for demonstration and commercial FBRs studied in the FaCT project. In the bundle compression test, bundle cross-sectional views were obtained from X-ray computer tomography (CT) images and local parameters of bundle deformation such as pin-to-duct and pin-to-pin clearances were measured by CT image analyses. In the verification, calculation results of bundle deformation obtained by the BAMBOO code analyses were compared with the experimental results from the CT image analyses. The comparison showed that the BAMBOO code reasonably predicts deformation of large diameter pin bundles under the BDI condition by assuming that pin bowing and cladding oval distortion are the major deformation mechanisms, the same as in the case of small diameter pin bundles. In addition, the BAMBOO analysis results confirmed that cladding oval distortion effectively suppresses BDI in large diameter pin bundles as well as in small diameter pin bundles.

  6. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-03-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  7. Venus small volcano classification and description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The high resolution and global coverage of the Magellan radar image data set allows detailed study of the smallest volcanoes on the planet. A modified classification scheme for volcanoes less than 20 km in diameter is shown and described. It is based on observations of all members of the 556 significant clusters or fields of small volcanoes located and described by this author during data collection for the Magellan Volcanic and Magmatic Feature Catalog. This global study of approximately 10 exp 4 volcanoes provides new information for refining small volcano classification based on individual characteristics. Total number of these volcanoes was estimated to be 10 exp 5 to 10 exp 6 planetwide based on pre-Magellan analysis of Venera 15/16, and during preparation of the global catalog, small volcanoes were identified individually or in clusters in every C1-MIDR mosaic of the Magellan data set. Basal diameter (based on 1000 measured edifices) generally ranges from 2 to 12 km with a mode of 34 km, and follows an exponential distribution similar to the size frequency distribution of seamounts as measured from GLORIA sonar images. This is a typical distribution for most size-limited natural phenomena unlike impact craters which follow a power law distribution and continue to infinitely increase in number with decreasing size. Using an exponential distribution calculated from measured small volcanoes selected globally at random, we can calculate total number possible given a minimum size. The paucity of edifice diameters less than 2 km may be due to inability to identify very small volcanic edifices in this data set; however, summit pits are recognizable at smaller diameters, and 2 km may represent a significant minimum diameter related to style of volcanic eruption. Guest, et al, discussed four general types of small volcanic edifices on Venus: (1) small lava shields; (2) small volcanic cones; (3) small volcanic domes; and (4) scalloped margin domes ('ticks'). Steep

  8. Introduction of a Nozzle Throat Diameter Dependency into the SRM Dust Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabroth, S.; Wegener, P.; Oswald, M.; Wiedemann, C.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    In the exhaust gas of SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) firings, a considerable amount of very small aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particles is generally included. In order to increase motor performance and to dampen burn instabilities, aluminium is used as an additive in the propellant. During the burn process this aluminium is transformed into Al2O3. A large number of small dust particles (< 1 μ m up to about 50 μ m) is generated continuously during a burn. At the end of a burn, a second group of much larger fragments from an Al2O3 slag pool clustering inside the motor leaves the nozzle. The ESA space debris population model MASTER-2001 considers 1,032 SRM firings with the associated generation of SRM slag and dust. The resulting Al2O3 population is a major contribution to the micron size space debris environment in Earth orbit. For the modelling of each SRM dust release event a detailed knowledge of the size distribution is essential. However, the knowledge of the particle size distribution after passing the nozzle throat is poor. The current dust implementation in the MASTER-2001 space debris model therefore assumes an average motor size, since information on the actual motor size is normally not available in common databases. Thus, a fixed distribution is identically used for large upper stages as well as small apogee motors. This assumption can lead to an over-representation of large dust in regions, where mainly apogee motors are used (i.e. GEO) and an under-representation in lower altitudes, where large stages predominate. In this paper, a concept for the improvement of SRM dust size modelling is discussed. It will be shown that an introduction of a nozzle throat diameter dependency into the dust size distribution could lead to a more precise modelling of SRM dust release events. Investigations showed that there is a good correlation between the propellant mass flow and the nozzle's throat diameter, which is in turn the determining term for the actual diameter

  9. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G.; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R.; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ≈4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ≈3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration. PMID:27658960

  10. Density profile control in a large diameter, helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.P.; Anderegg, F.A.; Freeman, R.L.; Gilleland, J.; Hilsabeck, T.J.; Isler, R.C.; Lee, W.D.; Litvak, A.A.; Miller, R.L.; Ohkawa, T.; Putvinski, S.; Umstadter, K.R.; Winslow, D.L.

    2005-05-15

    Plasmas with peaked radial density profiles have been generated in the world's largest helicon device, with plasma diameters of over 70 cm. The density profiles can be manipulated by controlling the phase of the current in each strap of two multistrap antenna arrays. Phase settings that excite long axial wavelengths create hollow density profiles, whereas settings that excite short axial wavelengths create peaked density profiles. This change in density profile is consistent with the cold-plasma dispersion relation for helicon modes, which predicts a strong increase in the effective skin depth of the rf fields as the wavelength decreases. Scaling of the density with magnetic field, gas pressure, and rf power is also presented.

  11. Experiments with large diameter gravity driven impacting liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storr, G. J.; Behnia, M.

    The phenomenon of a liquid jet released under gravity and falling through or impacting onto another liquid before colliding with an obstructing solid surface has been studied experimentally under isothermal conditions. Usually the jet diameter was sufficiently large to ensure jet coherency until collision. Direct flow visualization was used to study jets released into water pools with no air head space and jets impacting onto water pools after falling through an air head space. It is shown that distances predicting the onset of buoyancy and the entrainment of air using derivations from continuous plunging jets, are not applicable for impacting jets. The morphology of jet debris after collision with the solid surfaces correlates with the wetting properties of the jet liquid on the surface.

  12. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2016-09-23

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ≈4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ≈3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration.

  13. NEOWISE diameters and albedos: now available on PDS!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Bauer, James M.; Cutri, Roc M.; Grav, Tommy; Kramer, Emily A.; Nugent, Carolyn; Sonnett, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Rachel; Wright, Edward L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the recent PDS release of minor planet physical property data from the WISE/NEOWISE fully cryogenic, 3-band cryo, and post-cryo surveys as well as the first year of the NEOWISE-Reactivation survey. This release includes 165,865 diameters, visible albedos, near-infrared albedos, and/or beaming parameters for 140,493 unique minor planets. The published data include near-Earth asteroids, Main Belt asteroids, Hildas, Jupiter Trojans, Centaurs, active Main Belt objects and irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. We provide an overview of the available data and discuss the key features of the PDS data set. The data are available online at: http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/neowisediam.html.

  14. Molecular transport through large-diameter DNA nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Swati; Ziegler, Daniela; Arnaut, Vera; Martin, Thomas G.; Kapsner, Korbinian; Henneberg, Katharina; Bausch, Andreas R.; Dietz, Hendrik; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-09-01

    DNA-based nanopores are synthetic biomolecular membrane pores, whose geometry and chemical functionality can be tuned using the tools of DNA nanotechnology, making them promising molecular devices for applications in single-molecule biosensing and synthetic biology. Here we introduce a large DNA membrane channel with an ~4 nm diameter pore, which has stable electrical properties and spontaneously inserts into flat lipid bilayer membranes. Membrane incorporation is facilitated by a large number of hydrophobic functionalizations or, alternatively, streptavidin linkages between biotinylated channels and lipids. The channel displays an Ohmic conductance of ~3 nS, consistent with its size, and allows electrically driven translocation of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA analytes. Using confocal microscopy and a dye influx assay, we demonstrate the spontaneous formation of membrane pores in giant unilamellar vesicles. Pores can be created both in an outside-in and an inside-out configuration.

  15. The rotation, color, phase coefficient, and diameter of 1915 Quetzalcoatl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Tholen, D. J.

    1983-09-01

    Photoelectric observations of 1915 Quetzalcoatl on March 2, 1981 show that this asteroid has a rotational period of 4.9 + or - 0.3 hr and a lightcurve amplitude of 0.26 magnitudes. B-V and U-B colors are found to be 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.43 + or - 0.03, respectively, consistent with Quetzalcoatl being an S-type asteroid. Additional observations from March 31, 1981, give a linear phase coefficient of 0.033 mag/deg and a mean B(1,0) magnitude of 20.10. The resulting estimated mean diameter for Quetzalcoatl is only 0.37 km, making it one of the smallest asteroids for which physical observations have yet been made.

  16. The rotation, color, phase coefficient, and diameter of 1915 Quetzalcoatl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Tholen, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of 1915 Quetzalcoatl on March 2, 1981 show that this asteroid has a rotational period of 4.9 + or - 0.3 hr and a lightcurve amplitude of 0.26 magnitudes. B-V and U-B colors are found to be 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.43 + or - 0.03, respectively, consistent with Quetzalcoatl being an S-type asteroid. Additional observations from March 31, 1981, give a linear phase coefficient of 0.033 mag/deg and a mean B(1,0) magnitude of 20.10. The resulting estimated mean diameter for Quetzalcoatl is only 0.37 km, making it one of the smallest asteroids for which physical observations have yet been made.

  17. Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Retinal Microvascular Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Richard A.; Sim, Xueling; Smith, Albert Vernon; Li, Xiaohui; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Brody, Jennifer A.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Mcknight, Barbara; Klein, Ronald; Wang, Jie Jin; Kifley, Annette; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Taylor, Kent D.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Li, Xiang; Ikram, M. Arfan; Klaver, Caroline C.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Mutlu, Unal; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T.; Mitchell, Paul; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that retinal microvascular diameters are associated with cardio- and cerebrovascular conditions. The shared genetic effects of these associations are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the genetic factors that mediate retinal vessel size. Methods and Results This study extends previous genome-wide association study results using 24,000+ multi-ethnic participants from 7 discovery and 5,000+ subjects of European ancestry from 2 replication cohorts. Using the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, we investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants collectively across genes with summary measures of retinal vessel diameters, referred to as the central retinal venule equivalent (CRVE) and the central retinal arteriole equivalent (CRAE). We report 4 new loci associated with CRVE, one of which is also associated with CRAE. The 4 SNPs are rs7926971 in TEAD1 (p=3.1×10−11, minor allele frequency (MAF)=0.43), rs201259422 in TSPAN10 (p=4.4×10−9, MAF=0.27), rs5442 in GNB3 (p=7.0×10−10, MAF=0.05) and rs1800407 in OCA2 (p=3.4×10−8, MAF=0.05). The latter SNP, rs1800407, was also associated with CRAE (p=6.5×10−12). Results from the gene-based burden tests were null. In phenotype look-ups, SNP rs201255422 was associated with both systolic (p=0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p=8.3×10−04). Conclusions Our study expands the understanding of genetic factors influencing the size of the retinal microvasculature. These findings may also provide insight into the relationship between retinal and systemic microvascular disease. PMID:26567291

  18. Validation of EUCAST zone diameter breakpoints against reference broth microdilution.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, S; Bjelkenbrant, C; Kahlmeter, G

    2014-06-01

    The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) began harmonizing clinical breakpoints in Europe 2002. In 2009, work to develop a disc diffusion method began and the first disc diffusion breakpoints calibrated to EUCAST clinical MIC breakpoints were published in December 2009. In this study we validated EUCAST clinical zone diameter breakpoints against the International Standard Organization (ISO) reference broth microdilution. A collection of 544 isolates (238 Gram-negative and 306 Gram-positive) were tested against a panel of antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed with broth microdilution as described by ISO and disc diffusion in accordance with EUCAST methodology. Inhibition zone diameters and MIC values were interpreted and categorized (S, I and R) according to EUCAST clinical breakpoint table version 2.0. Categorical agreement (CA) as well as minor (mD), major (MD) and very major (VMD) discrepancies were determined. There was in general good correlation between susceptibility test results obtained with disc diffusion and broth microdilution. Overall CA was 97.3% for all combinations of organisms and antimicrobial agents (n = 5231) and the overall discrepancy rates were 110 (2.1%) mD, 24 (0.5%) MD and 7 (0.1%) VMD. The overall CA for Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms were 98.7% (2346 tests) and 96.2% (2942 tests), respectively. Seven VMD were observed, five for Gram-positive organisms (coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 2) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3)) and two for Gram-negative organisms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Minor discrepancies were mainly observed in Gram-negatives and were related to different antimicrobial agents and species.

  19. Automatic detection and estimation of biparietal diameter from fetal ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annangi, Pavan; Banerjee Krishnan, Kajoli; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Gupta, Madhumita; Patil, Uday

    2011-03-01

    Fetal bi-parietal diameter (BPD) is known to provide a reliable estimate of gestational age (GA) of a fetus in the first half of pregnancy. In this paper, we present an automated method to identify and measure BPD from B-mode ultrasound images of fetal head. The method (a) automatically detects and places a region-of-interest on the head based on a prior work in our group (b) utilizes the concept of phase congruency for edge detection and (c) employs a cost function to identify the third ventricle inside the head (d) measures the BPD along the perpendicular bisector of occipital frontal diameter (OFD) from the outer rim of the cranium closer to the transducer to the inner rim of the cranium away from the transducer. The cost function is premised on the distribution of anatomical shape, size and presentation of the third ventricle in images that adhere to clinical guidelines describing the scan plane for BPD measurement. The OFD is assumed to lie along the third ventricle. The algorithm has been tested on 137 images acquired from four different scanners. Based on GA estimates and their bounds specified in Standard Obstetric Tables, the GA predictions from automated measurements are found to be within +/-2SD of GA estimates from manual measurements by the operator and a second expert radiologist in 98% of the cases. The method described in this paper can also be adapted to assess the accuracy of the scan plane based on the presence/absence of the third ventricle.

  20. MAPLE: reflected light from exoplanets with a 50-cm diameter stratospheric balloon telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian; Bradley, Colin; Pazder, John; Nash, Reston; Metchev, Stanimir; Grandmont, Frédéric; Maire, Anne-Lise; Belikov, Ruslan; Macintosh, Bruce; Currie, Thayne; Galicher, Raphaël.; Marchis, Franck; Mawet, Dimitri; Serabyn, Eugene; Steinbring, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Detecting light reflected from exoplanets by direct imaging is the next major milestone in the search for, and characterization of, an Earth twin. Due to the high-risk and cost associated with satellites and limitations imposed by the atmosphere for ground-based instruments, we propose a bottom-up approach to reach that ultimate goal with an endeavor named MAPLE. MAPLE first project is a stratospheric balloon experiment called MAPLE-50. MAPLE-50 consists of a 50 cm diameter off-axis telescope working in the near-UV. The advantages of the near-UV are a small inner working angle and an improved contrast for blue planets. Along with the sophisticated tracking system to mitigate balloon pointing errors, MAPLE-50 will have a deformable mirror, a vortex coronograph, and a self-coherent camera as a focal plane wavefront-sensor which employs an Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) as the science detector. The EMCCD will allow photon counting at kHz rates, thereby closely tracking telescope and instrument-bench-induced aberrations as they evolve with time. In addition, the EMCCD will acquire the science data with almost no read noise penalty. To mitigate risk and lower costs, MAPLE-50 will at first have a single optical channel with a minimum of moving parts. The goal is to reach a few times 109 contrast in 25 h worth of flying time, allowing direct detection of Jovians around the nearest stars. Once the 50 cm infrastructure has been validated, the telescope diameter will then be increased to a 1.5 m diameter (MAPLE-150) to reach 1010 contrast and have the capability to image another Earth.

  1. Prediction of endotracheal tube size for pediatric patients from the epiphysis diameter of radius

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Ji Hyun; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Background Using a too big or a too small size of an endotracheal tube in pediatric patients would result in tracheal injury or insufficient ventilation. Determining the appropriate endotracheal tube size is important because using an inappropriate size can cause complications. This study was performed to predict the appropriate endotracheal tube size by measuring the transverse diameter of the epiphysis of the distal radius under the assumption that the growth rates of cartilages in the entire body are close to each other. Methods Fifty-eight children aged 3 to 10 years who required general anesthesia were intubated with an uncuffed endotracheal tube. The tube size was considered to be appropriate when leaks occurred at inspiratory peak pressures between 10 to 25 mmHg. The transverse diameters of the epiphysis were measured with an ultra-sonogram at the distal radius and the proximal phalanx of the third finger and the fifth finger. Correlations and prediction probabilities of measurements were evaluated. The number needed to harm (NNH), which indicates the number of patients who need to be intubated for one patient who needs tube exchange, was investigated. Results The Spearman's correlation coefficient between the endotracheal tube size and the epiphysis of the distal radius was 0.814, which was the biggest coefficient. For epiphysis of the proximal phalanx of the third finger and the fifth finger, the correlation coefficient was 0.704 and 0.701, respectively. If the Cole's formula was applied for selection of the tube size, the NNH would be 7. Conclusions The appropriate endotracheal tube size could be predicted by means of the epiphyseal transverse diameter of the distal radius rather than the circumference measurements of the phalanx. PMID:28184267

  2. Diameter-defined Strahler system and connectivity matrix of the pulmonary arterial tree.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z L; Kassab, G S; Fung, Y C

    1994-02-01

    For modeling of a vascular tree for hemodynamic analysis, the well-known Weibel, Horsfield, and Strahler systems have three shortcomings: vessels of the same order are all treated as in parallel, despite the fact that some are connected in series; histograms of the diameters of vessels in the successive orders have wide overlaps; and the "small-twigs-on-large-trunks" phenomenon is not given a quantitative expression. To improve the accuracy of the hemodynamic circuit model, we made a distinction between vessel segments and vessel elements: a segment is a vessel between two successive nodes of bifurcation; an element is a union of a group of segments of the same order that are connected in series. In an equivalent circuit, all elements of the same order are considered as arranged in parallel. Then, we follow the ordering method of Horsfield and Strahler, with introduction of an additional rule for the assignment of order numbers. If Dn and SDn denote the mean and standard deviation of the diameters of vessels of order n, then our rule divides the gap between Dn--SDn and Dn--1 + SDn--1 evenly between orders n and n--1. Finally, we introduced a connectivity matrix with a component in the mth row and the nth column that is the average number of vessels of order m that grow out of the vessels of order n. This method was applied to the rat. We found that the rat pulmonary arterial tree has 11 orders of vessels and that the geometry is fractal within these orders. The ratios of diameters, lengths, and numbers of elements in successive orders are 1.58, 1.60, and 2.76, respectively. The connectivity matrix reveals interesting features beyond the fractal concept. New features are found in the variation of the total cross-sectional area of elements with order numbers.

  3. A new noninvasive method for the accurate and precise assessment of varicose vein diameters.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Damiano; Pustina, Linda; Castelnuovo, Samuela; Bondioli, Alighiero; Carlà, Matteo; Sirtori, Cesare R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility and reproducibility of a new ultrasonic method for the direct assessment of maximal varicose vein diameter (VVD) were evaluated. A study was also performed to demonstrate the capacity of the method to detect changes in venous diameter induced by a pharmacologic treatment. Patients with varicose vein disease were recruited. A method that allows the precise positioning of patient and transducer and performance of scans in a gel-bath was developed. Maximal VVD was recorded both in the standing and supine positions. The intraassay reproducibility was determined by replicate scans made within 15 minutes in both positions. The interobserver variability was assessed by comparing VVDs measured during the first phase baseline examination with those obtained during baseline examinations in the second phase of the study. The error in reproducibility of VVD determinations was 5.3% when diameters were evaluated in the standing position and 6.4% when assessed in the supine position. The intramethod agreement was high, with a bias between readings of 0.06 +/- 0.18 mm and of -0.02 +/- 0.19 mm, respectively, in standing and supine positions. Correlation coefficients were better than 0.99 in both positions. The method appears to be sensitive enough to detect small changes in VVDs induced by treatments. The proposed technique provides a tool of potential valid use in the detection and in vivo monitoring of VVD changes in patients with varicose vein disease. The method offers an innovative approach to obtain a quantitative assessment of varicose vein progression and of treatment effects, thus providing a basis for epidemiologic surveys.

  4. Experimental study of lean flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures in tubes of different diameters

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshin, Y.L.; Goey, L.P.H. de

    2010-04-15

    Lean limit flames in methane/hydrogen/air mixtures propagating in tubes of internal diameters (ID) of 6.0, 8.9, 12.3, 18.4, 25.2, 35.0, and 50.2 mm have been experimentally studied. The flames propagated upward from the open bottom end of the tube to the closed upper end. The content of hydrogen in the fuel gas has been varied in the range 0-40 mol%. Lean flammability limits have been determined; flame shapes recorded and the visible speed of flame propagation measured. Most of the observed limit flames in tubes with diameters in the range of 8.9-18.4 mm had enclosed shape, and could be characterized as distorted or spherical flame balls. The tendency was observed for mixtures with higher hydrogen content to form smaller size, more uniform flame balls in a wider range of tube diameters. At hydrogen content of 20% or more in the fuel gas, limit flames in largest diameters (35.0 mm and 50.2 mm ID) tubes had small, compared to the tube diameter, size and were ''lens''-shaped. ''Regular'' open-front lean limit flames were observed only for the smallest diameters (6.0 mm and 8.9 mm) and largest diameters (35.0 and 50.2 mm ID), and only for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures, except for 6 mm ID tube in which all limit flames had open front. In all experiments, except for the lean limit flames in methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures in the 8.9 mm ID tube, and all limit flames in 6.0 mm ID tube, visible flame speeds very weakly depended on the hydrogen content in the fuel gas and were close to- or below the theoretical estimate of the speed of a rising hot bubble. This observation suggests that the buoyancy is the major factor which determines the visible flame speed for studied limit flames, except that last mentioned. A decrease of the lean flammability limit value with decreasing the tube diameter was observed for methane/air and (90% CH{sub 4} + 10% H{sub 2})/air mixtures for tubes having internal diameters in the range

  5. Performance of 26 Meter Diameter Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Performance of 26 Meter Diameter Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment. Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of an 85.3-foot (26-meter) nominal diameter ringsail parachute deployed at a Mach number of 1.15 and at an altitude of 132,600 feet (40.42 kilometers) were obtained from the first flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated to the reefed condition. However, the canopy was unstable and produced low drag in the reefed condition. Upon disreefing and opening to full inflation, a slight instability in the canopy mouth was observed initially. After a short time, the fluctuations diminished and a stable configuration was attained. Results indicate a loss in drag during the fluctuation period prior to stable inflation. During descent, stability characteristics of the system were such that the average pitch-yaw angle from the local vertical was less than 10 degrees. Rolling motion between the payload and parachute canopy quickly damped to small amplitude. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031003. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  6. Comparing the diameters and visual albedos derived from radar and infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P.; Howell, E.; Nolan, M.; Springmann, A.; Vervack, R., Jr.; Fernandez, Y.; Magri, C.

    2014-07-01

    Radar observations provide direct measurements of the physical sizes of near-Earth objects, independent of visual albedo, composition, and thermal properties, which can act as calibration or sanity checks for models of thermal-infrared emission by small bodies. Thermal modeling of infrared observations by the NEOWISE [1--3] and ExploreNEOs (Spitzer) [4--6] programs has provided diameters and visual albedos for several hundred near-Earth objects. Meanwhile, since 1998, the Arecibo radar program has detected over 350 near-Earth objects, including more than 40 objects from each of the NEOWISE and ExploreNEOs catalogs, providing rotation-rate, size, and shape constraints depending on the strength and resolution of the received echoes. In addition, our observations with the SpeX instrument on the NASA IRTF provide a sample of roughly two dozen objects, observed on multiple dates at different viewing geometries, that were also observed by the Arecibo radar and NEOWISE and/or ExploreNEOs programs. We will compare the diameters and visual albedos inferred from radar to those derived from thermal modeling of infrared observations from WISE, Spitzer, and/or the IRTF, and look for correlations between the outliers and their sizes, shapes, compositions, and viewing geometries, all of which can affect the assumptions made in the process of standard thermal modeling.

  7. Design of dual-diameter nanoholes for efficient solar-light harvesting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A dual-diameter nanohole (DNH) photovoltaic system is proposed, where a top (bottom) layer with large (small) nanoholes is used to improve the absorption for the short-wavelength (long-wavelength) solar incidence, leading to a broadband light absorption enhancement. Through three-dimensional finite-element simulation, the core device parameters, including the lattice constant, nanohole diameters, and nanohole depths, are engineered in order to realize the best light-matter coupling between nanostructured silicon and solar spectrum. The designed bare DNH system exhibits an outstanding absorption capability with a photocurrent density (under perfect internal quantum process) predicted to be 27.93 mA/cm2, which is 17.39%, 26.17%, and over 100% higher than the best single-nanohole (SNH) system, SNH system with an identical Si volume, and equivalent planar configuration, respectively. Considering the fabrication feasibility, a modified DNH system with an anti-reflection coating and back silver reflector is examined by simulating both optical absorption and carrier transport in a coupled way in frequency and three-dimensional spatial domains, achieving a light-conversion efficiency of 13.72%. PACS 85.60.-q; Optoelectronic device; 84.60.Jt; Photovoltaic conversion PMID:25258605

  8. Fabrication of 200 mm Diameter Sintering Body of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Material by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomida, T.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Nie, G.; Ochi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kikuchi, M.; Mukaiyama, K.; Guo, J. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Filled skutterudite is a promising material for thermoelectric power generation because its ZT value is relatively high. However, mass production of high-performance thermoelectric materials remains a challenge. This study focused on the sintering process of thermoelectric materials. Large-diameter n-type (Yb or La, Ca, Al, Ga, In)0.8(Co, Fe)4Sb12 skutterudite sintering bodies with a small thickness were successfully produced by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. When direct current flows through the thermoelectric sintering body during the SPS pulse, the Peltier effect causes a temperature difference within the sintering body. To eliminate the Peltier effect, an electrical insulating material was inserted between the punch (electrode) and the sintering body. In this way, an n-type La-filled skutterudite sample with a diameter of 200 mm, thickness of 21 mm, and weight of 5 kg was successfully produced. The thermoelectric properties and microstructures of the sample were almost the same throughout the whole sintering body, and the dimensionless figure of merit reached 1.0 at 773 K.

  9. Phagocytosis and hydrophobicity: a method of calculating contact angles based on the diameter of sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, C; Sunqvist, T

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between the contact angle and degree of phagocytosis of different yeast particles has been investigated. To facilitate the estimation of the contact angle, we have tested the hypothesis that the shape of a small liquid drop put on a flat surface is that of a truncated sphere. By making this approximation it is possible to calculate the contact angle, i.e. the tangent to the drop in the 3-phase liquid/solid/air meeting point, by measuring the drop diameter. Known volumes of saline were put on different surfaces and the diameters of the drops were measured from above. Calculation of the contact angle with drops of different volumes, and comparison between expected and measured height of 10 microl drops, indicated that the assumption that the shape of a drop is that of a truncated sphere is valid. Monolayers of leukocytes was shown to give rise to a contact angle of 17.9 degrees. Particles with a lower contact angle than the phagocytic cells resisted phagocytosis, but opsonization of the particles with normal human serum rendered them susceptible to phagocytosis, conferring a higher contact angle than that of the phagocytic cells.

  10. Development of a 5.5 m diameter vertical axis wind turbine, phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekitsch, A.; Etzler, C. C.; Fritzsche, A.; Lorch, G.; Mueller, W.; Rogalla, K.; Schmelzle, J.; Schuhwerk, W.; Vollan, A.; Welte, D.

    1982-06-01

    In continuation of development of a 5.5 m diameter vertical axis windmill that consists in conception, building, and wind tunnel testing, a Darrieus rotor windpowered generator feeding an isolated network under different wind velocity conditions and with optimal energy conversion efficiency was designed built, and field tested. The three-bladed Darrieus rotor tested in the wind tunnel was equiped with two variable pitch Savonius rotors 2 m in diameter. By means of separate measures of the aerodynamic factors and the energy consumption, effect of revisions and optimizations on different elements was assessed. Pitch adjustement of the Savonius blades, lubrication of speed reducer, rotor speed at cut-in of generator field excitation, time constant of field excitation, stability conditions, switch points of ohmic resistors which combined with a small electric battery simulated a larger isolated network connected with a large storage battery, were investigated. Fundamentals for the economic series production of windpowered generators with Darrieus rotors for the control and the electric conversion system are presented.

  11. The stability of Taylor bubbles in large-diameter tubes: Linear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Habib; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Taylor bubbles are a characteristic feature of the slug flow regime in gas-liquid pipe flows. With increasing pipe diameter, previous experimental observations have shown that at sufficiently large diameter (> 0.1 m), the slug flow regime, and hence Taylor bubbles, are not observed in gas-liquid flows in vertical pipes. Numerical simulations of a Taylor bubble rising in a quiescent liquid (see companion talk at this APS/DFD conference) have also shown that the wake of Taylor bubbles rising in a riser of such sizes is turbulent and has great impact on the stability of the subsequent, trailing bubbles. In view of these observations, a linear stability analysis is carried out to establish the stability conditions for a Taylor bubble rising in a turbulent flowing liquid. The stability of an axisymmetric Taylor bubble to a small-amplitude, three dimensional, perturbation is studied and the dimensionless flow parameters of the liquid investigated include the Froude number, the inverse viscosity number, and the Eotvos numbers. Nigerian Government scholarship (for HA).

  12. In Acute Myocardial Infarction Liver Parameters Are Associated With Stenosis Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Baars, Theodor; Neumann, Ursula; Jinawy, Mona; Hendricks, Stefanie; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Kälsch, Julia; Riemenschneider, Mona; Gerken, Guido; Erbel, Raimund; Heider, Dominik; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Detection of high-risk subjects in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by noninvasive means would reduce the need for intracardiac catheterization and associated complications. Liver enzymes are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. A potential predictive value for liver serum markers for the severity of stenosis in AMI was analyzed. Patients with AMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; n = 437) were retrospectively evaluated. Minimal lumen diameter (MLD) and percent stenosis diameter (SD) were determined from quantitative coronary angiography. Patients were classified according to the severity of stenosis (SD ≥ 50%, n = 357; SD < 50%, n = 80). Routine heart and liver parameters were associated with SD using random forests (RF). A prediction model (M10) was developed based on parameter importance analysis in RF. Age, alkaline phosphatase (AP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and MLD differed significantly between SD ≥ 50 and SD < 50. Age, AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and troponin correlated significantly with SD, whereas MLD correlated inversely with SD. M10 (age, BMI, AP, AST, ALT, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, troponin) reached an AUC of 69.7% (CI 63.8–75.5%, P < 0.0001). Routine liver parameters are associated with SD in AMI. A small set of noninvasively determined parameters can identify SD in AMI, and might avoid unnecessary coronary angiography in patients with low risk. The model can be accessed via http://stenosis.heiderlab.de. PMID:26871849

  13. Large-Diameter Burrows of the Triassic Ischigualasto Basin, NW Argentina: Paleoecological and Paleoenvironmental Implications

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Carina E.; Fernández, Eliana; Currie, Brian S.; Alcober, Oscar A.; Martínez, Ricardo; Correa, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Large-diameter ichnofossils comprising three morphotypes have been identified in the Upper Triassic Ischigualasto and Los Colorados formations of northwestern Argentina. These burrows add to the global record of the early appearance of fossorial behavior during early Mesozoic time. Morphotypes 1 and 2 are characterized by a network of tunnels and shafts that can be assigned to tetrapod burrows given similarities with previously described forms. However, differences in diameter, overall morphology, and stratigraphic occurrence allow their independent classification. Morphotype 3 forms a complex network of straight branches that intersect at oblique angles. Their calcareous composition and surface morphology indicate these structures have a composite biogenic origin likely developed due to combined plant/animal interactions. The association of Morphotypes 1 and 2 with fluvial overbank lithologies deposited under an extremely seasonal arid climate confirms interpretations that the early appearance of burrowing behavior was employed by vertebrates in response to both temperature and moisture-stress associated with seasonally or perpetually dry Pangean paleoclimates. Comparisons of burrow morphology and biomechanical attributes of the abundant paleovertebrate fauna preserved in both formations permit interpretations regarding the possible burrow architects for Morphotypes 1 and 2. In the case of the Morphotype 1, the burrow constructor could be one of the small carnivorous cynodonts, Ecteninion or Probelesodon. Assigning an architect for Morphotype 2 is more problematic due to mismatches between the observed burrow morphology and the size of the known Los Colorados vertebrates. PMID:23227195

  14. Space shuttle: Aerodynamic characteristics of a 162-inch diameter solid rocket booster with and without strakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. D.; Radford, W. D.; Rampy, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests conducted at NASA-Langley have shown that a small flap or strake can generate a significant amount of lift on a circular cylinder with large cross flow. If strakes are placed on the opposite sides and ends on a circular body, a moment will be produced about the center of mass of the body. The purpose of this test was to determine the static-aerodynamic forces and moments of a 162-inch diameter SRB (PRR) with and without strakes. The total angle-of-attack range of the SRB test was from -10 to 190 degrees. Model roll angles were 0, 45, 90, and 135 degrees with some intermediate angles. The Mach range was from 0.6 to 3.48. The 0.00494 scale model was designated as MSFC No. 449.

  15. Empirical Relationships Between Optical Properties and Equivalent Diameters of Fractal Soot Aggregates at 550 Nm Wavelength.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Soot aggregates (SAs)-fractal clusters of small, spherical carbonaceous monomers-modulate the incoming visible solar radiation and contribute significantly to climate forcing. Experimentalists and climate modelers typically assume a spherical morphology for SAs when computing their optical properties, causing significant errors. Here, we calculate the optical properties of freshly-generated (fractal dimension Df = 1.8) and aged (Df = 2.6) SAs at 550 nm wavelength using the numericallyexact superposition T-Matrix method. These properties were expressed as functions of equivalent aerosol diameters as measured by contemporary aerosol instruments. This work improves upon previous efforts wherein SA optical properties were computed as a function of monomer number, rendering them unusable in practical applications. Future research will address the sensitivity of variation in refractive index, fractal prefactor, and monomer overlap of SAs on the reported empirical relationships.

  16. Status of 30-centimeter-diameter mercury ion thruster isolator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of several 30 cm diameter mercury ion thruster isolator life tests that show that the onset and exponential increase of leakage current problems observed in earlier thruster operations and isolator tests have been solved. A 10,006 hour life test of a main isolator vaporizer operated with no mercury flow at 320 C and 1500 volts was found to have no onset of leakage current during the test. A cathode-isolator vaporizer operated with a mercury discharge at 340 to 360 C and 1200 volts for 18,000 hours, was found to have a small increase of leakage current with time. A 10,000 hour thruster life test exhibited no increase of leakage current during the life test. Isolators have been developed which will satisfy 30 cm mercury ion thruster mission requirements.

  17. Performance of 26 Meter Diameter Ringsail Parachute in a Simulated Martian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Charles H.; Bendura, Richard J.; Cotrane, Lucille C.

    1967-01-01

    Inflation, drag, and stability characteristics of an 85.3-foot (26-meter) nominal diameter ringsail parachute deployed at a Mach number of 1.15 and at an altitude of 132,600 feet (40.42 kilometers) were obtained from the first flight test of the Planetary Entry Parachute Program. After deployment, the parachute inflated to the reefed condition. However, the canopy was unstable and produced low drag in the reefed condition. Upon disreefing and opening to full inflation, a slight instability in the canopy mouth was observed initially. After a short time, the fluctuations diminished and a stable configuration was attained. Results indicate a loss in drag during the fluctuation period prior to stable inflation. During descent, stability characteristics of the system were such that the average pitch-yaw angle from the local vertical was less than 10 degrees. Rolling motion between the payload and parachute canopy quickly damped to small amplitude.

  18. Influence of diameter on particle transport in a fractured shale saprolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cumbie, D.H.; McKay, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments in an undisturbed, saturated column of weathered and fractured shale saprolite using fluorescent carboxylate-coated latex microspheres as tracers indicate that particle diameter plays a major role in controlling transport. In this study the optimum microsphere diameter for transport was approximately 0.5 ??m. Microspheres larger than the optimum size were present in the effluent at lower relative concentrations, apparently because of greater retention due to gravitational settling and/or physical straining. The smaller than optimum microspheres also experienced greater retention, apparently related to their higher rates of diffusion. Faster diffusion can lead to more frequent collisions with, and attachment to, fracture walls and may also lead to movement of particles into zones of relatively immobile pore water in the fractures or in the fine pore structure of the clay-rich matrix between fractures. Dismantling of the soil column and mapping of the distribution of retained microspheres indicated that there was substantial size-segregation of the microspheres between different fractures or in 'channels' within a fracture. Examination of small core samples showed that the smallest microspheres (0.05-0.1 ??m) were present in the fine pores of the matrix at distances of up to 3-4 mm from the nearest fracture, which supports the hypothesis that small particles can be retained by diffusion into the matrix. Calculations of settling velocity and diffusion rate using simple 1D approaches suggest that these processes could both cause significant retention of the larger and smaller particles, respectively, even for the fast advective transport rates (up to 32 m/day) observed during the experiments. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  20. Measuring Monodisperse Small Particles En Masse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert A.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    New optical method enables determination of sizes of approximately-micron-sized particles. Arrays of particles act as diffraction gratings. Simple and inexpensive apparatus replaces high-magnification microscopes in measurements of diameters of small polystyrene latex spheres. Device being used to determine monodispersity and diameters of polystyrene latex microspheres used as seeding material for laser-velocimetry flow measurements in NASA's wind tunnels. Characterization of particle sizes important in wide range of fields, including manufacture of plastics and ceramics, biochemistry, and medicine.

  1. Characterization of an 8-cm Diameter Ion Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Hawk, C. W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Buttweiler, Mark S.; Williams, John D.; Buchholtz, Brett

    2005-01-01

    Results of tests characterizing an 8-cm diameter ion source are presented. The tests were conducted in three separate vacuum test facilities at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, Colorado State University, and L3 Communications' ETI division. Standard ion optics tests describing electron backstreaming and total-voltage-limited impingement current behavior as a function of beam current were used as guidelines for selecting operating conditions where more detailed ion beam measurements were performed. The ion beam was profiled using an in-vacuum actuating probe system to determine the total ion current density and the ion charge state distribution variation across the face of the ion source. Both current density and ExB probes were utilized. The ion current density data were used to obtain integrated beam current, beam flatness parameters, and general beam profile shapes. The ExB probe data were used to determine the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion current. The ion beam profile tests were performed at over six different operating points that spanned the expected operating range of the DAWN thrusters being developed at L3. The characterization tests described herein reveal that the 8-cm ion source is suitable for use in (a) validating plasma diagnostic equipment, (b) xenon ion sputtering and etching studies of spacecraft materials, (c) plasma physics research, and (d) the study of ion thruster optics at varying conditions.

  2. Sustainable yields from large diameter wells in shallow weathered aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, K. R.; de Silva, C. S.

    2016-08-01

    Large diameter wells in shallow weathered aquifers provide a valuable source of water for domestic and agricultural purposes in many locations including the Indian subcontinent. However, when used for irrigation, these wells often fail towards the end of the dry season. By considering two case studies in the dry and intermediate rainfall zones of Sri Lanka, reasons for the limited yield of these wells are identified. The first case study is concerned with a sloping catchment; a significant proportion of the precipitation during the rainy season either becomes runoff or passes down-gradient through the aquifer and is discharged at the ground surface. Furthermore, during the dry season, groundwater discharge continues. In the second case study the topography is generally flat but, even though the aquifer fills most years during the rainy season, there is often only sufficient water to irrigate about half of each farmer's holding. These investigations are based on field information and the development of conceptual and computational models. Of critical importance in assessing the long term yield of a well is the formation of a seepage face on the side of the well, with the water table a significant distance above the pumping water level. Consequently the water table may only be lowered to about half the depth of the well. The paper concludes with recommendations for the exploitation of groundwater from shallow weathered aquifers to minimise the risk of failure during the dry season.

  3. Aggregate Morphology Evolution by Sintering: Number & Diameter of Primary Particles

    PubMed Central

    Eggersdorfer, Max L.; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of fractal-like agglomerates (physically-bonded) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded) is important in aerosol synthesis of nanoparticles, and in monitoring combustion emissions and atmospheric particles. It influences also particle mobility, scattering, and eventually performance of nanocomposites, suspensions and devices made with such particles. Here, aggregate sintering by viscous flow of amorphous materials (silica, polymers) and grain boundary diffusion of crystalline ceramics (titania, alumina) or metals (Ni, Fe, Ag etc.) is investigated. A scaling law is found between average aggregate projected area and equivalent number of constituent primary particles during sintering: from fractal-like agglomerates to aggregates and eventually compact particles (e.g. spheres). This is essentially a relation independent of time, material properties and sintering mechanisms. It is used to estimate the equivalent primary particle diameter and number in aggregates. The evolution of aggregate morphology or structure is quantified by the effective fractal dimension (Df) and mass-mobility exponent (Dfm) and the corresponding prefactors. The Dfm increases monotonically during sintering converging to 3 for a compact particle. Therefore Dfm and its prefactor could be used to gauge the degree or extent of sintering of agglomerates made by a known collision mechanism. This analysis is exemplified by comparison to experiments of silver nanoparticle aggregates sintered at different temperatures in an electric tube furnace. PMID:23658467

  4. The holin of bacteriophage lambda forms rings with large diameter.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos G; Dewey, Jill S; Deaton, John; White, Rebecca L; Struck, Douglas K; Holzenburg, Andreas; Young, Rye

    2008-08-01

    Holins control the length of the infection cycle of tailed phages (the Caudovirales) by oligomerizing to form lethal holes in the cytoplasmic membrane at a time dictated by their primary structure. Nothing is currently known about the physical basis of their oligomerization or the structure of the oligomers formed by any known holin. Here we use electron microscopy and single-particle analysis to characterize structures formed by the bacteriophage lambda holin (S105) in vitro. In non-ionic or mild zwitterionic detergents, purified S105, but not the lysis-defective variant S105A52V, forms rings of at least two size classes, the most common having inner and outer diameters of 8.5 and 23 nm respectively, and containing approximately 72 S105 monomers. The height of these rings, 4 nm, closely matches the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The central channel is of unprecedented size for channels formed by integral membrane proteins, consistent with the non-specific nature of holin-mediated membrane permeabilization. S105 present in detergent-solubilized rings and in inverted membrane vesicles showed similar sensitivities to proteolysis and cysteine-specific modification, suggesting that the rings are representative of the lethal holes formed by S105 to terminate the infection cycle and initiate lysis.

  5. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Redmon, John W. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly (15) made of beams (18, 19, 20, 21) joined by a center box structure (23). The assembly (15) is adapted to be mounted by brackets (16) to the outer end of a cylindrical case (11). The center box structure (23) has a vertical shaft (25) rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly (15). Secured to the vertical shaft (25) is a radius arm (28) which is adapted to rotate with shaft (25). On the longer end of the radius arm (28) is a measuring tip (30) which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm (28). An electric servomotor (49) rotates the vertical shaft (25) and an electronic resolver (61) provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft (25). The electric signals are provided to a computer station (73) which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  6. Aggregate Morphology Evolution by Sintering: Number & Diameter of Primary Particles.

    PubMed

    Eggersdorfer, Max L; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-04-01

    The structure of fractal-like agglomerates (physically-bonded) and aggregates (chemically- or sinter-bonded) is important in aerosol synthesis of nanoparticles, and in monitoring combustion emissions and atmospheric particles. It influences also particle mobility, scattering, and eventually performance of nanocomposites, suspensions and devices made with such particles. Here, aggregate sintering by viscous flow of amorphous materials (silica, polymers) and grain boundary diffusion of crystalline ceramics (titania, alumina) or metals (Ni, Fe, Ag etc.) is investigated. A scaling law is found between average aggregate projected area and equivalent number of constituent primary particles during sintering: from fractal-like agglomerates to aggregates and eventually compact particles (e.g. spheres). This is essentially a relation independent of time, material properties and sintering mechanisms. It is used to estimate the equivalent primary particle diameter and number in aggregates. The evolution of aggregate morphology or structure is quantified by the effective fractal dimension (Df ) and mass-mobility exponent (Dfm ) and the corresponding prefactors. The Dfm increases monotonically during sintering converging to 3 for a compact particle. Therefore Dfm and its prefactor could be used to gauge the degree or extent of sintering of agglomerates made by a known collision mechanism. This analysis is exemplified by comparison to experiments of silver nanoparticle aggregates sintered at different temperatures in an electric tube furnace.

  7. Development of the 15 meter diameter hoop column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The building of a deployable 15-meter engineering model of the 100 meter antenna based on the point-design of an earlier task of this contract, complete with an RF-capable surface is described. The 15 meter diameter was selected so that the model could be tested in existing manufacturing, near-field RF, thermal vacuum, and structural dynamics facilities. The antenna was designed with four offset paraboloidal reflector surfaces with a focal length of 366.85 in and a primary surface accuracy goal of .069 in rms. Surface adjustment capability was provided by manually resetting the length of 96 surface control cords which emanated from the lower column extremity. A detailed description of the 15-meter Hoop/Column Antenna, major subassemblies, and a history of its fabrication, assembly, deployment testing, and verification measurements are given. The deviation for one aperture surface (except the outboard extremity) was measured after adjustments in follow-on tests at the Martin Marietta Near-field Facility to be .061 in; thus the primary surface goal was achieved.

  8. Multi-diameter silicon nanowires: Fabrication, characterization, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, Arif Sinan

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field offering novel devices for broad range of applications. Quantum effects and surface to volume ratio of nanostructures are strongly size dependent, and redefine material properties at nanoscale. Silicon is one of the most promising materials for next generation nanostructured transistors, photonics devices, Li-ion batteries, photovoltaic solar cells, and thermoelectric energy generators. Since electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of nanostructures strongly depend on their shape, size, periodicity, and crystal structure; it is crucial to control these parameters in order to optimize device performance for targeted applications. This dissertation is intended to develop a low-cost, low-temperature, high-throughput, and large-area nanowire fabrication method that can produce well-ordered arrays of hierarchical single-crystal silicon nanowires at large scale by using nanosphere lithography and metal-assisted chemical etching. Nanowire morphology was characterized by using scanning electron microscope and optical properties of nanowire arrays were modeled with the help of finite-difference-time domain method. These novel multi-diameter silicon nanowire arrays have the potential applications in many fields including but not limited to next generation nanowire solar cells to field ionization gas sensors.

  9. A 24mm diameter fibre positioner for spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörler, Philipp; Kronig, Luzius; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Bleuler, Hannes; Bouri, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    One of the big research topics in modern cosmology is the mystery of dark Energy. To unveil the secret, cosmologists want to measure precisely the evolution of large scale structures in the universe. One way of doing so is to measure the 3D location of a high number of galaxies. By measuring the redshift of a galaxy, it is possible to find its distance. In order to measure a high number of galaxies in a practical amount of time, we need to observe multiple objects in parallel. Instead of a spectrograph, thousands of optical fibres are placed in the focal plane of a telescope. They will transmit the light of many objects to a spectrograph. Each fibre has to be positioned to several μm precision in the focal plane of a telescope for each exposure. Each fibre is positioned by a 2-axis fibre positioner. In this paper such a fibre positioner with 24-mm diameter is presented. It is driven by two brushless DC motors in combination with a backlash free gearbox. The positioner has an optimal central fibre path and improved angular alignment. The fibre runs through the centre of the positioner and is only bent at the top to reach its target position. In this way, the flexion and torsion of the fibre are minimal. In addition to the high positioning accuracy, the design is optimized to allow a minimal tilt error of the fibre. This is demonstrated using a novel optical tilt measurement system.

  10. Cylindrical surface profile and diameter measuring tool and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, James R. (Inventor); Kissel, Ralph R. (Inventor); Smith, Earnest C. (Inventor); Oliver, Charles E. (Inventor); Redmon, John W., Sr. (Inventor); Wallace, Charles C. (Inventor); Swanson, Charles P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tool is shown having a cross beam assembly made of beams joined by a center box structure. The assembly is adapted to be mounted by brackets to the outer end of a cylindrical case. The center box structure has a vertical shaft rotatably mounted therein and extending beneath the assembly. Secured to the vertical shaft is a radius arm which is adapted to rotate with the shaft. On the longer end of the radius arm is a measuring tip which contacts the cylindrical surface to be measured and which provides an electric signal representing the radius of the cylindrical surface from the center of rotation of the radius arm. An electric servomotor rotates the vertical shaft and an electronic resolver provides an electric signal representing the angle of rotation of the shaft. The electric signals are provided to a computer station which has software for its computer to calculate and print out the continuous circumference profile of the cylindrical surface, and give its true diameter and the deviations from the ideal circle.

  11. Packed tower program eases calculations for diameter, hydraulics of towers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrarca, C.A.

    1986-04-14

    A packed tower program will calculate the diameter and hydraulics of a packed tower, or check the hydraulics of an existing tower for other process conditions. It is written in simple BASIC for an IBM PC and could easily be converted to other PC's. There are approximately 100 statement lines, with memory requirement of approximately 4,100 bytes. The program is presented as an aid, or tool, to reduce tedious calculations in design or revision work. Much has already been written on the specifics of design methods and calculation procedures for packed towers. This article will cover only the program's procedure and calculation method, input requirements, output data, and features. The program first transforms the raw data into consistent units. Gas flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the input of standard cubic feet per minute and specific gravity, or moles per hour and molecular weight. Liquid flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the gallons per minute and specific gravity input. Using the temperature, pressure, compressibility, and molecular weight inputs, the gas density in pounds per cubic foot is calculated from the ideal gas law equation. Liquid density is calculated directly from the specific gravity. With this data, the program then calculates the ''x'' ordinate of the generalized flooding correlation for packed towers. Using regressed design curves of X vs. Y, which somewhat parallel the flooding curve, the program calculates the Y abscissa function which relates liquid and gas densities, gas mass velocity, packing factor, gravitational constant, and liquid viscosity.

  12. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  13. Collagen fibril diameter and alignment promote the quiescent keratocyte phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Peng, Lily; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George R.; Desai, Tejal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how matrix nanotopography affects corneal fibroblast phenotype and matrix synthesis. To this end, corneal fibroblasts isolated from bovine corneas were grown on collagen nanofiber scaffolds of different diameters and alignment – 30 nm aligned fibrils (30A), 300 nm or larger aligned fibrils (300A), and 30 nm nonaligned fibrils (30NA) in comparison to collagen coated flat glass substrates (FC). Cell morphology was visualized using confocal microscopy. Quantitative PCR was used to measure expression levels of six target genes: the corneal crystallin - transketolase (TKT), the myofibroblast marker - α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and four matrix proteins - collagen 1 (COL1), collagen 3 (COL3), fibronectin (FN) and biglycan. It was found that SMA expression was down-regulated and TKT expression was increased on all three collagen nanofiber substrates, compared to the FC control substrates. However, COL3 and biglycan expression was also significantly increased on 300A, compared to the FC substrates. Thus matrix nanotopography down-regulates the fibrotic phenotype, promotes formation of the quiescent keratocyte phenotype and influences matrix synthesis. These results have significant implications for the engineering of corneal replacements and for promoting regenerative healing of the cornea after disease and/or injury. PMID:22213336

  14. Diameter-dependent wetting of tungsten disulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Goldbart, Ohad; Cohen, Sidney R; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Glazyrina, Polina; Wagner, H Daniel; Enyashin, Andrey; Tenne, Reshef

    2016-11-29

    The simple process of a liquid wetting a solid surface is controlled by a plethora of factors-surface texture, liquid droplet size and shape, energetics of both liquid and solid surfaces, as well as their interface. Studying these events at the nanoscale provides insights into the molecular basis of wetting. Nanotube wetting studies are particularly challenging due to their unique shape and small size. Nonetheless, the success of nanotubes, particularly inorganic ones, as fillers in composite materials makes it essential to understand how common liquids wet them. Here, we present a comprehensive wetting study of individual tungsten disulfide nanotubes by water. We reveal the nature of interaction at the inert outer wall and show that remarkably high wetting forces are attained on small, open-ended nanotubes due to capillary aspiration into the hollow core. This study provides a theoretical and experimental paradigm for this intricate problem.

  15. Variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for propane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, Frank E; Simon, Dorothy M

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made of the variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for quiescent propane with tube diameter for quiescent propane-air mixtures. Pressure limits were measured in glass tubes of six different inside diameters, with a precise apparatus. Critical diameters for flame propagation were calculated and the effect of pressure was determined. The critical diameters depended on the pressure to the -0.97 power for stoichiometric mixtures. The pressure dependence decreased with decreasing propane concentration. Critical diameters were related to quenching distance, flame speeds, and minimum ignition energy.

  16. Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering acts in a variety of ways to create a surprising range of scenery on small satellites and asteroids. The visible crater population is a self-modifying characteristic of these airless objects, and determining the various ways younger craters can add or subtract from the population is an important aspect of small body "geology." Asteroid 433 Eros, the most closely studied of any small body, has two aspects of its crater population that have attracted attention: a fall-off of crater densities below approx.100 m diameter relative to an expected equilibrium population [1] and regions of substantially lower large crater densities [2, 3, 4]. In this work we examine the global variation of the density of craters on Eros larger than 0.177 km, a size range above that involved in small crater depletion hypotheses [1, 5]. We counted all craters on Eros to a size range somewhat below 0.177 km diameter (and different from data used in [3]). The primary metric for this study is the number of craters between 0.177 and 1.0 km within a set radius of each grid point on the 2deg x 2deg shape model of Eros. This number can be expressed as an R-value [6], provided that it is remembered that the large bin size makes individual R values slightly different from those obtained in the usual root-2 bins.

  17. Saqqar: A 34 km diameter impact structure in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Afifi, Abdulkader M.; Stewart, Simon A.; Poelchau, Michael H.; Cook, Douglas J.; Neville, Allen S.

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the first proof of an impact origin for the Saqqar circular structure in northwestern Saudi Arabia (Neville et al. ), with an apparent diameter of 34 km, centered at 29°35'N, 38°42'E. The structure is formed in Cambrian-Devonian siliciclastics and is unconformably overlain by undeformed Cretaceous and Paleogene sediments. The age of impact is not well constrained and lies somewhere between 410 and 70 Ma. The subsurface structure is constrained by 2-D reflection seismic profiles and six drilled wells. First-order structural features are a central uplift that rises approximately 2 km above regional datums, surrounded by a ring syncline. The crater rim is defined by circumferential normal faults. The central uplift and ring syncline correspond to a Bouguer gravity high and an annular ring-like low, respectively. The wells were drilled within the central uplift, the deepest among them exceed 2 km depth. Sandstone core samples from these wells show abundant indicators of a shock metamorphic overprint. Planar deformation features (PDFs) were measured with orientations along (0001), {101¯3}, and less frequently along {101¯1} and {101¯4}. Planar fractures (PFs) predominantly occur along (0001) and {101¯1}, and are locally associated with feather features (FFs). In addition, some shocked feldspar grains and strongly deformed mica flakes were found. The recorded shock pressure ranges between 5 and 15 GPa. The preserved level of shock and the absence of an allochthonous crater fill suggest that Saqqar was eroded by 1-2 km between the Devonian and Maastrichtian. The documentation of unequivocal shock features proves the formation of the Saqqar structure by a hypervelocity impact event.

  18. Pore diameter effects on phase behavior of a gas condensate in graphitic one-and two-dimensional nanopores.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on a hydrocarbon mixture representing a typical gas condensate composed mostly of methane and other small molecules with small fractions of heavier hydrocarbons, representative of mixtures found in tight shale reservoirs. The fluid was examined both in bulk and confined to graphitic nano-scale slits and pores. Numerous widths and diameters of slits and pores respectively were examined under variable pressures at 300 K in order to find conditions in which the fluid at the center of the apertures would not be affected by capillary condensation due to the oil-wet walls. For the bulk fluid, retrograde phase behavior was verified by liquid volumes obtained from Voronoi tessellations. In cases of both one and two-dimensional confinement, for the smallest apertures, heavy molecules aggregated inside the pore space and compression of the gas outside the solid structure lead to decreases in density of the confined fluid. Normal density/pressure relationships were observed for slits having gaps of above 3 nm and pores having diameters above 6 nm. At 70 bar, the minimum gap width at which the fluid could pass through the center of slits without condensation effects was predicted to be 6 nm and the corresponding diameter in pores was predicted to be 8 nm. The models suggest that in nanoscale networks involving pores smaller than these limiting dimensions, capillary condensation should significantly impede transmission of natural gases with similar composition.

  19. Protein Adsorption From Biofluids on Silica Nanoparticles: Corona Analysis as a Function of Particle Diameter and Porosity

    PubMed Central

    Clemments, Alden M.; Botella, Pablo; Landry, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    A study on the adsorption of proteins from fetal bovine serum (FBS) on spherical dense and mesoporous silica nanoparticles with a wide range of diameters, from 70 to 900 nm, is presented. Monodisperse populations of particles with a range of diameters were obtained through modifications of the Stöber method. Extensive characterization of the particles was then performed using N2 physisorption, TEM, DLS, and ζ-potential. Following serum exposure, proteomic evaluation in concert with thermogravimetric analysis revealed the associated concentrations of each protein identified in the hard corona. Small particles adsorbed the largest amount of protein, due to their larger external surface area. Proteins with low molecular weights (<50 kDa) composed the majority of the protein corona, totaling between 60 and 80 % of the total mass of adsorbed protein. Here, the higher surface curvature of small particles favors the enrichment of smaller proteins. Porosity does not promote protein adsorption, but improves deposition of the low molecular weight protein fraction due to the size exclusion effect related to pore diameter. These results have important implications for the use of dense and porous silica nanoparticles in biomedical applications. PMID:26371804

  20. Preparation of PCDTBT nanofibers with a diameter of 20 nm and their application to air-processed organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Yang, Seung Jae; Kim, Sung Kyun; Choi, Hong Soo; Park, Chong Rae

    2014-03-07

    A strategy for fabricating organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on PCDTBT nanofibers and PC70BM is described. Electrospinning techniques are used to prepare PCDTBT nanofibers and OPV devices in ambient air. The diameters of the PCDTBT nanofibers are approximately twice the exciton diffusion length, 20 nm. The active layer exhibits 100% photoluminescence quenching due to the small nanofiber diameter, indicating that the excitons are efficiently dissociated. The electrospun PCDTBT nanofibers absorb more photons at longer wavelengths, leading to improved photon harvesting. OPV devices composed of PCDTBT nanofibers show a high short circuit current of 11.54 mA cm(-2) and a high power conversion efficiency of 5.82%. The increase in the short circuit current is attributed to enhanced photon harvesting and charge transport. This method may be applied to the fabrication, in ambient air, of large-area active layers composed of other new conjugated polymers to yield high-performance OPV devices.

  1. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldpausch, T. R.; Banin, L.; Phillips, O. L.; Baker, T. R.; Lewis, S. L.; Quesada, C. A.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arets, E. J. M. M.; Berry, N. J.; Bird, M.; Brondizio, E. S.; de Camargo, P.; Chave, J.; Djagbletey, G.; Domingues, T. F.; Drescher, M.; Fearnside, P. M.; França, M. B.; Fyllas, N. M.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Hladik, A.; Higuchi, N.; Hunter, M. O.; Iida, Y.; Salim, K. A.; Kassim, A. R.; Keller, M.; Kemp, J.; King, D. A.; Lovett, J. C.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Lenza, E.; Marshall, A. R.; Metcalfe, D. J.; Mitchard, E. T. A.; Moran, E. F.; Nelson, B. W.; Nilus, R.; Nogueira, E. M.; Palace, M.; Patiño, S.; Peh, K. S.-H.; Raventos, M. T.; Reitsma, J. M.; Saiz, G.; Schrodt, F.; Sonké, B.; Taedoumg, H. E.; Tan, S.; White, L.; Wöll, H.; Lloyd, J.

    2011-05-01

    Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D) relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurrent H and D measurements encompassing 283 sites in 22 tropical countries. Utilising this database, our objectives were: 1. to determine if H:D relationships differ by geographic region and forest type (wet to dry forests, including zones of tension where forest and savanna overlap). 2. to ascertain if the H:D relationship is modulated by climate and/or forest structural characteristics (e.g. stand-level basal area, A). 3. to develop H:D allometric equations and evaluate biases to reduce error in future local-to-global estimates of tropical forest biomass. Annual precipitation coefficient of variation (PV), dry season length (SD), and mean annual air temperature (TA) emerged as key drivers of variation in H:D relationships at the pantropical and region scales. Vegetation structure also played a role with trees in forests of a high A being, on average, taller at any given D. After the effects of environment and forest structure are taken into account, two main regional groups can be identified. Forests in Asia, Africa and the Guyana Shield all have, on average, similar H:D relationships, but with trees in the forests of much of the Amazon Basin and tropical Australia typically being shorter at any given D than their counterparts elsewhere. The region-environment-structure model with the lowest Akaike's information criterion and lowest deviation estimated stand-level H across all plots to within amedian -2.7 to 0.9% of the true value. Some of the plot-to-plot variability in H:D relationships not accounted for by this model could be attributed to variations in soil physical conditions. Other things being equal, trees tend to be more slender in the absence of soil physical

  2. Height-diameter allometry of tropical forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldpausch, T. R.; Banin, L.; Phillips, O. L.; Baker, T. R.; Lewis, S. L.; Quesada, C. A.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arets, E. J. M. M.; Berry, N. J.; Bird, M.; Brondizio, E. S.; de Camargo, P.; Chave, J.; Djagbletey, G.; Domingues, T. F.; Drescher, M.; Fearnside, P. M.; França, M. B.; Fyllas, N. M.; Lopez-Gonzalez, G.; Hladik, A.; Higuchi, N.; Hunter, M. O.; Iida, Y.; Abu Silam, K.; Kassim, A. R.; Keller, M.; Kemp, J.; King, D. A.; Lovett, J. C.; Marimon, B. S.; Marimon-Junior, B. H.; Lenza, E.; Marshall, A. R.; Metcalfe, D. J.; Mitchard, E. T. A.; Moran, E. F.; Nelson, B. W.; Nilus, R.; Nogueira, E. M.; Palace, M.; Patiño, S.; Peh, K. S.-H.; Raventos, M. T.; Reitsma, J. M.; Saiz, G.; Schrodt, F.; Sonké, B.; Taedoumg, H. E.; Tan, S.; White, L.; Wöll, H.; Lloyd, J.

    2010-10-01

    Tropical tree height-diameter (H:D) relationships may vary by forest type and region making large-scale estimates of above-ground biomass subject to bias if they ignore these differences in stem allometry. We have therefore developed a new global tropical forest database consisting of 39 955 concurrent H and D measurements encompassing 283 sites in 22 tropical countries. Utilising this database, our objectives were: 1. to determine if H:D relationships differ by geographic region and forest type (wet to dry forests, including zones of tension where forest and savanna overlap). 2. to ascertain if the H:D relationship is modulated by climate and/or forest structural characteristics (e.g. stand-level basal area, A). 3. to develop H:D allometric equations and evaluate biases to reduce error in future local-to-global estimates of tropical forest biomass. Annual precipitation coefficient of variation (PV), dry season length (SD), and mean annual air temperature (TA) emerged as key drivers of variation in H:D relationships at the pantropical and region scales. Vegetation structure also played a role with trees in forests of a high A being, on average, taller at any given D. After the effects of environment and forest structure are taken into account, two main regional groups can be identified. Forests in Asia, Africa and the Guyana Shield all have, on average, similar H:D relationships, but with trees in the forests of much of the Amazon Basin and tropical Australia typically being shorter at any given D than their counterparts elsewhere. The region-environment-structure model with the lowest Akaike's information criterion and lowest deviation estimated stand-level H across all plots to within a median -2.7 to 0.9% of the true value. Some of the plot-to-plot variability in H:D relationships not accounted for by this model could be attributed to variations in soil physical conditions. Other things being equal, trees tend to be more slender in the absence of soil physical

  3. The diameter of the CoRoT target HD 49933. Combining the 3D limb darkening, asteroseismology, and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, L.; Mourard, D.; Berio, P.; Thévenin, F.; Ligi, R.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Chesneau, O.; Delaa, O.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Stee, Ph.; Boyajian, T.; Morel, P.; Pichon, B.; Kervella, P.; Schmider, F. X.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Ridgway, S. T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of θLD = 0.445 ± 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 ± 0.04 R⊙. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 ± 0.08 M⊙ and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 ± 100 K, log g = 4.21 ± 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.

  4. 75 FR 38989 - Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... International Trade Administration Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan: Notice of Rescission of... diameter line pipe from Japan. The review covers 4 producers/exporters of welded large diameter line pipe from Japan, which are, JFE Steel Corporation, Nippon Steel Corporation, Sumitomo Corporation,...

  5. 78 FR 60897 - Certain Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1... the antidumping duty order on certain welded large diameter line pipe from Japan would likely to lead... Certain Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe from Japan: Investigation No. 731-TA-919 (Second Review). By...

  6. 77 FR 30260 - Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Welded Large Diameter Line Pipe From Japan: Notice... antidumping duty order on welded large diameter line pipe from Japan. The review covers five producers/exporters of welded large diameter line pipe from Japan, which are, JFE Steel Corporation, Nippon...

  7. 15 CFR 241.4 - Application of tolerance for “diameter of head.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of head.â 241.4 Section 241.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... tolerance for “diameter of head.” (a) The tolerance established in this part for the dimension specified as “diameter of head” shall be applied to the diameter of the head over all, including the part which fits...

  8. 15 CFR 241.4 - Application of tolerance for “diameter of head.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of head.â 241.4 Section 241.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... tolerance for “diameter of head.” (a) The tolerance established in this part for the dimension specified as “diameter of head” shall be applied to the diameter of the head over all, including the part which fits...

  9. 15 CFR 241.4 - Application of tolerance for “diameter of head.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of head.â 241.4 Section 241.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... tolerance for “diameter of head.” (a) The tolerance established in this part for the dimension specified as “diameter of head” shall be applied to the diameter of the head over all, including the part which fits...

  10. 15 CFR 241.4 - Application of tolerance for “diameter of head.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of head.â 241.4 Section 241.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... tolerance for “diameter of head.” (a) The tolerance established in this part for the dimension specified as “diameter of head” shall be applied to the diameter of the head over all, including the part which fits...

  11. Diameter and chiral angle distribution dependencies on the carbon precursors in surface-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Lehtonen, Juha

    2012-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes grown from discrete Fe-containing nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride transmission electron microscope grid were systematically studied. The (n,m) indices of produced single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were deduced from their electron diffraction patterns. Relatively small diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution (0.7-1.6 nm) were produced using CO as the carbon source at 800 °C, while large diameter SWNTs ranging from 1.0 nm to 4.7 nm were synthesized when using CH4 as the carbon source. The chiral angle distributions of the SWNTs produced from different carbon sources are also different, which are attributed to the preferred cap nucleation associated with the carbon feed rate on the catalyst instead of carbon nanotube growth kinetics. Furthermore, growth of carbon laminar nanoclusters inside carbon nanotubes was achieved at a higher growth temperature, suggesting that dissociated carbon diffuses across the nanoparticle during the nanotube growth process.Carbon nanotubes grown from discrete Fe-containing nanoparticles dispersed on a silicon nitride transmission electron microscope grid were systematically studied. The (n,m) indices of produced single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were deduced from their electron diffraction patterns. Relatively small diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution (0.7-1.6 nm) were produced using CO as the carbon source at 800 °C, while large diameter SWNTs ranging from 1.0 nm to 4.7 nm were synthesized when using CH4 as the carbon source. The chiral angle distributions of the SWNTs produced from different carbon sources are also different, which are attributed to the preferred cap nucleation associated with the carbon feed rate on the catalyst instead of carbon nanotube growth kinetics. Furthermore, growth of carbon laminar nanoclusters inside carbon nanotubes was achieved at a higher growth temperature, suggesting that dissociated carbon diffuses across the nanoparticle during the

  12. Axonal diameter and density estimated with 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging in transgenic Alzheimer rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jacobs, Russell E.; Town, Terrence; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool to study brain tissue microstructure. DWI is sensitive to subtle changes in the white matter (WM), and can provide insight into abnormal brain changes in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we used 7-Tesla hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) to scan 3 transgenic rats (line TgF344-AD; that model the full clinico-pathological spectrum of the human disease) ex vivo at 10, 15 and 24 months. We acquired 300 DWI volumes across 5 q-sampling shells (b=1000, 3000, 4000, 8000, 12000 s/mm2). From the top three b-value shells with highest signal-to-noise ratios, we reconstructed markers of WM disease, including indices of axon density and diameter in the corpus callosum (CC) - directly quantifying processes that occur in AD. As expected, apparent anisotropy progressively decreased with age; there were also decreases in the intra- and extra-axonal MR signal along axons. Axonal diameters were larger in segments of the CC (splenium and body, but not genu), possibly indicating neuritic dystrophy - characterized by enlarged axons and dendrites as previously observed at the ultrastructural level (see Cohen et al., J. Neurosci. 2013). This was further supported by increases in MR signals trapped in glial cells, CSF and possibly other small compartments in WM structures. Finally, tractography detected fewer fibers in the CC at 10 versus 24 months of age. These novel findings offer great potential to provide technical and scientific insight into the biology of brain disease.

  13. 24-gauge ultrafine cryoprobe with diameter of 550 μm and its cooling performance.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel cryoprobe with the same size as a 24-gauge injection needle and the evaluation of its cooling performance. This ultrafine cryoprobe was designed to reduce the invasiveness and extend application areas of cryosurgery. The ultrafine cryoprobe has a double-tube structure and consists of two stainless steel microtubes. The outer diameter of the cryoprobe is 550 μm, and the inner tube has a 70-μm inner diameter to depressurize the high-pressure refrigerant. By solving the bioheat transfer equation and considering freezing phenomena, the relationship between the size of the frozen region and the heat transfer coefficient of the refrigerant flow in an ultrafine cryoprobe was derived analytically. The results showed that the size of the frozen region is strongly affected by the heat transfer coefficient. A high heat transfer coefficient such as that of phase change heat transfer is required to generate a frozen region of sufficient size. In the experiment, trifluoromethane (HFC-23) was used as the refrigerant, and the cooling effects of the gas and liquid phase states at the inlet were evaluated. When the ultrafine cryoprobe was cooled using a liquid refrigerant, the surface temperature was approximately -50°C, and the temperature distribution on the surface was uniform for a thermally insulated condition. However, for the case with vaporized refrigerant, the temperature distribution was not uniform. Therefore, it was concluded that the cooling mechanism using liquid refrigerant was suitable for ultrafine cryoprobes. Furthermore, to simulate cryosurgery, a cooling experiment using hydrogel was conducted. The results showed that the surface temperature of the ultrafine cryoprobe reached -35°C and formed a frozen region with a radius of 4 mm in 4 min. These results indicate that the ultrafine cryoprobe can be applied in actual cryosurgeries for small affected areas.

  14. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  15. Pseudomagnitudes and differential surface brightness: Application to the apparent diameter of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelli, Alain; Duvert, Gilles; Bourgès, Laurent; Mella, Guillaume; Lafrasse, Sylvain; Bonneau, Daniel; Chesneau, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The diameter of a star is a major observable that serves to test the validity of stellar structure theories. It is also a difficult observable that is mostly obtained with indirect methods since the stars are so remote. Today only ~600 apparent star diameters have been measured by direct methods: optical interferometry and lunar occultations. Accurate star diameters are now required in the new field of exoplanet studies, since they condition the planets' sizes in transit observations, and recent publications illustrate a visible renewal of interest in this topic. Our analysis is based on the modeling of the relationship between measured angular diameters and photometries. It makes use of two new reddening-free concepts: a distance indicator called pseudomagnitude, and a quasi-experimental observable that is independent of distance and specific to each star, called the differential surface brightness (DSB). The use of all the published measurements of apparent diameters that have been collected so far, and a careful modeling of the DSB allow us to estimate star diameters with a median statistical error of 1.1%, knowing their spectral type and, in the present case, the VJHKs photometries. We introduce two catalogs, the JMMC Measured Diameters Catalog (JMDC), containing measured star diameters, and the second version of the JMMC Stellar Diameter Catalog (JSDC), augmented to about 453 000 star diameters. Finally, we provide simple formulas and a table of coefficients to quickly estimate stellar angular diameters and associated errors from (V, Ks) magnitudes and spectral types.

  16. In vitro and in vivo study of He + ion irradiated collagen for development of small diameter stent graft material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Iwaki, M.; Takahashi, N.; Yotoriyama, T.; Kurotobi, K.; Ujiie, H.; Hori, T.

    2005-05-01

    Recently, stent graft technology for endovascular treatment of aortic dissections has made tremendous advances. It is now possible to apply this minimally invasive technique to a wider range of pathology. The aim of this study was to develop anti-thrombogenic coronary stent and graft materials using ion-beam technology. Our previous study indicted that collagen surfaces irradiated with He + ion at a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 have excellent blood compatibility. The ion-beam-irradiated collagen grafts demonstrated a high anti-thrombogenicity and graft patency. 150 keV-He +-irradiated collagen with a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 has the properties of anti-thrombogenicity and cell attachment. In vitro plasma protein adsorption was evaluated to investigate the mechanisms of anti-thrombogenicity of these surfaces. From these results, anti-thrombogenicity of the He +-irradiated collagen was caused by the reduction of the plasma protein adsorption, such as fibrinogen or von Willebrand factor, by ion-beam irradiation. Japanese white rabbits weighing 3-4.5 kg were used in this animal study. Collagen-coated graft material implanted with He + ions at a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions/cm 2 exhibited excellent anti-thrombogenicity and demonstrated patency for one year.

  17. 76 FR 56397 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ...,'' dated June 29, 2011 (``Wage Rate Memorandum''), for use in these final results. We did not receive... China: Analysis of the Final Results Margin Calculation for Fushun Jinly Petrochemical Carbon Co., Ltd.... (``Muzi Carbon'') met the criteria for separate rate status.\\9\\ We have not received any information...

  18. [First time revealed small formations of lungs (under 2 cm in diameter). Dynamic follow-up or surgery?

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Yu V; Rybin, V K

    Введение. Патологические образования легких малого размера (до 2 см) в подавляющем большинстве случаев выявляются при проведении компьютерной томографии грудной клетки, выполняемой по различным причинам. Обнаруженные при таком обследовании очаговые образования в легочной ткани нередко остаются без внимания специалистов, что порой влечет за собой неутешительные результаты лечения данной категории больных. Угрожающим фактором в диагностике опухолей легких малого диаметра является их бессимптомность. Цель. Разработать алгоритм лечения у больных с выявленными образованиями легких до 2 см в диаметре. Материал и методы. Работа основана на результатах обследования и лечения 110 больных с патологическими образованиями легких малого диаметра, находившихся в Клинике факультетской хирургии им. Н.Н. Бурденко с 1997 по 2013 г. Всем пациентам были выполнены операции удаления участков легочной ткани из различных операционных доступов: 44 видеоторакоскопические резекции легкого, 43 миниторакотомии с видео сопровождением, 23 миниторакотомии. Результаты. У 25 пациентов был выявлен рак легкого, у 38 — доброкачественные опухоли (гамартомы и туберкуломы), у 10 больных — диссеминированный туберкулез, что потребовало незамедлительного лечения в специализированных стационарах. Вывод. При малых размерах образований (от 0,5 до 2 см) показано удаление их без морфологического подтверждения диагноза до операции. Оптимальный оперативный доступ для хирургического лечения пациентов с опухолями легких малого размера следует выбирать в зависимости от диаметра и количества патологических образований. При единичной опухоли легкого размером менее 0,5 см, впервые выявленной при компьютерной томографии, наиболее целесообразной тактикой будет динамическое наблюдение больного и проведение контрольной компьютерной томографии через 3—6—12 мес.

  19. 77 FR 50465 - Certain Small Diameter Carbon and Alloy Seamless Standard, Line and Pressure Pipe From Romania...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... of review (POR) is August 1, 2010, through July 31, 2011. We preliminarily determine that AMTP did... COP and, in addition, such sales did not provide for the recovery of costs within a reasonable period... activities associated with all sales through this channel of distribution did not differ. We found...

  20. Harvesting Overstocked Stands of Small Diameter Trees. Report No. 5: Energy Value of Whole-Trees and Crowns.

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, James O.

    1987-07-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the higher heating value of whole-tree chips and crown materials for species being harvested in the doghair stands on the Quilcene Ranger district, Olympic National Forest. Values, in terms of Btu's per oven dry pound, were derived for the three major species occurring in these stands: western hemlock, Douglas-fir, and western redcedar. Hogfuel derived from these stands comes from whole-tree chipping and crown materials created during the delimbing/debarking process. Since hogfuel may be created separately from these two sources it is important that their energy values are known. Separation of species is not done during whole-tree chipping, thus a composite value of hogfuel from this source was determined. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  1. The transition between stratified and annular regimes for horizontal two-phase flow in small diameter tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Galbiati, L.; Andreini, P. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper a modification to the model of Taitel and Dukler to include the effect of surface tension in transition between stratified and annular regimes is proposed. The predictions of the modified theory given in this paper are compared with empirical boundaries presented in literature. A good agreement has been found.

  2. Impact of Screening on Behavior During Storage and Cost of Ground Small-Diameter Pine Trees: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Erin Searcy; Brad D Blackwelder; Mark E Delwiche; Allison E Ray; Kevin L Kenney

    2011-10-01

    Whole comminuted trees are known to self-heat and undergo quality changes during storage. Trommel screening after grinding is a process that removes fines from the screened material and removes a large proportion of high-ash, high-nutrient material. In this study, the trade-off between an increase in preprocessing cost from trommel screening and an increase in quality of the screened material was examined. Fresh lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) was comminuted using a drum grinder with a 10-cm screen, and the resulting material was distributed into separate fines and overs piles. A third pile of unscreened material, the unsorted pile, was also examined. The three piles exhibited different characteristics during a 6-week storage period. The overs pile was much slower to heat. The overs pile reached a maximum temperature of 56.88 degrees C, which was lower than the maximum reached by the other two piles (65.98 degrees C and 63.48 degrees C for the unsorted and fines, respectively). The overs also cooled faster and dried to a more uniform moisture content and had a lower ash content than the other two piles. Both piles of sorted material exhibited improved airflow and more drying than the unsorted material. Looking at supply system costs from preprocessing through in-feed into thermochemical conversion, this study found that trommel screening reduced system costs by over $3.50 per dry matter ton and stabilized material during storage.

  3. The Effects of a Hydrogen Environment on the Lifetime of Small-Diameter Drift Chamber Anode Wires

    SciTech Connect

    King, J; Smith, T; Kunkle, J; Castelaz, J; Thomson, S; Burstein, Z; Bernstein, A; Rosenberg, L; Hefner, M

    2005-04-29

    Possible deterioration of anode sense wires used in a hydrogen-filled neutron detector is investigated. Wires were loaded with free weights and put into a wire detector environment. Stainless Steel, Tungsten, and Platinum wires did not break after exposure to charge equivalent to many wire lifetimes. Furthermore, exposure to hydrogen gas caused no noticeable surface degradation or change in wire yield strength.

  4. Multivariate multiscale complex network analysis of vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow in a small diameter pipe

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Yu-Xuan; Zhai, Lu-Sheng; Dang, Wei-Dong; Yu, Jia-Liang; Jin, Ning-De

    2016-01-01

    High water cut and low velocity vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow is a typical complex system with the features of multiscale, unstable and non-homogenous. We first measure local flow information by using distributed conductance sensor and then develop a multivariate multiscale complex network (MMCN) to reveal the dispersed oil-in-water local flow behavior. Specifically, we infer complex networks at different scales from multi-channel measurements for three typical vertical oil-in-water flow patterns. Then we characterize the generated multiscale complex networks in terms of network clustering measure. The results suggest that the clustering coefficient entropy from the MMCN not only allows indicating the oil-in-water flow pattern transition but also enables to probe the dynamical flow behavior governing the transitions of vertical oil-water two-phase flow. PMID:26833427

  5. 77 FR 15042 - Small Diameter Graphite Electrodes From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ...''); Beijing Fangda Carbon Tech Co., Ltd. (``Beijing Fangda''), Fangda Carbon New Material Co., Ltd. (``Fangda... Tech Co., Ltd., Fangda Carbon New 1.10 Material Co., Ltd., Fushun Carbon Co., Ltd., Hefei Carbon...

  6. Improvement of the Output Characteristics of a Relativistic Magnetron using a Small Diameter Cathode Surrounded by a Transparent Cathode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    frequency Ve "t Vph in the total interaction space when the gap o, = dv,/dr, which is approximately equal to frequency between electrodes is narrow [1, 2...techniques of factors can promote synchronism in the wider interaction cathode [7] and magnetic [8] priming alone. space: i) stronger space charge and

  7. Electrospinning of nanofibers: Analysis of diameter distribution and process dynamics for control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xuri

    Electrospinning employs electrostatic force to stretch a charged polymer solution jet and is capable of producing submicron diameter fibers. There has been considerable interest in electrospun fibers due to the ease with which nanometer-scale fibers can be produced from a wide range of polymers. In many applications, the average electrospun fiber diameter and its uniformity have important implications for the product's performance and process economics. Thus, it is desirable to develop electrospinning capability to achieve consistent and controllable fiber diameters. However, the current state-of-the-art electrospinning process results in varying diameter both during a run and runto-run. In addition, the relations of the process and material parameters to the resulting fiber diameter characteristics are not completely understood. This research focuses on understanding what determines the fiber diameter distribution and developing the knowledge base for design of a fiber diameter control system in order to achieve a consistent and repeatable process. The effects of operating parameters on process variability and resulting fiber diameter distribution are investigated. Different operating regimes are determined based on the Taylor cone behaviors and fluctuations. A minimal jet fluctuation regime is identified which helps select appropriate operating conditions. The role of solvent evaporation in fiber spinning process is analyzed. Fiber diameter becomes smaller when solvent evaporation happens more slowly. The effect of ambient humidity on fiber formation by using aqueous PEO solutions is studied. For aqueous PEO solutions, the relative humidity is found to significantly affect fiber diameters and formation. The correlations between several measurable variables such as straight jet diameter and bending angle to the resulting fiber diameter are established and able to predict the resulting fiber diameter. The fundamental process dynamics are identified by step

  8. Nonmonotonic Diameter Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Extremely Thin Si Nanowires: Competition between Hydrodynamic Phonon Flow and Boundary Scattering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming

    2017-02-08

    By carefully and systematically performing Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we report that the thermal conductivity (κ) of Si nanowires (NWs) does not diverge but converges and increases steeply when NW diameter (D) becomes extremely small (dκ/dD < 0), a long debate of one-dimensional heat conduction in history. The κ of the thinnest possible Si NWs reaches a superhigh level that is as large as more than 1 order of magnitude higher than its bulk counterpart. The abnormality is explained in terms of the dominant normal (N) process (energy and momentum conservation) of low frequency acoustic phonons that induces hydrodynamic phonon flow in the Si NWs without being scattered. With D increasing, the downward shift of optical phonons triggers strong Umklapp (U) scattering with acoustic phonons and attenuates the N process, leading to the regime of phonon boundary scattering (dκ/dD < 0). The two competing mechanisms result in nonmonotonic diameter dependence of κ with minima at critical diameter of 2-3 nm. Our results unambiguously demonstrate the converged κ and the clear trend of κ ∼ D for extremely thin Si NWs by fully elucidating the competition between the hydrodynamic phonon flow and phonon boundary scattering.

  9. The Triaxial Ellipsoid Diameters and Rotational Pole of Asteroid (9) Metis from AO at Gemini and Keck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Merline, W. J.; Conrad, A.; Dumas, C.; Tamblyn, P.; Christou, J.; Carry, B.; Chapman, C.

    2012-10-01

    From Adaptive Optics (AO) images of (9) Metis at 14 epochs over 2008 December 8 and 9 at Gemini North, triaxial ellipsoid diameters of 218x175x112 km are derived with fitting uncertainties of 3x3x47 km. However, by including just two more AO images from Keck-II in June and August of 2003 in a global fit, the fitting uncertainty of the small axis drops by more than a third because of the lower sub-Earth latitude afforded in 2003 (-28°) compared to 2008 (+47°), and the triaxial ellipsoid diameters become 218x175x129 km with fitting uncertainties of 3x3x14 km. We have estimated the systematic uncertainty of our method to be 4.1, 2.7, and 3.8%, respectively, for the three diameters. These values were recently derived (Drummond et al., in prep) from a comparison of KOALA (Carry et al, Planetary and Space Science 66, 200-212) and our triaxial ellipsoid analysis of four asteroids. Quadratically adding this systematic error with the fitting error, the total uncertainty for Metis becomes 9x5x15 km. Concurrently, we find an EQJ2000 rotational pole at [RA; Dec]=[185° +19°] or in ecliptic coordinates, [λ ; β ]=[176° +20°] (ECJ2000).

  10. Substrate diameter and compliance affect the gripping strategies and locomotor mode of climbing boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C

    2010-12-15

    Arboreal habitats pose unique challenges for locomotion as a result of their narrow cylindrical surfaces and discontinuities between branches. Decreased diameter of branches increases compliance, which can pose additional challenges, including effects on stability and energy damping. However, the combined effects of substrate diameter and compliance are poorly understood for any animal. We quantified performance, kinematics and substrate deformation while boa constrictors (Boa constrictor) climbed vertical ropes with three diameters (3, 6 and 9 mm) and four tensions (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 body weights). Mean forward velocity decreased significantly with both decreased diameter and increased compliance. Both diameter and compliance had numerous effects on locomotor kinematics, but diameter had larger and more pervasive effects than compliance. Locomotion on the largest diameter had a larger forward excursion per cycle, and the locomotor mode and gripping strategy differed from that on the smaller diameters. On larger diameters, snakes primarily applied opposing forces at the same location on the rope to grip. By contrast, on smaller diameters forces were applied in opposite directions at different locations along the rope, resulting in increased rope deformation. Although energy is likely to be lost during deformation, snakes might use increased surface deformation as a strategy to enhance their ability to grip.

  11. Preparation of small bio-compatible microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such a hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  12. Evaluation function of drinking ease from aluminum beverage bottles relative to optimum bottle opening diameter and beverage type.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Takanori; Yamazaki, Koetsu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, aluminum beverage bottles having screw tops with opening diameters of 28 and 38 mm have been launched in the Japanese market in keeping with the modern-day drinking habits of consumers. Although Japanese consumers are familiar with such bottles, a majority of them feel that the 28 mm opening is too small and the 38 mm opening is too large. Therefore, we felt the need to develop a method for evaluating consumer feelings when they drink a beverage directly from the bottle opening. For this purpose, we propose an evaluation function of drinking ease that calculates the optimum opening diameter of the bottle. From results of our previous study, we know that there exists an ideal volume of beverage flowing into the mouth, at which consumers feel most comfortable while drinking directly from bottles. Therefore, we define the evaluation function of drinking ease in terms of the difference between the actual volume of fluid in the mouth and the expected ideal volume. If this difference is small, consumers probably feel comfortable while drinking the beverage. We consider a design variable, i.e., the opening diameter, and two state variables, i.e., the volume of beverage remaining in the bottle and the height of consumers, and construct the response surface of the evaluation function by using radial basis function networks. In addition, for investigating the influence of beverage type on the evaluation function, we select green tea and a carbonated beverage (Coke) as test beverages. Results of optimization of the proposed function show that when the opening diameters are 35.4 mm and 34.4 mm in the case of green tea and Coke, respectively, the actual volume of fluid in the mouth is closest to the ideal volume and the participants feel most comfortable. These results are in agreement with results of our previous study that an opening diameter of 33 mm is optimum for young Japanese adults. Thus, we confirm that the proposed function is accurate; it can be used

  13. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    - and large-diameter cast iron repair robots to assure their commercial success. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module in the last quarter 5. In this quarter, work has been concentrated on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) it was observed that it will be necessary to add a stiff brush to push debris away from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints in mains having low gas velocities. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (which were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) simply falls to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak free repair. Similarly, it is also necessary to design a small magnet to capture existing service tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. These new features require redesign of the pipe wall cleaning train and modification to the patch setting train. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. However, this must now be re-visited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design

  14. Inner capillary diameter of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of female rat increases during lactation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of the endothelial cell (EC) in blood flow regulation within the central nervous system has been little studied. Here, we explored EC participation in morphological changes of the anterior hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) microvasculature of female rats at two reproductive stages with different metabolic demand (virginity and lactation). We measured the inner capillary diameter (ICD) of 800 capillaries from either the magnocellular or parvocellular regions. The space occupied by neural (somas, dendrites and axons) and glial, but excluding vascular elements of the neurovascular compartment was also measured in 100-μm2 sample fields of both PVN subdivisions. Results The PVN of both groups of animals showed ICDs that ranged from 3 to 10 microns. The virgin group presented mostly capillaries with small ICD, whereas the lactating females exhibited a significant increment in the percentage of capillaries with larger ICD. The space occupied by the neural and glial elements of the neurovascular compartment did not show changes with lactation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that during lactation the microvasculature of the PVN of female rats undergoes dynamic, transitory changes in blood flow as represented by an increment in the ICD through a self-cytoplasmic volume modification reflected by EC changes. A model of this process is proposed. PMID:23302443

  15. Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

  16. 50 mm Diameter digital DC/pulse neutron generator for subcritical reactor test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhong-Shuai; Chi, Qian; Liu, Lin-Mao

    2012-11-01

    A 50 mm diameter digital DC/pulse neutron generator was developed with 25 mm ceramic drive-in target neutron tube. It was applied in the subcritical reactor test of China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The generator can produce neutron in three modes: DC, pulse and multiple pulse. The maximum neutron yield of the generator is 1 × 108 n/s, while the maximum pulse frequency is 10 kHz, and the minimum pulse width is 10 μs. As a remote controlled generator, it is small in volume, easy to be connected and controlled. The tested results indicate that penning ion source has the feature of delay time in glow discharge, and it is easier for glow discharge to happen when switching the DC voltage of penning ion source into pulse. According to these two characteristics, the generator has been modified. This improved generator can be used in many other areas including Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA), neutron testing and experiment.

  17. Analysis of the Effect of Osteon Diameter on the Potential Relationship of Osteocyte Lacuna Density and Osteon Wall Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Skedros, John G.; Clark, Gunnar C.; Sorenson, Scott M.; Taylor, Kevin W.; Qiu, Shijing

    2011-01-01

    An important hypothesis is that the degree of infilling of secondary osteons (Haversian systems) is controlled by the inhibitory effect of osteocytes on osteoblasts, which might be mediated by sclerostin (a glycoprotein produced by osteocytes). Consequently, this inhibition could be proportional to cell number: relatively greater repression is exerted by progressively greater osteocyte density (increased osteocytes correlate with thinner osteon walls). This hypothesis has been examined, but only weakly supported, in sheep ulnae. We looked for this inverse relationship between osteon wall thickness (On.W.Th) and osteocyte lacuna density (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar) in small and large osteons in human ribs, calcanei of sheep, deer, elk, and horses, and radii and third metacarpals of horses. Analyses involved: (1) all osteons, (2) smaller osteons, either ≤150μm diameter or ≤ the mean diameter, and (3) larger osteons (>mean diameter). Significant, but weak, correlations between Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar and On.W.Th/On.Dm (On.Dm = osteon diameter) were found when considering all osteons in limb bones (r values −0.16 to −0.40, p<0.01; resembling previous results in sheep ulnae: r= −0.39, p<0.0001). In larger osteons, these relationships were either not significant (five/seven bone types) or very weak (two/seven bone types). In ribs, a negative relationship was only found in smaller osteons (r= −0.228, p<0.01); this inverse relationship in smaller osteons did not occur in elk calcanei. These results do not provide clear or consistent support for the hypothesized inverse relationship. However, correlation analyses may fail to detect osteocyte-based repression of infilling if the signal is spatially non-uniform (e.g., increased near the central canal). PMID:21809466

  18. Analysis of the effect of osteon diameter on the potential relationship of osteocyte lacuna density and osteon wall thickness.

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Clark, Gunnar C; Sorenson, Scott M; Taylor, Kevin W; Qiu, Shijing

    2011-09-01

    An important hypothesis is that the degree of infilling of secondary osteons (Haversian systems) is controlled by the inhibitory effect of osteocytes on osteoblasts, which might be mediated by sclerostin (a glycoprotein produced by osteocytes). Consequently, this inhibition could be proportional to cell number: relatively greater repression is exerted by progressively greater osteocyte density (increased osteocytes correlate with thinner osteon walls). This hypothesis has been examined, but only weakly supported, in sheep ulnae. We looked for this inverse relationship between osteon wall thickness (On.W.Th) and osteocyte lacuna density (Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar) in small and large osteons in human ribs, calcanei of sheep, deer, elk, and horses, and radii and third metacarpals of horses. Analyses involved: (1) all osteons, (2) smaller osteons, either ≤150 μm diameter or less than or equal to the mean diameter, and (3) larger osteons (>mean diameter). Significant, but weak, correlations between Ot.Lc.N/B.Ar and On.W.Th/On.Dm (On.Dm = osteon diameter) were found when considering all osteons in limb bones (r values -0.16 to -0.40, P < 0.01; resembling previous results in sheep ulnae: r = -0.39, P < 0.0001). In larger osteons, these relationships were either not significant (five/seven bone types) or very weak (two/seven bone types). In ribs, a negative relationship was only found in smaller osteons (r = -0.228, P < 0.01); this inverse relationship in smaller osteons did not occur in elk calcanei. These results do not provide clear or consistent support for the hypothesized inverse relationship. However, correlation analyses may fail to detect osteocyte-based repression of infilling if the signal is spatially nonuniform (e.g., increased near the central canal).

  19. Diameter-driven crossover in resistive behaviour of heavily doped self-seeded germanium nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Stephen; Koleśnik-Gray, Maria; Hobbs, Richard; Lotty, Olan; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-01-01

    Summary The dependence of the resistivity with changing diameter of heavily-doped self-seeded germanium nanowires was studied for the diameter range 40 to 11 nm. The experimental data reveal an initial strong reduction of the resistivity with diameter decrease. At about 20 nm a region of slowly varying resistivity emerges with a peak feature around 14 nm. For diameters above 20 nm, nanowires were found to be describable by classical means. For smaller diameters a quantum-based approach was required where we employed the 1D Kubo–Greenwood framework and also revealed the dominant charge carriers to be heavy holes. For both regimes the theoretical results and experimental data agree qualitatively well assuming a spatial spreading of the free holes towards the nanowire centre upon diameter reduction. PMID:27826502

  20. Hydrodynamic Model with Binary Particle Diameters to Predict Axial Voidage Profile in a CFB Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, H. R.; Wu, Y. X.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    A hydrodynamic model with binary particle diameters was developed to better predict axial voidage profile in a CFB combustor. In the model, the CFB is regarded as a superposition of two sub-beds, a fast fluidized bed in the upper riser with a characteristic particle diameter of O.2mm and a bubbling fluidized bed or turbulent bed in the bottom riser with a characteristic particle diameter of 2mm. Furthermore, a variable critical particle diameter whose terminal velocity equals to the superficial gas velocity was employed to determine which flow regime the particle belongs to. The results show that binary particle diameter model has the advantages in describing wide particle diameter distribution while reducing the complexity of computation. The model was verified by the field data of voidage profile in a 300MW CFB boiler.