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Sample records for a-570-937 citric acid

  1. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic... order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China.... See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension...

  2. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The normal range is 320 ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  3. [Analysis of citric acid and citrates. Citric acid and urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P

    1979-08-01

    In the first part the physico-chemical, analytic chemical and physiologic biochemical properties of the citric acid are discussed. In the second part the author enters the role of the citric acid in the formation of uric calculi. In the third part is reported on the individual methods of the determination of citric acid and the method practised in the author's laboratory is described.

  4. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    PubMed Central

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid. PMID:24031566

  5. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1033 Citric acid. (a) Citric acid (C6H8O7, CAS Reg. No. 77-92-9) is the compound 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid. It is a naturally occurring constituent of plant...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1033 Citric acid. (a) Citric acid (C6H8O7, CAS Reg. No. 77-92-9) is the compound 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid. It is a naturally occurring constituent of plant...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and....1033 Citric acid. (a) Citric acid (C6H8O7, CAS Reg. No. 77-92-9) is the compound 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid. It is a naturally occurring constituent of plant and animal tissues. It occurs as...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1033 Citric acid. (a) Citric acid (C6H8O7, CAS Reg. No. 77-92-9) is the compound 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid. It is a naturally occurring constituent of plant...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1033 Citric acid. (a) Citric acid (C6H8O7, CAS Reg. No. 77-92-9) is the compound 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid. It is a naturally occurring constituent of plant...

  15. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  16. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  17. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  19. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  20. Citric acid fermentation in whey permeate

    SciTech Connect

    Somkuti, G.A.; Bencivengo, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Acid-whey permeate was used for the production of citric acid by Aspergillus niger. The fermentation proceeded in 2 phases: a growth phase when citric acid was not accumulated, followed by an acidogenic phase when citric acid accumulated and mold growth was greatly reduced. Optimal production of citric acid occurred after 8-12 days at 30 degrees. Maximum citric acid yields were influenced by the initial lactose concentration and reached 10 g/l when the lactose concentration in the acid-whey permeate was adjusted to 15%. MeOH at 2-4% markedly increased the production of citric acid. Fermentation of acid-whey permeate by a mutant strain (A. niger 599-3) was more reproducible, and yields of citric acid were substantially improved. The amount of citric acid produced by A. niger 599-3 was 18-23 g/l after 12-14 days, depending on the lactose content of the whey permeate. Throughout the fermentation, galactose was apparently co-metabolized with glucose.

  1. BNL Citric Acid Technology: Pilot Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A J; DODGE,; J, C; GILLOW, J B; FORRESTER, K E

    1999-09-24

    The objective of this project is to remove toxic metals such as lead and cadmium from incinerator ash using the Citric Acid Process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this process toxic metals in bottom ash from the incineration of municipal solid waste were first extracted with citric acid followed by biodegradation of the citric acid-metal extract by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens for metals recovery. The ash contained the following metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti, and Zn. Optimization of the Citric Acid Process parameters which included citric acid molarity, contact time, the impact of mixing aggressiveness during extraction and pretreatment showed lead and cadmium removal from incinerator ash of >90%. Seeding the treated ash with P. fluorescens resulted in the removal of residual citric acid and biostabilization of any leachable lead, thus allowing it to pass EPA?s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Biodegradation of the citric acid extract removed >99% of the lead from the extract as well as other metals such as Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ti, and Zn. Speciation of the bioprecipitated lead by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source showed that the lead is predominantly associated with the phosphate and carboxyl functional groups in a stable form. Citric acid was completely recovered (>99%) from the extract by sulfide precipitation technique and the extraction efficiency of recovered citric acid is similar to that of the fresh citric acid. Recycling of the citric acid should result in considerable savings in the overall treatment cost. We have shown the potential application of this technology to remove and recover the metal contaminants from incinerator ash as well as from other heavy metal bearing wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust from steel industry) or soils. Information developed from this project is being applied to demonstrate the remediation of

  2. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  3. Citraturic response to oral citric acid load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Alpern, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible that some orally administered citrate may appear in urine by escaping oxidation in vivo. To determine whether this mechanism contributes to the citraturic response to potassium citrate, we measured serum and urinary citrate for 4 hours after a single oral load of citric acid (40 mEq.) in 6 normal subjects. Since citric acid does not alter acid-base balance, the effect of absorbed citrate could be isolated from that of alkali load. Serum citrate concentration increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 30 minutes after a single oral dose of citric acid and remained significantly elevated for 3 hours after citric acid load. Commensurate with this change, urinary citrate excretion peaked at 2 hours and gradually decreased during the next 2 hours after citric acid load. In contrast, serum and urinary citrate remained unaltered following the control load (no drug). Differences of the citratemic and citraturic effects between phases were significant (p less than 0.05) at 2 and 3 hours. Urinary pH, carbon dioxide pressure, bicarbonate, total carbon dioxide and ammonium did not change at any time after citric acid load, and did not differ between the 2 phases. No significant difference was noted in serum electrolytes, arterialized venous pH and carbon dioxide pressure at any time after citric acid load and between the 2 phases. Thus, the citraturic and citratemic effects of oral citric acid are largely accountable by provision of absorbed citrate, which has escaped in vivo degradation.

  4. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  5. Citric Acid Metabolism in the Bovine Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms rapidly metabolize citric acid to carbon dioxide and acetic acid. The rate of metabolism varied between 0.00008 and 0.76 μmoles per g per min, the rate becoming higher as the citric acid concentration increased. The addition of potassium chloride to rumen contents decreased the rate of utilization. The results indicate that dietary citric acid is unlikely to accumulate in the rumen to a sufficiently high level to be an important factor in hypomagnesemia, except where other factors such as very high potassium levels in the food influence its metabolism. PMID:5549696

  6. Crystallization kinetics of citric acid anhydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemdili, L.; Koutchoukali, O.; Bouhelassa, M.; Seidel, J.; Mameri, F.; Ulrich, J.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility curve, metastable zone width (MSZW) and Crystallization kinetics (nucleation and growth) were measured and estimated during batch crystallization of citric acid anhydrate (CAA). The solubility of citric acid in pure water was measured over the temperature range from 15 to 60 °C using a refractometer. The experimental data were correlated by the modified Apelblat equation. The MSZW was determined under four cooling rates for different citric acid concentrations by means of an ultrasonic technique. The primary nucleation kinetics of CAA was calculated based on these data and the polythermal method of Nyvlt. It was found that the MSZW obtained is in good agreement with literature. Crystal growth rates were calculated by two methods. The first one used seeded isothermal growth experiments (desupersaturation curve) and the derivatives method of Garside. The second method used the measurement of the dimension change of a single crystal in a microscopic cell at different supersaturation levels.

  7. Utilization of citric acid in wood bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citric acid (CA) is a weak organic acid. It exists most notably in citrus fruits so that it is named likewise. As a commodity chemical, CA is produced on a large scale by fermentation. In this chapter, we first briefly review the applied research and methods for commercial production of CA. Then we ...

  8. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls.

  9. Effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-09-01

    An integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed to solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid fermentation process. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation to eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Acetic acid as an intermediate product of methane fermentation was present in anaerobic digestion effluent. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated and results showed that lower concentration of acetic acid could promote Aspergillus niger growth and citric acid production. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) staining was used to quantify the activity of A. niger cells, and the results suggested that when acetic acid concentration was above 8 mM at initial pH 4.5, the morphology of A. niger became uneven and the part of the cells' activity was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in deceasing of citric acid production. Effects of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation, as influenced by initial pH and cell number in inocula, were also examined. The result indicated that inhibition by acetic acid increased as initial pH declined and was rarely influenced by cell number in inocula.

  10. Germanium oxide removal by citric acid and thiol passivation from citric acid-terminated Ge(100).

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Aureau, Damien; Holmes, Justin D; Etcheberry, Arnaud; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-12-02

    Many applications of germanium (Ge) are underpinned by effective oxide removal and surface passivation. This important surface treatment step often requires H-X (X = Cl, Br, I) or HF etchants. Here, we show that aqueous citric acid solutions are effective in the removal of GeOx. The stability of citric acid-treated Ge(100) is compared to HF and HCl treated surfaces and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further Ge surface passivation was investigated by thiolation using alkane monothiols and dithiols. The organic passivation layers show good stability with no oxide regrowth observed after 3 days of ambient exposure.

  11. Citric acid cycle intermediates in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Czibik, Gabor; Steeples, Violetta; Yavari, Arash; Ashrafian, Houman

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a concerted clinical effort to deliver on the laboratory promise that a variety of maneuvers can profoundly increase cardiac tolerance to ischemia and/or reduce additional damage consequent upon reperfusion. Here we will review the proximity of the metabolic approach to clinical practice. Specifically, we will focus on how the citric acid cycle is involved in cardioprotection. Inspired by cross-fertilization between fundamental cancer biology and cardiovascular medicine, a set of metabolic observations have identified novel metabolic pathways, easily manipulable in man, which can harness metabolism to robustly combat ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  12. Submerged citric acid fermentation on orange peel autohydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Beatriz; Torrado, Ana; Torre, Paolo; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2008-04-09

    The citrus-processing industry generates in the Mediterranean area huge amounts of orange peel as a byproduct from the industrial extraction of citrus juices. To reduce its environmental impact as well as to provide an extra profit, this residue was investigated in this study as an alternative substrate for the fermentative production of citric acid. Orange peel contained 16.9% soluble sugars, 9.21% cellulose, 10.5% hemicellulose, and 42.5% pectin as the most important components. To get solutions rich in soluble and starchy sugars to be used as a carbon source for citric acid fermentation, this raw material was submitted to autohydrolysis, a process that does not make use of any acidic catalyst. Liquors obtained by this process under optimum conditions (temperature of 130 degrees C and a liquid/solid ratio of 8.0 g/g) contained 38.2 g/L free sugars (8.3 g/L sucrose, 13.7 g/L glucose, and 16.2 g/L fructose) and significant amounts of metals, particularly Mg, Ca, Zn, and K. Without additional nutrients, these liquors were employed for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger CECT 2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599). Addition of calcium carbonate enhanced citric acid production because it prevented progressive acidification of the medium. Moreover, the influence of methanol addition on citric acid formation was investigated. Under the best conditions (40 mL of methanol/kg of medium), an effective conversion of sugars into citric acid was ensured (maximum citric acid concentration of 9.2 g/L, volumetric productivity of 0.128 g/(L.h), and yield of product on consumed sugars of 0.53 g/g), hence demonstrating the potential of orange peel wastes as an alternative raw material for citric acid fermentation.

  13. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large ... clear view of the walls of the colon. Sodium picosulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Probing linker design in citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Milner, Stephen J; Snelling, Anna M; Kerr, Kevin G; Abd-El-Aziz, Ahmad; Thomas, Gavin H; Hubbard, Roderick E; Routledge, Anne; Duhme-Klair, Anne-Kathrin

    2014-08-15

    A series of structurally related citric acid-ciprofloxacin conjugates was synthesised to investigate the influence of the linker between citric acid and ciprofloxacin on antibacterial activities. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined against a panel of reference strains and clinical isolates of bacteria associated with infection in humans and correlated with the DNA gyrase inhibitory activity. The observed trend was rationalised by computational modelling.

  15. 77 FR 6061 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid) from... initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid from Canada with...

  16. 78 FR 34338 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid) from... is citric acid and certain citrate salts. The product is currently classified in the...

  17. 76 FR 5782 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid) from... citric acid from Canada with respect to JBL Canada covering the period November 20, 2008, through May...

  18. The pulpal response to topically applied citric acid.

    PubMed

    Kitchings, S K; del Rio, C E; Aufdemorte, T B; Meffert, R M; Lane, J J

    1984-08-01

    Citric acid is currently being used to aid in the reattachment of periodontal tissues to tooth roots which have become separated as a result of periodontitis. The present study examines the effect of topically applied citric acid on the dental pulp. Citric acid, pH 1, was applied for 3 minutes on instrumented premolar teeth in six dogs. As a control, saline solution was applied on similarly instrumented premolars. The teeth were removed 1, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 144 hours after citric acid application. After histologic preparation, the pulps were examined for inflammatory cell infiltrates, odontoblast displacement into the dentinal tubules, hyperemic capillaries in the odontoblast layer, hemorrhage, abscess formation, irregular dentin, and the thickness of the dentin remaining beneath the treated area. There was no statistically significant response to the citric acid over the saline controls. Nor was the pulpal response, as examined above, correlated to the thickness of the remaining dentin. The results suggest that citric acid, pH 1, when applied to tooth roots during surgical reattachment therapy, does not adversely affect the pulp.

  19. Citric acid: emerging applications of key biotechnology industrial product.

    PubMed

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Delisi, Riccardo; Pagliaro, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Owing to new biotechnological production units mostly located in China, global supply of citric acid in the course of the last two decades rose from less than 0.5 to more than 2 million tonnes becoming the single largest chemical obtained via biomass fermentation and the most widely employed organic acid. Critically reviewing selected research achievements and production trends, we identify the reasons for which this polycarboxylic acid will become a key chemical in the emerging bioeconomy.Graphical abstractPalermo's Fabbrica Chimica Italiana Goldenberg today. In 1930 it was Europe's largest citric acid plant (photo courtesy of Aldo Ferrande).

  20. Citric acid-assisted phytoextraction of lead: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eriberto Vagner; Nascimento, Clístenes Williams; Souza, Adailson; Silva, Fernando Bruno

    2013-06-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has become a serious environmental problem that requires affordable strategies of remediation. This study was carried out to assess the performance of maize and vetiver in the phytoextraction of Pb from a soil contaminated by battery recycling activities. The species were planted with different spacings between rows (0.80, 0.65 and 0.50m). Citric acid (40mmolkg(-1)) was applied on each experimental plot on the 61st d of cultivation in order to solubilize the Pb and assist the phytoextraction. The results showed that the chelating agent promoted a 14-fold increase in the Pb concentration in maize shoots as compared to the control, which accumulated only 111mgkg(-1) of the metal. The citric acid induced a Pb concentration in vetiver shoots that was 7.2-6.7-fold higher than the control at both the 0.65 and 0.50m plant spacing, respectively. The use of citric acid increased substantially the uptake and translocation of Pb to the shoots, regardless of plant spacing. Citric acid was efficient in solubilizing Pb from the soil and inducing its uptake by both species. Environmentally-friendly and cost effective, commercial citric acid is recommended for assisting Pb-phytoextraction in the studied area. Due to the low natural solubility of Pb and a time frame needed of longer than 150yr to accomplish the clean-up, phytoextraction with no chelate assistance is not recommended for the area.

  1. Effect of mineral supplements to citric acid on enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    Attin, T; Meyer, K; Hellwig, E; Buchalla, W; Lennon, A M

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of mineral supplements to citric acid (1%; pH 2.21) on enamel erosion under controlled conditions in an artificial mouth. From each of 156 bovine incisors one polished enamel sample was prepared. The samples were divided among 13 experimental groups (n=12). In group 1 citric acid only was used (control). In groups 2-10 either calcium, phosphate or fluoride in various low concentrations was admixed to the citric acid. In groups 11-13 the citric acid was supplemented with a mixture of calcium, phosphate and fluoride. For demineralisation the specimens were rinsed with the respective solution for 1 min, immediately followed by a remineralisation period with artificial saliva (1 min). The specimens were cycled through this alternating procedure five times followed by rinsing for 8 h with artificial saliva. The de- and remineralisation cycle was repeated three times for each specimen interrupted by the 8 h-remineralisation periods. Before and after the experiments, the specimens were examined using microhardness testing (Knoop hardness) and laser profilometry. Hardness loss and enamel dissolution was significantly higher for the controls as compared to the remaining groups. Significantly lowest hardness loss for all groups was recorded for group 12 with admixture of calcium, phosphate and fluoride to citric acid. The significantly highest enamel loss was recorded for the controls compared to all other samples. Groups 3 and 4 revealed significantly lower and higher tissue loss compared to the remaining groups (2-13), respectively. The other groups did not differ significantly from each other. Modification of citric acid with calcium, phosphate and fluoride exerts a significant protective potential with respect to dental erosion. However, with the low concentrations applied enamel dissolution could not be completely prevented.

  2. Assemblies of cytosine within H-bonded network of adipic acid and citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Babulal; Baruah, Jubaraj B.

    2011-08-01

    Adipic acid binds to cytosine to form H-bonded discrete cytosine-cytosinium assemblies embedded in 1D infinite chain of adipic acid, whereas citric acid stabilizes trimeric cytosine-cytosinium assemblies having length of 19.44 Å stabilized between layered structures of citric acid molecules.

  3. Citric acid metabolism in hetero- and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Drinan, D F; Robin, S; Cogan, T M

    1976-01-01

    The effect of citrate on production of diacetyl and acetoin by four strains each of heterofermentative and homofermentative lactic acid bacteria capable of utilizing citrate was studied. Acetoin was quantitatively the more important compound. The heterofermentative bacteria produced no acetoin or diacetyl in the absence of citrate, and two strains produced traces of acetoin in its presence. Citrate stimulated the growth rate of the heterofermentative lactobacilli. Acidification of all heterofermentative cultures with citric acid resulted in acetoin production. Destruction of accumulated acetoin appeared to coincide with the disappearance of citrate. All homofermentative bacteria produced more acetoin and diacetyl in the presence of citrate than in its absence. Citrate utilization was begun immediately by the streptococci but was delayed until at least the middle of the exponential phase in the case of the lactobacilli. PMID:5054

  4. Dissolution of kaolinite induced by citric, oxalic, and malic acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingxiang; Li, Qingman; Hu, Huafeng; Zhang, Taolin; Zhou, Yiyong

    2005-10-15

    Kaolinite is a dominant clay mineral in the soils in tropical and subtropical regions, and its dissolution has an influence on a variety of soil properties. In this work, kaolinite dissolution induced by three kinds of low-molecular-weight organic acid, i.e., citric, oxalic, and malic acids, was evaluated under far-from-equilibrium conditions. The rates of kaolinite dissolution depended on the kind and concentration of organic acids, with the sequence R(oxalate)>R(citrate)>R(malate). Chemical calculation showed the change in concentration of organic ligand relative to change in concentration of organic acid in suspensions of kaolinite and organic acid. The effect of organic acid on kaolinite dissolution was modeled by species of organic anionic ligand. For oxalic acid, L(2-)(oxalic) and HL(-)(oxalic) jointly enhanced the dissolution of kaolinite, but for malic and citric acids, HL(-)(malic) and H2L-(citric) made a higher contribution to the total dissolution rate of kaolinite than L(2-)(malic) and L(3-)(citric), respectively. For oxalic acid, the proposed model was R(Si)=1.89x10(-12)x[(25x)/(1+25x)]+1.93x10(-12)x[(1990x1)/(1+1990x1)] (R2=0.9763), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(oxalic) and L(oxalic), respectively, and x1=10(-3.81)xx/[H+]. For malic acid, the model was R(Si)=4.79x10(-12)x[(328x)/(1+328x)]+1.67x10(-13)x[(1149x1)/(1+1149x1)] (R2=0.9452), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of HL(malic) and L(malic), respectively, and x1=10(-5.11)xx/[H+], and for citric acid, the model was R(Si)=4.73x10(-12)x[(845x)/(1+845x)]+4.68x10(-12)x[(2855x1)/(1+2855x1)] (R2=0.9682), where x and x1 denote the concentrations of H2L(citric) and L(citric), respectively, and [Formula: see text] .

  5. Citric acid cycle biomimic on a carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Sokic-Lazic, Daria; Minteer, Shelley D

    2008-12-01

    The citric acid cycle is one of the main metabolic pathways living cells utilize to completely oxidize biofuels to carbon dioxide and water. The overall goal of this research is to mimic the citric acid cycle at the carbon surface of an electrode in order to achieve complete oxidation of ethanol at a bioanode to increase biofuel cell energy density. In order to mimic this process, dehydrogenase enzymes (known to be the electron or energy producing enzymes of the citric acid cycle) are immobilized in cascades at an electrode surface along with non-energy producing enzymes necessary for the cycle to progress. Six enzymatic schemes were investigated each containing an additional dehydrogenase enzyme involved in the complete oxidation of ethanol. An increase in current density is observed along with an increase in power density with each additional dehydrogenase immobilized on an electrode, reflecting increased electron production at the bioanode with deeper oxidation of the ethanol biofuel. By mimicking the complete citric acid cycle on a carbon electrode, power density was increased 8.71-fold compared to a single enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase)-based ethanol/air biofuel cell.

  6. 77 FR 24461 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... all grades and granulation sizes of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate in their... blends of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate; as well as blends with other ingredients, such as sugar, where the unblended form(s) of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium...

  7. 78 FR 64914 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of... of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from Canada.\\1\\ The review... period of review (POR) is May 1, 2011, through April 30, 2012. \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain...

  8. 78 FR 34648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts from the People's Republic... (202) 482-1503. Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is citric acid and...

  9. 76 FR 34044 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of... preliminary results of the first administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid) from Canada. The review covers one manufacturer/exporter of...

  10. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water.

  11. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  12. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    The vertebrate multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein (AIMP)1, AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of 20 tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates.

  13. Hydrophobic starch nanocrystals preparations through crosslinking modification using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiang; Tong, Jin; Su, Xingguang; Ren, Lili

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradable starch nanocrystals prepared by an acid treatment process were modified through crosslinking modification using citric acid as reactant by a dry reaction method. The occurrence of crosslinking modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and swelling degree. X-ray diffraction, wettability tests and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified starch nanocrystals. It was found that the crosslinked starch nanocrystals displayed a higher affinity for low polar solvents such as dichloromethane. The surface of starch nanocrystals became more roughness after crosslinking modification with citric acid and the size decreased as revealed by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline structure of starch nanocrystals was basically not changed after the crosslinking modification with shorter heating time. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanocrystals are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites.

  14. 21. Interior view of citric acid air pollution control room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Interior view of citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. The biochemistry of citric acid accumulation by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, L; Sándor, E; Fekete, E; Szentirmai, A

    2001-01-01

    Fungi, in particular Aspergilli, are well known for their potential to overproduce a variety of organic acids. These microorganisms have an intrinsic ability to accumulate these substances and it is generally believed that this provides the fungi with an ecological advantage, since they grow rather well at pH 3 to 5, while some species even tolerate pH values as low as 1.5. Organic acid production can be stimulated and in a number of cases conditions have been found that result in almost quantitative conversion of carbon substrate into acid. This is exploited in large-scale production of a number of organic acids like citric-, gluconic- and itaconic acid. Both in production volume as well as in knowledge available, citrate is by far the major organic acid. Citric acid (2-hydroxy-propane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid) is a true bulk product with an estimated global production of over 900 thousand tons in the year 2000. Till the beginning of the 20th century, it was exclusively extracted from lemons. Since the global market was dominated by an Italian cartel, other means of production were sought. Chemical synthesis was possible, but not suitable due to expensive raw materials and a complicated process with low yield. The discovery of citrate accumulation by Aspergillus niger led to a rapid development of a fermentation process, which only a decade later accounted for a large part of the global production. The application of citric acid is based on three of its properties: (1) acidity and buffer capacity, (2) taste and flavour, and (3) chelation of metal ions. Because of its three acid groups with pKa values of 3.1, 4.7 and 6.4, citrate is able to produce a very low pH in solution, but is also useful as a buffer over a broad range of pH values (2 to 7). Citric acid has a pleasant acid taste which leaves little aftertaste. It sometimes enhances flavour, but is also able to mask sweetness, such as the aspartame taste in diet beverages. Chelation of metal ions is a very

  16. Citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Tran, Richard T; Guleserian, Kristine J; Tang, Liping; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Citric-acid-derived thermally cross-linked biodegradable elastomers (CABEs) have recently received significant attention in various biomedical applications, including tissue-engineering orthopedic devices, bioimaging and implant coatings. However, citric-acid-derived photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomers are rarely reported. Herein, we report a novel photo-cross-linked biodegradable elastomer, referred to as poly(octamethylene maleate citrate) (POMC), which preserves pendant hydroxyl and carboxylic functionalities after cross-linking for the potential conjugation of biologically active molecules. Pre-POMC is a low-molecular-mass pre-polymer with an average molecular mass between 701 and 1291 Da. POMC networks are soft and elastic with an initial modulus of 0.07 to 1.3 MPa and an elongation-at-break between 38 and 382%. FT-IR-ATR results confirmed the successful surface immobilization of type-I collagen onto POMC films, which enhanced in vitro cellular attachment and proliferation. Photo-polymerized POMC films implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated minimal in vivo inflammatory responses. The development of POMC enriches the family of citric-acid-derived biodegradable elastomers and expands the available biodegradable polymers for versatile needs in biomedical applications.

  17. Citric acid application for denitrification process support in biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Dabrowska, Dorota; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Thornton, Arthur; Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    The study demonstrated that citric acid, as an organic carbon source, can improve denitrification in Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The consumption rate of the organic substrate and the denitrification rate were lower during the period of the reactor's acclimatization (cycles 1-60; 71.5 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 17.81 mgN L(-1) h(-1), respectively) than under the steady state conditions (cycles 61-180; 143.8 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 24.38 mgN L(-1) h(-1)). The biomass yield coefficient reached 0.04 ± 0.02 mgTSS· mgCODre(-1) (0.22 ± 0.09 mgTSS mgNre(-1)). Observations revealed the diversified microbiological ecology of the denitrifying bacteria. Citric acid was used mainly by bacteria representing the Trichoccocus genus, which represented above 40% of the sample during the first phase of the process (cycles 1-60). In the second phase (cycles 61-180) the microorganisms the genera that consumed the acetate and formate, as the result of citric acid decomposition were Propionibacterium (5.74%), Agrobacterium (5.23%), Flavobacterium (1.32%), Sphaerotilus (1.35%), Erysipelothrix (1.08%).

  18. 77 FR 9891 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic... Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act''). \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the...

  19. 76 FR 77772 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the... Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

  20. 76 FR 33219 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's... countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's...

  1. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %.

  2. Coamorphous Loratadine-Citric Acid System with Enhanced Physical Stability and Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Chang, Ruimiao; Zhao, Yanan; Zhang, Jiye; Zhang, Ting; Fu, Qiang; Chang, Chun; Zeng, Aiguo

    2017-02-21

    Coamorphous systems using citric acid as a small molecular excipient were studied for improving physical stability and bioavailability of loratadine, a BCS class II drug with low water solubility and high permeability. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid systems were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Solid-state analysis proofed that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) was amorphous and homogeneous, had a higher T g over amorphous loratadine, and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid exist. The solubility and dissolution of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) were found to be significantly greater than those of crystalline and amorphous form. The pharmacokinetic study in rats proved that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could significantly improve absorption and bioavailability of loratadine. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) showed excellently physical stability over a period of 3 months at 25°C under 0% RH and 25°C under 60% RH conditions. The improved stability of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could be related to an elevated T g over amorphous form and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid. These studies demonstrate that the developed coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system might be a promising oral formulation for improving solubility and bioavailability of loratadine.

  3. 76 FR 49735 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from..., 2011, Huangshi Xinghua Biochemical Co., Ltd. (``Xinghua''), a producer and exporter of citric...

  4. Fermentative production of high titer citric acid from corn stover feedstock after dry dilute acid pretreatment and biodetoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping-Ping; Meng, Jiao; Bao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the citric acid fermentation by a robust strain Aspergillus niger SIIM M288 using corn stover feedstock after dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment and biodetoxification. Citric acid at 100.04g/L with the yield of 94.11% was obtained, which are comparable to the starch or sucrose based citric acid fermentation. No free wastewater was generated in the overall process from the pretreatment to citric acid fermentation. Abundant divalent metal ions as well as high titer of potassium, phosphate, and nitrogen were found in corn stover hydrolysate. Further addition of extra nutrients showed no impact on increasing citric acid formation except minimum nitrogen source was required. Various fermentation parameters were tested and only minimum regulation was required during the fermentation. This study provided a biorefining process for citric acid fermentation from lignocellulose feedstock with the maximum citric acid titer and yield.

  5. Electrochemical monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kutyła-Olesiuk, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid electronic tongue was developed for the monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. The system based on various potentiometric/voltammetric sensors and appropriate chemometric techniques provided correct qualitative and quantitative classification of the samples collected during standard Aspergillus niger culture and culture infected with yeast. The performance of the proposed approach was compared with the monitoring of the fermentation process carried out using classical methods. The results obtained proved, that the designed hybrid electronic tongue was able to evaluate the progress and correctness of the fermentation process.

  6. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of metals and buffers on proton extrusion and citric acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A.; Burgstaller, W.; Schinner, F. )

    1991-03-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential.

  7. Physical properties and dyeability of silk fibers degummed with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Majibur Rahman; Tsukada, Masuhiro; Gotoh, Yasuo; Morikawa, Hideaki; Freddi, Giuliano; Shiozaki, Hideki

    2010-11-01

    Silk fibers from Bombyx mori silkworm was degummed with different concentration of citric acid, and the physical properties and fine structure were investigated to elucidate the effects of citric acid treatment. The silk sericin removal percentage was almost 100% after degumming with 30% citric acid which resulted in a total weight loss of 25.4% in the silk fibers. The surface morphology of silk fiber degummed with citric acid was very smooth and fine, showed perfect degumming like traditional soap-alkali method. The tensile strength of silk fiber was increased after degumming with citric acid (507MPa), where as the traditional soap-alkali method causes to decrease the strength about half of the control silk fiber (250MPa). The molecular conformation estimated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the crystalline structure evaluated from X-ray diffraction curve stayed unchanged regardless of the degumming with citric acid and soap. The dye uptake percentage of silk fiber degummed with citric acid decreased slightly, about 4.2%. On the other hand, the dye uptake percentage of silk degummed with soap was higher which indicates the disordering of the molecular orientation of the laterally ordered structure, accompanied with the partial hydrolysis of silk fibroin molecules by the alkali action of soap. The thermal properties were greatly enhanced by soap and citric acid degumming agents. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis showed silk degummed with citric acid is more stable in higher temperature than that of soap. With heating at above 300 degrees C, the silk degummed with citric acid shows an increase in storage modulus and an onset of tan delta peaks at 325 degrees C and the melt flow of the sample was inhibited. The degumming of silk fibers with citric acid is safe and the results obtained are quite promising as a basis for possible future industrial application.

  8. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue.

  9. Simple citric acid-catalyzed surface esterification of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Fortunati, Elena; Kenny, José María; Torre, Luigi; Foresti, María Laura

    2017-02-10

    A simple straightforward route for the surface esterification of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) is herein proposed. CNC obtained from microcrystalline cellulose were acetylated using as catalyst citric acid, a α-hydroxy acid present in citrus fruits and industrially produced by certain molds in sucrose or glucose-containing medium. No additional solvent was added to the system; instead, the acylant (acetic anhydride) was used in sufficient excess to allow CNC dispersion and proper suspension agitation. By tuning the catalyst load, CNC with two different degree of substitution (i.e. DS=0.18 and 0.34) were obtained. Acetylated cellulose nanocrystals were characterized in terms of chemical structure, crystallinity, morphology, thermal decomposition and dispersion in a non-polar solvent. Results illustrated for the first time the suitability of the protocol proposed for the simple surface acetylation of cellulose nanocrystals.

  10. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  11. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  12. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  13. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  14. 77 FR 22560 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'').\\1\\ On...). \\2\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of...

  15. 77 FR 1455 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See... of the administrative review of citric acid from the PRC within this time limit....

  16. Oxygen requirements for growth and citric acid production of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Shishkanova, Nadezda V; Morgunov, Igor G; Finogenova, Tatyana V

    2003-04-01

    During continuous cultivation of Yarrowia lipolytica N 1, oxygen requirements for growth and citric acid synthesis were found to depend on the iron concentration in the medium. A coupled effect of oxygen and iron concentrations on the functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Y. lipolytica N 1 was established. Based on the results obtained in continuous culture, conditions for citric acid production in a batch culture of Y. lipolytica N 1 were proposed. At relatively low pO(2) value and a high iron concentration, citric acid accumulation was as high as 120 g l(-1); the specific rate of citric acid synthesis reached 120 mg citric acid (g cells h)(-1). The mass yield coefficient was 0.87 and the energy yield coefficient was 0.31.

  17. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  18. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur.

  19. New insights into structural alteration of enamel apatite induced by citric acid and sodium fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojie; Klocke, Arndt; Mihailova, Boriana; Tosheva, Lubomira; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2008-07-24

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and complementary scanning electron microscopy were applied to analyze the surface structure of enamel apatite exposed to citric acid and to investigate the protective potential of fluorine-containing reagents against citric acid-induced erosion. Enamel and, for comparison, geological hydroxylapatite samples were treated with aqueous solutions of citric acid and sodium fluoride of different concentrations, ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 mol/L for citric acid solutions and from 0.5 to 2.0% for fluoride solutions. The two solutions were applied either simultaneously or consecutively. The citric acid-induced structural modification of apatite increases with the increase in the citric acid concentration and the number of treatments. The application of sodium fluoride alone does not suppress the atomic level changes in apatite exposed to acidic agents. The addition of sodium fluoride to citric acid solutions leads to formation of surface CaF2 and considerably reduces the changes in the apatite P-O-Ca framework. However, the CaF2 globules deposited on the enamel surface seem to be insufficient to prevent the alteration of the apatite structure upon further exposure to acidic agents. No evidence for fluorine-induced recovery of the apatite structure was found.

  20. 77 FR 56188 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Rescission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's...\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Intent to...

  1. 76 FR 4288 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from...

  2. 76 FR 77206 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') has completed its administrative review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on citric acid and... Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results...

  3. 77 FR 33167 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... conducting an administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On May 29, 2009, the Department published a CVD order on citric acid...

  4. 76 FR 47146 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') published the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Initiation...

  5. 78 FR 34642 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... Department'') is conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). The period of review...

  6. Citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b yeast when grown on waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Xu, Jiaxing; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang; He, Jianlong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, citric acid was produced from waste cooking oil by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b. To get the maximal yield of citric acid, the compositions of the medium for citric acid production were optimized, and our results showed that extra nitrogen and magnesium rather than vitamin B1 and phosphate were needed for CA accumulation when using waste cooking oil. The results also indicated that the optimal initial concentration of the waste cooking oil in the medium for citric acid production was 80.0 g/l, and the ideal inoculation size was 1 × 10(7) cells/l of medium. We also reported that during 10-l fermentation, 31.7 g/l of citric acid, 6.5 g/l of isocitric acid, 5.9 g/l of biomass, and 42.1 g/100.0 g cell dry weight of lipid were attained from 80.0 g/l of waste cooking oil within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 94.6 % of the waste cooking oil was utilized by the cells of Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the yield of citric acid was 0.4 g/g waste cooking oil, which suggested that waste cooking oil was a suitable carbon resource for citric acid production.

  7. Citric Acid Effects on Brain and Liver Oxidative Stress in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Eman R.; Mohammed, Nadia A.; Morsy, Safaa M. Youssef; Omara, Enayat A.; Sleem, Amany A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1–2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1–2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1–2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:24433072

  8. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced. The maximum yield was obtained at the pH of 2 with citric acid of 1.15 g/L and reducing sugar content of 0.541 mMol−1, 3% vegetative inoculum size with citric acid yield of 0.53 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.87 mMol−1, 2% of the substrate concentration with citric acid yield of 0.83 g/L and reducing sugar content of 9.36 mMol−1, incubation temperature of 55°C with citric acid yield of 0.62 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.37 mMol−1, and fermentation period of 5 days with citric acid yield of 0.61 g/L and reducing sugar content of 3.70 mMol−1. The results of this study are encouraging and suggest that Parkia biglobosa pulp can be harnessed at low concentration for large scale citric acid production. PMID:27433535

  9. Optimization of the integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process by air stripping and glucoamylase addition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ke; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed. In the integrated process, extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then reused to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. In this study, an Aspergillus niger mutant strain exhibiting resistance to high metal ions concentration was used to eliminate the inhibition of 200 mg/L Na(+) and 300 mg/L K(+) in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) and citric acid production increased by 25.0 %. Air stripping was used to remove ammonium, alkalinity, and part of metal ions in ADE before making mash. In consequence, citric acid production was significantly improved but still lower by 6.1 % than the control. Results indicated that metal ions in ADE synergistically inhibited the activity of glucoamylase, thus reducing citric acid production. When 130 U/g glucoamylase was added before fermentation, citric acid production was 141.5 g/L, which was even higher than the control (140.4 g/L). This process could completely eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  10. Low- and high-affinity transport systems for citric acid in the yeast Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Cássio, F; Leáo, C

    1991-01-01

    Citric acid-grown cells of the yeast Candida utilis induced two transport systems for citric acid, presumably a proton symport and a facilitated diffusion system for the charged and the undissociated forms of the acid, respectively. Both systems could be observed simultaneously when the transport was measured at 25 degrees C with labelled citric acid at pH 3.5 with the following kinetic parameters: for the low-affinity system, Vmax, 1.14 nmol of undissociated citric acid s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.59 mM undissociated acid; for the high-affinity system, Vmax, 0.38 nmol of citrate s-1 mg (dry weight) of cells-1, and Km, 0.056 mM citrate. At high pH values (above 5.0), the low-affinity system was absent or not measurable. The two transport systems exhibited different substrate specificities. Isocitric acid was a competitive inhibitor of citric acid for the high-affinity system, suggesting that these tricarboxylic acids used the same transport system, while aconitic, tricarballylic, trimesic, and hemimellitic acids were not competitive inhibitors. With respect to the low-affinity system, isocitric acid, L-lactic acid, and L-malic acid were competitive inhibitors, suggesting that all of these mono-, di-, and tricarboxylic acids used the same low-affinity transport system. The two transport systems were repressed by glucose, and as a consequence diauxic growth was observed. Both systems were inducible, and not only citric acid but also lactic acid and malic acid may induce those transport systems. The induction of both systems was not dependent on the relative concentration of the anionic form(s) and of undissociated citric acid in the culture medium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1664712

  11. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  12. Development of pectin films with pomegranate juice and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Henriette M C; Morrugares-Carmona, Rosario; Wellner, Nikolaus; Cross, Kathryn; Bajka, Balazs; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    The influence of pomegranate juice (PJ, replacing water as solvent) and citric acid (CA) on properties of pectin films was studied. PJ provided the films with a bright red color, and acted as a plasticizer. Increasing PJ/water ratio from 0/100 to 100/0 resulted in enhanced elongation (from 2% to 20%), decreased strength (from 10 to <2 MPa) and modulus (from 93 to <10 MPa), increased water vapor permeability (WVP, from 3 to 9 g.mm.kPa(-1).h(-1).m(-2)), and decreased insoluble matter (IM, from 35% to 24%). Although a crosslinking effect by CA was not confirmed, it has been suggested to occur from its effects on films. CA noticeably increased IM (from <10% to almost 40%); moreover, when measured on a dry film basis, the CA effects presented a noticeable tendency to increases strength and modulus, and to decrease WVP. The red color density was decreased by CA, suggesting a destabilization of anthocyanins.

  13. Application of carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Oe, Takaaki; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-08-01

    Japanese apricot liqueur manufacturers are required to control the quality and authenticity of their liqueur products. Citric acid made from corn is the main acidulant used in commercial liqueurs. In this study, we conducted spiking experiments and carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid used as an acidulant in Japanese apricot liqueurs. Our results showed that the δ(13)C values detected exogenous citric acid originating from C4 plants but not from C3 plants. The δ(2)H values of citric acid decreased as the amount of citric acid added increased, whether the citric acid originated from C3 or C4 plants. Commercial liqueurs with declared added acidulant provided higher δ(13)C values and lower δ(2)H values than did authentic liqueurs and commercial liqueurs with no declared added acidulant. Carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses are suitable as routine methods for detecting exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur.

  14. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  15. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations.

  16. Improved flotation performance of hematite fines using citric acid as a dispersant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi-mei; Yin, Wan-zhong; Sun, Chuan-yao; Wang, Nai-ling; Ma, Ying-qiang; Wang, Yun-fan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, citric acid was used as a dispersant to improve the flotation performance of hematite fines. The effect and mechanism of citric acid on the reverse flotation of hematite fines were investigated by flotation tests, sedimentation experiments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta-potential measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of SEM analysis and flotation tests reveal that a strong heterocoagulation in the form of slime coating or coagulation in hematite fine slurry affects the beneficiation of hematite ores by froth flotation. The addition of a small amount of citric acid (less than 300 g/t) favorably affects the reverse flotation of hematite fines by improving particle dispersion. The results of sedimentation experiments, zeta-potential measurements, and XPS measurements demonstrate that citric acid adsorbs onto hematite and quartz surfaces via hydrogen bonding, thereby reducing the zeta potentials of mineral surfaces, strengthening the electrical double-layer repulsion between mineral particles, and dispersing the pulp particles.

  17. Stoichiometry of Reducing Equivalents and Splitting of Water in the Citric Acid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Vitor M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a solution to the problem of finding the source of extra reducing equivalents, and accomplishing the stoichiometry of glucose oxidation reactions. Discusses the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (CW)

  18. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1178 Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible...

  19. Use of Energy Crop (Ricinus communis L.) for Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals Assisted with Citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Xueping; He, Chiquan; Liang, Xia; Oh, Kokyo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yanru

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. is a bioenergetic crop with high-biomass production and tolerance to cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), thus, the plant is a candidate crop for phytoremediation. Pot experiments were performed to study the effects of citric acid in enhancing phytoextraction of Cd/Pb by Ricinus communis L. Citric acid increased Cd and Pb contents in plant shoots in all treatments by about 78% and 18-45%, respectively, at the dosage of 10 mM kg(-1) soil without affecting aboveground biomass production. Addition of citric acid reduced CEC, weakened soil adsorption of heavy metals and activated Cd and Pb in soil solutions. The acid-exchangeable fraction (BCR-1) of Pb remained lower than 7% and significantly increased with citric acid amendment. Respective increases in soil evaluation index induces by 14% and 19% under the Cd1Pb50 and Cd1Pb250 treatments upon addition of citric acid resulted in soil quality improvement. Ricinus communis L. has great potential in citric acid-assisted phytoextraction for Cd and Pb remediation.

  20. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of copper by Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Ihsan Elahi; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Gill, Rafaqa Ali; Najeeb, Ullah; Iqbal, Naeem; Ahmad, Rehan

    2015-10-01

    Use of organic acids for promoting heavy metals phytoextraction is gaining worldwide attention. The present study investigated the influence of citric acid (CA) in enhancing copper (Cu) uptake by Brassica napus L. seedlings. 6 Weeks old B. napus seedlings were exposed to different levels of copper (Cu, 0, 50 and 100µM) alone or with CA (2.5mM) in a nutrient medium for 40 days. Exposure to elevated Cu levels (50 and 100µM) significantly reduced the growth, biomass production, chlorophyll content, gas exchange attributes and soluble proteins of B. napus seedlings. In addition, Cu toxicity increased the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in leaf and root tissues of B. napus. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as guaiacol peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in root and shoot tissues of B. napus were increased in response to lower Cu concentration (50µM) but increased under higher Cu concentration (100µM). Addition of CA into nutrient medium significantly alleviated Cu toxicity effects on B. napus seedlings by improving photosynthetic capacity and ultimately plant growth. Increased activities of antioxidant enzymes in CA-treated plants seems to play a role in capturing of stress-induced reactive oxygen species as was evident from lower level of H2O2, MDA and EL in CA-treated plants. Increasing Cu concentration in the nutrient medium significantly increased Cu concentration in in B. napus tissues. Cu uptake was further increased by CA application. These results suggested that CA might be a useful strategy for increasing phytoextraction of Cu from contaminated soils.

  1. Fed-batch production of citric acid by Candida lipolytica grown on n-paraffins.

    PubMed

    Crolla, A; Kennedy, K J

    2004-05-13

    This study reports on the effects of fermentor agitation and fed-batch mode of operation on citric acid production from Candida lipolytica using n-paraffin as the carbon source. An optimum range of agitation speeds in the 800-1000 rpm range corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 50000-63000 (based on initial batch conditions) seemed to give the best balance between substrate utilization for biomass growth and citric acid production. Application of multiple fed-batch feedings can be used to extend the batch fermentation and increase final citric acid concentrations and product yield. The three-cycle fed-batch system increased overall citric acid yields to 0.8-1.0 g citricacid/g n-paraffin, approximately a 100% improvement in product yield from those observed in the single cycle fed-batch system and a 200% improvement over normal batch operation. The three-cycle fed-batch mode of operation also increased the final citric acid concentration to 42 g/l from about 12 and 6g/l for single fed-batch cycle and normal batch modes of operation, respectively. Increased citric acid concentrations in three-cycle fed-batch mode was achieved at longer fermentation times.

  2. A novel cleaner production process of citric acid by recycling its treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel cleaner production process of citric acid was proposed to completely solve the problem of wastewater management in citric acid industry. In the process, wastewater from citric acid fermentation was used to produce methane through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent was further treated with air stripping and electrodialysis before recycled as process water for the later citric acid fermentation. This proposed process was performed for 10 batches and the average citric acid production in recycling batches was 142.4±2.1g/L which was comparable to that with tap water (141.6g/L). Anaerobic digestion was also efficient and stable in operation. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 95.1±1.2% and methane yield approached to 297.7±19.8mL/g TCODremoved. In conclusion, this novel process minimized the wastewater discharge and achieved the cleaner production in citric acid industry.

  3. Uptake of ozone to mixed sodium bromide/ citric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Tao; Steimle, Emilie; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Kato, Shunsuke; Lampimäki, Markus; Brown, Matthew; van Bokhoven, Jeroen; Nolting, Frithjof; Kleibert, Armin; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Sea-salt solution - air interfaces play an important role in the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. The reaction of ozone (O3) with bromide is of interest in the context of formation of photolabile halogens (Br2, BrCl) in the marine boundary layer. Recent experiments have suggested that the bromide oxidation rate is related to the surface concentration of bromide [1] and inversely related to the gas phase concentration of O3, an indication for a precursor mediated reaction at the surface [2]. So far, the effect of organics (such as those occurring at the ocean surface or in marine aerosols) on the reaction of O3 with bromide aerosols has not been studied yet. In our study we investigate the uptake kinetics of O3 to a mixed solution of sodium bromide (NaBr) and citric acid (CA), which represents highly oxidized organic compounds present in the environment, with a well-established coated wall flow tube technique, which leads to exposure of the film to O3 allowing the heterogeneous reactions to take place and the loss of O3 being measured. The results indicate that the uptake of O3 to the films with the higher bromide concentrations (0.34M and 4M) is independent of the gas phase concentration and roughly consistent with uptake limited by reaction in the bulk. For the lower bromide concentration (84mM), however, we observe a trend of the uptake coefficient to decrease with increasing O3 concentration, indicating an increasing importance of a surface reaction. In an attempt to constrain the kinetic data, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to get insight into the surface composition of the aqueous solution - air interface. Previous XPS studies have shown that halide ion concentrations are enhanced at the aqueous solution air interface [3-4], which likely promotes the surface reactions of bromide or iodide with O3. A first XPS study of ternary solutions of KI with butanol indicated the importance of specific interactions of the cation with the alcohol

  4. Multiple glass transitions and freezing events of aqueous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Loerting, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10-64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid-glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid-glass and reverse glass-liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role.

  5. Quantitative Determination of Citric and Ascorbic Acid in Powdered Drink Mixes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmann, Samuella B.; Wheeler, Dale E.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure by which the reactions are used to quantitatively determine the amount of total acid, the amount of total ascorbic acid and the amount of citric acid in a given sample of powdered drink mix, are described. A safe, reliable and low-cost quantitative method to analyze consumer product for acid content is provided.

  6. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  7. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Negrón-Mendoza, A. Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-23

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  8. Influence of ingestion of aluminum, citric acid and soil on mineral metabolism of lactating beef cows.

    PubMed

    Allen, V G; Horn, F P; Fontenot, J P

    1986-05-01

    Lactating beef cows (16 Hereford and 34 Angus, 430 kg average body weight, aged 8 to 10 yr) were fed a basal diet containing 200 micrograms/g Al alone or supplemented with Al-citrate, citric acid, soil or soil plus citric acid for 56 d. Diets containing Al-citrate, soil and soil plus citric acid contained 1,730, 1,870 and 1,935 micrograms/g Al, dry-basis, respectively. Adding soil to the diet also increased Mg and Fe content of the diet. Aluminum values in ruminal contents of beef cows fed the basal alone or supplemented with citric acid, Al-citrate, soil or soil plus citric acid were 800, 990, 2,930, 3,410 and 2,910 micrograms/g, air-dry basis, respectively. Serum Mg and inorganic P declined (P less than .01) and urinary Ca concentration increased (P less than .01) for cows fed Al-citrate. By d 56, serum Mg was 1.5 and 2.2 mg/dl, and serum P was 3.8 and 6.8 mg/dl, for cows fed Al-citrate and basal diets, respectively. Calcium concentrations in urine were 281 and 11 micrograms/g for cows fed Al-citrate and basal diets, respectively. Citric acid, soil and soil plus citric acid had no detrimental effects on serum Mg and inorganic P, or urinary Ca concentration. By d 56, serum Ca was higher (P less than .06) in cows fed Al-citrate, compared with cows on the other four diets. Bone Ca, P, Zn and percent ash were not significantly affected by treatment but bone Mg tended to be slightly lower (P less than .07) for cows fed Al-citrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Mechanism of aluminum tolerance in snapbeans. Root exudation of citric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, S.C. ); Buta, J.G.; Howell, R.K.; Foy, C.D. )

    1991-07-01

    One proposed mechanism of aluminum (Al) tolerance in plants is the release of an Al-chelating compound into the rhizosphere. In this experiment, two cultivars of snapbeans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Romano and Dade) that differ in Al tolerance were grown hydroponically with and without Al under aseptic conditions. After growth in nutrient solutions for 8 days, aliphatic and phenolic organic acids were analyzed in the culture solutions with an ion chromatograph and a high pressure liquid chromatograph. The tolerant snapbean, Dade when exposed to Al, exuded citric acid into the rhizosphere in a concentration that was 70 times as great as that of Dade grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano, exuded only slightly more citric acid into the growing medium under Al-stress, compared to nonstressed conditions. Citric acid is known to chelate Al strongly and to reverse its phytotoxic effects. Also, citric acid has been shown previously to enhance the availability of phosphorus (P) from insoluble Al phosphates, Thus, one mechanism of Al-tolerance in snapbeans appears to be the exudation of citric acid into the rhizosphere, induced either by toxic levels of Al or by low P due to the precipitation of insoluble Al phosphates. The experiment was not able to distinguish between these two factors; however, tolerance to both primary and secondary Al-stress injuries are important for plants growing in Al-toxic soils.

  10. Preparation and physico-chemical properties of hydrogels from carboxymethyl cassava starch crosslinked with citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonkham, Sasikan; Sangseethong, Kunruedee; Chatakanon, Pathama; Niamnuy, Chalida; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Sriroth, Klanarong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, environmentally friendly hydrogels prepared from renewable bio-based resources have drawn significant attention from both industrial and academic sectors. In this study, chemically crosslinked hydrogels have been developed from cassava starch which is a bio-based polymer using a non-toxic citric acid as a crosslinking agent. Cassava starch was first modified by carboxymethylation to improve its water absorbency property. The carboxymethyl cassava starch (CMCS) obtained was then crosslinked with citric acid at different concentrations and reaction times. The gel fraction of hydrogels increased progressively with increasing citric acid concentration. Free swelling capacity of hydrogels in de-ionized water, saline solution and buffers at various pHs as well as absorption under load were investigated. The results revealed that swelling behavior and mechanical characteristic of hydrogels depended on the citric acid concentration used in reaction. Increasing citric acid concentration resulted in hydrogels with stronger network but lower swelling and absorption capacity. The cassava starch hydrogels developed were sensitive to ionic strength and pH of surrounding medium, showing much reduced swelling capacity in saline salt solution and acidic buffers.

  11. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-11-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not.

  12. Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    He, Weihai; Miao, Frederick J-P; Lin, Daniel C-H; Schwandner, Ralf T; Wang, Zhulun; Gao, Jinhai; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Ling, Lei

    2004-05-13

    The citric acid cycle is central to the regulation of energy homeostasis and cell metabolism. Mutations in enzymes that catalyse steps in the citric acid cycle result in human diseases with various clinical presentations. The intermediates of the citric acid cycle are present at micromolar concentration in blood and are regulated by respiration, metabolism and renal reabsorption/extrusion. Here we show that GPR91 (ref. 3), a previously orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), functions as a receptor for the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate. We also report that GPR99 (ref. 4), a close relative of GPR91, responds to alpha-ketoglutarate, another intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Thus by acting as ligands for GPCRs, succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate are found to have unexpected signalling functions beyond their traditional roles. Furthermore, we show that succinate increases blood pressure in animals. The succinate-induced hypertensive effect involves the renin-angiotensin system and is abolished in GPR91-deficient mice. Our results indicate a possible role for GPR91 in renovascular hypertension, a disease closely linked to atherosclerosis, diabetes and renal failure.

  13. Hypotensive and toxicological study of citric acid and other constituents from Tagetes patula roots.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Rubeena; Ahmad, Mohammad; Naz, Aneela; Siddiqui, Humaira; Ahmad, Syed Iqbal; Faizi, Shaheen

    2004-10-01

    Study of the effects of the methanolic extract of Tagetes patula roots on blood pressure led to the isolation of well known citric (1) and malic acid (7) as hypotensive, and pyridine hydrochloride (4) as hypertensive constituents of the plant along with a new constituent, 2-hydroxy, 5-hydroxymethyl furan (9). Citric acid and malic acid caused 71% and 43% fall in Mean Arterial Blood Pressure (MABP) of rats at the doses of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg respectively while pyridine hydrochloride produced 34% rise in the MABP of rats at the dose of 30 mg/kg. LD50 and LD100 of citric acid in mice have been determined as 545 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg, respectively.

  14. 75 FR 71078 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ...., Ltd. Juxian Hongde Citric Acid Co., Ltd. Kelong International Co., Ltd. Laiwu Taihe Biochemistry Co.... Shandong Laiwu Gangcheng Group Shandong Ningmeng Biochemistry Co., Ltd. Shandong Yingfeng Chemical...

  15. Effects of citric acid esterification on digestibility, structural and physicochemical properties of cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ji-Qiang; Zhou, Da-Nian; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Xu, Xue-Ming; Chen, Han-Qing

    2015-11-15

    In this study, citric acid was used to react with cassava starch in order to compare the digestibility, structural and physicochemical properties of citrate starch samples. The results indicated that citric acid esterification treatment significantly increased the content of resistant starch (RS) in starch samples. The swelling power and solubility of citrate starch samples were lower than those of native starch. Compared with native starch, a new peak at 1724 cm(-1) was appeared in all citrate starch samples, and crystalline peaks of all starch citrates became much smaller or even disappeared. Differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the endothermic peak of citrate starches gradually shrank or even disappeared. Moreover, the citrate starch gels exhibited better freeze-thaw stability. These results suggested that citric acid esterification induced structural changes in cassava starch significantly affected its digestibility and it could be a potential method for the preparation of RS with thermal stability.

  16. Wheat straw hemicelluloses added with cellulose nanocrystals and citric acid. Effect on film physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paulo H F; Waldron, Keith W; Wilson, David R; Cunha, Arcelina P; Brito, Edy S de; Rodrigues, Tigressa H S; Rosa, Morsyleide F; Azeredo, Henriette M C

    2017-05-15

    Wheat straw has been used as a source of hemicelluloses (WSH) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) for the elaboration of biodegradable films. Different films have been formed by using WSH as a matrix and different contents of CNC and citric acid. The predominant hemicelluloses were arabinoxylans. CNC reinforced the films, improving tensile strength and modulus, water resistance and water vapor barrier. Citric acid, on the other hand, presented concomitant plasticizing and crosslinking effects (the latter also evidenced by FTIR), probably due to a crosslinking extension by glycerol. The use of 5.9wt% CNC and 30wt% citric acid was defined as optimal conditions, resulting in minimum water sensitivity and permeability, while maintaining a good combination of tensile properties. Under those conditions, the films presented enhanced modulus, elongation, water resistance, and barrier to water vapor when compared to the control WSH film, and might be used for wrapping or coating a variety of foods.

  17. Detection and formation scenario of citric acid, pyruvic acid, and other possible metabolism precursors in carbonaceous meteorites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, George; Reed, Chris; Nguyen, Dang; Carter, Malika; Wang, Yi

    2011-08-23

    Carbonaceous meteorites deliver a variety of organic compounds to Earth that may have played a role in the origin and/or evolution of biochemical pathways. Some apparently ancient and critical metabolic processes require several compounds, some of which are relatively labile such as keto acids. Therefore, a prebiotic setting for any such individual process would have required either a continuous distant source for the entire suite of intact precursor molecules and/or an energetic and compact local synthesis, particularly of the more fragile members. To date, compounds such as pyruvic acid, oxaloacetic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, and α-ketoglutaric acid (all members of the citric acid cycle) have not been identified in extraterrestrial sources or, as a group, as part of a "one pot" suite of compounds synthesized under plausibly prebiotic conditions. We have identified these compounds and others in carbonaceous meteorites and/or as low temperature (laboratory) reaction products of pyruvic acid. In meteorites, we observe many as part of three newly reported classes of compounds: keto acids (pyruvic acid and homologs), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (citric acid and homologs), and tricarboxylic acids. Laboratory syntheses using (13)C-labeled reactants demonstrate that one compound alone, pyruvic acid, can produce several (nonenzymatic) members of the citric acid cycle including oxaloacetic acid. The isotopic composition of some of the meteoritic keto acids points to interstellar or presolar origins, indicating that such compounds might also exist in other planetary systems.

  18. The Effect of Citric Acid on the Oxidation of Organic Contaminants by Fenton's Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seol, Y.; Javandel, I.; Lee, G.

    2003-12-01

    Combined with acids and iron catalysts, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as Fenton's reagent is proven to be effective in oxidizing halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Fenton's reagent, traditionally used for waste water treatment technique, has been applied to the remediation of contaminated soil systems and numerous investigators have found intrinsic iron salts are effective source of iron catalyst for the reaction. Citric acid, which is naturally occurring nutrients to microorganisms and less destructive to soil chemical properties, is selected for an acidifying agent to create acidic soil condition. However, citric acid has been considered as a reaction inhibitant because it sequesters ferric iron from Fenton's catalytic cycle by forming strong chelates with iron. This paper presents the feasibility of using citric acid as an acidifying agent of soil matrix for the Fenton-like oxidation. Series of batch tests were performed to test disappearance of VOCs in various aqueous systems with two acidifying agents (citric acid or sulfuric acid) and three iron sources (iron sulfate, water soluble soil iron, or soil matrix). Batch results show that soluble iron is essential for near complete disappearance of VOCs and that citric acid performs similarly to sulfuric acid at low H2O2 dosage (< 1 wt%). The test soil provided water-soluble soil iron but also contained scavengers of the oxidizing agents, resulting in limited removals of VOCs. Column tests confirmed the results of the batch tests, suggesting citric acid is also as effective as sulfuric acid in providing acidic environment for the Fenton-like oxidation. The batch experiments also reveal that higher doses of H2O2 lower the degree of VOC removals in citric acid systems. Potential explanations for this declining include that excessive presence of H2O2 expedites the oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron, which then forms a strong complex with citrate, leading to the sequestration of the iron from the Fenton

  19. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... with the minimum ratio of total soluble solids to anhydrous citric acid: Table II Total soluble solids (average pct) Maximum anhydrous citric acid (average pct) Minimum ratio of total soluble solids to... 1.027 9.25-1 9.6 1.043 9.20-1 9.7 1.060 9.15-1 9.8 1.077 9.10-1 9.9 1.094 9.05-1 10.0 1.111...

  20. Oxalic acid production by citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger overexpressing the oxaloacetate hydrolase gene oahA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used worldwide in the industrial production of citric acid. However, under specific cultivation conditions, citric acid-producing strains of A. niger accumulate oxalic acid as a by-product. Oxalic acid is used as a chelator, detergent, or tanning agent. Here, we sought to develop oxalic acid hyperproducers using A. niger as a host. To generate oxalic acid hyperproducers by metabolic engineering, transformants overexpressing the oahA gene, encoding oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC 3.7.1.1), were constructed in citric acid-producing A. niger WU-2223L as a host. The oxalic acid production capacity of this strain was examined by cultivation of EOAH-1 under conditions appropriate for oxalic acid production with 30 g/l glucose as a carbon source. Under all the cultivation conditions tested, the amount of oxalic acid produced by EOAH-1, a representative oahA-overexpressing transformant, exceeded that produced by A. niger WU-2223L. A. niger WU-2223L and EOAH-1 produced 15.6 and 28.9 g/l oxalic acid, respectively, during the 12-day cultivation period. The yield of oxalic acid for EOAH-1 was 64.2 % of the maximum theoretical yield. Our method for oxalic acid production gave the highest yield of any study reported to date. Therefore, we succeeded in generating oxalic acid hyperproducers by overexpressing a single gene, i.e., oahA, in citric acid-producing A. niger as a host.

  1. The Role of Citric Acid in Perfecting Platinum Monolayer on Palladium Nanoparticles during the Surface Limited Redox Replacement Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shangqian; Yue, Jeffrey; Qin, Xueping; Wei, Zidong; Liang, Zhixiu; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Brankovic, Stanko R.; Du, Zheng; Shao, Minhua

    2016-07-28

    Cu-mediated-Pt-displacement method that involves the displacement of an underpotentially deposited (UPD) Cu monolayer by Pt has been extensively studied to prepare core-shell catalysts. It has been found that Pt clusters instead of a uniform Pt monolayer were formed in the gram batch synthesis. With a suitable surfactant, such as citric acid, the Pt shell could be much more uniform. In this study, the role of citric acid in controlling the Cu-Pt displacement reaction kinetics was studied by electrochemical techniques and theoretical approaches. It was found that citric acid strongly adsorbed on Pd, Pt, Cu/Pd, and Pt/Pd surfaces, especially in the double layer region in acid solutions. The strong adsorption of citric acid slowed down the Cu-Pt displacement reaction. The main characteristics of such strong interaction most likely arises from the OH groups in the citric acid molecule according to the molecular dynamics simulation results.

  2. 76 FR 82275 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China (PRC). See... and Certain Citrate Salts, 74 FR 25705 (May 29, 2009). On May 2, 2011, the Department published...

  3. 77 FR 74171 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') on June 6, 2012.\\1\\ The period of... Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Post- Preliminary...

  4. 78 FR 54625 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China (PRC) covering the period...

  5. 76 FR 2648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China... initiation of administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate...

  6. The extraordinary mitochondrion and unusual citric acid cycle in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    van Hellemond, J J; Opperdoes, F R; Tielens, A G M

    2005-11-01

    African trypanosomes are parasitic protozoa that cause sleeping sickness and nagana. Trypanosomes are not only of scientific interest because of their clinical importance, but also because these protozoa contain several very unusual biological features, such as their specially adapted mitochondrion and the compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes in glycosomes. The energy metabolism of Trypanosoma brucei differs significantly from that of their hosts and changes drastically during the life cycle. Despite the presence of all citric acid cycle enzymes in procyclic insect-stage T. brucei, citric acid cycle activity is not used for energy generation. Recent investigations on the influence of substrate availability on the type of energy metabolism showed that absence of glycolytic substrates did not induce a shift from a fermentative metabolism to complete oxidation of substrates. Apparently, insect-stage T. brucei use parts of the citric acid cycle for other purposes than for complete degradation of mitochondrial substrates. Parts of the cycle are suggested to be used for (i) transport of acetyl-CoA units from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the biosynthesis of fatty acids, (ii) degradation of proline and glutamate to succinate, (iii) generation of malate, which can then be used for gluconeogenesis. Therefore the citric acid cycle in trypanosomes does not function as a cycle.

  7. The cardioprotective effects of citric Acid and L-malic Acid on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xilan; Liu, Jianxun; Dong, Wei; Li, Peng; Li, Lei; Lin, Chengren; Zheng, Yongqiu; Hou, Jincai; Li, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids in Chinese herbs, the long-neglected components, have been reported to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet aggregation activities; thus they may have potentially protective effect on ischemic heart disease. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the protective effects of two organic acids, that is, citric acid and L-malic acid, which are the main components of Fructus Choerospondiatis, on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and the underlying mechanisms. In in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, we found that treatments with citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced myocardial infarct size, serum levels of TNF-α, and platelet aggregation. In vitro experiments revealed that both citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced LDH release, decreased apoptotic rate, downregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3, and upregulated the expression of phosphorylated Akt in primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. These results suggest that both citric acid and L-malic acid have protective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury; the underlying mechanism may be related to their anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet aggregation and direct cardiomyocyte protective effects. These results also demonstrate that organic acids, besides flavonoids, may also be the major active ingredient of Fructus Choerospondiatis responsible for its cardioprotective effects and should be attached great importance in the therapy of ischemic heart disease.

  8. Analysis of Citric Acid in Beverages: Use of an Indicator Displacement Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umali, Alona P.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Wright, Aaron T.; Blieden, Clifford R.; Smith, Carolyne K.; Tian, Tian; Truong, Jennifer A.; Crumm, Caitlin E.; Garcia, Jorge E.; Lee, Soal; Mosier, Meredith; Nguyen, Chester P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of an indicator displacement assay permits the visualization of binding events between host and guest molecules. An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to demonstrate the technique in the determination of citric acid content in commercially available beverages such as soda pop and fruit juices. Through the technique, students…

  9. Corn starch granules with enhanced load-carrying capacity via citric acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Yea; Huber, Kerry C

    2013-01-02

    This research investigated conditions by which maize starch granule porosity and load-carrying capacity (LCC) might be enhanced via treatment with varying citric acid concentrations (0.5-1.5 M), temperatures (40-60 °C), and lengths of treatment (1-8 h). At the lowest temperatures (40 and 50 °C), citric acid treatment induced minimal physicochemical changes to granules. In contrast, both aqueous and oil LCCs of starches treated at 60 °C (0.5 M citric acid, 2 h) were almost doubled (15.69 and 14.48 mL/10 g starch, respectively), recovering 92% of the granular starch after treatment. Such treatment increased starch hydration capacity (0.97-1.91) and reduced gelatinization enthalpy (10.6-7.4 J/g). More severe treatment conditions adversely impacted aqueous LCC (due to excessive granule swelling), but improved oil absorption. The basis for LCC enhancement by citric acid treatment was ascribed to leaching of starch material from granules and partial disruption of the granule crystalline structure, as opposed to starch hydrolysis or chemical substitution.

  10. Iron-dependent changes in cellular energy metabolism: influence on citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oexle, H; Gnaiger, E; Weiss, G

    1999-11-10

    Iron modulates the expression of the critical citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase via a translational mechanism involving iron regulatory proteins. Thus, the present study was undertaken to investigate the consequences of iron perturbation on citric acid cycle activity, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration in the human cell line K-562. In agreement with previous data iron increases the activity of mitochondrial aconitase while it is reduced upon addition of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). Interestingly, iron also positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, namely citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase, while DFO decreases the activity of these enzymes. Consequently, iron supplementation results in increased formation of reducing equivalents (NADH) by the citric acid cycle, and thus in increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP formation via oxidative phosphorylation as shown herein. This in turn leads to downregulation of glucose utilization. In contrast, all these metabolic pathways are reduced upon iron depletion, and thus glycolysis and lactate formation are significantly increased in order to compensate for the decrease in ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of DFO. Our results point to a complex interaction between iron homeostasis, oxygen supply and cellular energy metabolism in human cells.

  11. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  12. Modification of wheat gluten with citric acid to produce superabsorbent materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten was reacted with citric acid to produce natural superabsorbent materials able to absorb up to 78 times its weight in water. The properties of the modified gluten samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and water uptak...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in the following Table II...

  14. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils. PMID:26087302

  15. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION...

  16. Leaching of metals from large pieces of printed circuit boards using citric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Umesh; Su, C; Hocheng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the leaching of metals from large pieces of computer printed circuit boards (CPCBs) was studied. A combination of citric acid (0.5 M) and 1.76 M hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to leach the metals from CPCB piece. The influence of system variables such as H2O2 concentration, concentration of citric acid, shaking speed, and temperature on the metal leaching process was investigated. The complete metal leaching was achieved in 4 h from a 4 × 4 cm CPCB piece. The presence of citric acid and H2O2 together in the leaching solution is essential for complete metal leaching. The optimum addition amount of H2O2 was 5.83 %. The citric acid concentration and shaking speed had an insignificant effect on the leaching of metals. The increase in the temperature above 30 °C showed a drastic effect on metal leaching process.

  17. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Yasser S; Alamri, Saad A

    2012-04-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid.

  18. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  19. EDTA and citric acid mediated phytoextraction of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd through marigold (Tagetes erecta).

    PubMed

    Sinhal, V K; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, V P

    2010-05-01

    Phytoextraction is an emerging cost-effective solution for remediation of contaminated soils which involves the removal of toxins, especially heavy metals and metalloids, by the roots of the plants with subsequent transport to aerial plant organs. The aim of the present investigation is to study the effects of EDTA and citric acid on accumulation potential of marigold (Tagetes erecta) to Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd and also to evaluate the impacts of these chelators (EDTA and citric acid) in combination with all the four heavy metals on the growth of marigold. The plants were grown in pots and treated with Zn (7.3 mg l(-1)), Cu (7.5 mg I(-1)), Pb (3.7 mg l(-1)) and Cd (0.2 mg l(-1)) alone and in combination with different doses of EDTA i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mg l(-1). All the three doses of EDTA i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mg l(-1) significantly increased the accumulation of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd by roots, stems and leaves as compared to control treatments. The 30 mg l(-1) concentration of citric acid showed reduced accumulation of these metals by root, stem and leaves as compared to lower doses i.e., 10 and 20 mg l(-1). Among the four heavy metals, Zn accumulated in the great amount (526.34 mg kg(-1) DW) followed by Cu (443.14 mg kg(-1) DW), Pb (393.16 mg kg(-1) DW) and Cd (333.62 mg kg(-1) DW) in leaves with 30 mg l(-1) EDTA treatment. The highest concentration of EDTA and citric acid (30 mg l(-1)) caused significant reduction in growth of marigold in terms of plant height, fresh weight of plant, total chlorophyll, carbohydrate content and protein content. Thus EDTA and citric acid efficiently increased the phytoextractability of marigold which can be used to remediate the soil contaminated with these metals.

  20. CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

  1. Influence of Citric Acid on the Pink Color and Characteristics of Sous Vide Processed Chicken Breasts During Chill Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki-Won

    2015-01-01

    Chicken breast dipped with citric acid (CA) was treated by sous vide processing and stored in a refrigerated state for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 14 d. A non-dipped control group (CON) and three groups dipped in different concentrations of citric acid concentration were analyzed (0.5%, 0.5CIT; 2.0%, 2CIT and 5.0%, 5CIT; w/v). Cooking yield and moisture content increased due to the citric acid. While the redness of the juice and meat in all groups showed significant increase during storage, the redness of the citric acid groups was reduced compared to the control group (p<0.05). The percentage of myoglobin denaturation (PMD) of the CA groups was also increased according to the level of CA during storage. Total aerobic counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts, volatile basic nitrogen and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were generally lower in the citric acid-treated samples than in untreated ones, indicating extended shelf life of the cooked chicken breast dipped in citric acid solution. The shear force of the 2CIT and 5CIT groups was significantly lower (p<0.05). The findings indicated positive effects in the physicochemical properties and storage ability of sous vide chicken breast at 2% and 5% citric acid concentrations. PMID:26761885

  2. Effect of Pre-Harvest Foliar Application of Citric Acid and Malic Acid on Chlorophyll Content and Post-Harvest Vase Life of Lilium cv. Brunello.

    PubMed

    Darandeh, Nafiseh; Hadavi, Ebrahim

    2011-01-01

    Citric acid is a regular ingredient in many vase solution formulations but pre-harvest use of citric acid is a novel method in vase life extension of cut flowers, which is reported on tuberose earlier. In order to verify previous result, and check for possible substitution of citric acid by malic acid, the current research was designed. Citric acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) and malic acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) were used in a factorial design with three replications. Foliar sprays were applied two times during growth period of Lilium plants. The results point out that 0.15% citric acid alone had increased vase life from 11.8 in control treatment to 14 days (α < 0.05). The interesting finding was the effect of citric acid on bulbil weight, which was decreased from 9 g in control to 1.5 g in treatment containing combination of 0.075% citric acid and 0.075% malic acid. Malic acid while having no direct effect on pre-mentioned traits surprisingly increased the chlorophyll content significantly. The interaction effect between citric acid and malic acid on vase life and chlorophyll content proved significant and was evident in results, both as antagonistic and synergistic in various traits.

  3. A mutation of Aspergillus niger for hyper-production of citric acid from corn meal hydrolysate in a bioreactor*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Lu, Dong; Wu, Qing-hua; Li, Wen-jian

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the screened mutants for hyper-production of citric acid induced by carbon (12C6+) ion beams and X-ray irradiation were investigated in our current study. Among these mutants, mutant H4002 screened from 12C6+ ion irradiation had a higher yield of citric acid production than the parental strain in a 250-ml shaking flash. These expanded submerged experiments in a bioreactor were also carried out for mutant H4002. The results showed that (177.7–196.0) g/L citric acid was accumulated by H4002 through exploiting corn meal hydrolysate (containing initial 200.0–235.7 g/L sugar) with the productivity of (2.96–3.27) g/(L∙h). This was especially true when the initial sugar concentration was 210 g/L, and the best economical citric acid production reached (187.5±0.7) g/L with a productivity of 3.13 g/(L∙h). It was observed that mutant H4002 can utilize low-cost corn meal as a feedstock to efficiently produce citric acid. These results imply that the H4002 strain has the industrial production potentiality for citric acid and offers strong competition for the citric acid industry. PMID:25367793

  4. Survival of heated Bacillus coagulans spores in a medium acidified with lactic or citric acid.

    PubMed

    Palop, A; Marco, A; Raso, J; Sala, F J; Condón, S

    1997-08-19

    The influence of the intensity of heat treatments on the capacity of citric or lactic acid to prevent growth of survivors of Bacillus coagulans spores after 10 days storage at 35 degrees C was studied. In most cases, the number of survivors during storage decreased. The extent of this spore inactivation depended on the intensity of previous heat treatment and the pH of the medium and the acidulant used. The inactivating effect of storage was pronounced even at pH values less acidic than those used by the canning industry. Citric acid was more effective than lactic acid on spores given only low heat treatments, but lactic was more effective against those given more severe heat treatments. The severity of heat treatment required for lactic to be more effective than citric acid increased with pH of the medium. Heat treatment also required increased pH for heated spores to grow. pH 4.6, regardless of acidulant used, was unable to prevent growth of unheated spores but a less acidic pH (pH 5.2) did prevent growth even when spores had been given only mild heat treatments (10 s at 100 degrees C).

  5. Potential citric acid exposure and toxicity to Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) associated with Eleutherodactylus frog control.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William C; Witmer, Gary W; Jojola, Susan M; Sin, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We examined potential exposure of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) to citric acid, a minimum risk pesticide registered for control of invasive Eleutherodactylus frog populations. Hoary bats are nocturnal insectivores that roost solitarily in foliage, federally listed as endangered, and are endemic to Hawaii. Oral ingestion during grooming of contaminated fur appears to be the principal route by which these bats might be exposed to citric acid. We made assessments of oral toxicity, citric acid consumption, retention of material on fur, and grooming using big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) as a surrogate species. We evaluated both ground application and aerial application of 16 % solutions of citric acid during frog control operations. Absorbent bat effigies exposed to ground and aerial operational spray applications retained means of 1.54 and 0.02 g, respectively, of dry citric acid, although retention by the effigies was much higher than bat carcasses drenched in citric acid solutions. A high dose delivered orally (2,811 mg/kg) was toxic to the big brown bats and emesis occurred in 1 bat dosed as low as the 759 mg/kg level. No effect was observed with the lower doses examined (≤ 542 mg/kg). Bats sprayed with 5 ml of 16 % (w/w) citric acid solution showed no evidence of intoxication. In field situations, it is unlikely that bats would be sprayed directly or ingest much citric acid retained by fur. Based on our observations, we believe Hawaiian hoary bats to be at very low risk from harmful exposure to a toxic dose of citric acid during frog control operations.

  6. Photochemical synthesis of citric acid cycle intermediates based on titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Brucato, John Robert; De Sio, Antonio; Botta, Giorgia; Pace, Emanuele; Gambicorti, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of the citric acid cycle is one of the most remarkable occurrences with regard to understanding the origin and evolution of metabolic pathways. Although the chemical steps of the cycle are preserved intact throughout nature, diverse organisms make wide use of its chemistry, and in some cases organisms use only a selected portion of the cycle. However, the origins of this cycle would have arisen in the more primitive anaerobic organism or even back in the proto-metabolism, which likely arose spontaneously under favorable prebiotic chemical conditions. In this context, we report that UV irradiation of formamide in the presence of titanium dioxide afforded 6 of the 11 carboxylic acid intermediates of the reductive version of the citric acid cycle. Since this cycle is the central metabolic pathway of contemporary biology, this report highlights the role of photochemical processes in the origin of the metabolic apparatus.

  7. Effect of citric acid deamidation on in vitro digestibility and antioxidant properties of wheat gluten.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chaoying; Sun, Weizheng; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-12-01

    The effects of citric acid deamidation on the physiochemical properties of wheat gluten were investigated. In vitro digestion was carried out to determine changes of molecular weight distribution, amino acids composition and antioxidant efficacy of wheat gluten hydrolysates. Results indicated that citric acid deamidation significantly increased gluten solubility and surface hydrophobicity, at a neutral pH. Deamidation induced molecular weight distribution change of gluten with little proteolysis. Results from FTIR indicated that the α-helix and β-turn of deamidated gluten increased accompanied by a decrease of the β-sheet structure. After deamidation, in vitro pepsin digestibility of wheat gluten decreased, while in vitro pancreatin digestibility increased. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) activity of the in vitro digests decreased with increase of deamidation time. The high Lys and total essential AAs amounts in the final digests suggested that the nutritional values of wheat gluten after deamidation might be enhanced.

  8. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    PubMed

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen.

  9. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  10. Chemical speciation and mobilization of copper and zinc in naturally contaminated mine soils with citric and tartaric acids.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Moliner, Ana; Masaguer, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A one-step extraction procedure and a leaching column experiment were performed to assess the effects of citric and tartaric acids on Cu and Zn mobilization in naturally contaminated mine soils to facilitate assisted phytoextraction. A speciation modeling of the soil solution and the metal fractionation of soils were performed to elucidate the chemical processes that affected metal desorption by organic acids. Different extracting solutions were prepared, all of which contained 0.01 M KNO(3) and different concentrations of organic acids: control without organic acids, 0.5 mM citric, 0.5 mM tartaric, 10 mM citric, 10 mM tartaric, and 5 mM citric +5 mM tartaric. The results of the extraction procedure showed that higher concentrations of organic acids increased metal desorption, and citric acid was more effective at facilitating metal desorption than tartaric acid. Metal desorption was mainly influenced by the decreasing pH and the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides, not by the formation of soluble metal-organic complexes as was predicted by the speciation modeling. The results of the column study reported that low concentrations of organic acids did not significantly increase metal mobilization and that higher doses were also not able to mobilize Zn. However, 5-10 mM citric acid significantly promoted Cu mobilization (from 1 mg kg(-1) in the control to 42 mg kg(-1) with 10 mM citric acid) and reduced the exchangeable (from 21 to 3 mg kg(-1)) and the Fe and Mn oxides (from 443 to 277 mg kg(-1)) fractions. Citric acid could efficiently facilitate assisted phytoextraction techniques.

  11. By-products from the biodiesel chain as a substrate to citric acid production by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuella; Zimmer, Gabriela F; Cremonese, Ezequiel B; de C de S Schneider, Rosana; Corbellini, Valeriano A

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we propose the use of tung cake for the production of organic acids, with an emphasis on citric acid by solid-state fermentation. We evaluated the conditions of production and the by-products from the biodiesel chain as raw materials involved in this bioprocess. First, we standardized the conditions of solid-state fermentation in tung cake with and without residual fat and with different concentrations of glycerine using the fungus Aspergillus niger The solid-state fermentation process was monitored for 7 days considering the biomass growth and pH level. Citric acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Fungal development was better in the crude tung cake, consisting of 20% glycerine. The highest citric acid yield was 350 g kg(-1) of biomass. Therefore, the solid-state fermentation of the tung cake with glycerine led to citric acid production using the Aspergillus niger fungus.

  12. The crystallinity of calcium phosphate powders influenced by the conditions of neutralized procedure with citric acid additions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chengfeng

    2009-05-06

    Calcium phosphate powders with nano-sized crystallinity were synthesized by neutralization using calcium hydroxide and orthophosphoric acid with the assistance of citric acid. The influence of processing parameters, such as free or additive citric acid, synthetic temperature and ripening time, on the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite were investigated. The results of X-ray diffraction and microstructure observations showed that the crystallinity and morphology of nano-sized hydroxyapatite particles were influenced by the presence or absence of citric acid. It was found that the crystallinities and crystallite sizes of hydroxyapatite powders prepared with the additive citric acid increased with increasing synthetic temperature and ripening time. Especially, the crystallinities of (h k 0) planes were raised and more homogeneously grown particles were obtained with increasing synthetic temperature.

  13. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-08-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short lived radioactive tracer method we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar di- and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ~ 3 × 10-4-~ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). This humidity dependence can be explained by a changing viscosity and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the viscosity of highly concentrated citric acid solutions is not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics may be limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  14. Chemical modification of chitosan film via surface grafting of citric acid molecular to promote the biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Shen, Xin; Zhou, Huan; Wang, Yingjun; Deng, Linhong

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel chitosan-citric acid film (abbreviated as CS-CA) suitable for biomedical applications in this study. In this CS-CA film, the citric acid, which is a harmless organic acid has been extensively investigated as a modifying agent on carbohydrate polymers, was cross-linked by 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) onto the surface of chitosan (CS) film. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the graft copolymerization of the modified chitosan film (CS-CA). Surface wettability, moisturizing performance, the capacity of mineralization in vitro and biocompatibility of the films were characterized. After modification, this CS-CA film has good hydrophilicity. It is very evident that the citric acid grafting treatment significantly promotes the biomineralization of the chitosan based substrates. Cell experiments show that the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts can adhere and proliferate well on the surface of CS-CA film. This CS-CA film, which can be prepared in large quantities and at low cost, should have potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  15. The effect of citric acid on the activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom polyphenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Li-qiang; Liu, Jun-ping; Zhang, Zhao-qin; Liu, Cheng-mei; Liang, Rui-hong

    2013-09-01

    Few reports have focused on the effect of citric acid on thermodynamics and conformation of polyphenoloxidase (PPO). In this study, variations on activity, thermodynamics and conformation of mushroom PPO induced by citric acid (1-60mM) and relationships among these were investigated. It showed that with the increasing concentration of citric acid, the activity of PPO decreased gradually to an inactivity condition; inactivation rate constant (k) of PPO increased and the activation energy (Ea) as well as thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) decreased, which indicated that the thermosensitivity, stability and number of non-covalent bonds of PPO decreased. The conformation was gradually unfolded, which was reflected in the decrease of α-helix contents, increase of β-sheet and exposure of aromatic amino acid residuals. Moreover, two linear relationships of relative activities, enthalpies (ΔH) against α-helix contents were obtained. It indicated that changes of activity and thermodynamics might correlate to the unfolding of conformation.

  16. Nucleation of calcium carbonate in presence of citric acid, DTPA, EDTA and pyromellitic acid.

    PubMed

    Westin, K-J; Rasmuson, A C

    2005-02-15

    The influence of four calcium complexing additives, i.e., citric acid (CIT), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and pyromellitic acid (PMA), and their concentration on the induction time of calcium carbonate nucleation has been studied. The experiments were performed by rapidly mixing a sodium carbonate solution and a calcium chloride solution of various concentrations. The induction time was obtained by recording the white light absorption of the solution. Chemical speciation was used to estimate the initial thermodynamic driving force of each experiment. The induction time was found to increase with additive concentration. The effect varies from one additive to another. CIT causes the greatest increase in induction time and PMA the least. Using classical nucleation theory the experimental data were evaluated in terms of the interfacial energy. In pure water a value of 37.8 mJ m(-2) was obtained, showing good agreement with other works. CIT, DTPA and EDTA caused a notable increase of the interfacial energy at a concentration of 0.5 mmol l(-1). PMA does not appear to have any effect at all on the interfacial energy. Different mechanisms for the influence of the additives on the measured induction time and on the estimated interfacial energy are discussed.

  17. Crystal growth of aragonite and calcite in presence of citric acid, DTPA, EDTA and pyromellitic acid.

    PubMed

    Westin, K-J; Rasmuson, A C

    2005-02-15

    The influence of four calcium complexing substances, i.e., citric acid (CIT), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and pyromellitic acid (PMA), on the crystal growth rate of the calcium carbonate polymorphs aragonite and calcite has been studied. Using a seeded constant supersaturation method supersaturation was maintained at 4 by keeping a constant pH of 8.5 through addition of sodium carbonate and calcium chloride solutions. The unique composition of each solution was calculated using chemical speciation. The growth rate was interpreted in terms of an overall growth rate. For both calcite and aragonite, the crystal growth rate is significantly reduced in the presence of the calcium complexing substances. The growth retarding effect depends on both the concentration and the polymorph. The relative crystal growth rate was correlated to the total complexing agent concentration using a Langmuir adsorption approach. Aragonite appeared fully covered for lower total concentrations than calcite. Furthermore, CIT very efficiently blocked aragonite growth contrary to what was observed for calcite. This is thought to be related to certain distinct features of the dominant aragonite crystal faces compared to the dominant calcite faces.

  18. Metabolism of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger: model definition, steady-state analysis and constrained optimization of citric acid production rate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasquez, F; González-Alcón, C; Torres, N V

    2000-10-05

    In an attempt to provide a rational basis for the optimization of citric acid production by A. niger, we developed a mathematical model of the metabolism of this filamentous fungus when in conditions of citric acid accumulation. The present model is based in a previous one, but extended with the inclusion of new metabolic processes and updated with currently available kinetic data. Among the different alternatives to represent the system behavior we have chosen the S-system representation within power-law formalism. This type of representation allows us to verify not only the ability of the model to exhibit a stable steady state of the integrated system but also the robustness and quality of the representation. The model analysis is shown to be self-consistent, with a stable steady state, and in good agreement with experimental evidence. Moreover, the model representation is sufficiently robust, as indicated by sensitivity and steady-state and dynamic analyses. From the steady-state results we concluded that the range of accuracy of the S-system representation is wide enough to model realistic deviations from the nominal steady state. The dynamic analysis indicated a reasonable response time, which provided further indication that the model is adequate. The extensive assessment of the reliability and quality of the model put us in a position to address questions of optimization of the system with respect to increased citrate production. We carried out the constrained optimization of A. niger metabolism with the goal of predicting an enzyme activity profile yielding the maximum rate of citrate production, while, at the same time, keeping all enzyme activities within predetermined, physiologically acceptable ranges. The optimization is based on a method described and tested elsewhere that utilizes the fact that the S-system representation of a metabolic system becomes linear at steady state, which allows application of linear programming techniques. Our results show

  19. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Sheu, Jer-Jia

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF.

  20. The citric acid-modified, enzyme-resistant dextrin from potato starch as a potential prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Sliżewska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, enzyme-resistant dextrin, prepared by heating of potato starch in the presence of hydrochloric (0.1% dsb) and citric (0.1% dsb) acid at 130ºC for 3 h (CA-dextrin), was tested as a source of carbon for probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria isolated from feces of three healthy 70-year old volunteers. The dynamics of growth of bacterial monocultures in broth containing citric acid (CA)-modified dextrin were estimated. It was also investigated whether lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria in the presence of resistant dextrin would be able to dominate the intestinal isolates. Prebiotic fermentation of resistant dextrin was analyzed using prebiotic index (PI). In co-cultures of intestinal and probiotic bacteria, the environment was found to be dominated by the probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, which is a beneficial effect.

  1. A Biodegradable Thermoset Polymer Made by Esterification of Citric Acid and Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Urbanski, Richard; Weinstock, Allison K.; Iwig, David F.; Mathers, Robert T.; von Recum, Horst

    2014-01-01

    A new biomaterial, a degradable thermoset polymer, was made from simple, economical, biocompatable monomers without the need for a catalyst. Glycerol and citric acid, non-toxic and renewable reagents, were crosslinked by a melt polymerization reaction at temperatures from 90-150°C. Consistent with a condensation reaction, water was determined to be the primary byproduct. The amount of crosslinking was controlled by the reaction conditions, including temperature, reaction time, and ratio between glycerol and citric acid. Also, the amount of crosslinking was inversely proportional to the rate of degradation. As a proof-of-principle for drug delivery applications, gentamicin, an antibiotic, was incorporated into the polymer with preliminary evaluations of antimicrobial activity. The polymers incorporating gentamicin had significantly better bacteria clearing of Staphylococcus aureus compared to non-gentamicin gels for up to nine days. PMID:23737239

  2. Facile production of chitin from crab shells using ionic liquid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Tatsuya; Kato, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    Facile production of chitin from crab shells was performed by direct extraction using an ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (AMIMBr), followed by demineralization using citric acid. First, dried crab shells were treated with AMIMBr at elevated temperatures to extract chitin. Supernatants separated by centrifugation were then subjected to a chelating treatment with an aqueous solution of citric acid to achieve demineralization. The precipitated extracts were filtered and dried. The isolated material was subjected to X-ray diffraction, IR, (1)H NMR, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis; the results indicated the structure of chitin. On the basis of the IR spectra, the degree of deacetylation in the samples obtained was calculated to be <7%. Furthermore, the protein content was <0.1% and the M(w) values were 0.7-2.2×10(5).

  3. Citric acid-coated gold nanoparticles for visual colorimetric recognition of pesticide dimethoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Aqib Iqbal; Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha

    2016-08-01

    A colorimetric chemo-sensor based on citric acid-coated gold NPs (C-GNP) showed a linear increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing concentration of pesticide dimethoate (DM). The limit of detection was found to be between 8.25± 0.3 and 20 ± 9.5 ppm. The increase in fluorescence intensity was suggested to have originated from the soft-soft interaction between C-GNPs and DM via sulfur group which is absent in pesticide dicofol (DF). Similar studies with citric acid-coated silver NPs (C-SNPs) did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity. The microscopic studies suggested aggregation of C-GNPs in the presence of DM but not in case of DF.

  4. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  5. Citric acid treatment of post operative wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Patil Dawale, Chandrakala; Raju, Reena; Wadher, Bharat; Chidrawar, Shruti; Selkar, Sohan; Suryawanshi, Namdev

    2014-02-01

    The normal cellular immunity is required for normal wound healing. The HIV infection affects wound healing adversely. Wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients are difficult to manage because of compromised immunity. The result is delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to wound infection. Here we report two cases of HIV positive patients who had developed the post operative wound gape, not responding to the conventional treatment, treated simply by local application of three percent citric acid ointment.

  6. Citric acid treatment of chronic nonhealing ulcerated tophaceous gout with bursitis.

    PubMed

    Nagoba, Basavaraj S; Punpale, Ajay; Poddar, Ashok; Suryawanshi, Namdev M; Swami, Ganesh A; Selkar, Sohan P

    2013-12-01

    The ulceration associated with gout tophi is very difficult to treat because of impaired and halted local inflammatory response resulting from the gout treatment regimen. We report chronic nonhealing tophaceous gout with bursitis in an 80-year-old male, not responding to conventional treatment modality for months together. This nonhealing ulcer was treated successfully with local application of 3% citric acid ointment for 22 days.

  7. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  8. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  9. In the aging housefly aconitase is the only citric acid cycle enzyme to decline significantly.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if the activities of the mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes are altered during the normal aging process. Flight muscle mitochondria of houseflies of different ages were used as a model system because of their apparent age-related decline in bioenergetic efficiency, evident as a failure of flying ability. The maximal activities of each of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in preparations of mitochondria from flies of relatively young, middle, and old age. Aconitase was the only enzyme exhibiting altered activity during aging. The maximal activity of aconitase from old flies was decreased by 44% compared to that from young flies while the other citric acid cycle enzymes showed no change in activity with age. It is suggested that the selective age-related decrease in aconitase activity is likely to contribute to a decline in the efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as result in secondary effects associated with accumulation of citrate and redox-active iron.

  10. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose.

  11. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  12. Changes in primary metabolism leading to citric acid overflow in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Legisa, Matic; Mattey, Michael

    2007-02-01

    For citric acid-accumulating Aspergillus niger cells, the enhancement of anaplerotic reactions replenishing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates predisposes the cells to form the product. However, there is no increased citrate level in germinating spores and a complex sequence of developmental events is needed to change the metabolism in a way that leads to an increased level of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in mycelia. A review of physiological events that cause such intracellular conditions, with the special emphasis on the discussion of hexose transport into the cells and regulation of primary metabolism, predominantly of glycolytic flux during the process, is presented.

  13. Pd/C synthesized with citric acid: an efficient catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H(2) mol(-1) catalyst h(-1), respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  14. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  15. Analysis of tellurium thin films electrodeposition from acidic citric bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik, Remigiusz; Kutyła, Dawid; Mech, Krzysztof; Żabiński, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the description of the electrochemical process of formation thin tellurium layers from citrate acidic solution. The suggested methodology consists in the preparation of stable acidic baths with high content of tellurium, and with the addition of citrate acid. In order to analyse the mechanism of the process of tellurium deposition, the electroanalytical tests were conducted. The tests of cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic ones were performed with the use of polycrystalline gold disk electrode. The range of potentials in which deposition of tellurium in direct four-electron process is possible was determined as well as the reduction of deposited Te° to Te2- and its re-deposition as a result of the comproportionation reaction. On the basis of the obtained results, the deposition of tellurium was conducted by the potentiostatic method. The influence of a deposition potential and a concentration of TeO2 in the solution on the rate of tellurium coatings deposition was examined. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by X-ray spectrofluorometry and electron probe microanalysis. In order to determine the phase composition and the morphology, the obtained coatings were analysed with the use of x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Growth/no growth interfaces of table olive related yeasts for natamycin, citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Bautista-Gallego, J; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-04-16

    The present work uses a logistic/probabilistic model to obtain the growth/no growth interfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii (three yeast species commonly isolated from table olives) as a function of the diverse combinations of natamycin (0-30 mg/L), citric acid (0.00-0.45%) and sodium chloride (3-6%). Mathematical models obtained individually for each yeast species showed that progressive concentrations of citric acid decreased the effect of natamycin, which was only observed below 0.15% citric acid. Sodium chloride concentrations around 5% slightly increased S. cerevisiae and C. boidinii resistance to natamycin, although concentrations above 6% of NaCl always favoured inhibition by this antimycotic. An overall growth/no growth interface, built considering data from the three yeast species, revealed that inhibition in the absence of citric acid and at 4.5% NaCl can be reached using natamycin concentrations between 12 and 30 mg/L for growth probabilities between 0.10 and 0.01, respectively. Results obtained in this survey show that is not advisable to use jointly natamycin and citric acid in table olive packaging because of the observed antagonistic effects between both preservatives, but table olives processed without citric acid could allow the application of the antifungal.

  17. Citric acid ingestion: a life-threatening cause of metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    DeMars, C S; Hollister, K; Tomassoni, A; Himmelfarb, J; Halperin, M L

    2001-11-01

    We present a case that illustrates the acute (<6 hours) metabolic and hemodynamic effects of the ingestion of a massive oral citric acid load. The principal findings included metabolic acidosis accompanied by an increase in the plasma anion gap that was not caused by L -lactic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and the abrupt onset of hypotension. A unique feature was a dramatic clinical improvement when ionized calcium was infused. The case illustrates the importance of considering the properties of the conjugate base (anion) of the added acid because, in this instance, the citrate anion had a unique and life-threatening consequence (lower ionized calcium level) that was rapidly reversible.

  18. Geobiochemistry of metabolism: Standard state thermodynamic properties of the citric acid cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, Peter A.; Shock, Everett L.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating microbial metabolism into geochemical modeling allows assessments of energy and mass transfer between the geosphere and the microbial biosphere. Energy and power supplies and demands can be assessed from analytical geochemical data given thermodynamic data for compounds involved in catabolism and anabolism. Results are reported here from a critique of the available standard state thermodynamic data for organic acids and acid anions involved in the citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle or the Krebs cycle). The development of methods for estimating standard state data unavailable from experiments is described, together with methods to predict corresponding values at elevated temperatures and pressures using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state for aqueous species. Internal consistency is maintained with standard state thermodynamic data for organic and inorganic aqueous species commonly used in geochemical modeling efforts. Standard state data and revised-HKF parameters are used to predict equilibrium dissociation constants for the organic acids in the citric acid cycle, and to assess standard Gibbs energies of reactions for each step in the cycle at elevated temperatures and pressures. The results presented here can be used with analytical data from natural and experimental systems to assess the energy and power demands of microorganisms throughout the habitable ranges of pressure and temperature, and to assess the consequences of abiotic organic compound alteration processes at conditions of subsurface aquifers, sedimentary basins, hydrothermal systems, meteorite parent bodies, and ocean worlds throughout the solar system.

  19. Citric acid traps to replace sulphuric acid in the ammonia diffusion of dilute water samples for 15N analysis.

    PubMed

    Schleppi, Patrick; Bucher-Wallin, Inga; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Landolt, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 15N in aqueous samples requires the concentration of dissolved nitrogen (N) into a small volume that can be analysed by mass spectrometry. This is conveniently achieved by the NH3 diffusion technique, where NH4+ is captured on small acidified filters enclosed in PTFE. NO3- can be analysed the same way by reducing it to NH4+ with Devarda's alloy. H2SO4 is commonly used for the acidification of the filters. During combustion, however, this acid leads to the production of SO2 and elemental sulphur, which both have detrimental effects on the mass spectrometer. We propose here to replace H2SO4 with citric acid because it is combusted completely to CO2 and H2O in the elemental analyser before entering the mass spectrometer. Citric acid was found to give comparable results in terms of N recovery and 15N values, both for NH4+ and for NO3- samples. Blank samples revealed that N contamination was slightly lower using citric instead of sulphuric acid as acidifier of the glass filters. NH4+ samples first concentrated over cation-exchange columns were strongly acidic and several methods were tested to raise the pH for the subsequent diffusion. These samples gave incomplete N recoveries, but this problem was independent of the acid used on the filters and of the final pH of the sample. Complete recovery was achieved only by increasing the volume of the eluate from the columns. Citric acid can thus generally be recommended instead of H2SO4 for ammonia diffusion.

  20. Use of ascorbic and citric acids to increase dialyzable iron from vinal (Prosopis ruscifolia) pulp.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, C; Freyre, M; Sambucetti, M E; Pirovani, M E

    2004-01-01

    Vinal (Prosopis ruscifolia) is an ecologically important wild leguminous tree that grows spontaneously in Argentine deforested lands, the fruit of which is consumed by humans and animals. Because considerable iron content with low to intermediate availability has been previously reported in vinal pulps, its enhancement would be of interest. Iron availability was determined as iron dialyzability using an in vitro technique. Response surface methodology was used to evaluate iron availability increase after adding ascorbic and/or citric acids to vinal pulp at different mM acid/mM Fe ratios. Those ratios ranged from 0.05:1 to 9.95:1 and from 0.5:1 to 99.5:1 for ascorbic acid/Fe (AA:Fe) and citric acid/Fe (CA:Fe), respectively. The obtained second- and first-order polynomial equations showed that AA:Fe and CA:Fe molar ratios linear terms had a significant effect on iron dialyzability increase (P < or = 0.05). It was possible to enhance iron availability to a maximum of 4.6 times. Additional confirmatory experiments were made adding the same organic acids to different vinal pulps and to a traditional cake prepared with vinal pulp called "patay." There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between predicted values obtained by the model and experimental results.

  1. Enhancing the functionality of biobased polyester coating resins through modification with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Noordover, Bart A J; Duchateau, Robbert; van Benthem, Rolf A T M; Ming, Weihua; Koning, Cor E

    2007-12-01

    Citric acid (CA) was evaluated as a functionality-enhancing monomer in biobased polyesters suitable for coating applications. Model reactions of CA with several primary and secondary alcohols and diols, including the 1,4:3,6-dianhydrohexitols, revealed that titanium(IV) n-butoxide catalyzed esterification reactions involving these compounds proceed at relatively low temperatures, often via anhydride intermediates. Interestingly, the facile anhydride formation from CA at temperatures around CA's melting temperature ( T m = 153 degrees C) proved to be crucial in modifying sterically hindered secondary hydroxyl end groups. OH-functional polyesters were reacted with CA in the melt between 150 and 165 degrees C, yielding slightly branched carboxylic acid functional materials with strongly enhanced functionality. The acid/epoxy curing reaction of the acid-functional polymers was simulated with a monofunctional glycidyl ether. Finally, the CA-modified polyesters were applied as coatings, using conventional cross-linking agents. The formulations showed rapid curing, resulting in chemically and mechanically stable coatings. These results demonstrate that citric acid can be applied in a new way, making use of its anhydride formation to functionalize OH-functional polyesters, which is an important new step toward fully biobased coating systems.

  2. Antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed of malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid from Cornus officinalis fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Chun; Zhao, Yue; Bian, Hui-Min

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed by malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid with a ratio of 3:2:2. The IC50 and inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by various agonists as well as platelet adhesion were evaluated in vitro. Of note, the IC50 for the formula inhibiting adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was 0.185 mg/mL. Meanwhile, the formula showed more potent inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and thrombin than the single component at same concentration (0.37 mg/mL). Moreover, the formula could prevent platelet adhesion significantly without influence on platelet viability.

  3. Model-based design of a pilot-scale simulated moving bed for purification of citric acid from fermentation broth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglan; Peng, Qijun; Arlt, Wolfgang; Minceva, Mirjana

    2009-12-11

    One of the conventional processes used for the recovery of citric acid from its fermentation broth is environmentally harmful and cost intensive. In this work an innovative benign process, which comprises simulated moving bed (SMB) technology and use of a tailor-made tertiary poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) resin as a stationary phase is proposed. This paper focuses on a model-based design of the operation conditions for an existing pilot-scale SMB plant. The SMB unit is modeled on the basis of experimentally determined hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and mass transfer characteristics in a single chromatographic column. Three mathematical models are applied and validated for the prediction of the experimentally attained breakthrough and elution profiles of citric acid and the main impurity component (glucose). The transport dispersive model was selected for the SMB simulation and design studies, since it gives a satisfactory prediction of the elution profiles within acceptable computational time. The equivalent true moving bed (TMB) and SMB models give a good prediction of the experimentally attained SMB separation performances, obtained with a real clarified and concentrated fermentation broth as a feed mixture. The SMB separation requirements are set to at least 99.8% citric acid purity and 90% citric acid recovery in the extract stream. The complete regeneration in sections 1 and 4 is unnecessary. Therefore the net flow rates in all four SMB sections have been considered in the unit design. The influences of the operating conditions (the flow rate in each section, switching time and unit configuration) on the SMB performances were investigated systematically. The resulting SMB design provides 99.8% citric acid purity and 97.2% citric acid recovery in the extract. In addition the citric acid concentration in the extract is a half of its concentration in the pretreated fermentation broth (feed).

  4. Comparison of sodium acid sulfate to citric acid to inhibit browning of fresh-cut potatoes.

    PubMed

    Calder, Beth L; Kash, Emily A; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Bushway, Alfred A

    2011-04-01

    Sodium acid sulfate (SAS) dip treatments were evaluated against a distilled water control and citric acid (CA) to compare its effectiveness in reducing enzymatic browning of raw, French-fry cut potatoes. Two separate studies were conducted with dip concentrations ranging from 0%, 1%, and 3% in experiment 1 to 0%, 2%, and 2.5% in experiment 2 to determine optimal dip concentrations. Russet Burbank potatoes were peeled, sliced, and dipped for 1 min and stored at 3 °C. Color, texture, fry surface pH, and microbiological analyses were conducted on days 0, 7, and 14. The 3% SAS- and CA-treated samples had significantly (p<0.0001) lower pH levels on fry surfaces than all other treatments. Both acidulants had significantly (p≤0.05) lower aerobic plate counts compared to controls in both studies by day 7. However, SAS appeared to be the most effective at the 3% level in maintaining a light fry color up to day 14 and had the highest L-values than all other treatments. The 3% SAS-treated fry slices appeared to have the least change in textural properties over storage time, having a significantly (p=0.0002) higher force value (kg force [kgf]) than the other treatments during experiment 1, without any signs of case-hardening that appeared in the control and CA-treated samples. SAS was just as comparable to CA in reducing surface fry pH and also lowering microbial counts over storage time. According to the results, SAS may be another viable acidulant to be utilized in the fresh-cut fruit and vegetable industry.

  5. Monitoring of the fermentation media of citric acid by the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic acids formed.

    PubMed

    Ghassempour, Alireza; Nojavan, Saeed; Talebpour, Zahra; Amiri, Ali Asghar; Najafi, Nahid Mashkouri

    2004-10-20

    In this approach, a derivatization method is described for monitoring of organic acids in fermentation media without any separation step. The aqueous phase of fermentation media was evaporated and heated in a silylation reagent to form trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The silylated compounds are analyzed by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 29Si NMR can qualitatively monitor the components produced in the Krebs cycle. Quantification of these compounds is investigated by using selected ion monitoring mode of mass spectrometry. In this mode, mass to charge (m/z) values of their [M - 15]+ ions, which are 465, 275, 247, 221, 335, 251, and 313 of TMS derivatives of citric, alpha-ketoglutaric, succinic, fumaric, l-malic, oxaloacetic, and palmitic (as an internal standard), acids, respectively, are used. The limit of detection and the linear working range for derivatized citric acid were found to be 0.1 mg L(-1) and 10-3 x 10(4) mg L(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method for five replicates was 2.1%. The average recovery efficiency for citric acid added to culture media was approximately 97.2%. Quantitative results of GC-MS are compared with those obtained by an ultraviolet-visible method.

  6. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity.

  7. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  8. Fungal production of citric and oxalic acid: importance in metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Gadd, G M

    1999-01-01

    The production of organic acids by fungi has profound implications for metal speciation, physiology and biogeochemical cycles. Biosynthesis of oxalic acid from glucose occurs by hydrolysis of oxaloacetate to oxalate and acetate catalysed by cytosolic oxaloacetase, whereas on citric acid, oxalate production occurs by means of glyoxylate oxidation. Citric acid is an intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with metals greatly influencing biosynthesis: growth limiting concentrations of Mn, Fe and Zn are important for high yields. The metal-complexing properties of these organic acids assist both essential metal and anionic (e.g. phosphate) nutrition of fungi, other microbes and plants, and determine metal speciation and mobility in the environment, including transfer between terrestrial and aquatic habitats, biocorrosion and weathering. Metal solubilization processes are also of potential for metal recovery and reclamation from contaminated solid wastes, soils and low-grade ores. Such 'heterotrophic leaching' can occur by several mechanisms but organic acids occupy a central position in the overall process, supplying both protons and a metal-complexing organic acid anion. Most simple metal oxalates [except those of alkali metals, Fe(III) and Al] are sparingly soluble and precipitate as crystalline or amorphous solids. Calcium oxalate is the most important manifestation of this in the environment and, in a variety of crystalline structures, is ubiquitously associated with free-living, plant symbiotic and pathogenic fungi. The main forms are the monohydrate (whewellite) and the dihydrate (weddelite) and their formation is of significance in biomineralization, since they affect nutritional heterogeneity in soil, especially Ca, P, K and Al cycling. The formation of insoluble toxic metal oxalates, e.g. of Cu, may confer tolerance and ensure survival in contaminated environments. In semi-arid environments, calcium oxalate formation is important in the formation and

  9. The Role of Citric Acid in Perfecting Platinum Monolayer on Palladium Nanoparticles during the Surface Limited Redox Replacement Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Shangqian; Yue, Jeffrey; Qin, Xueping; ...

    2016-07-28

    Cu-mediated-Pt-displacement method that involves the displacement of an underpotentially deposited (UPD) Cu monolayer by Pt has been extensively studied to prepare core-shell catalysts. It has been found that Pt clusters instead of a uniform Pt monolayer were formed in the gram batch synthesis. With a suitable surfactant, such as citric acid, the Pt shell could be much more uniform. In this study, the role of citric acid in controlling the Cu-Pt displacement reaction kinetics was studied by electrochemical techniques and theoretical approaches. It was found that citric acid strongly adsorbed on Pd, Pt, Cu/Pd, and Pt/Pd surfaces, especially in themore » double layer region in acid solutions. The strong adsorption of citric acid slowed down the Cu-Pt displacement reaction. The main characteristics of such strong interaction most likely arises from the OH groups in the citric acid molecule according to the molecular dynamics simulation results.« less

  10. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  11. Characterization and functional properties of mango peel pectin extracted by ultrasound assisted citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Huang, Bohui; Fan, Chuanhui; Zhao, Kaili; Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyun; Pan, Siyi; Liu, Fengxia

    2016-10-01

    Pectin was extracted from 'Tainong No. 1' mango peels, using a chelating agent-citric acid as extraction medium by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE) at temperatures of 20 and 80°C. Chemical structures, rheological and emulsifying properties of mango peel pectins (MPPs) were comparatively studied with laboratory grade citrus pectin (CP). All MPPs exhibited higher protein content (4.74%-5.94%), degree of methoxylation (85.43-88.38%), average molecular weight (Mw, 378.4-2858kDa) than the CP, but lower galacuronic acid content (GalA, 52.21-53.35%). CE or UAE at 80°C resulted in significantly higher pectin yield than those at 20°C, while the extraction time for UAE-80°C (15min) was significantly shorter compared to CE-80°C (2h) with comparable pectin yield. Moreover, MPPs extracted at 80°C were observed with higher GalA and protein content, higher Mw, resulting in higher viscosity, better emulsifying capacity and stability, as compared to those extracted at 20°C and the CP. Therefore, these results suggested that MPPs from 'Tainong No. 1' may become a highly promising pectin with good thickening and emulsifying properties, using ultrasound-assisted citric acid as an efficient and eco-friendly extraction method.

  12. Periodontal healing following guided tissue regeneration with citric acid and fibronectin application.

    PubMed

    Caffesse, R G; Nasjleti, C E; Anderson, G B; Lopatin, D E; Smith, B A; Morrison, E C

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) with and without citric acid conditioning and autologous fibronectin application. The study subjects were four female beagle dogs with spontaneous periodontitis. The dogs were given thorough root debridement and 4 weeks later, mucoperiosteal flaps were raised on both sides of the mandible involving the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th premolar and 1st molar teeth. After debridement, notches were placed on the roots at the level of supporting bone. Citric acid (pH 1) was topically applied for 3 minutes on the exposed root surfaces of one side (experimental). The roots were irrigated with normal saline solution. Both the root surfaces and the inner surface of the flap were then bathed in autologous fibronectin in saline. Following this, Gore-Tex periodontal material was adapted to the roots of each tooth and sutured. The contralateral side, serving as control, was treated by surgery and application of Gore-Tex periodontal material only. All membranes were removed 1 month after surgery, and the dogs sacrificed at 3 months. Both mesio-distal and bucco-lingual microscopic histological sections were evaluated by descriptive histology, and linear measurements and surface area determination of the furcal tissues were made. Periodontal healing following the use of GTR procedure resulted in an increase in connective tissue and alveolar bone regeneration. Adjunctive critic acid plus autologous fibronectin produced slightly better results, but these differences were not statistically significant for this sample.

  13. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    PubMed Central

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  14. Fabrication of calcium phosphate-calcium sulfate injectable bone substitute using hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Thai, Van Viet; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2010-06-01

    In this study, an injectable bone substitute (IBS) consisting of citric acid, chitosan, and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the liquid phase and tetra calcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD, CaSO4 x 2H2O) powders as the solid phase, were fabricated. Two groups were classified based on the percent of citric acid in the liquid phase (20, 40 wt%). In each groups, the HPMC percentage was 0, 2, and 4 wt%. An increase in compressive strength due to changes in morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. A good conversion rate of HAp at 20% citric acid was observed in the XRD profiles. In addition, HPMC was not obviously affected by apatite formation. However, both HPMC and citric acid increased the compressive strength of IBS. The maximum compressive strength for IBS was with 40% citric acid and 4% HPMC after 14 days of incubation in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C.

  15. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants.

  16. Reconsideration of the significance of substrate-level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle*.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, David O

    2006-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, students of metabolism in animals have been taught that a substrate-level phosphorylation in the Krebs citric acid cycle produces GTP that subsequently undergoes a transphosphorylation with ADP catalyzed by nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Research in the past decade has revealed that animals also express an ADP-forming succinate-CoA ligase whose activity exceeds that of the GDP-forming enzyme in some tissues. Here I argue that the primary fate of GTP is unlikely to be transphosphorylation with ADP. Rather, two succinate-CoA ligases with different nucleotide specificities have evolved to better integrate and regulate the central metabolic pathways that involve the citric acid cycle. The products of substrate-level phosphorylation, ATP and/or GTP, may represent a pool of nucleotide that has a different phosphorylation potential than the ATP made by oxidative phosphorylation and may be channeled to meet specific needs within mitochondria and the cell. Further research is needed to determine the applicable mechanisms and how they vary in tissues.

  17. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  18. Enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property of polyurethane materials modified with citric acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Ze; Qiu, Yun-Ren

    2016-08-01

    Citric acid (CA) and chitosan (CS) were covalently immobilized on polyurethane (PU) materials to improve the biocompatibility and antibacterial property. The polyurethane pre-polymer with isocyanate group was synthesized by one pot method, and then grafted with citric acid, followed by blending with polyethersulfone (PES) to prepare the blend membrane by phase-inversion method so that chitosan can be grafted from the membrane via esterification and acylation reactions eventually. The native and modified membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle measurement, and tensile strength test. Protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, hemolysis assay, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and adsorption of Ca(2+) were executed to evaluate the blood compatibility of the membranes decorated by CA and CS. Particularly, the antibacterial activities on the modified membranes were evaluated based on a vitro antibacterial test. It could be concluded that the modified membrane had good anticoagulant property and antibacterial property.

  19. Early tissue response to citric acid-based micro- and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji; Qiu, Hongjin; Kodali, Pradeep; Yang, Scott; Sprague, Stuart M.; Hwong, James; Koh, Jason; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2010-01-01

    Composites based on calcium phosphates and biodegradable polymers are desirable for orthopaedic applications due to their potential to mimic bone. Herein, we describe the fabrication, characterization, and in vivo response of novel citric acid-based microcomposites and nanocomposites. Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) was mixed with increasing amounts of HA nanoparticles or microparticles (up to 60 wt%), and the morphology and mechanical properties of the resulting composites were assessed. To investigate tissue response, nanocomposites, microcomposites, POC, and poly(L-lactide) (PLL) were implanted in osteochondral defects in rabbits and harvested at 6 weeks for histological evaluation. SEM confirmed increased surface roughness of microcomposites relative to nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of both types of composites increased with increasing amounts of HA (8–328 MPa), although nanocomposites with 60 wt.% HA displayed the highest strength and stiffness. Based on tissue-implant interfacial assessments, all implants integrated well with the surrounding bone and cartilage with no evidence of inflammation. Both nanocomposites and microcomposites supported bone remodeling; however, nanocomposites induced more trabecular bone formation at the tissue-implant interface. The mechanical properties of citric acid-based composites are within the range of human trabecular bone (1–1524 MPa, 211±78 MPa mean modulus) and tissue response was dependent on the size and content of HA, providing new perspectives of design and fabrication criteria for orthopaedic devices such as interference screws and fixation pins. PMID:20949482

  20. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal, Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-01

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  1. Evidence of a new role for the high-osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in yeast: regulating adaptation to citric acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Clare L; Botting, Catherine H; Antrobus, Robin; Coote, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Screening the Saccharomyces cerevisiae disruptome, profiling transcripts, and determining changes in protein expression have identified an important new role for the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the regulation of adaptation to citric acid stress. Deletion of HOG1, SSK1, PBS2, PTC2, PTP2, and PTP3 resulted in sensitivity to citric acid. Furthermore, citric acid resulted in the dual phosphorylation, and thus activation, of Hog1p. Despite minor activation of glycerol biosynthesis, the inhibitory effect of citric acid was not due to an osmotic shock. HOG1 negatively regulated the expression of a number of proteins in response to citric acid stress, including Bmh1p. Evidence suggests that BMH1 is induced by citric acid to counteract the effect of amino acid starvation. In addition, deletion of BMH2 rendered cells sensitive to citric acid. Deletion of the transcription factor MSN4, which is known to be regulated by Bmh1p and Hog1p, had a similar effect. HOG1 was also required for citric acid-induced up-regulation of Ssa1p and Eno2p. To counteract the cation chelating activity of citric acid, the plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel, CCH1, and a functional vacuolar membrane H(+)-ATPase were found to be essential for optimal adaptation. Also, the transcriptional regulator CYC8, which mediates glucose derepression, was required for adaptation to citric acid to allow cells to metabolize excess citrate via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Supporting this, Mdh1p and Idh1p, both TCA cycle enzymes, were up-regulated in response to citric acid.

  2. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of caprylic acid in combination with citric acid against both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and indigenous microflora in carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Rhee, M S

    2015-08-01

    The identification of novel, effective, and non-thermal decontamination methods is imperative for the preservation of unpasteurized and fresh vegetable juices. The aim of this study was to examine the bactericidal effects of caprylic acid + citric acid against the virulent pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and the endogenous microflora in unpasteurized fresh carrot juice. Carrot juice was treated with either caprylic acid, citric acid, or a combination of caprylic acid + citric acid at mild heating temperature (45 °C or 50 °C). The color of the treated carrot juice as well as microbial survival was examined over time. Combined treatment was more effective than individual treatment in terms of both color and microbial survival. Caprylic acid + citric acid treatment (each at 5.0 mM) at 50 °C for 5 min resulted in 7.46 and 3.07 log CFU/ml reductions in the E. coli O157:H7 and endogenous microflora populations, respectively. By contrast, there was no apparent reduction in either population following individual treatment. A validation assay using a low-density E. coli O157:H7 inoculum (3.31 log CFU/ml) showed that combined treatment with caprylic acid (5.0 mM) + citric acid (2.5 mM) at 50 °C for >5 min or with caprylic acid + citric acid (both at 5.0 mM) at either 45 °C or 50 °C for >5 min completely destroyed the bacteria. Combined treatment also increased the redness of the juice, which is a perceived indication of quality. Taken together, these results indicate that combined treatment with low concentrations of caprylic acid and citric acid, which are of biotic origin, can eliminate microorganisms from unpasteurized carrot juice.

  3. [On the contamination of the citric acid fermentation. I. The contamination by representatives of Enterobacteriaceae (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Leopold, H; Trefil, L

    1979-01-01

    Among the most dangerous bacterial contaminations of the citric acid fermentation is the so-called brown contamination, which is called forth by non pathogenic representatives of Enterobacteriaceae like Escherichia coli, Aerobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus vulgaris, while other bacteria do not produce the mentioned contamination. There is given a comprehensive characterization of the brown contamination. Enterobacteriaceae interrupt the growth of the mycelium of the mold Aspergillus niger and stop the production of citric acid, produce a characteristic repugnant smell and reduce nitrate to nitrite. In a case of weak contamination the phenomena of the brown contamination do not appear, but the yield of citric acid is rather low. The contamination may be transferred successfully within the first 24 hrs. of incubation. The effect of the bacteria is determined by their virulence and some other factors.

  4. Synthesis, spectral properties, and antitumor activity of a new axially substituted phthalocyanine complex of zirconium(IV) with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Tomachynski, Larisa A; Chernii, Victor Y; Gorbenko, Helena N; Filonenko, Valeriy V; Volkov, Sergey V

    2004-06-01

    The new axially substituted phthalocyanine (pc) complex of zirconium(IV) with citric acid is reported. It has been shown that the replacement of two Cl-atoms with two citric acid fragments takes place as the result of the reaction between [ZrCl2(pc)] and citric acid. The complex [Zr(citrate)2(pc)] was formed. The spectroscopic properties of the synthesized compound in DMSO, RPMI 1640 medium with and without fetal calf serum (FCS), H2O, and buffer (Tris) solutions have been described. Antitumor activity of this compound has been studied. The cytostatic activity was observed in the concentration range of 6.1-9.0x10(9) molecules [Zr(citrate)2(pc)]/cell and occurred in 4-6 h after treatment with [Zr(citrate)2(pc)] solution.

  5. 77 FR 72323 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China for the period January 1, 2010, through December... Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results...

  6. 77 FR 47370 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Intent To Rescind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ..., sodium citrate, and potassium citrate in their unblended forms, whether dry or in solution, and regardless of packaging type. The scope also includes blends of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium... acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate constitute 40 percent or more, by weight, of the blend....

  7. Accelerated anaerobic dechlorination of DDT in slurry with Hydragric Acrisols using citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiying; Xu, Xianghua; Fan, Jianling

    2015-12-01

    The application of electron donor and electron shuttle substances has a vital influence on electron transfer, thus may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in anaerobic reaction systems. To evaluate the roles of citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols that contain abundant iron oxide, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with four treatments of (1) control, (2) citric acid, (3) AQDS, and (4) citric acid+AQDS. Results showed that DDT residues decreased by 78.93%-92.11% of the initial quantities after 20days of incubation, and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDD) was the dominant metabolite. The application of citric acid accelerated DDT dechlorination slightly in the first 8days, while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly, and then the acceleration effect improved after the 8th day while the methanogenesis rate decreased. The amendment by AQDS decreased the Eh value of the reaction system and accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus enhancing the reductive dechlorination rate of DDT. The addition of citric acid+AQDS was most efficient in stimulating DDT dechlorination, but no significant interaction between citric acid and AQDS on DDT dechlorination was observed. The results will be of great significance for developing an efficient in situ remediation strategy for DDT-contaminated sites.

  8. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate.

  9. On a hypothetical generational relationship between HCN and constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Eschenmoser, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Encouraged by observations made on the course of reactions the HCN-tetramer can undergo with acetaldehyde, I delineate a constitutional and potentially generational relationship between HCN and those constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle that are direct precursors of amino acids in contemporary metabolism. In this context, the robustness postulate of classical prebiotic chemistry is questioned, and, by an analysis of the (hypothetical) reaction-tree of a stepwise hydrolysis of the HCN-tetramer, it is shown how such a non-robust chemical reaction platform could harbor the potential for the emergence of autocatalytic cycles. It is concluded that the chemistry of HCN should be revisited by focussing on its non-robust parts in order to demonstrate its full potential as one of the possible roots of prebiotic self-organizing chemical processes.

  10. Production of Succinic Acid from Citric Acid and Related Acids by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kaneuchi, Choji; Seki, Masako; Komagata, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    A number of Lactobacillus strains produced succinic acid in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth to various extents. Among 86 fresh isolates from fermented cane molasses in Thailand, 30 strains (35%) produced succinic acid; namely, 23 of 39 Lactobacillus reuteri strains, 6 of 18 L. cellobiosus strains, and 1 of 6 unidentified strains. All of 10 L. casei subsp. casei strains, 5 L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strains, 6 L. mali strains, and 2 L. buchneri strains did not produce succinic acid. Among 58 known strains including 48 type strains of different Lactobacillus species, the strains of L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. parvus produced succinic acid to the same extent as the most active fresh isolates, and those of L. alimentarius, L. collinoides, L. farciminis, L. fructivorans (1 of 2 strains tested), L. malefermentans, and L. reuteri were also positive, to lesser extents. Diammonium citrate in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth was determined as a precursor of the succinic acid produced. Production rates were about 70% on a molar basis with two fresh strains tested. Succinic acid was also produced from fumaric and malic acids but not from dl-isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, and pyruvic acids. The present study is considered to provide the first evidence on the production of succinic acid, an important flavoring substance in dairy products and fermented beverages, from citrate by lactobacilli. PMID:16347795

  11. Effect of Citric Acid and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid on the Surface Morphology of Young and Old Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam Zaccaro; de Noronha, Fernando; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; Maurício, Marcos; Gallito, Marco Antonio; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 10% citric acid and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) irrigating solutions on the surface morphology of young and old root dentin by determining the number and diameter of dentinal tubules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Fifty healthy human teeth collected from young (≤30 years) and old (≥60 years) individuals (n=25) were first prepared with a Largo bur #2 to produce smear layer on the root canal surface. Subsequently, the crowns and the root middle and apical thirds were sectioned and removed, and the cervical thirds were sectioned vertically in the buccal-lingual direction into two equal halves. The obtained samples were then immersed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and randomly separated into two treatment groups for each age group. In each age group, ten samples were selected as controls and did not receive any type of treatment. The rest of the specimens were then rinsed, dried and treated for 4 min with 10% citric acid or 17% EDTA. The samples were then assessed with SEM regarding the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. All data were assessed using Student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of treatment, no significant differences were observed in the number of open tubules between the young and old root dentin (P>0.05). Nonetheless, the diameter of the tubules in the old root dentin was larger when 17% EDTA was used (P<0.05). Both, young and old root dentin did not differ with the 10% citric acid treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that 17% EDTA treatment induced a significant demineralization in old root dentin. PMID:27471529

  12. Anti-thrombotic effect of a novel formula from Corni fructus with malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Chun; Zhao, Yue; Bian, Hui-Min

    2014-05-01

    Our previous investigation had confirmed the inhibition of platelet aggregation of a novel Corni fructus-derived formula composed of malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid with a ratio of 3:2:2. The present study was to further evaluate the anti-thrombotic effect of the formula in vivo. Mice of acute pulmonary thromboembolism, and rats of arterial thrombosis were used to determine the anti-thrombotic effect of the formula. Histology analysis of endothelium was conducted with hematoxylin and eosin stain. TXB2 , 6-K-PGF1α , cAMP, cGMP and NO in rat plasma were determined. In vitro assay of αIIbβ3 and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were performed in ADP-treated platelet. The formula significantly reduced the recovery time and mortality rate of mice with acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Remarkably extended occlusion time, decreased thrombus weight and more integrated endothelium were observed in rat with the formula. Enhanced 6-K-PGF1α , cGMP and NO, but not TXB2 and cAMP, were demonstrated in rat plasma with treatment of the formula. Finally, the formula was shown to inhibit αIIbβ3 expression and activation of ERK1/2 in platelet. The formula shows positive anti-thrombotic effect. The direct interference on ADP activated signaling in platelet and regulation of endothelium function are two primary pathways involved in the action on thrombosis.

  13. Do mitochondria regulate cellular iron homeostasis through citric acid and haem production? Implications for cancer and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2003-01-01

    Citric acid is produced industrially by depriving Aspergillus niger of iron. The lack of Fe deactivates mitochondrial aconitase and interrupts the krebs cycle, causing the mitochondria to release citric acid as a siderophore (an Fe getter). When the mitochondrion has plenty of Fe and the cell has enough ATP, aerobic phosphorylation stops and fatty acid or haem synthesis take place, when the cell has plenty of haem, haem synthesis stops. Since most of the Fe activity in the cell is related to the mitochondria, I hypothesise that in the animal cell when the mitochondria are low in Fe, citric acid acts as a signal that triggers the production of transferrin receptor messenger RNA (TrR mRNA) in the nucleus, which in the absence of Fe causes the expression of transferrin receptor. When the cell has plenty of Fe, cytosolic aconitase detaches itself from the transferrin receptor and ferritin mRNA stopping expression of the former and initiating expression of the latter. The detached cytosolic aconitase transforms the citric acid, blocking the production of the transferrin receptor mRNA.

  14. Phytotoxicity of citric acid and Tween® 80 for potential use as soil amendments in enhanced phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced phytoremediation adding biodegradable amendments like low molecular weight organic acids and surfactants is an interesting area of current research to overcome the limitation that represents low bioavailability of pollutants in soils. However, prior to their use in assisted phytoremediation, it is necessary to test if amendments per se exert any toxic effect to plants and to optimize their application mode. In this context, the present study assessed the effects of citric acid and Tween® 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate) on the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, as influenced by their concentration and frequency of application, in order to evaluate the feasibility for their future use in enhanced phytoremediation of multi-contaminated soils. The results showed that citric acid negatively affected plant germination, while it did not have any significant effect on biomass or chlorophyll content. In turn, Tween® 80 did not affect plant germination and showed a trend to increase biomass, as well as it did not have any significant effect on chlorophyll levels. M. sativa appeared to tolerate citric acid and Tween® 80 at the tested concentrations, applied weekly. Consequently, citric acid and Tween® 80 could potentially be utilized to assist phytoremediation of contaminated soils vegetated with M. sativa.

  15. [Metabolism of Yarrowia lipolytica grown on ethanol under conditions promoting the production of alpha-ketoglutaric and citric acids: a comparative study of the central metabolism enzymes].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A P; Cherniavskaia, O G; Shishkanova, N V; Finogenova, T V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and glyoxylate cycles in the mutant Yarrowia lipolytica strain N1 capable of producing alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) and citric acid showed that almost all enzymes of the TCA cycle are more active under conditions promoting the production of KGA. The only exception was citrate synthase, whose activity was higher in yeast cells producing citric acid. The production of both acids was accompanied by suppression of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, aconitase, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and fumarase were higher in cells producing KGA than in cells producing citric acid.

  16. Equilibrium concentrations for pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle at specified concentrations of certain coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2004-04-01

    It is of interest to calculate equilibrium compositions of systems of biochemical reactions at specified concentrations of coenzymes because these reactants tend to be in steady states. Thermodynamic calculations under these conditions require the definition of a further transformed Gibbs energy G" by use of a Legendre transform. These calculations are applied to the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction plus the citric acid cycle, but steady-state concentrations of CoA, acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA cannot be specified because they are involved in the conservation of carbon atoms. These calculations require the use of linear algebra to obtain further transformed Gibbs energies of formation of reactants and computer programs to calculate equilibrium compositions. At specified temperature, pH, ionic strength and specified concentrations of several coenzymes, the equilibrium composition depends on the specified concentrations of the coenzymes and the initial amounts of reactants.

  17. Properties of baked foams from citric acid modified cassava starch and native cassava starch blends.

    PubMed

    Pornsuksomboon, Kanlaya; Holló, Berta Barta; Szécsényi, Katalin Mészáros; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2016-01-20

    Starch foams from native cassava starch (NS) and citric acid modified cassava starch (CNS) were prepared using baking processes with blend ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 20/80. The density, thickness, morphology, thermal stability and water absorption of the NS, CNS and blended starch foams were determined. The ratio of the two starch components had a significant influence on the density and thickness of the blended starch foams. All blended starch foams showed good water resistance. Moreover, the morphology of the blended starch foam with the NS/CNS ratio of 50/50 showed a more ordered distribution of cell sizes with thicker cell walls than for the NS and CNS foams. The thermal stability of the blended starch foams was somewhat lower than the stability of the NS foam but not to the extent that it affected any potential practical applications.

  18. Fuzzy approach for improved recognition of citric acid induced piglet coughing from continuous registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    A natural acoustic indicator of animal welfare is the appearance (or absence) of coughing in the animal habitat. A sound-database of 5319 individual sounds including 2034 coughs was collected on six healthy piglets containing both animal vocalizations and background noises. Each of the test animals was repeatedly placed in a laboratory installation where coughing was induced by nebulization of citric acid. A two-class classification into 'cough' or 'other' was performed by the application of a distance function to a fast Fourier spectral sound analysis. This resulted in a positive cough recognition of 92%. For the whole sound-database however there was a misclassification of 21%. As spectral information up to 10000 Hz is available, an improved overall classification on the same database is obtained by applying the distance function to nine frequency ranges and combining the achieved distance-values in fuzzy rules. For each frequency range clustering threshold is determined by fuzzy c-means clustering.

  19. Effect of trace elements on citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A; Carreño, R; Ledezma, M

    1970-12-01

    Citric acid yields of 98.7% (sugar consumption basis) were reached in shaker flasks with mutant UV-ET-71-15 of Aspergillus niger in a resin-treated sucrose medium of the following composition (g/100 ml): sucrose, 14.0; NH(4)NO(3), 0.20; KH(2)PO(4), 0.10; MgSO(4).7H(2)O, 0.025; and (mg/liter): FeSO(4), 0.15 to 0.75; ZnSO(4), 0.10; and CuSO(4), 0.01. Yields of 75% were obtained in medium with resin-treated clarified syrup and 68% with ferrocyanide-treated blackstrap molasses. Optimal conditions included selection of appropriate pellets as inoculum at 3%, pH of 4.5, temperature at 30 C, agitation at 250 rev/min, and fermentation time of 8 days. The mutant tolerated high concentrations of trace elements.

  20. Citric Acid Capped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as an Effective MALDI Matrix for Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qiaoli; Sherwood, Jennifer; Macher, Thomas; Wilson, Joseph M.; Bao, Yuping; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2017-03-01

    A new matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry matrix is proposed for molecular mass determination of polymers. This matrix contains an iron oxide nanoparticle (NP) core with citric acid (CA) molecules covalently bound to the surface. With the assistance of additives, the particulate nature of NPs allows the matrix to mix uniformly with polar or nonpolar polymer layers and promotes ionization, which may simplify matrix selection and sample preparation procedures. Several distinctively different polymer classes (polyethyleneglycol (PEG), polywax/polyethylene, perfluoropolyether, and polydimethylsiloxane) are effectively detected by the water or methanol dispersed NPCA matrix with NaCl, NaOH, LiOH, or AgNO3 as additives. Furtheremore, successful quantitative measurements of PEG1000 using polypropylene glycol 1000 as an internal standard are demonstrated.

  1. Citric Acid Capped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as an Effective MALDI Matrix for Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qiaoli; Sherwood, Jennifer; Macher, Thomas; Wilson, Joseph M.; Bao, Yuping; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-12-01

    A new matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry matrix is proposed for molecular mass determination of polymers. This matrix contains an iron oxide nanoparticle (NP) core with citric acid (CA) molecules covalently bound to the surface. With the assistance of additives, the particulate nature of NPs allows the matrix to mix uniformly with polar or nonpolar polymer layers and promotes ionization, which may simplify matrix selection and sample preparation procedures. Several distinctively different polymer classes (polyethyleneglycol (PEG), polywax/polyethylene, perfluoropolyether, and polydimethylsiloxane) are effectively detected by the water or methanol dispersed NPCA matrix with NaCl, NaOH, LiOH, or AgNO3 as additives. Furtheremore, successful quantitative measurements of PEG1000 using polypropylene glycol 1000 as an internal standard are demonstrated.

  2. (Citric acid-co-polycaprolactone triol) polyester: a biodegradable elastomer for soft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lynda V; Nair, Prabha D

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds enormous challenges for materials science, wherein the ideal scaffold to be used is expected to be biocompatible, biodegradable and possess mechanical and physical properties that are suitable for target application. In this context, we have prepared degradable polyesters in different ratios by a simple polycondensation technique with citric acid and polycaprolactone triol. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the materials were amorphous based the absence of a crystalline melting peak and the presence of a glass transition temperature below 37°C. These polyesters were found to be hydrophilic and could be tailor-made into tubes and films. Porosity could also be introduced by addition of porogens. All the materials were non-cytotoxic in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay and may degrade via hydrolysis to non-toxic degradation products. These polyesters have potential implications in the field of soft tissue engineering on account of their similarity of properties.

  3. Importance of accurate spectral simulations for the analysis of terahertz spectra: citric acid anhydrate and monohydrate.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Davis, Eric A; Smith, Tiffany M; Korter, Timothy M

    2011-10-13

    The terahertz (THz) spectra of crystalline solids are typically uniquely sensitive to the molecular packing configurations, allowing for the detection of polymorphs and hydrates by THz spectroscopic techniques. It is possible, however, that coincident absorptions may be observed between related crystal forms, in which case careful assessment of the lattice vibrations of each system must be performed. Presented here is a THz spectroscopic investigation of citric acid in its anhydrous and monohydrate phases. Remarkably similar features were observed in the THz spectra of both systems, requiring the accurate calculation of the low-frequency vibrational modes by solid-state density functional theory to determine the origins of these spectral features. The results of the simulations demonstrate the necessity of reliable and rigorous methods for THz vibrational modes to ensure the proper evaluation of the THz spectra of molecular solids.

  4. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children.

  5. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  6. 76 FR 34048 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ..., which are intermediate products in the production of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate... factors of production (``FOP''), valued in a surrogate market-economy (``ME'') country or countries... respondents' factors of production.\\8\\ On November 17, 2010, Yixing Union identified both Indonesia and...

  7. 76 FR 56158 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for the Final Results of the Countervailing Duty Administrative Review...

  8. Microwave Treated Rapid Hydrothermal Synthesis Of Zno Nano-Flakes Array: The Effect Of Citric Acid As Capping Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal Ram, S. D.; Ravi, G.; Kulandainathan, M. Anbu

    2010-10-01

    Microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanostructures with improved surface area by the addition of Citric Acid (CA) as a metal capping agent is reported. Citric acid is added to the mother precursor in three different concentrations for the preparation of ZnO nanostructure. The influence of the citric acid as a capping agent has been studied both in the preparation of ZnO nanopowders and in the ordered array formation on the precoated ZnO seed layer over glass substrates. The addition of this capping agent has shown up clearly in the morphology of the nanostructures. The X-ray diffraction patterns has shown a diminished crystallinity and a increased full width half maximum (FWHM) in the preferred oriented diffraction peak. The peak broadening is an indication of the reduced crystallite size. This cause of the inhibition in growth is realized to be the effect of capping action of citric acid. The optical property of the ZnO nanostructure was characterized by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy.

  9. Functional citric acid cycle in an arcA mutant of Escherichia coli during growth with nitrate under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohl, C; Wackwitz, B; Vlad, D; Unden, G

    1998-07-01

    The operation of the citric acid cycle of Escherichia coli during nitrate respiration (anoxic conditions) was studied by measuring end products and enzyme activities. Excretion of products other than CO2, such as acetate or ethanol, was taken as an indication for a non-functional cycle. From glycerol, approximately 0.3 mol acetate was produced; the residual portion was completely oxidized, indicating the presence of a partially active citric acid cycle. In an arcA mutant devoid of the transcriptional regulator ArcA, glycerol was completely oxidized with nitrate as an electron acceptor, demonstrating derepression and function of the complete pathway. Glucose, on the other hand, was excreted mostly as acetate by the wild-type and by the arcA mutant. During growth on glucose, but not on glycerol, activities of succinate dehydrogenase and of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase were missing nearly completely. Thus, the previously described strong repression of the citric acid cycle during nitrate respiration occurs only during growth on glucose and is the effect of anaerobic and, more important, of glucose repression. In Pseudomonas fluorescens (but not Pseudomonas stutzeri), a similar decrease of citric acid cycle function during anaerobic growth with nitrate was found, indicating a broad distribution of this regulatory principle.

  10. The effect of pH on hydrolysis, cross-linking and barrier properties of starch barriers containing citric acid.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Erik; Menzel, Carolin; Johansson, Caisa; Andersson, Roger; Koch, Kristine; Järnström, Lars

    2013-11-06

    Citric acid cross-linking of starch for e.g. food packaging applications has been intensely studied during the last decade as a method of producing water-insensitive renewable barrier coatings. We managed to improve a starch formulation containing citric acid as cross-linking agent for industrial paper coating applications by adjusting the pH of the starch solution. The described starch formulations exhibited both cross-linking of starch by citric acid as well as satisfactory barrier properties, e.g. fairly low OTR values at 50% RH that are comparable with EVOH. Furthermore, it has been shown that barrier properties of coated papers with different solution pH were correlated to molecular changes in starch showing both hydrolysis and cross-linking of starch molecules in the presence of citric acid. Hydrolysis was shown to be almost completely hindered at solution pH≥4 at curing temperatures≤105 °C and at pH≥5 at curing temperatures≤150 °C, whereas cross-linking still occurred to some extent at pH≤6.5 and drying temperatures as low as 70 °C. Coated papers showed a minimum in water vapor transmission rate at pH 4 of the starch coating solution, corresponding to the point where hydrolysis was effectively hindered but where a significant degree of cross-linking still occurred.

  11. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bonding strength between Co-Cr alloy and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-02-01

    Novel techniques for creating a strong bond between polymeric matrices and biometals are required. We immobilized polymeric matrices on the surface of biometal for drug-eluting stents through covalent bond. We performed to improve the bonding strength between a cobalt-chromium alloy and a citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix by ultraviolet irradiation on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloy. The ultraviolet irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alloy. The bonding strength between the gelatin matrix and the alloy before ultraviolet irradiation was 0.38 ± 0.02 MPa, whereas it increased to 0.48 ± 0.02 MPa after ultraviolet irradiation. Surface analysis showed that the citric acid derivatives occurred on the surface of the cobalt-chromium alloy through ester bond. Therefore, ester bond formation between the citric acid derivatives active esters and the hydroxyl groups on the cobalt-chromium alloy contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Ultraviolet irradiation and subsequent immobilization of a gelatin matrix using citric acid derivatives is thus an effective way to functionalize biometal surfaces.

  12. Effect of EDTA and citric acid on phytoremediation of Cr- B[a]P-co-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Chigbo, Chibuike; Batty, Lesley

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in the environment are a concern, and their removal to acceptable level is required. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to treat contaminated soils, could be an interesting alternative to conventional remediation processes. This work evaluates the role of single and combined applications of chelates to single or mixed Cr + benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-contaminated soil. Medicago sativa was grown in contaminated soil and was amended with 0.3 g citric acid, 0.146 g ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or their combination for 60 days. The result shows that in Cr-contaminated soil, the application of EDTA + citric acid significantly (p<0.05) decreased the shoot dry matter of M. sativa by 55 % and, as such, decreased the Cr removal potential from the soil. The soluble Cr concentration in single Cr or Cr + B[a]P-contaminated soil was enhanced with the amendment of all chelates; however, only the application of citric acid in Cr-contaminated soil (44 %) or EDTA and EDTA + citric acid in co-contaminated soil increased the removal of Cr from the soil (34 and 54 %, respectively). The dissipation of B[a]P in single B[a]P-contaminated soil was effective even without planting and amendment with chelates, while in co-contaminated soil, it was related to the application of either EDTA or EDTA + citric acid. This suggests that M. sativa with the help of chelates in single or co-contaminated soil can be effective in phytoextraction of Cr and promoting the biodegradation of B[a]P.

  13. The expanded Hansen approach to solubility parameters. Paracetamol and citric acid in individual solvents.

    PubMed

    Barra, J; Lescure, F; Doelker, E; Bustamante, P

    1997-07-01

    In this study two solubility-parameter models have been compared using as dependent variables the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility, lnX2e, and ln(alpha)/U (originally used in the extended Hansen method), where alpha is the activity coefficient and U is a function of the molar volume of the solute and the volume fraction of the solvent. The results show for the first time the proton-donor and -acceptor hydrogen-bonding capacities of paracetamol, as measured by the acidic and basic partial-solubility parameters. The influence of solvents on the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) pattern of the solid phases was also studied in relation to the solubility models tested. Citric acid was chosen as a test substance because of its high acidity and its proton donor capacity to form hydrogen bonds with basic solvents. The partial acidic and basic solubility parameters obtained from multiple regression were consistent with this property, validating the model chosen. The results show that the more direct lnX2e variable was more suitable for fitting both models, and the four-parameter model seemed better for describing the interactions between solvent and solute.

  14. The opposite roles of agdA and glaA on citric acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Cao, Zhanglei; Hou, Li; Yin, Liuhua; Wang, Dawei; Gao, Qiang; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Depei

    2016-07-01

    Citric acid is produced by an industrial-scale process of fermentation using Aspergillus niger as a microbial cell factory. However, citric acid production was hindered by the non-fermentable isomaltose and insufficient saccharification ability in A. niger when liquefied corn starch was used as a raw material. In this study, A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA was constructed by deletion of the α-glucosidase-encoding agdA gene in A. niger CGMCC 10142 genome using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The transformants A. niger OG 1, OG 17, and OG 31 then underwent overexpression of glucoamylase in A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA. The results showed that the α-glucosidase activity of TNA 101ΔagdA was decreased by 62.5 % compared with CGMCC 10142, and isomaltose was almost undetectable in the fermentation broth. The glucoamylase activity of the transformants OG 1 and OG 17 increased by 34.5 and 16.89 % compared with that of TNA 101ΔagdA, respectively. In addition, for the recombinants TNA 101ΔagdA, OG 1 and OG 17, there were no apparent defects in the growth development. Consequently, in comparison with CGMCC 10142, TNA 101ΔagdA and OG 1 decreased the residual reducing sugar by 52.95 and 88.24 %, respectively, and correspondingly increased citric acid production at the end of fermentation by 8.68 and 16.87 %. Citric acid production was further improved by decreasing the non-fermentable residual sugar and increasing utilization rate of corn starch material in A. niger. Besides, the successive saccharification and citric acid fermentation processes were successfully integrated into one step.

  15. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  16. Effect of acid shock with hydrochloric, citric, and lactic acids on the survival and growth of Salmonella typhi and Salmonella typhimurium in acidified media.

    PubMed

    Arvizu-Medrano, Sofía M; Escartín, Eduardo F

    2005-10-01

    The effect of acid shock with hydrochloric, citric, or lactic acid on the survival and growth of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium in acidified broth was evaluated. Salmonella serovars were acid shocked (1 h at 35 degrees C) in Trypticase soy broth acidified with hydrochloric, citric, or lactic acid at pH 5.5. Unshocked cells were exposed to the same media that had been neutralized before use to pH 7.0. Shocked and unshocked cells were inoculated into broth acidified with hydrochloric acid (pH 3.0), citric acid (pH 3.0), or lactic acid (pH 3.8), and growth and survival ability were evaluated. The acid shock conferred protection to Salmonella against the lethal effects of low pH and organic acids. The adaptive response was not specific to the anion used for adaptation. The biggest difference in reduction of survival between shocked and unshocked strains (approximately 2 log CFU/ml) was observed when the microorganisms were shocked with lactic acid and then challenged with citric acid. Salmonella Typhi was more tolerant of citric acid than was Salmonella Typhimurium, but Salmonella Typhimurium had higher acid tolerance in response to acid shock than did Salmonella Typhi. The acid shock decreased the extension of the lag phase and enhanced the physiological state values of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium when the pH of growth was 4.5. This increased ability to tolerate acidity may have an important impact on food safety, especially in the case of Salmonella Typhi, given the very low infectious dose of this pathogen.

  17. The citric acid production from raw glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica yeast and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Lunina, Julia N

    2013-08-01

    The optimal cultivation conditions ensuring the maximal rate of citric acid (CA) biosynthesis by glycerol-grown mutant Yarrowia lipolytica NG40/UV7 were found to be as follows: growth limitation by inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur), 28 °C, pH 5.0, dissolved oxygen concentration (pO₂) of 50 % (of air saturation), and pulsed addition of glycerol from 20 to 80 g L⁻¹ depending on the rate of medium titration. Under optimal conditions of fed-batch cultivation, in the medium with pure glycerol, strain Y. lipolytica NG40/UV7 produced 115 g L⁻¹ of CA with the mass yield coefficient of 0.64 g g⁻¹ and isocitric acid (ICA) amounted to 4.6 g L⁻¹; in the medium with raw glycerol, CA production was 112 g L⁻¹ with the mass yield coefficient of 0.90 g g⁻¹ and ICA amounted to 5.3 g L⁻¹. Based on the activities of enzymes involved in the initial stages of raw glycerol assimilation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, the mechanism of increased CA yield from glycerol-containing substrates in Y. lipolytica yeast was explained.

  18. Mixture tetracycline citric acid and detergent – A root canal irrigant. A review

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, G.P.V.; Sekhar, K.S.; Nischith, K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Root canal irrigants play an indispensable role for the complete disinfection of the root canal system, in particular those areas of the root canal that are not accessible for instrumentation. Sodium hypochlorite, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine are the most commonly used root canal irrigants in endodontic practice, but they do not satisfy all the properties of an ideal root canal irrigant. Mixture tetracycline, citric acid and detergent, a root canal irrigant, is commercially available as BioPure MTAD (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK). Methodology The literature was searched for root canal irrigants used in the last 3 decades in PubMed. Data showed 83 relevant articles, of which 24 were found most suitable on the basis of description of properties, advantages and disadvantages of MTAD, hence were included. The aim of this study was to evaluate the properties of MTAD for its antibacterial efficiency, biocompatibility, chelating action with removal of endodontic smear layer and compare it with other commonly used root canal irrigants like sodium hypochlorite, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine. Results MTAD was found to be highly effective intracanal irrigant compared to other commonly used root canal irrigants with excellent disinfection of the entire root canal system. Conclusion MTAD is biocompatible with superior antimicrobial efficiency compared to other commonly used root canal irrigants. PMID:25737877

  19. [Evaluation of compounding EDTA and citric acid on remediation of heavy metals contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xue; Chen, Jia-Jun; Cai, Wen-Min

    2014-08-01

    As commonly used eluents, Na2EDTA (EDTA) and citric acid (CA) have been widely applied in remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. In order to evaluate the removal of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead in the contaminated soil collected in a chemical plant by compounding EDTA and CA, a series of stirring experiments were conducted. Furthermore, the changes in speciation distribution of heavy metals before and after washing were studied. The results showed that, adopting the optimal molar ratio of EDTA/CA (1:1), when the pH of the solution was 3, the stirring time was 30 min, the stirring rate was 150 r x min(-1) and the L/S was 5:1, the removal rates of arsenic, cadmium, copper and lead could reach 11.72%, 43.39%, 24.36% and 27.17%, respectively. And it was found that after washing, for arsenic and copper, the content of acid dissolved fraction rose which increased the percentage of available contents. Fe-Mn oxide fraction mainly contributed to the removal of copper. As for cadmium, the percentages of acid dissolved fraction, Fe-Mn oxide fraction and organic fraction also decreased. In practical projects, speciation changes would pose certain environmental risk after soil washing, which should be taken into consideration.

  20. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time.

  1. The effect of citric acid and pH on growth and metabolism of anaerobic Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii cultures.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marina Karelina; Arneborg, Nils

    2007-02-01

    The effects of citric acid at pH values of 3.0, 4.0, and 4.5 on growth and metabolism of anaerobic Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii cultures were investigated. S. cerevisiae and Z. bailii exhibited similar tolerances to citric acid, as determined by growth measurements, at all three pH values investigated. The citric-acid-induced growth inhibition of both yeast species increased with increasing pH values, indicating that the antimicrobial mechanism of citric acid differs from that of classical weak-acid preservatives. In S. cerevisiae, citric acid shifted the primary energy metabolism towards lower ethanol production and higher glycerol production, thus resulting in lower ATP production. These metabolic changes in S. cerevisiae were pH-dependent; i.e. the higher the pH, the lower the ATP production, and they may explain why growth of S. cerevisiae is more inhibited by citric acid at higher pH values. In Z. bailii, citric acid also caused an increased glycerol production, although to a lesser extent than in S. cerevisiae, but it caused virtually no changes in ethanol and ATP production.

  2. Effects of citric acid and the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the mobility of germanium and rare earth elements in soil and uptake in Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Wiche, Oliver; Tischler, Dirk; Fauser, Carla; Lodemann, Jana; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2017-02-03

    Effects of citric acid and desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the availability of Ge and selected REEs (La, Nd, Gd, Er) to P. arundinacea were investigated. A soil dissolution experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of citric acid and DFO-B at different concentrations (1 and 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid) on the release of Ge and REEs from soil. In a greenhouse plants of P. arundinacea were cultivated on soil and on sand cultures to investigate the effects of citric acid and DFO-B on the uptake of Ge and REEs by the plants. Addition of 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid significantly enhanced desorption of Ge and REEs from soil and uptake into soil-grown plants. Applying DFO-B enhanced the dissolution and the uptake of REEs, while no effect on Ge was observed. In sand cultures, presence of citric acid and DFO-B significantly decreased the uptake of Ge and REEs, indicating a discrimination of the formed complexes during uptake. This study clearly indicates that citric acid and the microbial siderophore DFO-B may enhance phytoextraction of Ge and REEs due to the formation of soluble complexes that increase the migration of elements in the rhizosphere.

  3. High-speed atomic force microscopy of dental enamel dissolution in citric acid.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice; Marks, Will; M Picco, Loren; G Dunton, Peter; Ulcinas, Arturas; E Barbour, Michele; B Jones, Siân; Gimzewski, James; J Miles, Mervyn

    2009-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS AFM) in 'contact' mode was used to image at video rate the surfaces of both calcium hydroxyapatite samples, often used as artificial dental enamel in such experiments, and polished actual bovine dental enamel in both neutral and acidic aqueous environments. The image in each frame of the video of the sample was a few micrometers square, and the high-speed scan window was panned across the sample in real time to examine larger areas. Conventional AFM images of the same regions of the sample were also recorded before and after high-speed imaging. The ability of HS AFM to follow processes occurring in liquid on the timescale of a few seconds was employed to study the dissolution process of both hydroxyapatite and bovine enamel under acidic conditions. Buffered citric acid at pH values between 3.0 and 4.0 was observed to dissolve the surface layers of these samples. The movies recorded showed rapid dissolution of the bovine enamel in particular, which proceeded until the relatively small amount of acid available had been exhausted. A comparison was made with enamel samples that had been treated in fluoride solution (1 h in 300 ppm NaF, pH 7) prior to addition of the acid; the speed of dissolution for these samples was much less than that of the untreated samples. The HS AFM used an in-house designed and constructed high-speed flexure scan stage employing a push-pull piezo actuator arrangement. The HS AFM is able to follow the large changes in height (on the micrometer scale) that occur during the dissolution process.

  4. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-15

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with (14)C-glucose and (3)H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

  5. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-05-12

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu(2+) and CuHL(0)) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL(-) and Cu2L2(2-)) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids.

  6. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-05-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL- and Cu2L22-) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids.

  7. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  8. Effects of Citric and Lactic Acid on the Reduction of Deoxynivalenol and Its Derivatives in Feeds

    PubMed Central

    Humer, Elke; Lucke, Annegret; Harder, Hauke; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Böhm, Josef; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxin-contaminated feeds represents a serious health risk. This has necessitated the need for the establishment of practical methods for mycotoxin decontamination. This study investigated the effects of citric acid (CA) and lactic acid (LA) on common trichothecene mycotoxins in feeds contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins. Contaminated feed samples were processed either with 5% CA or 5% LA solutions in a ratio of 1:1.2 (w/v) for 5, 24, or 48 h, and analyzed for multiple mycotoxin metabolites using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method. The analyses showed that treating the feed with CA and LA lowered the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON), whereby 5% LA lowered the original DON concentration in the contaminated feed samples by half, irrespective of the processing time. Similar lowering effects were observed for the concentrations of 15Ac-DON, 5-hydroxyculmorin, and sambucinol. The concentration of nivalenol was only lowered by the LA treatment. In contrast, CA and LA treatments showed no or only small effects on the concentration of several mycotoxins and their derivatives, including zearalenone, fumonisins, and culmorin. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the use of 5% solutions of LA and CA might reduce the concentration of common trichothecene mycotoxins, especially DON and its derivate 15Ac-DON. However, further research is required to determine the effect on overall toxicity and to identify the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27690101

  9. Citric acid production from Aspergillus niger MT-4 using hydrolysate extract of the insect Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mesut; Tasar, Gani Erhan; Incekara, Umit

    2013-06-01

    Citric acid (CA) is the most important organic acid used in the food and other industries. Locusta migratoria is an insect species, which has rich nutritional composition (especially protein) and cultivated in some countries. Therefore, the present study investigated the usability of hydrolysate extract of L. migratoria biomass as substrate for the production of CA from Aspergillus niger MT-4. The insect extract (IE) was found to be rich in ash (34.9 g/100 g), protein (35.6 g/100 g) and mineral contents. Yeast extract was found to be the most favorable substrate for biomass production, whereas the maximum production of CA (41.8 g/L) was achieved in the medium containing IE. Besides, uniform pellets with the smallest size (4 mm) were observed in IE medium. It was thought that rich magnesium (6.78 g/100 g) and manganese (1.14 g/100 g) contents of IE increased the production of CA, resulting in the formation of small uniform pellets. This is the first report on the effect of protein-rich insect biomasses on the production of CA. In this regard, L. migratoria biomass was tested for the first time as a CA-production substrate.

  10. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL− and Cu2L22−) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids. PMID:25962970

  11. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of manganese and plant growth by alleviating the ultrastructural damages in Juncus effusus L.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, U; Xu, L; Ali, Shafaqat; Jilani, Ghulam; Gong, H J; Shen, W Q; Zhou, W J

    2009-10-30

    Chelate-assisted phytoextraction by high biomass producing plant species enhances the removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. In this regard, Juncus effusus a wetland plant has great potential. This study evaluated the effects of elevated levels of manganese (Mn) on the vegetative growth, Mn uptake and antioxidant enzymes in J. effusus. We also studied the role of citric acid and EDTA on improving metal accumulation, plant growth and Mn toxicity stress alleviation. Three-week-old plantlets of J. effusus were subjected to various treatments in the hydroponics as: Mn (50, 100 and 500 microM) alone, Mn (500 microM) + citric acid (5 mM), and Mn (500 microM) + EDTA (5 mM). After 2 weeks of treatment, higher Mn concentrations significantly reduced the plant biomass and height. Both citric acid and EDTA restored the plant height as it was reduced at the highest Mn level. Only the citric acid (but not EDTA) was able to recover the plant biomass weight, which was also obvious from the microscopic visualization of mesophyll cells. There was a concentration dependent increase in Mn uptake in J. effusus plants, and relatively more deposition in roots compared to aerial parts. Although both EDTA and citric acid caused significant increase in Mn accumulation; however, the Mn translocation was enhanced markedly by EDTA. Elevated levels of Mn augmented the oxidative stress, which was evident from changes in the activities of antioxidative enzymes in plant shoots. Raised levels of lipid peroxidation and variable changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were recorded under Mn stress. Electron microscopic images revealed several modifications in the plants at cellular and sub-cellular level due to the oxidative damage induced by Mn. Changes in cell shape and size, chloroplast swelling, increased number of plastoglobuli and disruption of thylakoid were noticed. However, these plants showed a high degree of tolerance against Mn toxicity stress, and it removed

  12. Improved Cycling Performance of a Si Nanoparticle Anode Utilizing Citric Acid as a Surface-Modifying Agent.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cao Cuong; Seo, Daniel M; Chandrasiri, K W D K; Lucht, Brett L

    2016-12-20

    Citric acid and its analogues have been investigated as surface-modifying agents for Si nanoparticle anodes using electrochemical cycling, attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A Si nanoparticle anode prepared with citric acid (CA) has better capacity retention than one containing 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BA), but both electrodes outperform Si-PVDF. The Si-CA anode has an initial specific capacity of 3530 mA h/g and a first cycle efficiency of 82%. Surprisingly, the Si-CA electrode maintains a high specific capacity of ∼2200 mA h/g after 250 cycles, corresponding to 64% capacity retention, which is similar to the Si prepared with long-chain poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). On the contrary, the silicon electrode prepared with PVDF has a fast capacity fade and retains only 980 mA h/g after 50 cycles. The IR and XPS data show that the Si-CA electrode has an SEI composed primarily of lithium citrate during the first 50 cycles, resulting from the electrochemical reduction of citric acid. Only low concentrations of electrolyte reduction products are observed. The lithium citrate layer derived from CA stabilizes the silicon surface and suppresses electrolyte reduction, which likely contributes to the enhanced cycling performance of the Si nanoparticle anode.

  13. Effect of citric acid dosage and sintered temperature on the composition, morphology and electrochemical properties of lithium vanadium oxide prepared by a sol–gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. R.; Su, X. J.; Hou, G. L.; Liu, Z. H.; Yu, F. S.; Bi, S.; Li, H.

    2017-03-01

    A lithium vanadium oxide cathode material was synthesized via sol-gel processing using citric acid as the chelating agent. Different dosage of citric acid and sintered temperature were introduced to investigate their effects on the products composition, morphology and electrochemical properties. The results showed that the V2O3 yield was inhibited and the crystallization of grain was accelerated with the increasing dosage of citric acid. Furthermore, V2O3 was oxidized to LiV3O8 and Li0.3V2O5 with the increase of sintered temperature.

  14. Role of different additives and metallic micro minerals on the enhanced citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sikander; Haq, Ikram-ul

    2005-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the promotry effect of different additives and metallic micro minerals on citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials. For this, sugar cane bagasse was fortified with sucrose salt medium. Ethanol and coconut oil at 3.0% (v/w) level increased citric acid productivity. Fluoroacetate at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml bagasse enhanced the yield of citric acid significantly. However, the addition of ethanol and fluoroacetate after 6 h of growth gave the maximum conversion of available sugar to citric acid. In another study, influence of some metallic micro-minerals viz. copper sulphate, molybdenum sulphate, zinc sulphate and cobalt sulphate on microbial synthesis of citric acid using molasses medium was also carried out. It was found that copper sulphate and molybdenum sulphate remarkably enhanced the production of citric acid while zinc sulphate was not so effective. However, cobalt sulphate was the least effective for microbial biosynthesis of citric acid under the same experimental conditions. In case of CuSO(4), the strain of Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 showed enhanced citric productivity with experimental (9.80%) over the control (7.54%). In addition, the specific productivity of the culture at 30 ppm CuSO(4) (Q(p) = 0.012a g/g cells/h) was several folds higher than other all other concentrations. All kinetic parameters including yield coefficients and volumetric rates revealed the hyper productivity of citric acid by CuSO(4) using blackstrap molasses as the basal carbon source.

  15. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid* #

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of 109Cd increased significantly, and higher 109Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the 109Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  16. Overexpression of the NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (icdA) in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Hayashi, Rie; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    In the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, NADP(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICDH) catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation of isocitric acid to form α-ketoglutaric acid with NADP(+) as a cofactor. We constructed an NADP(+)-ICDH gene (icdA)-overexpressing strain (OPI-1) using Aspergillus niger WU-2223L as a host and examined the effects of increase in NADP(+)-ICDH activity on citric acid production. Under citric acid-producing conditions with glucose as the carbon source, the amounts of citric acid produced and glucose consumed by OPI-1 for the 12-d cultivation period decreased by 18.7 and 10.5%, respectively, compared with those by WU-2223L. These results indicate that the amount of citric acid produced by A. niger can be altered with the NADP(+)-ICDH activity. Therefore, NADP(+)-ICDH is an important regulator of citric acid production in the TCA cycle of A. niger. Thus, we propose that the icdA gene is a potentially valuable tool for modulating citric acid production by metabolic engineering.

  17. Aconitase is the main functional target of aging in the citric acid cycle of kidney mitochondria from mice.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Toroser, Dikran; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2006-01-01

    The activities of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of relatively young, middle age, and old mice. Aconitase exhibited the most significant decrease in activity with age. The activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase exhibited a modest decrease in activity, while NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICD) activity increased moderately with age. Activities of citrate synthase, NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD(+)-ICD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS), succinate dehydrogenase (SD), fumarase (FUM), and malate dehydrogenase (MD) were not affected. The molar ratio of the intra-mitochondrial redox indicator, NADPH:NADP(+), was higher in young compared to old animals, while the NADH:NAD(+) molar ratio remained unchanged. It is suggested that an age-related decrease in aconitase activity along with relatively subtle alterations in activities of some other citric acid cycle enzymes are likely to contribute to a decline in the overall efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics. The biological consequences of such alterations include age-related fluctuations in the citric acid cycle intermediates, which are precursors of protein synthesis, activators of fatty acid synthesis, and can also act as ligands for orphan G-protein coupled receptors.

  18. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectins from grape pomace using citric acid: a response surface methodology approach.

    PubMed

    Minjares-Fuentes, R; Femenia, A; Garau, M C; Meza-Velázquez, J A; Simal, S; Rosselló, C

    2014-06-15

    An ultrasound-assisted procedure for the extraction of pectins from grape pomace with citric acid as the extracting agent was established. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimize the extraction temperature (X1: 35-75°C), extraction time (X2: 20-60 min) and pH (X3: 1.0-2.0) to obtain a high yield of pectins with high average molecular weight (MW) and degree of esterification (DE) from grape pomace. Analysis of variance showed that the contribution of a quadratic model was significant for the pectin extraction yield and for pectin MW whereas the DE of pectins was more influenced by a linear model. An optimization study using response surface methodology was performed and 3D response surfaces were plotted from the mathematical model. According to the RSM model, the highest pectin yield (∼32.3%) can be achieved when the UAE process is carried out at 75°C for 60 min using a citric acid solution of pH 2.0. These pectic polysaccharides, composed mainly by galacturonic acid units (<97% of total sugars), have an average MW of 163.9 kDa and a DE of 55.2%. Close agreement between experimental and predicted values was found. These results suggest that ultrasound-assisted extraction could be a good option for the extraction of functional pectins with citric acid from grape pomace at industrial level.

  20. Properties of Aspergillus niger citrate synthase and effects of citA overexpression on citric acid production.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, G J; Panneman, H; Xu, D; Visser, J

    2000-03-01

    Using a combination of dye adsorption and affinity elution we purified Aspergillus niger citrate synthase to homogeneity using a single column and characterised the enzyme. An A. niger citrate synthase cDNA was isolated by immunological screening and used to clone the corresponding citA gene. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to other fungal citrate synthases. After processing upon mitochondrial import, the calculated M(r) of A. niger citrate synthase is 48501, which agrees well with the estimated molecular mass of the purified protein (48 kDa). In addition to an N-terminal mitochondrial import signal, a peroxisomal target sequence (AKL) was found at the C-terminus of the protein. Whether both signals are functional in vivo is not clear. Strains overexpressing citA were made by transformation and cultured under citric acid-producing conditions. Up to 11-fold overproduction of citrate synthase did not increase the rate of citric acid production by the fungus, suggesting that citrate synthase contributes little to flux control in the pathway involved in citric acid biosynthesis by a non-commercial strain.

  1. Synthesis of citric acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide coated corn straw for methylene blue adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ge, Heyi; Wang, Cuicui; Liu, Shanshan; Huang, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    The citric acid functionalized magnetic graphene oxide coated corn straw (CA-mGOCS) as a new adsorbent was synthesized in this work for the elimination of methylene blue (MB) from waste water. The as-prepared CA-mGOCS was tested by SEM, FTIR, XRD, Roman spectrum, TGA, particle size analyzer, BET and magnetic properties analyzer. Some factors affecting adsorption removal efficiency were explored. As a result, the addition of 5g CS (CA-mGO5CS) had the better adsorption performance than other adsorbents. The pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich described the adsorption behavior well. The equilibrium adsorption capacity was 315.5mgg(-1) for MB at pH=12 and 298k. The electrostatic incorporation as well as hydrophobic interactions between CA-mGO5CS and MB determined the favourable adsorption property. Besides, the thermodynamic studies results ΔG<0, ΔH<0, ΔS<0 suggested that the adsorption was a spontaneous, exothermic and randomness decrease process. Finally, reusability studies imply that CA-mGO5CS has an excellent reproducibility.

  2. Adsorption of copper ions from aqueous solution by citric acid modified soybean straw.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to convert soybean straw to a metal ion adsorbent and further to investigate the potential of using the adsorbent for the removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution. The soybean straw was water or base washed and citric acid (CA) modified to enhance its nature adsorption capacity. The morphological and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent were evaluated by spectroscopy and N(2)-adsorption techniques. The porous structure, as well as high amounts of introduced free carboxyl groups of CA modified soybean straw makes the adsorbent be good to retain Cu(2+). The adsorption capacities increased when the solution pH increased from 2 to 6 and reached the maximum value at pH 6 (0.64 mmol g(-1) for the base washed, CA modified soybean straw (CA-BWSS)). The Cu(2+) uptake increased and percentage adsorption of the Cu(2+) decreased with the increase in initial Cu(2+) concentration from 1 mM to 20 mM. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were tested, and the Freundlich model fited much better than the Langmuir model. It was found that CA-BWSS have the highest adsorption capacity of the four kinds of pretreated soybean straw.

  3. Identification and physicochemical characterization of caffeine-citric acid co-crystal polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Makoto; Watanabe, Yuka; Sugano, Kiyohiko; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to identify a new caffeine-citric acid co-crystal (CA-CI) polymorph and characterize three CA-CI polymorphs. The stability order among the three CA-CI polymorphs was also determined. One new and two known CA-CI polymorphs were prepared by the liquid-assisted grinding method or the slurry methods. The three CA-CIs were then identified and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dynamic vapor sorption (DVS). The stability order of the CA-CIs was determined by the slurry conversion method. Each CA-CI showed distinct PXRD, IR, Raman, and DVS data. The melting points of CA-CIs were 131°C (a new form, Form III), 141°C (Form I), and 160°C (Form II). The order of thermodynamic stability was CA-CI Form II>CA-CI Form I>CA-CI Form III. CA-CI Forms I and II were relatively stable against humidity compared to CA, CI and CA-CI Form III.

  4. Teaching about citric acid cycle using plant mitochondrial preparations: Some assays for use in laboratory courses*.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Joaquim A F; Gomes-Santos, Carina S S; Sousa, Ana Paula M; Madeira, Vítor M C

    2005-03-01

    Potato tubers and turnip roots were used to prepare purified mitochondria for laboratory practical work in the teaching of the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle). Plant mitochondria are particularly advantageous over the animal fractions to demonstrate the TCA cycle enzymatic steps, by using simple techniques to measure O(2) consumption and transmembrane potential (ΔΨ). The several TCA cycle intermediates induce specific enzyme activities, which can be identified by respiratory parameters. Such a strategy is also used to evidence properties of the TCA cycle enzymes: ADP stimulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase; activation by citrate of downstream oxidation steps, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase; and regulation of the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase by citrate action on the citrate/isocitrate carrier. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that, in the absence of exogenous Mg(2+) , isocitrate-dependent respiration favors the alternative oxidase pathway, as judged by changes of the ADP/O elicited by the inhibitor n-propyl galate. These are some examples of assays related with TCA cycle intermediates we can use in laboratory courses.

  5. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle--kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate --> pyruvate --> oxaloacetate --> malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  6. New multifunctional pharmaceutical excipient in tablet formulation based on citric acid-cyclodextrin polymer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, Maria José; Tabary, Nicolas; Chai, Feng; Cazaux, Frédéric; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Flament, Marie-Pierre; Martel, Bernard

    2016-09-25

    A β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) polymer obtained by crosslinking β-CD with citric acid in its water-insoluble (PCD-I) and soluble (PCD-S) forms was used as a multifunctional direct compression excipient for tablet designing. PCD-I powder was obtained after grinding the solid fraction through a 200μm grid. PCD-S powder was recovered after lyophilization or spray drying of the PCD-S aqueous solutions, eventually followed by a wet granulation step. Both PCD-I and PCD-S powders were characterized, separately and mixed in variable ratios, based on dynamic water vapor sorption, SEM, particle size distribution, tapped density, compressibility, and flowability. PCD-I and spray dried and lyophilized/wet granulated PCD-S, as well as the mixture PCD-I/PCD-S=90/10, presented optimal free flowing characteristics. Then, PCD-I or PCD-S powders - separately or mixed in variable ratios - were used for tablets preparation by direct compression without adding any other excipient (e.g. binder, lubricant, disintegrant etc). As PCD-I decreased, tablets resistance to crushing and disintegration time increased from 15s to 15min (against 30min for β-CD), showing the improved disintegrant functionality of PCD-I, that rapidly swelled once in contact with water. Finally, PCD was force-fed to Sprague-Dawley rats (2g/kg) which were then observed during 14days for any clinical signs of toxicity.

  7. EXAFS determinations of uranium structures: The uranyl ion complexed with tartaric, citric, and malic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.J.

    1996-01-31

    Studies of the coordination chemistry of uranium in aqueous solutions are increasingly important for understanding the behavior of uranium in the environment. Actinide speciation information is essential for assessing and developing long-term strategies addressing problems such as migration in nuclear waste repositories or improvements in the processing of nuclear waste and materials. Relative to the latter, one method for removing uranium contamination from soils involves extraction using a chelating agent such as Tiron, or citrate. These types of extractants are quite efficient at binding the uranyl ion and thus are suitable for removing uranium contamination when it is in the hexavalent uranyl ion form. Martell et al. and Markovits et al. have published a series of articles detailing the complexation of the uranyl ion with tartaric, malic, and citric acids as a function of pH. Using the functional dependencies of potentiometric titration results, they showed that, in the pH range 2-4, the uranyl ion forms a 2:2 dimeric species, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2-} (L){sub 2}, where L = tartrate, malate, or citrate ligands. The authors have reinvestigated the solution structures of the uranyl complexes formed in these systems with the structural technique extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  8. Effect of Trace Elements on Citric Acid Fermentation by Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Carreño, R.; Ledezma, M.

    1970-01-01

    Citric acid yields of 98.7% (sugar consumption basis) were reached in shaker flasks with mutant UV-ET-71-15 of Aspergillus niger in a resin-treated sucrose medium of the following composition (g/100 ml): sucrose, 14.0; NH4NO3, 0.20; KH2PO4, 0.10; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.025; and (mg/liter): FeSO4, 0.15 to 0.75; ZnSO4, 0.10; and CuSO4, 0.01. Yields of 75% were obtained in medium with resin-treated clarified syrup and 68% with ferrocyanide-treated blackstrap molasses. Optimal conditions included selection of appropriate pellets as inoculum at 3%, pH of 4.5, temperature at 30 C, agitation at 250 rev/min, and fermentation time of 8 days. The mutant tolerated high concentrations of trace elements. PMID:5492439

  9. Eco-friendly Rot and Crease Resistance Finishing of Jute Fabric using Citric Acid and Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, A. K.; Bagchi, A.

    2013-03-01

    Citric acid (CA) along with chitosan was used on bleached jute fabrics to impart anti crease and rot resistance properties in one step. The treatment was carried out by pad-dry-cure method in presence of sodium hypophosphite monohydrate catalyst. Curing at 150° Centigrade for 5 min delivered good crease resistant property (dry crease recovery angle is 244°) and high rot resistance simultaneously by a single treatment, which are durable for five washings with distilled water. Strength retention of jute fabric after 21 days soil burial was found to be 81 % and the loss (%) in strength due to this treatment was 15-18 %. The results showed that chitosan and CA treated-fabric exhibited higher rot resistance (as indicated by soil burial test) when compared to either CA or chitosan by individual treatment. The effect of CA and chitosan combination on the resistance to rotting of jute fabric was found to be synergistic which is higher than the sum of the effects of individual chemicals. CA possibly reacts with hydroxyl groups in cellulose or chitosan to form ester. The CA and chitosan finished fabric has adverse effect on stiffness. Thermal studies showed that final residue left at 500° C was much higher for CA and chitosan treated fabric than untreated jute fabric. FTIR spectroscopy suggested the formation of ester cross-linkage between the jute fibre, CA and chitosan and hence it is understood that this rot resistant finish on jute fabric become durable by this mechanism.

  10. Citric acid based durable and sustainable flame retardant treatment for lyocell fabric.

    PubMed

    Mengal, Naveed; Syed, Uzma; Malik, Samander Ali; Ali Sahito, Iftikhar; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2016-11-20

    Pyrovatex CP New, is a commonly used organophosphorus based flame retardant (FR) reagent for cellulosic materials. However, it has a drawback of high formaldehyde release when used with methylated melamine (MM) based cross-linker, a known carcinogenous compound. In the present approach, a durable and sustainable flame retarding recipe formulation for lyocell fabrics is developed using citric acid (CA) as a cross-linker. The FR finish was applied by pad-dry-cure process. The treated fabrics were characterized for surface morphology, elemental analysis, TG analysis, char study and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, flame retardancy, washing durability, formaldehyde release and breaking strength were also assessed, and compared with the conventional MM based FR recipe. The fabric samples treated with 400gL(-1) of FR with either 40 or 80gL(-1) of CA demonstrate flame retardancy even after 10 washing cycles. Furthermore, a 75% reduction in formaldehyde release is achieved. Higher char yield and lower decomposition temperature are found compared to untreated and FR+ MM treated lyocell. Such an improved sustainable recipe formulation can be used for lyocell fabric without any health risk in apparel wear.

  11. Citric acid mediates the iron absorption from low molecular weight human milk fractions.

    PubMed

    Palika, Ravindranadh; Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Kasula, Sunanda; Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2013-11-20

    Previously, we have demonstrated increased iron absorption from low molecular weight (LMW) human milk whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of heat denaturation, zinc (a competitor of iron), duodenal cytochrome b (DcytB) antibody neutralization and citrate lyase treatment on LMW human milk fraction (>5 kDa referred as 5kF) induced ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Heat denaturation and zinc inhibited the 5kF fraction induced ferric iron reduction. In contrast, zinc but not heat denaturation abrogated the ferric iron solubilization activity. Despite inhibition of ferric iron reduction, iron uptake in Caco-2 cells was similar from both native and heat denatured 5kF fractions. However, iron uptake was higher from native compared to heat denatured 5kF fractions in the cells preincubated with the DcytB antibody. Citrate lyase treatment inhibited the ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. These findings demonstrate that citric acid present in human milk solubilizes the ferric iron which could be reduced by other heat labile components leading to increased uptake in intestinal cells.

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of direct current (DC) plasma electrolytic oxidation of zirconium in citric acid.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Radić-Perić, Jelena; Vasilić, Rastko; Perić, Miljenko

    2014-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation of zirconium in citric acid was investigated using optical spectroscopy. A rich emission spectrum consisting of about 360 zirconium and 170 oxygen atomic and ionic lines was identified in the spectral regions 313-320, 340-516, and 626-640 nm. It was shown that the remaining features observed in the spectrum could be ascribed to various molecular species, which involve zirconium, oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. The temperature of the plasma core (T = 7500 ± 1000 K) was determined using measured Zr line intensities, and the temperature of peripheral plasma zone (T = 2800 ± 500 K) was estimated from the intensity distribution within a part of an OH spectrum. The composition of the plasma containing zirconium, oxygen, and hydrogen, under assumption of local thermal equilibrium, was calculated in the temperature range up to 12,000 K and for pressure of 10(5) and 10(7) Pa, in order to explain the appearance of the observed spectral features.

  13. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  14. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent

    PubMed Central

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: “Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch–glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent” González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature. PMID:27158645

  15. Production of tartrates by cyanide-mediated dimerization of glyoxylate: a potential abiotic pathway to the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Butch, Christopher; Cope, Elizabeth D; Pollet, Pamela; Gelbaum, Leslie; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Liotta, Charles L

    2013-09-11

    An abiotic formation of meso- and DL-tartrates in 80% yield via the cyanide-catalyzed dimerization of glyoxylate under alkaline conditions is demonstrated. A detailed mechanism for this conversion is proposed, supported by NMR evidence and (13)C-labeled reactions. Simple dehydration of tartrates to oxaloacetate and an ensuing decarboxylation to form pyruvate are known processes that provide a ready feedstock for entry into the citric acid cycle. While glyoxylate and high hydroxide concentration are atypical in the prebiotic literature, there is evidence for natural, abiotic availability of each. It is proposed that this availability, coupled with the remarkable efficiency of tartrate production from glyoxylate, merits consideration of an alternative prebiotic pathway for providing constituents of the citric acid cycle.

  16. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  17. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: "Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent" González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature.

  18. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  19. Influence of acetic, citric, and lactic acids on Escherichia coli O157:H7 membrane lipid composition, verotoxin secretion, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Marshall, Douglas L

    2005-04-01

    The effect of organic acid (acetic, citric, and lactic acids) adaptation at equivalent initial pH values (6.4 and 5.4) on changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.5, 37 degrees C) was determined for Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (HEC) and an rpoS mutant of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (RM, FRIK 816-3). For HEC, lactic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the greatest D-value (32.2 min) and acetic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the smallest D-value (16.6 min) in simulated gastric fluid. For RM, D-values of citric and acetic acid-adapted cells were similar to those for nonadapted cells grown at pH 7.3, but D-values increased from 13.1 to 27.9 min in lactic acid-adapted cells (from pH 7.3 to pH 5.4). For both strains, the ratio of cis-vaccenic to palmitic acids decreased for citric and lactic acid-adapted cells, but the ratio increased for acetic acid-adapted cells at pH 5.4. Organic acid-adapted cells produced less total verotoxin than did nonadapted cells at approximately 10(8) CFU/ml. Extracellular verotoxin concentration proportionally decreased with decreasing pH for both HEC and RM. Changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in HEC and RM were dependent on both pH and organic acid. Deletion of the rpoS gene did not affect these changes but did decrease acid resistance in citric acid-adapted cells. Results indicate that decreased membrane fluidity may have caused increased acid resistance and decreased verotoxin secretion.

  20. Coagulation of bitumen with kaolinite in aqueous solutions containing Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe3+: effect of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Gan, Weibing; Liu, Qi

    2008-08-01

    Heterocoagulation experiments of kaolinite with solvent-diluted-bitumen were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrolyzable metal cations and citric acid on the liberation of bitumen from kaolinite. The adsorption of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) on kaolinite, and zeta potentials of kaolinite and bitumen droplets in solutions containing 10(-3)mol/L of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Fe(3+) with or without citric acid were also measured. It was found that the heterocoagulation of bitumen with kaolinite was enhanced in the presence of the metal cations from pH 7 to pH 10.5, accompanied by a decrease in the magnitude of the zeta potentials and an increase in the adsorption of the metal cations on kaolinite and possibly on bitumen droplets. The addition of 5 x 10(-4)mol/L citric acid reduced the degree of coagulation from 90% to less than 40% in the presence of 10(-3)mol/L Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations at pH approximately 10, and at pH approximately 8 for Fe(3+). It was found that hydrolyzable metal cations enhanced bitumen-kaolinite interactions through electrical double layer compression and specific adsorption of the metal hydrolysis species on the surface of kaolinite. The effect of metal cations was removed by citric acid through formation of metal-citrate complexes and/or the adsorption of citrate anions, which restored the zeta potentials of both kaolinite and bitumen. Therefore, electrostatic attraction or repulsion was responsible for the coagulation or dispersion of kaolinite particles from bitumen droplets in the tested system.

  1. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture.

    PubMed

    Galushko, A S; Schink, B

    2000-11-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was measured as benzyl viologen reduction and strictly CoA-dependent; a low activity was also observed with NADP+. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate ductase both were membrane-bound. Succinate oxidation was coupled to NADP+ reduction whereas fumarate reduction was coupled to NADPH and NADH Coupling of succinate oxidation to NADP+ or cytochrome(s) reduction required an ATP-dependent reversed electron transport. Net ATP synthesis proceeded exclusively through electron transport phosphorylation. During fumarate reduction, both NADPH and NADH delivered reducing equivalents into the electron transport chain, which contained a menaquinone. Overall, acetate oxidation with fumarate proceeded through an open loop of citric acid cycle reactions, excluding succinate dehydrogenase, with fumarate reductase as the key reaction for electron delivery, whereas acetate oxidation in the syntrophic coculture required the complete citric acid cycle.

  2. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle: II. Heterogeneity of metabolite labeling pattern.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Kasumov, Takhar; Kombu, Rajan S; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-08

    In this second of two companion articles, we compare the mass isotopomer distribution of metabolites of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle labeled from NaH(13)CO(3) or dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate. The mass isotopomer distribution of intermediates reveals the reversibility of the isocitrate dehydrogenase + aconitase reactions, even in the absence of a source of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, in many cases, a number of labeling incompatibilities were found as follows: (i) glucose versus triose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate; (ii) differences in the labeling ratios C-4/C-3 of glucose versus (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate)/(dihydroxyacetone phosphate); and (iii) labeling of citric acid cycle intermediates in tissue versus effluent perfusate. Overall, our data show that gluconeogenic and citric acid cycle intermediates cannot be considered as sets of homogeneously labeled pools. This probably results from the zonation of hepatic metabolism and, in some cases, from differences in the labeling pattern of mitochondrial versus extramitochondrial metabolites. Our data have implications for the use of labeling patterns for the calculation of metabolic rates or fractional syntheses in liver, as well as for modeling liver intermediary metabolism.

  3. The effect of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of nedocromil sodium, sodium cromoglycate and codeine phosphate on citric acid-induced cough have been studied in conscious tracheostomised dogs. 2. Nedocromil sodium (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) and codeine phosphate (5 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly increased the time to the first cough when dogs were challenged with citric acid aerosol. The mean number of coughs in the initial period of coughing fell after treatment of dogs with nedocromil sodium or with codeine phosphate, but this reduction in mean cough number was not statistically significant. 3. Neither sodium cromoglycate (approximately 15 mg given as an aerosol) nor saline had significant effect on a citric acid challenge. 4. It is concluded that nedocromil sodium, but not sodium cromoglycate, possesses an anti-tussive action that may result from inhibition of sensory nerve activity in the lung. Nedocromil sodium may prove useful in the treatment of unproductive cough in situations where the use of a centrally-acting antitussive is undesirable. PMID:2836011

  4. Development of a novel glue consisting of naturally-derived biomolecules: citric acid and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Tetsushi; Saito, Hirofumi; Iwasashi, Masashi; Sakane, Masataka; Kakinoki, Sachiro; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2007-03-01

    A novel glue consisting of human serum albumin (HSA) and citric acid derivative (CAD) was developed where the glue is named as CAD-A glue. In this adhesive, CAD works as a crosslinking reagent of HSA. For preparing crosslinking reagent CAD, using citric acid as a starting material, three carboxyl groups of a citric acid were modified with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride. From 1H-NMR spectrum, CAD with three active ester groups in a molecule was successfully synthesized with a high yield (more than 80%). The boding time of CAD-A glue to collagen-based casing was saturated within 15 minutes. The bonding strength of this glue to collagen-based casings increased with increasing of HSA concentration. The maximum bonding strength of CAD-A glue was a slightly low level compared to the bonding strength of cyanoacrylate adhesive and was 9 times higher than that of fibrin glue. The CAD-A glue showed excellent biocompatibility and high ability of wound closure similar to that of cyanoacrylate-based adhesive when glues were applied to the mouse skin. These results suggested that this developed adhesive had both tissue compatibility and bonding strength for use in clinical field.

  5. Changes in citric acid cycle flux and anaplerosis antedate the functional decline in isolated rat hearts utilizing acetoacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R R; Taegtmeyer, H

    1991-01-01

    To determine the temporal relationship between changes in contractile performance and flux through the citric acid cycle in hearts oxidizing acetoacetate, we perfused isolated working rat hearts with either glucose or acetoacetate (both 5 mM) and freeze-clamped the tissue at defined times. After 60 min of perfusion, hearts utilizing acetoacetate exhibited lower systolic and diastolic pressures and lower cardiac outputs. The oxidation of acetoacetate increased the tissue content of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate and decreased the content of succinyl-CoA suggesting inhibition of citric acid cycle flux through 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Whereas hearts perfused with either acetoacetate or glucose were similar with respect to their function for the first 20 min, changes in tissue metabolites were already observed within 5 min of perfusion at near-physiological workloads. The addition of lactate or propionate, but not acetate, to hearts oxidizing acetoacetate improved contractile performance, although inhibition of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase was probably not diminished. If lactate or propionate were added, malate and citrate accumulated indicating utilization of anaplerotic pathways for the citric acid cycle. We conclude that a decreased rate of flux through 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase in hearts oxidizing acetoacetate precedes, and may be responsible for, contractile failure and is not the result of decreased cardiac work. Further, anaplerosis play an important role in the maintenance of contractile function in hearts utilizing acetoacetate. Images PMID:1671390

  6. Improvement of production of citric acid from oil palm empty fruit bunches: optimization of media by statistical experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Bari, Md Niamul; Alam, Md Zahangir; Muyibi, Suleyman A; Jamal, Parveen; Abdullah-Al-Mamun

    2009-06-01

    A sequential optimization based on statistical design and one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method was employed to optimize the media constituents for the improvement of citric acid production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) through solid state bioconversion using Aspergillus niger IBO-103MNB. The results obtained from the Plackett-Burman design indicated that the co-substrate (sucrose), stimulator (methanol) and minerals (Zn, Cu, Mn and Mg) were found to be the major factors for further optimization. Based on the OFAT method, the selected medium constituents and inoculum concentration were optimized by the central composite design (CCD) under the response surface methodology (RSM). The statistical analysis showed that the optimum media containing 6.4% (w/w) of sucrose, 9% (v/w) of minerals and 15.5% (v/w) of inoculum gave the maximum production of citric acid (337.94 g/kg of dry EFB). The analysis showed that sucrose (p<0.0011) and mineral solution (p<0.0061) were more significant compared to inoculum concentration (p<0.0127) for the citric acid production.

  7. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  8. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  9. Differential effects of heptanoate and hexanoate on myocardial citric acid cycle intermediates following ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Okere, Isidore C; McElfresh, Tracy A; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; Martini, Wenjun; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Brunengraber, Henri; Stanley, William C

    2006-01-01

    In the normal heart, there is loss of citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates that is matched by the entry of intermediates from outside the cycle, a process termed anaplerosis. Previous in vitro studies suggest that supplementation with anaplerotic substrates improves cardiac function during myocardial ischemia and/or reperfusion. The present investigation assessed whether treatment with the anaplerotic medium-chain fatty acid heptanoate improves contractile function during ischemia and reperfusion. The left anterior descending coronary artery of anesthetized pigs was subjected to 60 min of 60% flow reduction and 30 min of reperfusion. Three treatment groups were studied: saline control, heptanoate (0.4 mM), or hexanoate as a negative control (0.4 mM). Treatment was initiated after 30 min of ischemia and continued through reperfusion. Myocardial CAC intermediate content was not affected by ischemia-reperfusion; however, treatment with heptanoate resulted in a more than twofold increase in fumarate and malate, with no change in citrate and succinate, while treatment with hexanoate did not increase fumarate or malate but increased succinate by 1.8-fold. There were no differences among groups in lactate exchange, glucose oxidation, oxygen consumption, and contractile power. In conclusion, despite a significant increase in the content of carbon-4 CAC intermediates, treatment with heptanoate did not result in improved mechanical function of the heart in this model of reversible ischemia-reperfusion. This suggests that reduced anaplerosis and CAC dysfunction do not play a major role in contractile and metabolic derangements observed with a 60% decrease in coronary flow followed by reperfusion.

  10. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  11. New fermentation processes for producing itaconic acid and citric acid for industrial uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Itaconic acid is an important industrial chemical that we have produced by fermentation of simple sugars using the yeast Pseudozyma antarctica. Itaconic acid is priced at ~$4 per kg and has an annual market volume of about 15,000 metric tons. Itaconic acid is used in the polymer industry and for m...

  12. Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Romih, Tea; Drašler, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobič, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susič, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The isopods were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2 weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in isopods exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity.

  13. Pyruvate and citric acid cycle carbon requirements in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Messer, Jeffrey I; Jackman, Matthew R; Willis, Wayne T

    2004-03-01

    Carbohydrate depletion precipitates fatigue in skeletal muscle, but, because pyruvate provides both acetyl-CoA for mainline oxidation and anaplerotic carbon to the citric acid cycle (CAC), the mechanism remains obscure. Thus pyruvate and CAC kinetic parameters were independently quantified in mitochondria isolated from rat mixed skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (Jo) was measured polarographically while either pyruvate or malate was added stepwise in the presence of a saturating concentration of the other substrate. These substrate titrations were carried out across a physiological range of fixed extramitochondrial ATP free energy states (DeltaGP), established with a creatine kinase energy clamp, and also at saturating [ADP]. The apparent Km,malate for mitochondrial Jo ranged from 21 to 32 microM, and the apparent Km,pyruvate ranged from 12 to 26 microM, with both substrate Km values increasing as DeltaGP declined. Vmax for both substrates also increased as DeltaGP fell, reflecting thermodynamic control of Jo. Reported in vivo skeletal muscle [malate] are >10-fold greater than the Km,malate determined in this study. In marked contrast, the K(m,pyruvate) determined is near the [pyruvate] reported in muscle approaching exhaustion associated with glycogen depletion. When data were evaluated in the context of a linear thermodynamic force-flow (DeltaGP-Jo) relationship, the DeltaGP-Jo slope was essentially insensitive to changes in [malate] in the range observed in vivo but decreased markedly with declining [pyruvate] across the physiological range. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly sensitive to variations in [pyruvate] in the physiological range. In contrast, physiological [malate] exerts very little, if any, influence on mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation measured in vitro.

  14. Mast cells in citric acid-induced cough of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw; Lin, T.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    It was demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced cough, three experiments were carried out in this study. In the first experiment, 59 guinea pigs were employed and we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit leukotriene synthesis, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H{sub 1} receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, 56 compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into two parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C{sub 4}, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine in CA-induced cough. Each animal with one of the above pretreatments was exposed sequentially to saline (baseline) and CA (0.6 M) aerosol, each for 3 min. Then, cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining arterial plasma histamine concentration in 17 animals. Exposure to CA induced a marked increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced cough. Injection of LTC{sub 4} or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in plasma histamine concentration, which was blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced cough via perhaps mediators LTs and histamine.

  15. Enhanced citric acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by overexpression of the Escherichia coli citrate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Buch, Aditi D; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2009-08-01

    Citric acid secretion by fluorescent pseudomonads has a distinct significance in microbial phosphate solubilization. The role of citrate synthase in citric acid biosynthesis and glucose catabolism in pseudomonads was investigated by overexpressing the Escherichia coli citrate synthase (gltA) gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525. The resultant approximately 2-fold increase in citrate synthase activity in the gltA-overexpressing strain Pf(pAB7) enhanced the intracellular and extracellular citric acid yields during the stationary phase, by about 2- and 26-fold, respectively, as compared to the control, without affecting the growth rate, glucose depletion rate or biomass yield. Decreased glucose consumption was paralleled by increased gluconic acid production due to an increase in glucose dehydrogenase activity. While the extracellular acetic acid yield increased in Pf(pAB7), pyruvic acid secretion decreased, correlating with an increase in pyruvate carboxylase activity and suggesting an increased demand for the anabolic precursor oxaloacetate. Activities of two other key enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase, remained unaltered, and the contribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate lyase to glucose catabolism was negligible. Strain Pf(pAB7) demonstrated an enhanced phosphate-solubilizing ability compared to the control. Co-expression of the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and E. coli gltA genes in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, so as to supplement oxaloacetate for citrate biosynthesis, neither significantly affected citrate biosynthesis nor caused any change in the other physiological and biochemical parameters measured, despite approximately 1.3- and 5-fold increases in citrate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities, respectively. Thus, our results demonstrate that citrate synthase is rate-limiting in enhancing citrate biosynthesis in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525

  16. Citric acid as the last therapeutic approach in an acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Siekmeyer, Manuela; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Terpe, Friederike; Beblo, Skadi; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schlensog-Schuster, Franziska; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle represents the key enzymatic steps in cellular energy metabolism. Once the TCA cycle is impaired in case of inherited metabolic disorders, life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and severe organ failure can arise. We present the case of a 6 ½-year-old girl with propionic acidaemia during an episode of acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation and severe lactic acidosis. Citric acid given as an oral formulation showed the potential to sustain the TCA cycle flux. This therapeutic approach may become a treatment option in a situation of acute metabolic crisis, possibly preventing severe disturbance of energy metabolism.

  17. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  18. Citric acid and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid as effective washing agents to treat sewage sludge for agricultural reuse.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianghao; Yan, Rui; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Kou, Ying-Ying; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Kim, In S; Park, Yong-Jin; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the effects of different concentrations of citric acid (CA) and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) when used as additive reagents for the treatment of sewage sludge for agricultural use. Herein, both the retention of nutrients and removal of metals from the sewage sludge are examined. The average removal rate for the metals after treatment by CA decreased in the order Cu>Pb>Cd>Cr>Zn, while the rates after treatment by EDTA decreased in the order of Pb>Cu>Cr>Cd>Zn. After treatment with CA and EDTA, total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in the sludge decreased, while the content of available nitrogen and Olsen-P increased. In addition, a multi-criteria analysis model-fuzzy analytic network process method (with 3 main factors and 12 assessment sub-factors) was adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment methods. The results showed that the optimal CA and EDTA concentrations for sewage sludge treatment were 0.60 and 0.125 mol/L, respectively.

  19. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  20. Remediation of soils contaminated with chromium using citric and hydrochloric acids: the role of chromium fractionation in chromium leaching.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Chin-Yuan; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Acid washing is a common method for soil remediation, but is not always efficient for chromium-contaminated soil. Both soil particle size and the forms of chromium existing in the soil affect the efficiency of soil washing. Laboratory batch and column dissolution experiments were conducted to determine the efficiencies of citric and hydrochloric acids as agents to extract chromium from soils contaminated with chromium. The effects of soil particle size and chromium fractionation on Cr leaching were also investigated. About 90% of chromium in the studied soil existed either in residual form or bound to iron and manganese oxides, and Cr fraction distributions were similar for all soil particle sizes. Almost all exchangeable and carbonate-bound chromium was removed by washing once with 0.5 M HCl, whereas organic chromium was more effectively removed by washing with citric acid rather than with HCl solution of the same concentration. For chromium fractions that were either bound to Fe-Mn oxides or existed as residual forms, the efficiencies of acid washing were usually 20% or less, except for 0.5 M HCl solution, which had much higher efficiencies. Separation of the soil sample by particle size before the separate washing of the soil fractions had little improvement on the chromium removal.

  1. Metabolism of glycerol, glucose, and lactate in the citric acid cycle prior to incorporation into hepatic acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2013-05-17

    During hepatic lipogenesis, the glycerol backbone of acylglycerols originates from one of three sources: glucose, glycerol, or substrates passing through the citric acid cycle via glyceroneogenesis. The relative contribution of each substrate source to glycerol in rat liver acylglycerols was determined using (13)C-enriched substrates and NMR. Animals received a fixed mixture of glucose, glycerol, and lactate; one group received [U-(13)C6]glucose, another received [U-(13)C3]glycerol, and the third received [U-(13)C3]lactate. After 3 h, the livers were harvested to extract fats, and the glycerol moiety from hydrolyzed acylglycerols was analyzed by (13)C NMR. In either fed or fasted animals, glucose and glycerol provided the majority of the glycerol backbone carbons, whereas the contribution of lactate was small. In fed animals, glucose contributed >50% of the total newly synthesized glycerol backbone, and 35% of this contribution occurred after glucose had passed through the citric acid cycle. By comparison, the glycerol contribution was ~40%, and of this, 17% of the exogenous glycerol passed first through the cycle. In fasted animals, exogenous glycerol became the major contributor to acylglycerols. The contribution from exogenous lactate did increase in fasted animals, but its overall contribution remained small. The contributions of glucose and glycerol that had passed through the citric acid cycle first increased in fasted animals from 35 to 71% for glucose and from 17 to 24% for glycerol. Thus, a substantial fraction from both substrate sources passed through the cycle prior to incorporation into the glycerol moiety of acylglycerols in the liver.

  2. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  3. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Martínez, D.; Martínez-de la Cruz, A.; López-Cuéllar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ► WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ► WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}·xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UV–vis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 °C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  4. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger.

  5. Which way does the citric acid cycle turn during hypoxia? The critical role of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-08-01

    The citric acid cycle forms a major metabolic hub and as such it is involved in many disease states involving energetic imbalance. In spite of the fact that it is being branded as a "cycle", during hypoxia, when the electron transport chain does not oxidize reducing equivalents, segments of this metabolic pathway remain operational but exhibit opposing directionalities. This serves the purpose of harnessing high-energy phosphates through matrix substrate-level phosphorylation in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. In this Mini-Review, these segments are appraised, pointing to the critical importance of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex dictating their directionalities.

  6. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  7. The regulatory effect of citric acid on the co-production of poly(ε-lysine) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) in Streptomyces albulus PD-1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai; Bo, Fangfang

    2014-10-01

    Streptomyces albulus PD-1 can co-produce antimicrobial homo-polymers poly(ε-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP). In this study, a novel feeding strategy of citric acid coupled with glucose-(NH4)2SO4 feeding was employed to S. albulus PD-1. When the pH of the culture broth dropped to 4.0, the feeding solution was added continuously to maintain the concentrations of glucose and citric acid at 10 and 4 g L(-1), respectively. As a result, the final concentration of ε-PL increased from 21.7 to 29.7 g L(-1) and the final concentration of PDAP decreased from 4.8 to 3.2 g L(-1). Assays on intracellular nucleotide levels and key enzyme activities were performed to elucidate the underlying regulation mechanism. The addition of citric acid increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio and decreased intracellular ATP level; meanwhile, the activities of pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase decreased while aspartate aminotransferase activity increased. Therefore, we deduced that citric acid feeding resulted in metabolic flux redistribution at the node of phosphoenolpyruvate; the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into tricarboxylic acid cycle was weakened and thus PDAP production was inhibited. On the other hand, the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into oxaloacetate and L-aspartate was enhanced, thereby improving ε-PL production. This fermentation strategy may be potentially useful in ε-PL production because it can effectively inhibit the formation of by-products, such as PDAP.

  8. Citric acid production from hydrolysate of pretreated straw cellulose by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b using batch and fed-batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, crude cellulase produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-30 was used to hydrolyze pretreated straw. After the compositions of the hydrolysate of pretreated straw were optimized, the study showed that natural components of pretreated straw without addition of any other components such as (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, or Mg(2+) were suitable for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the optimal ventilatory capacity was 10.0 L/min/L medium. Batch and fed-batch production of citric acid from the hydrolysate of pretreated straw by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b has been investigated. In the batch cultivation, 25.4 g/L and 26.7 g/L citric acid were yields from glucose and hydrolysate of straw cellulose, respectively, while the cultivation time was 120 hr. In the three-cycle fed-batch cultivation, citric acid (CA) production was increased to 42.4 g/L and the cultivation time was extended to 240 hr. However, iso-citric acid (ICA) yield in fed-batch cultivation (4.0 g/L) was similar to that during the batch cultivation (3.9 g/L), and only 1.6 g/L of reducing sugar was left in the medium at the end of fed-batch cultivation, suggesting that most of the added carbon was used in the cultivation.

  9. Gene transfer between different Trichoderma species and Aspergillus niger through intergeneric protoplast fusion to convert ground rice straw to citric acid and cellulases.

    PubMed

    El-Bondkly, Ahmed M

    2006-11-01

    Single-stage direct bioconversion of cellulosic materials to citric acid using intergeneric hybrids obtained from three different Trichoderma species and Aspergillus niger was carried out. The recent results were obtained on the basis of either resistance or sensitivity to one or more of five metal ions, two catabolite repressors, and five antifungal agents, which were used in this study at different concentrations. Sixty-six fusants were isolated after using the three intergeneric protoplast fusion experiments, belonging to two types of intergeneric fusants. Fusants of the first type are heterokaryons (35 fusants). On the other hand, those of the second type are haploids (31 fusants), i.e., they were stable. The present study can be successfully applied in the construction of 14 new genetic fusants, which produced at least 100% more citric acid than the citric acid producer strain A. niger. Out of the fusants, three (1/18, 2/13 and 2/15) showed about a threefold increase of citric acid production in comparison with the parent A. niger strain. Furthermore, studies on DNA content showed that this finding may be submitted on the evidence that citric acid and cellulases production was not correlated with DNA content; however, the productivity depends on specific DNA content.

  10. Performance, kinetics, and equilibrium of methylene blue adsorption on biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Dongmei; Wan, Shungang; Yu, Zebin

    2015-12-01

    Biochar derived from eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids at low temperatures was utilized as adsorbent to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that the carboxyl group was introduced on the biochar surface. Adsorption experiment data indicated that eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric acid showed higher MB adsorption efficiency than that modified with tartaric and acetic acids. Pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model for describing MB adsorption on biochar compared with pseudo-first-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The calculated values of ΔG(0) and ΔH(0) indicated the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the adsorption process. MB adsorption on biochar followed the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacities for eucalyptus saw dust modified with citric, tartaric, and acetic acids were 178.57, 99.01, and 29.94 mg g(-1), respectively, at 35°C.

  11. Effect of dietary citric acid on the performance and mineral metabolism of broiler.

    PubMed

    Islam, K M S; Schaeublin, H; Wenk, C; Wanner, M; Liesegang, A

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary citric acid (CA) on the performance and mineral metabolism of broiler chicks. A total of 1720 Ross PM3 broiler chicks (days old) were randomly assigned to four groups (430 in each) and reared for a period of 35 days. The diets of groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were supplemented with 0%, 0.25%, 0.75% or 1.25% CA by weight respectively. Feed and faeces samples were collected weekly and analysed for acid insoluble ash, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg). The pH was measured in feed and faeces. At the age of 28 days, 10 birds from each group were slaughtered; tibiae were collected from each bird for the determination of bone mineral density, total ash, Ca, P, Mg and bone-breaking strength, and blood was collected for the measurement of osteocalcin, serum CrossLaps(®), Ca, P, Mg and 1,25(OH)(2)Vit-D in serum. After finishing the trial on day 37, all chicks were slaughtered by using the approved procedure. Birds that were fed CA diets were heavier (average body weights of 2030, 2079 and 2086 g in the 0.25%, 0.75% and 1.25% CA groups, respectively, relative to the control birds (1986 g). Feed conversion efficiency (weight gain in g per kg of feed intake) was also higher in birds of the CA-fed groups (582, 595 and 587 g/kg feed intake for 0.25%, 0.75% and 1.25% CA respectively), relative to the control birds (565 g/kg feed intake). The digestibility of Ca, P and Mg increased in the CA-fed groups, especially for the diets supplemented with 0.25% and 0.75% CA. Support for finding was also indicated in the results of the analysis of the tibia. At slaughter, the birds had higher carcass weights and higher graded carcasses in the groups that were fed the CA diets. The estimated profit margin was highest for birds fed the diet containing 0.25% CA. Birds of the 0.75% CA group were found to have the second highest estimated profit margin. Addition of CA up to a level of 1.25% of the diet increased performance

  12. Comparison of clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide 5% gel to a novel composition containing salicylic acid, capryloyl salicylic acid, HEPES, glycolic acid, citric acid, and dioic acid in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie S; Oresajo, Christian; Yatskayer, Margarita; Dahl, Amanda; Figueras, Kristian

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated the tolerance and efficacy of 2 facial skin products in subjects with acne using the following acne treatments: 1) treatment A, a combination of salicylic acid, capryloyl salicylic acid, HEPES, glycolic acid, citric acid, and dioic acid, and 2) treatment B (BenzaClin®, clindamycin 1% and benzoyl peroxide 5% gel). The treatment design included the split-face application of treatment A and treatment B and the full-face application of the cleanser, moisturizer, and sunscreen. Data were collected through physician visual assessments, subject irritation questionnaires and assessments, along with clinical photography. Results showed similar tolerance and efficacy for both treatments.

  13. Evaluation of shrinking core model in leaching process of Pomalaa nickel laterite using citric acid as leachant at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanta, K. C.; Perdana, I.; Petrus, H. T. B. M.

    2016-11-01

    Most of kinetics studies related to leaching process used shrinking core model to describe physical phenomena of the process. Generally, the model was developed in connection with transport and/or reaction of reactant components. In this study, commonly used internal diffusion controlled shrinking core model was evaluated for leaching process of Pomalaa nickel laterite using citric acid as leachant. Particle size was varied at 60-70, 100-120, -200 meshes, while the operating temperature was kept constant at 358 K, citric acid concentration at 0.1 M, pulp density at 20% w/v and the leaching time was for 120 minutes. Simulation results showed that the shrinking core model was inadequate to closely approach the experimental data. Meanwhile, the experimental data indicated that the leaching process was determined by the mobility of product molecules in the ash layer pores. In case of leaching resulting large product molecules, a mathematical model involving steps of reaction and product diffusion might be appropriate to develop.

  14. Palladium-platinum core-shell electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction prepared with the assistance of citric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lulu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Shangqian; Chang, Qiaowan; Yue, Jeffrey; Du, Zheng; Shao, Minhua

    2016-04-26

    Core–shell structure is a promising alternative to solid platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A simple method of preparing palladium (Pd)–platinum (Pt) core–shell catalysts (Pd@Pt/C) in a gram-batch was developed with the assistance of citric acid. The Pt shell deposition involves three different pathways: galvanic displacement reaction between Pd atoms and Pt cations, chemical reduction by citric acid, and reduction by negative charges on Pd surfaces. The uniform ultrathin (~0.4 nm) Pt shell was characterized by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Compared with state-of-the-art Pt/C, the Pd@Pt/C core–shell catalyst showed 4 times higher Pt mass activity and much better durability upon potential cycling. As a result, both the mass activity and durability were comparable to that of Pd@Pt/C synthesized by a Cu-mediated-Pt-displacement method, which is more complicated and difficult for mass production.

  15. Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Seligra, Paula González; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Biodegradable and non-retrogradable starch-glycerol based films were obtained using citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent at 75°C. This material allowed decreasing water vapor permeability (WVP) more than 35%, remained amorphous for at least 45 days as a result of the network formed by the CA that avoided starch retrogradation and maintained the degradability in compost, occurring only six days after the films without citric acid. A simulation of the gelatinization process of starch-glycerol with and without CA, using a differential thermal analysis device, showed that the system with CA completed the gelatinization 5°C before than the other and, CA first reacted with glycerol and then starch-glycerol-CA reaction occurred. The temperature at which the gelatinization process was carried out was critical to obtain the best results. An increase of gelatinization process temperature at 85°C in system with CA, led to a worsening on WVP and its integrity after a swelling process with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compared to the films processed at 75°C.

  16. Fabrication of Self-Ordered Alumina Films with Large Interpore Distance by Janus Anodization in Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingjun; Wen, Yihao; Li, Juan; Li, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhiying; Feng, Chenchen; Sun, Runguang

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized porous anodic alumina (PAA) formed by electrochemical anodization have become a fundamental tool to develop various functional nanomaterials. However, it is still a great challenge to break the interpore distance (Dint) limit (500 nm) by using current anodization technologies of mild anodization (MA) and hard anodization (HA). Here, we reported a new anodization mode named “Janus anodization” (JA) to controllably fabricate self-ordered PAA with large Dint at high voltage of 350–400 V. JA naturally occurs as anodizing Al foils in citric acid solution, which possessing both the characteristics of MA and HA. The process can be divided into two stages: I, slow pore nucleation stage similar to MA; II, unequilibrium self-organization process similar to HA. The as-prepared films had the highest modulus (7.0 GPa) and hardness (127.2 GPa) values compared with the alumina obtained by MA and HA. The optical studies showed that the black films have low reflectance (<10 %) in the wavelength range of 250–1500 nm and photoluminescence property. Dint can be tuned between 645–884 nm by controlling citric acid concentration or anodization voltage. JA is a potential technology to efficiently and controllably fabricate microstructured or hybrid micro- and nanostructured materials with novel properties. PMID:27958365

  17. Identification of transport pathways for citric acid cycle intermediates in the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Pajor, Ana M

    2008-04-01

    Citric acid cycle intermediates are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract through carrier-mediated mechanisms, although the transport pathways have not been clearly identified. This study examines the transport of citric acid cycle intermediates in the Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cell line, often used as a model of small intestine. Inulin was used as an extracellular volume marker instead of mannitol since the apparent volume measured with mannitol changed with time. The results show that Caco-2 cells contain at least three distinct transporters, including the Na+-dependent di- and tricarboxylate transporters, NaDC1 and NaCT, and one or more sodium-independent pathways, possibly involving organic anion transporters. Succinate transport is mediated mostly by Na+-dependent pathways, predominantly by NaDC1, but with some contribution by NaCT. RT-PCR and functional characteristics verified the expression of these transporters in Caco-2 cells. In contrast, citrate transport in Caco-2 cells occurs by a combination of Na+-independent pathways, possibly mediated by an organic anion transporter, and Na+-dependent mechanisms. The non-metabolizable dicarboxylate, methylsuccinate, is also transported by a combination of Na+-dependent and -independent pathways. In conclusion, we find that multiple pathways are involved in the transport of di- and tricarboxylates by Caco-2 cells. Since many of these pathways are not found in human intestine, this model may be best suited for studying Na+-dependent transport of succinate by NaDC1.

  18. Effects of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric Acid Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadanand, K.; Vandana, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors that may bring about mineralization changes in teeth. Routine treatment of root biomodification is commonly followed during Periodontal therapy. Background: The Purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the morphological changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed root dentin subsequent to the application of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric acid. Both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth comprising of periodontally healthy and diseased were included in this study. Method: Each of them was grouped into Tetracycline Hydrochloride, EDTA and Citric acid treatment groupes. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM), the photomicrographs of dentin specimens were obtained. Results: Showed that there was no significant difference in exposure of number of tubules in different groups, while significant increase in the tubular width and tubular surface area was seen in fluorosed healthy, followed by fluorosed diseased groups, nonfluorosed healthy and nonfluorosed diseased groups after root biomodification procedure using various root conditioning agents. The root biomodification procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and nonfluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:27335611

  19. Application of natural citric acid sources and their role on arsenic removal from drinking water: a green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Islam, Sk Mijanul; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chatterjee, Debashis; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-11-15

    Solar Oxidation and Removal of Arsenic (SORAS) is a low-cost non-hazardous technique for the removal of arsenic (As) from groundwater. In this study, we tested the efficiency of natural citric acid sources extracted from tomato, lemon and lime to promote SORAS for As removal at the household level. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory using both synthetic solutions and natural groundwater samples collected from As-polluted areas in West Bengal. The role of As/Fe molar ratios and citrate doses on As removal efficiency were checked in synthetic samples. The results demonstrate that tomato juice (as citric acid) was more efficient to remove As from both synthetic (percentage of removal: 78-98%) and natural groundwater (90-97%) samples compared to lemon (61-83% and 79-85%, respectively) and lime (39-69% and 63-70%, respectively) juices. The As/Fe molar ratio and the citrate dose showed an 'optimized central tendency' on As removal. Anti-oxidants, e.g. 'hydroxycinnamates', found in tomato, were shown to have a higher capacity to catalyze SORAS photochemical reactions compared to 'flavanones' found in lemon or lime. The application of this method has several advantages, such as eco- and user- friendliness and affordability at the household level compared to other low-cost techniques.

  20. Palladium-platinum core-shell electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction prepared with the assistance of citric acid

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Lulu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Shangqian; ...

    2016-04-26

    Core–shell structure is a promising alternative to solid platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A simple method of preparing palladium (Pd)–platinum (Pt) core–shell catalysts (Pd@Pt/C) in a gram-batch was developed with the assistance of citric acid. The Pt shell deposition involves three different pathways: galvanic displacement reaction between Pd atoms and Pt cations, chemical reduction by citric acid, and reduction by negative charges on Pd surfaces. The uniform ultrathin (~0.4 nm) Pt shell was characterized by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopymore » (HAADF-STEM) images combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Compared with state-of-the-art Pt/C, the Pd@Pt/C core–shell catalyst showed 4 times higher Pt mass activity and much better durability upon potential cycling. As a result, both the mass activity and durability were comparable to that of Pd@Pt/C synthesized by a Cu-mediated-Pt-displacement method, which is more complicated and difficult for mass production.« less

  1. Fabrication of Self-Ordered Alumina Films with Large Interpore Distance by Janus Anodization in Citric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingjun; Wen, Yihao; Li, Juan; Li, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhiying; Feng, Chenchen; Sun, Runguang

    2016-12-01

    Self-organized porous anodic alumina (PAA) formed by electrochemical anodization have become a fundamental tool to develop various functional nanomaterials. However, it is still a great challenge to break the interpore distance (Dint) limit (500 nm) by using current anodization technologies of mild anodization (MA) and hard anodization (HA). Here, we reported a new anodization mode named “Janus anodization” (JA) to controllably fabricate self-ordered PAA with large Dint at high voltage of 350–400 V. JA naturally occurs as anodizing Al foils in citric acid solution, which possessing both the characteristics of MA and HA. The process can be divided into two stages: I, slow pore nucleation stage similar to MA; II, unequilibrium self-organization process similar to HA. The as-prepared films had the highest modulus (7.0 GPa) and hardness (127.2 GPa) values compared with the alumina obtained by MA and HA. The optical studies showed that the black films have low reflectance (<10 %) in the wavelength range of 250–1500 nm and photoluminescence property. Dint can be tuned between 645–884 nm by controlling citric acid concentration or anodization voltage. JA is a potential technology to efficiently and controllably fabricate microstructured or hybrid micro- and nanostructured materials with novel properties.

  2. Fabrication of Self-Ordered Alumina Films with Large Interpore Distance by Janus Anodization in Citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingjun; Wen, Yihao; Li, Juan; Li, Yuxin; Zhang, Zhiying; Feng, Chenchen; Sun, Runguang

    2016-12-13

    Self-organized porous anodic alumina (PAA) formed by electrochemical anodization have become a fundamental tool to develop various functional nanomaterials. However, it is still a great challenge to break the interpore distance (Dint) limit (500 nm) by using current anodization technologies of mild anodization (MA) and hard anodization (HA). Here, we reported a new anodization mode named "Janus anodization" (JA) to controllably fabricate self-ordered PAA with large Dint at high voltage of 350-400 V. JA naturally occurs as anodizing Al foils in citric acid solution, which possessing both the characteristics of MA and HA. The process can be divided into two stages: I, slow pore nucleation stage similar to MA; II, unequilibrium self-organization process similar to HA. The as-prepared films had the highest modulus (7.0 GPa) and hardness (127.2 GPa) values compared with the alumina obtained by MA and HA. The optical studies showed that the black films have low reflectance (<10 %) in the wavelength range of 250-1500 nm and photoluminescence property. Dint can be tuned between 645-884 nm by controlling citric acid concentration or anodization voltage. JA is a potential technology to efficiently and controllably fabricate microstructured or hybrid micro- and nanostructured materials with novel properties.

  3. The mixture of liquid foam soap, ethanol and citric acid as a new fixative-preservative solution in veterinary anatomy.

    PubMed

    Turan, Erkut; Gules, Ozay; Kilimci, Figen Sevil; Kara, Mehmet Erkut; Dilek, Omer Gurkan; Sabanci, Seyyid Said; Tatar, Musa

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the efficiency of liquid foam soap, ethanol, citric acid and benzalkonium chloride as a fixative-preservative solution (a soap-and ethanol-based fixing solution, or SEFS). In this study, ethanol serves as the fixative and preservative, liquid foam soap as the modifying agent, citric acid as the antioxidant and benzalkonium chloride as the disinfectant. The goat cadavers perfused with SEFS (n=8) were evaluated over a period of one year with respect to hardness, colour and odour using objective methods. Colour and hardness were compared between one fresh cadaver and the SEFS-embalmed cadavers. Histological and microbiological examinations were also performed in tissue samples. Additionally, the cadavers were subjectively evaluated after dissection and palpation. The SEFS provided the effectiveness expected over a 1-year embalming period for the animal cadavers. No bacteria or fungi were isolated except for some non-pathogenic Bacillus species. Visible mould was not present on either cadavers or in the surrounding environment. The cadavers maintained an appearance close to their original anatomical appearance, with muscles having good hardness and elasticity for dissection.

  4. Poly(citric acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers--new biocompatible hybrid materials for nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Naeini, Ashkan Tavakoli; Adeli, Mohsen; Vossoughi, Manouchehr

    2010-08-01

    Linear-dendritic ABA triblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as B block and hyperbranched poly(citric acid) (PCA) as A blocks were synthesized through polycondensation. The molecular self-assembly of synthesized PCA-PEG-PCA copolymers in water led to formation of nanoparticles and fibers in different sizes and shapes depending on the time and size of PCA blocks. Ten days after dissolving PCA-PEG-PCA copolymers in water, the size of fibers had reached several millimeters. Mixing a water solution of fluorescein as a small guest molecule and PCA-PEG-PCA copolymers led to the encapsulation of fluorescein by products of molecular self-assembly. To investigate their potential application in nanomedicine and to understand the limitations and capabilities of these materials as nanoexcipients in biological systems, different types of short-term in vitro cytotoxicity experiments on the HT1080 cell line (human fibrosarcoma) and hemocompatibility tests were performed. From the clinical editor: This manuscript investigates the potentials of linear-dendritic ABA triblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as B block and hyperbranched poly(citric acid) (PCA) as A blocks for future applications in nanomedicine.

  5. Determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar using visible/near infrared spectroscopy and least squares-support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Li; He, Yong

    2008-11-01

    The determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar was processed using visible and near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM). Five concentration levels (100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20%) of lemon vinegar were studied. The calibration set was consisted of 225 samples (45 samples for each level) and the remaining 75 samples for the validation set. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis was employed for the calibration models as well as extraction of certain latent variables (LVs) and effective wavelengths (EWs). Different preprocessing methods were compared in PLS models including smoothing, standard normal variate (SNV), the first and second derivative. The selected LVs and EWs were employed as the inputs to develop least square-support vector machine (LSSVM) models. The optimal prediction results were achieved by LV-LS-SVM model, and the correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and bias for validation set were 0.9990, 0.1972 and -0.0334, respectively. Moreover, the EW-LS-SVM model was also acceptable and slightly better than all PLS models. The results indicated that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be utilized as a parsimonious and efficient way for the determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar based on LS-SVM method.

  6. Enhanced citric acid production in aspergillus with inactivated asparagine-linked glycosylation protein 3 (ALG3), and/or increased laeA expression

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-12-08

    Provided herein are fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, having a dolichyl-P-Man:Man(5)GlcNAc(2)-PP-dolichyl mannosyltransferase (Alg3) gene genetic inactivation, increased expression of a loss of aflR expression A (Lae), or both. In some examples, such mutants have several phenotypes, including an increased production of citric acid relative to the parental strain. Methods of using the disclosed fungi to make citric acid are also provided, as are compositions and kits including the disclosed fungi.

  7. Effects of Citric Acid and Desensitizing Agent Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Neha, Mahajan; Vandana, Laxman K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors which bring about mineralisation changes in a dentinal structure leading to dentin. The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the dentinal tubular changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth subsequent to the application of citric acid,strontium acetate based sodium fluoride (SAF) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dentin specimens from healthy fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth were included in the study. Each of them was grouped into acid treated and SAF treatment groups. Using SEM, the photomicrographs (3500x) of dentin specimens were evaluated. Results showed while there was a significant difference in tubular width of partial occlusion ≤ 25%, being more in fluorosed group compared to nonfluorosed group after application SAF. Application of desensitising agents demonstrated higher number of dentinal tubular occlusion and diameter reduction in nonfluorosed dentin compared to fluorosed dentin. Summary: Root biomodification and desensitising agent procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and non-fluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:25870716

  8. Improving clarity and stability of skim milk powder dispersions by dissociation of casein micelles at pH 11.0 and acidification with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-09-25

    Casein micelles in milk cause turbidity and have poor stability at acidic conditions. In this study, skim milk powder dispersions were alkalized to pH 10.0 or 11.0, corresponding to reduced particle mass. In the following acidification with hydrochloric or citric acid, the re-formation of casein particles was observed. The combination of treatment at pH 11.0 and acidification with citric acid resulted in dispersions with the lowest turbidity and smallest particles, which enabled translucent dispersions at pH 5.5-7.0, corresponding to discrete nanoparticles. The concentration of ionic calcium was lower when acidified with citric acid than hydrochloric acid, corresponding to smaller particles with less negative zeta potential. The pH 11.0 treatment followed by acidification with citric acid also resulted in smaller particles than the simple chelating effects (directly implementing sodium citrate). The produced casein nanoparticles with reduced dimensions can be used for beverage and other novel applications.

  9. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic, acetic, citric and propionic acid for Listeria monocytogenes under conditions relevant to cheese.

    PubMed

    Wemmenhove, Ellen; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Zwietering, Marcel H; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2016-09-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of undissociated lactic acid were determined for six different Listeria monocytogenes strains at 30 °C and in a pH range of 4.2-5.8. Small increments in pH and acid concentrations were used to accurately establish the growth/no growth limits of L. monocytogenes for these acids. The MICs of undissociated lactic acid in the pH range of 5.2-5.8 were generally higher than at pH 4.6 for the different L. monocytogenes strains. The average MIC of undissociated lactic acid was 5.0 (SD 1.5) mM in the pH range 5.2-5.6, which is relevant to Gouda cheese. Significant differences in MICs of undissociated lactic acid were found between strains of L. monocytogenes at a given pH, with a maximum observed level of 9.0 mM. Variations in MICs were mostly due to strain variation. In the pH range 5.2-5.6, the MICs of undissociated lactic acid were not significantly different at 12 °C and 30 °C. The average MICs of undissociated acetic acid, citric acid, and propionic acid were 19.0 (SD 6.5) mM, 3.8 (SD 0.9) mM, and 11.0 (SD 6.3) mM, respectively, for the six L. monocytogenes strains tested in the pH range 5.2-5.6. Variations in MICs of these organic acids for L. monocytogenes were also mostly due to strain variation. The generated data contribute to improved predictions of growth/no growth of L. monocytogenes in cheese and other foods containing these organic acids.

  10. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C.; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  11. Lemon juice improves the extractability and quality characteristics of pectin from yellow passion fruit by-product as compared with commercial citric acid extractant.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Beda M

    2009-06-01

    An environment-friendly procedure, allowing the extraction of safe pectin products with good functional properties from yellow passion fruit by-product, was developed using two natural acid extractants, namely, pure lemon juice and citric acid solvent. The results show that both of them solubilise, from cell wall material, pectins characterised by high galacturonic acid content (64-78% w/w), degree of esterification (52-73), viscosity-average molecular weight (70-95 kDa) and capable of forming gels in the presence of high soluble solids (sucrose) content and acid. However, compared to pure citric acid solvents, lemon natural juice and its concentrate isolate, under similar extraction conditions, pectins of superior quality characteristics, i.e., higher galacturonic acid content, degree of esterification, viscosity-average molecular weight and gelling power.

  12. Acetylation of bacterial cellulose catalyzed by citric acid: Use of reaction conditions for tailoring the esterification extent.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Gómez Hoyos, Catalina; Arroyo, Silvana; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2016-11-20

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanoribbons were partially acetylated by a simple direct solvent-free route catalyzed by citric acid. The assay of reaction conditions within chosen intervals (i.e. esterification time (0.5-7h), catalyst content (0.08-1.01mmol/mmol AGU), and temperature (90-140°C)), illustrated the flexibility of the methodology proposed, with reaction variables which can be conveniently manipulated to acetylate BC to the required degree of substitution (DS) within the 0.20-0.73 interval. Within this DS interval, characterization results indicated a surface-only process in which acetylated bacterial cellulose with tunable DS, preserved fibrous structure and increased hydrophobicity could be easily obtained. The feasibility of reusing the catalyst/excess acylant in view of potential scale-up was also illustrated.

  13. in situ formation of rGO quantum dots during GO reduction via interaction with citric acid in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Amaya, R.; Matsumoto, Y.; Flores-Conde, A.; Pérez-Guzmán, M. A.; Ortega-López, M.

    2016-10-01

    Chemical methods represent an economical approach to the mass production of graphene. Their main drawback is the use of environmentally harmful reagents. This work describes a simple, green method to prepare reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets and rGO quantum dots (rGOQD) in a single step using citric acid (CA) as the reductant in aqueous medium at room temperature. The reduction level of the nanocomposite obtained depends strongly on the processing time; the sample treated for 24 h demonstrate significant reduction. It is found that CA not only reduces GO but also functionalizes it to produce well-stabilized rGO aqueous dispersions. Additionally, a mechanism for the reduction and functionalization of GO by CA is proposed.

  14. Thorium(IV) removal from aqueous medium by citric acid treated mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. #ZZF51.

    PubMed

    Yang, S K; Tan, N; Yan, X M; Chen, F; Long, W; Lin, Y C

    2013-09-15

    Thorium(IV) biosorption is investigated by citric acid treated mangrove endophytic fungus Fussarium sp. #ZZF51 (CA-ZZF51) from South China Sea. The biosorption process was optimized at pH 4.5, equilibrium time 90 min, initial thorium(IV) concentration 50 mg L(-1) and adsorbent dose 0.6 g L(-1) with 90.87% of removal efficiency and 75.47 mg g(-1) of adsorption capacity, which is obviously greater than that (11.35 mg g(-1)) of the untreated fungus Fussarium sp. #ZZF51 for thorium(IV) biosorption under the condition of optimization. The experimental data are analyzed by using isotherm and kinetic models. Kinetic data follow the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data agree very well with the Langmuir model. In addition, FTIR analysis indicates that hydroxyl, amino, and carbonyl groups act as the important roles in the adsorption process.

  15. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  16. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of chromium, plant growth, and photosynthesis by alleviating the oxidative damages in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Afshan, Sehar; Ali, Shafaqat; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Abbas, Farhat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) toxicity is widespread in crops grown on Cr-contaminated soils and has become a serious environmental issue which requires affordable strategies for the remediation of such soils. This study was performed to assess the performance of citric acid (CA) through growing Brassica napus in the phytoextraction of Cr from contaminated soil. Different Cr (0, 100, and 500 μM) and citric acid (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mM) treatments were applied alone and in combinations to 4-week-old seedlings of B. napus plants in soil under wire house condition. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks of sowing, and the data was recorded regarding growth characteristics, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolytic leakage (EL), antioxidant enzymes, and Cr uptake and accumulation. The results showed that the plant growth, biomass, chlorophyll contents, and carotenoid as well as soluble protein concentrations significantly decreased under Cr stress alone while these adverse effects were alleviated by application of CA. Cr concentration in roots, stem, and leaves of CA-supplied plant was significantly reduced while total uptake of Cr increased in all plant parts with CA application. Furthermore, in comparison with Cr treatments alone, CA supply reduced the MDA and EL values in both shoots and roots. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in shoots and roots markedly increased by 100 μM Cr exposure, while decreased at 500 μM Cr stress. CA application enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the same Cr treatment alone. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cr uptake and can minimize Cr stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cr through hyper-accumulating plants such as B. napus.

  17. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory.

  18. Improving the degradation behavior and in vitro biological property of nano-hydroxyapatite surface- grafted with the assist of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuyun; Jiang, Lixin; Xiong, Chengdong; Su, Shengpei

    2016-10-01

    To obtain ideal nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA) filler for poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a new surface-grafting with the assist of citric acid for nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was designed, and the effect of n-HA surface-grafted with or without citric acid on in vitro degradation behavior and cells viability was studied by the experiments of soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) and incubating with human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63). The change of pH value, tensile strength reduction, the surface deposits, cells attachment and proliferation of samples during the soaking and incubation were investigated by means of pH meter, electromechanical universal tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectro-scopy (EDS), fluorescence microscope and MTT method. The results showed that the introduction of citric acid not only delayed the strength reduction during the degradation by inhibiting the detachment of n-HA from PLGA, but also endowed it better cell attachment and proliferation, suggesting that the n-HA surface-grafted with the assist of citric acid was an important bioactive ceramic fillers for PLGA used as bone materials.

  19. Rapid (<3 min) microwave synthesis of block copolymer templated ordered mesoporous metal oxide and carbonate films using nitrate-citric acid systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhong; Bhaway, Sarang M; Wang, Yi; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Becker, Matthew L; Vogt, Bryan D

    2015-03-25

    Rapid chemical transformation from micelle templated precursors (metal nitrate and citric acid) to ordered mesoporous metal carbonates and oxides is demonstrated using microwave heating for cobalt, copper, manganese and zinc. Without aging requirements, <3 min of microwave processing yields highly ordered mesoporous films.

  20. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-04-25

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  1. Survival of Listeria innocua in rainbow trout protein recovered by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation with acetic and citric acids.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Paker, I; Bane, L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-08-01

    During mechanical fish processing, a substantial amount of protein is discarded as by-products. Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a process that uses extreme pH shifts to solubilize and precipitate protein from by-products to recover previously discarded protein. Typically, strong acids are used for pH reduction, but these acids do not have a pasteurization effect (6 log reduction) on bacterial load; therefore, organic acids were used during ISP processing to test the impact on Listeria innocua concentrations. Headed and gutted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were inoculated with L. innocua, homogenized, and brought to the target pH with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized for 10 min at 4°C, and insoluble components (e.g., skin and insoluble protein) were removed by centrifugation. The remaining solution was pH shifted to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with sodium hydroxide, and precipitated protein was separated from the water. Microbial cells for each component (proteins, insolubles, and water) were enumerated on modified Oxford agar (MOX) and tryptic soy agar with 6% yeast extract (TSAYE). The sums of the surviving cells from each component were compared with the initial inoculum levels. No significant differences were observed between results obtained from TSAYE and from MOX (P > 0.05). Significant reductions in microbial populations were detected, regardless of pH or acid type (P < 0.05). The greatest reduction was at pH 3.0 with glacial acetic acid, resulting in a mean reduction of 6.41 log CFU/g in the recovered protein and 5.88 log CFU/g in the combined components. These results demonstrate the antimicrobial potential of organic acids in ISP processing.

  2. Effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant and antidiabetic capacity of a roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) beverage.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Ramírez-de León, José A; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía

    2015-04-01

    Plant infusions are consumed due to their beneficial effects on health, which is attributed to their bioactive compounds content. However, these compounds are susceptible to degradation during processing and storage. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzyme inhibitory activity of roselle beverages during storage. The optimum extraction conditions of roselle polyphenolic compounds was of 95 °C/60 min, which was obtained by a second order experimental design. The incorporation of stevia increased the stability of colour and some polyphenols, such as quercetin, gallic acid and rosmarinic acid, during storage. In addition, stevia decreased the loss of ABTS, DPPH scavenging activity and α-amylase inhibitory capacity, whereas the incorporation of citric acid showed no effect. These results may contribute to the improvement of technological processes for the elaboration of hypocaloric and functional beverages.

  3. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations: relationship between calcium chelation and proteolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette; Brayden, David J; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Buckley, Stephen T

    2014-04-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation activity was developed and verified experimentally using an ion-selective electrode. The effects of CA, its salt (citrate, Cit) and the established permeation enhancer, lauroyl carnitine chloride (LCC) were compared by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of insulin and FD4 across Caco-2 monolayers and rat small intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Proteolytic degradation of insulin was determined in rat luminal extracts across a range of pH values in the presence of CA. CA's capacity to chelate calcium decreased ~10-fold for each pH unit moving from pH 6 to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral bioavailability since this is a weak property of CA.

  4. Investigation of citric acid-glycerol based pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels for dye removal applications: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D S; Guhanathan, S

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are three dimensional polymeric structure with segments of hydrophilic groups. The special structure of hydrogels facilitates the diffusion of solutes into the interior network and possess numerous ionic and non-ionic functional groups, which can absorb or trap ionic dyes from waste water. The present investigation was devoted to the synthesis of a series of citric acid and glycerol based pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels using a solventless green approach via condensation polymerization in the presence of acidic medium. The formations of hydrogels were confirmed using various spectral investigations viz., FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR. The thermal properties of various hydrogels have been studied using TGA, DTA and DSC analysis. The rationalized relationship was noticed with increasing of pH from 4.0 to 10.0. The surface morphologies of hydrogels were analyzed using SEM technique which was well supported from the results of swelling studies. Methylene blue has been selected as a cationic dye for its removal from various environmental sources using pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels. The results of dye removal revealed that glycerol based biopolymeric hydrogels have shown an excellent dye removal capacity. Hence, the synthesized pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels have an adaptability with pH tuned properties might have greater potential opening in various environmental applications viz., metal ion removal, agrochemical release, purification of water, dye removal etc.

  5. Citric-acid cycle key enzyme activities during in vitro growth and metacyclogenesis of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Louassini, M; Foulquié, M; Benítez, R; Adroher, J

    1999-08-01

    The activities of 5 key regulatory enzymes in most energetic systems, namely citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7, CS), NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.42, ICDH), succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1, SDH), L-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37, MDH), and decarboxylating malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40, ME), were measured during the growth and metacyclogenesis of a cutaneous (CL) and a visceral (VL) strain of Leishmania infantum. As occurs with other Leishmania species, infective promastigotes were present along all phases of growth, but their percentages were higher at the early stationary phase for VL and the end of the same phase for CL. High CS and SDH activities were detected in both strains, as compared with other trypanosomatids, bringing more evidence for an actively functional citric-acid cycle in L. infantum. Both strains showed higher levels of CS, ICDH, and MDH and lower SDH and ME activities when more metacyclic promastigotes were present, but in VL these changes paralleled an increase in glucose consumption, whereas in CL these changes coincided with an NH3 hyperproduction. This suggests that the energy metabolism during L. infantum growth and metacyclogenesis is affected by regulated enzymes that probably respond to changes in the culture medium in the levels of glucose and amino acids.

  6. 13C-NMR spectroscopic evaluation of the citric acid cycle flux in conditions of high aspartate transaminase activity in glucose-perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Gyppaz, F; Herve, M

    1998-12-01

    A new mathematical model, based on the observation of 13C-NMR spectra of two principal metabolites (glutamate and aspartate), was constructed to determine the citric acid cycle flux in the case of high aspartate transaminase activity leading to the formation of large amounts of labeled aspartate and glutamate. In this model, the labeling of glutamate and aspartate carbons by chemical and isotopic exchange with the citric acid cycle are considered to be interdependent. With [U-13C]Glc or [1,2-(13)C]acetate as a substrate, all glutamate and aspartate carbons can be labeled. The isotopic transformations of 32 glutamate isotopomers into 16 aspartate isotopomers or vice versa were studied using matrix operations; the results were compiled in two matrices. We showed how the flux constants of the citric acid cycle and the 13C-enrichment of acetyl-CoA can be deduced from 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate and/or aspartate. The citric acid cycle flux in beating Wistar rat hearts, aerobically perfused with [U-13C]glucose in the absence of insulin, was investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, aspartate instead of glutamate was found to be the most abundantly-labeled metabolite, indicating that aspartate transaminase (which catalyses the reversible reaction: (glutamate + oxaloacetate <--> 2-oxoglutarate + aspartate) is highly active in the absence of insulin. The amount of aspartate was about two times larger than glutamate. The quantities of glutamate (G0) or aspartate (A0) were approximately the same for all hearts and remained constant during perfusion: G0 = (0.74 +/- 0.03) micromol/g; A0 = (1.49 +/- 0.05) micromol/g. The flux constants, i.e., the fraction of glutamate and aspartate in exchange with the citric acid cycle, were about 1.45 min(-1) and 0.72 min(-1), respectively; the flux of this cycle is about (1.07 +/- 0.02) micromol min(-1) g(-1). Excellent agreement between the computed and experimental data was obtained, showing that: i) in the absence of insulin

  7. In vitro evidence that D-serine disturbs the citric acid cycle through inhibition of citrate synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Angela; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-17

    The present work investigated the in vitro effects of D-serine (D-Ser) on important parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of young rats. The parameters analyzed were CO(2) generation from glucose and acetate, glucose uptake and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, of the citric acid cycle enzymes citrate synthase, aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase and of creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results show that D-Ser significantly reduced CO(2) production from acetate, but not from glucose, reflecting an impairment of the citric acid cycle function. Furthermore, D-Ser did not affect glucose uptake. We also observed that the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase from mitochondrial preparations and purified citrate synthase was significantly inhibited by D-Ser, whereas the other activities of the citric acid cycle as well as the activities of complexes I-III, II-III, II and IV of the respiratory chain, creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were not affected by this D-amino acid. We also found that L-serine did not affect citrate synthase activity from mitochondrial preparations and purified enzyme. The data indicate that D-Ser impairs the citric acid cycle activity via citrate synthase inhibition, therefore compromising energy metabolism production in cerebral cortex of young rats. Therefore, it is presumed that this mechanism may be involved at least in part in the neurological damage found in patients affected by disorders in which D-Ser metabolism is impaired, with altered cerebral concentrations of this D-amino acid.

  8. Foliar sprays of citric acid and salicylic acid alter the pattern of root acquisition of some minerals in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ghazijahani, Noushin; Hadavi, Ebrahim; Jeong, Byoung R.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of foliar application of two levels of citric acid (CA; 0 and 7 mM) and two levels of salicylic acid (SA; 0 and 1 mM) combined with two levels of nutrient solution strength (full strength and half strength) on mineral acquisition by sweet basil were investigated. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design arrangement with three replications. SA alone reduced the plant height and thickened the stem. Plants supplied with a full strength solution had a ticker stem, produced more biomass, and showed higher values of Fv/Fm. Some changes in the uptake pattern of some nutrients, especially boron and sulfur, were noticed. Higher boron concentrations in leaves were in plants sprayed with a combination of 7 mM CA and 1 mM of SA. Applying combination of CA and SA was more effective than using them individually that suggests an effective synergism between them. PMID:25400645

  9. Foliar sprays of citric acid and salicylic acid alter the pattern of root acquisition of some minerals in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    PubMed

    Ghazijahani, Noushin; Hadavi, Ebrahim; Jeong, Byoung R

    2014-01-01

    The effect of foliar application of two levels of citric acid (CA; 0 and 7 mM) and two levels of salicylic acid (SA; 0 and 1 mM) combined with two levels of nutrient solution strength (full strength and half strength) on mineral acquisition by sweet basil were investigated. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design arrangement with three replications. SA alone reduced the plant height and thickened the stem. Plants supplied with a full strength solution had a ticker stem, produced more biomass, and showed higher values of Fv/Fm. Some changes in the uptake pattern of some nutrients, especially boron and sulfur, were noticed. Higher boron concentrations in leaves were in plants sprayed with a combination of 7 mM CA and 1 mM of SA. Applying combination of CA and SA was more effective than using them individually that suggests an effective synergism between them.

  10. Enhanced adsorption of methylene blue by citric acid modification of biochar derived from water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Yunguo; Liu, Shaobo; Tan, Xiaofei; Zeng, Guangming; Zeng, Wei; Ding, Yang; Cao, Weicheng; Zheng, Bohong

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel potential adsorbent, citric acid (CA)-modified biochar, named as CAWB, was obtained from water hyacinth biomass by slow pyrolysis in a N2 environment at 300 °C. The CA modification focused on enhancing the contaminants adsorption capacity of biochar pyrolyzed at relatively low temperature. Over 90 % of the total methylene blue (MB) could be removed at the first 60 min by CAWB, and the maximum MB adsorption capacity could reach to 395 mg g(-1). The physicochemical properties of CAWB was examined by FTIR, XPS, SEM, and BET analysis. The results indicated that the additional carboxyl groups were introduced to the surface of CAWB via the esterification reaction with CA, which played a significant role in the adsorption of MB. Batch adsorption studies showed that the initial MB concentration, solution pH, background ionic strength, and temperature could affect the removal efficiency obviously. The adsorption process could be well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the MB adsorption onto CAWB was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The regeneration study revealed that CAWB still exhibited an excellent regeneration and adsorption performance after multiple cycle adsorptions. The adsorption experiments of actual dye wastewater by CAWB suggested that it had a great potential in environmental application.

  11. Individual differences in sour and salt sensitivity: detection and quality recognition thresholds for citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S

    2013-05-01

    Taste sensitivity is assessed with various techniques, including absolute detection and quality recognition. For any stimulus, one might expect individual differences in sensitivity to be reflected in all measures, but they are often surprisingly independent. Here, we focus on sensitivity to sour and salty taste, in part because processing of these qualities is poorly understood relative to other tastes. In Study 1, we measured retest reliability for detection (modified, forced-choice staircase method) and recognition (modified Harris-Kalmus procedure) for both citric acid (CA) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Despite good retest reliability, individual differences in detection and recognition were weakly correlated, suggesting that detection and recognition of sour and salty stimuli may reflect different physiological processes. In Study 2, a subset of subjects returned to contribute full detection (psychometric) functions for CA and NaCl. Thresholds estimated from full detection functions correlated with both staircase and recognition thresholds, suggesting that both tasks may reflect absolute sensitivity to some extent. However, the ranges of individual differences were systematically compressed for staircase thresholds relative to those from full detection functions. Thus, individual differences in sensitivity appear to interact with different test methodologies in lawful ways. More work will be required to understand how different taste phenotypes relate to one another.

  12. Combined effects of independent variables on yield and protein content of pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp by citric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Du, Guang-Ming; Jing, Wei-Wen; Li, Jun-Fang; Yan, Jia-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yong

    2015-09-20

    The extraction of pectin from sugar beet pulp by citric acid was carried out under different conditions using Box-Behnken design for four independent variables (pH, temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio). The yield of sugar beet pulp pectin ranged from 6.3% to 23.0%, and the content of protein from 1.5% to 4.5%. All independent variables significantly affected the yield, and all variables except liquid to solid ratio significantly affected the protein content. The yield increased as decreasing pH of extracting solution, extending time and advancing temperature, and an opposite relationship of effects between variables and content of protein was obtained. The chemical composition of collected samples was determined. Moreover, from the results of emulsifying properties study, the extracted pectin from sugar beet pulp could prepare steady oil-in-water emulsions. Therefore, it was inferred that the extraction conditions could influence yield and protein content, resulting in different emulsifying property.

  13. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  14. Determination of sup 13 C labeling pattern of citric acid cycle intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, L.; Montgomery, J.A.; Des Rosiers, C.; David, F.; Garneau, M.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Investigations of the regulation of the citric acid cycle require determination of labeling patterns of cycle intermediates. These were assayed to date, using infusion of: (i) ({sup 14}C)tracer followed by chemical degradation of intermediates and (ii) ({sup 13}C)tracer followed by NMR analysis of intermediates. The authors developed a strategy to analyze by GC-MS the ({sup 13}C) labeling pattern of {mu}mole samples of citrate (CIT), isocitrate (ICIT), 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG), glutamate (GLU) and glutamine (GLN). These are enzymatically or chemically converted to 2-KG, ICIT, 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-OHG). GC-MS analyses of TMS or TBDMS derivatives of these compounds yield the enrichment of each carbon. The authors confirmed the identity of each fragment using the spectra of (1-{sup 13}C), (5-{sup 13}C), (2,3,3,4,4-{sup 2}H{sub 5})glutamate and (1-{sup 13}C), (1,4-{sup 13}C)GABA.

  15. Citric acid improves lead (pb) phytoextraction in brassica napus L. by mitigating pb-induced morphological and biochemical damages.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Ali, Shafaqat; Hameed, Amjad; Farid, Mujahid; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Najeeb, Ullah; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is an environmentally friendly and a cost-effective strategy for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, lower bioavailability of some of the metals in polluted environments e.g. lead (Pb) is a major constraint of phytoextraction process that could be overcome by applying organic chelators. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to evaluate the role of citric acid (CA) in enhancing Pb phytoextraction. Brassica napus L. seedlings were grown in hydroponic media and exposed to various treatments of Pb (50 and 100 μM) as alone or in combination with CA (2.5mM) for six weeks. Pb-induced damage in B. napus toxicity was evident from elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 that significantly inhibited plant growth, biomass accumulation, leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters. Alternatively, CA application to Pb-stressed B. napus plants arrested lipid membrane damage by limiting MDA and H2O2 production and by improving antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, CA significantly increased the Pb accumulation in B. napus plants. The study concludes that CA has a potential to improve Pb phytoextraction without damaging plant growth.

  16. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil.

  17. Freezing and glass transitions upon cooling and warming and ice/freeze-concentration-solution morphology of emulsified aqueous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki

    2016-12-01

    Although freeze-induced phase separation and the ice/FCS (freeze-concentration solution) morphology of aqueous solutions play an important role in fields ranging from life sciences and biotechnology to geophysics and high-altitude ice clouds, their understanding is far from complete. Herein, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and optical cryo-microscope (OC-M), we have studied the freezing and glass transition behavior and the ice/FCS morphology of emulsified 10-60wt% CA (citric acid) solutions in the temperature region of ∼308and153K. We have obtained a lot of new result which are understandable and unclear. The most essential understandable results are as follows: (i) similar to bulk CA/H2O, emulsified CA/H2O also freezes upon cooling and warming and (ii) the ice/FCS morphology of frozen drops smaller than ∼3-4μm is less ramified than that of frozen bulk solutions. Unclear results, among others, are as follows: (i) in contrast to bulk solutions, which produce one freezing event, emulsified CA/H2O produces two freezing events and (ii) in emulsions, drop concentration is not uniform. Our results demonstrate that DSC thermograms and OC-M images/movies are mutually supplementary and allow us to extract important information which cannot be gained when DSC and OC-M techniques are used alone.

  18. The energetics of the reductive citric acid cycle in the pyrite-pulled surface metabolism in the early stage of evolution.

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2007-09-21

    The chemoautotrophic theory concerning the origin of life postulates that a central role is played in the prebiotic chemical machinery by a reductive citric acid cycle operating without enzymes. The crucial point in this scenario is the formation of pyrite from hydrogen sulfide and ferrous sulfide, a reaction suggested to be linked to endergonic reactions, making them exergonic. This mechanism is believed to provide the driving force for the cycle to operate as a carbon dioxide fixation network. The present paper criticizes the thermodynamic calculations and their presentation in the original version of the archaic reductive citric acid cycle [Wächtershäuser, 1990. Evolution of the first metabolic cycles. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 87, 200-204.]. The most significant differences between the Wächtershäuser hypothesis and the present proposal: Wächtershäuser did not consider individual reactions in his calculations. A particularly questionable feature is the involvement of seven molecules of pyrite which does not emerge as a direct consequence of the chemical reactions presented in the archaic reductive citric acid cycle. The involvement of a considerable number of sulfur-containing organic intermediates as building blocks is also disputed. In the new scheme of the cycle proposed here, less free energy is liberated than hypothesized by Wächtershäuser, but it has the advantages that the free energy changes for the individual reactions can be calculated, the number of pyrite molecules involved in the cycle is reduced, and fewer sulfur-containing intermediates are required for the cycle to operate. In combination with a plausible route for the anaplerotic reactions [Kalapos, 1997a. Possible evolutionary role of methylglyoxalase pathway: anaplerotic route for reductive citric acid cycle of surface metabolists. J. Theor. Biol. 188, 201-206.], this new presentation of the cycle assigns a special meaning to hydrogen sulfide formation in the early stage of biochemical

  19. Effect of citric acid on metals mobility in pruning wastes and biosolids compost and metals uptake in Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Y; Eymar, E; Gárate, A; Masaguer, A

    2013-05-01

    To assess metal mobility in pruning waste and biosolids compost (pH 6.9 and total concentration of metals in milligram per kilogram of Cd 1.9, Cu 132, Fe 8,513, Mn 192, Pb 81, and Zn 313), shrubs species Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis were transplanted in this substrate and irrigated with citric acid (4 g L(-1), pH 2.9) and nutrient solution daily for 60 days. Citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of soluble Mn and Fe in the nutrient substrate solution measured by suction probes, while other metals did not vary in concentration (Cu and Zn) or were not observed at detectable levels (Cd and Pb). In plants, citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of Cu (2.7 ± 0.1-3.3 ± 0.1 mg kg(-1)), Fe (49.2 ± 5.2-76.8 ± 6.8 mg kg(-1)), and Mn (7.2 ± 1.1-11.4 ± 0.7 mg kg(-1)) in leaves of R. officinalis, whereas the concentration of only Mn (25.4 ± 0.3-42.2 ± 2.9 mg kg(-1)) was increased in A. halimus. Increasing Fe and Mn solubility by citric acid addition indicates the possibility of using it to improve plant nutrition. The mobility of metals in this substrate was influenced for the concentration of the metal, the degree of humification of organic matter and its high Fe content.

  20. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers.

    PubMed

    Krug, Peter W; Larson, Christopher R; Eslami, Angelique C; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2012-04-23

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contaminated agriculture facilities to return to food production. Wood surfaces are prevalent at these locations, but there is no standardized method for porous surface disinfection; commercial disinfectants are only certified for use on hard, nonporous surfaces. To model porous surface disinfection in the laboratory, FMDV and ASFV stocks were dried on wood coupons and exposed to citric acid or sodium hypochlorite. We found that 2% citric acid was effective at inactivating both viruses dried on a wood surface by 30 min at 22°C. While 2000 ppm sodium hypochlorite was capable of inactivating ASFV on wood under these conditions, this chemical did not meet the 4-log disinfection threshold for FMDV. Taken together, our data supports the use of chemical disinfectants containing at least 2% citric acid for porous surface disinfection of FMDV and ASFV.

  1. Effect of ph on the Electrodeposition of Cu(In, Al)Se2 from Aqueous Solution in Presence of Citric Acid as Complexing Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjkhanlou, Yadolah; Ebadzadeh, Touradj; Kazemzad, Mahmood; Maghsoudipour, Amir; Kianpour-Rad, Mansoor

    2015-05-01

    Effect of pH on the one-step electrodeposition of Cu(In, Al)Se2 chalcopyrite layer in the presence of citric acid has been investigated by applying different electrochemical and characterization techniques. It has been observed that at pH of 1.5, nanocrystalline phase of chalcopyrite and small amount of binary phase of Cu2Se with overall composition of Cu0.91In0.32Al0.39Se2 have been deposited. On the other hand, at pH of 4, the film composition changed to Cu1.9In0.05Al0.21Se2 and an additional binary phase of copper selenide (CuSe) has also been formed. Morphological investigation illustrated that smooth and compact layer with fine spherical particles having the size of 20 nm has been obtained at pH of 1.5 whereas mixture of planar and spherical particles with size of 450-550 nm have been formed at pH of 4. In alkaline environment (pH 9), the deposition current has been noticeably decreased and no deposition occurred due to the formation of a stable complex of citric acid with metal ions. The mechanism of citric acid interaction with metal ions at different pH has also been studied by cyclic voltammetry measurement.

  2. The effect of citric acid on morphology and photoluminescence properties of white light emitting ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakami, R.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    2016-07-01

    The white light emitting ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites were synthesized by sol-gel combustion method using zinc nitrate, citric acid and tetraethoxysilane. To analyze the effect of fuel content on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites, the citric acid content was varied as 1, 5, and 10 moles with respect to one mole of zinc. The SEM images of the nanocomposites revealed the spherical, flower and platelet like morphology with variation in citric acid content and annealing temperatures. The ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites prepared with various Zn:CA ratio excited at UV (280 nm), near UV (365 nm), violet (405 nm) and blue (465 nm) wavelength showed blue and greenish-yellow emission. Among all ratios, the ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites with Zn:CA - 1:1 ratio showed the intense broad band emission compared to Zn:CA - 1:5 and 1:10 values. This particular composition of sample excited under violet (405 nm) LED source shows white light, as confirmed by the CIE chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.342, y = 0.318).

  3. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  5. Influence of barley grain particle size and treatment with citric acid on digestibility, ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Bonchenari, M; Salem, A Z M; López, S

    2017-01-18

    Chemical and physical treatments of barley grain increase ruminally resistant starch and can improve the rumen fermentation pattern. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chemical (addition of citric acid, CA) and physical (grinding to two different particle sizes, PS) treatment of barley grain on performance, rumen fermentation, microbial protein yield in the rumen and selected blood metabolites in growing calves. In all, 28 male Holstein calves (172±5.1 kg initial BW) were used in a complete randomised design with a factorial arrangement of 2 barley grain particle sizes×2 levels of citric acid. The diets were as follows: (i) small PS (average 1200 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no CA addition); (ii) small PS barley grain soaked in a CA solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley); (iii) large PS (average 2400 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no citric acid addition) and (iv) large PS barley grain soaked in a citric acid solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley). Barley grain was then incorporated at 35% in a total mixed ration and fed to the calves for 11 weeks. Feeding small PS barley decreased feed intake (P=0.02) and average daily weight gain (P=0.01). The addition of CA to barley grain did not affect intake but increased weight gain (P0.05). However, the molar proportion of propionate was increased (P=0.03) when barley was more finely ground, and that of acetate was increased (P=0.04) when CA was added to barley grain. The ruminal concentration of ammonia nitrogen was increased (P<0.01) and microbial nitrogen synthesis in the rumen tended to decrease by adding CA to barley. Treating barley grain with citric acid increased fibre digestibility of total mixed rations, attenuated the decrease in ruminal pH, and improved weight gain and feed efficiency in male Holstein growing calves fed a high-cereal diet (550 g cereal grain/kg diet).

  6. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  7. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  8. Copper removal from aqueous solutions by sugar beet pulp treated by NaOH and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Altundogan, H Soner; Arslan, N Ezgi; Tumen, Fikret

    2007-10-22

    Sugar beet pulp was converted into effective copper sorption material by treating subsequently with NaOH and citric acid. Compared with the untreated sugar beet pulp, the cation exchange capacity of the modified sugar beet pulp increased from 0.86 to 3.21 mequiv.g(-1). Swelling capacity and COD values of modified sugar beet pulp were found to be decreased in the ratio of 38% and 61%, respectively, compared to the corresponding values of native sugar beet pulp, meaning that modification causes stabilization. Sorption characteristics of the modified sugar beet pulp towards copper ions were studied with batch experiments. Pseudo-first, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle kinetic models were applied to the kinetic data and it was found that the sorption processes followed the pseudo-second-order rate kinetics with activation energy of 16.34 kJ mol(-1). The equilibration data fit best with the Langmuir isotherm the maximum copper sorption capacity of which is 119.43 mgg(-1). The mean free energy of copper sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich model and the Polanyi potential concept was found to be in the range of 10.91-11.95 kJ mol(-1) showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process is ion exchange. The negative values found for enthalpy change (-14.797 kJ mol(-1) over the range of 25-55 degrees C) and free energy change (-19.361 kJ mol(-1) for 25 degrees C) indicate that the sorption process is exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  9. Determination of boron in blood, urine and bone by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using zirconium and citric acid as modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José Luis; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo

    2001-10-01

    A comparative study of various potential chemical modifiers (Au, Ba, Be, Ca, Cr, Ir, La, Lu, Mg, Ni, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr, V, W, and Zr), and different 'coating' treatments (Zr, W, and W+Rh) of the pyrolytic graphite platform of a longitudinally heated graphite tube atomizer for thermal stabilization and determination of boron was undertaken. The use of Au, Ba, Be, Cr, Ir, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr and V as modifiers, and of W+Rh coating produced erratic, and noisy signals, while the addition of La, Ni and Pd as modifiers, and the W coating had positive effects, but with too high background absorption signals, rendering their use unsuitable for boron determination even in aqueous solutions. The atomic absorption signal for boron was increased and stabilized when the platform was coated with Zr, and by the addition of Ca, Mg, Lu, W or Zr as modifiers. Only the addition of 10 μg of Zr as a modifier onto Zr-treated platforms allowed the use of a higher pyrolysis temperature without analyte losses. The memory effect was minimized by incorporating a cleaning step with 10 μl of 50 g l -1 NH 4F HF after every three boron measurements. The addition of 10 μl of 15 g l -1 citric acid together with Zr onto Zr-treated platforms significantly improved the characteristic mass to m0=282 pg, which is adequate for biological samples such as urine and bone, although the sensitivity was still inadequate for the determination of boron in blood of subjects without supplementary diet. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit (3σ) was 60 μg l -1. The amount of boron found in whole blood, urine and femur head samples from patients with osteoporosis was in agreement with values previously reported in the literature.

  10. Expression of the H+-ATPase AHA10 proton pump is associated with citric acid accumulation in lemon juice sac cells.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Alessio; Federici, Claire; Close, Timothy J; De Bellis, Luigi; Cattivelli, Luigi; Roose, Mikeal L

    2011-12-01

    The sour taste of lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm.) is determined by the amount of citric acid in vacuoles of juice sac cells. Faris is a "sweet" lemon variety since it accumulates low levels of citric acid. The University of California Riverside Citrus Variety Collection includes a Faris tree that produces sweet (Faris non-acid; FNA) and sour fruit (Faris acid; FA) on different branches; it is apparently a graft chimera with layer L1 derived from Millsweet limetta and layer L2 from a standard lemon. The transcription profiles of Faris sweet lemon were compared with Faris acid lemon and Frost Lisbon (L), which is a standard sour lemon genetically indistinguishable from Faris in prior work with SSR markers. Analysis of microarray data revealed that the transcriptomes of the two sour lemon genotypes were nearly identical. In contrast, the transcriptome of Faris sweet lemon was very different from those of both sour lemons. Among about 1,000 FNA-specific, presumably pH-related genes, the homolog of Arabidopsis H(+)-ATPase proton pump AHA10 was not expressed in FNA, but highly expressed in FA and L. Since Arabidopsis AHA10 is involved in biosynthesis and acidification of vacuoles, the lack of expression of the AHA10 citrus homolog represents a very conspicuous molecular feature of the FNA sweet phenotype. In addition, high expression of several 2-oxoglutarate degradation-related genes in FNA suggests activation of the GABA shunt and degradation of valine and tyrosine as components of the mechanism that reduces the level of citric acid in sweet lemon.

  11. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils. PMID:27212680

  12. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.

  13. 77 FR 33399 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... monohydrate, and tricalcium citrate tetrahydrate, which are intermediate products in the production of citric... NME producer's factors of production (``FOP''). In accordance with section 773(c)(4) of the Act, in... Department's Policy Bulletin No. 04.1, regarding, ``Non-Market Economy Surrogate Country Selection...

  14. Poly-(L-lactic acid) and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin composite matrices as a drug-eluting stent coating material with endothelialization, antithrombogenic, and drug release properties.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2013-07-01

    Biodegradable composite matrices comprising poly-(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated gelatin (AlGelatin) with endothelialization, antithrombogenic, and drug release properties were prepared. The characterization of composite matrices with various mixing ratios was performed by evaluating their swelling ratio, endothelial cell culture, antithrombogenic tests, and drug release behavior. Tamibarotene (Am80), which specifically inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, was employed as the drug. The swelling ratio of composite matrices decreased as the PLLA content decreased. The number of endothelial cells cultured on the surfaces of composite matrices was maximal at the PLLA/AlGelatin-TSC ratio of 80/20. Antithrombogenic tests revealed that the levels of platelets and fibrin network formation decreased as the AlGelatin-TSC content increased. The Am80 release test indicated that the release rate decreased as PLLA content increased. Using the resulting composite matrix, Am80-eluting stents possessing a smooth surface and a coating thickness of ∼15 μm were successfully obtained. Am80 was continuously released from the resulting stent at ∼40%, up to 28 days without burst release. Therefore, Am80-eluting stent with its antithrombogenic and endothelialization properties has great potential for clinical use.

  15. Heavy metal removal from sludge with organic chelators: Comparative study of N, N-bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Dimon, Biaou; Mama, Daouda; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The applicability and performance of a new generation of biodegradable chelator, N, N-Bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid (GLDA), for extracting heavy metals from sewage sludge was carried out and compared with citric acid (CA). Targeted metals included Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, and their contents in the raw sludge were 63.1, 73.4, 1103.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis), respectively. Metals were divided into six fractions including water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates bound, Fe-Mn bound, organic matters bound and residual fraction via chemical fractionation. Washing results showed that in general GLDA exhibited better performance compared with CA, with removal efficiency of 83.9, 87.3, 81.2, 85.6, 89.3 and 90.2% for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively at equilibrium pH = 3.3. Residual metals were better stabilized in the GLAD-washed sludge than in the CA-washed sludge, and were mostly tightly bonded to the residual fraction. Furthermore, CA promoted phosphorus (P) release while GLDA had an opposite effect and tended to retain P within sludge, which could be beneficial for further application in agricultural use. Findings from this study suggested that GLDA could be a potential replacement for refractory and less environmentally-friendly chelators in the extraction of metals from sludge.

  16. Effectiveness of trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite, citric acid, and peroxyacids against pathogenic bacteria on poultry during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    del Río, Elena; Muriente, Rebeca; Prieto, Miguel; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    The effects of dipping treatments (15 min) in potable water or in solutions (wt/vol) of 12% trisodium phosphate (TSP), 1,200 ppm acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), 2% citric acid (CA), and 220 ppm peroxyacids (PA) on inoculated pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Yersinia enterocolitica) and skin pH were investigated throughout storage of chicken legs (days 0, 1, 3, and 5) at 3 +/- 1 degrees C. All chemical solutions reduced microbial populations (P < 0.001) as compared with the control (untreated) samples. Similar bacterial loads (P > 0.05) were observed on water-dipped and control legs. Type of treatment, microbial group, and sampling day influenced microbial counts (P < 0.001). Average reductions with regard to control samples were 0.28 to 2.41 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.33 to 3.15 log CFU/g with ASC, 0.82 to 1.97 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.07 to 0.96 log CFU/g with PA. Average reductions were lower (P < 0.001) for gram-positive (0.96 log CFU/g) than for gram-negative (1.33 log CFU/g) bacteria. CA and ASC were the most effective antimicrobial compounds against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. TSP was the second most effective compound for both bacterial groups. Average microbial reductions per gram of skin were 0.87 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.86 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.39 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.74 log CFU/g with PA for gram-positive bacteria, and 1.28 log CFU/g with TSP, 2.03 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.23 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.78 log CFU/g with PA for gram-negative bacteria. With only a few exceptions, microbial reductions in TSP- and ASC-treated samples decreased and those in samples treated with CA increased throughout storage. Samples treated with TSP and samples dipped in CA and ASC had the highest and lowest pH values, respectively, after treatment. The pH of the treated legs tended to return to normal (6.3 to 6.6) during storage. However, at the end of

  17. Optimization of ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase production from date wastes by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus niger, and Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Acourene, S; Ammouche, A

    2012-05-01

    The present study deals with submerged ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae SDB, Aspergillus niger ANSS-B5, and Candida guilliermondii CGL-A10, using date wastes as the basal fermentation medium. The physical and chemical parameters influencing the production of these metabolites were optimized. As for the ethanol production, the optimum yield obtained was 136.00 ± 0.66 g/l under optimum conditions of an incubation period of 72 h, inoculum content of 4% (w/v), sugars concentration of 180.0 g/l, and ammonium phosphate concentration of 1.0 g/l. Concerning citric acid production, the cumulative effect of temperature (30°C), sugars concentration of 150.0 g/l, methanol concentration of 3.0%, initial pH of 3.5, ammonium nitrate concentration of 2.5 g/l, and potassium phosphate concentration of 2.5 g/l during the fermentation process of date wastes syrup did increase the citric acid production to 98.42 ± 1.41 g/l. For the production of α-amylase, the obtained result shows that the presence of starch strongly induces the production of α-amylase with a maximum at 5.0 g/l. Among the various nitrogen sources tested, urea at 5.0 g/l gave the maximum biomass and α-amylase estimated at 5.76 ± 0.56 g/l and 2,304.19 ± 31.08 μmol/l/min, respectively after 72 h incubation at 30°C, with an initial pH of 6.0 and potassium phosphate concentration of 6.0 g/l.

  18. Citric acid- and Tween(®) 80-assisted phytoremediation of a co-contaminated soil: alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) performance and remediation potential.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-05-01

    A pot experiment was designed to assess the phytoremediation potential of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in a co-contaminated (i.e., heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons) soil and the influence of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate), applied individually and combined together, for their possible use in chemically assisted phytoremediation. The results showed that alfalfa plants could tolerate and grow in a co-contaminated soil. Over a 90-day experimental time, shoot and root biomass increased and negligible plant mortality occurred. Heavy metals were uptaken by alfalfa to a limited extent, mostly by plant roots, and their concentration in plant tissues were in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb. Microbial population (alkane-degrading microorganisms) and activity (lipase enzyme) were enhanced in the presence of alfalfa with rhizosphere effects of 9.1 and 1.5, respectively, after 90 days. Soil amendments did not significantly enhance plant metal concentration or total uptake. In contrast, the combination of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 significantly improved alkane-degrading microorganisms (2.4-fold increase) and lipase activity (5.3-fold increase) in the rhizosphere of amended plants, after 30 days of experiment. This evidence supports a favorable response of alfalfa in terms of tolerance to a co-contaminated soil and improvement of rhizosphere microbial number and activity, additionally enhanced by the joint application of citric acid and Tween(®) 80, which could be promising for future phytoremediation applications.

  19. Effects of reaction time and citric acid contents on the morphologies of BaCO{sub 3} via PVP-assisted method

    SciTech Connect

    Lv Sa; Sheng Jie; Zhang Shuang; Sun Wendong

    2008-05-06

    BaCO{sub 3} with different morphologies, such as dumbbell-like, pillar-like, peanut-like and ellipsoid-like have been successfully synthesized using citric acid (CA) as chelating ligand via a simple polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted method. The effects of the pH of the starting solutions, reaction time and the molar ratio of CA/Ba{sup 2+} on the morphologies of BaCO{sub 3} were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the infrared (IR) spectrum of the sample are used to characterize the obtained products.

  20. Calculation of the aqueous thermodynamic properties of citric acid cycle intermediates and precursors and the estimation of high temperature and pressure equation of state parameters.

    PubMed

    Dalla-Betta, Peter; Schulte, Mitchell

    2009-06-22

    The citric acid cycle (CAC) is the central pathway of energy transfer for many organisms, and understanding the origin of this pathway may provide insight into the origins of metabolism. In order to assess the thermodynamics of this key pathway for microorganisms that inhabit a wide variety of environments, especially those found in high temperature environments, we have calculated the properties and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for the major components of the CAC. While a significant amount of data is not available for many of the constituents of this fundamental pathway, methods exist that allow estimation of these missing data.

  1. Ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film fabricated by citric acid-assisted hot-water-treatment of aluminum-palladium alloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Harumoto, Takashi; Tamura, Yohei; Ishiguro, Takashi

    2015-01-15

    Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.

  2. Adding wheat middlings, microbial phytase, and citric acid to corn-soybean meal diets for growing pigs may replace inorganic phosphorus supplementation.

    PubMed

    Han, Y M; Roneker, K R; Pond, W G; Lei, X G

    1998-10-01

    Three experiments were conducted with 96 growing Landrace x Yorkshire x Duroc crossbreds to determine the collective effectiveness of cereal phytase from wheat middlings, microbial phytase, and citric acid in improving phytate-P bioavailability in corn-soy diets. In Exp. 1, 40 gilts (7 wk old) were fed five diets for 8 wk. Diets 1, 2, and 3 were low-P, corn-soybean meal diets (CSB) + 0, .1, or .2% inorganic P (Pi) as calcium phosphate, respectively. Diet 4 was a similar corn-soy diet that included 15% wheat middlings (461 cereal phytase U/kg). Diet 5 was the CSB + microbial phytase (1,200 U/kg; Natuphos, BASF, Mount Olive, NJ). In Exp. 2, 16 barrows (8 wk old) were fed two diets for 6 wk. Diet 1 was the same as Diet 3 of Exp. 1 (.2% Pi). Diet 2 was Diet 4 of Exp. 1 + microbial phytase (300 U/kg). In Exp. 3, 40 barrows and gilts (6 wk old) were fed four diets for 6 wk. Diets 1 and 2 were the same as those in Exp. 2. Diet 3 was Diet 2 of Exp. 2 + 1.5% citric acid. Diet 4 was similar to Diet 3 but contained 10 instead of 15% wheat middlings. In Exp. 1, pigs fed the low-P, CSB (Diet 1) had lower (P < .05) ADG, ADFI, plasma Pi concentration, bone strength, and mobility score than pigs of the other four treatments. Measurements for pigs fed the 15% wheat middlings diet were not significantly different from those of pigs fed the CSB + .1% Pi or microbial phytase. In Exp. 2, ADG (P=.06) during wk 1 to 3 and gain:feed ratio (P < .02) and plasma Pi concentration (P < .005) during all weeks favored pigs fed the CSB + .2% Pi compared with the other diet including 15% wheat middlings. In Exp. 3, identical ADG during all weeks and similar plasma Pi concentrations at wk 4 and 6 were observed between pigs fed the two citric acid diets (Diets 3 and 4) and the CSB + .2% Pi (Diet 1). Pigs fed Diet 4 (10% wheat middlings) had even higher (P < .02) gain:feed ratio during wk 1 to 3 than those fed Diet 1. It seems feasible to completely replace calcium phosphate with 10 to 15% wheat

  3. Facile fabrication of luminescent organic dots by thermolysis of citric acid in urea melt, and their use for cell staining and polyelectrolyte microcapsule labelling

    PubMed Central

    Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Popov, Anton L; Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Popova, Nelly R; Guzyk, Mykhailo M; Antonovich, Valeriy P; Yegorova, Alla V; Scrypynets, Yuliya V; Leonenko, Inna I; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent organic dots (O-dots) were synthesized via a one-pot, solvent-free thermolysis of citric acid in urea melt. The influence of the ratio of the precursors and the duration of the process on the properties of the O-dots was established and a mechanism of their formation was hypothesized. The multicolour luminescence tunability and toxicity of synthesized O-dots were extensively studied. The possible applications of O-dots for alive/fixed cell staining and labelling of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte microcapsules were evaluated. PMID:28144539

  4. Retention mechanisms of citric acid in ternary kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate acid systems using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; ...

    2016-05-23

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L-3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/ormore » coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤ 0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. In conclusion, these findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.« less

  5. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study.

  6. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle. I. Interrelation between gluconeogenesis and cataplerosis; formation of methoxamates from aminooxyacetate and ketoacids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Kombu, Rajan S; Kasumov, Takhar; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-08

    We conducted a study coupling metabolomics and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle. Rat livers were perfused with lactate or pyruvate +/- aminooxyacetate or mercaptopicolinate in the presence of 40% enriched NaH(13)CO(3). Other livers were perfused with dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate +/- mercaptopicolinate. In this first of two companion articles, we show that a substantial fraction of gluconeogenic carbon leaves the liver as citric acid cycle intermediates, mostly alpha-ketoglutarate. The efflux of gluconeogenic carbon ranges from 10 to 200% of the rate of liver gluconeogenesis. This cataplerotic efflux of gluconeogenic carbon may contribute to renal gluconeogenesis in vivo. Multiple crossover analyses of concentrations of gluconeogenic intermediates and redox measurements expand previous reports on the regulation of gluconeogenesis and the effects of inhibitors. We also demonstrate the formation of adducts from the condensation, in the liver, of (i) aminooxyacetate with pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and oxaloacetate and (ii) mercaptopicolinate and pyruvate. These adducts may exert metabolic effects unrelated to their effect on gluconeogenesis.

  7. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; ...

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  8. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  9. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P Deepa S; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E; Frisvad, Jens C; Nielsen, Kristian F; Punt, Peter J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  10. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  11. Electrochemical, HPLC and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopic analyses of peroxycitric acid coexisting with citric acid and hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ferdousi, Begum Nadira; Islam, Md Mominul; Okajima, Takeyoshi; Ohsaka, Takeo

    2008-02-15

    We successfully determined the molecular structure of peroxycitric acid (PCA) coexisting in the aqueous equilibrium mixture with citric acid (CA; 1,2,3-tricarboxylic-2-hydroxy propane) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by a combined use of reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC), potentiometric, hydrodynamic chronocoulometric (HCC) and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopic (ESI-MS) methods. Firstly, the RP-HPLC was employed to separate CA, PCA and H(2)O(2) coexisting in the equilibrium mixture and the concentration of CA consumed (DeltaC(CA)) in the formation of PCA that was evidenced to be fairly stable during the RP-HPLC measurement was quantitatively measured based on the standard calibration curve of CA. Secondly, the total oxidant concentration (C(Ox)) corresponding to peroxycarboxylic (-COOOH) group in PCA in the equilibrium mixture was determined using potentiometric measurement. The ratio of C(Ox)/DeltaC(CA) was found to be 1.07, which indicates that only one -COOH group in CA molecule is oxidized to the corresponding -COOOH group in PCA molecule. Thirdly, using the HCC technique the diffusion coefficient of PCA, which could be electroreduced at a more positive potential by 1.0 V than the coexisting H(2)O(2), was independently measured as 0.3 x 10(-5)cm(2)s(-1) and at the same time, by considering DeltaC(CA) as the concentration of PCA, the number of electrons (n) required for the reduction of PCA was determined to be 2. The result obtained from RP-HPLC and HCC, i.e., n=2 which is equivalent to one -COOOH group in PCA, is in agreement with that obtained from the combination of RP-HPLC and potentiometric measurements. Finally, the structure of PCA was proposed to contain one -COOOH group with a molecular mass of 208 confirmed by negative ion ESI-MS method. A probable molecular structure of PCA was discussed.

  12. Complementary approaches for the evaluation of biocompatibility of 90Y-labeled superparamagnetic citric acid (Fe,Er)3O4 coated nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Antic, Bratislav; Boskovic, Marko; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; ...

    2017-02-10

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of immense interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in medicine. Design and development of new iron oxide-based MNPs for such applications is of rather limited breadth without reliable and sensitive methods to determine their levels in body tissues. Commonly used methods, such as ICP, are quite problematic, due to the inability to decipher the origin of the detected iron, i.e. whether it originates from the MNPs or endogenous from tissues and bodily fluids. One of the approaches to overcome this problem and to increase reliability of tracing MNPs is to partially substitute iron ions in themore » MNPs with Er. Here, we report on the development of citric acid coated (Fe,Er)3O4 nanoparticles and characterization of their physico-chemical and biological properties by utilization of various complementary approaches. The synthesized MNPs had a narrow (6–7 nm) size distribution, as consistently seen in atomic pair distribution function, transmission electron microscopy, and DC magnetization measurements. The particles were found to be superparamagnetic, with a pronounced maximum in measured zero-field cooled magnetization at around 90 K. Reduction in saturation magnetization due to incorporation of 1.7% Er3+ into the Fe3O4 matrix was clearly observed. From the biological standpoint, citric acid coated (Fe,Er)3O4 NPs were found to induce low toxicity both in human cell fibroblasts and in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Biodistribution pattern of the MNPs after intravenous administration in healthy Wistar rats was followed by the radiotracer method, revealing that 90Y-labeled MNPs were predominantly found in liver (75.33% ID), followed by lungs (16.70% ID) and spleen (2.83% ID). Quantitative agreement with these observations was obtained by ICP-MS elemental analysis using Er as the detected tracer. Based on the favorable physical, chemical and biological characteristics, citric acid coated (Fe,Er)3O4 MNPs could be further

  13. The complete targeted profile of the organic acid intermediates of the citric acid cycle using a single stable isotope dilution analysis, sodium borodeuteride reduction and selected ion monitoring GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Mamer, Orval; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Choinière, Luc; Chénard, Valérie; St-Pierre, Julie; Avizonis, Daina

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative profiling of the organic acid intermediates of the citric acid cycle (CAC) presents a challenge due to the lack of commercially available internal standards for all of the organic acid intermediates. We developed an analytical method that enables the quantitation of all the organic acids in the CAC in a single stable isotope dilution GC/MS analysis with deuterium-labeled analogs used as internal standards. The unstable α-keto acids are rapidly reduced with sodium borodeuteride to the corresponding stable α-deutero-α-hydroxy acids and these, along with their unlabeled analogs and other CAC organic acid intermediates, are converted to their tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives. Selected ion monitoring is employed with electron ionization. We validated this method by treating an untransformed mouse mammary epithelial cell line with well-known mitochondrial toxins affecting the electron transport chain and ATP synthase, which resulted in profound perturbations of the concentration of CAC intermediates.

  14. Structural and cyclic volta metric investigations on BIPBVOX solid electrolyte synthesized by ethylene glycol-citric acid sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Faria K.; Beg, Saba; Al-Areqi, Niyazi A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Samples of BIPBVOX.x (Bi2V1-xPbxO5.5-x/2) in the composition range 0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.20 were prepared by ethylene glycol- citric acid sol-gel synthesis route. Structural investigations were carried out by X-ray diffraction, DTA. The highly conducting γ'- phase was effectively stabilized at room temperature for compositions with x ≥ 0.17. Cyclic voltammetric measurements showed reversible redox reactions of vanadium and irreversible redox reaction of Bi3+ in the BIPBVOX system during the first cathodic and anodic sweep. However, a higher stability against the reduction of Bi3+ to metallic bismuth was seen for x=0.20.

  15. Kinetics of moisture-induced hydrolysis in powder blends stored at and below the deliquescence relative humidity: investigation of sucrose-citric acid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kaho; Mauer, Lisa J; Taylor, Lynne S

    2010-11-24

    Previous studies have shown that deliquescent organic compounds frequently exhibit chemical instability when stored in environmental conditions above their deliquescence relative humidity (RH). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of atmospheric moisture on the long-term chemical stability of crystalline sucrose-citric acid mixtures following storage at RHs at and below the mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH). Interestingly, it was found that sucrose hydrolysis can occur below the MDRH of 64% and was observed for samples stored at 54% RH. However, hydrolysis was not seen for samples stored at 33 or 43% RH. The rate of sucrose hydrolysis could be modeled by taking into account the rate and extent of moisture uptake, which in turn was dependent on the composition of the powder and the storage RH. A reaction mechanism initiated by capillary condensation and involving additional deliquescence lowering by the degradation products formed as a result of sucrose hydrolysis (glucose and fructose) was proposed.

  16. Effects of intake of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid on adiposity in healthy subjects with high percent body fat.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Koutarou; Murosaki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Ishijima, Akitoshi; Toh, Yasuo

    2003-11-01

    We assessed the effects of intake of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid (TACC) on lipid metabolism in healthy subjects. Thirty-one subjects with high percent body fat (> or = 25.0%) were randomly assigned to a 12-wk intervention with daily intake of TACC-supplemented tea (1.1, 1240, 52, and 540 mg, respectively; n=16) or control tea (n=15). The percent body fat decreased significantly during the intervention in both groups, especially in the TACC group. A percentage decrease in triceps skinfold was significantly greater in the TACC group than in the control group. The decrease in abdominal visceral fat in obese subjects was significantly greater in the TACC group than in the control group. Serum triglyceride was significantly lower during intervention than that during the non-intervention period in the TACC group. These results suggest that TACC may be effective in reducing body fat in obese subjects.

  17. Solid-phase synthesis of graphene quantum dots from the food additive citric acid under microwave irradiation and their use in live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qianfen; Wang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian

    2016-05-01

    The work demonstrated that solid citric acid, one of the most common food additives, can be converted to graphene quantum dots (GQDs) under microwave heating. The as-prepared GQDs were further characterized by various analytical techniques like transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity of the GQDs was evaluated using HeLa cells. The result showed that the GQDs almost did not exhibit cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 1000 µg mL(-1). In addition, it was found that the GQDs showed good solubility, excellent photostability, and excitation-dependent multicolor photoluminescence. Subsequently, the multicolor GQDs were successfully used as a fluorescence light-up probe for live-cell imaging.

  18. Effect of EDTA, EDDS, NTA and citric acid on electrokinetic remediation of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn contaminated dredged marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Ammami, Mohamed-Tahar; Benamar, Ahmed; Mezazigh, Salim; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, electrokinetic (EK) remediation method has been widely considered to remove metal pollutants from contaminated dredged sediments. Chelating agents are used as electrolyte solutions to increase metal mobility. This study aims to investigate heavy metal (HM) (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) mobility by assessing the effect of different chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) or citric acid (CA)) in enhancing EK remediation efficiency. The results show that, for the same concentration (0.1 mol L(-1)), EDTA is more suitable to enhance removal of Ni (52.8 %), Pb (60.1 %) and Zn (34.9 %). EDDS provides effectiveness to increase Cu removal efficiency (52 %), while EDTA and EDDS have a similar enhancement removal effect on As EK remediation (30.5∼31.3 %). CA is more suitable to enhance Cd removal (40.2 %). Similar Cr removal efficiency was provided by EK remediation tests (35.6∼43.5 %). In the migration of metal-chelate complexes being directed towards the anode, metals are accumulated in the middle sections of the sediment matrix for the tests performed with EDTA, NTA and CA. But, low accumulation of metal contamination in the sediment was observed in the test using EDDS.

  19. Reactive extraction of citric acid using tri-n-octylamine in nontoxic natural diluents: part 1--equilibrium studies from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Keshav, Amit; Norge, Prakriti; Wasewar, Kailas L

    2012-05-01

    Use of cheap, nontoxic, and selective solvents could economically provide a solution to the recovery of carboxylic acids produced by the bioroute. In this regard in the present paper, reactive extraction of citric acid was studied. Problems encompassing the recovery of the acid ([H(3)A](aq)(o) = 0.1-0.8) was solved by using tertiary amine (tri-n-octylamine, TOA) in natural diluents (rice bran oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, and sesame oil). TOA was very effective in removal of acid providing distribution coefficient (D) as high as 18.51 (E% = 95%), 12.82 (E% = 93%), 15.09 (E% = 94%), and 16.28 (E% = 94%) when used with rice bran oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, and sesame oil, respectively. Overall extraction constants and association numbers for TOA + rice bran oil, TOA + sunflower oil, TOA + soybean oil, and TOA + sesame oil were evaluated to be 35.48 (mol/l)(-1.46), 29.79 (mol/l)(-1.30), 33.79 (mol/l)(-1.51), and 37.64 (mol/l)(-1.65) and 1.46, 1.30, 1.51, and 1.65, respectively. Specific equilibrium complexation constants (K (E(n/m))) were also predicted using mathematical modeling.

  20. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  1. The effect of composite organic acid (citric acid & tartaric acid) on microstructure and electrochemical properties of Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 Li-rich layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fenghua; Ou, Xing; Pan, Qichang; Xiong, Xunhui; Yang, Chenghao; Liu, Meilin

    2017-04-01

    The sol-gel method is applied to prepare nano-sized LMNCO lithium-rich layered oxides by adding of composite organic acid (citric acid & tartaric acid). The effect of composite organic acid on the microstructure of Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 (LMNCO) Li-rich cathode material is explored in this work. The results confirm the existence of interactions between the composite organic acid molecules and the precursors, and formation of stronger space steric effect. The stronger space steric effect can effectively prevent the growth of precursor particles in the presintering process at 550 °C for 5 h, which eventually contributed to the fabrication of nano-sized LMNCO. According to EIS analysis, the synthesized LMNCO has low charge transfer resistance of 135.4 Ω. Furthermore, it shows excellent electrochemical performance with a discharge capacity of 263.1 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 187.9 mAh g-1 at 5 C.

  2. The effect of using citric or acetic acid on survival of Listeria monocytogenes during fish protein recovery by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-10-01

    Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a protein recovery process effective at reducing Listeria innocua, a nonpathogenic bacterium typically used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in recovered trout protein. The response of L. monocytogenes to ISP processing was determined and compared to the response of L. innocua. Headed and gutted rainbow trout were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10.16 log CFU/g), homogenized, and pH-adjusted with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized and centrifugation was used to remove insoluble components (skin, insoluble protein, so on). The supernatant was returned to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with NaOH and centrifuged to remove precipitated protein. Microbial load was enumerated on both growth and selective media; recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Surviving cells from each component (protein, insoluble, and water) were compared to initial inoculum numbers. Significant reductions were detected at all pH (P < 0.05). The greatest reductions were at pH 3.0 with acetic acid, with a mean log reduction of 3.03 in the combined components, and a 3.53 log reduction in the protein portion. Data were compared to results from a previous study using L. innocua. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in recovery were found between the 2 species at pH 2.0 and 3.0 with greater recovery of L. monocytogenes, regardless of processing pH or acid type. These results demonstrate the variability in resistance between species and indicate that L. innocua is not an appropriate surrogate for L. monocytogenes for ISP processing with organic acids.

  3. Comparison of removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid and citric acid in primary teeth: A scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul J.; Bapna, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Root canal irrigants are considered momentous in their tissue dissolving property, eliminating microorganisms, and removing smear layer. The present study was aimed to compare the removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and citric acid solutions with saline as a control in primary anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty primary anterior teeth were chosen for the study. The teeth were distributed into three groups having ten teeth each. Following instrumentation, root canals of the first group were treated with 17% EGTA and the second group with 6% citric acid. Only saline was used as an irrigant for the control group. Then, the teeth were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study. The scale given by Rome et al. for the smear layer removal was used in the present study. Results: The pictures from the SEM showed that among the tested irrigants, 17% EGTA + 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) group showed the best results when compared to other groups. Conclusion: The results advocate that the sequential irrigation of the pulp canal walls with 17% EGTA followed by 5% NaOCl produced efficacious and smear-free root canal walls. PMID:27307670

  4. Effects of Continuous Triiodothyronine Infusion on Citric Acid Cycle in the Normal Immature Swine Heart under Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-02-13

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age 25-38 days) with ECMO were received [2-13C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-13C]octanoate (medium chain fatty acid) and [U-13C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 minutes of each protocol. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution (Fc) of these substrates to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg/kg/hour) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions T3 significantly increased lactate-Fc with a marginal increase in octanoate-Fc. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased myocardial energy status indexed by [Phosphocreatine]/[ATP]. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the CAC during ECMO suggesting that T3 releases inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  5. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João ARG; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  6. Impaired cytosolic NADH shuttling and elevated UCP3 contribute to inefficient citric acid cycle flux support of postischemic cardiac work in diabetic hearts.

    PubMed

    Banke, Natasha H; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic hearts are subject to more extensive ischemia/reperfusion (ISC/REP) damage. This study examined the efficiency of citric acid cycle (CAC) flux and the transfer of cytosolic reducing equivalents into the mitochondria for oxidative support of cardiac work following ISC/REP in hearts of c57bl/6 (NORM) and type 2 diabetic, db/db mouse hearts. Flux through the CAC and malate-aspartate shuttle (MA) were monitored via dynamic (13)C NMR of isolated hearts perfused with (13)C palmitate+glucose. MA flux was lower in db/db than NORM. Oxoglutarate malate carrier (OMC) was elevated in the db/db heart, suggesting a compensatory response to low NADHc. Baseline CAC flux per unit work (rate-pressure-product, RPP) was similar between NORM and db/db, but ISC/REP reduced the efficiency of CAC flux/RPP by 20% in db/db. ISC/REP also increased UCP3 transcription, indicating potential for greater uncoupling. Therefore, ISC/REP induces inefficient carbon utilization through the CAC in hearts of diabetic mice due to the combined inefficiencies in NADHc transfer per OMC content and increased uncoupling via UCP3. Ischemia and reperfusion exacerbated pre-existing mitochondrial defects and metabolic limitations in the cytosol of diabetic hearts. These limitations and defects render diabetic hearts more susceptible to inefficient carbon fuel utilization for oxidative energy metabolism.

  7. Suppression of Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes and their Encoding Genes in Button Mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) by CaCl2 and Citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zia Ullah; Jiayin, Li; Khan, Nasir Mehmood; Mou, Wangshu; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Yansheng; Feng, Simin; Luo, Zisheng; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2017-03-01

    Fresh button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) were harvested and treated with a solution of 1.5% CaCl2 + 0.5% citric acid and stored for 16 days at 12 °C. The effects of this treatment on firmness, weight, color, cell wall compositions (cellulose and chitin) and cell wall degrading enzymes (cel1ulase, beta-1, 3 glucanase, chitinase and phenylalanine ammonialyase) were investigated during post-harvest storage. The expressions of major genes (Cel1, Glu1, Chi1 and PAL1) involved in cell wall degradation during post-harvest storage were also monitored. The results revealed that the post-harvest chemical treatment maintained better firmness, weight, color and inhibited cellulase, beta-1, 3 glucanase, chitinase and phenylalanine ammonialyase activities. These findings showed that the down-regulation of cell wall degrading enzymes is a possible mechanism that delays the softening of button mushrooms by the application of combined chemical treatment.

  8. Anti-obesity effects of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid in non-insulin dependent diabetic KK mice.

    PubMed

    Muroyama, Koutarou; Murosaki, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Odaka, Hiroyuki; Chung, Hee Chung; Miyoshi, Masamitsu

    2003-02-01

    Anti-obesity effects of a mixture of thiamin, arginine, caffeine, and citric acid (TACC) were investigated in non-insulin dependent diabetic KK mice. Feeding of either arginine or caffeine significantly suppressed an increase in hepatic lipid contents in fasted-refed KK mice. In addition, each component admixed with a low-calorie diet effectively reduced adipose tissue weight in KK mice previously fed a high-calorie diet. The decrease in adipose tissue weight was greater with a mixture of arginine and caffeine, and much greater with TACC than with arginine or caffeine alone. Moreover, plasma insulin concentration was significantly lower in mice fed TACC than in control mice. The anti-obesity effects of TACC were also shown when it was supplemented with a tea beverage. Adipose tissue weight, hepatic triglyceride contents, and plasma insulin concentration were significantly lower in mice given TACC-supplemented tea than in control mice. These results suggest that TACC is effective in reducing adipose tissue mass as well as improving disorders in lipid metabolism.

  9. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  10. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João Arg; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity.

  11. From CO2 to cell: energetic expense of creating biomass using the Calvin-Benson-Bassham and reductive citric acid cycles based on genome data.

    PubMed

    Mangiapia, Mary; Scott, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    The factors driving the dominance of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle (CBB) or reductive citric acid cycle (rCAC) in autotrophic microorganisms in different habitats are debated. Based on costs for synthesizing a few metabolic intermediates, it has been suggested that the CBB poses a disadvantage due to higher metabolic cost. The purpose of this study was to extend this estimate of cost from metabolite synthesis to biomass synthesis. For 12 gammaproteobacteria (CBB) and five epsilonproteobacteria (rCAC), the amount of ATP to synthesize a gram of biomass from CO2 was calculated from genome sequences via metabolic maps. The eleven central carbon metabolites needed to synthesize biomass were all less expensive to synthesize via the rCAC (66%-89% of the ATP needed to synthesize them via CBB). Differences in cell compositions did result in differing demands for metabolites among the organisms, but the differences in cost to synthesize biomass were small among organisms that used a particular pathway (e.g. rCAC), compared to the difference between pathways (rCAC versus CBB). The rCAC autotrophs averaged 0.195 moles ATP per g biomass, while their CBB counterparts averaged 0.238. This is the first in silico estimate of the relative expense of both pathways to generate biomass.

  12. Collagen based film with well epithelial and stromal regeneration as corneal repair materials: Improving mechanical property by crosslinking with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Long, Kai; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Ren, Li

    2015-10-01

    Corneal disease can lead to vision loss. It has become the second greatest cause of blindness in the world, and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)-citric acid (CA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The results showed that the Col-CA films had necessary optical performance, water content. The collagenase resistance of CA crosslinked films was superior to that of EDC crosslinked films. And CA5 film (Col:CA:EDC:NHS=60:3:10:10) had the best mechanical properties. Cell experiments showed that CA5 film was non-cytotoxic and human corneal epithelial cells could proliferate well on the films. Lamellar keratoplasty showed that the CA5 film could be sutured in the rabbit eyes and was epithelialized completely in about 10 days, and the transparency was restored quickly in 30±5 days. No inflammation and corneal neovascularization were observed at 6 months. Corneal stroma had been repaired; stromal cells and neo-stroma could be seen in the area of operation from the hematoxylin-eosin stained histologic sections and anterior segment optical coherence tomography images. These results indicated that Col-CA films were highly promising biomaterials that could be used in corneal tissue engineering and a variety of other tissue engineering applications.

  13. Citric acid modifies surface properties of commercial CeO2 nanoparticles reducing their toxicity and cerium uptake in radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Majumdar, S; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2013-12-15

    Little is known about the mobility, reactivity, and toxicity to plants of coated engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Surface modification may change the interaction of ENPs with living organisms. This report describes surface changes in commercial CeO2 NPs coated with citric acid (CA) at molar ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:7, and 1:10 CeO2:CA, and their effects on radish (Raphanus sativus) seed germination, cerium and nutrients uptake. All CeO2 NPs and their absorption by radish plants were characterized by TEM, DLS, and ICP-OES. Radish seeds were germinated in pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs suspensions at 50mg/L, 100mg/L, and 200mg/L. Deionized water and CA at 100mg/L were used as controls. Results showed ζ potential values of 21.6 mV and -56 mV for the pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs, respectively. TEM images showed denser layers surrounding the CeO2 NPs at higher CA concentrations, as well as better distribution and smaller particle sizes. None of the treatments affected seed germination. However, at 200mg/L the CA coated NPs at 1:7 ratio produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more root biomass, increased water content and reduced by 94% the Ce uptake, compared to bare NPs. This suggests that CA coating decrease CeO2 NPs toxicity to plants.

  14. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  15. Triiodothyronine increases myocardial function and pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle after reperfusion in a model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation improves clinical outcomes in infants after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass by unknown mechanisms. We utilized a translational model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC), thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-(13)Carbon((13)C)]pyruvate for 40 min (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (control) or immediately after reperfusion (I/R) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (I/R-Tr) received T3 (1.2 μg/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC) using [2-(13)C]pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When compared with I/R, T3 (group I/R-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after I/R while elevating flux of both PDC and PC (∼4-fold). Although neither I/R nor I/R-Tr modified absolute CAC levels, T3 inhibited I/R-induced reductions in their molar percent enrichment. Furthermore, (13)C-labeling of CAC intermediates suggests that T3 may decrease entry of unlabeled carbons at the level of oxaloacetate through anaplerosis or exchange reaction with asparate. T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC fluxes, thereby providing potential substrate for elevated cardiac function after reperfusion. This T3-induced increase in pyruvate fluxes occurs with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Our labeling data raise the possibility that T3 reduces reliance on amino acids for anaplerosis after reperfusion.

  16. TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASES MYOCARDIAL FUNCTION AND PYRUVATE ENTRY INTO THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE AFTER REPERFUSION IN A MODEL OF INFANT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    We utilized a translational model of infant CPB to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. Methods and Results: Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]-pyruvate for 40 minutes (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (Cont) or immediately after reperfusion (IR) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (IR-Tr) received T3 (1.2 ug/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels (aCAC) and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC ) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC; ) using 13C-labeled pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C NMR. Neither IR nor IR-Tr modified aCAC. However, compared to IR, T3 (group IR-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after CPB while elevating both PDC and PC (~ four-fold). T3 inhibited IR induced reductions in CAC intermediate molar percent enrichment (MPE) and oxaloacetate(citrate)/malate MPE ratio; an index of aspartate entry into the CAC. Conclusions: T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC thereby providing substrate for elevated cardiac function and work after reperfusion. The increases in pyruvate flux occur with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Additionally, T3 inhibition of reductions in CAC intermediate MPEs indicates that T3 reduces the reliance on amino acids (AA) for anaplerosis after reperfusion. Thus, AA should be more available for other functions such as protein synthesis.

  17. Role of Cr(III) deposition during the photocatalytic transformation of hexavalent chromium and citric acid over commercial TiO2 samples.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, V N; Salou, C; Meichtry, J M; Colbeau-Justin, C; Litter, M I

    2016-02-01

    Removal of Cr(VI) and citric acid (Cit) by heterogeneous photocatalytic Cr(VI) transformation under UV light over two commercial TiO2 samples (1 g L(-1)), Evonik P25 and Hombikat UV100, was studied at pH 2 and Cr(VI) concentrations between 0.2 and 3 mM, with a fixed [Cit]0/[Cr(VI)]0 molar ratio (MR) of 2.5. In both cases, up to complete Cr(VI) removal, the temporal profiles of Cr(VI) and Cit were well adjusted to a pseudo-first order rate law with the same rate constant, evidencing that Cr(VI) removal controls the kinetics of the system. Once Cr(VI) is fully removed, Cit degradation continues with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood behaviour. In all cases, the rate constants decreased with increasing [Cr(VI)]0, and time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements revealed that this was due to an increasing retention of Cr(III) on the surface of the photocatalysts, which reduces the lifetime of the electrons. Both kinetic experiments and TRMC measurements confirm that UV100 is not only more efficient than P25 for Cr(VI) and Cit removal, but it is also less influenced by the poisoning of the surface, consistent with its larger specific area. The use of Cit as the sacrificial agent improves the rate and efficiency of the photocatalytic Cr(VI) removal, and also the stability of the photocatalyst by preventing Cr(III) deposition, due to the formation of soluble Cr(III)-complexes, envisaged as a general result of the presence of oligocarboxylic acids in the photocatalytic Cr(VI) system.

  18. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases by citric acid cycle intermediates: possible links between cell metabolism and stabilization of HIF.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Peppi; Hirsilä, Maija; Remes, Anne M; Hassinen, Ilmo E; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2007-02-16

    The stability and transcriptional activity of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are regulated by two oxygen-dependent events that are catalyzed by three HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (HIF-P4Hs) and one HIF asparaginyl hydroxylase (FIH). We have studied possible links between metabolic pathways and HIF hydroxylases by analyzing the abilities of citric acid cycle intermediates to inhibit purified human HIF-P4Hs and FIH. Fumarate and succinate were identified as in vitro inhibitors of all three HIF-P4Hs, fumarate having K(i) values of 50-80 microM and succinate 350-460 microM, whereas neither inhibited FIH. Oxaloacetate was an additional inhibitor of all three HIF-P4Hs with K(i) values of 400-1000 microM and citrate of HIF-P4H-3, citrate being the most effective inhibitor of FIH with a K(i) of 110 microM. Culturing of cells with fumarate diethyl or dimethyl ester, or a high concentration of monoethyl ester, stabilized HIF-1alpha and increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor and erythropoietin. Similar, although much smaller, changes were found in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with fumarate hydratase (FH) deficiency and upon silencing FH using small interfering RNA. No such effects were seen upon culturing of cells with succinate diethyl or dimethyl ester. As FIH was not inhibited by fumarate, our data indicate that the transcriptional activity of HIF is quite high even when binding of the coactivator p300 is prevented. Our data also support recent suggestions that the increased fumarate and succinate levels present in the FH and succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors, respectively, can inhibit the HIF-P4Hs with consequent stabilization of HIF-alphas and effects on tumor pathology.

  19. Use of hydrogen peroxide in combination with nisin, sodium lactate and citric acid for reducing transfer of bacterial pathogens from whole melon surfaces to fresh-cut pieces.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Bari, M L; Kawamoto, S; Isshiki, K

    2005-10-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (2.5%) alone or hydrogen peroxide (1%) in combination with nisin (25 microg/ml), sodium lactate (1%), and citric acid (0.5%) (HPLNC) were investigated as potential sanitizers for reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Listeria monocytogenes populations on whole cantaloupe and honeydew melons. Whole cantaloupes inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes at 5.27 and 4.07 log10 CFU/cm2, respectively, and whole honeydew melons inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes at 3.45 and 3.05 log10 CFU/cm2, respectively, were stored at 5 degrees C for 7 days. Antimicrobial washing treatments were applied to inoculated whole melons on days 0 or 7 of storage and surviving bacterial populations and the numbers transferred to fresh-cut pieces were determined. At days 0 and 7 treatment with HPLNC significantly (p<0.05) reduced the numbers of both pathogens, by 3 to 4 log CFU/cm2 on both types of whole melon. Treatment with HPLNC was significantly (p<0.05) more effective than treatment with 2.5% hydrogen peroxide. While fresh-cut pieces prepared from stored whole melons were negative for the pathogens by both direct plating and by enrichment, fresh-cut pieces from cantaloupe melons treated with 2.5% hydrogen peroxide were positive for both pathogens and pieces from honeydew melons were positive for E. coli 0157:H7. The native microflora on fresh-cut melons were also substantially reduced by HPLNC treatment of whole melons. The results suggest that HPLNC could be used to decontaminate whole melon surfaces and so improve the microbial safety and quality of fresh-cut melons.

  20. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults. PMID:26635626

  1. SALDI-TOF-MS analyses of small molecules (citric acid, dexasone, vitamins E and A) using TiO2 nanocrystals as substrates.

    PubMed

    Popović, Iva A; Nešić, Maja; Vranješ, Mila; Šaponjić, Zoran; Petković, Marijana

    2016-10-01

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-TOF-MS) might be the method of choice for the analysis of low mass molecules (less than m/z 500). Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystals as a substrate for SALDI-TOF-MS improve the reproducibility of the signal intensities and prevent the fragmentation of some molecules upon laser irradiation, as we have previously shown. In addition, variously shaped and sized TiO2 nanocrystals/substrates for SALDI-MS could be used for quantification of small molecules, which are otherwise difficult to detect with the assistance of organic matrices. TiO2-assisted LDI-MS spectra could be acquired with excellent reproducibility and repeatability and with low detection limit. In the current study, we analysed the spectra of dexasone, citric acid, vitamin E and vitamin A acquired with TiO2 nanocrystals of various shapes and dimensions, i.e. the colloidal TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), TiO2 prolate nanospheroids (TiO2 PNSs) and TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). Various shapes and dimensions of substrates were used since these factors determine desorption and ionisation processes. The homogeneity on the target plate was compared based on signal-to-noise values of peaks of interest of analysed molecules as well as the within-day and day-to-day repeatability. In summary, the obtained results show that the applicability of individual TiO2 nanocrystals depends on the analyte. Signals which are acquired with the assistance of TiO2 PNSs have the highest sensitivity and reproducibility (the smallest standard deviation), even compared with those in the LDI mode. This implies that TiO2 PNSs could also be suitable for quantitative analyses of small molecules.

  2. Light and Electron Microscopic Studies of the Rat Kidney After Administration of Inhibitors of the Citric Acid Cycle In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Elizabeth M.

    1972-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies of morphologic changes in the rat proximal convoluted tubule after intraperitoneal injection of sodium fluoroacetate (FAc), 60, 20 and 3.5 mg/kg body weight, have been made. Particular attention was directed toward appreciating different changes in the first (S1) and second (S2) segments of the proximal tubule. The earliest change was loss of mitochondrial granules and pallor of the mitochondrial matrix, not necessarily associated with matrix swelling. Matrix swelling was greatest at 3 hours after 3.5 mg/kg and was reversible. However, the mitochondria retained their elongate shape and cristae persisted. At 48 hours, some mitochondria appeared normal; in others, abnormal matrix densities of unknown nature were present. Mitochondrial changes were similar in S1 and S2 at all times. Enlarged apical vacuoles, most pronounced in S1, occurred in all rats after 20 mg/kg. The change was uncommon after 3.5 mg/kg. The hypothesis proposed is that vacuoles arise during an FAc-induced hyperglycemic phase, when pinocytotic activity is maintained but the normal pathway of glucose catabolism is inhibited. Moderate dilatation of the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum occurred during the first 2-hour period in S1 and S2 tubules after high and low doses, but between 6 and 24 hours, dilatation was extensive in S1 tubules after 3.5 mg/kg. This change was reversible. Two types of abnormal vacuolar bodies, large and small, have been described, and were unique to S1 tubules. Acid phosphatase activity was demonstrated in a proportion of the small ones, indiciating that they were a type of lysosome. The larger ones shared features in common with cytosomes of control cells, but acid phosphatase activity was not demonstrated in them and their origins and functions remain obscure. The biochemical lesions induced by fluoroacetate have been discussed and a tentative interpretation of some of the morphologic changes has ben made. ImagesFig 20Fig 21Fig 1Fig

  3. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Andersen, Mikael R.; Salazar, Margarita P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Vondervoot, Peter J.I. van de; Culley, David; Thykaer, Jette; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristen F.; Albang, Richard; Albermann, Kaj; Berka, Randy M.; Braus, Gerhard H.; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Dai, Ziyu; Dijck, Piet W.M. van; Hofmann, Gerald; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnusson, Jon K.; Meijer, Susan L.; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Ooyen, Albert J.J. van; Panther, Kathyrn S.; Pel, Herman J.; Poulsen, Lars; Samson, Rob A.; Stam, Hen; Tsang, Adrian; Brink, Johannes M. van den; Atkins, Alex; Aerts, Andrea; Shapiro, Harris; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Salamov, Asaf; Lou, Yigong; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grimwood, Jane; Kubicek, Christian P.; Martinez, Diego; Peij, Noel N.M.E. van; Roubos, Johannes A.; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-04-28

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzyme-producing A. niger strain (CBS 513.88) has already been sequenced, the versatility and diversity of this species compels additional exploration. We therefore undertook whole genome sequencing of the acidogenic A. niger wild type strain (ATCC 1015), and produced a genome sequence of very high quality. Only 15 gaps are present in the sequence and half the telomeric regions have been elucidated. Moreover, sequence information from ATCC 1015 was utilized to improve the genome sequence of CBS 513.88. Chromosome-level comparisons uncovered several genome rearrangements, deletions, a clear case of strain-specific horizontal gene transfer, and identification of 0.8 megabase of novel sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms per kilobase (SNPs/kb) between the two strains were found to be exceptionally high (average: 7.8, maximum: 160 SNPs/kb). High variation within the species was confirmed with exo-metabolite profiling and phylogenetics. Detailed lists of alleles were generated, and genotypic differences were observed to accumulate in metabolic pathways essential to acid production and protein synthesis. A transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of the electron transport chain, specifically the alternative oxidative pathway in ATCC 1015, while CBS 513.88 showed significant up-regulation of genes relevant to glucoamylase A production, such as tRNA-synthases and protein transporters. Our results and datasets from this integrative systems biology analysis resulted in a snapshot of fungal evolution and will support further optimization of cell factories based on filamentous fungi.[Supplemental materials (10 figures, three text documents and 16 tables) have been made available

  4. A Comparative Study of the Quality of Apical Seal in Resilon/Epiphany SE Following Intra canal Irrigation With 17% EDTA, 10% Citric Acid, And MTAD as Final Irrigants – A Dye Leakage Study Under Vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathi, Vidya; Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Sampath, J. Sivakumar; Singh, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adequate apical sealing ability of the root canal filling material is an essential requisite for a successful endodontic therapy. Various endodontic irrigants are used for the removal of smear layer before obturating with a solid core material, thereby, reducing microleakage and improving apical seal. Resilon, a synthetic material was developed as an alternative to replace the conventional gutta-percha (standard root canal filling material) and traditional sealers for the obturation of endodontically treated teeth. Aim To evaluate and compare in-vitro, the post obturation apical seal obtained with Resilon /Epiphany SE (Self Etch) sealer following irrigation with 17% Ethylenediamine Tetra-Acetic Acid (EDTA), 10% citric acid, and MTAD (a mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent, Tween 80), as final irrigants in combination with Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) using dye leakage under vacuum method. Materials and Methods Fifty five single rooted human maxillary central incisors were subjected to root canal instrumentation. Based on the final irrigation solution, samples were divided into three experimental groups (n=15); (I) 17% EDTA + 1.3% NaOCl, (II) 10% citric acid + 1.3% NaOCl, (III) MTAD + 1.3% NaOCl and two control groups (positive and negative) with 0.9% normal saline as a final irrigant. The samples were obturated with resilon/epiphany SE sealer according to manufacturer instructions and placed in 2% rhodamine B dye solution under vacuum pressure for 30 minutes and allowed to remain in the dye for seven days. All samples were then longitudinally split and examined for dye leakage under stereomicroscope and the data were statistically analysed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc tukey test. Results Statistically significant difference (p=0.001) was observed in the mean apical leakage between the experimental and the control groups. However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) observed in the mean apical leakage amongst the three

  5. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  6. Structural, electronic and photoluminescence properties of Eu3+-doped CaYAlO4 obtained by using citric acid complexes as precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, R. V.; Júnior, C. S. Nascimento; Góes, M. S.; Pecoraro, E.; Schiavon, M. A.; Paiva-Santos, C. O.; Lima, H.; Couto dos Santos, M. A.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Ferrari, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The search for new materials that meet the current technological demands for photonic applications, make the Rare Earth ions embedded in inorganic oxides as excellent candidates for several technological devices. This work presents the synthesis of Eu3+-doped CaYAlO4 using citric acid as ligand to form a complex precursor. The methodology used has big draw due to its easy handling and low cost of the materials. The thermal analysis of viscous solutions was evaluated and the obtained compounds show the formation of a polycrystalline tetragonal phase. Rietveld refinement was used to understand the structural and the cell parameters of the crystalline phase as a function of temperature of heat-treatment. Crystallite size and microstrain were determined and were shown to have a direct relationship with the temperature of the heat-treatment. The band-gap of the CaYAlO4 doped with 1 and 10 mol% of Eu3+ showed values close to 4.30 eV, resulting in their transparency in the visible region between 330 and 750 nm. Besides the intense photoluminescence from Eu3+, a study was conducted to evaluate the possible position of the Eu3+ in the CaYAlO4 as host lattice. Lifetime of the emission decay from Eu3+ excited state 5D0 show that CaYAlO4 is a good host to rare earth ions, once it can avoid clustering of these ions in concentration as high as 10 mol%. The predictions of the sublevels of the 7F1 crystal field level are discussed through the method of equivalent nearest neighbours (MENN). The intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ = 2 and 4) are reproduced with physically reasonable values of average polarizabilities. The set of charge factors used in both calculations are in good agreement with the charge of the europium ion described by the Batista-Longo improved model (BLIM). The quantum efficiencies of the materials were calculated based on Judd-Ofelt theory. Based on the results obtained in this work, the materials have potential use in photonic devices such as lasers and solid

  7. CSP0510 Lotion as a Novel Moisturizer Containing Citric Acid and Trisodium Phosphate Relieves Objective and Subjective Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-June; Yang, Nam-Woong; Choi, Jee-Young; Lee, Jee-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background Moisturizers with anti-inflammatory or anti-itch activity should be developed for the safe and effective management of atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of a newly developed moisturizer, CSP0510 lotion (Twolines Inc., Korea), containing citric acid (CA) and trisodium phosphate (TSP) as active ingredients, in mild to moderate AD. Methods and Results CSP0510 lotion applied twice daily for 4 weeks to eczematous lesions improved objective and subjective (itch) symptoms of AD. The physician's global assessment (PGA) score for objective symptoms decreased from 2.5±0.6 before application to 1.3±0.5 after application in the CSP0510-treated group (n=42, p<0.001). Also, the PGA score decreased from 2.3±0.6 to 1.9±0.5 by vehicle-treated (without CA and TSP) control group (p=0.001), but there was no statistical difference between CSP0510-treated and vehicle-treated groups (p=0.089). The visual analogue scale score for itch decreased from 4.8±1.3 to 2.0±0.9 in the CSP0510-treated group (p<0.001), and from 4.6±1.1 to 3.5±0.9 in the control group (p=0.075), showing a statistical significance between two groups (p=0.002). Our results in humans were further supported by in vitro and animal experiments. In HaCaT cells treated with compound 48/80 (7.5 µg/ml), CA:TSP (1:1, vol:vol) synergistically suppressed the compound 48/80-induced upregulation of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, nerve grow factor, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Application of CSP0510 to the dorsal skin of hairless mice for 3 weeks suppressed the oxazolone-induced allergic skin inflammation. Conclusion In conclusion, CSP0510 lotion has anti-itch and anti-inflammatory activity in the skin, which improves both objective and subjective symptoms of AD. PMID:27274633

  8. Effect of high-dose phytase and citric acid, alone or in combination, on growth performance of broilers given diets severely limited in available phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Taheri, H R; Jabbari, Z; Adibnia, S; Shahir, M H; Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    1. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of high-dose phytase alone or in combination with citric acid (CA) in the diet severely limited in available phosphorus (P) on performance, plasma P and plasma Ca of broilers from 22 to 42 d of age. 2. In Trial 1, 297 21-d-old female chicks were placed into 27 pens and allocated to 9 maize-soybean meal-based dietary treatments, which were a positive control [PC, 4.23 g/kg non-phytate P (NPP)] and 8 negative control (NC, 1.35 g/kg NPP) groups consisting of two concentrations of CA (0 and 20 g/kg) and 4 concentrations of phytase (0, 1000, 2000 and 4000 U/kg) in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement. In Trial 2, 192 21-d-old male chicks were placed into 24 pens and allocated to 6 wheat-canola meal-based dietary treatments, which were a PC (4.2 g/kg NPP), a NC (1.68 g/kg NPP) and 4 NC groups consisting of two concentrations of CA (0 and 20 g/kg) and two concentrations of phytase (2000 and 4000 U/kg) in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. 3. In both trials, birds fed on the PC had significantly higher average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), plasma P and lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) and plasma Ca than those of birds fed on the NC. CA supplementation significantly increased ADG and ADFI. There was a significant interaction between CA and phytase on plasma P where CA improved the effect of phytase on plasma P. In Trial 1, phytase addition improved ADG, ADFI, FCR and plasma Ca linearly. 4. Briefly, this research showed the interaction effect between CA and phytase on plasma P when broilers were fed on diets based on maize-soybean meal or wheat-canola meal. The results showed that CA supplementation lowered the concentration of phytase that is needed in low NPP diets to increase plasma P.

  9. Geochemical behaviour of palladium in soils and Pd/PdO model substances in the presence of the organic complexing agents L-methionine and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zereini, Fathi; Wiseman, Clare L S; Vang, My; Albers, Peter; Schneider, Wolfgang; Schindl, Roland; Leopold, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments of platinum group metal (PGE) emissions, notably those of platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh), have been mostly based on data regarding the metallic forms used in vehicular exhaust converters, known to be virtually biologically inert and immobile. To adequately assess the potential impacts of PGE, however, data on the chemical behaviour of these metals under ambient conditions post-emission is needed. Complexing agents with a high affinity for metals in the environment are hypothesized to contribute to an increased bioaccessibility of PGE. The purpose of this study is to examine the modulating effects of the organic complexing agents, L-methionine and citric acid, on the geochemical behavior of Pd in soils and model substances (Pd black and PdO). Batch experimental tests were conducted with soils and model substances to examine the impacts of the concentration of complexing agents, pH and length of extraction period on Pd solubility and its chemical transformation. Particle surface chemistry was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on samples treated with solutions under various conditions, including low and high O2 levels. Pd was observed to be more soluble in the presence of organic complexing agents, compared to Pt and Rh. Pd in soils was more readily solubilized with organic complexing agents compared to the model substances. After 7 days of extraction, L-methionine (0.1 M) treated soil and Pd black samples, for instance, had mean soluble Pd fractions of 12.4 ± 5.9% and 0.554 ± 0.024%, respectively. Surface chemistry analyses (XPS) confirmed the oxidation of metallic Pd surfaces when treated with organic complexing agents. The type of organic complexing agent used for experimental purposes was observed to be the most important factor influencing solubility, followed by solution pH and time of extraction. The results demonstrate that metallic Pd can be transformed into more bioaccessible species in the presence of

  10. Combined efficacy of nisin and pediocin with sodium lactate, citric acid, phytic acid, and potassium sorbate and EDTA in reducing the Listeria monocytogenes population of inoculated fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Bari, M L; Ukuku, D O; Kawasaki, T; Inatsu, Y; Isshiki, K; Kawamoto, S

    2005-07-01

    The inability of chlorine to completely inactivate human bacterial pathogens on whole and fresh-cut produce suggests a need for other antimicrobial washing treatments. Nisin (50 microg/ml) and pediocin (100 AU/ml) individually or in combination with sodium lactate (2%), potassium sorbate (0.02%), phytic acid (0.02%), and citric acid (10 mM) were tested as possible sanitizer treatments for reducing the population of Listeria monocytogenes on cabbage, broccoli, and mung bean sprouts. Cabbage, broccoli, and mung bean sprouts were inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes at 4.61, 4.34, and 4.67 log CFU/g, respectively. Inoculated produce was left at room temperature (25 degrees C) for up to 4 h before antimicrobial treatment. Washing treatments were applied to inoculated produce for 1 min, and surviving bacterial populations were determined. When tested alone, all compounds resulted in 2.20- to 4.35-log reductions of L. monocytogenes on mung bean, cabbage, and broccoli, respectively. The combination treatments nisin-phytic acid and nisin-pediocin-phytic acid caused significant (P < 0.05) reductions of L. monocytogenes on cabbage and broccoli but not on mung bean sprouts. Pediocin treatment alone or in combination with any of the organic acid tested was more effective in reducing L. monocytogenes populations than the nisin treatment alone. Although none of the combination treatments completely eliminated the pathogen on the produce, the results suggest that some of the treatments evaluated in this study can be used to improve the microbial safety of fresh-cut cabbage, broccoli, and mung bean sprouts.

  11. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, Deepa; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.

    2016-01-11

    Rapid acidification of the culture medium by the production of organic acids and the production of acid-induced proteases are key characteristics of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. The D15 mutant of A. niger is non-acidifying mutant and used often for the expression of recombinant proteins in A. niger, because of its reduced production of extracellular proteases under non-acidic conditions. In this study, the D15 mutant is characterized in detail. Strongly reduced levels of citric and oxalic acid were observed in the D15 mutant both in shake flask cultures and in controlled batch cultivations. To identify the mutation in the D15 mutant, we successfully combined high-throughput sequencing (Illumina) with bulk segregant analysis. Because of the lack of a sexual cycle for A. niger, the parasexual cycle was used to generate a pool of segregants. From the 52 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the parental strains, three SNPs were homozygous in the genomic DNA of pool of segregants. These three SNPs mapped to all the right arm of chromosome II, indicating that this region contains the genetic locus affecting the phenotype related to acid production. Of the three SNPs, one mutation resulted in a missense mutation in the gene encoding the A. niger homologue of the A. nidulans methyltransferase gene laeA. Complementation analysis of the original mutant with the laeA gene and targeted disruption of laeA further confirmed that LaeA is involved in citric acid production in A. niger lab (N402) and citric acid production strains (ATCC 11414). Analysis of the secondary metabolite (SM) profile of the laeA mutants indicate that LaeA is required for the production of several SMs (asperrubrol, atromentin and JBIR86), but deletion of laeA also resulted in the presence of SMs (aspernigrin A/B and BMS-192548) that were not detected in the wild-type strain. The levels of ten other SMs were not strongly affected as a result of laeA deletion indicating that only a

  12. Palladium-citric acid-ammonium fluoride as a matrix modifier for overcoming of interferences occurring during the direct determination of Sn in aqua regia extracts from environmental samples by D2-ETAAS.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Srámková, Jitka; Cernohorský, Tomás; Urbanová-Dolezalová, Iva

    2009-02-15

    When tin is to be determined in such a complex matrix like aqua regia extracts of environmental samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), spectral interferences occur when deuterium-lamp (D(2)) background correction is used, even using high pyrolysis temperature of 1400 degrees C achieved with palladium with citric acid chemical modifier. We have found that the further addition of NH(4)F to palladium with citric acid chemical modifier is essential for overcoming the above-mentioned problems for which aluminium oxide is most probably responsible. It is supposed, that NH(4)F enables volatilization of the alumina matrix formed by hydrolysis from the chloride salt and interfering in a gas phase via the formation of AlF(3) which could be, in contrast to aluminium oxide, removed from the graphite furnace during the pyrolysis stage. Using the proposed chemical modifier, the direct and accurate determination of Sn in aqua regia extracts from rocks, soils and sediments is possible even when using matrix free standard solutions. This presumption was confirmed by the analysis of certified reference samples and by the comparison with inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (ICP-TOFMS) method. Characteristic mass and LOD value for the original sample (10-microL aliquots of sample) was 17 pg and 0.055 microg g(-1), respectively.

  13. Retention mechanisms of citric acid in ternary kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate acid systems using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-05-23

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L-3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤ 0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. In conclusion, these findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.

  14. Predictive model and optimization of a combined treatment of caprylic acid and citric acid for the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Rhee, M S

    2015-03-16

    Our recent previous study reported the outstanding synergistic bactericidal activity of a combination of two natural antimicrobials: caprylic acid (CA) and citric acid (CTA). In the present study, the response surface methodology was used with the central composite design to build a model based on four factors, i.e., the CA concentration, CTA concentration, temperature, and treatment time, for the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7. This model was used to determine the optimum conditions for desirable responses and to evaluate the effects of experimental factors. The ranges of the four variables used in the design were as follows: CA concentration (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 mM), CTA concentration (0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 mM), temperature (25, 30, 35, 40, and 45°C), and time (1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 min). A second-order quadratic model of the effect of four variables was constructed and the experimental values agreed well with the values derived from model equation (R(2)=0.954). The adequacy of this model for predicting the magnitude of bacterial reduction was verified based on the validation data (R(2)=0.946). The optimum conditions for the combined treatment for microbial reduction were determined by ridge analysis, which were 1.0mM CA and 0.8mM CTA at 39.6°C for 5.4 min. The CA concentration and temperature were the most significant variables. This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the bactericidal effects of the combined CA and CTA treatment. A distinct advantage of the proposed method is its cost-effectiveness. This treatment could be used as a preservative in the food industry because the two components are natural products.

  15. Effects of Combined Treatment with Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Citric Acid, L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10, Zinc, and Various Vitamins in Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Awa, Hiroko; Futamura, Akihiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Mori, Naoharu; Murai, Miyo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    A functional dietary supplement (FDS) containing Coenzyme Q10, branched-chain amino acids and L-carnitine was administered to tumor-bearing mice, investigating its effects on tumor and muscle tissues. Experiment (A): B16 melanoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into the right side of the abdomen of 8- to 9-week-old C57BL/6J mice. The mice were divided into two groups: a FDS group that received oral administration of FDS (n=10), and a control group that received oral administration of glucose (n=10). The moribund condition was used as the endpoint, and median survival time was determined. Experiment (B): On day 21 after tumor implantation, tumors, soleus muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, and suprahyoid muscles were collected. Tumor and muscle weight and other aspects were evaluated in each group: FDS group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The median survival time was comparable (21 d in the FDS group vs. 18 d in the control group, p=0.30). However, cumulative food intake was significantly higher in the FDS group than the control group (p=0.011). Metastasis of melanoma to the lung was observed in the control group but not in the FDS group (p=0.043). The weight of the suprahyoid muscles was significantly higher in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.0045). The weight of the tumor was significantly lower in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.013). The results possibly suggest oral administration of FDS in tumor-bearing mice enhances the maintenance of suprahyoid muscles, resulting in an extended feeding period and suppression of tumor growth and metastasis.

  16. Improved electrochemical performance of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 cathode material synthesized by citric acid assisted sol-gel method for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Hyungsub; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Youn, Hee-Chang; Kang, Kisuk; Cho, Byung-Won; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-05-01

    A citric acid assisted sol-gel method is employed for synthesizing LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 for use as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of heat-treatment temperature and oxygen atmosphere on the structural and electrochemical properties of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 are investigated, in order to determine optimal conditions for the synthesis of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 via the citric acid assisted sol-gel method. In particular, the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere effectively leads to a decrease in the degree of cation mixing and the formation of LiOH and Li2CO3 on the surface of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2. Furthermore, heat-treatment in an oxygen atmosphere improves the uniformity of oxidation state of Ni ions between the surface and bulk. LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 synthesized by heat-treatment at 850 °C under an oxygen atmosphere shows a discharge capacity of 174 mA h g-1 and 89% capacity retention after 100 cycles. In addition, it shows high rate capability (i.e., 41% capacity retention at 10 C), which is an improved rate performance over a previous report. The results of this study should provide useful information for the synthesis of Ni-rich layered oxides for lithium ion batteries.

  17. Visual expression analysis of the responses of the alternative oxidase gene (aox1) to heat shock, oxidative, and osmotic stresses in conidia of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuki; Hattori, Takasumi; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2012-03-01

    The citric acid-producing filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger WU-2223L shows cyanide-insensitive respiration catalyzed by alternative oxidase in addition to the cytochrome pathway. Sequence analysis of the 5' flanking region of the alternative oxidase gene (aox1) revealed a potential heat shock element (HSE) and a stress response element (STRE). We have previously confirmed aox1 expression in conidia. In this study, to confirm whether the upstream region of aox1 responds to various stresses, we used a visual expression analysis system for single-cell conidia of the A. niger strain AOXEGFP-1. This strain harbored a fusion gene comprising aox1 and egfp, which encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fluorescence intensity of EGFP increased in conidia of A. niger AOXEGFP-1 that were subjected to heat shock at 35-45 °C, oxidative stress by exposure to 5mM paraquat or 1 mM t-butylhydroperoxide, or osmotic stresses by exposure to 0.5 M KCl or 1.0 M mannitol. These results indicate that the putative HSE and STRE in the upstream region of aox1 directly or indirectly respond to heat shock, oxidative, and osmotic stresses.

  18. Probing the origin of acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate entering the citric acid cycle from the 13C labeling of citrate released by perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Comte, B; Vincent, G; Bouchard, B; Des Rosiers, C

    1997-10-17

    We present a strategy for simultaneous assessment of the relative contributions of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation, pyruvate decarboxylation, and fatty acid oxidation to citrate formation in the perfused rat heart. This requires perfusing with a mix of 13C-substrates and determining the 13C labeling pattern of a single metabolite, citrate, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mass isotopomer distributions of the oxaloacetate and acetyl moieties of citrate allow calculation of the flux ratios: (pyruvate carboxylation)/(pyruvate decarboxylation), (pyruvate carboxylation)/(citrate synthesis), (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(citrate synthesis) (pyruvate carboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation), and (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation). Calculations, based on precursor-product relationship, are independent of pool size. The utility of our method was demonstrated for hearts perfused under normoxia with [U-13C3](lactate + pyruvate) and [1-13C]octanoate under steady-state conditions. Under these conditions, effluent and tissue citrate were similarly enriched in all 13C mass isotopomers. The use of effluent citrate instead of tissue citrate allows probing substrate fluxes through the various reactions non-invasively in the intact heart. The methodology should also be applicable to hearts perfused with other 13C-substrates, such as 1-13C-labeled long chain fatty acid, and under various conditions, provided that assumptions on which equations are developed are valid.

  19. Utilization of carrageenan, citric acid and cinnamon oil as an edible coating of chicken fillets to prolong its shelf life under refrigeration conditions

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Anshul Kumar; Abraham, Robinson J. J.; Appa Rao, V.; Babu, R. Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to determine efficacy of edible coating of carrageenan and cinnamon oil to enhance the shelf life of chicken meat stored under refrigeration conditions. Materials and Methods: Chicken breast was coated with carrageenan and cinnamon oil by three methods of application viz., spraying brushing and dipping. The coated meat was evaluated for drip loss, pH, thiobarbituric acid number (TBA), tyrosine value (TV), extract release volume (ERV), Warner-Bratzler shear force value (WBSFV), instrumental color, microbiological, and sensory qualities as per standard procedures. Results: There was a significant difference observed for physicochemical parameters (pH, TBA, TV, ERV, drip loss and WBSFV) and microbiological analysis between storage periods in all the samples and between the control and treatments throughout the storage period but samples did not differed significantly for hunter color scores. However, there was no significant difference among three methods of application throughout the storage period though dipping had a lower rate of increase. A progressive decline in mean sensory scores was recorded along with the increase in storage time. Conclusion: The carrageenan and cinnamon edible coating was found to be a good alternative to enhance the shelf life of chicken meat under refrigeration conditions. It was also observed from study that dipping method of the application had comparatively higher shelf life than other methods of application. PMID:27051203

  20. Nonpeptide tachykinin receptor antagonists. III. SB 235375, a low central nervous system-penetrant, potent and selective neurokinin-3 receptor antagonist, inhibits citric acid-induced cough and airways hyper-reactivity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Douglas W P; Giardina, Giuseppe A M; Griswold, Don E; Underwood, David C; Kotzer, Charles J; Bush, Brian; Potts, William; Sandhu, Punam; Lundberg, Dave; Foley, James J; Schmidt, Dulcie B; Martin, Lenox D; Kilian, David; Legos, Jeffrey J; Barone, Frank C; Luttmann, Mark A; Grugni, Mario; Raveglia, Luca F; Sarau, Henry M

    2002-01-01

    In this report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profile of (-)-(S)-N-(alpha-ethylbenzyl)-3-(carboxymethoxy)-2-phenylquinoline-4-carboxamide (SB 235375), a low central nervous system (CNS)-penetrant, human neurokinin-3 (NK-3) receptor (hNK-3R) antagonist, is described. SB 235375 inhibited (125)I-[MePhe(7)]-neurokinin B (NKB) binding to membranes of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the hNK-3R (CHO-hNK-3R) with a K(i) = 2.2 nM and antagonized competitively NKB-induced Ca(2+) mobilization in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the hNK-3R (HEK 293-hNK-3R) with a K(b) = 12 nM. SB 235375 antagonized senktide (NK-3R)-induced contractions in rabbit isolated iris sphincter (pA(2) = 8.1) and guinea pig ileal circular smooth muscles (pA(2) = 8.3). SB 235375 was selective for the hNK-3R compared with hNK-1 (K(i) > 100,000 nM) and hNK-2 receptors (K(i) = 209 nM), and was without effect, at 1 microM, in 68 other receptor, enzyme, and ion channel assays. Intravenous SB 235375 produced a dose-related inhibition of miosis induced by i.v. senktide in the rabbit (ED(50) of 0.56 mg/kg). Intraperitoneal SB 235375 (10-30 mg/kg) inhibited citric acid-induced cough and airways hyper-reactivity in guinea pigs. In mice oral SB 235375 (3-30 mg/kg) was without significant effect on the behavioral responses induced by intracerebral ventricular administration of senktide. Pharmacokinetic evaluation in the mouse and rat revealed that oral SB 235375 was well absorbed systemically but did not effectively cross the blood-brain barrier. The preclinical profile of SB 235375, encompassing high affinity, selectivity, oral activity, and low CNS penetration, suggests that it is an appropriate tool compound to define the pathophysiological roles of the NK-3Rs in the peripheral nervous system.

  1. Heat treatment effect on crystal structure and design of highly sensitive room temperature CO2 gas sensors using anodic Bi2O3 nanoporous formed in a citric acid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahila, M.; Dhanalakshmi, J.; Celina Selvakumari, J.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of annealing temperature on the crystal structure of anodic bismuth trioxide (ABO) layers prepared via anodization in a citric acid-based electrolyte was studied. The samples were annealed in air at temperatures ranging from 200 °C to 600 °C. Characterization of nanoporous ABO layers was carried out through x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible (UV-Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL). Effects of heat treatment on crystallinity, morphology and gas-sensing properties were investigated in detail. The XRD measurements showed that a gradual phase change from beta to gamma occurs with an increase in annealing temperature. The beta to gamma transformation occurred between 500 and 600 °C. The changes in the average crystallite sizes of beta and gamma occurring during heat treatment of the ABO layers are correlated with the mechanism of gamma-phase nucleation. During the growth of the gamma phase, the grain size gets enlarged with a reduction in the total area of grain boundary. The pores’ formation and the pore diameter of both anodized and annealed samples were found to be in the range of 50 to 150 nm. The band gap of the ABO layer crystallines was determined using the diffuse reflectance technique according to the Kubelka-Munk theory. Results showed that the band gap of the ABO layer decreased from 4.09 to 2.42 eV when the particle size decreased from 58 to 24 nm. The CO2 sensing properties of the ABO were investigated at room temperature for 0-100 ppm concentration. The variations in the electrical resistances were measured with the exposure of CO2 as a function of time. The maximum value of the response magnitude of 77% was obtained for 100 ppm of CO2. These experimental results show that the ABO layer of nanoporous is a promising material for CO2 sensors at room temperature.

  2. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp.

  3. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  4. Determination of selenium in biological tissue samples rich in phosphorus using electrothermal atomization with Zeeman-effect background correction and (NH 4) 3RhCl 6+citric acid as a mixed chemical modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Li; Zhe-ming, Ni; Zhu, Rao

    1998-09-01

    Spectral interferences from phosphorus on the determination of selenium in biological tissue materials were not observed when a Zeeman-effect background correction was used with rhodium as a chemical modifier. A suppression effect on the selenium signal resulted when the concentration of phosphorus present was greater than 1.0 mg ml -1. Rhodium was found to be more effective than palladium in overcoming the phosphate interference. Analytical procedures for the direct determination of trace selenium in standard reference materials by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry following sample dissolution in nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide using a microwave oven has been described. The results obtained agreed favourably with the certified values.

  5. [Influence of chosen metals on the citric acid cycle].

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołebiewska, Ewa; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Industrial activity growth influenced not only technological progress, but also had negative effects on human natural environment. It results among others in increased human exposition to heavy metals. In case of detoxication mechanisms disturbance in organism, heavy metals cumulate in tissues causing mutations and disrupting metabolism, including Krebs cycle. Recent studies have revealed that iron, zinc and manganese have especially strong influence on Krebs cycle. These elements act as cofactors or inhibitors regulating activity of particular enzymes of this cycle, which has a reflection in cellular energy production disturbances.

  6. 27 CFR 24.182 - Use of acid to correct natural deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... citric acid may be added to citrus fruit, juice or wine, only malic acid may be added to apples, apple juice or wine, and only citric acid or malic acid may be added to other fruit (including berries) or to juice or wine derived from other fruit (including berries) to correct natural deficiencies to 9.0...

  7. Interconversion of biologically important carboxylic acids by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interconversion of a group of biologically important polycarboxylic acids (acetic, fumaric, malic, malonic, succinic, citric, isocitric, tricarballylic) under gamma-ray or ultraviolet radiation was investigated. The formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed in all cases. Succinic acid was formed in almost all radiolysis experiments. Citric, malonic, and succinic acids appeared to be relatively insensitive to radiation. Interconversion of the polycarboxylic acids studied may have occurred under the effect of radiation in the prebiotic earth.

  8. Relative efficacy of organic acids and antibiotics as growth promoters in broiler chicken

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Vikrant Laxman; Khatta, Vinod Kumar; Tewatia, Bachu Singh; Sangwan, Sandeep Kumar; Raut, Subhash Shamrao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic acids as replacer to antibiotics in their various combinations on feed consumption, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chicks during different phases of growth. Materials and Methods: Antibiotics and organic acids were incorporated into boiler feed in different combinations to form 10 maize based test diets (T1 to T10). Each test diet was offered to four replicates of 10 birds each constituting a total of 400 birds kept for 45 days. Results: Significantly better effect in terms of body weight gain from supplementation of 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic was observed throughout the entire study, whereas the effect of tartaric acid supplementation was similar to control group. Citric acid (1%) along with antibiotic supplementation showed highest feed intake during the experimental period. Significantly better FCR was observed in groups supplemented with 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic followed by antibiotic along with organic acids supplemented group. Conclusion: Growth performance of birds in terms of body weight, body weight gain, and FCR improved significantly in 1% citric acid which was significantly higher than antibiotic supplemented group. 1% citric acid can effectively replace antibiotic growth promoter (chlortetracycline) without affecting growth performance of birds. PMID:27182133

  9. Chemical and structural properties of sweet potato starch treated with organic and inorganic acid.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Surendra; Parimalavalli, R; Jagannadham, K; Rao, J Sudhakara

    2015-09-01

    In the present study sweet potato starch was treated with hydrochloric acid or citric acid at 1 or 5 % concentration and its properties were investigated. Citric acid treatment resulted higher starch yield. Water holding capacity and water absorption index was increased with increased acid concentration. Emulsion properties improved at 5 % acid concentration. The DE value of acid-thinned sweet potato starches was ranged between 1.93 and 3.76 %. Hydrochloric acid treated starches displayed a higher fraction of amylose. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study revealed that all the starches displayed C-type crystalline pattern with varied crystallinity. FT-IR spectra perceived a slight change in percentage intensity of C-H stretch of citric acid modified starches. Starch granules tended to appear less smooth than the native starch granules after acid treatment in Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) with granule size ranging between 8.00 and 8.90 μm. A drastic decrease in the pasting profile was noticed in hydrochloric acid (5 %) treated starch. While 5 % citric acid treated starch exhibited higher pasting profile. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) showed that peak and conclusion gelatinisation temperatures increased with increase in hydrochloric acid or citric acid concentration. Hence citric acid was found to mimic the hydrochloric acid with some variation which suggests that it may have promising scope in acid modification.

  10. The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids on threo-Ds-isocitric acid production from rapeseed oil by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Allayarov, Ramil K; Lunina, Julia N; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids, the inhibitors of the isocitrate lyase, on the production of isocitric acid by the wild strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 grown in the medium containing rapeseed oil was studied. In the presence of oxalic and itaconic acids, strain Y. lipolytica accumulated in the medium isocitric acid (70.0 and 82.7 g/L, respectively) and citric acid (23.0 and 18.4 g/L, respectively). In control experiment, when the inhibitors were not added to the medium, the strain accumulated isocitric and citric acids at concentrations of 62.0 and 28.0 g/L, respectively. Thus, the use of the oxalic and itaconic acids as additives to the medium is a simple and convenient method of isocitric acid production with a minimum content of citric acid.

  11. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  12. [Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on speciation of exogenous Cu in an acid soil].

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Yong; Fu, Qing-Ling; Zhu, Jun; Wan, Tian-Ying; Hu, Hong-Qing

    2014-08-01

    In order to ascertain the effect of LMWOA (citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid) on Cu-contaminated soils and to investigate the change of Cu species, a red soil derived from quartz sandstone deposit was added by Cu (copper) in the form of CuSO4 x 5H2O so as to simulate soil Cu pollution, keeping the additional Cu concentrations were 0, 100, 200, 400 mg x kg(-1) respectively. After 9 months, different LMWOA was also added into the simulated soil, keeping the additional LMWOAs in soil were 0, 5, 10, 20 mmol x kg(-1) respectively. After 2 weeks incubation, the modified sequential extraction method on BCR (European Communities Bureau of Reference) was used to evaluate the effects of these LMWOAs on the changes of copper forms in soil. The result showed that the percentage of weak acid dissolved Cu, the most effective form in the soil increased with three organic acids increase in quantity in the simulated polluted soil. And there was a good activation effect on Cu in the soil when organic acid added. Activation effects on Cu increased with concentration of citric acid increasing, but it showed a rise trend before they are basically remained unchanged in the case of tartaric acid and oxalic acid added in the soil. On the contrary, the state of the reduction of copper which was regarded as a complement for effective state decreased with the increased concentration of organic acid in the soil, especially with citric acid. When 20 mmol x kg(-1) oxalic acid and citric acid were added into the soil, the activation effect was the best; whereas for tartaric, the concentration was 10 mmol x kg(-1). In general, the effect on the changes of Cu forms in the soil is citric acid > tartaric acid > oxalic acid.

  13. Potential improvement to a citric wastewater treatment plant using bio-hydrogen and a hybrid energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Xiaohua; Yang, Haijun; Berthold, Sascha; Doetsch, Christian; Shen, Jianquan

    Treatment of highly concentrated organic wastewater is characterized as cost-consuming. The conventional technology uses the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic process (A 2/O), which does not produce hydrogen. There is potential for energy saving using hydrogen utilization associated with wastewater treatment because hydrogen can be produced from organic wastewater using anaerobic fermentation. A 50 m 3 pilot bio-reactor for hydrogen production was constructed in Shandong Province, China in 2006 but to date the hydrogen produced has not been utilized. In this work, a technical-economic model based on hydrogen utilization is presented and analyzed to estimate the potential improvement to a citric wastewater plant. The model assesses the size, capital cost, annual cost, system efficiency and electricity cost under different configurations. In a stand-alone situation, the power production from hydrogen is not sufficient for the required load, thus a photovoltaic array (PV) is employed as the power supply. The simulated results show that the combination of solar and bio-hydrogen has a much higher cost compared with the A 2/O process. When the grid is connected, the system cost achieved is 0.238 US t -1 wastewater, which is lower than 0.257 US t -1 by the A 2/O process. The results reveal that a simulated improvement by using bio-hydrogen and a FC system is effective and feasible for the citric wastewater plant, even when compared to the current cost of the A 2/O process. In addition, lead acid and vanadium flow batteries were compared for energy storage service. The results show that a vanadium battery has lower cost and higher efficiency due to its long lifespan and energy efficiency. Additionally, the cost distribution of components shows that the PV dominates the cost in the stand-alone situation, while the bio-reactor is the main cost component in the parallel grid.

  14. Use of organic acids for prevention and removal of Bacillus subtilis biofilms on food contact surfaces.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen; Cag, Seyda

    2016-10-01

    The efficacies of organic acid (citric, malic, and gallic acids) treatments at 1% and 2% concentrations on prevention and removal of Bacillus subtilis biofilms were investigated in this study. The analyses were conducted on microtitration plates and stainless steel coupons. The biofilm removal activities of these organic acids were compared with chlorine on both surfaces. The results showed that citric acid treatments were as powerful as chlorine treatments for prevention and removal of biofilms. The antibiofilm effects of malic acid treatments were higher than gallic acid and less than citric acid treatment. When the antibiofilm effects of these acids and chlorine on the two surfaces were compared, the prevention and removal of biofilms were measured higher on microtitration plates than those on stainless steel coupons. Higher reductions were obtained by increasing concentrations of sanitizers on 24-hour biofilm with 20-minute sanitizer treatments for removal of biofilms.

  15. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  16. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  17. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Scientific Publications, 1978:388. 27. Pashley DH, Michelich V, Kehl T. Dentin permeability: effects of smear layer removal. J Pros Dent 1981;46:531-37. 23...to fluid flow in human dentine in vitro. Arch Oral Biol 1978;23: 807-10. 30. Reeder OW, Walton RD, Livingston MJ, Pashley DH. Dentin permeability...determinants of hydraulic conductance . J Dent Res 1982;57:187-93. 31. Dippel H, Hoppenbrouwers P, Borgareven J. Influence of the smear layer and

  18. Analysis of Sporulation Mutants II. Mutants Blocked in the Citric Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fortnagel, Peter; Freese, Ernst

    1968-01-01

    Sporulation mutants that were unable to incorporate uracil during the developmental period recovered this capacity with the addition of ribose and in most cases with the addition of glutamate. Of the mutants that responded to both ribose and glumate, all but three also responded to citrate, and all but five responded to acetate. One of the exceptional strains was deficient in aconitase and another one in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase; both required glutamate for growth. For the mutants which did not respond to glutamate, the products made from 14C-glutamate were determined by thin-layer chromatography. Significant differences were found which enabled the identification of mutant blocks. The deficiency of the corresponding enzyme activity was verified. Several mutants were deficient in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and one lacked succinic dehydrogenase. These mutants could still grow on glucose as sole carbon source, but not on glutamate. The intact Krebs cycle is therefore not required for vegetative growth of aerobic Bacillis subtilis, but it is indispensable for sporulation. Images PMID:4967197

  19. Role of calcium signaling in the activation of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase and citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Traaseth, Nathaniel; Elfering, Sarah; Solien, Joseph; Haynes, Virginia; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2004-07-23

    An apparent discrepancy arises about the role of calcium on the rates of oxygen consumption by mitochondria: mitochondrial calcium increases the rate of oxygen consumption because of the activation of calcium-activated dehydrogenases, and by activating mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), decreases the rates of oxygen consumption because nitric oxide is a competitive inhibitor of cytochrome oxidase. To this end, the rates of oxygen consumption and nitric oxide production were followed in isolated rat liver mitochondria in the presence of either L-Arg (to sustain a mtNOS activity) or N(G)-monomethyl-L-Arg (NMMA, a competitive inhibitor of mtNOS) under State 3 conditions. In the presence of NMMA, the rates of State 3 oxygen consumption exhibited a K(0.5) of 0.16 microM intramitochondrial free calcium, agreeing with those required for the activation of the Krebs cycle. By plotting the difference between the rates of oxygen consumption in State 3 with L-Arg and with NMMA at various calcium concentrations, a K(0.5) of 1.2 microM intramitochondrial free calcium was obtained, similar to the K(0.5) (0.9 microM) of the dependence of the rate of nitric oxide production on calcium concentrations. The activation of dehydrogenases, followed by the activation of mtNOS, would lead to the modulation of the Krebs cycle activity by the modulation of nitric oxide on the respiratory rates. This would ensue in changes in the NADH/NAD and ATP/ADP ratios, which would influence the rate of the cycle and the oxygen diffusion.

  20. A new method for assembling metabolic networks, with application to the Krebs citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Mittenthal, J E; Clarke, B; Waddell, T G; Fawcett, G

    2001-02-01

    To understand why a molecular network has a particular connectivity one can generate an ensemble of alternative networks, all of which meet the same performance criteria as the real network. We have generated alternatives to the Krebs cycle, allowing group transfers and B(12)-mediated shifts that were excluded in previous work. Our algorithm does not use a reaction list, but determines the reactants and products in generic reactions. It generates networks in order of increasing number of reaction steps. We find that alternatives to the Krebs cycle are very likely to be cycles. Many of the alternatives produce toxic or unstable compounds and use group transfer reactions, which have unfavorable consequences. Although alternatives are better than the Krebs cycle in some respects, the Krebs cycle has the most favorable combination of traits.

  1. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction.

  2. Design of antimicrobial peptides conjugated biodegradable citric acid derived hydrogels for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiwei; Aphale, Nikhil V; Kadapure, Tejaswi D; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Orr, Sara; Gyawali, Dipendra; Qian, Guoying; Nguyen, Kytai T; Yang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is usually facilitated by the use of a wound dressing that can be easily applied to cover the wound bed, maintain moisture, and avoid bacterial infection. In order to meet all of these requirements, we developed an in situ forming biodegradable hydrogel (iFBH) system composed of a newly developed combination of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol) maleate citrate (PEGMC) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The in situ forming hydrogel systems are able to conform to the wound shape in order to cover the wound completely and prevent bacterial invasion. A 2(k) factorial analysis was performed to examine the effects of polymer composition on specific properties, including the curing time, Young's modulus, swelling ratio, and degradation rate. An optimized iFBH formulation was achieved from the systematic factorial analysis. Further, in vitro biocompatibility studies using adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) confirmed that the hydrogels and degradation products are not cytotoxic. The iFBH wound dressing was conjugated and functionalized with antimicrobial peptides as well. Evaluation against bacteria both in vitro and in vivo in rats demonstrated that the peptide-incorporated iFBH wound dressing offered excellent bacteria inhibition and promoted wound healing. These studies indicated that our in situ forming antimicrobial biodegradable hydrogel system is a promising candidate for wound treatment.

  3. UV irradiation enhances the bonding strength between citric acid-crosslinked gelatin and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of ultraviolet ray (UV) irradiation on the bonding strength between low carbon stainless steel 316 (SUS316L) and trisuccinimidyl citrate (TSC)-crosslinked alkali-treated gelatin (AlGelatin-TSC) was investigated. The UV irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of SUS316L. The bonding strength between AlGelatin-TSC and SUS316L before UV irradiation was 0.345±0.007 MPa, and upon UV irradiation it increased to 0.750±0.069 MPa. In order to explain this enhanced bonding strength, the surface of SUS316L was examined using its water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the N 1s peaks derived from the TSC succinimidyl group were assigned to the surface of SUS316L after the immobilization of the TSC. This indicates that ester bond formation between the TSC active esters and the SUS316L hydroxyl groups contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Therefore, UV irradiation and subsequent TSC immobilization is a simple way to functionalize biometal surfaces with various structures. This has practical applications for medical devices such as drug-eluting stents, dental implants, and metallic artificial bone.

  4. Application of chitosan-citric acid nanoparticles for removal of chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mahdiye; Younesi, Habibollah; Hajati, Shaaker; Borghei, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, CS-CA nanoparticle was prepared for forming a new amide linkage, by grafting the amino groups of CS in the presence of carboxylic groups of CA that acts as cross-linking agent. The as-prepared CS-CA nanoparticle samples were characterized by use of dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques, which showed that the cross-linking agent preserved during the chemical modifications. The adsorption capacity of the CS-CA nanoparticles for the removal of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution was studied. The adsorption equilibrium data taken at the optimized condition, i.e., 25 °C and pH of 3, were analyzed with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models. The kinetics of Cr (VI) adsorption on CS-CA nanoparticles obtained at different initial concentrations were also analyzed using the pseudo-second-order model.

  5. Biochemical characteristics and gelling capacity of pectin from yellow passion fruit rind as affected by acid extractant nature.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Beda M

    2009-02-25

    The effects of acid extractant type on the yield and characteristics of pectin from yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis flavicarpa) rind was investigated by using citric, nitric, or sulfuric acids at different concentrations (10 mM and 30 mM) and pH (1.8 and 2.5). The results showed that not only concentration, but also acid type influenced the extracted pectin yields (3-14%, w/w). The yield of pectin extracted with citric acid was the lowest. Acid type and concentration affected the molecular characteristics of pectin, notably, the degree of esterification (29-73), galacturonic acid to rhamnose ratio (14-35), weight average-molecular weight (100-250 kDa), gel strength (127-179), and setting time (841-1236 s). Citric acid-extracted pectin had a higher degree of esterification and weight average-molecular weight and better gelling properties. At 30 mM concentration, nitric and sulfuric acids solubilize pectins having a degree of esterification <50, contrary to citric acid. The results indicate that the latter acid exerts the least deesterifying action on pectin solubilization from the cell wall material. Citric acid-extracted pectin was closer to lemon pectin of similar degree of esterification in terms of gelling properties.

  6. Polyol and Amino Acid-Based Biosurfactants, Builders, and Hydrogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews different detergent materials which have been synthesized from natural agricultural commodities. Background information, which gives reasons why the use of biobased materials may be advantageous, is presented. Detergent builders from L-aspartic acid, citric acid and D-sorbitol...

  7. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  8. Mechanisms of Radionuclide-Hyroxycarboxylic Acid Interactions for Decontamination of Metallic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Francis; C.J. Dodge; J.B. Gillow; G.P. Halada; C.R. Clayton

    2002-04-24

    Is this EMSP program we investigated the key fundamental issues involved in the use of simple and safe methods for the removal of radioactive contamination from equipment and facilities using hydroxycarboxylic acids. Specifically, we investigate (i) the association of uranium with various iron oxides commonly formed on corroding plain carbon steel surfaces, (ii) the association of uranium with corroding metal coupons under a variety of conditions, and (iii) the decontamination of the uranium contaminated metal coupons by citric acid or citric acid formulations containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Emerging biotechnologies for production of itaconic acid and its applications as a platform chemical

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, itaconic acid (IA), an unsaturated C5-dicarboxylic acid, has attracted much attention as a biobased building block chemical. It is produced industrially (> 80 g L**-1) from glucose by fermentation with Aspergillus terreus. The titer is low compared with citric acid production (> 200 g L**-...

  10. Synergistic effect of thymol and carvacrol combined with chelators and organic acids against Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Ji, Baoping; Zhang, Hong; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Zhiwei; Li, Jingjing; Li, Jihai; Ren, Yali; Yan, Wenjie

    2007-07-01

    To identify synergistic combinations of different food additives, the antimicrobial effects of thymol and carvacrol against Salmonella Typhimurium were assessed alone and in combination with various other preservatives including EDTA, acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid. Overall, growth of Salmonella Typhimurium was significantly inhibited in Mueller-Hinton broth containing thymol, carvacrol, EDTA, acetic acid, lactic acid, or citric acid at concentrations of 400 mg/liter, 400 microl/liter, 300 mg/liter, 0.2% (vol/vol), 0.2% (vol/vol), and 0.2% (wt/vol), respectively. The combination of different antimicrobials such as thymol or carvacrol with EDTA, thymol or carvacrol with acetic acid, and thymol or carvacrol with citric acid all resulted in significantly reduced populations of Salmonella Typhimurium. In samples treated with combinations, these antimicrobials had synergistic effects compared with samples treated with thymol, carvacrol, EDTA, acetic acid, or citric acid alone. However, the combined use of lactic acid with thymol or carvacrol did not produce a synergistic effect against Salmonella Typhimurium. Thus, some chelators or organic acids can be used as food preservatives in combination with thymol and carvacrol to reduce the concentrations needed to produce an adequate antimicrobial effect.

  11. Effects of three kinds of organic acids on phosphorus recovery by magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) crystallization from synthetic swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghui; Dai, Yunrong; Hu, Qiong; Yu, Xiaohua; Qian, Feng

    2014-04-01

    P recovery from swine wastewater has become a great concern as a result of the high demand for P resources and its potential eutrophication effects on water ecosystems. The method of magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) crystallization was used to recover P from simulated swine wastewater, and the effects of three organic acids (citric acid, succinic acid and acetic acid) on P removal efficiency and rate at different pH values were investigated. The results indicated that the P removal efficiency was worst affected by citric acid in the optimal pH range of 9.0-10.5, followed by succinic acid and acetic acid, and the influencing extent of organic acids decreased with the increasing pH value. Due to the complexation between organic acid and Mg(2+)/NH4(+), all of three organic acids could inhibit the P removal rate at the beginning of the reaction, which showed positive correlation between the inhibition effects and the concentration of organic acids. The high concentration of citric acid could completely suppress the MAP crystallization reaction. Moreover, citric acid and succinic acid brought obvious effects on the morphology of the crystallized products. The experimental results also demonstrated that MAP crystals could be obtained in the presence of different kinds and concentrations of organic acids.

  12. Removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil by electrodialytic remediation enhanced with organic acids.

    PubMed

    Merdoud, Ouarda; Cameselle, Claudio; Boulakradeche, Mohamed Oualid; Akretche, Djamal Eddine

    2016-11-09

    The soil from an industrial area in Algeria was contaminated with Cr (8370 mg kg(-1)), Ni (1135 mg kg(-1)) and zinc (1200 mg kg(-1)). The electrodialytic remediation of this soil was studied using citric acid and EDTA as facilitating agents. 0.1 M citric acid or EDTA was added directly to the soil before it was introduced in an electrodialytic cell in an attempt to enhance the heavy metal solubility in the interstitial fluid. The more acidic pH in the soil when citric acid was used as the facilitating agent was not enough to mobilize and remove the metals from the soil. Only 7.2% of Ni and 6.7% of Zn were removed from the soil in the test with citric acid. The best results were found with EDTA, which was able to solubilize and complex Zn and Ni forming negatively charged complexes that were transported and accumulated in the anolyte. Complete removal was observed for Ni and Zn in the electrodialytic treatment with EDTA. Minor amounts of Cr were removed with both EDTA and citric acid.

  13. Dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunoglu, Sait; Kaya, Muammer

    2015-11-01

    The dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method was investigated. The effects of the type of organic acid, acid concentration, leaching time, and leaching temperature on the lateritic nickel ore were examined. Organic acids were used individually prior to sequential leaching. Citric acid was more effective than the other two acids for the selective leaching of nickel and cobalt. An increase in the citric acid concentration negligibly affected the dissolution of the metals, whereas temperature exhibited a strong beneficial effect. Oxalic acid was determined to be the most appropriate organic acid for the second leaching step. After 8 h (4 h + 4 h) of leaching with organic acids (0.5 M citric + 0.5 M oxalic) in sequence at 90°C, 89.63% Ni, 82.89% Co, and 69.63% Fe were leached from the lateritic nickel ore. A sequential citric + oxalic acid leaching method could represent a viable alternative for the dissolution of metals from lateritic nickel ore.

  14. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on phosphorus adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Wang, Ziyuan; Lin, Lu; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs; citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid) on phosphorus (P) adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals (FARs) were studied. Both batch and column experiments indicated that the effects of LMWOAs on P adsorption were closely related to adsorption time. Initially, all acids presented inhibitory function on P adsorption. The inhibition became weaker with time, eventually promoting P adsorption for citric acid and tartaric acid. In the column experiment with a 61-day duration, high P adsorption rates (>55%) were observed for the test groups containing citric acid and tartaric acid. Interestingly, higher pH likely enhanced P adsorption with the effects of LMWOAs and a distinct relationship between LMWOAs' effects on P adsorption and their concentrations was not observed. Moreover, fractionation of the adsorbed P from the FARs demonstrated that oxalic acid reduced P adsorption capacity, while citric acid and tartaric acid increased. Based on the forms of Fe and Al existing in the FARs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, LMWOAs can promote P adsorption through activating crystalline Fe/Al and preventing crystallization of amorphous Fe/Al to increase P adsorption sites, and can also inhibit P adsorption by competition with adsorption sites.

  15. Deletion of glucose oxidase changes the pattern of organic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius has potential as a cell factory for the production of different organic acids. At pH 5.5, A.carbonarius accumulates high amounts of gluconic acid when it grows on glucose based medium whereas at low pH, it produces citric acid. The conversion of glucose to gluconic acid is carried out by secretion of the enzyme, glucose oxidase. In this work, the gene encoding glucose oxidase was identified and deleted from A. carbonarius with the aim of changing the carbon flux towards other organic acids. The effect of genetic engineering was examined by testing glucose oxidase deficient (Δgox) mutants for the production of different organic acids in a defined production medium. The results obtained showed that the gluconic acid accumulation was completely inhibited and increased amounts of citric acid, oxalic acid and malic acid were observed in the Δgox mutants. PMID:25401063

  16. Effects of surfactants on low-molecular-weight organic acids to wash soil zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Yao, Ping; Li, Ting; Wang, Guiyin; Gong, Guoshu; Li, Yun; Deng, Ouping

    2016-03-01

    Soil washing is an effective approach to the removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil. In this study, the effects of the surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, Triton X-100, and non-ionic polyacrylamide (NPAM) on oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid used to remove zinc from contaminated soils were investigated. The Zn removal efficiencies of all washing solutions showed a logarithmic increase with acid concentrations from 0.5 to 10.0 g/L, while they decreased as pH increased from 4 to 9. Increasing the reaction time enhanced the effects of surfactants on Zn removal efficiencies by the acids during washing and significantly (P < 0.05) improved the removal under some mixed cases. Oxalic acid suffered antagonistic effects from the three surfactants and seriously damaged soil nutrients during the removal of soil Zn. Notably, the three surfactants caused synergistic effects on tartaric and citric acid during washing, with NPAM leading to an increase in Zn removal by 5.0 g/L citric acid of 10.60 % (P < 0.05) within 2 h. NPAM also alleviated the loss of cation exchange capacity of washed soils and obviously improved soil nitrogen concentrations. Overall, combining citric acid with NPAM offers a promising approach to the removal of zinc from contaminated soil.

  17. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  18. [Pharmacological significance of alpha lipoic acid in up to date treatment of diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Becić, Fahir; Kapić, Elvedina; Rakanović-Todić, Maida

    2008-01-01

    Alpha lipoic acid is important intramolecular redox system. It is coenzyme of piruvate dehydrogenase and ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. Alpha lipoic acid has enzymatic and cytoprotective effect. It has key role in citric acid cycle, as a coenzyme. Therapeutic efficacy of alpha lipoic acid in diabetic neuropathy is based on reaction with free radicals and lipophylic antioxydans properties. Clinical studies results showed efficacy and safety of alpha liponic acid application in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Effects of alpha-hydroxy acids on the human skin of Japanese subjects: the rationale for chemical peeling.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Yonei, Nozomi; Kishioka, Akiko; Ohtani, Toshio; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2006-01-01

    Alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA) agents, such as glycolic acid and lactic acid, have been used as therapeutic agents for more than a quarter of a century. Recently, they have been used as agents to rejuvenate photo-aged skin. It is believed that these AHA agents induce the epidermis to remodel and accelerate desquamation, thus exerting their therapeutic effects. In this study, we investigated the histological differences in skin treated with glycolic, lactic, citric and acetic acids once daily for 6 weeks. The melanin pigments in the basal layer were less prominent in the glycolic and lactic acid-treated skin than in the citric and acetic acid-treated skin. The melanin deposits in the horny layers were equal for all AHA. However, the melanin deposits in the squamous layers were less prominent in the glycolic and lactic acid-treated skins than in the citric and acetic acid-treated skins; this was analogous to observations of the basal layers. Collagen I and procollagen I were increased after treatment with glycolic, lactic and citric acid in the upper dermis, but were not increased with acetic acid treatment. However, the staining of the epidermis and dermis for matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) after treatment was not significantly different among the agents. Our data suggest that longer treatment intervals with glycolic and lactic acid can cause improvements in both the epidermal and dermal components and support the usefulness of AHA for rejuvenating photo-damaged skin.

  20. Organic acids make Escherichia coli more resistant to pulsed electric fields at acid pH.

    PubMed

    Somolinos, M; García, D; Mañas, P; Condón, S; Pagán, R

    2010-01-01

    Stationary growth phase cells of Escherichiacoli were more pulsed electric fields (PEF) resistant in citrate-phosphate McIlvaine buffer at pH 4.0 than at pH 7.0. The greater PEF resistance was also confirmed in fruit juices of similar acid pH. In this work we studied whether the higher PEF resistance of E. coli at acid pH was due to the low pH itself or to the interaction of the components of the treatment medium with the cells. The protective effect on E. coli cells was due to the presence of organic acids such as citric, acetic, lactic or malic at pH 4.0. The protective effect of citric acid at pH 4.0 depended on its concentration. A linear relationship was observed between the Log(10) of the citric acid concentration and the degree of inactivation. Organic acids contained in laboratory treatment media (citrate-phosphate buffer) or in fruit juices did not sensitize E. coli cells to PEF but, on the contrary, they induced a protective effect that made E. coli cells more resistant at pH 4.0 than at neutral pH. This work could be useful for improving food preservation by PEF technology and it contributes to the knowledge of the mechanism of microbial inactivation by PEF.

  1. Polymetallic citric complexes as precursors for spray-pyrolysis deposition of thin ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanova, M.; Koleva, I.; Todorovska, R.; Zaharieva, J.; Кostadinov, M.; Todorovsky, D.

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of ferrites of the type M IIFe 2O 4 (M = Cu, Mg, Zn) are prepared by spray-pyrolysis using ethylene glycol solutions of mixed-metal citric complexes of the respective metals at substrate temperature between 350 °C and 450 °C and post-deposition annealing at 480-750 °C in air. Phase composition, crystal structure, morphology and adhesion of the obtained films (40-400 nm in thickness) are studied by X-ray diffraction, SEM, energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and AFM. Single phase dense uniform films with grains from 30-100 nm (M = Cu, Mg) to 0.15-2 μm (M = Zn) are obtained.

  2. Bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids towards bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids were determined using the agar diffusion assay. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid (FA) was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric aci...

  3. Analysis of Organic Acids, Deacetyl Asperulosidic Acid and Polyphenolic Compounds as a Potential Tool for Characterization of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Products.

    PubMed

    Bittová, Miroslava; Hladůkova, Dita; Roblová, Vendula; Krácmar, Stanislav; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, deacetyl asperulosidic acid (DAA) and polyphenolic compounds in various noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) products (4 juices, 4 dry fruit powders and 2 capsules with dry fruit powder) were analyzed. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a variable wavelength detector (VWD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF MS) was applied for simultaneous analysis of organic acids (malic, lactic, citric and succinic acid) and DAA. An RP-HPLC method with diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the analysis of polyphenolic compound content (rutin, catechin, quercitrin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid). The developed methods can contribute to better characterization of available noni products that is required from the consumers. In our study, we discovered significant dissimilarities in the content of DAA, citric acid and several phenolic compounds in some samples.

  4. The effect of high moisture heat-acid treatment on the structure and digestion property of normal maize starch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Liang, Rong; Antoniou, John; Liu, Fei; Shoemaker, Charles F; Li, Yue; Zhong, Fang

    2014-09-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of thermal-acid treatment on the formation of resistant starch (RS). The maximum RS content in citric acid-heat treated starches (CAHT) reached 36.55%, which was 7 times higher of that in native starch. According to HPSEC-MALLS-RI analysis, amylopectin was more susceptible to hydrolysis than amylose during citric acid-heat treatment (CAH). X-ray measurement revealed that even though the starch crystalline pattern was changed from A-type to a more resistant B-type after CAH, the fraction of crystalline region decreased from 21.16% to 8.37%. The hydroxyls on the starch chains were substituted by the citric acid anhydrides during CAH according to FT-IR analysis, which led to the formation of ester bond cross-linking structures in starch granules, and it could be the main contribution to the increase of RS content in CAHT samples.

  5. The effect of several organic acids on phytate phosphorus hydrolysis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Liem, A; Pesti, G M; Edwards, H M

    2008-04-01

    Supplementation of some organic acids to a P-deficient diet has been shown to improve phytate P utilization. Two experiments were conducted from 0 to 16 d in battery brooders to determine the effect of various organic acids supplementation on phytate P utilization. In both experiments, birds were fed P-deficient corn and soybean meal-based diets. In experiment 1, citric acid, malic acid, fumaric acid, and EDTA were supplemented. Experiment 2 had a 2 x 2 factorial design with 2 sources of Met, 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) and dl-Met, with or without 500 U/kg of phytase. In experiment 1, the addition of citric, malic, and fumaric acids increased percentage of bone ash, but only the effect of citric acid was significant. The addition of citric and malic acids also significantly increased the retention of P and phytate P (P<0.05). In experiment 2, the addition of phytase to the diet significantly increased 16-d BW gain, feed intake, percentage of bone ash, milligrams of bone ash, phytate P disappearance, and decreased the incidence of P-deficiency rickets. Methionine source did not affect 16-d BW gain, feed intake, feed efficiency, milligrams of bone ash, or P rickets incidence. However, the birds fed HMB had a higher percentage of bone ash and phytate P disappearance compared with the groups fed dl-Met only when phytase was added to the diets. The additions of citric acid and HMB improved phytate P utilization. However, the reason why some organic acids are effective whereas others are not is not apparent.

  6. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  7. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  8. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing.

  9. Effect of phenolic acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by lactic acid bacteria from wine.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco M; Figueiredo, Ana R; Hogg, Tim A; Couto, José A

    2009-06-01

    The influence of phenolic (p-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic and protocatechuic) acids on glucose and organic acid metabolism by two strains of wine lactic acid bacteria (Oenococcus oeni VF and Lactobacillus hilgardii 5) was investigated. Cultures were grown in modified MRS medium supplemented with different phenolic acids. Cellular growth was monitored and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC-RI. Despite the strong inhibitory effect of most tested phenolic acids on the growth of O. oeni VF, the malolactic activity of this strain was not considerably affected by these compounds. While less affected in its growth, the capacity of L. hilgardii 5 to degrade malic acid was clearly diminished. Except for gallic acid, the addition of phenolic acids delayed the metabolism of glucose and citric acid in both strains tested. It was also found that the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric, caffeic and ferulic) increased the yield of lactic and acetic acid production from glucose by O. oeni VF and not by L. hilgardii 5. The results show that important oenological characteristics of wine lactic acid bacteria, such as the malolactic activity and the production of volatile organic acids, may be differently affected by the presence of phenolic acids, depending on the bacterial species or strain.

  10. Identification of Scirpus triqueter root exudates and the effects of organic acids on desorption and bioavailability of pyrene and lead in co-contaminated wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yunyun; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xinying; Chen, Xiao; Tao, Kaiyun; Chen, Xueping; Liang, Xia; He, Chiquan

    2015-11-01

    Root exudates (REs) of Scirpus triqueter were extracted from the rhizosphere soil in this study. The components in the REs were identified by GC-MS. Many organic acids, such as hexadecanoic acid, pentadecanoic acid, vanillic acid, octadecanoic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, and so on, were found. Batch simulated experiments were conducted to evaluate the impacts of different organic acids, such as citric acid, artificial root exudates (ARE), succinic acid, and glutaric acid in REs of S. triqueter on desorption of pyrene (PYR) and lead (Pb) in co-contaminated wetland soils. The desorption amount of PYR and Pb increased with the rise in concentrations of organic acids in the range of 0-50 g·L(-1), within shaking time of 2-24 h. The desorption effects of PYR and Pb in soils with various organic acids treatments decreased in the