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Sample records for a-570-937 citric acid

  1. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Administrative Review, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). On January 25, 2011, the Department published the extension... Time Limit for the Preliminary Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 4288... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's...

  2. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  3. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  4. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    PubMed Central

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid. PMID:24031566

  5. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  11. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  12. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  13. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made...

  15. BNL Citric Acid Technology: Pilot Scale Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    FRANCIS, A J; DODGE,; J, C; GILLOW, J B; FORRESTER, K E

    1999-09-24

    The objective of this project is to remove toxic metals such as lead and cadmium from incinerator ash using the Citric Acid Process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this process toxic metals in bottom ash from the incineration of municipal solid waste were first extracted with citric acid followed by biodegradation of the citric acid-metal extract by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens for metals recovery. The ash contained the following metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti, and Zn. Optimization of the Citric Acid Process parameters which included citric acid molarity, contact time, the impact of mixing aggressiveness during extraction and pretreatment showed lead and cadmium removal from incinerator ash of >90%. Seeding the treated ash with P. fluorescens resulted in the removal of residual citric acid and biostabilization of any leachable lead, thus allowing it to pass EPA?s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Biodegradation of the citric acid extract removed >99% of the lead from the extract as well as other metals such as Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ti, and Zn. Speciation of the bioprecipitated lead by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source showed that the lead is predominantly associated with the phosphate and carboxyl functional groups in a stable form. Citric acid was completely recovered (>99%) from the extract by sulfide precipitation technique and the extraction efficiency of recovered citric acid is similar to that of the fresh citric acid. Recycling of the citric acid should result in considerable savings in the overall treatment cost. We have shown the potential application of this technology to remove and recover the metal contaminants from incinerator ash as well as from other heavy metal bearing wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust from steel industry) or soils. Information developed from this project is being applied to demonstrate the remediation of

  16. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  17. Citraturic response to oral citric acid load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Alpern, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible that some orally administered citrate may appear in urine by escaping oxidation in vivo. To determine whether this mechanism contributes to the citraturic response to potassium citrate, we measured serum and urinary citrate for 4 hours after a single oral load of citric acid (40 mEq.) in 6 normal subjects. Since citric acid does not alter acid-base balance, the effect of absorbed citrate could be isolated from that of alkali load. Serum citrate concentration increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 30 minutes after a single oral dose of citric acid and remained significantly elevated for 3 hours after citric acid load. Commensurate with this change, urinary citrate excretion peaked at 2 hours and gradually decreased during the next 2 hours after citric acid load. In contrast, serum and urinary citrate remained unaltered following the control load (no drug). Differences of the citratemic and citraturic effects between phases were significant (p less than 0.05) at 2 and 3 hours. Urinary pH, carbon dioxide pressure, bicarbonate, total carbon dioxide and ammonium did not change at any time after citric acid load, and did not differ between the 2 phases. No significant difference was noted in serum electrolytes, arterialized venous pH and carbon dioxide pressure at any time after citric acid load and between the 2 phases. Thus, the citraturic and citratemic effects of oral citric acid are largely accountable by provision of absorbed citrate, which has escaped in vivo degradation.

  18. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National.... Citric acid may be produced by recovery from sources such as lemon or pineapple juice; by...

  20. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, ... oxide and anhydrous citric acid combine when the powder is mixed with water to form a medication ...

  1. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls. PMID:27474543

  2. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  3. Conductance Studies on Aqueous Citric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelblat, Alexander; Barthel, Josef

    1991-02-01

    Conductance measurements of citric acid and neutral citrates (tri-lithium citrate, tri-sodium citrate and tri-potassium citrate) were performed in water at 278.15 to 308.15 K. The equilibrium constants for the primary and secondary steps of dissociation, Kx and K2, and the limiting conductances, λ0(H2Cit-), λ°(1/2 HCit2-), and λ0(1/3 Cit3-) are reported as a function of temperature. They are obtained by application of the Quint and Viallard conductance equation. The enthalpies of dissociation are estimated.

  4. Assessment of antitussive effects by citric acid threshold.

    PubMed

    Rees, P J; Clark, T J

    1983-01-01

    The cough threshold to citric acid inhalation was measured in eight subjects by single inhalations of increasing concentrations of citric acid until a cough was consistently produced. The cough threshold was measured before and after 60 mg glaucine, 60 mg codeine and matched placebo on three separate days a week apart. Base-line cough threshold in each subject was consistent from week to week. Codeine increased the threshold by more than one citric acid concentration in three subjects. Placebo and glaucine did not produce a threshold change of more than one citric acid concentration. We conclude that the citric acid threshold is a simple measure of antitussive activity. No such activity was found with glaucine. PMID:6344901

  5. Submerged citric acid fermentation on orange peel autohydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Beatriz; Torrado, Ana; Torre, Paolo; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2008-04-01

    The citrus-processing industry generates in the Mediterranean area huge amounts of orange peel as a byproduct from the industrial extraction of citrus juices. To reduce its environmental impact as well as to provide an extra profit, this residue was investigated in this study as an alternative substrate for the fermentative production of citric acid. Orange peel contained 16.9% soluble sugars, 9.21% cellulose, 10.5% hemicellulose, and 42.5% pectin as the most important components. To get solutions rich in soluble and starchy sugars to be used as a carbon source for citric acid fermentation, this raw material was submitted to autohydrolysis, a process that does not make use of any acidic catalyst. Liquors obtained by this process under optimum conditions (temperature of 130 degrees C and a liquid/solid ratio of 8.0 g/g) contained 38.2 g/L free sugars (8.3 g/L sucrose, 13.7 g/L glucose, and 16.2 g/L fructose) and significant amounts of metals, particularly Mg, Ca, Zn, and K. Without additional nutrients, these liquors were employed for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger CECT 2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599). Addition of calcium carbonate enhanced citric acid production because it prevented progressive acidification of the medium. Moreover, the influence of methanol addition on citric acid formation was investigated. Under the best conditions (40 mL of methanol/kg of medium), an effective conversion of sugars into citric acid was ensured (maximum citric acid concentration of 9.2 g/L, volumetric productivity of 0.128 g/(L.h), and yield of product on consumed sugars of 0.53 g/g), hence demonstrating the potential of orange peel wastes as an alternative raw material for citric acid fermentation. PMID:18321055

  6. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) before a colonoscopy (examination of the inside of the colon to check ...

  7. Psychophysical assessments of sourness in citric acid-ethanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Guirao, Miguelina; Greco Driano, Ezequiel J; Evin, Diego; Calviño, Amalia

    2013-12-01

    The effect of ethanol in modulating the intensity and duration of the perceived sourness induced by citric acid was studied. Magnitude Estimation-Converging Limits method was applied to rate the sourness of seven solutions (3-70 mM) of citric acid in aqueous solution presented alone and mixed with 8% V/V or 15% V/V ethanol. Dynamic sourness ratings of 5, 15, and 45 mM citric acid alone and mixed with the same two ethanol levels were assessed by the Time Intensity Method (TI). Results were consistent with both methods. Sourness changed with citric acid concentration and ethanol levels. From TI measurements, a similar interactive pattern was obtained for parameters as duration, area under the curve, peak and average intensity. PMID:24665803

  8. Biothermoplastics from hydrolyzed and citric acid crosslinked chicken feathers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Narendra; Chen, Lihong; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach of developing thermoplastic films from feathers by alkaline hydrolysis and crosslinking with citric acid. Unlike previous approaches that used toxic chemicals, complicated and/or expensive methods to develop films, in this research, feathers were hydrolyzed using various concentrations of alkali and the hydrolyzed feathers were compression molded into films using glycerol as plasticizer and crosslinked with citric acid to improve water stability. Alkali hydrolyzed feathers could be compression molded into films with tensile strength of 5.9 MPa and elongation of 31.7% but had poor wet strength. Feather films crosslinked with citric acid had tensile strength of 1.9 MPa and elongation of 24.6% after being in 90% humidity at 21 °C for 24 hours. Alkaline hydrolysis and citric acid crosslinking provides an opportunity to develop inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastics from the inexpensive, renewable and sustainable poultry feathers. PMID:23827561

  9. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Dabbs, Daniel M.; Ramachandran, Usha; Lu, Sang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2005-12-06

    Citric acid has been shown to act as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous suspensions of aluminum-containing particles. Solutions of aluminum chloride, with and without citric acid added, were titrated with NaO(aq). The presence and size of particles were determined using quasi-elastic light scattering. In solutions that contained no citric acid, particles formed instantaneously when NaOH(aq) was added but these were observed to rapidly diminish in size, disappearing at OH/Al ratios below 2.5 mol/mol. When the OH/Al ratio was raised beyond 2.5 by addingmoreNaOH(aq), suspensions of colloidally stable particles formed. Large polycations containing 13 aluminum atoms were detected by 27Al solution NMR in citric-acid-free solutions with OH/Al ratios slightly lower than 2.5. In comparison, adding citric acid to solutions of aluminum chloride inhibited the formation of large aluminum-containing polycations. The absence of the polycations prevents or retards the subsequent formation of particles, indicating that the polycations, when present, act as seeds to the formation of new particles. Particles did not form in solutions with a citric acid/aluminum ratio of 0.8 until sufficient NaOH(aq) was added to raise the OH/Al ratio to 3.29. By comparison, lower amounts of citric acid did not prevent particles from forming but did retard the rate of growth.

  10. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173... Solvent extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid from conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid...

  11. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173... Solvent extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid from conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid...

  12. Citric acid-assisted phytoextraction of lead: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eriberto Vagner; Nascimento, Clístenes Williams; Souza, Adailson; Silva, Fernando Bruno

    2013-06-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals has become a serious environmental problem that requires affordable strategies of remediation. This study was carried out to assess the performance of maize and vetiver in the phytoextraction of Pb from a soil contaminated by battery recycling activities. The species were planted with different spacings between rows (0.80, 0.65 and 0.50m). Citric acid (40mmolkg(-1)) was applied on each experimental plot on the 61st d of cultivation in order to solubilize the Pb and assist the phytoextraction. The results showed that the chelating agent promoted a 14-fold increase in the Pb concentration in maize shoots as compared to the control, which accumulated only 111mgkg(-1) of the metal. The citric acid induced a Pb concentration in vetiver shoots that was 7.2-6.7-fold higher than the control at both the 0.65 and 0.50m plant spacing, respectively. The use of citric acid increased substantially the uptake and translocation of Pb to the shoots, regardless of plant spacing. Citric acid was efficient in solubilizing Pb from the soil and inducing its uptake by both species. Environmentally-friendly and cost effective, commercial citric acid is recommended for assisting Pb-phytoextraction in the studied area. Due to the low natural solubility of Pb and a time frame needed of longer than 150yr to accomplish the clean-up, phytoextraction with no chelate assistance is not recommended for the area. PMID:23490185

  13. Influence of citric acid on the hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Moeschner, Goeril Lothenbach, Barbara; Figi, Renato; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2009-04-15

    Citric acid can be used to retard the hydration of cement. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of citric acid on the composition of solid and liquid phases during cement hydration. Analyses of the solid phases showed that dissolution of alite and aluminate slowed down while analyses of the pore solution showed that citric acid was removed almost completely from the pore solution within the first hours of hydration. The complexation of the ions by citrate was weak, which could also be confirmed by thermodynamic calculations. Only 2% of the dissolved Ca and 0.001% of the dissolved K formed complexes with citrate during the first hours. Thus, citric acid retards cement hydration not by complex formation, but by slowing down the dissolution of the clinker grains. Thermodynamic calculations did not indicate precipitation of a crystalline citrate species. Thus, it is suggested that citrate sorbed onto the clinker surface and formed a protective layer around the clinker grains retarding their dissolution.

  14. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Solvent extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid...

  15. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid...

  16. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water. PMID:25898079

  17. Hydrophobic starch nanocrystals preparations through crosslinking modification using citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiang; Tong, Jin; Su, Xingguang; Ren, Lili

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradable starch nanocrystals prepared by an acid treatment process were modified through crosslinking modification using citric acid as reactant by a dry reaction method. The occurrence of crosslinking modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and swelling degree. X-ray diffraction, wettability tests and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified starch nanocrystals. It was found that the crosslinked starch nanocrystals displayed a higher affinity for low polar solvents such as dichloromethane. The surface of starch nanocrystals became more roughness after crosslinking modification with citric acid and the size decreased as revealed by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline structure of starch nanocrystals was basically not changed after the crosslinking modification with shorter heating time. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanocrystals are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites. PMID:27365120

  18. 21. Interior view of citric acid air pollution control room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Interior view of citric acid air pollution control room (also known as scrubber room) in Components Test Laboratory (T-27), looking southeast. Photograph shows upgraded instrumentation, piping, tanks, and technological modifications installed in 1997-99 to accommodate component testing requirements for the Atlas V missile. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. The biochemistry of citric acid accumulation by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, L; Sándor, E; Fekete, E; Szentirmai, A

    2001-01-01

    Fungi, in particular Aspergilli, are well known for their potential to overproduce a variety of organic acids. These microorganisms have an intrinsic ability to accumulate these substances and it is generally believed that this provides the fungi with an ecological advantage, since they grow rather well at pH 3 to 5, while some species even tolerate pH values as low as 1.5. Organic acid production can be stimulated and in a number of cases conditions have been found that result in almost quantitative conversion of carbon substrate into acid. This is exploited in large-scale production of a number of organic acids like citric-, gluconic- and itaconic acid. Both in production volume as well as in knowledge available, citrate is by far the major organic acid. Citric acid (2-hydroxy-propane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid) is a true bulk product with an estimated global production of over 900 thousand tons in the year 2000. Till the beginning of the 20th century, it was exclusively extracted from lemons. Since the global market was dominated by an Italian cartel, other means of production were sought. Chemical synthesis was possible, but not suitable due to expensive raw materials and a complicated process with low yield. The discovery of citrate accumulation by Aspergillus niger led to a rapid development of a fermentation process, which only a decade later accounted for a large part of the global production. The application of citric acid is based on three of its properties: (1) acidity and buffer capacity, (2) taste and flavour, and (3) chelation of metal ions. Because of its three acid groups with pKa values of 3.1, 4.7 and 6.4, citrate is able to produce a very low pH in solution, but is also useful as a buffer over a broad range of pH values (2 to 7). Citric acid has a pleasant acid taste which leaves little aftertaste. It sometimes enhances flavour, but is also able to mask sweetness, such as the aspartame taste in diet beverages. Chelation of metal ions is a very

  20. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %. PMID:23584740

  1. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of Metals and Buffers on Proton Extrusion and Citric Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Andreas; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Schinner, Franz

    1991-01-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential. Surface phenomena possibly involving the plasma membrane H+-ATPase are thought to participate in the induction of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum in the presence of industrial filter dust. PMID:16348442

  2. Production of citric acid using its extraction wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion and ion exchange in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of extraction wastewater pollution in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process is proposed in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then used to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was done for seven batches. Citric acid production (82.4 g/L on average) decreased by 34.1 % in the recycling batches (2nd-7th) compared with the first batch. And the residual reducing sugar exceeded 40 g/L on average in the recycling batches. Pigment substances, acetic acid, ammonium, and metal ions in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) were considered to be the inhibitors, and their effects on the fermentation were studied. Results indicated that ammonium, Na(+) and K(+) in the ADE significantly inhibited citric acid fermentation. Therefore, the ADE was treated by acidic cation exchange resin prior to reuse to make mash for citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was performed for ten batches, and citric acid productions in the recycling batches were 126.6 g/L on average, increasing by 1.7 % compared with the first batch. This process could eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. PMID:24522611

  3. Pectin extraction from pomegranate peels with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paulo Henrique F; Oliveira, Túlio Ítalo S; Rosa, Morsyleide F; Cavalcante, Fabio Lima; Moates, Graham K; Wellner, Nikolaus; Waldron, Keith W; Azeredo, Henriette M C

    2016-07-01

    Pectins were extracted from pomegranate peels with citric acid, according to a central composite design with three variables: pH (2-4), temperature (70-90°C), and extraction time (40-150min). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to follow changes in material composition during the main steps of pectin extraction, and also to determine the degree of methyl esterification and galacturonic acid content of pectins produced under different conditions. Harsh conditions enhanced the extraction yield and the galacturonic acid contents, but decreased the degree of methoxylation. The optimum extraction conditions, defined as those predicted to result in a yield of galacturonic acid higher than 8g/100g while keeping a minimum degree of methoxylation of 54% were: 88°C, 120min, pH 2.5. Close agreement was found between experimental and predicted values at the extraction conditions defined as optimum. PMID:27044343

  4. Detection of exogenous citric acid in fruit juices by stable isotope ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Eric; Martin, Frédérique; Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Lees, Michèle

    2005-06-29

    A new method has been developed for measuring the D/H ratio of the nonexchangeable sites of citric acid by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Pure citric acid is transformed into its calcium salt and subsequently analyzed by pyrolysis-IRMS. The citric acid isolated from authentic fruit juices (citrus, pineapple, and red fruits) systematically shows higher D/H values than its nonfruit counterpart produced by fermentation of various sugar sources. The discrimination obtained with this simplified method is similar to that obtained previously by applying site specific isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to an ester derivative of citric acid. The combination of carbon 13 and deuterium measurements of extracted citric acid is proposed as a routine method for an optimum detection of exogenous citric acid in all kinds of fruit juices. PMID:15969486

  5. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of metals and buffers on proton extrusion and citric acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A.; Burgstaller, W.; Schinner, F. )

    1991-03-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential.

  6. Citric-acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Răcuciu, M.; Creangă, D. E.; Airinei, A.

    2006-10-01

    Water-based magnetic fluids, generally intended for biomedical applications, often have various coating molecules that make them stable and compatible with biological liquids. Magnetic fluids containing iron oxide particles have been prepared by a co-precipitation method, using citric acid as stabilizer. The magnetic particles of the magnetic fluids were obtained by chemical precipitation from ferric ( FeCl3) and ferrous salts ( FeSO4 or FeCl2) in alkali medium (ammonia hydroxide). Citric acid was used to stabilize the magnetic-particle suspension. Physical tests were performed in order to determine various microstructural and rheological features. Transmission electron microscopy was the main investigation method for assessing the magnetic-particle size. The dimensional distribution of the magnetic-particle physical diameter was analyzed using the box-plot statistical method while infrared absorption spectra were used to study the colloidal particle structure. The magnetic-fluid density (picnometric method), viscosity (capillary method) and surface tension (stalagmometric method) were measured using standard methods.

  7. Electrodeposited Fe-Co films prepared from a citric-acid-based plating bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, T.; Uto, H.; Shimokawa, T.; Nakano, M.; Fukunaga, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-06-01

    Electrodeposited Fe-Co films are commonly prepared in a boric-acid-based bath. In this research, we applied citric acid instead of boric acid for the plating of Fe-Co films because boron in the waste bath is restricted by environmental-protection regulations in Japan. We evaluated the effect of citric acid on the magnetic and structural properties of the films. The saturation magnetization of the Fe-Co films slightly increased while the Fe content in the Fe-Co films decreased with increasing citric acid concentration. The lowest coercivity value of 240 A/m was obtained at a citric acid concentration of 100 g/L. The plating bath with this citric acid concentration enabled us to obtain Fe-Co films with high saturation magnetizations and smooth surface morphologies.

  8. 78 FR 34338 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ...: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). Methodology The Department has...: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). Cash Deposit Requirements The following deposit... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results...

  9. 78 FR 34648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... Countervailing Duty Order, 74 FR 25705 (May 29, 2009), remains dispositive. A full description of the scope of... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts from the People's...

  10. 78 FR 64914 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). Period of Review...-others rate made effective by the LTFV investigation. See Citric Acid Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703. These... Salts from Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011- 2012, 78...

  11. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of cadmium by Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Sana; Ali, Shafaqat; Noureen, Shamaila; Mahmood, Khalid; Farid, Mujahid; Ishaque, Wajid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Rizwan, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    Phytoextraction is an eco-friendly and cost-effective technique for removal of toxins, especially heavy metals and metalloids from contaminated soils by the roots of high biomass producing plant species with subsequent transport to aerial parts. Lower metal bioavailability often limits the phytoextraction. Organic chelators can help to improve this biological technique by increasing metal solubility. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of improving the phytoextraction of Cd by the application of citric acid. For this purpose, plants were grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions. Results indicated that Cd supply significantly decreased the plant growth, biomass, pigments, photosynthetic characteristics and protein contents which were accompanied by a significant increase in Cd concentration, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and decrease in antioxidant capacity. The effects were dose dependent with obvious effects at higher Cd concentration. Application of CA significantly enhanced Cd uptake and its accumulation in plant roots, stems and leaves. Citric acid alleviated Cd toxicity by increasing plant biomass and photosynthetic and growth parameters alone and in combination with Cd and by reducing oxidative stress as observed by reduction in MDA and H₂O₂ production and decreased electrolyte leakage induced by Cd stress. Application of CA also enhanced the antioxidant enzymes activity alone and under Cd stress. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cd uptake and minimize Cd stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cd through hyper-accumulating plants such as Brassica napus L. PMID:24840879

  12. Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride by citric acid in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Alok; Zhao, Zhicheng; Sørensen, Dan; Zhou, Jay; Zhang, Fa

    2016-09-10

    Esterification of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PSE) by citric acid was observed in a solid dose pharmaceutical preparation at room temperature and accelerated stability condition (40°C/75% relative humidity). The esterification of PSE with citric acid was confirmed by a solid-state binary reaction in the presence of minor level of water at elevated temperature to generate three isomeric esters. The structures of the pseudoephedrine citric acid esters were elucidated using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Occurrence of esterification in solid state, instead of amidation which is generally more favorable than esterification, is likely due to remaining HCl salt form of solid pseudoephedrine hydrochloride to protect its amino group from amidation with citric acid. In contrast, the esterification was not observed from solution reaction between PSE and citric acid. PMID:27474946

  13. The effects of addition of citric acid on the morphologies of ZnO nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Zao . E-mail: yangzao888@tom.com; Liu Quanhui; Yang Lei

    2007-02-15

    ZnO nanorods of 25-100 nm in diameter and 0.2-1 {mu}m in length were fabricated through citric acid assisted annealing process. The microstructure of ZnO nanorods was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. As a result, it was found that ZnO nanorods were single crystalline and pure. The effects of the growth conditions such as addition of citric acid, annealing temperature on the morphologies of ZnO nanostructures have also been investigated. At the given temperature the length decreased but the diameter increased with addition of the mass of citric acid. With the rising of the calcining heat, the shape of ZnO changed from rod to granule for a given amount of citric acid. Finally, the mechanism for citric acid assisted annealing synthesis of the ZnO nanostructure is discussed.

  14. ACID RECYCLING TO OPTIMIZE CITRIC ACID-MODIFIED SOYBEAN HULL PRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were 1) to develop a wash procedure to remove non-reacted or residual citric acid after soybean hull modification in order to maximize the amount of non- reacted acid removed but minimize the subsequent effect on the product's ability to adsorb copper ion (Cu2+) and 2) t...

  15. Citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b yeast when grown on waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Xu, Jiaxing; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang; He, Jianlong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, citric acid was produced from waste cooking oil by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b. To get the maximal yield of citric acid, the compositions of the medium for citric acid production were optimized, and our results showed that extra nitrogen and magnesium rather than vitamin B1 and phosphate were needed for CA accumulation when using waste cooking oil. The results also indicated that the optimal initial concentration of the waste cooking oil in the medium for citric acid production was 80.0 g/l, and the ideal inoculation size was 1 × 10(7) cells/l of medium. We also reported that during 10-l fermentation, 31.7 g/l of citric acid, 6.5 g/l of isocitric acid, 5.9 g/l of biomass, and 42.1 g/100.0 g cell dry weight of lipid were attained from 80.0 g/l of waste cooking oil within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 94.6 % of the waste cooking oil was utilized by the cells of Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the yield of citric acid was 0.4 g/g waste cooking oil, which suggested that waste cooking oil was a suitable carbon resource for citric acid production. PMID:25488499

  16. 77 FR 9891 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Republic of China: Final Results of the First Administrative Review of the Antidumping Duty Order, 76 FR... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's...

  17. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp.

    PubMed

    Auta, Helen Shnada; Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced. The maximum yield was obtained at the pH of 2 with citric acid of 1.15 g/L and reducing sugar content of 0.541 mMol(-1), 3% vegetative inoculum size with citric acid yield of 0.53 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.87 mMol(-1), 2% of the substrate concentration with citric acid yield of 0.83 g/L and reducing sugar content of 9.36 mMol(-1), incubation temperature of 55°C with citric acid yield of 0.62 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.37 mMol(-1), and fermentation period of 5 days with citric acid yield of 0.61 g/L and reducing sugar content of 3.70 mMol(-1). The results of this study are encouraging and suggest that Parkia biglobosa pulp can be harnessed at low concentration for large scale citric acid production. PMID:27433535

  18. Citric Acid Effects on Brain and Liver Oxidative Stress in Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Eman R.; Mohammed, Nadia A.; Morsy, Safaa M. Youssef; Omara, Enayat A.; Sleem, Amany A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1–2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1–2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1–2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation. PMID:24433072

  19. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced. The maximum yield was obtained at the pH of 2 with citric acid of 1.15 g/L and reducing sugar content of 0.541 mMol−1, 3% vegetative inoculum size with citric acid yield of 0.53 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.87 mMol−1, 2% of the substrate concentration with citric acid yield of 0.83 g/L and reducing sugar content of 9.36 mMol−1, incubation temperature of 55°C with citric acid yield of 0.62 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.37 mMol−1, and fermentation period of 5 days with citric acid yield of 0.61 g/L and reducing sugar content of 3.70 mMol−1. The results of this study are encouraging and suggest that Parkia biglobosa pulp can be harnessed at low concentration for large scale citric acid production. PMID:27433535

  20. Citric acid-based hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds enhance calvarial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dawei; Chen, Yuhui; Tran, Richard T; Xu, Song; Xie, Denghui; Jia, Chunhong; Wang, Yuchen; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Zhongmin; Guo, Jinshan; Yang, Jian; Jin, Dadi; Bai, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid-based polymer/hydroxyapatite composites (CABP-HAs) are a novel class of biomimetic composites that have recently attracted significant attention in tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of using two different CABP-HAs, poly (1,8-octanediol citrate)-click-HA (POC-Click-HA) and crosslinked urethane-doped polyester-HA (CUPE-HA) as an alternative to autologous tissue grafts in the repair of skeletal defects. CABP-HA disc-shaped scaffolds (65 wt.-% HA with 70% porosity) were used as bare implants without the addition of growth factors or cells to renovate 4 mm diameter rat calvarial defects (n = 72, n = 18 per group). Defects were either left empty (negative control group), or treated with CUPE-HA scaffolds, POC-Click-HA scaffolds, or autologous bone grafts (AB group). Radiological and histological data showed a significant enhancement of osteogenesis in defects treated with CUPE-HA scaffolds when compared to POC-Click-HA scaffolds. Both, POC-Click-HA and CUPE-HA scaffolds, resulted in enhanced bone mineral density, trabecular thickness, and angiogenesis when compared to the control groups at 1, 3, and 6 months post-trauma. These results show the potential of CABP-HA bare implants as biocompatible, osteogenic, and off-shelf-available options in the repair of orthopedic defects. PMID:25372769

  1. Development of pectin films with pomegranate juice and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Henriette M C; Morrugares-Carmona, Rosario; Wellner, Nikolaus; Cross, Kathryn; Bajka, Balazs; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    The influence of pomegranate juice (PJ, replacing water as solvent) and citric acid (CA) on properties of pectin films was studied. PJ provided the films with a bright red color, and acted as a plasticizer. Increasing PJ/water ratio from 0/100 to 100/0 resulted in enhanced elongation (from 2% to 20%), decreased strength (from 10 to <2 MPa) and modulus (from 93 to <10 MPa), increased water vapor permeability (WVP, from 3 to 9 g.mm.kPa(-1).h(-1).m(-2)), and decreased insoluble matter (IM, from 35% to 24%). Although a crosslinking effect by CA was not confirmed, it has been suggested to occur from its effects on films. CA noticeably increased IM (from <10% to almost 40%); moreover, when measured on a dry film basis, the CA effects presented a noticeable tendency to increases strength and modulus, and to decrease WVP. The red color density was decreased by CA, suggesting a destabilization of anthocyanins. PMID:26769510

  2. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  3. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  4. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of copper by Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Ihsan Elahi; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Gill, Rafaqa Ali; Najeeb, Ullah; Iqbal, Naeem; Ahmad, Rehan

    2015-10-01

    Use of organic acids for promoting heavy metals phytoextraction is gaining worldwide attention. The present study investigated the influence of citric acid (CA) in enhancing copper (Cu) uptake by Brassica napus L. seedlings. 6 Weeks old B. napus seedlings were exposed to different levels of copper (Cu, 0, 50 and 100µM) alone or with CA (2.5mM) in a nutrient medium for 40 days. Exposure to elevated Cu levels (50 and 100µM) significantly reduced the growth, biomass production, chlorophyll content, gas exchange attributes and soluble proteins of B. napus seedlings. In addition, Cu toxicity increased the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in leaf and root tissues of B. napus. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as guaiacol peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in root and shoot tissues of B. napus were increased in response to lower Cu concentration (50µM) but increased under higher Cu concentration (100µM). Addition of CA into nutrient medium significantly alleviated Cu toxicity effects on B. napus seedlings by improving photosynthetic capacity and ultimately plant growth. Increased activities of antioxidant enzymes in CA-treated plants seems to play a role in capturing of stress-induced reactive oxygen species as was evident from lower level of H2O2, MDA and EL in CA-treated plants. Increasing Cu concentration in the nutrient medium significantly increased Cu concentration in in B. napus tissues. Cu uptake was further increased by CA application. These results suggested that CA might be a useful strategy for increasing phytoextraction of Cu from contaminated soils. PMID:26099461

  5. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations. PMID:22296174

  6. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2016-08-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74-96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51-78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid production or on cellulose or xylanase activity. PMID:27169528

  7. Stoichiometry of Reducing Equivalents and Splitting of Water in the Citric Acid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Vitor M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a solution to the problem of finding the source of extra reducing equivalents, and accomplishing the stoichiometry of glucose oxidation reactions. Discusses the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (CW)

  8. The role of citric acid in cadmium and nickel uptake and translocation, in Halimione portulacoides.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Bernardo; Delgado, Marta; Caçador, Isabel

    2007-10-01

    Some plants have high ability to absorb heavy metals in high concentrations. In this study, Halimione portulacoides was tested in conjunction with citric acid, in order to evaluate the possible use of this plant in phytoremediation processes in salt marshes. Two different concentrations of chelator were used combined with two heavy metal concentrations. When 25microM of citric acid was applied, Cd uptake and translocation was enhanced while for Ni these processes were almost inhibited. Increasing citric acid concentration to 50microM, Ni absorption decreased by the roots while for Cd there was still an increase in root uptake. Analysing translocation with this concentration of chelator, a decreased metal content in the upper organs for both metals was observed. While for Cd an optimal concentration of 25microM of citric acid was observed for phytoremediative processes, for nickel neither concentrations of chelator showed advantages for application in this remediative method. PMID:17585999

  9. Clastogenic effects of food additive citric acid in human peripheral lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Fatma; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2008-01-01

    Clastogenic properties of the food additive citric acid, commonly used as an antioxidant, were analysed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Citric acid induced a significant increase of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) at all the concentrations and treatment periods tested. Citric acid significantly decreased mitotic index (MI) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. However, it did not decrease the replication index (RI) significantly. Citric acid also significantly increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. This chemical significantly increased the micronuclei frequency (MN) compared to the negative control. It also decreased the cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI), but this result was not statistically significant. PMID:19002851

  10. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J E; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrogen-limited conditions, while oxalic acid production was promoted under carbon-limited conditions. Citric acid was produced in both growth and stationary phases, but oxalic acid production occurred only in stationary phase. When submerged cultures which normally produce acid were induced to sporulate, the culture medium shifted toward alkaline rather than acid reaction with growth. PMID:1622211

  11. A novel cleaner production process of citric acid by recycling its treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel cleaner production process of citric acid was proposed to completely solve the problem of wastewater management in citric acid industry. In the process, wastewater from citric acid fermentation was used to produce methane through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent was further treated with air stripping and electrodialysis before recycled as process water for the later citric acid fermentation. This proposed process was performed for 10 batches and the average citric acid production in recycling batches was 142.4±2.1g/L which was comparable to that with tap water (141.6g/L). Anaerobic digestion was also efficient and stable in operation. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 95.1±1.2% and methane yield approached to 297.7±19.8mL/g TCODremoved. In conclusion, this novel process minimized the wastewater discharge and achieved the cleaner production in citric acid industry. PMID:27054882

  12. Inhibition of Listeria innocua in hummus by a combination of nisin and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Al-Holy, M; Al-Qadiri, H; Lin, M; Rasco, B

    2006-06-01

    The effect of nisin or citric acid or combinations of these two inhibitors on the inactivation of a cocktail of three Listeria innocua strains was investigated in a model brain heart infusion (BHI) broth and hummus (chickpea dip). In BHI broth, citric acid had a limited ability to inhibit L. innocua growth. Nisin initially reduced L. innocua concentrations by about 3 log cycles; however, L. innocua reached concentrations similar to those of the control after 5 days at 22 degrees C. In combination, the effects of 500 IU/ml nisin and 0.2% citric acid were synergistic and resulted in complete elimination of L. innocua in the BHI broth. The inhibition of L. innocua by nisin (500 or 1,000 IU/g), citric acid (0.1, 0.2, or 0.3%), or their combinations also was evaluated in hummus. Citric acid alone did not affect L. innocua growth or the aerobic bacterial plate count. A combination of 1,000 IU/g nisin and 0.3% citric acid was somewhat effective (approximately 1.5-log reduction) in controlling the concentration of L. innocua and the aerobic plate count for up to 6 days. This combination also may be useful, in addition to proper hygienic practices, for minimizing the growth of the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in hummus. PMID:16786852

  13. A comparative study on glycerol metabolism to erythritol and citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rakicka, Magdalena; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-09-01

    Citric acid and erythritol biosynthesis from pure and crude glycerol by three acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast was investigated in batch cultures in a wide pH range (3.0-6.5). Citric acid biosynthesis was the most effective at pH 5.0-5.5 in the case of Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7. With a decreasing pH value, the direction of biosynthesis changed into erythritol synthesis accompanied by low production of citric acid. Pathways of glycerol conversion into erythritol and citric acid were investigated in Wratislavia K1 cells. Enzymatic activity was compared in cultures run at pH 3.0 and 4.5, that is, under conditions promoting the production of erythritol and citric acid, respectively. The effect of pH value (3.0 and 4.5) and NaCl presence on the extracellular production and intracellular accumulation of citric acid and erythritol was compared as well. Low pH and NaCl resulted in diminished activity of glycerol kinase, whereas such conditions stimulated the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The presence of NaCl strongly influenced enzymes activity - the effective erythritol production was correlated with a high activity of transketolase and erythrose reductase. Therefore, presented results confirmed that transketolase and erythrose reductase are involved in the overproduction of erythritol in the cells of Y. lipolytica yeast. PMID:25041612

  14. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  15. Quantitative Determination of Citric and Ascorbic Acid in Powdered Drink Mixes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmann, Samuella B.; Wheeler, Dale E.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure by which the reactions are used to quantitatively determine the amount of total acid, the amount of total ascorbic acid and the amount of citric acid in a given sample of powdered drink mix, are described. A safe, reliable and low-cost quantitative method to analyze consumer product for acid content is provided.

  16. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  17. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Negrón-Mendoza, A. Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-23

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  18. Preparation and physico-chemical properties of hydrogels from carboxymethyl cassava starch crosslinked with citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonkham, Sasikan; Sangseethong, Kunruedee; Chatakanon, Pathama; Niamnuy, Chalida; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Sriroth, Klanarong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, environmentally friendly hydrogels prepared from renewable bio-based resources have drawn significant attention from both industrial and academic sectors. In this study, chemically crosslinked hydrogels have been developed from cassava starch which is a bio-based polymer using a non-toxic citric acid as a crosslinking agent. Cassava starch was first modified by carboxymethylation to improve its water absorbency property. The carboxymethyl cassava starch (CMCS) obtained was then crosslinked with citric acid at different concentrations and reaction times. The gel fraction of hydrogels increased progressively with increasing citric acid concentration. Free swelling capacity of hydrogels in de-ionized water, saline solution and buffers at various pHs as well as absorption under load were investigated. The results revealed that swelling behavior and mechanical characteristic of hydrogels depended on the citric acid concentration used in reaction. Increasing citric acid concentration resulted in hydrogels with stronger network but lower swelling and absorption capacity. The cassava starch hydrogels developed were sensitive to ionic strength and pH of surrounding medium, showing much reduced swelling capacity in saline salt solution and acidic buffers.

  19. Effects of Citric Acid and l-Carnitine on Physical Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Tomohiro; Aoyagi, Sayaka; Shirai, Tomoko; Kajimoto, Yoshitaka; Kajimoto, Osami

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of citric acid and l-carnitine administration on physical fatigue. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-way crossover study, 18 healthy volunteers were randomized to oral citric acid (2,700 mg/day), l-carnitine (1,000 mg/day), or placebo for 8 days. The fatigue-inducing physical task consisted of workload trials on a cycle ergometer at fixed workloads for 2 h on 2 occasions. Before the physical load, salivary chromogranin A, measured as a physiological stress marker, was lower in the group given citric acid than in the group given placebo. Also, after the physical load, the subjective feeling of fatigue assessed with a visual analogue scale was lower in the citric acid group than in the placebo group. In contrast, l-carnitine had no effect on chromogranin A or subjective fatigue. These results suggest that citric acid reduces physiological stress and attenuates physical fatigue, whereas l-carnitine does not. PMID:18299720

  20. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. PMID:26188303

  1. Citric acid production using immobilized conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, S.S.; To, K.Y.

    1987-02-20

    Conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022 were immobilized in calcium alginate for the production of citric acid. A 1-ml condidia suspension containing ca. 2.32 x 10/sup 8/ conidia were entrapped into sodium alginate solution in order to prepare 3% Ca-alginate (w/v) gel bead. Immobilized conidia were inoculated into productive medium containing 14% sucrose, 0.25% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, 0.25% KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, and 0.025% MgSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O with addition of 0.06 mg/l CuSO/sub 4/.5H/sub 2/O, 0.25 mg/l ZnCl/sub 2/, 1.3 mg/l FeCl/sub 3/.6H/sub 2/O, pH 3.8, and incubated at 35 degrees C for 13 days by surface culture to produce 61.53 g/l anhydrous citric acid. Under the same conditions with a batchwise culture, it was found that immobilized conidia could maintain a longer period for citric acid production (31 days): over 70 g/l anhydrous citric acid from runs No. 2-4, with the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid reaching 77.02 g/l for run No. 2. In contrast, free conidia maintained a shorter acid-producing phase, circa 17 days; the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid was 71.07 g/l for run No. 2 but dropped quickly as the run number increased. 14 references.

  2. 77 FR 1455 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ..., 76 FR 37781, 37785 (June 28, 2011). This review covers the period May 1, 2010, through April 30, 2011... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'')....

  3. A Candida guilliermondii lysine hyperproducer capable of elevated citric acid production.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    A mutant of the yeast Candida guilliermondii ATCC 9058 exhibiting elevated citric acid production was isolated based upon its ability to overproduce lysine. This method involved the use of a solid medium containing a combination of lysine analogues to identify a mutant that produced a several-fold higher lysine level compared to its parent strain using glucose or glycerol as a carbon source. The mutant strain was also capable of producing more than a fivefold higher citric acid level on glycerol as a carbon source compared to its parent strain. It was concluded that the screening of yeast lysine hyperproducer strains could provide a rapid approach to isolate yeast citric acid hyperproducer strains. PMID:27038943

  4. 76 FR 5782 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Part, and Final Determination to Not Revoke Order in Part: Canned Pineapple Fruit from Thailand, 68 FR... Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). Also on June 30, 2010... Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from Canada, 74 FR 16843 (April 13, 2009) (Citric Acid LTFV)....

  5. Effect of Ginger Extract and Citric Acid on the Tenderness of Duck Breast Muscles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ginger extract (GE) combined with citric acid on the tenderness of duck breast muscles. Total six marinades were prepared with the combination of citric acid (0 and 0.3 M citric acid) and GE (0, 15, and 30%). Each marinade was sprayed on the surface of duck breasts (15 mL/100 g), and the samples were marinated for 72 h at 4℃. The pH and proteolytic activity of marinades were determined. After 72 h of marination, Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF), myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI), pH, cooking loss, moisture content, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protein solubility were evaluated. There was no significant (p>0.05) difference in moisture content or cooking loss among all samples. However, GE marination resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in WBSF but a significant (p<0.05) increase in pH and MFI. In addition, total protein and myofibrillar protein solubility of GE-marinated duck breast muscles in both WOC (without citric acid) and WC (with citric acid) conditions were significantly (p<0.05) increased compared to non-GE-marinated duck breast muscles. SDS-PAGE showed an increase of protein degradation (MHC and actin) in WC condition compared to WOC condition. There was a marked actin reduction in GE-treated samples in WC. The tenderization effect of GE combined with citric acid may be attributed to various mechanisms such as increased MFI and myofibrillar protein solubility. PMID:26877631

  6. Effect of Ginger Extract and Citric Acid on the Tenderness of Duck Breast Muscles.

    PubMed

    He, Fu-Yi; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Si-Young; Yeo, In-Jun; Jung, Tae-Jun; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ginger extract (GE) combined with citric acid on the tenderness of duck breast muscles. Total six marinades were prepared with the combination of citric acid (0 and 0.3 M citric acid) and GE (0, 15, and 30%). Each marinade was sprayed on the surface of duck breasts (15 mL/100 g), and the samples were marinated for 72 h at 4℃. The pH and proteolytic activity of marinades were determined. After 72 h of marination, Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF), myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI), pH, cooking loss, moisture content, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protein solubility were evaluated. There was no significant (p>0.05) difference in moisture content or cooking loss among all samples. However, GE marination resulted in a significant (p<0.05) decrease in WBSF but a significant (p<0.05) increase in pH and MFI. In addition, total protein and myofibrillar protein solubility of GE-marinated duck breast muscles in both WOC (without citric acid) and WC (with citric acid) conditions were significantly (p<0.05) increased compared to non-GE-marinated duck breast muscles. SDS-PAGE showed an increase of protein degradation (MHC and actin) in WC condition compared to WOC condition. There was a marked actin reduction in GE-treated samples in WC. The tenderization effect of GE combined with citric acid may be attributed to various mechanisms such as increased MFI and myofibrillar protein solubility. PMID:26877631

  7. Synthesis and sintering of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powders by citric acid sol-gel combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yingchao; Li Shipu; Wang Xinyu; Chen Xiaoming

    2004-01-03

    The citric acid sol-gel combustion method has been used for the synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) powder from calcium nitrate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and citric acid. The phase composition of HAP powder was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD). The morphology of HAP powder was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The HAP powder has been sintered into microporous ceramic in air at 1200 deg. C with 3 h soaking time. The microstructure and phase composition of the resulting HAP ceramic were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD, respectively. The physical characterization of open porosity and flexural strength have also been carried out.

  8. Barium hydroxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by citric acid sol-gel combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu Zhiliang; Lue Mengkai . E-mail: mklu@icm.sdu.edu.cn; Liu Suwen; Zhou Guangjun; Su Benyu; Zhang Haiping

    2005-09-01

    Barium hydroxyapatite (BaHAP) nanoparticles have been synthesized by citric acid sol-gel combustion method using citric acid as a reductant/fuel and nitrate as an oxidant at a relatively low temperature of 600 deg. C. The thermal decomposition of nitrate-citrate xerogel was investigated by thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) technique. The yielding powders calcined at 600 deg. C have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The possible combustion process was presented.

  9. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils. PMID:26087302

  10. Analysis of Citric Acid in Beverages: Use of an Indicator Displacement Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umali, Alona P.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Wright, Aaron T.; Blieden, Clifford R.; Smith, Carolyne K.; Tian, Tian; Truong, Jennifer A.; Crumm, Caitlin E.; Garcia, Jorge E.; Lee, Soal; Mosier, Meredith; Nguyen, Chester P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of an indicator displacement assay permits the visualization of binding events between host and guest molecules. An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to demonstrate the technique in the determination of citric acid content in commercially available beverages such as soda pop and fruit juices. Through the technique, students…

  11. Establishment and assessment of an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Bao, Jia-Wei; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industrial production, an improved integrated citric acid-methane production process was established in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was stripped by air to remove ammonia. Followed by solid-liquid separation to remove metal ion precipitation, the supernatant was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. 130U/g glucoamylase was added to medium after inoculation and the recycling process performed for 10 batches. Fermentation time decreased by 20% in recycling and the average citric acid production (2nd-10th) was 145.9±3.4g/L, only 2.5% lower than that with tap water (149.6g/L). The average methane production was 292.3±25.1mL/g CODremoved and stable in operation. Excessive Na(+) concentration in ADE was confirmed to be the major challenge for the proposed process. PMID:25460992

  12. Influence of admixed citric acid on the release profile of pelanserin hydrochloride from HPMC matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, R; Hong, E; Villafuerte, L

    2000-05-25

    Pelanserin is a weakly basic experimental drug with a short half-life and a prolonged release formulation was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and citric acid to set up a system bringing about gradual release of this drug. For this purpose powder mixtures were wet granulated with water and compressed with a hydraulic press at 55 MPa. Dissolution studies were made using 900 ml HCl 0.1 N, the first 3 h, and phosphate buffer pH 7.4, h 3-8. Dissolution curves were described by M(t)/M(inf)=kt(n), applied separately for each dissolution medium. The dissolution mechanism involved a coupled diffusion/relaxation with a trend favoring the diffusion mechanism with increasing citric acid concentrations. Increasing concentrations of citric acid produced increasing values of the kinetic constants, in a cubic relationship. Higher HPMC proportions produced slower dissolution rates but with a citric acid compensating more clearly a decreased solubility of pelanserin at pH 7.4. Individually calculated dissolution curves showed experimental 8 h pelanserin dissolution in a range of 65-99% for matrices with 100 mg HPMC/tab., while those with 200 mg HPMC/tab. were in the range 57-73%. PMID:10878323

  13. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  14. Bioreduction of Uranium(VI) Complexed with Citric Acid by Clostridia Affects its Structure and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.; Dodge, C

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination of the environment from mining and milling operations, nuclear-waste disposal, and ammunition use is a widespread global problem. Natural attenuation processes such as bacterial reductive precipitation and immobilization of soluble uranium is gaining much attention. However, the presence of naturally occurring organic ligands can affect the precipitation of uranium. Here, we report that the anaerobic spore-forming bacteria Clostridia, ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), U(VI) to U(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III), and Tc(VI) to Tc(IV); reduced U(VI) associated with citric acid in a dinuclear 2:2 U(VI):citric acid complex to a biligand mononuclear 1:2 U(IV):citric acid complex, which remained in solution, in contrast to reduction and precipitation of uranium. Our findings show that U(VI) complexed with citric acid is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the inability of the bacterium to metabolize the complexed organic ligand. Furthermore, it suggests that the presence of organic ligands at uranium-contaminated sites can affect the mobility of the actinide under both oxic and anoxic conditions by forming such soluble complexes.

  15. Bioreduction of uranium(VI) complexed with citric acid by Clostridia affects its structure and solubility.

    PubMed

    Francis, A J; Dodge, C J

    2008-11-15

    Uranium contamination of the environment from mining and milling operations, nuclear-waste disposal, and ammunition use is a widespread global problem. Natural attenuation processes such as bacterial reductive precipitation and immobilization of soluble uranium is gaining much attention. However, the presence of naturally occurring organic ligands can affect the precipitation of uranium. Here, we report that the anaerobic spore-forming bacteria Clostridia, ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), U(VI) to U(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III), and Tc(VI) to Tc(IV); reduced U(VI) associated with citric acid in a dinuclear 2:2 U(VI): citric acid complex to a biligand mononuclear 1:2 U(IV):citric acid complex,which remained in solution, in contrast to reduction and precipitation of uranium. Our findings show that U(VI) complexed with citric acid is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the inability of the bacterium to metabolize the complexed organic ligand. Furthermore, it suggests that the presence of organic ligands at uranium-contaminated sites can affect the mobility of the actinide under both oxic and anoxic conditions by forming such soluble complexes. PMID:19068806

  16. Modification of wheat gluten with citric acid to produce superabsorbent materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten was reacted with citric acid to produce natural superabsorbent materials able to absorb up to 78 times its weight in water. The properties of the modified gluten samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and water uptak...

  17. PHOTODEGRADATION OF A TERNARY IRON(III)-URANIUM(VI)-CITRIC ACID COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms of photodegradation of binary iron- and uranium-citrate and ternary iron-uranium-citrate complexes were elucidated. Citric acid degradation products were identified by HPLC and GC, and the metal precipitates were identified by XRD and EXAFS. Photodegradation of a b...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... corresponding total soluble solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in the following Table II...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... corresponding total soluble solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in the following Table II...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in the following Table II...

  3. 77 FR 6061 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June... Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). \\2\\ Archer Daniels Midland Company... Rescind in Part, 70 FR 39735, 39737 (July 11, 2005), unchanged in Notice of Final Results and...

  4. Synthesis and characterisation of manganese oxides from potassium permanganate and citric acid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Syazwani; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-01

    Reaction of KMnO4 and citric acid at different stoichiometric ratio found to give black precipitate after calcined at 500 %C. The black precipitate are classified as two type of manganese oxides mineral namely as bixbyite and hollandite. IR and XRD data were in agreement with the literature report.

  5. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  6. The Cardioprotective Effects of Citric Acid and L-Malic Acid on Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xilan; Liu, Jianxun; Dong, Wei; Li, Peng; Li, Lei; Lin, Chengren; Zheng, Yongqiu; Hou, Jincai; Li, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids in Chinese herbs, the long-neglected components, have been reported to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet aggregation activities; thus they may have potentially protective effect on ischemic heart disease. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the protective effects of two organic acids, that is, citric acid and L-malic acid, which are the main components of Fructus Choerospondiatis, on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and the underlying mechanisms. In in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, we found that treatments with citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced myocardial infarct size, serum levels of TNF-α, and platelet aggregation. In vitro experiments revealed that both citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced LDH release, decreased apoptotic rate, downregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3, and upregulated the expression of phosphorylated Akt in primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. These results suggest that both citric acid and L-malic acid have protective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury; the underlying mechanism may be related to their anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet aggregation and direct cardiomyocyte protective effects. These results also demonstrate that organic acids, besides flavonoids, may also be the major active ingredient of Fructus Choerospondiatis responsible for its cardioprotective effects and should be attached great importance in the therapy of ischemic heart disease. PMID:23737849

  7. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum).

    PubMed

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  8. Exogenous Application of Citric Acid Ameliorates the Adverse Effect of Heat Stress in Tall Fescue (Lolium arundinaceum)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longxing; Zhang, Zhifei; Xiang, Zuoxiang; Yang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Citric acid may be involved in plant response to high temperature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether exogenous citric acid could improve heat tolerance in a cool-season turfgrass species, tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum), and to determine the physiological mechanisms of citric acid effects on heat stress tolerance. The grasses were subjected to four citric acid levels (0, 0.2, 2, and 20 mM) and two temperature levels (25/20 and 35/30 ± 0.5°C, day/night) treatments in growth chambers. Heat stress increased an electrolyte leakage (EL) and malonaldehyde (MDA) content, while reduced plant growth, chlorophyll (Chl) content, photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), root activity and antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; peroxidase, POD). External citric acid alleviated the detrimental effects of heat stress on tall fescue, which was evidenced by decreased EL and MDA content, and improved plant growth under stress conditions. Additionally, the reduction in Chl content, Fv/Fm, SOD, POD, CAT and root activity were ameliorated in citric acid treated plants under heat stressed conditions. High temperature induced the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) genes, which exhibited greater expression levels after citric acid treatment under heat stress. These results suggest that exogenous citric acid application may alleviate growth and physiological damage caused by high temperature. In addition, the exogenously applied citric acid might be responsible for maintaining membrane stability, root activity, and activation of antioxidant response and HSP genes which could contribute to the protective roles of citric acid in tall fescue responses to heat stress. PMID:26925085

  9. CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

  10. Influence of Citric Acid on the Pink Color and Characteristics of Sous Vide Processed Chicken Breasts During Chill Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki-Won

    2015-01-01

    Chicken breast dipped with citric acid (CA) was treated by sous vide processing and stored in a refrigerated state for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 14 d. A non-dipped control group (CON) and three groups dipped in different concentrations of citric acid concentration were analyzed (0.5%, 0.5CIT; 2.0%, 2CIT and 5.0%, 5CIT; w/v). Cooking yield and moisture content increased due to the citric acid. While the redness of the juice and meat in all groups showed significant increase during storage, the redness of the citric acid groups was reduced compared to the control group (p<0.05). The percentage of myoglobin denaturation (PMD) of the CA groups was also increased according to the level of CA during storage. Total aerobic counts, Enterobacteriaceae counts, volatile basic nitrogen and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were generally lower in the citric acid-treated samples than in untreated ones, indicating extended shelf life of the cooked chicken breast dipped in citric acid solution. The shear force of the 2CIT and 5CIT groups was significantly lower (p<0.05). The findings indicated positive effects in the physicochemical properties and storage ability of sous vide chicken breast at 2% and 5% citric acid concentrations. PMID:26761885

  11. Reactivation of an aged commercial three-way catalyst by oxalic and citric acid washing.

    PubMed

    Christou, Stavroula Y; Birgersson, Henrik; Fierro, José L G; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2006-03-15

    The efficiency of dilute oxalic and citric acid solutions on improving the oxygen storage capacity (OSC) and catalytic activity of a severely aged (83,000 km) commercial three-way catalyst (TWC) has been investigated. Washing procedures applied after optimization of experimental parameters, namely, temperature, flow-rate, and concentration of acid solution, led to significant improvements of OSC and catalytic activity (based on dynamometer test measurements) of the aged TWC. The latterwas made possible due to the removal of significant amounts of various contaminants accumulated on the catalyst surface (e.g., P, S, Pb, Ca, Zn, Si, Fe, Cu, and Ni) during driving conditions, as revealed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. For the first time, it is demonstrated that dilute oxalic acid solution significantly improves the catalytic activity of an aged commercial TWC toward CO, Cx,Hy, and NOx conversions under real exhaust gas conditions (dynamometer tests) by two to eight times in the 250-450 degrees C range and the OSC quantity by up to 50%. Oxalic acid appears to be more efficient than citric acid in removing specifically P- and S-containing compounds from the catalyst surface, whereas citric acid in removing Pb- and Zn-containing compounds, thus uncovering surface active catalytic sites. PMID:16570632

  12. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-07-08

    This report presents findings from tests investigating the dissolution of simulated and radioactive Savannah River Site sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acid previously recommended by a Russian team from the Khlopin Radium Institute and the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC). Testing also included characterization of the simulated and radioactive waste sludges. Testing results showed the following: Dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges with oxalic and citric acid mixtures at SRTC confirmed general trends reported previously by Russian testing. Unlike the previous Russian testing six sequential contacts of a mixture of oxalic acid citric acids at a 2:1 ratio (v/w) of acid to sludge did not produce complete dissolution of simulated HM and PUREX sludges. We observed that increased sludge dissolution occurred at a higher acid to sludge ratio, 50:1 (v/w), compared to the recommended ratio of 2:1 (v/w). We observed much lower dissolution of aluminum in a simulated HM sludge by sodium hydroxide leaching. We attribute the low aluminum dissolution in caustic to the high fraction of boehmite present in the simulated sludge. Dissolution of HLW sludges with 4 per cent oxalic acid and oxalic/citric acid followed general trends observed with simulated sludges. The limited testing suggests that a mixture of oxalic and citric acids is more efficient for dissolving HM and PUREX sludges and provides a more homogeneous dissolution of HM sludge than oxalic acid alone. Dissolution of HLW sludges in oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures produced residual sludge solids that measured at higher neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios than that in the untreated sludge solids. This finding suggests that residual solids do not present an increased nuclear criticality safety risk. Generally the neutron poison to equivalent 235U weight ratios of the acid solutions containing dissolved sludge components are lower than those in the untreated

  13. A mutation of Aspergillus niger for hyper-production of citric acid from corn meal hydrolysate in a bioreactor*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Lu, Dong; Wu, Qing-hua; Li, Wen-jian

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the screened mutants for hyper-production of citric acid induced by carbon (12C6+) ion beams and X-ray irradiation were investigated in our current study. Among these mutants, mutant H4002 screened from 12C6+ ion irradiation had a higher yield of citric acid production than the parental strain in a 250-ml shaking flash. These expanded submerged experiments in a bioreactor were also carried out for mutant H4002. The results showed that (177.7–196.0) g/L citric acid was accumulated by H4002 through exploiting corn meal hydrolysate (containing initial 200.0–235.7 g/L sugar) with the productivity of (2.96–3.27) g/(L∙h). This was especially true when the initial sugar concentration was 210 g/L, and the best economical citric acid production reached (187.5±0.7) g/L with a productivity of 3.13 g/(L∙h). It was observed that mutant H4002 can utilize low-cost corn meal as a feedstock to efficiently produce citric acid. These results imply that the H4002 strain has the industrial production potentiality for citric acid and offers strong competition for the citric acid industry. PMID:25367793

  14. Effect of Pre-Harvest Foliar Application of Citric Acid and Malic Acid on Chlorophyll Content and Post-Harvest Vase Life of Lilium cv. Brunello

    PubMed Central

    Darandeh, Nafiseh; Hadavi, Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Citric acid is a regular ingredient in many vase solution formulations but pre-harvest use of citric acid is a novel method in vase life extension of cut flowers, which is reported on tuberose earlier. In order to verify previous result, and check for possible substitution of citric acid by malic acid, the current research was designed. Citric acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) and malic acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) were used in a factorial design with three replications. Foliar sprays were applied two times during growth period of Lilium plants. The results point out that 0.15% citric acid alone had increased vase life from 11.8 in control treatment to 14 days (α < 0.05). The interesting finding was the effect of citric acid on bulbil weight, which was decreased from 9 g in control to 1.5 g in treatment containing combination of 0.075% citric acid and 0.075% malic acid. Malic acid while having no direct effect on pre-mentioned traits surprisingly increased the chlorophyll content significantly. The interaction effect between citric acid and malic acid on vase life and chlorophyll content proved significant and was evident in results, both as antagonistic and synergistic in various traits. PMID:22639626

  15. Effect of Pre-Harvest Foliar Application of Citric Acid and Malic Acid on Chlorophyll Content and Post-Harvest Vase Life of Lilium cv. Brunello.

    PubMed

    Darandeh, Nafiseh; Hadavi, Ebrahim

    2011-01-01

    Citric acid is a regular ingredient in many vase solution formulations but pre-harvest use of citric acid is a novel method in vase life extension of cut flowers, which is reported on tuberose earlier. In order to verify previous result, and check for possible substitution of citric acid by malic acid, the current research was designed. Citric acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) and malic acid (0, 0.075, 0.15% w/v) were used in a factorial design with three replications. Foliar sprays were applied two times during growth period of Lilium plants. The results point out that 0.15% citric acid alone had increased vase life from 11.8 in control treatment to 14 days (α < 0.05). The interesting finding was the effect of citric acid on bulbil weight, which was decreased from 9 g in control to 1.5 g in treatment containing combination of 0.075% citric acid and 0.075% malic acid. Malic acid while having no direct effect on pre-mentioned traits surprisingly increased the chlorophyll content significantly. The interaction effect between citric acid and malic acid on vase life and chlorophyll content proved significant and was evident in results, both as antagonistic and synergistic in various traits. PMID:22639626

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Citric Acid in Lemon Juice, Lime Juice, and Commercially-Available Fruit Juice Products

    PubMed Central

    PENNISTON, KRISTINA L.; NAKADA, STEPHEN Y.; HOLMES, ROSS P.; ASSIMOS, DEAN G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Knowledge of the citric acid content of beverages may be useful in nutrition therapy for calcium urolithiasis, especially among patients with hypocitraturia. Citrate is a naturally-occurring inhibitor of urinary crystallization; achieving therapeutic urinary citrate concentration is one clinical target in the medical management of calcium urolithiasis. When provided as fluids, beverages containing citric acid add to the total volume of urine, reducing its saturation of calcium and other crystals, and may enhance urinary citrate excretion. Information on the citric acid content of fruit juices and commercially-available formulations is not widely known. We evaluated the citric acid concentration of various fruit juices. Materials and Methods The citric acid content of 21 commercially-available juices and juice concentrates and the juice of three types of fruits was analyzed using ion chromatography. Results Lemon juice and lime juice are rich sources of citric acid, containing 1.44 and 1.38 g/oz, respectively. Lemon and lime juice concentrates contain 1.10 and 1.06 g/oz, respectively. The citric acid content of commercially available lemonade and other juice products varies widely, ranging from 0.03 to 0.22 g/oz. Conclusions Lemon and lime juice, both from the fresh fruit and from juice concentrates, provide more citric acid per liter than ready-to-consume grapefruit juice, ready-to-consume orange juice, and orange juice squeezed from the fruit. Ready-to-consume lemonade formulations and those requiring mixing with water contain ≤6 times the citric acid, on an ounce-for-ounce basis, of lemon and lime juice. PMID:18290732

  17. Study of the sequential conversion of citric to itaconic to methacrylic acid in near-critical and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, M.; Habenicht, C.; Kam, L.C.; Antal, M.J. Jr. ); Bian, N.; Cunningham, R.J.; Jones, M. Jr. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-08-01

    Between 200 and 400 million lb of citric acid are produced annually in the USA by fermentation of molasses and other sugars using the microorganism Aspergillus niger. A lesser quantity of itaconic acid is manufactured by a similar technology using Aspergillus terreus. The recovery of citric acid from its fermentation broth via calcium salt precipitation is a costly, highly complex, sophisticated operation. USDOE estimates the cost of dry citric acid produced from a new plant to be about $0.59/lb, whereas the estimated cost of wet citric acid (in its fermentation broth) from a new plant is about $0.19/lb and from an old plant is about $0.15/lb. Citric acid rapidly reacts in hot (250 C), compressed (34.5 MPa) liquid water to form itaconic and citraconic acids with a combined selectivity that exceeds 90%. At higher temperatures (360 C), in the absence and presence of NaOH, itaconic acid decarboxylates to form methacrylic acid. The yield of methacrylic acid depends on the temperature, pH, and buffer strength of the medium, reaching a maximum of about 70% (by mole) of the itaconic acid feed. Conditions which favor the production of methacrylic acid also lead to the formation of its hydration product: hydroxyisobutyric acid. Under optimum conditions the combined yield of methacrylic acid and hydroxyisobutyric acid from itaconic acid exceeds 80%. Results are consistent with well-established dehydration and decarboxylation mechanisms.

  18. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  19. Chemical modification of chitosan film via surface grafting of citric acid molecular to promote the biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Shen, Xin; Zhou, Huan; Wang, Yingjun; Deng, Linhong

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel chitosan-citric acid film (abbreviated as CS-CA) suitable for biomedical applications in this study. In this CS-CA film, the citric acid, which is a harmless organic acid has been extensively investigated as a modifying agent on carbohydrate polymers, was cross-linked by 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) onto the surface of chitosan (CS) film. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the graft copolymerization of the modified chitosan film (CS-CA). Surface wettability, moisturizing performance, the capacity of mineralization in vitro and biocompatibility of the films were characterized. After modification, this CS-CA film has good hydrophilicity. It is very evident that the citric acid grafting treatment significantly promotes the biomineralization of the chitosan based substrates. Cell experiments show that the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts can adhere and proliferate well on the surface of CS-CA film. This CS-CA film, which can be prepared in large quantities and at low cost, should have potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  20. The crystallinity of calcium phosphate powders influenced by the conditions of neutralized procedure with citric acid additions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chengfeng

    2009-05-06

    Calcium phosphate powders with nano-sized crystallinity were synthesized by neutralization using calcium hydroxide and orthophosphoric acid with the assistance of citric acid. The influence of processing parameters, such as free or additive citric acid, synthetic temperature and ripening time, on the crystallinity of hydroxyapatite were investigated. The results of X-ray diffraction and microstructure observations showed that the crystallinity and morphology of nano-sized hydroxyapatite particles were influenced by the presence or absence of citric acid. It was found that the crystallinities and crystallite sizes of hydroxyapatite powders prepared with the additive citric acid increased with increasing synthetic temperature and ripening time. Especially, the crystallinities of (h k 0) planes were raised and more homogeneously grown particles were obtained with increasing synthetic temperature.

  1. A Biodegradable Thermoset Polymer Made by Esterification of Citric Acid and Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Urbanski, Richard; Weinstock, Allison K.; Iwig, David F.; Mathers, Robert T.; von Recum, Horst

    2014-01-01

    A new biomaterial, a degradable thermoset polymer, was made from simple, economical, biocompatable monomers without the need for a catalyst. Glycerol and citric acid, non-toxic and renewable reagents, were crosslinked by a melt polymerization reaction at temperatures from 90-150°C. Consistent with a condensation reaction, water was determined to be the primary byproduct. The amount of crosslinking was controlled by the reaction conditions, including temperature, reaction time, and ratio between glycerol and citric acid. Also, the amount of crosslinking was inversely proportional to the rate of degradation. As a proof-of-principle for drug delivery applications, gentamicin, an antibiotic, was incorporated into the polymer with preliminary evaluations of antimicrobial activity. The polymers incorporating gentamicin had significantly better bacteria clearing of Staphylococcus aureus compared to non-gentamicin gels for up to nine days. PMID:23737239

  2. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Sheu, Jer-Jia

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF.

  3. In vitro stability of a highly crystalline hydroxylapatite coating in a saturated citric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Story, B J; Burgess, A V; La, D; Wagner, W R

    1999-01-01

    A novel pressurized hydrothermal post-plasma-spray process has been developed to convert the crystalline non-HA and amorphous components of plasma-sprayed hydroxylapatite coatings back into crystalline HA. The process, known commercially as MP-1, was used to produce coatings comprising approximately 96% crystalline HA. The in vitro solubility of the coating in saturated citric acid solution has been measured to simulate the effect of implant detoxification procedures, which use citric acid as a cleaning medium. The MP-1 coating solubility in saturated citric acid solution (pH = 1) was compared to that of coatings with crystalline HA contents ranging from 37.5-82%. All coatings showed an initial sharp rise in coating dissolution, which correlated with crystalline HA content, followed by a steady state dissolution rate. After 60 s at 25 degrees C, the MP-1 coating showed a 65% decrease in solubility compared to a highly amorphous coating (AM-2). All coatings showed very similar steady state dissolution rates, except for AM-2, which was significantly higher. SEM analysis showed that the AM-2 coating surface was degraded substantially more than the other coatings, resulting in partial coating exfoliation. A mechanism of coating dissolution is proposed, in which the initial rapid leaching of soluble phases from the coating leaves behind a porous layer of highly crystalline HA at the coating surface. The stability of this porous crystalline layer leads to steady state, diffusion-limited dissolution of the remainder of the coating. The observed two-regime dissolution profile can be accurately represented by a 2-parameter model, which predicts the initial sharp rise in coating dissolution followed by a slower, steady state loss in coating mass. Model parameters were determined from experimental solubility data, and were shown to correlate with the percentage of crystalline HA in the coatings. The present data suggest that the treated coating is significantly more resistant

  4. Application of kaolin to improve citric acid production by a thermophilic Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sikander

    2006-12-01

    Citric acid production by a thermophilic strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger IIB-6 in a medium containing blackstrap cane molasses was improved by the addition of kaolin to the fermentation medium. The fermentation was run in a 7.5-l stirred bioreactor (60% working volume). The optimal sugar concentration was found to be 150 g/l. Kaolin (1.0 ml) was added to the fermentation medium to enhance volumetric production. The best results in terms of product formation were observed when 15 parts per million (ppm) kaolin was added 24 h after inoculation. With added kaolin, citric acid production was enhanced 2.34-fold, compared to a control fermentation without added kaolin. The length of incubation to attain this product yield was shortened from 168 to 96 h. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed improved citrate synthase activity of the culture (Y (p/x)=7.046 g/g). When the culture grown at various kaolin concentrations was monitored for Q (p), Q (s), and q (p), there was significant improvement in these variables over the control. Specific production by the culture (q (p)=0.073 g/g cells/h) was improved several fold. The addition of kaolin substantially improved the enthalpy (DeltaH (D)=74.5 kJ/mol) and entropy of activation (DeltaS=-174 J/mol/K) for citric acid production, free energies for transition state formation, and substrate binding for sucrose hydrolysis. The performance of fuzzy logic control of the bioreactor was found to be very promising for an improvement ( approximately 4.2-fold) in the production of citric acid (96.88 g/l), which is of value in commercial applications. PMID:16871375

  5. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  6. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  7. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  8. Effects of citric acid, cucumis powder and pressure cooking on quality attributes of goat meat curry.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Raj; Mendiratta, S K; Mane, B G

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, comparative effects of marination in citric acid (1 %), spray of cucumis powder (2 %) and pressure cooking (at 15 psi) were observed on quality attributes of goat meat curry. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in pH of citric acid treated samples compared to other samples. Significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in protein and soluble collagen content of meat curry treated with pressure as compared to other treated samples including control. Cooking yield was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in control samples. The significant difference was observed in chewiness and gumminess at (p < 0.05) level and hardness at (p < 0.01) level within and between the various treatment groups. However, overall values were higher in control samples. Similarly, shear force value was significantly (p < 0.05) higher for control compared to treated samples. The significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed in various sensory attributes of goat meat curry and pressure treated cooked meat curry was highly preferred followed by cucumis powder, citric acid and control samples. PMID:25745255

  9. Ternary complexation of carvedilol, beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid for mouth-dissolving tablet formulation.

    PubMed

    Pokharkar, Varsha; Khanna, Abhishek; Venkatpurwar, Vinod; Dhar, Sheetal; Mandpe, Leenata

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the solubility and dissolution rate of carvedilol by forming a ternary complex with beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid and to formulate its mouth-dissolving tablets. The rationale for preparing mouth-dissolving tablet of carvedilol was to make the drug available in a soluble form in the mouth, which would facilitate its absorption from the buccal cavity. This would help to overcome its first-pass metabolism and thereby improve bioavailability. Phase solubility studies revealed the ability of beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid to complex with carvedilol and significantly increase its solubility. Ternary complexation of carvedilol was carried out with beta-cyclodextrin and citric acid by physical mixing, kneading and spray drying methods and the prepared complexes were characterized by Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and complexation efficiency. The complex obtained by the spray drying method resulted in highest complexation efficiency and a 110-fold increase in the solubility of carvedilol. The mouth-dissolving tablets formulated using the spray dried complex with suitable excipients showed 100 % dissolution within five minutes. Accelerated stability studies of mouth-dissolving tablets carried out as per ICH guidelines revealed that the tablets were stable. PMID:19564138

  10. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  11. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  12. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  13. Lipid and citric acid production by wild yeasts grown in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Souza, Karla Silva Teixeira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    In this study, crude glycerol was used as a carbon source in the cultivation of wild yeasts, aiming for the production of microbial lipids and citric acid. Forty yeasts of different sources were tested concerning their growth in crude and commercial glycerol. Four yeasts (Lidnera saturnus UFLA CES-Y677, Yarrowia lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4, Rhodotorula glutinis NCYC 2439, and Cryptococcus curvatus NCYC 476) were then selected owing to their ability to grow in pure (OD600 2.133, 1.633, 2.055, and 2.049, respectively) and crude (OD600 2.354, 1.753, 2.316, and 2.281, respectively) glycerol (10%, 20%, and 30%). Y. lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4 was selected for its ability to maintain cell viability in concentrations of 30% of crude glycerol, and high glycerol intake (18.907 g/l). This yeast was submitted to lipid production in 30 g/l of crude glycerol, and therefore obtained 63.4% of microbial lipids. In the fatty acid profile, there was a predominance of stearic (C18:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids in the concentrations of 87.64% and 74.67%, respectively. We also performed optimization of the parameters for the production of citric acid, which yielded a production of 0.19 g/l of citric acid in optimum conditions (38.4 g/l of crude glycerol, agitation of 184 rpm, and temperature of 30°C). Yarrowia lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4 presented good lipid production when in the concentration of 30 g/l of glycerol. These data may be used for production in large quantities for the application of industrial biodiesel. PMID:24473455

  14. N-terminal sequence of amino acids and some properties of an acid-stable alpha-amylase from citric acid-koji (Aspergillus usamii var.).

    PubMed

    Suganuma, T; Tahara, N; Kitahara, K; Nagahama, T; Inuzuka, K

    1996-01-01

    An acid-stable alpha-amylase (AA) was purified from an acidic extract of citric acid-koji (A. usamii var.). The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids of the enzyme was identical with that of AA from A. niger, but the two enzymes differed in molecular weight. HPLC analysis for identifying the anomers of products indicated that the AA hydrolyzed maltopentaose (G5) at the third glycoside bond predominantly, which differed from Taka-amylase A and the neutral alpha-amylase (NA) from the citric acid-koji. PMID:8824843

  15. An autopsy case of death due to metabolic acidosis after citric acid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoya; Usui, Akihito; Matsumura, Takashi; Aramaki, Tomomi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Igari, Yui; Ohuchi, Tsukasa; Hayashizaki, Yoshie; Usui, Kiyotaka; Funayama, Masato

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was found unconscious on a sofa in a communal residence for people with various disabilities. He appeared to have drunk 800 ml of undiluted citric acid from a commercial plastic bottle. The instructions on the label of the beverage specified that the beverage be diluted 20- to 30-fold before consumption. The patient was admitted to an emergency hospital with severe metabolic acidosis (pH, 6.70; HCO3(-), 3.6 mEq/L) and a low ionized calcium level (0.73 mmol/L). Although ionized calcium and catecholamines were continuously administered intravenously to correct the acidosis, the state of acidemia and low blood pressure did not improve, and he died 20 h later. Citric acid concentrations in the patient's serum drawn shortly after treatment in the hospital and from the heart at autopsy were 80.6 mg/ml and 39.8 mg/dl, respectively (normal range: 1.3-2.6 mg/dl). Autopsy revealed black discoloration of the mucosal surface of the esophagus. Microscopically, degenerated epithelium and neutrophilic infiltration in the muscle layer were observed. In daily life, drinking a large amount of concentrated citric acid beverage is rare as a cause of lethal poisoning. However, persons with mental disorders such as dementia may mistakenly drink detergent or concentrated fluids, as in our case. Family members or facility staff in the home or nursing facility must bear in mind that they should not leave such bottles in places where they are easily accessible to mentally handicapped persons. PMID:26594004

  16. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  17. Citric acid demineralization of cementum and dentin: the effect of the storage medium.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C; Sterrett, J D; Russell, C

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if the root surface topography of teeth, stored in saline and subsequently treated with citric acid, differred from the root surface topography of teeth that were treated immediately upon extraction, 12 freshly extracted adult human permanent teeth, with proximal surfaces free of caries and periodontal disease, were treated in succession. The crowns were removed at the level of periodontal attachment, the teeth sectioned buccal-lingually and a treatment area deligniated on each proximal section. The treatment area of 6 teeth was root planed to expose dentin (D) and scaled to remove adherent tissue and leave a cementum surfaces (C) on the other 6 teeth. A coronal-apical groove down the middle of the treatment area divided it into approximately equal parts or experimental regions. One proximal section of each tooth was placed in physiologic saline (S) and treated after 6 weeks of storage while the other proximal section was freshly treated (F). Treatment consisted of applying a 30% citric acid (CA) solution (pH = 1.60) for 5 min. Cotton pellets soaked in the citric acid solution were placed (P) on one half of the experimental area and heavily burnished (B) on the other half. Treatment areas were subsequently prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. Assessment was made of (i) the % of surface area tufted, (ii) fibril tufting depth (0.3) and (iii) fibril tufting density (1.3). Similarities were found in the data for both storage methods (F and S) across each application technique (P or B) and each tooth surface (D or C) with respect to the (i) % area tufted and (ii) frequency distribution of tufting depth scores. As for the application techniques, the data for burnishing was greater than placed across each storage method (F or S) and each tooth surface (D or C) for the same two parameters. The results of the study indicated that 6-week physiologic saline storage does not affect root surface demineralization by citric acid

  18. Characterization and functional properties of mango peel pectin extracted by ultrasound assisted citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Huang, Bohui; Fan, Chuanhui; Zhao, Kaili; Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyun; Pan, Siyi; Liu, Fengxia

    2016-10-01

    Pectin was extracted from 'Tainong No. 1' mango peels, using a chelating agent-citric acid as extraction medium by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE) at temperatures of 20 and 80°C. Chemical structures, rheological and emulsifying properties of mango peel pectins (MPPs) were comparatively studied with laboratory grade citrus pectin (CP). All MPPs exhibited higher protein content (4.74%-5.94%), degree of methoxylation (85.43-88.38%), average molecular weight (Mw, 378.4-2858kDa) than the CP, but lower galacuronic acid content (GalA, 52.21-53.35%). CE or UAE at 80°C resulted in significantly higher pectin yield than those at 20°C, while the extraction time for UAE-80°C (15min) was significantly shorter compared to CE-80°C (2h) with comparable pectin yield. Moreover, MPPs extracted at 80°C were observed with higher GalA and protein content, higher Mw, resulting in higher viscosity, better emulsifying capacity and stability, as compared to those extracted at 20°C and the CP. Therefore, these results suggested that MPPs from 'Tainong No. 1' may become a highly promising pectin with good thickening and emulsifying properties, using ultrasound-assisted citric acid as an efficient and eco-friendly extraction method. PMID:27283236

  19. Periodontal healing following guided tissue regeneration with citric acid and fibronectin application.

    PubMed

    Caffesse, R G; Nasjleti, C E; Anderson, G B; Lopatin, D E; Smith, B A; Morrison, E C

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effects of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) with and without citric acid conditioning and autologous fibronectin application. The study subjects were four female beagle dogs with spontaneous periodontitis. The dogs were given thorough root debridement and 4 weeks later, mucoperiosteal flaps were raised on both sides of the mandible involving the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th premolar and 1st molar teeth. After debridement, notches were placed on the roots at the level of supporting bone. Citric acid (pH 1) was topically applied for 3 minutes on the exposed root surfaces of one side (experimental). The roots were irrigated with normal saline solution. Both the root surfaces and the inner surface of the flap were then bathed in autologous fibronectin in saline. Following this, Gore-Tex periodontal material was adapted to the roots of each tooth and sutured. The contralateral side, serving as control, was treated by surgery and application of Gore-Tex periodontal material only. All membranes were removed 1 month after surgery, and the dogs sacrificed at 3 months. Both mesio-distal and bucco-lingual microscopic histological sections were evaluated by descriptive histology, and linear measurements and surface area determination of the furcal tissues were made. Periodontal healing following the use of GTR procedure resulted in an increase in connective tissue and alveolar bone regeneration. Adjunctive critic acid plus autologous fibronectin produced slightly better results, but these differences were not statistically significant for this sample. PMID:2002428

  20. Experience of using heat citric acid disinfection method in central dialysis fluid delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Koji; Uchiumi, Nobuko; Sato, Sumihiko; Aida, Nobuhiko; Ishimatsu, Taketo; Igoshi, Tadaaki; Kodama, Yoshihiro; Hotta, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We applied the heat citric acid disinfection method in the main part of the central dialysis fluid delivery system (MPCDDS), which consists of a multiple-patient dialysis fluid supply unit, dialysis console units, and dialysis fluid piping. This disinfection method has been used for single-patient dialysis machines, but this is the first trial in the MPCDDS. We examined, by points of safety and disinfection effect, whether this disinfection method is comparable to conventional disinfection methods in Japan. The conventional disinfection method is a combination of two disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and acetic acid, used separately for protein removal and decalcification. Consequently, total microbial counts and endotoxin concentrations fully satisfied the microbiological requirements for standard dialysis fluid of ISO 11663. From our results and discussion, this heat citric acid disinfection method is proved to be safe and reliable for MPCDDS. However, to satisfy the microbiological requirements for ultrapure dialysis fluid, further consideration for this method in MPCDDS including the reverse osmosis device composition and piping is necessary. PMID:20514548

  1. [Effect of trace metals on cell morphology, enzyme activation, and production of citric acid in a strain of Aspergillus wentii].

    PubMed

    Majolli, M V; Aguirre, S N

    1999-01-01

    Data concerning the effect of very low concentrations of metals on citric acid production by microorganisms, as well as on the activity of enzymes presumptively involved in the process, are confuse. The bulk of information was obtained mainly studying selected strains of Aspergillus niger. Information concerning other citric acid producer filamentous fungi, such as A. wentii, is scanty. In the present article we report the effect of different cations on the growth pattern of A. wentii P1 as well as on the related citric acid production and the activity of several enzymes. It was found that without any addition to the culture medium the fungus developed a pelleted form of growth, pellets being about 1.5 mm in diameter. The citric acid yield was about 90%. The addition of Cu2+ impaired the sugar uptake, as well as the production of citric acid and biomass. The uptake of sugar increased in the presence of Zn2+, and there was a marked increase of the biomass production, which could account for the low citric acid production. The addition of Fe2+ impaired the citric acid production and, as sulfate, the sugar uptake. The presence of Fe3+ markedly impaired the citric acid production and increased the sugar uptake. There is no agreement about the enzymes involved in the accumulation of citric acid by microorganisms. In spite of this, aconitase (Ac), isocitrate lyase (IL), isocitrate dehydrogenase NAD(+)-dependent (ICDH- NAD+) and isocitrate dehydrogenase NADP(+)-dependent (ICDH-NADP+) are often postulated as key enzymes. In our case, these enzymes were active during the standard fermentation, although with variations, particularly concerning Ac and IL. The behavior of enzymes might be different when tested in vivo or in vitro, mainly from the quantitative point of view. Nevertheless, the activity determined in vitro might give some indication concerning the effect on fermentation of substances present in the medium. It was found that all the enzymes tested increased their

  2. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    PubMed Central

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  3. Fabrication of calcium phosphate–calcium sulfate injectable bone substitute using hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose and citric acid

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Van Viet

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an injectable bone substitute (IBS) consisting of citric acid, chitosan, and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the liquid phase and tetra calcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD, CaSO4·2H2O) powders as the solid phase, were fabricated. Two groups were classified based on the percent of citric acid in the liquid phase (20, 40 wt%). In each groups, the HPMC percentage was 0, 2, and 4 wt%. An increase in compressive strength due to changes in morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. A good conversion rate of HAp at 20% citric acid was observed in the XRD profiles. In addition, HPMC was not obviously affected by apatite formation. However, both HPMC and citric acid increased the compressive strength of IBS. The maximum compressive strength for IBS was with 40% citric acid and 4% HPMC after 14 days of incubation in 100% humidity at 37°C. PMID:20333539

  4. Fabrication of calcium phosphate-calcium sulfate injectable bone substitute using hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Thai, Van Viet; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2010-06-01

    In this study, an injectable bone substitute (IBS) consisting of citric acid, chitosan, and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the liquid phase and tetra calcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD, CaSO4 x 2H2O) powders as the solid phase, were fabricated. Two groups were classified based on the percent of citric acid in the liquid phase (20, 40 wt%). In each groups, the HPMC percentage was 0, 2, and 4 wt%. An increase in compressive strength due to changes in morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. A good conversion rate of HAp at 20% citric acid was observed in the XRD profiles. In addition, HPMC was not obviously affected by apatite formation. However, both HPMC and citric acid increased the compressive strength of IBS. The maximum compressive strength for IBS was with 40% citric acid and 4% HPMC after 14 days of incubation in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C. PMID:20333539

  5. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants. PMID:26672385

  6. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  7. Enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property of polyurethane materials modified with citric acid and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Ze; Qiu, Yun-Ren

    2016-08-01

    Citric acid (CA) and chitosan (CS) were covalently immobilized on polyurethane (PU) materials to improve the biocompatibility and antibacterial property. The polyurethane pre-polymer with isocyanate group was synthesized by one pot method, and then grafted with citric acid, followed by blending with polyethersulfone (PES) to prepare the blend membrane by phase-inversion method so that chitosan can be grafted from the membrane via esterification and acylation reactions eventually. The native and modified membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle measurement, and tensile strength test. Protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, hemolysis assay, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and adsorption of Ca(2+) were executed to evaluate the blood compatibility of the membranes decorated by CA and CS. Particularly, the antibacterial activities on the modified membranes were evaluated based on a vitro antibacterial test. It could be concluded that the modified membrane had good anticoagulant property and antibacterial property. PMID:27102367

  8. An investigation of the chemistry of citric acid in military soldering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissan, Robin; Merwin, Larry; Fischer, John; Smith, Jim; Maurice, Jerry

    1995-06-01

    As a result of the phase-out of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC), the military and its contractors are facing the problem of developing alternative materials and processes which currently employ these materials. Electronics are a particularly challenging problem because efficient removal of post soldering flux residues is critical to the long-term performance of high reliability electronics. The use of water soluble flux offers an attractive option because all cleaning would be accomplished using only water. Until recently, the military has not allowed this type of flux because of the highly corrosive fluxing action usually associated with these materials. However, a new flux ingredient, citric acid, is gaining favor within the electronics manufacturing industry. Citric acid offers excellent fluxing ability, efficient removal of residues with water, and non-ionic flux formulations. This report examines the chemistry of this material under simulated soldering conditions in an effort to gain an improved understanding of thermal reactions and degradation products which may have an effect on long-term reliability of military electronic hardware.

  9. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of caprylic acid in combination with citric acid against both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and indigenous microflora in carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Rhee, M S

    2015-08-01

    The identification of novel, effective, and non-thermal decontamination methods is imperative for the preservation of unpasteurized and fresh vegetable juices. The aim of this study was to examine the bactericidal effects of caprylic acid + citric acid against the virulent pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and the endogenous microflora in unpasteurized fresh carrot juice. Carrot juice was treated with either caprylic acid, citric acid, or a combination of caprylic acid + citric acid at mild heating temperature (45 °C or 50 °C). The color of the treated carrot juice as well as microbial survival was examined over time. Combined treatment was more effective than individual treatment in terms of both color and microbial survival. Caprylic acid + citric acid treatment (each at 5.0 mM) at 50 °C for 5 min resulted in 7.46 and 3.07 log CFU/ml reductions in the E. coli O157:H7 and endogenous microflora populations, respectively. By contrast, there was no apparent reduction in either population following individual treatment. A validation assay using a low-density E. coli O157:H7 inoculum (3.31 log CFU/ml) showed that combined treatment with caprylic acid (5.0 mM) + citric acid (2.5 mM) at 50 °C for >5 min or with caprylic acid + citric acid (both at 5.0 mM) at either 45 °C or 50 °C for >5 min completely destroyed the bacteria. Combined treatment also increased the redness of the juice, which is a perceived indication of quality. Taken together, these results indicate that combined treatment with low concentrations of caprylic acid and citric acid, which are of biotic origin, can eliminate microorganisms from unpasteurized carrot juice. PMID:25846927

  10. Accelerated anaerobic dechlorination of DDT in slurry with Hydragric Acrisols using citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiying; Xu, Xianghua; Fan, Jianling

    2015-12-01

    The application of electron donor and electron shuttle substances has a vital influence on electron transfer, thus may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in anaerobic reaction systems. To evaluate the roles of citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols that contain abundant iron oxide, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with four treatments of (1) control, (2) citric acid, (3) AQDS, and (4) citric acid+AQDS. Results showed that DDT residues decreased by 78.93%-92.11% of the initial quantities after 20days of incubation, and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDD) was the dominant metabolite. The application of citric acid accelerated DDT dechlorination slightly in the first 8days, while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly, and then the acceleration effect improved after the 8th day while the methanogenesis rate decreased. The amendment by AQDS decreased the Eh value of the reaction system and accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus enhancing the reductive dechlorination rate of DDT. The addition of citric acid+AQDS was most efficient in stimulating DDT dechlorination, but no significant interaction between citric acid and AQDS on DDT dechlorination was observed. The results will be of great significance for developing an efficient in situ remediation strategy for DDT-contaminated sites. PMID:26702971

  11. Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on citric acid assisted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bardhan, Neel Kanth; Krishna, Rohit; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Gracio, José

    2012-08-01

    A novel and practical glucose biosensor was fabricated with immobilization of Glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on the surface of citric acid (CA) assisted cobalt ferrite (CF) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This innovative sensor was constructed with glassy carbon electrode which is represented as (GOx)/CA-CF/(GCE). An explicit high negative zeta potential value (-22.4 mV at pH 7.0) was observed on the surface of CA-CF MNPs. Our sensor works on the principle of detection of H2O2 which is produced by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. This sensor has tremendous potential for application in glucose biosensing due to the higher sensitivity 2.5 microA/cm2-mM and substantial increment of the anodic peak current from 0.2 microA to 10.5 microA. PMID:22962799

  12. Effect of forced aeration on citric acid production by Aspergillus sp. mutants in SSF.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Cristine; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sturm, Wilerson; Dergint, Dario E A; Spier, Michele Rigon; de Carvalho, Júlio Cesar; Soccol, Carlos R

    2013-12-01

    Citric acid (CA) is one of the most important products of fermentation in the world. A great variety of agro-industrial residues can be used in solid state fermentation. Aspergillus niger parental strain (CCT 7716) and two strains obtained by mutagenesis (CCT 7717 and CCT 7718) were evaluated in Erlenmeyer flasks and glass columns using citric pulp (CP) as substrate/support, sugarcane molasses and methanol. Best results using glass columns (forced aeration) were found in the fourth day of fermentation: 278.4, 294.9 and 261.1 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. In Erlenmeyer flasks (aeration by diffusion) CA reached 410.7, 446.8 and 492.7 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. The aeration by diffusion improved CA production by the three strains. A data acquisition system specially developed for biotechnological processes analysis was used to perform the respirometric parameters measurement. PMID:23760557

  13. Production of Succinic Acid from Citric Acid and Related Acids by Lactobacillus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kaneuchi, Choji; Seki, Masako; Komagata, Kazuo

    1988-01-01

    A number of Lactobacillus strains produced succinic acid in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth to various extents. Among 86 fresh isolates from fermented cane molasses in Thailand, 30 strains (35%) produced succinic acid; namely, 23 of 39 Lactobacillus reuteri strains, 6 of 18 L. cellobiosus strains, and 1 of 6 unidentified strains. All of 10 L. casei subsp. casei strains, 5 L. casei subsp. rhamnosus strains, 6 L. mali strains, and 2 L. buchneri strains did not produce succinic acid. Among 58 known strains including 48 type strains of different Lactobacillus species, the strains of L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. jensenii, and L. parvus produced succinic acid to the same extent as the most active fresh isolates, and those of L. alimentarius, L. collinoides, L. farciminis, L. fructivorans (1 of 2 strains tested), L. malefermentans, and L. reuteri were also positive, to lesser extents. Diammonium citrate in de Man-Rogosa-Sharpe broth was determined as a precursor of the succinic acid produced. Production rates were about 70% on a molar basis with two fresh strains tested. Succinic acid was also produced from fumaric and malic acids but not from dl-isocitric, α-ketoglutaric, and pyruvic acids. The present study is considered to provide the first evidence on the production of succinic acid, an important flavoring substance in dairy products and fermented beverages, from citrate by lactobacilli. PMID:16347795

  14. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate. PMID:25045161

  15. Effect of Citric Acid and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid on the Surface Morphology of Young and Old Root Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Scelza, Miriam Zaccaro; de Noronha, Fernando; da Silva, Licinio Esmeraldo; Maurício, Marcos; Gallito, Marco Antonio; Scelza, Pantaleo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of 10% citric acid and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) irrigating solutions on the surface morphology of young and old root dentin by determining the number and diameter of dentinal tubules using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Methods and Materials: Fifty healthy human teeth collected from young (≤30 years) and old (≥60 years) individuals (n=25) were first prepared with a Largo bur #2 to produce smear layer on the root canal surface. Subsequently, the crowns and the root middle and apical thirds were sectioned and removed, and the cervical thirds were sectioned vertically in the buccal-lingual direction into two equal halves. The obtained samples were then immersed in 2.5% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min and randomly separated into two treatment groups for each age group. In each age group, ten samples were selected as controls and did not receive any type of treatment. The rest of the specimens were then rinsed, dried and treated for 4 min with 10% citric acid or 17% EDTA. The samples were then assessed with SEM regarding the number and diameter of dentinal tubules. All data were assessed using Student’s t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of treatment, no significant differences were observed in the number of open tubules between the young and old root dentin (P>0.05). Nonetheless, the diameter of the tubules in the old root dentin was larger when 17% EDTA was used (P<0.05). Both, young and old root dentin did not differ with the 10% citric acid treatment (P>0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that 17% EDTA treatment induced a significant demineralization in old root dentin. PMID:27471529

  16. Phytotoxicity of citric acid and Tween® 80 for potential use as soil amendments in enhanced phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced phytoremediation adding biodegradable amendments like low molecular weight organic acids and surfactants is an interesting area of current research to overcome the limitation that represents low bioavailability of pollutants in soils. However, prior to their use in assisted phytoremediation, it is necessary to test if amendments per se exert any toxic effect to plants and to optimize their application mode. In this context, the present study assessed the effects of citric acid and Tween® 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate) on the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, as influenced by their concentration and frequency of application, in order to evaluate the feasibility for their future use in enhanced phytoremediation of multi-contaminated soils. The results showed that citric acid negatively affected plant germination, while it did not have any significant effect on biomass or chlorophyll content. In turn, Tween® 80 did not affect plant germination and showed a trend to increase biomass, as well as it did not have any significant effect on chlorophyll levels. M. sativa appeared to tolerate citric acid and Tween® 80 at the tested concentrations, applied weekly. Consequently, citric acid and Tween® 80 could potentially be utilized to assist phytoremediation of contaminated soils vegetated with M. sativa. PMID:25976880

  17. In vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in murine fibroblasts exposed to EDTA, NaOCl, MTAD and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Marins, Juliana Soares Roter; Sassone, Luciana Moura; Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capacity of some root canal irrigants to induce genetic damage and/or cellular death in vitro. Murine fibroblast cells were exposed to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), MTAD™ and citric acid in increasing concentrations for 3 h at 37ºC. The negative control group was treated with vehicle control (phosphate buffer solution - PBS) for 3 h at 37°C, and the positive control group was treated with methylmetanesulfonate, 1 μM. for 3 h at 37°C. Cytotoxicity was assessed by the trypan blue test and genotoxicity was evaluated by the single cell gel (comet) assay. The results showed that exposure to 2.5% and 5% NaOCl and 8.5% citric acid resulted in a significant cytotoxic effect. NaOCl, EDTA and citric acid did not produce genotoxic effects with respect to the comet assay data for all evaluated concentrations. Although MTAD was not a cytotoxic agent, it showed significant genotoxic effects at all tested concentrations (ANOVA and Tukey's test; p<0.05). NaOCl, EDTA and citric acid were found to be cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner, but they were not genotoxic. MTAD did not cause cell death, but presented genotoxic effects. PMID:23306229

  18. Development of anti-scale poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) dual polymer systems for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Nayunigari, Mithil Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Kokkarachedu, Varaprasad; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2014-01-01

    The formation of calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scale poses major problems in heat exchangers and water cooling systems, thereby affecting the performance of these types of equipment. In order to inhibit these scale formations, new types of biodegradable water soluble single polymer and dual poly(aspartic acid-citric acid) polymers were developed and tested. The effectiveness of single polymer and four different compositions of poly aspartic acid and citric acid dual polymer systems as scale inhibitors were evaluated. Details of the synthesis, thermal stability, scale inhibition and the morphological characterization of single and dual polymers are presented in this scientific paper. It was found that the calcium sulphate scale inhibition rate was in the range 76.06-91.45%, while the calcium carbonate scale inhibition rate observed was in the range 23.37-30.0% at 65-70 °C. The finding suggests that the water soluble dual polymers are very effective in sulphate scale inhibition in comparison of calcium carbonate scale inhibition. PMID:25189837

  19. Fuzzy approach for improved recognition of citric acid induced piglet coughing from continuous registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    A natural acoustic indicator of animal welfare is the appearance (or absence) of coughing in the animal habitat. A sound-database of 5319 individual sounds including 2034 coughs was collected on six healthy piglets containing both animal vocalizations and background noises. Each of the test animals was repeatedly placed in a laboratory installation where coughing was induced by nebulization of citric acid. A two-class classification into 'cough' or 'other' was performed by the application of a distance function to a fast Fourier spectral sound analysis. This resulted in a positive cough recognition of 92%. For the whole sound-database however there was a misclassification of 21%. As spectral information up to 10000 Hz is available, an improved overall classification on the same database is obtained by applying the distance function to nine frequency ranges and combining the achieved distance-values in fuzzy rules. For each frequency range clustering threshold is determined by fuzzy c-means clustering.

  20. A Study of Krebs Citric Acid Cycle Enzymes in Rice Larvae (Corcyrace phalonica St) During Mycotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Umashashi C.; Shanmugasundaram, E. R. B.

    1967-01-01

    Krebs citric acid cycle enzymes have been studied in rice moth larvae (Corcyra cephalonica St) reared in groundnut meal control and contaminated with A. flavus, wheat bran control and wheat bran contaminated with A. flavus and also wheat bran containing aflatoxin. It was observed that the activity of enzymes other than succinic oxidase, succinic dehydrogenase and isocitric dehydrogenase were reduced significantly in larvae reared in contaminated groundnut meal when compared with the control. In the case of larvae reared in contaminated wheat bran all the enzymes except succinic oxidase were inhibited when compared to the control larvae. It was also observed that the inhibition of these enzymes is greater in the case of larvae reared in contaminated wheat bran than in contaminated groundnut meal. The higher toxicity of wheat bran has been discussed. PMID:4229935

  1. Prediction of positional isotopomers of the citric acid cycle: the syntactic approach.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D M; Bergman, R N

    1994-03-01

    We propose a syntactic approach to modeling of biochemical fluxes that combines a rule-based description of atomic transfer in chemical reactions with a structurally oriented, stochastic model of chemical reaction kinetics. This approach avoids the use of differential equations to describe the production and disappearance of each molecule. The computer simulation predicts the changes over time in the abundance of each positional isotopomer of every metabolic intermediate in the citric acid cycle of heart cells, subsequent to administration of [2-13C]acetate (including natural abundance of 13C). (Positional isotopomers are isomers that differ in the positions of isotopes within the molecule.) The 32 positional isotopomers of glutamate fell into four groups with similar intragroup dynamics but with very different amplitudes. From the relative abundance of each isotopomer of glutamate, we calculate the relative area of multiplets of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. PMID:7909408

  2. Properties of baked foams from citric acid modified cassava starch and native cassava starch blends.

    PubMed

    Pornsuksomboon, Kanlaya; Holló, Berta Barta; Szécsényi, Katalin Mészáros; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2016-01-20

    Starch foams from native cassava starch (NS) and citric acid modified cassava starch (CNS) were prepared using baking processes with blend ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 20/80. The density, thickness, morphology, thermal stability and water absorption of the NS, CNS and blended starch foams were determined. The ratio of the two starch components had a significant influence on the density and thickness of the blended starch foams. All blended starch foams showed good water resistance. Moreover, the morphology of the blended starch foam with the NS/CNS ratio of 50/50 showed a more ordered distribution of cell sizes with thicker cell walls than for the NS and CNS foams. The thermal stability of the blended starch foams was somewhat lower than the stability of the NS foam but not to the extent that it affected any potential practical applications. PMID:26572335

  3. Antifouling polyethersulfone hemodialysis membranes incorporated with poly (citric acid) polymerized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abidin, Muhammad Nidzhom Zainol; Goh, Pei Sean; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; Othman, Mohd Hafiz Dzarfan; Hasbullah, Hasrinah; Said, Noresah; Kadir, Siti Hamimah Sheikh Abdul; Kamal, Fatmawati; Abdullah, Mohd Sohaimi; Ng, Be Cheer

    2016-11-01

    Poly (citric acid)-grafted-MWCNT (PCA-g-MWCNT) was incorporated as nanofiller in polyethersulfone (PES) to produce hemodialysis mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Citric acid monohydrate was polymerized onto the surface of MWCNTs by polycondensation. Neat PES membrane and PES/MWCNTs MMMs were fabricated by dry-wet spinning technique. The membranes were characterized in terms of morphology, pure water flux (PWF) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein rejection. The grafting yield of PCA onto MWCNTs was calculated as 149.2%. The decrease of contact angle from 77.56° to 56.06° for PES/PCA-g-MWCNTs membrane indicated the increase in surface hydrophilicity, which rendered positive impacts on the PWF and BSA rejection of the membrane. The PWF increased from 15.8Lm(-2)h(-1) to 95.36Lm(-2)h(-1) upon the incorporation of PCA-g-MWCNTs due to the attachment of abundant hydrophilic groups that present on the MWCNTs, which have improved the affinity of membrane towards the water molecules. For protein rejection, the PES/PCA-g-MWCNTs MMM rejected 95.2% of BSA whereas neat PES membrane demonstrated protein rejection of 90.2%. Compared to commercial PES hemodialysis membrane, the PES/PCA-g-MWCNTs MMMs showed less flux decline behavior and better PWF recovery ratio, suggesting that the membrane antifouling performance was improved. The incorporation of PCA-g-MWCNTs enhanced the separation features and antifouling capabilities of the PES membrane for hemodialysis application. PMID:27524052

  4. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children. PMID:25784372

  5. Comparison of fibrin clot adhesion to dentine conditioned with citric acid, tetracycline, and ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid: An in vitro scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Tanuj; Rahul, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root surface changes subsequent to the application of citric acid, tetracycline, Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the combination of citric acid and tetracycline, and its influence on the adhesion of a fibrin clot with and without mild disruptive forces. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 periodontally diseased root specimens were grouped into Saline (control Group I), 24% EDTA gel (Group-II), Citric acid (Group-III), Tetracycline (Group IV), and Citric acid + tetracycline (Group V) treatment groups containing 20 in each. After root conditioning, fresh human blood was applied to each root specimen and was allowed to clot. Ten specimens in each group were rinsed in phosphate-buffered saline and designated as ′Non-agitated′. The remaining ten specimens from each group were rinsed in phosphate-buffered saline on a rotary shaker and designated as ′Agitated′. The roots were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to assess and compare the clot adhesion on them. The scores were compared through standard statistical packages. Results: The highest mean blood clot adhesion score was observed in roots treated with a combination of citric acid and tetracycline, whereas, the least score was observed in roots treated with saline. Conclusion: The root specimens treated with the combination of citric acid and tetracycline as well as citric acid alone, best supported the fibrin clot. Tetracycline alone appeared to be less effective in supporting the clot. EDTA gel of 24% was least effective to promote the adhesion of a fibrin clot. PMID:23162325

  6. Clinical and microbiological effects of subgingival antimicrobial irrigation with citric acid as evaluated by an enzyme immunoassay and culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Renvert, S; Dahlén, G; Snyder, B

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare an enzyme immunoassay with culture samples from untreated and non-surgically treated periodontal pockets and to assess the clinical and microbiological effects of citric acid irrigation as a supplement to scaling and root planing. The enzyme immunoassay used in this study is a chairside diagnostic tool aimed at identifying the presence of P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and A. actinomycetemcomitans. Six sites with pocket depths > or = 6 mm in each of 16 patients were monitored for 24 weeks using clinical and microbiological parameters. In two out of the six sites, scaling and root planing was supplemented with subgingival citric acid irrigation of the pocket after completion of the mechanical treatment. The sensitivity of the immunoassay in relation to culture was calculated to 85.5% and the specificity to 90.2%. The immunoassay corresponded to a detection level of 10(4) as estimated by culture. Sites treated with a combination of scaling and irrigation with citric acid demonstrated a similar healing pattern as sites treated with scaling and root planing alone. The profile of the marker bacteria was almost parallel for the two groups. The results of this investigation thus indicated that the immunoassay can be used as a screening tool for selected periodontal pathogens and that adjunctive irrigation with citric acid has no measurable clinical or microbiological effects. PMID:9150039

  7. 77 FR 72323 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...The Department of Commerce (the Department) has completed its administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China for the period January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2010. On June 5, 2012, we published the preliminary results of this review.\\1\\......

  8. 75 FR 71078 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Request Administrative Review, 75 FR 23236-37 (May 3, 2010). On June 1, 2010, in accordance with 19 CFR... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). On...., Ltd. Juxian Hongde Citric Acid Co., Ltd. Kelong International Co., Ltd. Laiwu Taihe Biochemistry...

  9. 76 FR 49735 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 76 FR 24460 (May 2, 2011). On May 31... Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June 28, 2011). Rescission... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of...

  10. 76 FR 47146 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Deferral of Administrative Review, 75 FR 37759... of the Antidumping Duty Order; and Partial Rescission of Administrative Review, 76 FR 34048 (June 10... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of...

  11. 77 FR 33399 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... Administrative Review, 77 FR 1455 (January 10, 2012). \\10\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the... Certain Citrate Salts from Canada and the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703... Request for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781, 37785 (June 28, 2011) (``Initiation''). \\3\\ See Letter...

  12. 76 FR 34048 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 4288 (January 25, 2011). \\6\\ See Citric Acid and... Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009). \\2\\ See Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759...

  13. Quantitative analysis of citric acid/sodium hypophosphite modified cotton by HPLC and conductometric titration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Wang, Bijia; Liu, Jian; Chen, Jiangang; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-05-01

    Isocratic HPLC was used in conjunction with conductometric titration to quantitatively examine the modification of cotton cellulose by citric acid (CA)/sodium hypophosphite (SHP). CA/SHP had been extensively used as a green crosslinking agent for enhancement of cellulose and other carbohydrate polymers without in-depth understanding of the mechanisms. The current study investigated all identifiable secondary polycarboxylic acids from CA decomposition in the CA/SHP-cellulose system under various curing conditions. It was found that CA decomposition was more sensitive to temperature compared with the desirable esterification reaction. Two crosslinking mechanisms, namely ester crosslinking and SHP crosslinking were responsible for the observed improvement in crease resistance of CA/SHP treated cotton fabrics. An oligomer of citraconic acid (CCA) and/or itaconic acid (IA) was identified as a possible contributor to fabric yellowing. Finally, the crease resistance of fabrics correlated strongly with CA preservation in polyol-added CA/SHP crosslinking systems. The dosage of polyol should be held below an inflexion point to keep the undesirable competition against cellulose minimum. The combination of HPLC and conductometric titration was demonstrated to be useful in studying the CA/SHP-cellulose crosslinking system. The findings have implications for better application of CA/SHP in polysaccharide modifications in general. PMID:25659676

  14. The opposite roles of agdA and glaA on citric acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Cao, Zhanglei; Hou, Li; Yin, Liuhua; Wang, Dawei; Gao, Qiang; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Depei

    2016-07-01

    Citric acid is produced by an industrial-scale process of fermentation using Aspergillus niger as a microbial cell factory. However, citric acid production was hindered by the non-fermentable isomaltose and insufficient saccharification ability in A. niger when liquefied corn starch was used as a raw material. In this study, A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA was constructed by deletion of the α-glucosidase-encoding agdA gene in A. niger CGMCC 10142 genome using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The transformants A. niger OG 1, OG 17, and OG 31 then underwent overexpression of glucoamylase in A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA. The results showed that the α-glucosidase activity of TNA 101ΔagdA was decreased by 62.5 % compared with CGMCC 10142, and isomaltose was almost undetectable in the fermentation broth. The glucoamylase activity of the transformants OG 1 and OG 17 increased by 34.5 and 16.89 % compared with that of TNA 101ΔagdA, respectively. In addition, for the recombinants TNA 101ΔagdA, OG 1 and OG 17, there were no apparent defects in the growth development. Consequently, in comparison with CGMCC 10142, TNA 101ΔagdA and OG 1 decreased the residual reducing sugar by 52.95 and 88.24 %, respectively, and correspondingly increased citric acid production at the end of fermentation by 8.68 and 16.87 %. Citric acid production was further improved by decreasing the non-fermentable residual sugar and increasing utilization rate of corn starch material in A. niger. Besides, the successive saccharification and citric acid fermentation processes were successfully integrated into one step. PMID:26837219

  15. Optimization of pectin extraction from banana peels with citric acid by using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Túlio Ítalo S; Rosa, Morsyleide F; Cavalcante, Fabio Lima; Pereira, Paulo Henrique F; Moates, Graham K; Wellner, Nikolaus; Mazzetto, Selma E; Waldron, Keith W; Azeredo, Henriette M C

    2016-05-01

    A central composite design was used to determine effects of pH (2.0-4.5), extraction temperature (70-90 °C) and time (120-240 min) on the yield, degree of methoxylation (DM) and galacturonic acid content (GA) of pectins extracted from banana peels with citric acid. Changes in composition during the main steps of pectin extraction were followed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR was also used to determine DM and GA of pectins. Harsh temperature and pH conditions enhanced the extraction yield, but decreased DM. GA presented a maximum value at 83 °C, 190 min, and pH 2.7. The yield of galacturonic acid (YGA), which took into account both the extraction yield and the pectin purity, was improved by higher temperature and lower pH values. The optimum extraction conditions, defined as those resulting in a maximum YGA while keeping DM at a minimum of 51%, were: 87 °C, 160 min, pH 2.0. PMID:26769512

  16. Influence of enteric citric acid on the release profile of 4-aminopyridine from HPMC matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Martínez González, Ilona; Villafuerte Robles, Leopoldo

    2003-01-30

    A weakly basic experimental drug, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), was taken as a model to study the influence of enteric citric acid (ECA) on the release profile from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrices, to set up a system bringing about gradual release of the drug. For this purpose, powder mixtures were wet granulated with water and compressed with a hydraulic press at 55 MPa. Dissolution studies were made using first 900 ml HCl 0.1 N, and then phosphate buffer pH 7.4. Dissolution curves were described by M(t)/M(inf)=kt(n). As physically expected, increasing proportions (2-9%) of the in acid insoluble ECA decreased the release rate. In an acid medium, ECA acts as a physical barrier obstructing the diffusion path, dissolving after the pH change to 7.4. Both circumstances flattening the release profile. Apparent zero order release was observed at ECA concentrations of about 10%. The presence of ECA compensates the effect of decreased solubility of 4-AP at pH 7.4. Unexpectedly, higher ECA proportions (10-50%) act increasing the dissolution rate. This is attributed to a void space formation around the insoluble ECA, after HPMC hydration, which percolates after a critical ECA proportion of approximately 10%. Moreover, decreasing release constant values (k) show a logarithmic relationship with increasing values of the exponent (n). This indicates that an apparent zero-order release can be obtained at a given release constant. PMID:12527188

  17. Whiteness improvement of citric acid crosslinked cotton fabrics: H2O2 bleaching under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peixin; Ji, Bolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-08-20

    Polycarboxylic acids have been employed as formaldehyde-free crosslinking agents in anti-wrinkle treatment for cotton fabrics. Cotton fabrics treated by citric acid (CA) catalyzed with effective catalysts have shown satisfactory anti-wrinkle properties. Meanwhile, CA is a natural-based and environmental friendly compound. However, the yellowing of CA treated fabrics is a stumbling block for its practical application. Due to the fact that CA firstly forms aconitic acid (AA) before forming anhydrides, the cause of the yellowing, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) bleaching was adopted to treat the CA treated fabrics in order to break the CC bond structure and reduce the yellow color but retaining the desired anti-wrinkle properties. Thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were employed to investigate the reactions. The results revealed that the H2O2 bleaching can effectively improve the whiteness and also maintain a good anti-wrinkle performance of the CA treated fabrics under an appropriate bleaching temperature and time. PMID:27178918

  18. Mixture tetracycline citric acid and detergent – A root canal irrigant. A review

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, G.P.V.; Sekhar, K.S.; Nischith, K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Root canal irrigants play an indispensable role for the complete disinfection of the root canal system, in particular those areas of the root canal that are not accessible for instrumentation. Sodium hypochlorite, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine are the most commonly used root canal irrigants in endodontic practice, but they do not satisfy all the properties of an ideal root canal irrigant. Mixture tetracycline, citric acid and detergent, a root canal irrigant, is commercially available as BioPure MTAD (Dentsply, Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK). Methodology The literature was searched for root canal irrigants used in the last 3 decades in PubMed. Data showed 83 relevant articles, of which 24 were found most suitable on the basis of description of properties, advantages and disadvantages of MTAD, hence were included. The aim of this study was to evaluate the properties of MTAD for its antibacterial efficiency, biocompatibility, chelating action with removal of endodontic smear layer and compare it with other commonly used root canal irrigants like sodium hypochlorite, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, chlorhexidine. Results MTAD was found to be highly effective intracanal irrigant compared to other commonly used root canal irrigants with excellent disinfection of the entire root canal system. Conclusion MTAD is biocompatible with superior antimicrobial efficiency compared to other commonly used root canal irrigants. PMID:25737877

  19. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-01

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with 14C-glucose and 3H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD+] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD+] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation. PMID:15550462

  20. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix components in experimentally induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; Veeraraghavan, Vishnu Priya; Jainu, Mallika

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is an important component of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum, which progresses to the end stage liver disease, if not diagnosed and treated properly. The disproportionate production of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines secreted from fat contributes to the pathogenesis of NASH. In this study, the comparative effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix (ECM) component levels were studied in experimentally induced NASH. Materials and Methods: The experimental protocol consists of using 48 male Wister rats, which were divided into 8 groups. The levels of hyaluronic acid, leptin and adiponectin were monitored in experimental NASH. Results: The experimental NASH rats treated with pioglitazone showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and significant increase in adiponectin levels when compared to experimentally induced NASH group, but did not show any effect on the levels of leptin. Contrary to these two drugs, viz. pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid, the group treated with quercetin showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and leptin and significant decrease in adiponectin levels compared with that of experimentally induced NASH NASH group, offering maximum protection against NASH. Conclusion: Considering our findings, it could be concluded that quercetin may offer maximum protection against NASH by significantly increasing the levels of adiponectin, when compared to pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid. PMID:26557974

  1. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  2. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-05-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL- and Cu2L22-) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids.

  3. Effect of plant oils upon lipase and citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Farshad; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Momenbeik, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA), and single-cell protein (SCP) by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lipase and CA production. The Y. lipolytica DSM 3286 produced 34.6 +/- 0.1 U/mL of lipase and also CA and SCP as by-product on olive oil medium supplemented with yeast extract. Urea, as organic nitrogen, was the best nitrogen source for CA production. The results of this study suggest that the two biotechnologically valuable products, lipase and CA, could be produced simultaneously by this strain using renewable low-cost substrates such as plant oils in one procedure. PMID:19826636

  4. Effect of Plant Oils upon Lipase and Citric Acid Production in Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Farshad; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Momenbeik, Fariborz

    2009-01-01

    The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA), and single-cell protein (SCP) by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lipase and CA production. The Y. lipolytica DSM 3286 produced 34.6 ± 0.1 U/mL of lipase and also CA and SCP as by-product on olive oil medium supplemented with yeast extract. Urea, as organic nitrogen, was the best nitrogen source for CA production. The results of this study suggest that the two biotechnologically valuable products, lipase and CA, could be produced simultaneously by this strain using renewable low-cost substrates such as plant oils in one procedure. PMID:19826636

  5. Citric Acid Enhanced Copper Removal by a Novel Multi-amines Decorated Resin

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fuqiang; Pei, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wei, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yanhong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Li, Aimin; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Cu removal by a novel multi-amines decorated resin (PAMD) from wastewater in the absence or presence of citric acid (CA) was examined. Adsorption capacity of Cu onto PAMD markedly increased by 186% to 5.07 mmol/g in the presence of CA, up to 7 times of that onto four commercial resins under the same conditions. Preloaded and kinetic studies demonstrated adsorption of [Cu-CA] complex instead of CA site-bridging and variations of adsorbate species were qualitatively illustrated. The interaction configuration was further studied with ESI-MS, FTIR, XPS and XANES characterizations. The large enhancement of Cu adsorption in Cu-CA bi-solutes systems was attributed to mechanism change from single-site to dual-sites interaction in which cationic or neutral Cu species (Cu2+ and CuHL0) coordinated with neutral amine sites and anionic complex species (CuL− and Cu2L22−) directly interacted with protonated amine sites via electrostatic attraction, and the ratio of the two interactions was approximately 0.5 for the equimolar bi-solutes system. Moreover, commonly coexisting ions in wastewaters had no obvious effect on the superior performance of PAMD. Also, Cu and CA could be recovered completely with HCl. Therefore, PAMD has a great potential to efficiently remove heavy metal ions from wastewaters in the presence of organic acids. PMID:25962970

  6. Insights into cadmium induced physiological and ultra-structural disorders in Juncus effusus L. and its remediation through exogenous citric acid.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Ullah; Jilani, Ghulam; Ali, Shafaqat; Sarwar, Muhammad; Xu, Ling; Zhou, Weijun

    2011-02-15

    This study appraised cadmium (Cd) toxicity stress in wetland plant Juncus effusus, and explored its potential for Cd phytoextraction through chelators (citric acid and EDTA). Cadmium altered morphological and physiological attributes of J. effusus as reflected by growth retardation. Citric acid in the presence of 100 μM Cd significantly countered Cd toxicity by improving plant growth. Elevated Cd concentrations reduced translocation factor that was increased under application of both chelators. Citric acid enhanced Cd accumulation, while EDTA reduced its uptake. Cadmium induced oxidative stress modified the antioxidative enzyme activity. Both levels of citric acid (2.5 and 5.0 mM) and lower EDTA concentration (2.5 mM) helped plants to overcome oxidative stress by enhancing their antioxidative enzyme activities. Cadmium damaged the root cells through cytoplasmic shrinkage and metal deposition. Citric acid restored structure and shape of root cells and eliminated plasmolysis; whereas, EDTA exhibited no positive effect on it. Shoot cells remained unaffected under Cd treatment alone or with citric acid except for chloroplast swelling. Only EDTA promoted starch accumulation in chloroplast reflecting its negative impact on cellular structure. It concludes that Cd and EDTA induce structural and morphological damage in J. effusus; while, citric acid ameliorates Cd toxicity stress. PMID:21159423

  7. Comparative evaluation of demineralization of radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid, and MTAD at different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yogender; Lohar, Jitendra; Bhat, Sureka; Bhati, Manisha; Gandhi, Aanesh; Mehta, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The smear layer has the capability to protect the bacteria within the dentinal tubules from intracanal medicament. After removal of the smear layer from infected root canals, it allows disinfection of the entire root canal. The smear layer compromising the seal between the root canal sealer and root canal wall also decreases the penetration of irrigants into dentinal tubules. Aims: This study compares the amount of phosphorous liberated and demineralization of the radicular dentin with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 10% citric acid and mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Extracted maxillary single-rooted teeth were prepared by using a combination of passive step-back and rotary 0.04 taper nickel-titanium files. Sodium hypochlorite 5.25% and sterile distilled water were used as an intracanal irrigant. The canals were then treated with 5 mL of one of the following solutions such as final rinse sterile distilled water, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent. The presence or absence of smear layer and the amount of erosion on the surface of the root canal walls at the coronal, middle, and apical portions of each canal were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to determine whether there were significant differences between the groups. Results: The results show that mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent is an effective solution for the removal of the smear layer and does not significantly change the structure of the dentinal tubules. Conclusions: In this study, 10% citric acid shows the maximum amount of dimeneralization of radicular dentine followed by mixture of doxycycline, citric acid, and a detergent, and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. When all the subgroups were compared, it was seen

  8. Role of different additives and metallic micro minerals on the enhanced citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sikander; Haq, Ikram-ul

    2005-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the promotry effect of different additives and metallic micro minerals on citric acid production by Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 using different carbohydrate materials. For this, sugar cane bagasse was fortified with sucrose salt medium. Ethanol and coconut oil at 3.0% (v/w) level increased citric acid productivity. Fluoroacetate at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml bagasse enhanced the yield of citric acid significantly. However, the addition of ethanol and fluoroacetate after 6 h of growth gave the maximum conversion of available sugar to citric acid. In another study, influence of some metallic micro-minerals viz. copper sulphate, molybdenum sulphate, zinc sulphate and cobalt sulphate on microbial synthesis of citric acid using molasses medium was also carried out. It was found that copper sulphate and molybdenum sulphate remarkably enhanced the production of citric acid while zinc sulphate was not so effective. However, cobalt sulphate was the least effective for microbial biosynthesis of citric acid under the same experimental conditions. In case of CuSO(4), the strain of Aspergillus niger MNNG-115 showed enhanced citric productivity with experimental (9.80%) over the control (7.54%). In addition, the specific productivity of the culture at 30 ppm CuSO(4) (Q(p) = 0.012a g/g cells/h) was several folds higher than other all other concentrations. All kinetic parameters including yield coefficients and volumetric rates revealed the hyper productivity of citric acid by CuSO(4) using blackstrap molasses as the basal carbon source. PMID:15678560

  9. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid* #

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-01-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of 109Cd increased significantly, and higher 109Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the 109Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  10. Improved cadmium uptake and accumulation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii: the impact of citric acid and tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-li; Tian, Sheng-ke; Yang, Xiao-e; Peng, Hong-yun; Li, Ting-qiang

    2013-02-01

    The elucidation of a natural strategy for metal hyperaccumulation enables the rational design of technologies for the clean-up of metal-contaminated soils. Organic acid has been suggested to be involved in toxic metallic element tolerance, translocation, and accumulation in plants. The impact of exogenous organic acids on cadmium (Cd) uptake and translocation in the zinc (Zn)/Cd co-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated in the present study. By the addition of organic acids, short-term (2 h) root uptake of (109)Cd increased significantly, and higher (109)Cd contents in roots and shoots were noted 24 h after uptake, when compared to controls. About 85% of the (109)Cd taken up was distributed to the shoots in plants with citric acid (CA) treatments, as compared with 75% within controls. No such effect was observed for tartaric acid (TA). Reduced growth under Cd stress was significantly alleviated by low CA. Long-term application of the two organic acids both resulted in elevated Cd in plants, but the effects varied with exposure time and levels. The results imply that CA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation and tolerance in S. alfredii, whereas the impact of TA is mainly on the root uptake of Cd. PMID:23365009

  11. Blood metabolomics analysis identifies abnormalities in the citric acid cycle, urea cycle, and amino acid metabolism in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimi, Noriko; Futamura, Takashi; Kakumoto, Keiji; Salehi, Alireza M.; Sellgren, Carl M.; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jakobsson, Joel; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and debilitating psychiatric disorder. However, the precise biological basis remains unknown, hampering the search for novel biomarkers. We performed a metabolomics analysis to discover novel peripheral biomarkers for BD. Methods We quantified serum levels of 116 metabolites in mood-stabilized male BD patients (n = 54) and age-matched male healthy controls (n = 39). Results After multivariate logistic regression, serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, α-ketoglutarate, and arginine were significantly higher in BD patients than in healthy controls. Conversely, serum levels of β-alanine, and serine were significantly lower in BD patients than in healthy controls. Chronic (4-weeks) administration of lithium or valproic acid to adult male rats did not alter serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, β-alanine, serine, or arginine, but lithium administration significantly increased serum levels of α-ketoglutarate. Conclusions The metabolomics analysis demonstrated altered serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, β-alanine, serine, and arginine in BD patients. General significance The present findings suggest that abnormalities in the citric acid cycle, urea cycle, and amino acid metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of BD. PMID:27114925

  12. Linear birefringence and dichroism in citric acid coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Tsai, Chun-Chin; Lee, Meng-Zhe

    2014-12-01

    To prepare highly dispersed water-based Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), we adopted the co-precipitation method and used citric acid (CA) as the surfactant. Via transmission electronic microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and X-ray diffractometry, we characterized the dispersibility and size of the products. Through two single-parameter experiments, including the pH value of suspension and the action of double centrifugations, the appropriate parameters' values were determined. Further, to produce CA coated MNPs with good magneto-optical properties as high retardance and low dichroism, the orthogonal design method was used to find the optimal parameters' values, including pH value of suspension after coating was 5, molar ratio of CA to Fe3O4 MNPs was 0.06, volume of CA was 40 ml, and coating temperature was 70 °C. Above all, the linear birefringence and dichroism of the best CA coated ferrofluid we produced were measured by a Stokes polarimeter as 23.6294° and 0.3411 under 64.5 mT, respectively. Thus, the biomedical applications could be performed hereafter.

  13. The Viability of a Nonenzymatic Reductive Citric Acid Cycle Kinetics and Thermochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David S.

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate → pyruvate → oxaloacetate → malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite magnetite quartz and pyrrhotite pyrite magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  14. Citric acid-derived in situ crosslinkable biodegradable polymers for cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gyawali, Dipendra; Nair, Parvathi; Zhang, Yi; Tran, Richard T.; Zhang, Chi; Samchukov, Mikhail; Makarov, Marina; Kim, Harry; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we report the first citric acid (CA)-derived in situ crosslinkable biodegradable polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) maleate citrate (PEGMC). The synthesis of PEGMC could be carried out via a one-pot polycondensation reaction without using organic solvents or catalysts. PEGMC could be in-situ crosslinked into elastomeric PPEGMC hydrogels. The performance of hydrogels in terms of swelling, degradation, and mechanical properties were highly dependent on the molar ratio of monomers, crosslinker concentration, and crosslinking mechanism used in the synthesis process. Cyclic conditioning tests showed that PPEGMC hydrogels could be compressed up to 75% strain without permanent deformation and with negligible hysteresis. Water-soluble PEGMC demonstrated excellent cytocompatibilty in vitro. The degradation products of PPEGMC also showed minimal cytotoxicity in vitro. Animal studies in rats clearly demonstrated the excellent injectability of PEGMC and degradability of the in situ-formed PPEGMC. PPEGMC elicited minimal inflammation in the early stages post-injection and was completely degraded within 30 days in rats. In conclusion, the development of CA-derived injectable biodegradable PEGMC presents numerous opportunities for material innovation and offers excellent candidate materials for in situ tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. PMID:20800893

  15. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Gurparkash Singh; Chhina, Kamalpreet; Chhabra, Vipin; Bhatnagar, Rakhi; Chahal, Amna

    2014-01-01

    Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the Passive burnishing technique for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows). For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used. PMID:24744541

  16. Fabrication and characterization of citric acid-modified starch nanoparticles/plasticized-starch composites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaofei; Jian, Ruijuan; Chang, Peter R; Yu, Jiugao

    2008-11-01

    Starch nanoparticles (SN) were prepared by delivering ethanol as the precipitant into starch-paste solution dropwise. Citric acid (CA) modified SN (CASN) were fabricated with the dry preparation technique. According to the characterization of CASN with Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, rapid visco analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), amorphous CASN could not be gelatinized in hot water because of the cross-linking, and most of CASN ranged in size from about 50 to 100 nm. The nanocomposites were also prepared using CASN as the filler in glycerol plasticized-pea starch (GPS) matrix by the casting process. SEM revealed that CASN was dispersed evenly in the GPS matrix. As shown in dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, the introduction of CASN could improve the storage modulus and the glass transition temperature of CASN/GPS composites. The tensile yield strength and Young's modulus increased from 3.94 to 8.12 MPa and from 49.8 to 125.1 MPa, respectively, when the CASN contents varied from 0 to 4 wt %. Moreover, the values of water vapor permeability decreased from 4.76 x 10(-10) to 2.72 x 10(-10) g m(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1). The improvement of these properties could be attributed to the good interaction between CASN filler and GPS matrix. The comprehensive application of green chemistry principles were demonstrated in the preparation of CASN and CASN/GPS composites. PMID:18844405

  17. EXAFS determinations of uranium structures: The uranyl ion complexed with tartaric, citric, and malic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.J.

    1996-01-31

    Studies of the coordination chemistry of uranium in aqueous solutions are increasingly important for understanding the behavior of uranium in the environment. Actinide speciation information is essential for assessing and developing long-term strategies addressing problems such as migration in nuclear waste repositories or improvements in the processing of nuclear waste and materials. Relative to the latter, one method for removing uranium contamination from soils involves extraction using a chelating agent such as Tiron, or citrate. These types of extractants are quite efficient at binding the uranyl ion and thus are suitable for removing uranium contamination when it is in the hexavalent uranyl ion form. Martell et al. and Markovits et al. have published a series of articles detailing the complexation of the uranyl ion with tartaric, malic, and citric acids as a function of pH. Using the functional dependencies of potentiometric titration results, they showed that, in the pH range 2-4, the uranyl ion forms a 2:2 dimeric species, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2-} (L){sub 2}, where L = tartrate, malate, or citrate ligands. The authors have reinvestigated the solution structures of the uranyl complexes formed in these systems with the structural technique extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

  18. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  19. An oral sodium citrate-citric acid non-particulate buffer in humans.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, J J; Payne, K A

    1996-11-01

    We have investigated the effect on the pH of the gastric fluid of a single dose of sodium citrate 0.3 mol litre-1 (antacid) and a solution containing sodium citrate dehydrate (100 mg ml-1) with citric acid monohydrate (66 mg ml-1) (buffer). The dose for both solutions was 0.4 ml kg-1 via a nasogastric tube. Each group comprised 10 patients undergoing neurosurgical operations of 5-7 h duration. A control group of 10 patients received no gastric solution. The pH of the gastric aspirate was measured hourly using a Metrohm 632 digital pH meter (Synectics Medical, Sweden). Mean baseline gastric pH was 2.64 (SD 1.71). In the control group, pH increased to 4.4 (1.51) at 5 h, returning to baseline at 7 h. In the antacid group, pH increased to 6.11 (0.47) at 15 min and decreased to 3.70 (1.94) at 7 h (P < 0.01). In the buffer group, pH was stable at 3.80-3.95 (0.22) over 7 h (P > 0.01). Total mean gastric aspirate was 0.5 ml kg-1. PMID:8957982

  20. Rheology and molecular mobility of amorphous blends of citric acid and paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Hoppu, Pekka; Hietala, Sami; Schantz, Staffan; Juppo, Anne Mari

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the rheological properties, molecular mobility and crystallization tendency of pure citric acid and paracetamol or blends of them. Amorphous samples were produced by ethanol-evaporation or by melt-quenching. Enthalpy recovery, glass fragility and heat capacity were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Other physical characterization methods were rheology and the crystallization tendency using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and DSC. All the samples behaved as Newtonian liquids and they were fragile glasses. The 50/50 (w/w,%) blend had good physical stability upon consecutive shearing regardless of the preparation method. All the samples were stable for at least one year in dry conditions at -20 degrees C. The melt-produced blends containing 25% or 50% paracetamol were stable at least two years in dry ambient conditions. The good physical stability at ambient temperature cannot be explained by molecular mobility because molecular mobility of the model material is less than 100 s in ambient conditions. Thus other factors, such as the thermodynamic and crystallization driving forces or formation of degradation products, must determine the physical stability of the blends. The composition and processing method have an impact on the physical stability of the sample. PMID:18656536

  1. Citric acid based durable and sustainable flame retardant treatment for lyocell fabric.

    PubMed

    Mengal, Naveed; Syed, Uzma; Malik, Samander Ali; Ali Sahito, Iftikhar; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2016-11-20

    Pyrovatex CP New, is a commonly used organophosphorus based flame retardant (FR) reagent for cellulosic materials. However, it has a drawback of high formaldehyde release when used with methylated melamine (MM) based cross-linker, a known carcinogenous compound. In the present approach, a durable and sustainable flame retarding recipe formulation for lyocell fabrics is developed using citric acid (CA) as a cross-linker. The FR finish was applied by pad-dry-cure process. The treated fabrics were characterized for surface morphology, elemental analysis, TG analysis, char study and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, flame retardancy, washing durability, formaldehyde release and breaking strength were also assessed, and compared with the conventional MM based FR recipe. The fabric samples treated with 400gL(-1) of FR with either 40 or 80gL(-1) of CA demonstrate flame retardancy even after 10 washing cycles. Furthermore, a 75% reduction in formaldehyde release is achieved. Higher char yield and lower decomposition temperature are found compared to untreated and FR+ MM treated lyocell. Such an improved sustainable recipe formulation can be used for lyocell fabric without any health risk in apparel wear. PMID:27561474

  2. Photocatalytic hydrogen production from biomass-derived compounds: a case study of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Alkaim, Ayad F; Kandiel, Tarek A; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2016-11-01

    Highly crystalline anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with high BET surface area have been synthesized by thermal hydrolysis of titanium(IV) bis(ammoniumlactato) dihydroxide aqueous solutions. The photocatalytic H2 production from aqueous citric acid (CA) solutions over Pt-loaded TiO2 has been investigated under different experimental conditions, that is, different CA concentration, temperature, light intensity, and pH of Pt/TiO2 suspension. For comparison, the photocatalytic dehydrogenation of triethanolamine (TEA) has also been investigated. The highest H2 production rates were obtained at pH 3 and 9 for CA and TEA, respectively. This behavior is readily explained by the adsorption characteristic of the employed reagent on the surface of the charged TiO2. The effect of the photocatalyst loading and the light intensity on the H2 production rate showed the same behavior in the case of CA and TEA evincing that these parameters are catalyst dependent. The apparent activation energies have been determined to be 13.5 ± 1.8 and 14.7 ± 1.6 kJ mol(-1) for CA and TEA, respectively, indicating the existence of an activation energy barrier in a photocatalytic process which can be attributed to the desorption of adsorbed products. PMID:26930545

  3. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle--kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate --> pyruvate --> oxaloacetate --> malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. PMID:17136437

  4. Eco-friendly Rot and Crease Resistance Finishing of Jute Fabric using Citric Acid and Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, A. K.; Bagchi, A.

    2013-03-01

    Citric acid (CA) along with chitosan was used on bleached jute fabrics to impart anti crease and rot resistance properties in one step. The treatment was carried out by pad-dry-cure method in presence of sodium hypophosphite monohydrate catalyst. Curing at 150° Centigrade for 5 min delivered good crease resistant property (dry crease recovery angle is 244°) and high rot resistance simultaneously by a single treatment, which are durable for five washings with distilled water. Strength retention of jute fabric after 21 days soil burial was found to be 81 % and the loss (%) in strength due to this treatment was 15-18 %. The results showed that chitosan and CA treated-fabric exhibited higher rot resistance (as indicated by soil burial test) when compared to either CA or chitosan by individual treatment. The effect of CA and chitosan combination on the resistance to rotting of jute fabric was found to be synergistic which is higher than the sum of the effects of individual chemicals. CA possibly reacts with hydroxyl groups in cellulose or chitosan to form ester. The CA and chitosan finished fabric has adverse effect on stiffness. Thermal studies showed that final residue left at 500° C was much higher for CA and chitosan treated fabric than untreated jute fabric. FTIR spectroscopy suggested the formation of ester cross-linkage between the jute fibre, CA and chitosan and hence it is understood that this rot resistant finish on jute fabric become durable by this mechanism.

  5. Citric acid mediates the iron absorption from low molecular weight human milk fractions.

    PubMed

    Palika, Ravindranadh; Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Kasula, Sunanda; Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2013-11-20

    Previously, we have demonstrated increased iron absorption from low molecular weight (LMW) human milk whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of heat denaturation, zinc (a competitor of iron), duodenal cytochrome b (DcytB) antibody neutralization and citrate lyase treatment on LMW human milk fraction (>5 kDa referred as 5kF) induced ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Heat denaturation and zinc inhibited the 5kF fraction induced ferric iron reduction. In contrast, zinc but not heat denaturation abrogated the ferric iron solubilization activity. Despite inhibition of ferric iron reduction, iron uptake in Caco-2 cells was similar from both native and heat denatured 5kF fractions. However, iron uptake was higher from native compared to heat denatured 5kF fractions in the cells preincubated with the DcytB antibody. Citrate lyase treatment inhibited the ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. These findings demonstrate that citric acid present in human milk solubilizes the ferric iron which could be reduced by other heat labile components leading to increased uptake in intestinal cells. PMID:24160751

  6. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectins from grape pomace using citric acid: a response surface methodology approach.

    PubMed

    Minjares-Fuentes, R; Femenia, A; Garau, M C; Meza-Velázquez, J A; Simal, S; Rosselló, C

    2014-06-15

    An ultrasound-assisted procedure for the extraction of pectins from grape pomace with citric acid as the extracting agent was established. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimize the extraction temperature (X1: 35-75°C), extraction time (X2: 20-60 min) and pH (X3: 1.0-2.0) to obtain a high yield of pectins with high average molecular weight (MW) and degree of esterification (DE) from grape pomace. Analysis of variance showed that the contribution of a quadratic model was significant for the pectin extraction yield and for pectin MW whereas the DE of pectins was more influenced by a linear model. An optimization study using response surface methodology was performed and 3D response surfaces were plotted from the mathematical model. According to the RSM model, the highest pectin yield (∼32.3%) can be achieved when the UAE process is carried out at 75°C for 60 min using a citric acid solution of pH 2.0. These pectic polysaccharides, composed mainly by galacturonic acid units (<97% of total sugars), have an average MW of 163.9 kDa and a DE of 55.2%. Close agreement between experimental and predicted values was found. These results suggest that ultrasound-assisted extraction could be a good option for the extraction of functional pectins with citric acid from grape pomace at industrial level. PMID:24721067

  7. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent

    PubMed Central

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: “Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch–glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent” González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature. PMID:27158645

  8. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: "Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent" González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature. PMID:27158645

  9. Nitrilotriacetate- and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction of cadmium by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czernj, Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Quartacci, M F; Baker, A J M; Navari-Izzo, F

    2005-06-01

    In a pot experiment the effects of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) and citric acid applications on Cd extractibility from soil as well as on its uptake and accumulation by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) were investigated. Plants were grown in a sandy soil with added CdS at four levels ranging from 50 to 200 mg Cd kg(-1) soil. After 30 days of growth, pots were amended with NTA or citric acid at 10 and 20 mmol kg(-1). Control pots were not treated with chelates. Harvest of plants was performed immediately before and one week after chelate addition. Soil water-, NH(4)NO(3)- and EDTA-extractable Cd fractions increased constantly with both increasing soil metal application and chelate concentration. Shoot dry weights did not suffer significant reductions with increasing Cd addition to the soil except for both NTA treatments in which at 200 mg Cd kg(-1) a 30% decrease in dry matter was observed. Generally, following NTA and citric acid amendments, Cd concentration in shoots increased with soil Cd level. However, due to Cd toxicity, at the highest metal application rate both NTA treatments lowered Cd concentration in the above-ground parts. Compared to the control, at 10 mmol kg(-1) citric acid did not change Cd concentration in shoots, whereas NTA-treated plants showed an about 2-fold increase. The addition of chelates at 20 mmol kg(-1) further enhanced Cd concentration in shoots up to 718 and 560 microg g(-1) dry weight in the NTA and citrate treatments, respectively. PMID:15857636

  10. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  11. Citric Acid Induced Synthesis of a Series of Morphology-Controllable Ag Microspheres and Their Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Wang, F.; Li, Y.; Li, Q.

    2015-11-01

    A facile route has been used to synthesize a series of morphology-controllable 3D hierarchical Ag microspheres (AgMS) by using citric acid as a morphology directing-reagent. The AgMS are self-assembled by Ag nanosheets which can be controlled, including the thickness of the nanosheets and the distance between two nanosheets by varying the concentration of citric acid. The average thickness of the Ag nanosheets decreased from ~107 to ~22 nm with increasing citric acid concentration. The distance between two of Ag nanosheets is at a range of 15 to 35 nm. The SERS activity of the products has been investigated in detail by using rhodamine 6G (R6G). The results show that R6G can be detected in a concentration as low as 10-7 M. The appropriate interstitial sites of interlaced Ag nanosheets assembled on AgMS provide "hot spots" which result in a strong SERS response, and the electromagnetic enhancement may play the main role in SERS. The SERS activity of a sample has been studied by using melamine, and the limit of detection is found to be 0.6 ppm.

  12. Improvement of production of citric acid from oil palm empty fruit bunches: optimization of media by statistical experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Bari, Md Niamul; Alam, Md Zahangir; Muyibi, Suleyman A; Jamal, Parveen; Abdullah-Al-Mamun

    2009-06-01

    A sequential optimization based on statistical design and one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method was employed to optimize the media constituents for the improvement of citric acid production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) through solid state bioconversion using Aspergillus niger IBO-103MNB. The results obtained from the Plackett-Burman design indicated that the co-substrate (sucrose), stimulator (methanol) and minerals (Zn, Cu, Mn and Mg) were found to be the major factors for further optimization. Based on the OFAT method, the selected medium constituents and inoculum concentration were optimized by the central composite design (CCD) under the response surface methodology (RSM). The statistical analysis showed that the optimum media containing 6.4% (w/w) of sucrose, 9% (v/w) of minerals and 15.5% (v/w) of inoculum gave the maximum production of citric acid (337.94 g/kg of dry EFB). The analysis showed that sucrose (p<0.0011) and mineral solution (p<0.0061) were more significant compared to inoculum concentration (p<0.0127) for the citric acid production. PMID:19231166

  13. Role of citric acid in the formation of silver nanoplates through a synergistic reduction approach.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X C; Chen, C Y; Chen, W M; Yu, A B

    2010-03-16

    This study discusses the function of citrate ions in the synthesis of silver nanoplates through a synergetic reduction approach in ambient conditions. It was found that the citrate ions can play multiple roles in the synthesis process, including a reducing agent, a stabilizer, and a complex agent, and they show some unique features under the reported conditions. The reducing ability of these citrate ions was shown to be weaker than that of sodium borohydride and/or L-ascorbic acid used in the same system. The stability in the shape/size control of silver particles is weaker than that of other surfactants tested in the present system, such as bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and thiols. Citrate ions could form a silver complex with silver ions as [Ag(2)(+)...citrate] or [Ag(3)(C(6)H(5)O(7))(n+1)](3n-), as confirmed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and the kinetic analysis that the molar ratio of citric acid or sodium citrate to silver ions can greatly influence the reaction rate and, hence, the particle growth of silver nanoparticles. Such a complexing effect is further confirmed by the use of chelating ions (e.g., [Fe(CN)(6)](4-)) to form Ag(n)[Fe(CN)(6)](n-4), which can largely influence the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. These results show some formation results of generating silver nanoplates involving citrate ions, which are useful in the shape-controlled synthesis of other metallic nanoparticles with desirable functionalities. PMID:19957976

  14. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  15. New fermentation processes for producing itaconic acid and citric acid for industrial uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Itaconic acid is an important industrial chemical that we have produced by fermentation of simple sugars using the yeast Pseudozyma antarctica. Itaconic acid is priced at ~$4 per kg and has an annual market volume of about 15,000 metric tons. Itaconic acid is used in the polymer industry and for m...

  16. Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Romih, Tea; Drašler, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobič, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susič, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The isopods were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2 weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in isopods exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity. PMID:25437955

  17. The role of mast cells in citric acid-induced airway constriction and cough.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yih-Loong; Wu, Li-Ling; Lin, Tai-Yin; Lin, Chien-He

    2009-11-30

    Inhalation of citric acid (CA) causes airway constriction and coughing. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced airway constriction and cough, three experiments using guinea pigs were carried out. In the first experiment, we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit synthesis of leukotrienes, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H1 receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into 2 parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C4, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine. Decreases in respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 sec (FEV0.1) were used as indicators for airway constriction in anesthetized guinea pigs. CA-induced cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph in conscious animals. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining lung tissue or arterial plasma histamine concentration in animals. Exposure to CA induced marked airway constriction and increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced airway constriction and cough. Injection of LTC4 or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced airway constriction and cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in lung tissue and plasma histamine concentrations, which were blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced airway constriction and cough via perhaps mediators including LTs and histamine. PMID:20359123

  18. Citric Acid Production from Orange Peel Wastes by Solid-State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Ana María; Cortés, Sandra; Manuel Salgado, José; Max, Belén; Rodríguez, Noelia; Bibbins, Belinda P.; Converti, Attilio; Manuel Domínguez, José

    2011-01-01

    Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis) peel was employed in this work as raw material for the production of citric acid (CA) by solid-state fermentation (SSF) of Aspergillus niger CECT-2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599) in Erlenmeyer flasks. To investigate the effects of the main operating variables, the inoculum concentration was varied in the range 0.5·103 to 0.7·108 spores/g dry orange peel, the bed loading from 1.0 to 4.8 g of dry orange peel (corresponding to 35-80 % of the total volume), and the moisture content between 50 and 100 % of the maximum water retention capacity (MWRC) of the material. Moreover, additional experiments were done adding methanol or water in different proportions and ways. The optimal conditions for CA production revealed to be an inoculum of 0.5·106 spores/g dry orange peel, a bed loading of 1.0 g of dry orange peel, and a humidification pattern of 70 % MWRC at the beginning of the incubation with posterior addition of 0.12 mL H2O/g dry orange peel (corresponding to 3.3 % of the MWRC) every 12 h starting from 62 h. The addition of methanol was detrimental for the CA production. Under these conditions, the SSF ensured an effective specific production of CA (193 mg CA/g dry orange peel), corresponding to yields of product on total initial and consumed sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose) of 376 and 383 mg CA/g, respectively. These results, which demonstrate the viability of the CA production by SSF from orange peel without addition of other nutrients, could be of interest to possible, future industrial applications. PMID:24031646

  19. Citric Acid production from orange peel wastes by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Ana María; Cortés, Sandra; Manuel Salgado, José; Max, Belén; Rodríguez, Noelia; Bibbins, Belinda P; Converti, Attilio; Manuel Domínguez, José

    2011-01-01

    Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis) peel was employed in this work as raw material for the production of citric acid (CA) by solid-state fermentation (SSF) of Aspergillus niger CECT-2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599) in Erlenmeyer flasks. To investigate the effects of the main operating variables, the inoculum concentration was varied in the range 0.5·10(3) to 0.7·10(8) spores/g dry orange peel, the bed loading from 1.0 to 4.8 g of dry orange peel (corresponding to 35-80 % of the total volume), and the moisture content between 50 and 100 % of the maximum water retention capacity (MWRC) of the material. Moreover, additional experiments were done adding methanol or water in different proportions and ways. The optimal conditions for CA production revealed to be an inoculum of 0.5·10(6) spores/g dry orange peel, a bed loading of 1.0 g of dry orange peel, and a humidification pattern of 70 % MWRC at the beginning of the incubation with posterior addition of 0.12 mL H2O/g dry orange peel (corresponding to 3.3 % of the MWRC) every 12 h starting from 62 h. The addition of methanol was detrimental for the CA production. Under these conditions, the SSF ensured an effective specific production of CA (193 mg CA/g dry orange peel), corresponding to yields of product on total initial and consumed sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose) of 376 and 383 mg CA/g, respectively. These results, which demonstrate the viability of the CA production by SSF from orange peel without addition of other nutrients, could be of interest to possible, future industrial applications. PMID:24031646

  20. New multifunctional pharmaceutical excipient in tablet formulation based on citric acid-cyclodextrin polymer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, Maria José; Tabary, Nicolas; Chai, Feng; Cazaux, Frédéric; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Flament, Marie-Pierre; Martel, Bernard

    2016-09-25

    A β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) polymer obtained by crosslinking β-CD with citric acid in its water-insoluble (PCD-I) and soluble (PCD-S) forms was used as a multifunctional direct compression excipient for tablet designing. PCD-I powder was obtained after grinding the solid fraction through a 200μm grid. PCD-S powder was recovered after lyophilization or spray drying of the PCD-S aqueous solutions, eventually followed by a wet granulation step. Both PCD-I and PCD-S powders were characterized, separately and mixed in variable ratios, based on dynamic water vapor sorption, SEM, particle size distribution, tapped density, compressibility, and flowability. PCD-I and spray dried and lyophilized/wet granulated PCD-S, as well as the mixture PCD-I/PCD-S=90/10, presented optimal free flowing characteristics. Then, PCD-I or PCD-S powders - separately or mixed in variable ratios - were used for tablets preparation by direct compression without adding any other excipient (e.g. binder, lubricant, disintegrant etc). As PCD-I decreased, tablets resistance to crushing and disintegration time increased from 15s to 15min (against 30min for β-CD), showing the improved disintegrant functionality of PCD-I, that rapidly swelled once in contact with water. Finally, PCD was force-fed to Sprague-Dawley rats (2g/kg) which were then observed during 14days for any clinical signs of toxicity. PMID:27473278

  1. Mast cells in citric acid-induced cough of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw; Lin, T.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    It was demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. To investigate the role of mast cells in CA-induced cough, three experiments were carried out in this study. In the first experiment, 59 guinea pigs were employed and we used compound 48/80 to deplete mast cells, cromolyn sodium to stabilize mast cells, MK-886 to inhibit leukotriene synthesis, pyrilamine to antagonize histamine H{sub 1} receptor, methysergide to antagonize serotonin receptor, and indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenase. In the second experiment, 56 compound 48/80-pretreated animals were divided into two parts; the first one was used to test the role of exogenous leukotriene (LT) C{sub 4}, while the second one to test the role of exogenous histamine in CA-induced cough. Each animal with one of the above pretreatments was exposed sequentially to saline (baseline) and CA (0.6 M) aerosol, each for 3 min. Then, cough was recorded for 12 min using a barometric body plethysmograph. In the third experiment, the activation of mast cells upon CA inhalation was investigated by determining arterial plasma histamine concentration in 17 animals. Exposure to CA induced a marked increase in cough number. Compound 48/80, cromolyn sodium, MK-886 and pyrilamine, but not indomethacin or methysergide, significantly attenuated CA-induced cough. Injection of LTC{sub 4} or histamine caused a significant increase in CA-induced cough in compound 48/80-pretreated animals. In addition, CA inhalation caused significant increase in plasma histamine concentration, which was blocked by compound 48/80 pretreatment. These results suggest that mast cells play an important role in CA aerosol inhalation-induced cough via perhaps mediators LTs and histamine.

  2. Citric acid as the last therapeutic approach in an acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation of propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Siekmeyer, Manuela; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Terpe, Friederike; Beblo, Skadi; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schlensog-Schuster, Franziska; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle represents the key enzymatic steps in cellular energy metabolism. Once the TCA cycle is impaired in case of inherited metabolic disorders, life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and severe organ failure can arise. We present the case of a 6 ½-year-old girl with propionic acidaemia during an episode of acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation and severe lactic acidosis. Citric acid given as an oral formulation showed the potential to sustain the TCA cycle flux. This therapeutic approach may become a treatment option in a situation of acute metabolic crisis, possibly preventing severe disturbance of energy metabolism. PMID:23412866

  3. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Érico

    2005-06-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g - 1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g - 1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively ( n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l - 1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium.

  4. Enhanced efficiency of cadmium removal by Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. in the presence of exogenous citric and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaying; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yaqin; Wang, Chunlin; Hu, Xinjiang; Xu, Weihua

    2014-12-01

    Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. is a potential candidate for the remediation of Cd contaminated sites. The present investigation aims to explore Cd tolerance threshold and to quickly identify the role of exogenous organic acids in Cd uptake and abiotic metal stress damage. Elevated Cd levels (0-10mg/L) resulted in an obvious rise in Cd accumulation, ranging from 268.0 to 374.4 in root and 25.2 to 41.2mg/kg dry weight in shoot, respectively. Citric acid at 1.5 mmol/L significantly facilitated Cd uptake by 26.7% in root and by 1-fold in shoot, respectively. Cd translocation efficiency from root to shoot was improved by a maximum of 66.4% under 3 mmol/L of oxalic acid. Citric acid exhibited more prominent mitigating effect than oxalic acid due to its stronger ligand affinity for chelating with metal and avoiding the toxicity injury of free Cd ions more efficiently. The present work provides a potential strategy for efficient Cd remediation with B. nivea. PMID:25499499

  5. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  6. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H(+) transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties 'Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)' and an early maturing mutant 'Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)'. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  7. The role of citric acid and ascorbic acid in morphology control of palladium nanocrystals: A molecular dynamics and density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jeffrey; Du, Zheng; Shao, Minhua

    2016-08-01

    The effect of surfactants on the synthesis of shape-controlled palladium (Pd) nanocrystals was studied using computational simulation methods. We found that the functional groups in surfactant molecules played an important role in the specific adsorption on Pd surfaces. Citric acid and ascorbic acid were found to be preferentially adsorbed onto Pd(1 1 1) and (1 0 0) planes resulting in the formation of octahedral and cubic nanocrystals, respectively.

  8. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Martínez, D.; Martínez-de la Cruz, A.; López-Cuéllar, E.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ► WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ► WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}·xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UV–vis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 °C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  9. Olodaterol attenuates citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  10. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p < 0.01). Formoterol and salmeterol showed a trend towards reducing cough. On the contrary, indacaterol demonstrated pro-tussive properties as it significantly increased the number of coughs, both in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized animals (p < 0.001). In conclusion, olodaterol, at doses eliciting bronchodilation, showed antitussive properties in a model of citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the

  11. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger. PMID:27088852

  12. The regulatory effect of citric acid on the co-production of poly(ε-lysine) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) in Streptomyces albulus PD-1.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai; Bo, Fangfang

    2014-10-01

    Streptomyces albulus PD-1 can co-produce antimicrobial homo-polymers poly(ε-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP). In this study, a novel feeding strategy of citric acid coupled with glucose-(NH4)2SO4 feeding was employed to S. albulus PD-1. When the pH of the culture broth dropped to 4.0, the feeding solution was added continuously to maintain the concentrations of glucose and citric acid at 10 and 4 g L(-1), respectively. As a result, the final concentration of ε-PL increased from 21.7 to 29.7 g L(-1) and the final concentration of PDAP decreased from 4.8 to 3.2 g L(-1). Assays on intracellular nucleotide levels and key enzyme activities were performed to elucidate the underlying regulation mechanism. The addition of citric acid increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio and decreased intracellular ATP level; meanwhile, the activities of pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase decreased while aspartate aminotransferase activity increased. Therefore, we deduced that citric acid feeding resulted in metabolic flux redistribution at the node of phosphoenolpyruvate; the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into tricarboxylic acid cycle was weakened and thus PDAP production was inhibited. On the other hand, the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into oxaloacetate and L-aspartate was enhanced, thereby improving ε-PL production. This fermentation strategy may be potentially useful in ε-PL production because it can effectively inhibit the formation of by-products, such as PDAP. PMID:24752482

  13. Debris and smear layer removal efficacy and changes in morphology of dentinal tubules after using citric acid, tetracycline-hydrochloride and mixture of tetracycline and acid and detergent

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Ahmad Moghare; Farhad, Shirin Zahra; Farhad, Alireza; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Mafi, Morvarid; Abooie, Mohammad Shah

    2013-01-01

    Background: In periodontal diseases, contamination of roots with bacteria and their active biologic agents and smear layer formation following periodontal treatments, prevents reattachment of periodontal cells. As a matter of fact biomodification of root surface and removal of smear layer and debris is critical for regeneration of periodontal structures. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of smear layer removal by citric acid, tetracycline-hydrochloride (TTC-HCL) and mixture of tetracycline and acid and detergent (MTAD). Materials and Methods: In this in vitro and experimental study, 12 impacted third molars were sectioned from cervical enamel junction (CEJ) to mid-root area into four dentinal specimens (n = 48). Three groups were conditioned by citric acid 3%, TTC-HCL 50 mg/mL and MTAD by means of cotton pellets, which were changed every 30 s for 3 min. The control group was conditioned by distilled water. Images from scanning electron microscope (SEM) were examined by two different analyzers. Data was analyzed by Kroskal Wallis and Mann–Whitney statistical analysis. Results: The mean of dentinal tubules diameter was the most in MTAD group and the least in TTC-HCL and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.05). Conclusion: According to the present study, TTC-HCL could remove debris and smear layer but citric acid and MTAD had better debris and smear layer removal efficacy and demineralization effect in comparison with TTC-HCL. PMID:23946742

  14. Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    PubMed

    Seligra, Paula González; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-03-15

    Biodegradable and non-retrogradable starch-glycerol based films were obtained using citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent at 75°C. This material allowed decreasing water vapor permeability (WVP) more than 35%, remained amorphous for at least 45 days as a result of the network formed by the CA that avoided starch retrogradation and maintained the degradability in compost, occurring only six days after the films without citric acid. A simulation of the gelatinization process of starch-glycerol with and without CA, using a differential thermal analysis device, showed that the system with CA completed the gelatinization 5°C before than the other and, CA first reacted with glycerol and then starch-glycerol-CA reaction occurred. The temperature at which the gelatinization process was carried out was critical to obtain the best results. An increase of gelatinization process temperature at 85°C in system with CA, led to a worsening on WVP and its integrity after a swelling process with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), compared to the films processed at 75°C. PMID:26794739

  15. Determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar using visible/near infrared spectroscopy and least squares-support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Li; He, Yong

    2008-11-01

    The determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar was processed using visible and near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM). Five concentration levels (100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20%) of lemon vinegar were studied. The calibration set was consisted of 225 samples (45 samples for each level) and the remaining 75 samples for the validation set. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis was employed for the calibration models as well as extraction of certain latent variables (LVs) and effective wavelengths (EWs). Different preprocessing methods were compared in PLS models including smoothing, standard normal variate (SNV), the first and second derivative. The selected LVs and EWs were employed as the inputs to develop least square-support vector machine (LSSVM) models. The optimal prediction results were achieved by LV-LS-SVM model, and the correlation coefficient (r), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and bias for validation set were 0.9990, 0.1972 and -0.0334, respectively. Moreover, the EW-LS-SVM model was also acceptable and slightly better than all PLS models. The results indicated that Vis/NIR spectroscopy could be utilized as a parsimonious and efficient way for the determination of citric acid of lemon vinegar based on LS-SVM method.

  16. Application of natural citric acid sources and their role on arsenic removal from drinking water: a green chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Islam, Sk Mijanul; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chatterjee, Debashis; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-11-15

    Solar Oxidation and Removal of Arsenic (SORAS) is a low-cost non-hazardous technique for the removal of arsenic (As) from groundwater. In this study, we tested the efficiency of natural citric acid sources extracted from tomato, lemon and lime to promote SORAS for As removal at the household level. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory using both synthetic solutions and natural groundwater samples collected from As-polluted areas in West Bengal. The role of As/Fe molar ratios and citrate doses on As removal efficiency were checked in synthetic samples. The results demonstrate that tomato juice (as citric acid) was more efficient to remove As from both synthetic (percentage of removal: 78-98%) and natural groundwater (90-97%) samples compared to lemon (61-83% and 79-85%, respectively) and lime (39-69% and 63-70%, respectively) juices. The As/Fe molar ratio and the citrate dose showed an 'optimized central tendency' on As removal. Anti-oxidants, e.g. 'hydroxycinnamates', found in tomato, were shown to have a higher capacity to catalyze SORAS photochemical reactions compared to 'flavanones' found in lemon or lime. The application of this method has several advantages, such as eco- and user- friendliness and affordability at the household level compared to other low-cost techniques. PMID:23122734

  17. Palladium-platinum core-shell electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction prepared with the assistance of citric acid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Lulu; Su, Dong; Zhu, Shangqian; Chang, Qiaowan; Yue, Jeffrey; Du, Zheng; Shao, Minhua

    2016-04-26

    Core–shell structure is a promising alternative to solid platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). A simple method of preparing palladium (Pd)–platinum (Pt) core–shell catalysts (Pd@Pt/C) in a gram-batch was developed with the assistance of citric acid. The Pt shell deposition involves three different pathways: galvanic displacement reaction between Pd atoms and Pt cations, chemical reduction by citric acid, and reduction by negative charges on Pd surfaces. The uniform ultrathin (~0.4 nm) Pt shell was characterized by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopymore » (HAADF-STEM) images combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Compared with state-of-the-art Pt/C, the Pd@Pt/C core–shell catalyst showed 4 times higher Pt mass activity and much better durability upon potential cycling. As a result, both the mass activity and durability were comparable to that of Pd@Pt/C synthesized by a Cu-mediated-Pt-displacement method, which is more complicated and difficult for mass production.« less

  18. Effects of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric Acid Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadanand, K.; Vandana, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors that may bring about mineralization changes in teeth. Routine treatment of root biomodification is commonly followed during Periodontal therapy. Background: The Purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the morphological changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed root dentin subsequent to the application of Tetracycline, EDTA and Citric acid. Both fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth comprising of periodontally healthy and diseased were included in this study. Method: Each of them was grouped into Tetracycline Hydrochloride, EDTA and Citric acid treatment groupes. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM), the photomicrographs of dentin specimens were obtained. Results: Showed that there was no significant difference in exposure of number of tubules in different groups, while significant increase in the tubular width and tubular surface area was seen in fluorosed healthy, followed by fluorosed diseased groups, nonfluorosed healthy and nonfluorosed diseased groups after root biomodification procedure using various root conditioning agents. The root biomodification procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and nonfluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:27335611

  19. Development of tailored and self-mineralizing citric acid-crosslinked hydrogels for in situ bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ferrero, Aitor; Mata, Álvaro; Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A; Rodríguez-Cabello, José C; Alonso, Matilde; Planell, Josep; Engel, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering demands alternatives overcoming the limitations of traditional approaches in the context of a constantly aging global population. In the present study, elastin-like recombinamers hydrogels were produced by means of carbodiimide-catalyzed crosslinking with citric acid, a molecule suggested to be essential for bone nanostructure. By systematically studying the effect of the relative abundance of reactive species on gelation and hydrogel properties such as functional groups content, degradation and structure, we were able to understand and to control the crosslinking reaction to achieve hydrogels mimicking the fibrillary nature of the extracellular matrix. By studying the effect of polymer concentration on scaffold mechanical properties, we were able to produce hydrogels with a stiffness value of 36.13 ± 10.72 kPa, previously suggested to be osteoinductive. Microstructured and mechanically-tailored hydrogels supported the growth of human mesenchymal stem cells and led to higher osteopontin expression in comparison to their non-tailored counterparts. Additionally, tailored hydrogels were able to rapidly self-mineralize in biomimetic conditions, evidencing that citric acid was successfully used both as a crosslinker and a bioactive molecule providing polymers with calcium phosphate nucleation capacity. PMID:26264645

  20. Effects of Citric Acid and Desensitizing Agent Application on Nonfluorosed and Fluorosed Dentin: An In Vitro Sem Study

    PubMed Central

    Neha, Mahajan; Vandana, Laxman K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorosis is one of the factors which bring about mineralisation changes in a dentinal structure leading to dentin. The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the dentinal tubular changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth subsequent to the application of citric acid,strontium acetate based sodium fluoride (SAF) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Dentin specimens from healthy fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth were included in the study. Each of them was grouped into acid treated and SAF treatment groups. Using SEM, the photomicrographs (3500x) of dentin specimens were evaluated. Results showed while there was a significant difference in tubular width of partial occlusion ≤ 25%, being more in fluorosed group compared to nonfluorosed group after application SAF. Application of desensitising agents demonstrated higher number of dentinal tubular occlusion and diameter reduction in nonfluorosed dentin compared to fluorosed dentin. Summary: Root biomodification and desensitising agent procedure brings in definite difference between fluorosed and non-fluorosed dentin specimens. PMID:25870716

  1. Structural study of very thin anodic alumina films on silicon by anodization in citric acid aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kokonou, M; Nassiopoulou, A G; Giannakopoulos, K P; Boukos, N; Travlos, A

    2005-03-01

    The formation of thin alumina films on a silicon substrate by anodization in a mild acid, specifically in 1% wt citric acid aqueous solution, is investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We present a comparative study between two cases of starting material: pure aluminum and an alloy of aluminum with 1% silicon. In both cases the thickness of the Al layer was less than 50 nm. It was observed that under exactly the same conditions, in the first case the anodization was stopping before anodizing the whole film and a remaining non-anodized Al layer was always present, while in the second case, the Al layer was fully anodized, resulting in an alumina matrix with a very high density of silicon nanocrystals of uniform sizes embedded in it. In both cases the alumina film was compact and amorphous. PMID:15913255

  2. Enhanced citric acid production in aspergillus with inactivated asparagine-linked glycosylation protein 3 (ALG3), and/or increased laeA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-12-08

    Provided herein are fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, having a dolichyl-P-Man:Man(5)GlcNAc(2)-PP-dolichyl mannosyltransferase (Alg3) gene genetic inactivation, increased expression of a loss of aflR expression A (Lae), or both. In some examples, such mutants have several phenotypes, including an increased production of citric acid relative to the parental strain. Methods of using the disclosed fungi to make citric acid are also provided, as are compositions and kits including the disclosed fungi.

  3. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic, acetic, citric and propionic acid for Listeria monocytogenes under conditions relevant to cheese.

    PubMed

    Wemmenhove, Ellen; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Zwietering, Marcel H; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2016-09-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of undissociated lactic acid were determined for six different Listeria monocytogenes strains at 30 °C and in a pH range of 4.2-5.8. Small increments in pH and acid concentrations were used to accurately establish the growth/no growth limits of L. monocytogenes for these acids. The MICs of undissociated lactic acid in the pH range of 5.2-5.8 were generally higher than at pH 4.6 for the different L. monocytogenes strains. The average MIC of undissociated lactic acid was 5.0 (SD 1.5) mM in the pH range 5.2-5.6, which is relevant to Gouda cheese. Significant differences in MICs of undissociated lactic acid were found between strains of L. monocytogenes at a given pH, with a maximum observed level of 9.0 mM. Variations in MICs were mostly due to strain variation. In the pH range 5.2-5.6, the MICs of undissociated lactic acid were not significantly different at 12 °C and 30 °C. The average MICs of undissociated acetic acid, citric acid, and propionic acid were 19.0 (SD 6.5) mM, 3.8 (SD 0.9) mM, and 11.0 (SD 6.3) mM, respectively, for the six L. monocytogenes strains tested in the pH range 5.2-5.6. Variations in MICs of these organic acids for L. monocytogenes were also mostly due to strain variation. The generated data contribute to improved predictions of growth/no growth of L. monocytogenes in cheese and other foods containing these organic acids. PMID:27217360

  4. Characterization of sericin powder prepared from citric acid-degraded sericin polypeptides of the silkworm, Bombyx Mori.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Akira; Kurioka, Fujie; Yamazaki, Masayoshi

    2004-04-01

    Acid-degraded sericin powder (AC-SP) was prepared from aqueous solution containing citric acid-degraded sericin polypeptides of Bombyx mori. The morphological and biochemical properties of AC-SP were compared with those of alkali-degraded sericin powder (AL-SP) and hot-water degraded sericin powder (HW-SP). Based on an SEM analysis, AC-SP showed a thin film structure of 10-100 microm with good dispersity while AL-SP and HW-SP had a much larger thin film structure (<500 microm). The extract of AC-SP showed stronger trypsin inhibitor activity due to cocoon shell trypsin inhibitor (CSTI-IV) than that of HW-SP. The extract of AL-SP showed no CSTI-IV activity. It was found that AC-SP was a trypsin inhibitor complex powder and that the release of CSTI-IV from AC-SP depended on pH and ion strength. Similar powder materials were obtained when such organic acids as tartaric acid and succinic acid were used. These results suggest that the acid-degraded sericin polypeptides work as a protein matrix to which CSTI-IV may bind ionically. PMID:15118302

  5. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C.; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  6. High performance B doped BiVO4 photocatalyst with visible light response by citric acid complex method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zheng, Haoyan; Liu, Qiong; Niu, Chao; Che, Yinsheng; Dang, Mingyan

    2013-10-01

    A B-doped BiVO4 photocatalyst was synthesized by citric acid complex method and using H3BO3 as the dopant source, and the photocatalyst was characterized with XPS, XRD, SEM, BET and UV-Vis DRS. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the photocatalytic degradation of a methyl orange (MO) solution under visible light. This assay revealed that both the pure BiVO4 and all of the B doped samples were the monoclinic phase. Doping the BiVO4 with B increased the number of V(4+) and oxygen vacancies, which led to the red shift of the absorbing boundary of the B-doped BiVO4 but had little influence on the morphology and crystal size. The B doping improved the photocatalytic activity, and the highest photocatalytic degradation rate of 98% occurred with a B dopant concentration of 0.04. PMID:23751222

  7. Acetylation of bacterial cellulose catalyzed by citric acid: Use of reaction conditions for tailoring the esterification extent.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Gómez Hoyos, Catalina; Arroyo, Silvana; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2016-11-20

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanoribbons were partially acetylated by a simple direct solvent-free route catalyzed by citric acid. The assay of reaction conditions within chosen intervals (i.e. esterification time (0.5-7h), catalyst content (0.08-1.01mmol/mmol AGU), and temperature (90-140°C)), illustrated the flexibility of the methodology proposed, with reaction variables which can be conveniently manipulated to acetylate BC to the required degree of substitution (DS) within the 0.20-0.73 interval. Within this DS interval, characterization results indicated a surface-only process in which acetylated bacterial cellulose with tunable DS, preserved fibrous structure and increased hydrophobicity could be easily obtained. The feasibility of reusing the catalyst/excess acylant in view of potential scale-up was also illustrated. PMID:27561540

  8. [In vivo study of bacterial invasion in root planed and citric acid treated radicular surfaces of periodontally involved human teeth].

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Arai, N; Otogoto, J; Murai, S

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether plaque bacteria invade the exposed radicular dentin after root planing or chemical root treatment in vivo. Eighteen caries-free human periodontally involved teeth with hopeless prognoses were studied. Fourteen teeth were scaled and root planed with hand curette type scalers. The proximal surface of each treated tooth was designated as the RP surface. The remaining half of the proximal surface was treated with citric acid (pH 1.0) for 3 minutes and was designated as the CA surface. Four untreated teeth served as controls. After 4 weeks, the teeth were extracted, and were processed for light microscopy and for scanning electron microscopy concerning bacterial invasion into the supragingival radicular dentin. The following results were obtained. 1. Radicular cementum was present on most untreated tooth surfaces. However, bacteria were never seen in the dentinal tubules. 2. Bacterial invasion into the dentinal tubules was observed in five of the 10 proximal surfaces (50% of the RP surfaces) and in nine of the 10 proximal surfaces (90% of the CA surfaces). 3. The depth (9.5 +/- 24.1 microns vs 84.6 +/- 136.3 microns) and percentage (0.8 +/- 2.1% vs 20.3 +/- 17.3%) of bacterial invasion in the dentinal tubules of the RP surfaces was lower than that of the CA surfaces. 4. Cocci and short rods were present in the supragingival dentinal tubules. 5. Since CA surfaces may accelerate bacterial invasion the citric acid treatment might be harmful in patients with inadequate plaque control. PMID:2700200

  9. Improving the degradation behavior and in vitro biological property of nano-hydroxyapatite surface- grafted with the assist of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuyun; Jiang, Lixin; Xiong, Chengdong; Su, Shengpei

    2016-10-01

    To obtain ideal nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA) filler for poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a new surface-grafting with the assist of citric acid for nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was designed, and the effect of n-HA surface-grafted with or without citric acid on in vitro degradation behavior and cells viability was studied by the experiments of soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) and incubating with human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63). The change of pH value, tensile strength reduction, the surface deposits, cells attachment and proliferation of samples during the soaking and incubation were investigated by means of pH meter, electromechanical universal tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectro-scopy (EDS), fluorescence microscope and MTT method. The results showed that the introduction of citric acid not only delayed the strength reduction during the degradation by inhibiting the detachment of n-HA from PLGA, but also endowed it better cell attachment and proliferation, suggesting that the n-HA surface-grafted with the assist of citric acid was an important bioactive ceramic fillers for PLGA used as bone materials. PMID:27343845

  10. Rapid (<3 min) microwave synthesis of block copolymer templated ordered mesoporous metal oxide and carbonate films using nitrate-citric acid systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhong; Bhaway, Sarang M; Wang, Yi; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Becker, Matthew L; Vogt, Bryan D

    2015-03-25

    Rapid chemical transformation from micelle templated precursors (metal nitrate and citric acid) to ordered mesoporous metal carbonates and oxides is demonstrated using microwave heating for cobalt, copper, manganese and zinc. Without aging requirements, <3 min of microwave processing yields highly ordered mesoporous films. PMID:25714045

  11. Survival of Listeria innocua in rainbow trout protein recovered by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation with acetic and citric acids.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Paker, I; Bane, L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-08-01

    During mechanical fish processing, a substantial amount of protein is discarded as by-products. Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a process that uses extreme pH shifts to solubilize and precipitate protein from by-products to recover previously discarded protein. Typically, strong acids are used for pH reduction, but these acids do not have a pasteurization effect (6 log reduction) on bacterial load; therefore, organic acids were used during ISP processing to test the impact on Listeria innocua concentrations. Headed and gutted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were inoculated with L. innocua, homogenized, and brought to the target pH with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized for 10 min at 4°C, and insoluble components (e.g., skin and insoluble protein) were removed by centrifugation. The remaining solution was pH shifted to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with sodium hydroxide, and precipitated protein was separated from the water. Microbial cells for each component (proteins, insolubles, and water) were enumerated on modified Oxford agar (MOX) and tryptic soy agar with 6% yeast extract (TSAYE). The sums of the surviving cells from each component were compared with the initial inoculum levels. No significant differences were observed between results obtained from TSAYE and from MOX (P > 0.05). Significant reductions in microbial populations were detected, regardless of pH or acid type (P < 0.05). The greatest reduction was at pH 3.0 with glacial acetic acid, resulting in a mean reduction of 6.41 log CFU/g in the recovered protein and 5.88 log CFU/g in the combined components. These results demonstrate the antimicrobial potential of organic acids in ISP processing. PMID:21819665

  12. Effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds and in vitro antioxidant and antidiabetic capacity of a roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) beverage.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Ramírez-de León, José A; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía

    2015-04-01

    Plant infusions are consumed due to their beneficial effects on health, which is attributed to their bioactive compounds content. However, these compounds are susceptible to degradation during processing and storage. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of stevia and citric acid on the stability of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzyme inhibitory activity of roselle beverages during storage. The optimum extraction conditions of roselle polyphenolic compounds was of 95 °C/60 min, which was obtained by a second order experimental design. The incorporation of stevia increased the stability of colour and some polyphenols, such as quercetin, gallic acid and rosmarinic acid, during storage. In addition, stevia decreased the loss of ABTS, DPPH scavenging activity and α-amylase inhibitory capacity, whereas the incorporation of citric acid showed no effect. These results may contribute to the improvement of technological processes for the elaboration of hypocaloric and functional beverages. PMID:25442634

  13. Investigation of citric acid-glycerol based pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels for dye removal applications: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D S; Guhanathan, S

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are three dimensional polymeric structure with segments of hydrophilic groups. The special structure of hydrogels facilitates the diffusion of solutes into the interior network and possess numerous ionic and non-ionic functional groups, which can absorb or trap ionic dyes from waste water. The present investigation was devoted to the synthesis of a series of citric acid and glycerol based pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels using a solventless green approach via condensation polymerization in the presence of acidic medium. The formations of hydrogels were confirmed using various spectral investigations viz., FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR. The thermal properties of various hydrogels have been studied using TGA, DTA and DSC analysis. The rationalized relationship was noticed with increasing of pH from 4.0 to 10.0. The surface morphologies of hydrogels were analyzed using SEM technique which was well supported from the results of swelling studies. Methylene blue has been selected as a cationic dye for its removal from various environmental sources using pH-sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels. The results of dye removal revealed that glycerol based biopolymeric hydrogels have shown an excellent dye removal capacity. Hence, the synthesized pH sensitive biopolymeric hydrogels have an adaptability with pH tuned properties might have greater potential opening in various environmental applications viz., metal ion removal, agrochemical release, purification of water, dye removal etc. PMID:25982408

  14. Efficacy of citric acid denture cleanser on the Candida albicans biofilm formed on poly(methyl methacrylate): effects on residual biofilm and recolonization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that the use of denture cleansers can reduce Candida albicans biofilm accumulation; however, the efficacy of citric acid denture cleansers is uncertain. In addition, the long-term efficacy of this denture cleanser is not well established, and their effect on residual biofilms is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of citric acid denture cleanser treatment on C. albicans biofilm recolonization on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface. Methods C. albicans biofilms were developed for 72 h on PMMA resin specimens (n = 168), which were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 cleansing treatments (CTs) overnight (8 h). CTs included purified water as a control (CTC) and two experimental groups that used either a 1:5 dilution of citric acid denture cleanser (CT5) or a 1:8 dilution of citric acid denture cleanser (CT8). Residual biofilms adhering to the specimens were collected and quantified at two time points: immediately after CTs (ICT) and after cleaning and residual biofilm recolonization (RT). Residual biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the viable cells (CFU/mL), and biofilm architecture was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Denture cleanser treatments and evaluation periods were considered study factors. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). Results Immediately after treatments, citric acid denture cleansing solutions (CT5 and CT8) reduced the number of viable cells as compared with the control (p < 0.01). However, after 48 h, both CT groups (CT5 and CT8) showed biofilm recolonization (p < 0.01). Residual biofilm recolonization was also detected by CLSM and SEM analysis, which revealed a higher biomass and average biofilm thickness for the CT8 group (p < 0.01). Conclusion Citric acid denture cleansers can reduce C. albicans biofilm accumulation and cell viability. However, this

  15. A citric acid solution is an optimal test drink in the 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J E; Leodolter, A; Sauerbruch, T; Malfertheiner, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) is a simple, non-invasive and reliable test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The duration of the test, the timing of breath sampling, and the accuracy of the method vary according to the test meal used. AIM: To identify the optimal test meal or drink for rapid and accurate performance of the 13C-UBT for the detection of H pylori infection. PATIENTS: Eighty patients with dyspeptic symptoms were included. Of these, 48 patients had a positive H pylori status and 32 a negative one according to the results of the rapid urease test, histological examination, and culture. METHODS: A 13C-UBT was performed after an overnight fast, on three consecutive days. On each study day a different test meal or drink was given (0.1 N citric acid solution, a standard semiliquid meal, or a semiliquid fatty meal) 10 minutes before giving 75 mg 13C-urea. Breath samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, and analysed by isotype ratio mass spectrometry. Results were expressed as delta (delta) and considered as positive for H pylori if the highest delta (peak) was greater than 4.0. RESULTS: The delta peak obtained with the citric acid drink in H pylori positive subjects (24.1 (SEM 1.5)) was significantly higher than that obtained with any of the semiliquid meals (13.3 (SEM 1.1) and 17.1 (SEM 1.0) respectively, p < 0.001). Furthermore, this delta peak was obtained earlier with the citric acid drink (30 (SEM 2) minutes) than with the other two meals tests (53 (SEM 2) min and 45 (SEM 2) min, p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the 13C-UBT for the diagnosis of H pylori infection was 96-100% with all three test meals. This high sensitivity was, however, obtained from 15 minutes by giving citric acid as the test drink, from 45 minutes by giving a semiliquid fatty meal, and at 60 minutes by giving the semiliquid standard meal. The specificity was 100% for all test meals. Citric acid is inexpensive and palatable to patients

  16. Foliar sprays of citric acid and salicylic acid alter the pattern of root acquisition of some minerals in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ghazijahani, Noushin; Hadavi, Ebrahim; Jeong, Byoung R.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of foliar application of two levels of citric acid (CA; 0 and 7 mM) and two levels of salicylic acid (SA; 0 and 1 mM) combined with two levels of nutrient solution strength (full strength and half strength) on mineral acquisition by sweet basil were investigated. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design arrangement with three replications. SA alone reduced the plant height and thickened the stem. Plants supplied with a full strength solution had a ticker stem, produced more biomass, and showed higher values of Fv/Fm. Some changes in the uptake pattern of some nutrients, especially boron and sulfur, were noticed. Higher boron concentrations in leaves were in plants sprayed with a combination of 7 mM CA and 1 mM of SA. Applying combination of CA and SA was more effective than using them individually that suggests an effective synergism between them. PMID:25400645

  17. Foliar sprays of citric acid and salicylic acid alter the pattern of root acquisition of some minerals in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    PubMed

    Ghazijahani, Noushin; Hadavi, Ebrahim; Jeong, Byoung R

    2014-01-01

    The effect of foliar application of two levels of citric acid (CA; 0 and 7 mM) and two levels of salicylic acid (SA; 0 and 1 mM) combined with two levels of nutrient solution strength (full strength and half strength) on mineral acquisition by sweet basil were investigated. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design arrangement with three replications. SA alone reduced the plant height and thickened the stem. Plants supplied with a full strength solution had a ticker stem, produced more biomass, and showed higher values of Fv/Fm. Some changes in the uptake pattern of some nutrients, especially boron and sulfur, were noticed. Higher boron concentrations in leaves were in plants sprayed with a combination of 7 mM CA and 1 mM of SA. Applying combination of CA and SA was more effective than using them individually that suggests an effective synergism between them. PMID:25400645

  18. Synthesis of hydrophobic photoluminescent carbon nanodots by using L-tyrosine and citric acid through a thermal oxidation route.

    PubMed

    Gude, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CNDs) were fabricated by using citric acid and L-tyrosine precursor molecules through a simple, facile thermal oxidation process in air. These CNDs (less than 4 nm in size) exhibited a characteristic excitation wavelength dependent emission and upconversion emission properties and are insoluble in water, but soluble in organic solvents. FTIR and (1)H NMR analyses showed a selective participation of L-tyrosine molecule during the carbonization process at 220 °C without a disturbance of its benzylic protons and aromatic phenyl ring bearing hydroxy group. TEM and XRD studies revealed a quasi-spherical morphology and poor-crystalline nature of CNDs. Because the presence of the hydroxy group of L-tyrosine is dominating at the surface, these CNDs are also soluble in water under basic conditions. The effects of base and silver nanoparticles on the luminescence properties of CNDs were studied and a quenching of fluorescence was observed. These tyrosine-passivated CNDs are applicable for both biologically and commercially. PMID:25247134

  19. Combined effects of independent variables on yield and protein content of pectin extracted from sugar beet pulp by citric acid.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Qiang; Du, Guang-Ming; Jing, Wei-Wen; Li, Jun-Fang; Yan, Jia-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yong

    2015-09-20

    The extraction of pectin from sugar beet pulp by citric acid was carried out under different conditions using Box-Behnken design for four independent variables (pH, temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio). The yield of sugar beet pulp pectin ranged from 6.3% to 23.0%, and the content of protein from 1.5% to 4.5%. All independent variables significantly affected the yield, and all variables except liquid to solid ratio significantly affected the protein content. The yield increased as decreasing pH of extracting solution, extending time and advancing temperature, and an opposite relationship of effects between variables and content of protein was obtained. The chemical composition of collected samples was determined. Moreover, from the results of emulsifying properties study, the extracted pectin from sugar beet pulp could prepare steady oil-in-water emulsions. Therefore, it was inferred that the extraction conditions could influence yield and protein content, resulting in different emulsifying property. PMID:26050895

  20. Antitussive Activity of the Water-Extracted Carbohydrate Polymer from Terminalia chebula on Citric Acid-Induced Cough

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Udipta Ranjan; Majee, Sujay Kumar; Ray, Bimalendu

    2013-01-01

    Terminalia chebula, a medicinal plant, is widely used in the management of various diseases. As the water extract of its dried ripe fruit is a frequently used preparation, we decided to look for bioactive polysaccharide in this extract. We demonstrate that the obtained polysaccharide fraction, CP, contained a highly branched arabinogalactan protein having a (1 → 3)-, (1 → 6)- and (1 → 3, 6)-linked β-D-Galp together with (1 → 5)- and (1 → 3)-linked α-L-Araf and nonreducing end units of α-L-Araf. This polymer possesses strong antitussive property. Our results showed that the number of citric acid-induced cough efforts decreased significantly after the oral application of polysaccharide fraction in a dose of 50 mg kg−1 body weight. Its antitussive efficacy was higher than cough suppressive effect of standard drug codeine. Therefore, traditional aqueous extraction method provides a major polysaccharide, which induces a pharmacological effect: this could represent an attractive approach in phytotherapeutic managements. PMID:23878602

  1. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26286803

  2. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  3. Enhancing the reactivity of bimetallic Bi/Fe(0) by citric acid for remediation of polluted water.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianyu; Lee, Chung-Seop; Kim, Eun-Ju; Chang, Yoon-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the environmentally benign citric acid (CA) was utilized to improve the aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) over bismuth modified nanoscale zero-valent iron (Bi/Fe(0)). The characterization results revealed the existence of bismuth covering on the Fe(0) surface under zero-valent state. And, the Bi/Fe(0)-CA+O2 system performed excellent reactivity in degradation of 4-CP due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After 30min of reaction, 80% of 4-CP was removed using Bi/Fe(0)-CA+O2 accompanying with high dechlorination rate. The oxidative degradation intermediates were analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS. We found that CA could promote the bismuth-iron system to produce much reactive oxygen species ROS under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions due to its ligand function, which could react with Fe(3+) to form a ligand complex (Fe(III)Cit), accompanying with a considerable production of Fe(2+) and H2O2. This study provides a new strategy for generating ROS on nZVI and suggests its application for the mineralization of many recalcitrant pollutants. PMID:26905611

  4. Synthesis of highly photoluminescent carbon dots via citric acid and Tris for iron(III) ions sensors and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Zhulong; Gong, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, high quantum yield and strong photoluminescent carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are successfully synthesized via a facile and green hydrothermal method using citric acid and Tris as precursors. The as-synthesized C-QDs with a quantum yield (QY) as high as 52% were characterized by UV, FT-IR, TEM, XPS and fluorescence spectroscope. TEM results show that C-QDs are mono-dispersed spherical particles and the diameter distribution of C-QDs is 2.8±1.1 nm. The extraordinary photoluminescent properties and low cytotoxicity of C-QDs were obtained through optical property characterization and cytotoxicity assay. In addition, we found that the as-prepared C-QDs had a high affinity for Fe(3+) ions and the response toward Fe(3+) ions was highly linear (R(2)=0.997) over the concentration range from 2 to 50 μM, which could provide an effective platform for portable detection of Fe(3+) ions. Also, it is demonstrated that the photoluminescent C-QDs display hypotoxicity and are biocompatible for use as biosensors in living cells. PMID:26078136

  5. Determination of sup 13 C labeling pattern of citric acid cycle intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, L.; Montgomery, J.A.; Des Rosiers, C.; David, F.; Garneau, M.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Investigations of the regulation of the citric acid cycle require determination of labeling patterns of cycle intermediates. These were assayed to date, using infusion of: (i) ({sup 14}C)tracer followed by chemical degradation of intermediates and (ii) ({sup 13}C)tracer followed by NMR analysis of intermediates. The authors developed a strategy to analyze by GC-MS the ({sup 13}C) labeling pattern of {mu}mole samples of citrate (CIT), isocitrate (ICIT), 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG), glutamate (GLU) and glutamine (GLN). These are enzymatically or chemically converted to 2-KG, ICIT, 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-OHG). GC-MS analyses of TMS or TBDMS derivatives of these compounds yield the enrichment of each carbon. The authors confirmed the identity of each fragment using the spectra of (1-{sup 13}C), (5-{sup 13}C), (2,3,3,4,4-{sup 2}H{sub 5})glutamate and (1-{sup 13}C), (1,4-{sup 13}C)GABA.

  6. Citric acid improves lead (pb) phytoextraction in brassica napus L. by mitigating pb-induced morphological and biochemical damages.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Ali, Shafaqat; Hameed, Amjad; Farid, Mujahid; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Najeeb, Ullah; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is an environmentally friendly and a cost-effective strategy for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, lower bioavailability of some of the metals in polluted environments e.g. lead (Pb) is a major constraint of phytoextraction process that could be overcome by applying organic chelators. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to evaluate the role of citric acid (CA) in enhancing Pb phytoextraction. Brassica napus L. seedlings were grown in hydroponic media and exposed to various treatments of Pb (50 and 100 μM) as alone or in combination with CA (2.5mM) for six weeks. Pb-induced damage in B. napus toxicity was evident from elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 that significantly inhibited plant growth, biomass accumulation, leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters. Alternatively, CA application to Pb-stressed B. napus plants arrested lipid membrane damage by limiting MDA and H2O2 production and by improving antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, CA significantly increased the Pb accumulation in B. napus plants. The study concludes that CA has a potential to improve Pb phytoextraction without damaging plant growth. PMID:25164201

  7. Geochemical roots of autotrophic carbon fixation: hydrothermal experiments in the system citric acid, H 2O-(±FeS)-(±NiS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G. D.; Boctor, N. Z.; Hazen, R. M.; Brandes, J. A.; Morowitz, Harold J.; Yoder, H. S.

    2001-10-01

    Recent theories have proposed that life arose from primitive hydrothermal environments employing chemical reactions analogous to the reductive citrate cycle (RCC) as the primary pathway for carbon fixation. This chemistry is presumed to have developed as a natural consequence of the intrinsic geochemistry of the young, prebiotic, Earth. There has been no experimental evidence, however, demonstrating that there exists a natural pathway into such a cycle. Toward this end, the results of hydrothermal experiments involving citric acid are used as a method of deducing such a pathway. Homocatalytic reactions observed in the citric acid-H 2O experiments encompass many of the reactions found in modern metabolic systems, i.e., hydration-dehydration, retro-Aldol, decarboxylation, hydrogenation, and isomerization reactions. Three principal decomposition pathways operate to degrade citric acid under thermal and aquathermal conditions. It is concluded that the acid catalyzed βγ decarboxylation pathway, leading ultimately to propene and CO 2, may provide the most promise for reaction network reversal under natural hydrothermal conditions. Increased pressure is shown to accelerate the principal decarboxylation reactions under strictly hydrothermal conditions. The effect of forcing the pH via the addition of NaOH reveals that the βγ decarboxylation pathway operates even up to intermediate pH levels. The potential for network reversal (the conversion of propene and CO 2 up to a tricarboxylic acid) is demonstrated via the Koch (hydrocarboxylation) reaction promoted heterocatalytically with NiS in the presence of a source of CO. Specifically, an olefin (1-nonene) is converted to a monocarboxylic acid; methacrylic acid is converted to the dicarboxylic acid, methylsuccinic acid; and the dicarboxylic acid, itaconic acid, is converted into the tricarboxylic acid, hydroaconitic acid. A number of interesting sulfur-containing products are also formed that may provide for additional

  8. Fabrication of Sn-3.5Ag Eutectic Alloy Powder by Annealing Sub-Micrometer Sn@Ag Powder Prepared by Citric Acid-Assisted Ag Immersion Plating.

    PubMed

    Chee, Sang-Soo; Choi, Eun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    A Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder has been developed by chemically synthesizing sub-micrometer Sn@Ag powder at room temperature. This synthesis was achieved by first obtaining a sub-micrometer Sn powder for the core using a modified variant of the polyol method, and then coating this with a uniformly thin and continuous Ag layer through immersion plating in 5.20 mM citric acid. The citric acid was found to play multiple roles in the Ag coating process, acting as a chelating agent, a reducing agent and a stabilizer to ensure coating uniformity; and as such, the amount used has an immense influence on the coating quality of the Ag shells. It was later verified by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis that the coated Ag layer transfers to the Sn core via diffusion to form an Ag3Sn phase at room temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry also revealed that the synthesized Sn@Ag powder is nearly transformed into Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder upon annealing three times at a temperature of up to 250 degrees C, as evidenced by a single melting peak at 220.5 degrees C. It was inferred from this that Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder can be successfully prepared through the synthesis of core Sn powders by a modified polyol method, immersion plating using citric acid, and annealing, in that order. PMID:26726525

  9. Influence of the Metal Nitrates to Citric Acid Molar Ratio on the Processing of Nickel Zinc Ferrite Nanocrystalline Powders Synthesized by a Sol-Gel Auto Combustion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati, M. R.; Ebrahimi, S. A. Seyyed; Badiei, A.

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline powder of the single phase nickel-zinc ferrite have been prepared by a sol-gel auto-combustion process. The nitrate-citrate gels were prepared from metal nitrates and citric acid solutions with various molar ratios of the metal nitrates to citric acid. The results showed that the nitrate citrate gels exhibit a self-propagating behavior after ignition in air. The thermal decomposition of nitrate-citrate gels and the phase evolution of the as-burnt powder were investigated by differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetry (DTA/TG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques respectively. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to characterize the microstructure of the material. Magnetic properties were also measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) with a maximum applied field of 10 kOe. The results also revealed that the molar ratio of the metal nitrates to citric acid has important effects on the formation temperature and the crystallite size which affect the magnetic properties of the nickel-zinc ferrite.

  10. The effect of citric acid on morphology and photoluminescence properties of white light emitting ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakami, R.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    2016-07-01

    The white light emitting ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites were synthesized by sol-gel combustion method using zinc nitrate, citric acid and tetraethoxysilane. To analyze the effect of fuel content on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites, the citric acid content was varied as 1, 5, and 10 moles with respect to one mole of zinc. The SEM images of the nanocomposites revealed the spherical, flower and platelet like morphology with variation in citric acid content and annealing temperatures. The ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites prepared with various Zn:CA ratio excited at UV (280 nm), near UV (365 nm), violet (405 nm) and blue (465 nm) wavelength showed blue and greenish-yellow emission. Among all ratios, the ZnO-SiO2 nanocomposites with Zn:CA - 1:1 ratio showed the intense broad band emission compared to Zn:CA - 1:5 and 1:10 values. This particular composition of sample excited under violet (405 nm) LED source shows white light, as confirmed by the CIE chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.342, y = 0.318).

  11. A comparative study of the antitussive activity of levodropropizine and dropropizine in the citric acid-induced cough model in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, G; Cordaro, C I; Vanasia, M; Balzarotti, C; Camusso, L; Caiazzo, G; Maghini, L; Mazzocchi, M; Zennaro, M

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the levo-rotatory (S)-enantiomer of dropropizine, a racemic non-opiate antitussive agent which has been used clinically for many years. Compared with the racemic drug, levodropropizine exhibits in animal models similar antitussive activity but considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. It is also less likely to cause sedation in treated patients. Since the comparative antitussive potency of the two drugs in clinical experimental models has not been evaluated, the authors performed a randomized, double blind, cross over investigation in which the effects of single oral doses (60 and 90 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine were assessed by using the citric acid-induced cough model in eight normal volunteers. Stimulation tests involved inhalation of individual cumulative doses of citric acid (6.3 to 53.3 mg) which at pre-study assessment had been found to induce reproducibly at least ten coughs over a 30 sec period. Each subject was studied by repeating the citric acid stimulation test four times (0 h, 1 h, 2 h and 6 h) on each of five different days separated by intervals of at least three days. In the absence of drug administration (control session), cough response to citric inhalation was remarkably reproducible throughout the 6 h period of observation. A marked and statistically significant reduction in cough response (to about one third--one sixth of the pre-drug values) was observed 1 h after intake for both compounds. At subsequent testing 2 h and 6 h after dosing, cough response was still depressed and did not differ significantly from that observed at 1 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1295724

  12. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  13. Nanoporous alumina formed by self-organized two-step anodization of Ni3Al intermetallic alloy in citric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stępniowski, Wojciech J.; Cieślak, Grzegorz; Norek, Małgorzata; Karczewski, Krzysztof; Michalska-Domańska, Marta; Zasada, Dariusz; Polkowski, Wojciech; Jóźwik, Paweł; Bojar, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the nanoporous alumina on the surface of Ni3Al intermetallic alloy has been studied in details and compared with anodization of aluminum. Successful self-organized anodization of this alloy was performed in 0.3 M citric acid at voltages ranging from 2.0 to 12.0 V using a typical two-electrode cell. Current density records revealed different mechanism of the porous oxide growth when compared to the mechanism pertinent for the anodization of aluminum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments confirmed the differences in anodic oxide growth. Surface and cross-sections of the Ni3Al intermetallic alloy with anodic oxide were observed with field-emission scanning electron microscope and characterized with appropriate software. Nanoporous oxide growth rate was estimated from cross-sectional FE-SEM images. The lowest growth rate of 0.14 μm/h was found for the anodization at 0 °C and 2.0 V. The highest one - 2.29 μm/h - was noticed for 10.0 V and 30 °C. Pore diameter was ranging from 18.9 nm (2.0 V, 0 °C) to 32.0 nm (12.0 V, 0 °C). Interpore distance of the nanoporous alumina was ranging from 56.6 nm (2.0 V, 0 °C) to 177.9 nm (12.0 V, 30 °C). Pore density (number of pore occupying given area) was decreasing with anodizing voltage increase from 394.5 pores/μm2 (2.0 V, 0 °C) to 94.9 pores/μm2 (12.0 V, 0 °C). All the geometrical features of the anodic alumina formed by two-step self-organized anodization of Ni3Al intermetallic alloy are depending on the operating conditions.

  14. Functions of the Membrane-Associated and Cytoplasmic Malate Dehydrogenases in the Citric Acid Cycle of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Douwe; van der Rest, Michel E.; Drysch, André; Yücel, Raif

    2000-01-01

    Like many other bacteria, Corynebacterium glutamicum possesses two types of l-malate dehydrogenase, a membrane-associated malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO; EC 1.1.99.16) and a cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (MDH; EC 1.1.1.37) The regulation of MDH and of the three membrane-associated dehydrogenases MQO, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and NADH dehydrogenase was investigated. MQO, MDH, and SDH activities are regulated coordinately in response to the carbon and energy source for growth. Compared to growth on glucose, these activities are increased during growth on lactate, pyruvate, or acetate, substrates which require high citric acid cycle activity to sustain growth. The simultaneous presence of high activities of both malate dehydrogenases is puzzling. MQO is the most important malate dehydrogenase in the physiology of C. glutamicum. A mutant with a site-directed deletion in the mqo gene does not grow on minimal medium. Growth can be partially restored in this mutant by addition of the vitamin nicotinamide. In contrast, a double mutant lacking MQO and MDH does not grow even in the presence of nicotinamide. Apparently, MDH is able to take over the function of MQO in an mqo mutant, but this requires the presence of nicotinamide in the growth medium. It is shown that addition of nicotinamide leads to a higher intracellular pyridine nucleotide concentration, which probably enables MDH to catalyze malate oxidation. Purified MDH from C. glutamicum catalyzes oxaloacetate reduction much more readily than malate oxidation at physiological pH. In a reconstituted system with isolated membranes and purified MDH, MQO and MDH catalyze the cyclic conversion of malate and oxaloacetate, leading to a net oxidation of NADH. Evidence is presented that this cyclic reaction also takes place in vivo. As yet, no phenotype of an mdh deletion alone was observed, which leaves a physiological function for MDH in C. glutamicum obscure. PMID:11092846

  15. Determination of boron in blood, urine and bone by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using zirconium and citric acid as modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José Luis; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo

    2001-10-01

    A comparative study of various potential chemical modifiers (Au, Ba, Be, Ca, Cr, Ir, La, Lu, Mg, Ni, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr, V, W, and Zr), and different 'coating' treatments (Zr, W, and W+Rh) of the pyrolytic graphite platform of a longitudinally heated graphite tube atomizer for thermal stabilization and determination of boron was undertaken. The use of Au, Ba, Be, Cr, Ir, Pt, Rh, Ru, Sr and V as modifiers, and of W+Rh coating produced erratic, and noisy signals, while the addition of La, Ni and Pd as modifiers, and the W coating had positive effects, but with too high background absorption signals, rendering their use unsuitable for boron determination even in aqueous solutions. The atomic absorption signal for boron was increased and stabilized when the platform was coated with Zr, and by the addition of Ca, Mg, Lu, W or Zr as modifiers. Only the addition of 10 μg of Zr as a modifier onto Zr-treated platforms allowed the use of a higher pyrolysis temperature without analyte losses. The memory effect was minimized by incorporating a cleaning step with 10 μl of 50 g l -1 NH 4F HF after every three boron measurements. The addition of 10 μl of 15 g l -1 citric acid together with Zr onto Zr-treated platforms significantly improved the characteristic mass to m0=282 pg, which is adequate for biological samples such as urine and bone, although the sensitivity was still inadequate for the determination of boron in blood of subjects without supplementary diet. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit (3σ) was 60 μg l -1. The amount of boron found in whole blood, urine and femur head samples from patients with osteoporosis was in agreement with values previously reported in the literature.

  16. Scalable Fabrication of Electrospun Nanofibrous Membranes Functionalized with Citric Acid for High-Performance Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuxia; Wang, Xueqin; Si, Yang; Liu, Lifang; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-05-11

    Fabricating protein adsorbents with high adsorption capacity and appreciable throughput is extremely important and highly desired for the separation and purification of protein products in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries, yet still remains a great challenge. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a novel protein adsorbent by in situ functionalizing eletrospun ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) nanofibrous membranes (NFM) with critic acid (CCA). Taking advantage of the merits of large specific surface area, highly tortuous open-porous structure, abundant active carboxyl groups introduced by CCA, superior chemical stability, and robust mechanical strength, the obtained CCA-grafted EVOH NFM (EVOH-CCA NFM) present an excellent integrated protein (take lysozyme as the model protein) adsorption performance with a high capacity of 284 mg g(-1), short equilibrium time of 6 h, ease of elution, and good reusability. Meanwhile, the adsorption performance of EVOH-CCA NFM can be optimized by regulating buffer pH, ionic strength, and initial concentration of protein solutions. More importantly, a dynamic binding efficiency of 250 mg g(-1) can be achieved driven solely by the gravity of protein solution, which matches well with the demands of the high yield and energy conservation in the actual protein purification process. Furthermore, the resultant EVOH-CCA NFM also possess unique selectivity for positively charged proteins which was confirmed by the method of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Significantly, the successful synthesis of such intriguing and economic EVOH-CCA NFM may provide a promising candidate for the next generation of protein adsorbents for rapid, massive, and cost-effective separation and purification of proteins. PMID:27111287

  17. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.

  18. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils. PMID:27212680

  19. Retention Mechanisms of Citric Acid in Ternary Kaolinite-Fe(III)-Citrate Acid Systems Using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. These findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils. PMID:27212680

  20. Cotton textiles modified with citric acid as efficient anti-bacterial agent for prevention of nosocomial infections

    PubMed Central

    Bischof Vukušić, Sandra; Flinčec Grgac, Sandra; Budimir, Ana; Kalenić, Smilja

    2011-01-01

    Aim To study the antimicrobial activity of citric acid (CA) and sodium hypophosphite monohydrate (SHP) against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and to determine the influence of conventional and microwave thermal treatments on the effectiveness of antimicrobial treatment of cotton textiles. Method Textile material was impregnated with CA and SHP solution and thermally treated by either conventional or microwave drying/curing treatment. Antibacterial effectiveness was tested according to the ISO 20743:2009 standard, using absorption method. The surfaces were morphologically observed by scanning electron microscopy, while physical characteristics were determined by wrinkle recovery angles method (DIN 53 891), tensile strength (DIN 53 837), and whiteness degree method (AATCC 110-2000). Results Cotton fabric treated with CA and SHP showed significant antibacterial activity against MRSA (6.38 log10 treated by conventional drying and 6.46 log10 treated by microwave drying before washing, and 6.90 log10 and 7.86 log10, respectively, after 1 cycle of home domestic laundering washing [HDLW]). Antibacterial activity was also remarkable against S. aureus (4.25 log10 by conventional drying, 4.58 log10 by microwave drying) and against P. aeruginosa (1.93 log10 by conventional and 4.66 log10 by microwave drying). Antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa was higher in samples subjected to microwave drying/curing than in those subjected to conventional drying/curing. As expected, antibacterial activity was reduced after 10 HDLW cycles but the compound was still effective. The surface of the untreated cotton polymer was smooth, while minor erosion stripes appeared on the surfaces treated with antimicrobial agent, and long and deep stripes were found on the surface of the washed sample. Conclusion CA can be used both for the disposable (non-durable) materials (gowns, masks, and cuffs for blood pressure measurement) and the materials that require durability to laundering

  1. Amylose-like polysaccharide accumulation and hyphal cell-surface structure in relation to citric acid production by Aspergillus niger in shake culture.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, K; Yusa, S; Rugsaseel, S; Nakagawa, H; Osumi, M; Usami, S

    1999-09-01

    When 120 mg glucose/ml was used as a carbon source, in shake culture Aspergillus niger Yang no. 2 maximally produced only 15.4 mg citric acid/ml but accumulated 3.0 mg extracellular polysaccharide/ml. The polysaccharide secreted by mycelia of Yang no. 2 in shake culture was confirmed to be an amylose-like alpha-1,4-glucan by hydrolysis analysis with acid, amylase and glucoamylase. However, in static cultures, such as semisolid and surface cultures free from physical stresses caused by shaking damage, Yang no. 2 produced more citric acid but did not accumulate the polysaccharide. With cultivation time in shake culture, the amount of extracellular polysaccharide and the viscosity of the culture broth increased. The increase of shaking speed caused a remarkable increase in the accumulation of extracellular polysaccharide, e.g. 11.2 mg extracellular polysaccharide/ml was accumulated in the medium at a shaking speed of 200 rpm. The addition of 2.0 mg carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)/ml as a viscous additive to the medium reduced drastically the amount of extracellular polysaccharide accumulated to 1.5 mg/ml, but increased the citric acid produced to 52.0 mg/ml. However, intracellular polysaccharide accumulation kept up a steady rate of 0.26 microgram/mg dried mycelium through the entire period of cultivation. The addition of 3.0 mg polysaccharide/ml purified from the culture broth to the medium at the start of a culture resulted in a decrease of extracellular polysaccharide accumulation but an increase of citric acid accumulation. From electronmicroscopic observation, cell surfaces of hyphae cultivated with CMC were smooth, while hyphae cultivated without CMC had fibrous and granular polysaccharide on the cell surface. These results suggested that Yang no. 2 secreted the polysaccharide on the cell surface as a viscous substance and/or a shock absorber to protect itself from physical stresses caused by shaking damage in shake culture. PMID:10531655

  2. Poly-(L-lactic acid) and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin composite matrices as a drug-eluting stent coating material with endothelialization, antithrombogenic, and drug release properties.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2013-07-01

    Biodegradable composite matrices comprising poly-(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated gelatin (AlGelatin) with endothelialization, antithrombogenic, and drug release properties were prepared. The characterization of composite matrices with various mixing ratios was performed by evaluating their swelling ratio, endothelial cell culture, antithrombogenic tests, and drug release behavior. Tamibarotene (Am80), which specifically inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, was employed as the drug. The swelling ratio of composite matrices decreased as the PLLA content decreased. The number of endothelial cells cultured on the surfaces of composite matrices was maximal at the PLLA/AlGelatin-TSC ratio of 80/20. Antithrombogenic tests revealed that the levels of platelets and fibrin network formation decreased as the AlGelatin-TSC content increased. The Am80 release test indicated that the release rate decreased as PLLA content increased. Using the resulting composite matrix, Am80-eluting stents possessing a smooth surface and a coating thickness of ∼15 μm were successfully obtained. Am80 was continuously released from the resulting stent at ∼40%, up to 28 days without burst release. Therefore, Am80-eluting stent with its antithrombogenic and endothelialization properties has great potential for clinical use. PMID:23280946

  3. Heavy metal removal from sludge with organic chelators: Comparative study of N, N-bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Dimon, Biaou; Mama, Daouda; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The applicability and performance of a new generation of biodegradable chelator, N, N-Bis(carboxymethyl) glutamic acid (GLDA), for extracting heavy metals from sewage sludge was carried out and compared with citric acid (CA). Targeted metals included Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, and their contents in the raw sludge were 63.1, 73.4, 1103.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis), respectively. Metals were divided into six fractions including water soluble, exchangeable, carbonates bound, Fe-Mn bound, organic matters bound and residual fraction via chemical fractionation. Washing results showed that in general GLDA exhibited better performance compared with CA, with removal efficiency of 83.9, 87.3, 81.2, 85.6, 89.3 and 90.2% for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively at equilibrium pH = 3.3. Residual metals were better stabilized in the GLAD-washed sludge than in the CA-washed sludge, and were mostly tightly bonded to the residual fraction. Furthermore, CA promoted phosphorus (P) release while GLDA had an opposite effect and tended to retain P within sludge, which could be beneficial for further application in agricultural use. Findings from this study suggested that GLDA could be a potential replacement for refractory and less environmentally-friendly chelators in the extraction of metals from sludge. PMID:26520041

  4. Citric acid- and Tween(®) 80-assisted phytoremediation of a co-contaminated soil: alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) performance and remediation potential.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-05-01

    A pot experiment was designed to assess the phytoremediation potential of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in a co-contaminated (i.e., heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons) soil and the influence of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate), applied individually and combined together, for their possible use in chemically assisted phytoremediation. The results showed that alfalfa plants could tolerate and grow in a co-contaminated soil. Over a 90-day experimental time, shoot and root biomass increased and negligible plant mortality occurred. Heavy metals were uptaken by alfalfa to a limited extent, mostly by plant roots, and their concentration in plant tissues were in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb. Microbial population (alkane-degrading microorganisms) and activity (lipase enzyme) were enhanced in the presence of alfalfa with rhizosphere effects of 9.1 and 1.5, respectively, after 90 days. Soil amendments did not significantly enhance plant metal concentration or total uptake. In contrast, the combination of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 significantly improved alkane-degrading microorganisms (2.4-fold increase) and lipase activity (5.3-fold increase) in the rhizosphere of amended plants, after 30 days of experiment. This evidence supports a favorable response of alfalfa in terms of tolerance to a co-contaminated soil and improvement of rhizosphere microbial number and activity, additionally enhanced by the joint application of citric acid and Tween(®) 80, which could be promising for future phytoremediation applications. PMID:26838038

  5. Synthesis of high intrinsic loss power aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted hydrothermal-reduction route

    SciTech Connect

    Behdadfar, Behshid; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Mozaffari, Morteza

    2012-03-15

    Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results showed that certain concentrations of citric acid (CA) are required to obtain only magnetic iron oxides with mean particle sizes around 8 nm. CA acts as a modulator and reducing agent in iron oxide formation which controls nanoparticle size. The XRD, magnetic and heating measurements showed that the temperature and time of hydrothermal reaction can affect the magnetic properties of obtained ferrofluids. The synthesized ferrofluids were stable at pH 7. Their mean hydrodynamic size was around 80 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.158. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) was 9.4 nHm{sup 2}/kg. So this clean and cheap route is an efficient way to synthesize high ILP aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. - Graphical abstract: Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction method with citric acid as reductant which is an efficient way to synthesize aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid acted as reducing agent and surfactant in the route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were monodispersed and stable at pH of 7. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated intrinsic loss power of the synthesized ferrofluids was very high.

  6. Optimization of ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase production from date wastes by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus niger, and Candida guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Acourene, S; Ammouche, A

    2012-05-01

    The present study deals with submerged ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae SDB, Aspergillus niger ANSS-B5, and Candida guilliermondii CGL-A10, using date wastes as the basal fermentation medium. The physical and chemical parameters influencing the production of these metabolites were optimized. As for the ethanol production, the optimum yield obtained was 136.00 ± 0.66 g/l under optimum conditions of an incubation period of 72 h, inoculum content of 4% (w/v), sugars concentration of 180.0 g/l, and ammonium phosphate concentration of 1.0 g/l. Concerning citric acid production, the cumulative effect of temperature (30°C), sugars concentration of 150.0 g/l, methanol concentration of 3.0%, initial pH of 3.5, ammonium nitrate concentration of 2.5 g/l, and potassium phosphate concentration of 2.5 g/l during the fermentation process of date wastes syrup did increase the citric acid production to 98.42 ± 1.41 g/l. For the production of α-amylase, the obtained result shows that the presence of starch strongly induces the production of α-amylase with a maximum at 5.0 g/l. Among the various nitrogen sources tested, urea at 5.0 g/l gave the maximum biomass and α-amylase estimated at 5.76 ± 0.56 g/l and 2,304.19 ± 31.08 μmol/l/min, respectively after 72 h incubation at 30°C, with an initial pH of 6.0 and potassium phosphate concentration of 6.0 g/l. PMID:22193823

  7. An investigation of the applicability of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy for measurement of solubility and supersaturation of aqueous citric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwila, Dilum D.; Carroll, Leslie B.; Berglund, Kris A.

    1994-04-01

    Currently applied methods for measurement of solubility and supersaturation based on viscometry, refractometry, interferometry and density require the separation of phases prior to measurement. ATR (attenuated total reflection) infrared spectroscopy provides a unique configuration in which the infrared spectrum of a liquid phase can be obtained in a slurry without phase separation. The applicability of the technique was investigated using a micro Circle ® open boat cell equipped with a ZnSe (zinc selenide) ATR rod. Experiments conducted with aqueous citric acid proved that ATR infrared spectroscopy can be successfully employed to determine solubility and supersaturation.

  8. Effects of reaction time and citric acid contents on the morphologies of BaCO{sub 3} via PVP-assisted method

    SciTech Connect

    Lv Sa; Sheng Jie; Zhang Shuang; Sun Wendong

    2008-05-06

    BaCO{sub 3} with different morphologies, such as dumbbell-like, pillar-like, peanut-like and ellipsoid-like have been successfully synthesized using citric acid (CA) as chelating ligand via a simple polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted method. The effects of the pH of the starting solutions, reaction time and the molar ratio of CA/Ba{sup 2+} on the morphologies of BaCO{sub 3} were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the infrared (IR) spectrum of the sample are used to characterize the obtained products.

  9. An electromyographic method of objectively assessing cough intensity and use of the method to assess effects of codeine on the dose-response curve to citric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, I D; Wallis, P J; Apps, M C; Hughes, D T; Empey, D W; Osman, R C; Burke, C A

    1984-01-01

    The integrated surface abdominal electromyogram (EMG) has been used as a simple measurement of cough intensity which correlates well with the volume, air flow and noise produced in different coughs. Using the integrated abdominal EMG as a measure of cough intensity, dose response curves to inhaled citric acid can be drawn which are highly reproducible. We have studied the effects of codeine (60 mg) on these curves, and have demonstrated a reduction in cough intensity. It is suggested that this method of testing the effects of an antitussive on such a dose-response curve may be a useful one. PMID:6487476

  10. Ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film fabricated by citric acid-assisted hot-water-treatment of aluminum-palladium alloy film

    SciTech Connect

    Harumoto, Takashi; Tamura, Yohei; Ishiguro, Takashi

    2015-01-15

    Hot-water-treatment has been adapted to fabricate ultrafine nanoporous palladium-aluminum film from aluminum-palladium alloy film. Using citric acid as a chelating agent, a precipitation of boehmite (aluminum oxide hydroxide, AlOOH) on the nanoporous palladium-aluminum film was suppressed. According to cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy observations, the ligament/pore sizes of the prepared nanoporous film were considerably small (on the order of 10 nm). Since this fabrication method only requires aluminum alloy film and hot-water with chelating agent, the ultrafine nanoporous film can be prepared simply and environmentally friendly.

  11. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-01-01

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27120592

  12. Retention mechanisms of citric acid in ternary kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate acid systems using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L3,2-edge XANES spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Pan, Weinan; Regier, Tom; Hu, Yongfeng; Rumpel, Cornelia; Bolan, Nanthi; Sparks, Donald

    2016-05-23

    Organic carbon (OC) stability in tropical soils is strongly interlinked with multivalent cation interaction and mineral association. Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) represent the readily biodegradable OC. Therefore, investigating retention mechanisms of LMWOAs in mineral-cation-LMWOAs systems is critical to understanding soil C cycling. Given the general acidic conditions and dominance of kaolinite in tropical soils, we investigated the retention mechanisms of citric acid (CA) in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems with various Fe/CA molar ratios at pH ~3.5 using Fe K-edge EXAFS and L-3,2-edge XANES techniques. With Fe/CA molar ratios >2, the formed ferrihydrite mainly contributed to CA retention through adsorption and/ormore » coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios from 2 to 0.5, ternary complexation of CA to kaolinite via a five-coordinated Fe(III) bridge retained higher CA than ferrihydrite-induced adsorption and/or coprecipitation. With Fe/CA molar ratios ≤ 0.5, kaolinite-Fe(III)-citrate complexation preferentially occurred, but less CA was retained than via outer-sphere kaolinite-CA complexation. This study highlighted the significant impact of varied Fe/CA molar ratios on CA retention mechanisms in kaolinite-Fe(III)-CA systems under acidic conditions, and clearly showed the important contribution of Fe-bridged ternary complexation on CA retention. In conclusion, these findings will enhance our understanding of the dynamics of CA and other LMWOAs in tropical soils.« less

  13. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study. PMID:27234881

  14. Identification of a Classical Mutant in the Industrial Host Aspergillus niger by Systems Genetics: LaeA Is Required for Citric Acid Production and Regulates the Formation of Some Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2015-01-01

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. Finally, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations. PMID:26566947

  15. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. nigermore » has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.« less

  16. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Jing; Arentshorst, Mark; Nair, P. Deepa S.; Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Punt, Peter J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-11-13

    The asexual filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an important industrial cell factory for citric acid production. In this study, we genetically characterized a UV-generated A. niger mutant that was originally isolated as a nonacidifying mutant, which is a desirable trait for industrial enzyme production. Physiological analysis showed that this mutant did not secrete large amounts of citric acid and oxalic acid, thus explaining the nonacidifying phenotype. As traditional complementation approaches to characterize the mutant genotype were unsuccessful, we used bulk segregant analysis in combination with high-throughput genome sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for the nonacidifying phenotype. Since A. niger has no sexual cycle, parasexual genetics was used to generate haploid segregants derived from diploids by loss of whole chromosomes. We found that the nonacidifying phenotype was caused by a point mutation in the laeA gene. LaeA encodes a putative methyltransferase-domain protein, which we show here to be required for citric acid production in an A. niger lab strain (N402) and in other citric acid production strains. The unexpected link between LaeA and citric acid production could provide new insights into the transcriptional control mechanisms related to citric acid production in A. niger. Interestingly, the secondary metabolite profile of a ΔlaeA strain differed from the wild-type strain, showing both decreased and increased metabolite levels, indicating that LaeA is also involved in regulating the production of secondary metabolites. As a result, we show that our systems genetics approach is a powerful tool to identify trait mutations.

  17. Cloning and Characterization of a Pyruvate Carboxylase Gene from Penicillium rubens and Overexpression of the Genein the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for Enhanced Citric Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ge-Yi; Lu, Yi; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Zhao, Shou-Feng; Jiang, Hong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a pyruvate carboxylase gene (PYC1) from a marine fungus Penicillium rubens I607 was cloned and characterized. ORF of the gene (accession number: KM397349.1) had 3534 bp encoding 1177 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127.531 kDa and a PI of 6.20. The promoter of the gene was located at -1200 bp and contained a TATAA box, several CAAT boxes and a sequence 5'-SYGGRG-3'. The PYC1 deduced from the gene had no signal peptide, was a homotetramer (α4), and had the four functional domains. After expression of the PYC1 gene from the marine fungus in the marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, the transformant PR32 obtained had much higher specific pyruvate carboxylase activity (0.53 U/mg) than Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b (0.07 U/mg), and the PYC1 gene expression (133.8%) and citric acid production (70.2 g/l) by the transformant PR32 were also greatly enhanced compared to those (100 % and 27.3 g/l) by Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b. When glucose concentration in the medium was 60.0 g/l, citric acid (CA) concentration formed by the transformant PR32 was 36.1 g/l, leading to conversion of 62.1% of glucose into CA. During a 10-l fed-batch fermentation, the final concentration of CA was 111.1 ± 1.3 g/l, the yield was 0.93 g/g, the productivity was 0.46 g/l/h, and only 1.72 g/l reducing sugar was left in the fermented medium within 240 h. HPLC analysis showed that most of the fermentation products were CA. However, minor malic acid and other unknown products also existed in the culture. PMID:26470708

  18. New decontamination method based on caprylic acid in combination with citric acid or vanillin for eliminating Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in reconstituted infant formula.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Kim, S A; Lee, N Y; Rhee, M S

    2013-09-16

    The antimicrobial effects of natural compounds (caprylic acid, CA; citric acid, CTA; and vanillin, VNL) on the inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were examined in reconstituted infant formula. The samples were treated with: 1) CA, CTA, or VNL alone (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 mM); 2) a combination of CA (10 and 20 mM) and CTA (15 and 30 mM); and 3) a combination of CA (10 and 20 mM) and VNL (15 and 30 mM), at mild feeding temperatures (40 °C and 45 °C), and the bacterial populations were assayed periodically (0, 5, 10, and 30 min). For both bacteria, the combined treatments had marked synergistic antimicrobial effects compared with the sum of the effects of each individual treatment. For example, there was no noticeable reduction (P > 0.05) in the population of C. sakazakii following an individual treatment with 20 mM CA or 30 mM CTA for 5 min at 40 °C, whereas the population was reduced to undetectable levels (reduction > 7.3 log CFU/ml) following treatment with a combination of CA and CTA (20 CA+30 CTA for 5 min at 40 °C). As the temperature increased, the bactericidal effect was stronger at all time points with a synergistic effect. In a validation assay using a low level inoculum (approximately 10³ CFU/ml) of desiccation-stressed bacteria in certain conditions, the combined treatments (e.g., CA 10 mM+CTA 30 mM for 5 min at 45 °C for C. sakazakii, and CA 10mM+VNL 15 mM for 10 min at 45 °C for S. Typhimurium) completely destroyed the bacteria with no recovery of cell viability. Disintegration of the membrane and changes in the cell structure or morphology, such as plasmolysis and membrane disruption, were detected by flow cytometry and electron microscopy, respectively. These methods use antimicrobials that could be applied as food additives in infant formula, which may help to eliminate bacteria. PMID:24042002

  19. Ticlopidine, Alka-Seltzer, or a combination of citric acid with aspirin: effects on platelet aggregation in individuals with an insufficient response to aspirin alone.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S; Kaplan, A; Marcoe, K; Sauvage, L R

    2000-10-01

    Aspirin (ASA) does not effectively lower platelet aggregation in all people. The platelet aggregation (PA) score is an easily used clinical method for measuring the effect in individuals of antiplatelet medications. Fifteen apparently healthy subjects (2 men and 13 women), selected for their resistance to ASA's antiaggregation effect, completed a sequential trial of ticlopidine, Alka-Seltzer, and ASA + citric acid (CTA). Ticlopidine was the strongest aggregation inhibitor and the ASA + CTA combination was more inhibitory than Alka-Seltzer. It was determined that measuring antiaggregation effects of a particular agent in an individual prior to usage would optimize treatment. The PA score methodology provides a means for testing patients prior to antiplatelet therapy for prevention and treatment of the thrombotic complications of vascular disease. PMID:11030528

  20. Structural and cyclic volta metric investigations on BIPBVOX solid electrolyte synthesized by ethylene glycol-citric acid sol-gel route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, Faria K.; Beg, Saba; Al-Areqi, Niyazi A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Samples of BIPBVOX.x (Bi2V1-xPbxO5.5-x/2) in the composition range 0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.20 were prepared by ethylene glycol- citric acid sol-gel synthesis route. Structural investigations were carried out by X-ray diffraction, DTA. The highly conducting γ'- phase was effectively stabilized at room temperature for compositions with x ≥ 0.17. Cyclic voltammetric measurements showed reversible redox reactions of vanadium and irreversible redox reaction of Bi3+ in the BIPBVOX system during the first cathodic and anodic sweep. However, a higher stability against the reduction of Bi3+ to metallic bismuth was seen for x=0.20.

  1. Solid-phase synthesis of graphene quantum dots from the food additive citric acid under microwave irradiation and their use in live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qianfen; Wang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian

    2016-05-01

    The work demonstrated that solid citric acid, one of the most common food additives, can be converted to graphene quantum dots (GQDs) under microwave heating. The as-prepared GQDs were further characterized by various analytical techniques like transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity of the GQDs was evaluated using HeLa cells. The result showed that the GQDs almost did not exhibit cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 1000 µg mL(-1) . In addition, it was found that the GQDs showed good solubility, excellent photostability, and excitation-dependent multicolor photoluminescence. Subsequently, the multicolor GQDs were successfully used as a fluorescence light-up probe for live-cell imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26310294

  2. Solid-state thermal behavior and stability studies of theophylline-citric acid cocrystals prepared by neat cogrinding or thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Wang, Shun-Li; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-08-15

    To investigate the thermal behavior of cocrystal formed between anhydrous theophylline (TP) and anhydrous citric acid (CA) by neat manual cogrinding or thermal treatment, DSC and FTIR microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis were applied. The physical mixture and 60-min ground mixture were stored at 55{+-}0.5 Degree-Sign C/40{+-}2% RH condition to determine their stability behavior. Typical TP-CA cocrystals were prepared by slow solvent evaporation method. Results indicate that the cogrinding process could gradually induce the cocrystal formation between TP and CA. The IR spectral peak shift from 3495 to 3512 cm{sup -1} and the stepwise appearance of several new IR peaks at 1731, 1712, 1676, 1651, 1557 and 1265 cm{sup -1} with cogrinding time suggest that the mechanism of TP-CA cocrystal formation was evidenced by interacting TP with CA through the intermolecular O-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}O hydrogen bonding. The stability of 60-min ground mixture of TP-CA was confirmed at 55{+-}0.5 Degree-Sign C/40{+-}2% RH condition over a storage time of 60 days. - Garphical abstract: Cogrinding, thermal and solvent-evaporation methods might easily induce the theophylline-citric acid cocrystal formation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogrinding process could gradually induce the cocrystal formation between TP and CA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TP-CA cocrystal was formed through the intermolecular O-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}O hydrogen bonding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 60-min TP-CA ground mixture was similar to the solvent-evaporated cocrystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal-induced TP-CA cocrystal formation was confirmed by pre-heating the physical mixture to 152 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 60-min TP-CA ground mixture was stable at accelerated condition over a storage time of 60 days.

  3. Effect of EDTA, EDDS, NTA and citric acid on electrokinetic remediation of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn contaminated dredged marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Song, Yue; Ammami, Mohamed-Tahar; Benamar, Ahmed; Mezazigh, Salim; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, electrokinetic (EK) remediation method has been widely considered to remove metal pollutants from contaminated dredged sediments. Chelating agents are used as electrolyte solutions to increase metal mobility. This study aims to investigate heavy metal (HM) (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) mobility by assessing the effect of different chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) or citric acid (CA)) in enhancing EK remediation efficiency. The results show that, for the same concentration (0.1 mol L(-1)), EDTA is more suitable to enhance removal of Ni (52.8 %), Pb (60.1 %) and Zn (34.9 %). EDDS provides effectiveness to increase Cu removal efficiency (52 %), while EDTA and EDDS have a similar enhancement removal effect on As EK remediation (30.5∼31.3 %). CA is more suitable to enhance Cd removal (40.2 %). Similar Cr removal efficiency was provided by EK remediation tests (35.6∼43.5 %). In the migration of metal-chelate complexes being directed towards the anode, metals are accumulated in the middle sections of the sediment matrix for the tests performed with EDTA, NTA and CA. But, low accumulation of metal contamination in the sediment was observed in the test using EDDS. PMID:26782321

  4. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  5. Mathematical analysis of isotope labeling in the citric acid cycle with applications to 13C NMR studies in perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Chance, E M; Seeholzer, S H; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1983-11-25

    Rat hearts have been perfused in vitro with 5 mM glucose and either 5 mM acetate or 1 mM pyruvate to achieve steady state conditions, followed by replacement of the acetate with 90% enriched [2-13C]acetate or pyruvate with 90% enriched [3-13C]pyruvate. The hearts were frozen different times after addition of 13C-substrate and neutralized perchloric acid extracts from three pooled hearts per time point were used to obtain high resolution proton-decoupled 13C NMR spectra at 90.55 MHz. The 13C fractional enrichment of individual carbons of different metabolites was calculated from the area of the resolved resonances after correction for nuclear Overhauser enhancement and saturation effects. A mathematical flux model of the citric acid cycle and ancillary transamination reactions was constructed with the FACSIMILE program, and used to solve unknown flux parameters with constant pool sizes by nonlinear least squares analysis of the approximately 200 simultaneous differential equations required to describe the reactions. With [2-13C] acetate as substrate, resonances and line splittings due to 13C-13C spin coupling of the C-2, C-3, and C-4 carbons of glutamate were well resolved. The half-times to reach maximum 13C enrichment were 2.6 min for glutamate C-4 and 8 min for glutamate C-2 and C-3. From these data, a well determined citric acid cycle flux of 8.3 mumol/g dry weight X min was calculated for an observed oxygen consumption of 31 mumol/g dry weight X min. With [3-13C]pyruvate as substrate, resonances of aspartate C-2 and C-3 and of alanine C-3 were well resolved in addition to those of glutamate C-2, C-3, and C-4. Nonlinear least squares fitting of these data to the model gave nonrandomly distributed residuals for the 13C fractional enrichments of glutamate C-4, suggesting an incomplete model, but a well determined cycle flux of 11.9 mumol/g dry weight X min for an oxygen uptake of 35 mumol/g dry weight X min. Our studies demonstrate the practicality of 13C NMR

  6. The effect of using citric or acetic acid on survival of Listeria monocytogenes during fish protein recovery by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Otto, R A; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-10-01

    Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a protein recovery process effective at reducing Listeria innocua, a nonpathogenic bacterium typically used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in recovered trout protein. The response of L. monocytogenes to ISP processing was determined and compared to the response of L. innocua. Headed and gutted rainbow trout were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10.16 log CFU/g), homogenized, and pH-adjusted with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized and centrifugation was used to remove insoluble components (skin, insoluble protein, so on). The supernatant was returned to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with NaOH and centrifuged to remove precipitated protein. Microbial load was enumerated on both growth and selective media; recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Surviving cells from each component (protein, insoluble, and water) were compared to initial inoculum numbers. Significant reductions were detected at all pH (P < 0.05). The greatest reductions were at pH 3.0 with acetic acid, with a mean log reduction of 3.03 in the combined components, and a 3.53 log reduction in the protein portion. Data were compared to results from a previous study using L. innocua. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in recovery were found between the 2 species at pH 2.0 and 3.0 with greater recovery of L. monocytogenes, regardless of processing pH or acid type. These results demonstrate the variability in resistance between species and indicate that L. innocua is not an appropriate surrogate for L. monocytogenes for ISP processing with organic acids. PMID:21913922

  7. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation for characterization of citric acid-modified Hβ zeolite particles: Effect of particle dispersion and carrier composition.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Bai, Guoyi; Ding, Liang; Li, Yueqiu; Lee, Seungho

    2015-11-27

    In this study, sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, applied for determination of size distribution of Hβ zeolite particles modified by citric acid (CA-Hβ). Effects of the particle dispersion and the carrier liquid composition (type of dispersing reagent (surfactant) and salt added in the carrier liquid, ionic strength, and pH) on SdFFF elution behavior of CA-Hβ zeolite particles were systematically investigated. Also the SdFFF separation efficiency of the particles was discussed in terms of the forces such as van der Waals, hydrophobic, and induced-dipole interactions. Results reveal that the type of salt and pH of the carrier liquid significantly affect the SdFFF separation efficiency of the zeolite particles. It was found that addition of a salt (NaN3) into the carrier liquid affects the characteristic of the SdFFF channel surface. It was found that the use of an acidic medium (pH 3.2) leads to a particle-channel interaction, while the use of a basic medium (pH 10.6) promotes an inter-particle hydrophobic interaction. Result from SdFFF was compared with those from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It seems that, once the experimental conditions are optimized, SdFFF becomes a valuable tool for size characterization of the zeolite particles. PMID:26493474

  8. Comparison of removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid and citric acid in primary teeth: A scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Rahul J.; Bapna, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Root canal irrigants are considered momentous in their tissue dissolving property, eliminating microorganisms, and removing smear layer. The present study was aimed to compare the removal of endodontic smear layer using ethylene glycol bis (beta-amino ethyl ether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and citric acid solutions with saline as a control in primary anterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty primary anterior teeth were chosen for the study. The teeth were distributed into three groups having ten teeth each. Following instrumentation, root canals of the first group were treated with 17% EGTA and the second group with 6% citric acid. Only saline was used as an irrigant for the control group. Then, the teeth were subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study. The scale given by Rome et al. for the smear layer removal was used in the present study. Results: The pictures from the SEM showed that among the tested irrigants, 17% EGTA + 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) group showed the best results when compared to other groups. Conclusion: The results advocate that the sequential irrigation of the pulp canal walls with 17% EGTA followed by 5% NaOCl produced efficacious and smear-free root canal walls. PMID:27307670

  9. Effects of Continuous Triiodothyronine Infusion on Citric Acid Cycle in the Normal Immature Swine Heart under Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-02-13

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently used in infants with postoperative cardiopulmonary failure. ECMO also suppresses circulating triiodothyronine (T3) levels and modifies myocardial metabolism. We assessed the hypothesis that T3 supplementation reverses ECMO induced metabolic abnormalities in the immature heart. Twenty-two male Yorkshire pigs (age 25-38 days) with ECMO were received [2-13C]lactate, [2,4,6,8-13C]octanoate (medium chain fatty acid) and [U-13C]long-chain fatty acids as metabolic tracers either systemically (totally physiological intracoronary concentration) or directly into the coronary artery (high substrate concentration) for the last 60 minutes of each protocol. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of left ventricular tissue determined the fractional contribution (Fc) of these substrates to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Fifty percent of the pigs in each group received intravenous T3 supplement (bolus at 0.6 μg/kg and then continuous infusion at 0.2 μg/kg/hour) during ECMO. Under both substrate loading conditions T3 significantly increased lactate-Fc with a marginal increase in octanoate-Fc. Both T3 and high substrate provision increased myocardial energy status indexed by [Phosphocreatine]/[ATP]. In conclusion, T3 supplementation promoted lactate metabolism to the CAC during ECMO suggesting that T3 releases inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Manipulation of substrate utilization by T3 may be used therapeutically during ECMO to improve resting energy state and facilitate weaning.

  10. From CO2 to cell: energetic expense of creating biomass using the Calvin-Benson-Bassham and reductive citric acid cycles based on genome data.

    PubMed

    Mangiapia, Mary; Scott, Kathleen

    2016-04-01

    The factors driving the dominance of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle (CBB) or reductive citric acid cycle (rCAC) in autotrophic microorganisms in different habitats are debated. Based on costs for synthesizing a few metabolic intermediates, it has been suggested that the CBB poses a disadvantage due to higher metabolic cost. The purpose of this study was to extend this estimate of cost from metabolite synthesis to biomass synthesis. For 12 gammaproteobacteria (CBB) and five epsilonproteobacteria (rCAC), the amount of ATP to synthesize a gram of biomass from CO2 was calculated from genome sequences via metabolic maps. The eleven central carbon metabolites needed to synthesize biomass were all less expensive to synthesize via the rCAC (66%-89% of the ATP needed to synthesize them via CBB). Differences in cell compositions did result in differing demands for metabolites among the organisms, but the differences in cost to synthesize biomass were small among organisms that used a particular pathway (e.g. rCAC), compared to the difference between pathways (rCAC versus CBB). The rCAC autotrophs averaged 0.195 moles ATP per g biomass, while their CBB counterparts averaged 0.238. This is the first in silico estimate of the relative expense of both pathways to generate biomass. PMID:26940292

  11. Collagen based film with well epithelial and stromal regeneration as corneal repair materials: Improving mechanical property by crosslinking with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Long, Kai; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Ren, Li

    2015-10-01

    Corneal disease can lead to vision loss. It has become the second greatest cause of blindness in the world, and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)-citric acid (CA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The results showed that the Col-CA films had necessary optical performance, water content. The collagenase resistance of CA crosslinked films was superior to that of EDC crosslinked films. And CA5 film (Col:CA:EDC:NHS=60:3:10:10) had the best mechanical properties. Cell experiments showed that CA5 film was non-cytotoxic and human corneal epithelial cells could proliferate well on the films. Lamellar keratoplasty showed that the CA5 film could be sutured in the rabbit eyes and was epithelialized completely in about 10 days, and the transparency was restored quickly in 30±5 days. No inflammation and corneal neovascularization were observed at 6 months. Corneal stroma had been repaired; stromal cells and neo-stroma could be seen in the area of operation from the hematoxylin-eosin stained histologic sections and anterior segment optical coherence tomography images. These results indicated that Col-CA films were highly promising biomaterials that could be used in corneal tissue engineering and a variety of other tissue engineering applications. PMID:26117756

  12. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João Arg; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  13. A rapid response time and highly sensitive amperometric glucose biosensor based on ZnO nanorod via citric acid-assisted annealing route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zao; Ye, Zhizhen; Zhao, Binghui; Zong, Xiaolin; Wang, Ping

    2010-04-01

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by citric acid-assisted annealing route. In a phosphate buffer solution with a pH value of 7.4, glucose oxidase was immobilized on the surface of ZnO nanorod through chitosan-assisted cross-linking technique. The one-dimensional ZnO nanorods provide a large effective surface area with high surface-to-volume ratio and provide a favorable environment for the immobilization of GO x. The response time of this biosensor is less than 2 s. This biosensor has a very high sensitivity of 25.7 μA cm -2 mM -1. The low detection limit was estimated to be 0.01 mM. Two linear response ranges are 0.01-0.25 mM and 0.3-0.7 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant is found to be 1.95 mM. These results demonstrate that zinc oxide nanorods have potential applications in biosensors.

  14. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João ARG; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  15. Oligosaccharide-based Surfactant/Citric Acid Buffer System Stabilizes Lactate Dehydrogenase during Freeze-drying and Storage without the Addition of Natural Sugar.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Kawai, Ryuichiro; Koga, Maito; Asakura, Kouichi; Takahashi, Isao; Osanai, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the maintenance effects of oligosaccharide-based surfactants on the enzymatic activity of a model protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), during freeze-drying and room temperature storage using the citric acid buffer system. Oligosaccharide-based surfactants, which exhibit a high glass transition temperature (Tg), promoted the eminent retention of enzymatic activity during these protocols, whereas monosaccharide-based surfactants with a low Tg displayed poor performance at high concentration, albeit much better than that of Tween 80 at middle concentration. The increase in the alkyl chain length did not exert positive effects as observed for the maintenance effect during freeze-thawing, but an amphiphilic nature and a glass forming ability were crucial for the effective stabilization at a low excipient concentration during freeze-drying. Even a low oligosaccharide-based surfactant content (0.1 mg mL(-1)) could maintain LDH activity during freeze-drying, but a high surfactant content (1.0 mg mL(-1)) was required to prevent buffer precipitation and retain high LDH activity on storage. Regarding storage, glass formation restricted molecular mobility in the lyophilized matrix, and LDH activity was effectively retained. The present results describe a strategy based on the glass-forming ability of surfactant-type excipients that affords a natural sugar-free formulation or an alternative use for polysorbate-type surfactants. PMID:27181251

  16. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gergely; Konrad, Csaba; Pour-Ghaz, Issa; Mansour, Josef J.; Németh, Beáta; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Adam-Vizi, Vera; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Substrate-level phosphorylation mediated by succinyl-CoA ligase in the mitochondrial matrix produces high-energy phosphates in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, when the electron transport chain is dysfunctional, provision of succinyl-CoA by the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) is crucial for maintaining the function of succinyl-CoA ligase yielding ATP, preventing the adenine nucleotide translocase from reversing. We addressed the source of the NAD+ supply for KGDHC under anoxic conditions and inhibition of complex I. Using pharmacologic tools and specific substrates and by examining tissues from pigeon liver exhibiting no diaphorase activity, we showed that mitochondrial diaphorases in the mouse liver contribute up to 81% to the NAD+ pool during respiratory inhibition. Under these conditions, KGDHC's function, essential for the provision of succinyl-CoA to succinyl-CoA ligase, is supported by NAD+ derived from diaphorases. Through this process, diaphorases contribute to the maintenance of substrate-level phosphorylation during respiratory inhibition, which is manifested in the forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase. Finally, we show that reoxidation of the reducible substrates for the diaphorases is mediated by complex III of the respiratory chain.—Kiss, G., Konrad, C., Pour-Ghaz, I., Mansour, J. J., Németh, B., Starkov, A. A., Adam-Vizi, V., Chinopoulos, C. Mitochondrial diaphorases as NAD+ donors to segments of the citric acid cycle that support substrate-level phosphorylation yielding ATP during respiratory inhibition. PMID:24391134

  17. Kinetics of co-crystal formation with caffeine and citric acid via liquid-assisted grinding analyzed using the distinct element method.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Keisuke; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi; Shimosaka, Atsuko; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Jusuke

    2015-08-30

    The kinetics of co-crystal formation of caffeine (CF) with citric acid (CTA) was evaluated. Ball milling of CF and CTA in molar ratios of 4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4 was performed by the liquid-assisted grinding (LAG) method. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two types of co-crystals (co-crystal-1, a 1:1 CF-CTA co-crystal; and co-crystal-2, a new co-crystal form) were obtained. The kinetic characteristics of this new co-crystal formation were assessed by calculating the ball impact energy and force using the distinct element method (DEM) simulations. The results indicated that co-crystal-2 creation occurred under a condition in which the ball impact force exceeded a certain threshold value. Moreover, the total ball impact energy was positively correlated with co-crystal formation, exhibiting a higher ball impact force than the threshold value. The kinetics of co-crystal-2 formation was almost consistent with the Jander equation. Consequently, co-crystal-2 formation could be explained according to a three-dimensional diffusion mechanism. PMID:25998562

  18. Solid-state thermal behavior and stability studies of theophylline-citric acid cocrystals prepared by neat cogrinding or thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Wang, Shun-Li; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the thermal behavior of cocrystal formed between anhydrous theophylline (TP) and anhydrous citric acid (CA) by neat manual cogrinding or thermal treatment, DSC and FTIR microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis were applied. The physical mixture and 60-min ground mixture were stored at 55±0.5 °C/40±2% RH condition to determine their stability behavior. Typical TP-CA cocrystals were prepared by slow solvent evaporation method. Results indicate that the cogrinding process could gradually induce the cocrystal formation between TP and CA. The IR spectral peak shift from 3495 to 3512 cm-1 and the stepwise appearance of several new IR peaks at 1731, 1712, 1676, 1651, 1557 and 1265 cm-1 with cogrinding time suggest that the mechanism of TP-CA cocrystal formation was evidenced by interacting TP with CA through the intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonding. The stability of 60-min ground mixture of TP-CA was confirmed at 55±0.5 °C/40±2% RH condition over a storage time of 60 days.

  19. Effect of different concentrations of acetic, citric, and propionic acid dipping solutions on bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial contamination of raw, processed poultry may include spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens. We evaluated different combinations of organic acid (OA) wash solutions for their ability to reduce bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin and to inhibit growth of spoilage bacteria and path...

  20. THE EFFECT OF CITRIC ACID, COPPER SULFATE CONCENTRATION, AND TEMPERATURE ON THE EFFICACY OF THE POND SHORELINE TREATMENT FOR CONTROLLING RAMS-HORN SNAILS AND THE POTENTIAL TOXICITY OF THIS TREATMENT TO CHANNEL CATFISH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tests were run to determine if any refinements were warranted in the copper sulfate-citric acid (CuSO4-CA) pond shoreline treatment (589 g of CuSO4 with 58.9 g of CA applied in a 2 m swath over a 10 m length of shoreline) for rams-horn snails (EPA registration #1278-8). In research ponds without veg...

  1. EFFECT OF CITRIC ACID, COPPER SULFATE CONCENTRATION, AND TEMPERATURE ON A POND SHORELINE TREATMENT FOR CONTROL OF THE RAMS-HORN SNAIL PLANORBELLA TRIVOLVUS AND THE POTENTIAL TOXICITY OF THE TREATMENT TO CHANNEL CATFISH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were run to determine if any refinements were warranted in the copper sulfate-citric acid (CuSO4-CA) pond shoreline treatment (589 g of CuSO4 with 58.9 g of CA applied in a 2 m swath over a 10 m length of shoreline) for rams-horn snails (EPA registration #1278-8). The use of this treatme...

  2. TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASES MYOCARDIAL FUNCTION AND PYRUVATE ENTRY INTO THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE AFTER REPERFUSION IN A MODEL OF INFANT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    We utilized a translational model of infant CPB to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. Methods and Results: Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]-pyruvate for 40 minutes (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (Cont) or immediately after reperfusion (IR) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (IR-Tr) received T3 (1.2 ug/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels (aCAC) and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC ) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC; ) using 13C-labeled pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C NMR. Neither IR nor IR-Tr modified aCAC. However, compared to IR, T3 (group IR-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after CPB while elevating both PDC and PC (~ four-fold). T3 inhibited IR induced reductions in CAC intermediate molar percent enrichment (MPE) and oxaloacetate(citrate)/malate MPE ratio; an index of aspartate entry into the CAC. Conclusions: T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC thereby providing substrate for elevated cardiac function and work after reperfusion. The increases in pyruvate flux occur with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Additionally, T3 inhibition of reductions in CAC intermediate MPEs indicates that T3 reduces the reliance on amino acids (AA) for anaplerosis after reperfusion. Thus, AA should be more available for other functions such as protein synthesis.

  3. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Mikael R.; Salazar, Margarita; Schaap, Peter; van de Vondervoort, Peter; Culley, David E.; Thykaer, Jette; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Albang, Richard; Albermann, Kaj; Berka, Randy; Braus, Gerhard; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Corrochano, Luis; Dai, Ziyu; van Dijck, Piet; Hofmann, Gerald; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Menke, Hildegard; Meijer, Martin; Meijer, Susan; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Nielsen, Michael L.; van Ooyen, Albert; Pel, Herman J.; Poulsen, Lars; Samson, Rob; Stam, Hein; Tsang, Adrian; van den Brink, Johannes M.; ATkins, Alex; Aerts, Andrea; Shapiro, Harris; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Salamov, Asaf; Lou, Yigong; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Martinez, Diego; van Peij, Noel; Roubos, Johannes A.; Nielsen, Jens B.; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-06-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzyme-producing A. niger strain (CBS 513.88) has already been sequenced, the versatility and diversity of this species compels additional exploration. We therefore undertook whole genome sequencing of the acidogenic A. niger wild type strain (ATCC 1015), and produced a genome sequence of very high quality. Only 15 gaps are present in the sequence and half the telomeric regions have been elucidated. Moreover, sequence information from ATCC 1015 was utilized to improve the genome sequence of CBS 513.88. Chromosome-level comparisons uncovered several genome rearrangements, deletions, a clear case of strain-specific horizontal gene transfer, and identification of 0.8 megabase of novel sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms per kilobase (SNPs/kb) between the two strains were found to be exceptionally high (average: 7.8, maximum: 160 SNPs/kb). High variation within the species was confirmed with exo-metabolite profiling and phylogenetics. Detailed lists of alleles were generated, and genotypic differences were observed to accumulate in metabolic pathways essential to acid production and protein synthesis. A transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of the electron transport chain, specifically the alternative oxidative pathway in ATCC 1015, while CBS 513.88 showed significant up regulation of genes associated with biosynthesis of amino acids that are abundant in glucoamylase A, tRNA-synthases and protein transporters.

  4. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Andersen, Mikael R.; Salazar, Margarita P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Vondervoot, Peter J.I. van de; Culley, David; Thykaer, Jette; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristen F.; Albang, Richard; Albermann, Kaj; Berka, Randy M.; Braus, Gerhard H.; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Dai, Ziyu; Dijck, Piet W.M. van; Hofmann, Gerald; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnusson, Jon K.; Meijer, Susan L.; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Ooyen, Albert J.J. van; Panther, Kathyrn S.; Pel, Herman J.; Poulsen, Lars; Samson, Rob A.; Stam, Hen; Tsang, Adrian; Brink, Johannes M. van den; Atkins, Alex; Aerts, Andrea; Shapiro, Harris; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Salamov, Asaf; Lou, Yigong; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grimwood, Jane; Kubicek, Christian P.; Martinez, Diego; Peij, Noel N.M.E. van; Roubos, Johannes A.; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-04-28

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzyme-producing A. niger strain (CBS 513.88) has already been sequenced, the versatility and diversity of this species compels additional exploration. We therefore undertook whole genome sequencing of the acidogenic A. niger wild type strain (ATCC 1015), and produced a genome sequence of very high quality. Only 15 gaps are present in the sequence and half the telomeric regions have been elucidated. Moreover, sequence information from ATCC 1015 was utilized to improve the genome sequence of CBS 513.88. Chromosome-level comparisons uncovered several genome rearrangements, deletions, a clear case of strain-specific horizontal gene transfer, and identification of 0.8 megabase of novel sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms per kilobase (SNPs/kb) between the two strains were found to be exceptionally high (average: 7.8, maximum: 160 SNPs/kb). High variation within the species was confirmed with exo-metabolite profiling and phylogenetics. Detailed lists of alleles were generated, and genotypic differences were observed to accumulate in metabolic pathways essential to acid production and protein synthesis. A transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of the electron transport chain, specifically the alternative oxidative pathway in ATCC 1015, while CBS 513.88 showed significant up-regulation of genes relevant to glucoamylase A production, such as tRNA-synthases and protein transporters. Our results and datasets from this integrative systems biology analysis resulted in a snapshot of fungal evolution and will support further optimization of cell factories based on filamentous fungi.[Supplemental materials (10 figures, three text documents and 16 tables) have been made available

  5. Citric acid modifies surface properties of commercial CeO2 nanoparticles reducing their toxicity and cerium uptake in radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Majumdar, S; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2013-12-15

    Little is known about the mobility, reactivity, and toxicity to plants of coated engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Surface modification may change the interaction of ENPs with living organisms. This report describes surface changes in commercial CeO2 NPs coated with citric acid (CA) at molar ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:7, and 1:10 CeO2:CA, and their effects on radish (Raphanus sativus) seed germination, cerium and nutrients uptake. All CeO2 NPs and their absorption by radish plants were characterized by TEM, DLS, and ICP-OES. Radish seeds were germinated in pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs suspensions at 50mg/L, 100mg/L, and 200mg/L. Deionized water and CA at 100mg/L were used as controls. Results showed ζ potential values of 21.6 mV and -56 mV for the pristine and CA coated CeO2 NPs, respectively. TEM images showed denser layers surrounding the CeO2 NPs at higher CA concentrations, as well as better distribution and smaller particle sizes. None of the treatments affected seed germination. However, at 200mg/L the CA coated NPs at 1:7 ratio produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more root biomass, increased water content and reduced by 94% the Ce uptake, compared to bare NPs. This suggests that CA coating decrease CeO2 NPs toxicity to plants. PMID:24231324

  6. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults. PMID:26635626

  7. Enhancement of mechanical properties, microstructure, and antimicrobial activities of zein films cross-linked using succinic anhydride, eugenol, and citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ashraf A; Deraz, Sahar F; Elrahman, Somia Abd; El-Fawal, Gomaa

    2015-08-18

    Zein constitutes about half of the endosperm proteins in corn. Recently, attempts have been made to utilize zein for food coatings and biodegradable materials, which require better physical properties, using chemical modification of zein. In this study, zein proteins were modified using citric acid, succinic anhydride, and eugenol as natural cross-linking agents in the wet state. The cross-linkers were added either separately or combined in increment concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4%). The effects of those agents on the mechanical properties, microstructure, optical properties, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and antibacterial activities of zein were investigated. The addition of cross-linking agents promoted changes in the arrangement of groups in zein film-forming particles. Regarding the film properties, incorporation of cross-linking agents into zein films prepared in ethanol resulted in two- to three-fold increases in tensile strength (TS) values. According to the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and Hunter parameters there were no remarkable changes in the structure and color of zein films. Transparency of zein films was decreased differentially according to the type and cross-linker concentration. The mechanical and optical properties of zein films were closely related to their microstructure. All cross-linked films showed remarkable antibacterial activities against Bacillus cereus ATCC 49064 and Salmonella enterica ATCC 25566. Food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria were affected in a film-dependent manner. Our experimental results show that even with partial cross-linking the mechanical properties and antipathogen activities of zein films were significantly improved, which would be useful for various industrial applications. PMID:25036665

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Gd{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} co-doped ceria by using citric acid-nitrate combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Hong-Chang; Zhang, Yu-Xin; Henan Vocational College of Chemical Technology, Zhengzhou 450052 ; Liu, Jia-Jia; Li, Yue-Li; Wang, Jian-She; Li, Zhong-Jun

    2011-01-15

    A series of Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} (x = 0-0.20) compositions have been synthesized by citric acid-nitrate combustion method. XRD measurements indicate that all the obtained materials crystallized in cubic fluorite-type structure. Lattice parameters were calculated by Rietveld method and the parameter a values in Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} system obey Vegard's law, a (A) = 5.4224 + 0.1208x. The obtained powders have good sinterability and the relative density could reach above 95% after being sintered at 1400 {sup o}C. Impedance spectroscopy measurements indicated that the conductivity of Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} first increased and then decreased with Nd dopant content x. The maximum conductivity, {sigma}{sub 700{sup o}C} = 6.26 x 10{sup -2} S/cm, was found in Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.12}Nd{sub 0.08}O{sub 1.9} when sintered at 1300 {sup o}C. The corresponding activation energies of conduction had a minimum value E{sub a} = 0.676 eV. The results tested experimentally the validity of the effective atomic number concept of recent density functional theory, which had suggested that co-dopant with effective atomic number between 61 (Pm) and 62 (Sm) was the ideal dopant exhibiting high ionic conductivity and low activation energy.

  9. Structural, electronic and photoluminescence properties of Eu3+-doped CaYAlO4 obtained by using citric acid complexes as precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrella, R. V.; Júnior, C. S. Nascimento; Góes, M. S.; Pecoraro, E.; Schiavon, M. A.; Paiva-Santos, C. O.; Lima, H.; Couto dos Santos, M. A.; Ribeiro, S. J. L.; Ferrari, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    The search for new materials that meet the current technological demands for photonic applications, make the Rare Earth ions embedded in inorganic oxides as excellent candidates for several technological devices. This work presents the synthesis of Eu3+-doped CaYAlO4 using citric acid as ligand to form a complex precursor. The methodology used has big draw due to its easy handling and low cost of the materials. The thermal analysis of viscous solutions was evaluated and the obtained compounds show the formation of a polycrystalline tetragonal phase. Rietveld refinement was used to understand the structural and the cell parameters of the crystalline phase as a function of temperature of heat-treatment. Crystallite size and microstrain were determined and were shown to have a direct relationship with the temperature of the heat-treatment. The band-gap of the CaYAlO4 doped with 1 and 10 mol% of Eu3+ showed values close to 4.30 eV, resulting in their transparency in the visible region between 330 and 750 nm. Besides the intense photoluminescence from Eu3+, a study was conducted to evaluate the possible position of the Eu3+ in the CaYAlO4 as host lattice. Lifetime of the emission decay from Eu3+ excited state 5D0 show that CaYAlO4 is a good host to rare earth ions, once it can avoid clustering of these ions in concentration as high as 10 mol%. The predictions of the sublevels of the 7F1 crystal field level are discussed through the method of equivalent nearest neighbours (MENN). The intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ = 2 and 4) are reproduced with physically reasonable values of average polarizabilities. The set of charge factors used in both calculations are in good agreement with the charge of the europium ion described by the Batista-Longo improved model (BLIM). The quantum efficiencies of the materials were calculated based on Judd-Ofelt theory. Based on the results obtained in this work, the materials have potential use in photonic devices such as lasers and solid

  10. CSP0510 Lotion as a Novel Moisturizer Containing Citric Acid and Trisodium Phosphate Relieves Objective and Subjective Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-June; Yang, Nam-Woong; Choi, Jee-Young; Lee, Jee-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background Moisturizers with anti-inflammatory or anti-itch activity should be developed for the safe and effective management of atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of a newly developed moisturizer, CSP0510 lotion (Twolines Inc., Korea), containing citric acid (CA) and trisodium phosphate (TSP) as active ingredients, in mild to moderate AD. Methods and Results CSP0510 lotion applied twice daily for 4 weeks to eczematous lesions improved objective and subjective (itch) symptoms of AD. The physician's global assessment (PGA) score for objective symptoms decreased from 2.5±0.6 before application to 1.3±0.5 after application in the CSP0510-treated group (n=42, p<0.001). Also, the PGA score decreased from 2.3±0.6 to 1.9±0.5 by vehicle-treated (without CA and TSP) control group (p=0.001), but there was no statistical difference between CSP0510-treated and vehicle-treated groups (p=0.089). The visual analogue scale score for itch decreased from 4.8±1.3 to 2.0±0.9 in the CSP0510-treated group (p<0.001), and from 4.6±1.1 to 3.5±0.9 in the control group (p=0.075), showing a statistical significance between two groups (p=0.002). Our results in humans were further supported by in vitro and animal experiments. In HaCaT cells treated with compound 48/80 (7.5 µg/ml), CA:TSP (1:1, vol:vol) synergistically suppressed the compound 48/80-induced upregulation of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, nerve grow factor, and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Application of CSP0510 to the dorsal skin of hairless mice for 3 weeks suppressed the oxazolone-induced allergic skin inflammation. Conclusion In conclusion, CSP0510 lotion has anti-itch and anti-inflammatory activity in the skin, which improves both objective and subjective symptoms of AD. PMID:27274633

  11. Polyelectrolyte Complexes of Low Molecular Weight PEI and Citric Acid as Efficient and Nontoxic Vectors for in Vitro and in Vivo Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Giron-Gonzalez, M Dolores; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael; Lopez-Jaramillo, F Javier; Salinas-Castillo, Alfonso; Jodar-Reyes, Ana Belen; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2016-03-16

    Gene transfection mediated by the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered a standard methodology. However, while highly branched PEIs form smaller polyplexes with DNA that exhibit high transfection efficiencies, they have significant cell toxicity. Conversely, low molecular weight PEIs (LMW-PEIs) with favorable cytotoxicity profiles display minimum transfection activities as a result of inadequate DNA complexation and protection. To solve this paradox, a novel polyelectrolyte complex was prepared by the ionic cross-linking of branched 1.8 kDa PEI with citric acid (CA). This system synergistically exploits the good cytotoxicity profile exhibited by LMW-PEI with the high transfection efficiencies shown by highly branched and high molecular weight PEIs. The polyectrolyte complex (1.8 kDa-PEI@CA) was obtained by a simple synthetic protocol based on the microwave irradiation of a solution of 1.8 kDa PEI and CA. Upon complexation with DNA, intrinsic properties of the resulting particles (size and surface charge) were measured and their ability to form stable polyplexes was determined. Compared with unmodified PEIs the new complexes behave as efficient gene vectors and showed enhanced DNA binding capability associated with facilitated intracellular DNA release and enhanced DNA protection from endonuclease degradation. In addition, while transfection values for LMW-PEIs are almost null, transfection efficiencies of the new reagent range from 2.5- to 3.8-fold to those of Lipofectamine 2000 and 25 kDa PEI in several cell lines in culture such as CHO-k1, FTO2B hepatomas, L6 myoblasts, or NRK cells, simultaneously showing a negligible toxicity. Furthermore, the 1.8 kDa-PEI@CA polyelectrolyte complexes retained the capability to transfect eukaryotic cells in the presence of serum and exhibited the capability to promote in vivo transfection in mouse (as an animal model) with an enhanced efficiency compared to 25 kDa PEI. Results support the polyelectrolyte complex

  12. Interference-free determination of thallium in aqua regia leaches from rocks, soils and sediments by D(2)-ETAAS method using mixed palladium-citric acid-lithium chemical modifier.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Cernohorský, Tomás; Srámková, Jitka; Hubácková, Katerina; Dolezalová, Iva

    2008-04-28

    The mixture of palladium (chloride) with citric acid and lithium is proposed as a new chemical modifier for the elimination of interference occurred during the determination of Tl in aqua regia extracts from rocks, soils and sediments by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using instrumentation with deuterium-lamp background correction (D(2)-ETAAS). Palladium was preferred to rhodium and platinum as to analyte stabilization, citric acid served as an effective reducing agent facilitating formation of Pd-Tl stable covalent bonds playing an important role in the analyte stabilization. Citric acid in addition helps to remove most of interfering chloride at low temperature. The further addition of Li increased significantly the robustness of chemical modifier against strongly interfering ZnCl2 matrix by binding free chlorine into a more stable LiCl molecule. In the presence of the proposed chemical modifier the temperature for the final step of pyrolysis was adjustable up to 1000 degrees C, without any noticeable loss of volatile Tl species and the interference of the rest chloride matrix was significantly reduced. The application of the modifier to direct determination of Tl in aqua regia extracts from rocks, soils and sediments has ensured the characteristic mass and LOD value for the original sample 13 pg and 0.043 microg g(-1), respectively (10-microL aliquots of sample) and has enabled the use of matrix-free standard solutions for attaining accurate analysis. The accuracy was verified by the analysis of certified reference samples and by the comparison of results with those found by an inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-oa-TOFMS) method. PMID:18405679

  13. Transglutaminase-induced or citric acid-mediated cross-linking of whey proteins to tune the characteristics of subsequently desolvated sub-micron and nano-scaled particles.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Leila; Yarmand, Mohammadsaeed; Madadlou, Ashkan; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins were inter-connected either by the enzyme transglutaminase or citric acid and then desolvated with ethanol to generate particles. Both samples comprised of sub-micron (>300 nm) and nano-scaled (~100 nm) particles based on the hydrodynamic size measurements. Enzyme-induced cross-linking of proteins yielded more monodisperse particles and decreased the mean size of the major (nano-scaled) fraction of particles. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed a spherical morphology for all samples with mean sizes of <40 nm. Atomic force microscopy indicated a lower height for the particles from enzymatically cross-linked proteins. The mediating role of citric acid in bridging the proteins was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that pre-heating of protein solution before cross-linking and desolvation denatured the proteins entirely. In vitro degradation of whey protein particles in a simulated gastric fluid demonstrated that cross-linking of whey proteins before desolvation stage enhanced significantly the digestion stability of particles. PMID:24766206

  14. The effect of the concentration of citric acid and pH values on the preparation of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ultrafine powder by citrate sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haijun; Jia Xiaolin; Yan Yongjie; Liu Zhanjie; Yang Daoyuan; Li Zhenzhen

    2004-05-05

    Ultrafine MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized by citrate sol-gel process. A model was presented to evaluate the concentration of species in a citric solution for preparing MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} ultrafine powder. The evaluated concentration of species can provide valuable information and help in selecting the optimal condition for preparation of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} powder by citrate sol-gel process. The influence of molar ratio of cations, citric acid and pH on the formation of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} was studied. The spinel precursor gel and the ultrafine MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric (TG-DTA) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that the MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase begins to form at 600 deg. C, and most of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystals are spherical with a crystal size about 30-50 nm.

  15. Validation of a lactic acid- and citric acid-based antimicrobial product for the reduction of Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Salmonella on beef tips and whole chicken carcasses.

    PubMed

    Laury, A M; Alvarado, M V; Nace, G; Alvarado, C Z; Brooks, J C; Echeverry, A; Brashears, M M

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of a lactic acid- and citric acid-based antimicrobial product on the reduction of Salmonella on whole broiler carcasses during processing and the reduction of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on beef trim. Freshly harvested broiler carcasses were inoculated with an inoculum of Salmonella strains to yield a 10(5) CFU/ml pathogen load on the surface of the carcass. The beef tips were inoculated as well with an inoculum of either E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella to yield 10(4) CFU/100 cm(2). After 30 min for attachment, the broiler carcasses were treated with Chicxide applied for 5 s via a spray or immersed in Chicxide for 5, 10, or 20 s. Broiler carcasses were rinsed in poultry rinse bags with 400 ml of Butterfield's phosphate buffer in which Salmonella was enumerated from the diluents and Butterfield's phosphate. Chicxide significantly reduced Salmonella by 1.3 log CFU/ml with spray treatment and 2.3 log CFU/ml for all dip treatments. Following 30 min of attachment, the beef tips were placed into a spray cabinet with either Beefxide or sterilized water (control) and sprayed at 1 ft/2.5 s chain speed at 40 lb/in(2). The external surface of each beef tip was swabbed (100 cm(2)) to determine pathogen loads. Beefxide significantly reduced E. coli O157:H7 by 1.4 log CFU/100 cm(2) and Salmonella by 1.1 log CFU/100 cm(2) (P < 0.05) compared with the control samples. PMID:19833048

  16. Improved electrochemical performance of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 cathode material synthesized by citric acid assisted sol-gel method for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk-Woo; Kim, Hyungsub; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Youn, Hee-Chang; Kang, Kisuk; Cho, Byung-Won; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2016-05-01

    A citric acid assisted sol-gel method is employed for synthesizing LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 for use as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. The effects of heat-treatment temperature and oxygen atmosphere on the structural and electrochemical properties of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 are investigated, in order to determine optimal conditions for the synthesis of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 via the citric acid assisted sol-gel method. In particular, the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere effectively leads to a decrease in the degree of cation mixing and the formation of LiOH and Li2CO3 on the surface of LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2. Furthermore, heat-treatment in an oxygen atmosphere improves the uniformity of oxidation state of Ni ions between the surface and bulk. LiNi0.6Co0.2Mn0.2O2 synthesized by heat-treatment at 850 °C under an oxygen atmosphere shows a discharge capacity of 174 mA h g-1 and 89% capacity retention after 100 cycles. In addition, it shows high rate capability (i.e., 41% capacity retention at 10 C), which is an improved rate performance over a previous report. The results of this study should provide useful information for the synthesis of Ni-rich layered oxides for lithium ion batteries.

  17. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Lactic Acid and Citric Acid Blend against Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli Biotype I on Inoculated Prerigor Beef Carcass Surface Tissue.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Adler, Jeremy M; Belk, Keith E

    2015-12-01

    Studies were conducted to (i) determine whether inoculants of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli biotype I effectively served as surrogates for E. coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and Salmonella when prerigor beef carcass tissue was treated with a commercially available blend of lactic acid and citric acid (LCA) at a range of industry conditions of concentration, temperature, and pressure; (ii) determine the antimicrobial efficacy of LCA; and (iii) investigate the use of surrogates to validate a hot water and LCA sequential treatment as a carcass spray intervention in a commercial beef harvest plant. In an initial laboratory study, beef brisket tissue samples were left uninoculated or were inoculated (∼6 log CFU/cm(2)) on the adipose side with E. coli O157:H7 (5-strain mixture), non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (12-strain mixture), Salmonella (6-strain mixture), or nonpathogenic E. coli (5-strain mixture). Samples were left untreated (control) or were treated with LCA, in a spray cabinet, at one of eight combinations of solution concentration (1.9 and 2.5%), solution temperature (43 and 60°C), and application pressure (15 and 30 lb/in(2)). In a second study, the E. coli surrogates were inoculated (∼6 log CFU/cm(2)) on beef carcasses in a commercial facility to validate the use of a hot water treatment (92.2 to 92.8°C, 13 to 15 lb/in(2)) followed by an LCA treatment (1.9%, 50 to 51.7°C, 13 to 15 lb/in(2), 10 s). In the in vitro study, surrogate and pathogen bacteria did not differ in their response to the tested LCA treatments. Treatment with LCA reduced (P < 0.05) inoculated populations by 0.9 to 1.5 log CFU/cm(2), irrespective of inoculum type. The hot water and LCA sequential treatments evaluated in the commercial facility reduced (P < 0.05) the inoculated nonpathogenic E. coli surrogates on carcasses by 3.7 log CFU/cm(2). This study therefore provides the meat industry with data for this sequential multiple hurdle system for the

  18. Utilization of carrageenan, citric acid and cinnamon oil as an edible coating of chicken fillets to prolong its shelf life under refrigeration conditions

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Anshul Kumar; Abraham, Robinson J. J.; Appa Rao, V.; Babu, R. Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to determine efficacy of edible coating of carrageenan and cinnamon oil to enhance the shelf life of chicken meat stored under refrigeration conditions. Materials and Methods: Chicken breast was coated with carrageenan and cinnamon oil by three methods of application viz., spraying brushing and dipping. The coated meat was evaluated for drip loss, pH, thiobarbituric acid number (TBA), tyrosine value (TV), extract release volume (ERV), Warner-Bratzler shear force value (WBSFV), instrumental color, microbiological, and sensory qualities as per standard procedures. Results: There was a significant difference observed for physicochemical parameters (pH, TBA, TV, ERV, drip loss and WBSFV) and microbiological analysis between storage periods in all the samples and between the control and treatments throughout the storage period but samples did not differed significantly for hunter color scores. However, there was no significant difference among three methods of application throughout the storage period though dipping had a lower rate of increase. A progressive decline in mean sensory scores was recorded along with the increase in storage time. Conclusion: The carrageenan and cinnamon edible coating was found to be a good alternative to enhance the shelf life of chicken meat under refrigeration conditions. It was also observed from study that dipping method of the application had comparatively higher shelf life than other methods of application. PMID:27051203

  19. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... lemon or pineapple juice; by mycological fermentation using Candida spp., described in §§ 173.160...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... lemon or pineapple juice; by mycological fermentation using Candida spp., described in §§ 173.160...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... lemon or pineapple juice; by mycological fermentation using Candida spp., described in §§ 173.160...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... lemon or pineapple juice; by mycological fermentation using Candida spp., described in §§ 173.160...

  3. Morphological development of Aspergillus niger in submerged citric acid fermentation as a function of the spore inoculum level. Application of neural network and cluster analysis for characterization of mycelial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, Maria; Mattey, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background Although the citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger is one of the most important industrial microbial processes and various aspects of the fermentation appear in a very large number of publications since the 1950s, the effect of the spore inoculum level on fungal morphology is a rather neglected area. The aim of the presented investigations was to quantify the effects of changing spore inoculum level on the resulting mycelial morphology and to investigate the physiology that underlines the phenomena. Batch fermentations were carried out in a stirred tank bioreactor, which were inoculated directly with spores in concentrations ranging from 104 to 109 spores per ml. Morphological features, evaluated by digital image analysis, were classified using an artificial neural network (ANN), which considered four main object types: globular and elongated pellets, clumps and free mycelial trees. The significance of the particular morphological features and their combination was determined by cluster analysis. Results Cell volume fraction analysis for the various inoculum levels tested revealed that by rising the spore inoculum level from 104 to 109 spores per ml, a clear transition from pelleted to dispersed forms occurs. Glucosamine formation and release by the mycelium appears to be related to spore inoculum level. Maximum concentrations detected in fermentations inoculated with 104 and 105 spores/ml, where pellets predominated. At much higher inoculum levels (108, 109 spores/ml), lower dissolved oxygen levels during the early fermentation phase were associated with slower ammonium ions uptakes and significantly lower glucosamine concentrations while the mycelium developed in dispersed morphologies. A big increase in the main and total hyphal lengths and branching frequency was observed in mycelial trees as inoculum levels rise from 104 to 109 spores/ml, while in aggregated forms particle sizes and their compactness decreased. Conclusion The methods used in

  4. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  5. Preparation of Y 3Al 5O 12:Eu phosphors by citric-gel method and their luminescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. H.; Lin, J.; Wang, S. B.; Zhang, H. J.

    2002-08-01

    By using metal nitrates as starting materials and citric acid as complexing agent, Y 3Al 5O 12 (YAG) and Y 3Al 5O 12:Eu (1 mol%) (YAG:Eu) powder phosphors were prepared by a citrate-gel method. The formation process of YAG and YAG:Eu were investigated by means of XRD, TG-DTA and FT-IR spectra. The purified crystalline phases of YAG and YAG:Eu were obtained at 800 °C. The crystalline YAG:Eu phosphors showed an orange-red emission with 5D0- 7F1 (591 nm) as the most prominent group, whose intensity was dependent on the pH value of the starting solution, citric acid content and firing temperature. It has been found that the suitable pH and citric acid/metal ratio are 3 and 2 for obtaining the highest emission intensity, respectively. The emission intensity increases steadily with increasing the annealing temperature from 800 to 1200 °C, and nearly remains constant after 1200 °C. Furthermore, great differences were observed for the lifetimes and the charge transfer band of Eu 3+ in crystalline and amorphous states of YAG.

  6. Leaching of lead metallurgical slag in citric solutions--implications for disposal and weathering in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Ettler, Vojtech; Komárková, Marie; Jehlicka, Jan; Coufal, Pavel; Hradil, David; Machovic, Vladimír; Delorme, Fabian

    2004-11-01

    Metallurgical slags from primary lead smelting were submitted to a 30-day batch leaching procedure in 20 and 8 mM citric solutions in order to determine the kinetics of release of Pb, Cu, Zn and As. The experiment was coupled with the PHREEQC-2 speciation-solubility modelling and mineralogical study of newly formed products (SEM/EDS, XRD, TEM/EDS and Raman spectrometry). A strong scavenging of metals and metalloids from the 8 mM citric leachate was observed due to the formation of newly formed products. The secondary precipitate consisted of well-developed calcite (CaCO3) crystals and amorphous organo-mineral matrix composed of hydrous ferric oxides and amorphous SiO2. Metals (Pb, Zn, Cu) and arsenic released into the solution were subsequently bound onto the newly formed product (adsorption on oxides) or trapped within the calcite structure (Zn, Mn). Similar scavenging mechanism can be taken into account in real soil systems with lower concentration of citric acid. Then, the covering of slag dumps with a thick soil layer and subsequent re-vegetation might be a possible scenario for slag management on some metallurgical sites. PMID:15488918

  7. 27 CFR 24.182 - Use of acid to correct natural deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Tartaric acid or malic acid, or a combination of tartaric acid and malic acid, may be added prior to or... acid, fumaric acid, malic acid, lactic acid or tartaric acid, or a combination of two or more of these... citric acid may be added to citrus fruit, juice or wine, only malic acid may......

  8. 27 CFR 24.182 - Use of acid to correct natural deficiencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Tartaric acid or malic acid, or a combination of tartaric acid and malic acid, may be added prior to or... acid, fumaric acid, malic acid, lactic acid or tartaric acid, or a combination of two or more of these... citric acid may be added to citrus fruit, juice or wine, only malic acid may......

  9. Interconversion of biologically important carboxylic acids by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The interconversion of a group of biologically important polycarboxylic acids (acetic, fumaric, malic, malonic, succinic, citric, isocitric, tricarballylic) under gamma-ray or ultraviolet radiation was investigated. The formation of high molecular weight compounds was observed in all cases. Succinic acid was formed in almost all radiolysis experiments. Citric, malonic, and succinic acids appeared to be relatively insensitive to radiation. Interconversion of the polycarboxylic acids studied may have occurred under the effect of radiation in the prebiotic earth.

  10. Relative efficacy of organic acids and antibiotics as growth promoters in broiler chicken

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Vikrant Laxman; Khatta, Vinod Kumar; Tewatia, Bachu Singh; Sangwan, Sandeep Kumar; Raut, Subhash Shamrao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic acids as replacer to antibiotics in their various combinations on feed consumption, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chicks during different phases of growth. Materials and Methods: Antibiotics and organic acids were incorporated into boiler feed in different combinations to form 10 maize based test diets (T1 to T10). Each test diet was offered to four replicates of 10 birds each constituting a total of 400 birds kept for 45 days. Results: Significantly better effect in terms of body weight gain from supplementation of 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic was observed throughout the entire study, whereas the effect of tartaric acid supplementation was similar to control group. Citric acid (1%) along with antibiotic supplementation showed highest feed intake during the experimental period. Significantly better FCR was observed in groups supplemented with 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic followed by antibiotic along with organic acids supplemented group. Conclusion: Growth performance of birds in terms of body weight, body weight gain, and FCR improved significantly in 1% citric acid which was significantly higher than antibiotic supplemented group. 1% citric acid can effectively replace antibiotic growth promoter (chlortetracycline) without affecting growth performance of birds. PMID:27182133

  11. Chemical and structural properties of sweet potato starch treated with organic and inorganic acid.

    PubMed

    Babu, A Surendra; Parimalavalli, R; Jagannadham, K; Rao, J Sudhakara

    2015-09-01

    In the present study sweet potato starch was treated with hydrochloric acid or citric acid at 1 or 5 % concentration and its properties were investigated. Citric acid treatment resulted higher starch yield. Water holding capacity and water absorption index was increased with increased acid concentration. Emulsion properties improved at 5 % acid concentration. The DE value of acid-thinned sweet potato starches was ranged between 1.93 and 3.76 %. Hydrochloric acid treated starches displayed a higher fraction of amylose. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study revealed that all the starches displayed C-type crystalline pattern with varied crystallinity. FT-IR spectra perceived a slight change in percentage intensity of C-H stretch of citric acid modified starches. Starch granules tended to appear less smooth than the native starch granules after acid treatment in Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) with granule size ranging between 8.00 and 8.90 μm. A drastic decrease in the pasting profile was noticed in hydrochloric acid (5 %) treated starch. While 5 % citric acid treated starch exhibited higher pasting profile. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) showed that peak and conclusion gelatinisation temperatures increased with increase in hydrochloric acid or citric acid concentration. Hence citric acid was found to mimic the hydrochloric acid with some variation which suggests that it may have promising scope in acid modification. PMID:26344988

  12. The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids on threo-Ds-isocitric acid production from rapeseed oil by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Allayarov, Ramil K; Lunina, Julia N; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxalic and itaconic acids, the inhibitors of the isocitrate lyase, on the production of isocitric acid by the wild strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 grown in the medium containing rapeseed oil was studied. In the presence of oxalic and itaconic acids, strain Y. lipolytica accumulated in the medium isocitric acid (70.0 and 82.7 g/L, respectively) and citric acid (23.0 and 18.4 g/L, respectively). In control experiment, when the inhibitors were not added to the medium, the strain accumulated isocitric and citric acids at concentrations of 62.0 and 28.0 g/L, respectively. Thus, the use of the oxalic and itaconic acids as additives to the medium is a simple and convenient method of isocitric acid production with a minimum content of citric acid. PMID:26851896

  13. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  14. Potential improvement to a citric wastewater treatment plant using bio-hydrogen and a hybrid energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Xiaohua; Yang, Haijun; Berthold, Sascha; Doetsch, Christian; Shen, Jianquan

    Treatment of highly concentrated organic wastewater is characterized as cost-consuming. The conventional technology uses the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic process (A 2/O), which does not produce hydrogen. There is potential for energy saving using hydrogen utilization associated with wastewater treatment because hydrogen can be produced from organic wastewater using anaerobic fermentation. A 50 m 3 pilot bio-reactor for hydrogen production was constructed in Shandong Province, China in 2006 but to date the hydrogen produced has not been utilized. In this work, a technical-economic model based on hydrogen utilization is presented and analyzed to estimate the potential improvement to a citric wastewater plant. The model assesses the size, capital cost, annual cost, system efficiency and electricity cost under different configurations. In a stand-alone situation, the power production from hydrogen is not sufficient for the required load, thus a photovoltaic array (PV) is employed as the power supply. The simulated results show that the combination of solar and bio-hydrogen has a much higher cost compared with the A 2/O process. When the grid is connected, the system cost achieved is 0.238 US t -1 wastewater, which is lower than 0.257 US t -1 by the A 2/O process. The results reveal that a simulated improvement by using bio-hydrogen and a FC system is effective and feasible for the citric wastewater plant, even when compared to the current cost of the A 2/O process. In addition, lead acid and vanadium flow batteries were compared for energy storage service. The results show that a vanadium battery has lower cost and higher efficiency due to its long lifespan and energy efficiency. Additionally, the cost distribution of components shows that the PV dominates the cost in the stand-alone situation, while the bio-reactor is the main cost component in the parallel grid.

  15. INTERACTION OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF CHLORINE WITH MALIC ACID, TARTARIC ACID, AND VARIOUS FRUIT JUICES, A SOURCE OF MUTAGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interactions of aqueous solutions of chlorine with some fruit acids (citric acid, DL-malic acid, and L-tartaric acid) at different pH values were studied. iethyl ether extraction followed by GC/MS analysis indicated that a number of mutagens (certain chlorinated propanones an...

  16. Enhancement of carboxylic acid degradation with sulfate radical generated by persulfate activation.

    PubMed

    Criquet, J; Nebout, P; Karpel Vel Leitner, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the generation of sulfate radical for the removal of two carboxylic acids in aqueous solution: acetic and citric acids. From photochemical and radiolytic processes, kinetics of the degradation of these two carboxylic acids was studied as a function of the pH of the solution. It was shown that the maximum of acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. Above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of with the solute. In the case of citric acid, pH has only a little effect on the kinetic of citric acid degradation. The determination of mineralization yields shows several differences depending on carboxylic acids and pH. The degradation of both carboxylic acids was also studied in the radiolysis process whether with or without persulfate addition. A comparison of the processes of sulfate radical production is presented. PMID:20220244

  17. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction. PMID:26895788

  18. Citric Acid Treatment of Flax, Cotton and Blended Nonwoven Mats for Copper Ion Absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The removal of metal ions from polluted wate and wastewater with biodegradeable, natural products is an area of current interest in the environmental arena. The objective of this study is to determine whether nonwoven mats made of biodegradeable, natural fibers of flax and cotton can be used for rem...

  19. CITRIC ACID TREATMENT OF FLAX, COTTON AND BLENDED NONWOVEN MATS FOR COPPER ION ABSORPTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The removal of metal ions from polluted water and wastewater with biodegradable, natural products is an area of current interest in the environmental arena. The objective of this study is to determine whether nonwoven mats made of biodegradable, natural fibers of flax and cotton can be used for rem...

  20. 77 FR 24461 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 6061 (February 7, 2012) (Preliminary...: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003) (Assessment Policy Notice). This clarification... Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009). These deposit requirements...

  1. 76 FR 34044 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 5782... Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003) (Assessment Policy Notice). This clarification will apply to entries of... Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009). These deposit requirements...

  2. Flavor and other quality factors of enzyme-peeled oranges treated with citric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oranges can be satisfactorily processed for fresh slices using a process of enzyme infiltration under vacuum. Scored 'Valencia' and 'Hamlin' oranges were placed under 90 kPa vacuum in a 0 ppm (water-infused) or 1000 ppm enzyme solution (Ultrazym) at 30 °C for 2 min, followed by 30 min incubation in ...

  3. Design of antimicrobial peptides conjugated biodegradable citric acid derived hydrogels for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiwei; Aphale, Nikhil V; Kadapure, Tejaswi D; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Orr, Sara; Gyawali, Dipendra; Qian, Guoying; Nguyen, Kytai T; Yang, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is usually facilitated by the use of a wound dressing that can be easily applied to cover the wound bed, maintain moisture, and avoid bacterial infection. In order to meet all of these requirements, we developed an in situ forming biodegradable hydrogel (iFBH) system composed of a newly developed combination of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol) maleate citrate (PEGMC) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). The in situ forming hydrogel systems are able to conform to the wound shape in order to cover the wound completely and prevent bacterial invasion. A 2(k) factorial analysis was performed to examine the effects of polymer composition on specific properties, including the curing time, Young's modulus, swelling ratio, and degradation rate. An optimized iFBH formulation was achieved from the systematic factorial analysis. Further, in vitro biocompatibility studies using adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) confirmed that the hydrogels and degradation products are not cytotoxic. The iFBH wound dressing was conjugated and functionalized with antimicrobial peptides as well. Evaluation against bacteria both in vitro and in vivo in rats demonstrated that the peptide-incorporated iFBH wound dressing offered excellent bacteria inhibition and promoted wound healing. These studies indicated that our in situ forming antimicrobial biodegradable hydrogel system is a promising candidate for wound treatment. PMID:26014899

  4. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-6030 or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (d) Residues of n-octyl..., which is incorporated by reference. The Director of the Office of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from...

  5. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  6. Increase in the permeability of tonoplast of garlic (Allium sativum) by monocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Li, Lei; Hu, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhengfu; Zhao, Guanghua

    2006-10-18

    Immersion of intact aged garlic (Allium sativum) cloves in a series of 5% weak organic monocarboxylate solutions (pH 2.0) resulted in green color formation. No color was formed upon treatment with other weak organic acids, such as citric and malic acids, and the inorganic hydrochloric acid under the same conditions. To understand the significance of monocarboxylic acids and their differing function from that of other acids, acetic acid was compared with organic acids citric and malic and the inorganic hydrochloric acid. The effects of these acids on the permeability of plasma and intracellular membrane of garlic cells were measured by conductivity, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Except for hydrochloric acid, treatment of garlic with all three organic acids greatly increased the relative conductivity of their respective pickling solutions, indicating that all tested organic acids increased the permeability of plasma membrane. Moreover, a pickling solution containing acetic acid exhibited 1.5-fold higher relative conductivity (approximately 90%) as compared to those (approximately 60%) of both citric and malic acids, implying that exposure of garlic cloves to acetic acid not only changed the permeability of the plasma membrane but also increased the permeability of intracellular membrane. Exposure of garlic to acetic acid led to the production of precipitate along the tonoplast, but no precipitate was formed by citric and malic acids. This indicates that the structure of the tonoplast was damaged by this treatment. Further support for this conclusion comes from results showing that the concentration of thiosulfinates [which are produced only by catalytic conversion of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in cytosol by alliinase located in the vacuole] in the acetic acid pickling solution is 1.3 mg/mL, but almost no thiosulfinates were detected in the pickling solution of citric and malic acids. Thus, all present results suggest that damage of

  7. Polyol and Amino Acid-Based Biosurfactants, Builders, and Hydrogels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews different detergent materials which have been synthesized from natural agricultural commodities. Background information, which gives reasons why the use of biobased materials may be advantageous, is presented. Detergent builders from L-aspartic acid, citric acid and D-sorbitol...

  8. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  9. [Relationships between cadmium accumulation and organic acids in leaves of Solanum nigrum L. as a cadmium-hyperaccumulator].

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-lian; Zhou, Qi-xing; Wang, Xin

    2006-04-01

    The influence of different cadmium concentrations on the organic acid level in leaves of the Cd hyperaccumulator, Solanum nigrum L., in particular, the relationship of organic acids with Cd accumulation in S. nigrum was investigated based on the pot-culture experiment. The results showed that the Cd concentration in S. nigrum leaves exceeded 100 microg x g(-1), the threshold value used to define Cd-hyperaccumulators, and the bioaccumulation coefficient of cadmium in shoots of S. nigrum was higher than 1 when Cd concentration in soil was 25 microg x g(-1). The level of organic acids in leaves of S. nigrum had significant differences between the seedling stage and the mature stage. At the seedling stage, the sequence of organic acids in leaves of S. nigrum was acetic acid> tartaric acid> malic acid> citric acid. On the contrary, the accumulation of organic acids in S. nigrum at the mature stage was approximately in the following sequence malic acid> tartaric acid, acetic acid> citric acid. The significant positive correlation between Cd accumulation in leaves of S. nigrum and the concentration of tartaric acid in leaves of S. nigrum was observed at the seedling stage, whereas there was a significant positive correlation between Cd accumulation in leaves of S. nigrum and both acetic and citric acid concentrations at the mature stage. These results indicated that tartaric, acetic and citric acids in leaves of S. nigrum might act as the indication of Cd hyperaccumulation. PMID:16768003

  10. Mechanisms of Radionuclide-Hyroxycarboxylic Acid Interactions for Decontamination of Metallic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Francis; C.J. Dodge; J.B. Gillow; G.P. Halada; C.R. Clayton

    2002-04-24

    Is this EMSP program we investigated the key fundamental issues involved in the use of simple and safe methods for the removal of radioactive contamination from equipment and facilities using hydroxycarboxylic acids. Specifically, we investigate (i) the association of uranium with various iron oxides commonly formed on corroding plain carbon steel surfaces, (ii) the association of uranium with corroding metal coupons under a variety of conditions, and (iii) the decontamination of the uranium contaminated metal coupons by citric acid or citric acid formulations containing oxalic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Leaching of spent lead acid battery paste components by sodium citrate and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinfeng; He, Xiong; Yang, Jiakuan; Gao, Linxia; Liu, Jianwen; Yang, Danni; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Qin; Kumar, R Vasant

    2013-04-15

    A sustainable method, with minimal pollution and low energy cost in comparison with the conventional smelting methods, is proposed for treating components of spent lead-acid battery pastes in aqueous organic acid(s). In this study, PbO, PbO2, and PbSO4, the three major components in a spent lead paste, were individually reacted with a mixture of aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid solution. Pure lead citrate precursor of Pb3(C6H5O7)2 · 3H2O is the only product crystallized in each leaching experiment. Conditions were optimized for individual lead compounds which were then used as the basis for leaching real industrial spent paste. In this work, efficient leaching process is achieved and raw material cost is reduced by using aqueous sodium citrate and acetic acid, instead of aqueous sodium citrate and citric acid as reported in a pioneering hydrometallurgical method earlier. Acetic acid is not only cheaper than citric acid but is also more effective in aiding dissolution of the lead compounds thus speeding up the leaching process in comparison with citric acid. Lead citrate is readily crystallized from the aqueous solution due to its low solubility and can be combusted to directly produce leady oxide as a precursor for making new battery pastes. PMID:23500418

  12. Dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursunoglu, Sait; Kaya, Muammer

    2015-11-01

    The dissolution behavior of Caldag lateritic nickel ore subjected to a sequential organic acid leaching method was investigated. The effects of the type of organic acid, acid concentration, leaching time, and leaching temperature on the lateritic nickel ore were examined. Organic acids were used individually prior to sequential leaching. Citric acid was more effective than the other two acids for the selective leaching of nickel and cobalt. An increase in the citric acid concentration negligibly affected the dissolution of the metals, whereas temperature exhibited a strong beneficial effect. Oxalic acid was determined to be the most appropriate organic acid for the second leaching step. After 8 h (4 h + 4 h) of leaching with organic acids (0.5 M citric + 0.5 M oxalic) in sequence at 90°C, 89.63% Ni, 82.89% Co, and 69.63% Fe were leached from the lateritic nickel ore. A sequential citric + oxalic acid leaching method could represent a viable alternative for the dissolution of metals from lateritic nickel ore.

  13. Effects of surfactants on low-molecular-weight organic acids to wash soil zinc.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Yao, Ping; Li, Ting; Wang, Guiyin; Gong, Guoshu; Li, Yun; Deng, Ouping

    2016-03-01

    Soil washing is an effective approach to the removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil. In this study, the effects of the surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, Triton X-100, and non-ionic polyacrylamide (NPAM) on oxalic acid, tartaric acid, and citric acid used to remove zinc from contaminated soils were investigated. The Zn removal efficiencies of all washing solutions showed a logarithmic increase with acid concentrations from 0.5 to 10.0 g/L, while they decreased as pH increased from 4 to 9. Increasing the reaction time enhanced the effects of surfactants on Zn removal efficiencies by the acids during washing and significantly (P < 0.05) improved the removal under some mixed cases. Oxalic acid suffered antagonistic effects from the three surfactants and seriously damaged soil nutrients during the removal of soil Zn. Notably, the three surfactants caused synergistic effects on tartaric and citric acid during washing, with NPAM leading to an increase in Zn removal by 5.0 g/L citric acid of 10.60 % (P < 0.05) within 2 h. NPAM also alleviated the loss of cation exchange capacity of washed soils and obviously improved soil nitrogen concentrations. Overall, combining citric acid with NPAM offers a promising approach to the removal of zinc from contaminated soil. PMID:26527338

  14. Variability for free sugars and organic acids in Capsicum Chinense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of 216 genotypes of Capsicum chinense Jacq. were analyzed for concentrations of the simple sugars sucrose, glucose, fructose, and the organic acids; citric, malic, succinic, fumaric and ascorbic. Concentrations [mg/100g Fresh Weight (FW) of whole fruit] of sucrose, glucose and fructose in fru...

  15. Degradation rates of glycerol polyesters at acidic and basic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyesters prepared from glycerol with mixtures of adipic and citric acids were evaluated in the laboratory to estimate degradation rates over a range of pH conditions. These renewable polymers provide a market for glycerol that is generated during biodiesel production. The polyesters were prepared...

  16. Bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids towards bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids were determined using the agar diffusion assay. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid (FA) was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric aci...

  17. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100 grams of juice is not less than 21 to 1 or more than 26 to 1. (b) The name of the food is “Reduced...

  18. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100 grams of juice is not less than 21 to 1 or more than 26 to 1. (b) The name of the food is “Reduced...

  19. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100 grams of juice is not less than 21 to 1 or more than 26 to 1. (b) The name of the food is “Reduced...

  20. Analysis of Organic Acids, Deacetyl Asperulosidic Acid and Polyphenolic Compounds as a Potential Tool for Characterization of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Products.

    PubMed

    Bittová, Miroslava; Hladůkova, Dita; Roblová, Vendula; Krácmar, Stanislav; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, deacetyl asperulosidic acid (DAA) and polyphenolic compounds in various noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) products (4 juices, 4 dry fruit powders and 2 capsules with dry fruit powder) were analyzed. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a variable wavelength detector (VWD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF MS) was applied for simultaneous analysis of organic acids (malic, lactic, citric and succinic acid) and DAA. An RP-HPLC method with diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the analysis of polyphenolic compound content (rutin, catechin, quercitrin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid). The developed methods can contribute to better characterization of available noni products that is required from the consumers. In our study, we discovered significant dissimilarities in the content of DAA, citric acid and several phenolic compounds in some samples. PMID:26749805

  1. LC-MS analysis of low molecular weight organic acids derived from root exudation.

    PubMed

    Jaitz, Leonhard; Mueller, Bernhard; Koellensperger, Gunda; Huber, Daniela; Oburger, Eva; Puschenreiter, Markus; Hann, Stephan

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method for quantification of citric, fumaric, malic, malonic, oxalic, trans aconitic, and succinic acid in soil- and root-related samples is presented. The method is based on a novel, fast, and simple esterification procedure and subsequent analysis via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Derivatization comprises in situ generation of HCl, which catalyzes the Fischer esterification with benzyl alcohol. As a key advance, the esterification with the aromate allows reversed-phase separation and improves electrospray ionization efficiency. The method provided procedural detection limits of 1 nM for citric, 47 nM for fumaric, 10 nM for malic, 10 nM for malonic, 16 nM for oxalic, 15 nM for succinic, and 2 nM for aconitic acid utilizing 500 μL of liquid sample. The working range was 3 nM to 10 μM for citric acid, 158 nM to 10 μM for fumaric acid, 34 nM to 10 μM for malic acid, 33 nM to 10 μM for malonic acid, 53 nM to 10 μM for oxalic acid, 48 nM to 10 μM for succinic acid, and 6 nM to 10 μM for aconitic acid. Quantification of the analytes in soil-related samples was performed via external calibration of the entire procedure utilizing (13)C-labeled oxalic and citric acid as internal standards. The robustness of the method was tested with soil extracts and samples from hydroponic experiments. The latter concerned the regulation of phosphorus solubilization via plant root exudation of citric, malic, and oxalic acid. PMID:20711769

  2. The effect of several organic acids on phytate phosphorus hydrolysis in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Liem, A; Pesti, G M; Edwards, H M

    2008-04-01

    Supplementation of some organic acids to a P-deficient diet has been shown to improve phytate P utilization. Two experiments were conducted from 0 to 16 d in battery brooders to determine the effect of various organic acids supplementation on phytate P utilization. In both experiments, birds were fed P-deficient corn and soybean meal-based diets. In experiment 1, citric acid, malic acid, fumaric acid, and EDTA were supplemented. Experiment 2 had a 2 x 2 factorial design with 2 sources of Met, 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio) butanoic acid (HMB) and dl-Met, with or without 500 U/kg of phytase. In experiment 1, the addition of citric, malic, and fumaric acids increased percentage of bone ash, but only the effect of citric acid was significant. The addition of citric and malic acids also significantly increased the retention of P and phytate P (P<0.05). In experiment 2, the addition of phytase to the diet significantly increased 16-d BW gain, feed intake, percentage of bone ash, milligrams of bone ash, phytate P disappearance, and decreased the incidence of P-deficiency rickets. Methionine source did not affect 16-d BW gain, feed intake, feed efficiency, milligrams of bone ash, or P rickets incidence. However, the birds fed HMB had a higher percentage of bone ash and phytate P disappearance compared with the groups fed dl-Met only when phytase was added to the diets. The additions of citric acid and HMB improved phytate P utilization. However, the reason why some organic acids are effective whereas others are not is not apparent. PMID:18339989

  3. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  4. Acids in combination with sodium dodecyl sulfate caused quality deterioration of fresh-cut iceburg lettuce during storage in modified atmosphere package

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies showed that levulinic acid (LA) and sodium acid sulfate (SAS) were effective in inactivating human pathogens on fresh produce. The present study investigated the effects of LA and SAS in comparison with citric acid and chlorine on the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and the sensory qu...

  5. Effects of sulfhydryl compounds, carbohydrates, organic acids, and sodium sulfite on the formation of lysinoalanine in preserved egg.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Ying; Tu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-01

    To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose, L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing. PMID:25047093

  6. Influence of organic acids on the transport of heavy metals in soil.

    PubMed

    Schwab, A P; Zhu, D S; Banks, M K

    2008-06-01

    Vegetation historically has been an important part of reclamation of sites contaminated with metals, whether the objective was to stabilize the metals or remove them through phytoremediation. Understanding the impact of organic acids typically found in the rhizosphere would contribute to our knowledge of the impact of plants in contaminated environments. Heavy metal transport in soils in the presence of simple organic acids was assessed in two laboratory studies. In the first study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) was used to investigate Zn, Cd, and Pb movement in a sandy loam soil as affected by soluble organic acids in the rhizosphere. Many of these organic acids enhanced heavy metal movement. For organic acid concentrations of 10mM, citric acid had the highest R(f) values (frontal distance moved by metal divided by frontal distance moved by the solution) for Zn, followed by malic, tartaric, fumaric, and glutaric acids. Citric acid also has the highest R(f) value for Cd movement followed by fumaric acid. Citric acid and tartaric acid enhanced Pb transport to the greatest degree. For most organic acids studied, R(f) values followed the trend Zn>Cd>Pb. Citric acid (10mM) increased R(f) values of Zn and Cd by approximately three times relative to water. In the second study, small soil columns were used to test the impact of simple organic acids on Zn, Cd, and Pb leaching in soils. Citric acid greatly enhanced Zn and Cd movement in soils but had little influence on Pb movement. The Zn and Cd in the effluents from columns treated with 10mM citric acid attained influent metal concentrations by the end of the experiment, but effluent metal concentrations were much less than influent concentrations for citrate <10mM. Exchangeable Zn in the soil columns was about 40% of total Zn, and approximately 80% total Cd was in exchangeable form. Nearly all of the Pb retained by the soil columns was exchangeable. PMID:18482743

  7. Formation of trichloromethane in chlorinated water and fresh-cut produce and as a result of reacting with citric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) is commonly used by the fresh produce industry to sanitize wash water, fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. However, possible formation of harmful chlorine by-products is a concern. The objectives of this study were to compare chlorine and chlorine dioxide in t...

  8. Inhibition of citric acid accumulation by manganese ions in Aspergillus niger mutants with reduced citrate control of phosphofructokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Schreferl, G.; Kubicek, C.P.; Roehr, M.

    1986-03-01

    Mutant strains of Aspergillus niger with reduced citrate control of carbohydrate catabolism (cic mutants) grow faster than the parent strain on media containing 5% (wt/vol) citrate. The mutants tolerated a higher intracellular citrate concentration than the parent strain. One mutant (cic-7/3) contained phosphofructokinase activity significantly less sensitive towards citrate than the enzyme from the parent strain. When this mutant was grown under citrate accumulating conditions, acidogenesis was far less sensitive to inhibition by Mn/sup 2 +/ than in the parent strain. Some of the cic mutants also showed altered citrate inhibition of NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase.

  9. Carbonate and citric acid leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils: Pilot-scale studies (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.H.; Chernikoff, R.; DeMarco, W.D.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the results of the soil decontamination demonstration conducted at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site by the Fernald Environmental Restoration and Management Corporation (FERMCO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration, which began in November 1993 and ended in October 1994, involved the removal of uranium from contaminated soil sampled from two FEMP sites. The demonstration was conducted so as to meet the requirements of the Fernald Site Integrated Demonstration program, as well as all environmental, safety, and health requirements of the site.

  10. 78 FR 34642 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE..., International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce (``the.... & Exp. Co., Ltd. (``RZBC I&E''), has not made sales of subject merchandise at less than normal...

  11. 78 FR 54625 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ...; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 78 FR 25423 (May 1, 2013). \\2\\ Archer Daniels Midland Company..., 78 FR 38924 (June 28, 2013). Rescission, in Part Pursuant to 19 CFR 351.213(d)(1), the Secretary will... from RZBC and Laiwu Taihe Biochemistry Co., Ltd. (Laiwu) for a CVD administrative review of...

  12. 76 FR 77772 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Review, 76 FR 34048 (June 10, 2011) (``Preliminary Results''). We invited interested parties to comment...: Extension of Time Limit for the Final Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 47146... Value: Sparklers from the People's Republic of China, 56 FR 20588 (May 6, 1991), as further developed...

  13. 77 FR 33167 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... FR 25705 (May 29, 2009) (CVD Order). \\2\\ See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 76 FR 24460 (May 2, 2011). On May 20... Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June 28, 2011). On July 26, 2011, the Department issued the...

  14. 77 FR 56188 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Rescission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ..., Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 77 FR 25679 (May 1... Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 77 FR 40565, 40573 (July 10, 2012). \\4... Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, in Part, 77 FR 47370 (August 8, 2012). Scope of the Order The scope...

  15. 77 FR 47370 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Intent To Rescind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ..., Finding, or Suspended Investigation; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 77 FR 25679 (May 1... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 77 FR 40565, 40573 (July 10, 2012... to Rescind Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, in Part, 74 FR 39062 (August 5, 2009)....

  16. 76 FR 33219 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...: Notice of Countervailing Duty Order, 74 FR 25705 (May 29, 2009) (``CVD Order''). On May 3, 2010, we... Request Administrative Review, 75 FR 23236 (May 3, 2010). On May 18, 2010, we received a request for... Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). On...

  17. 76 FR 77206 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 33219 (June 8, 2011) (``Preliminary Results''). We provided... Republic of China; Notice of Countervailing Duty Order, 74 FR 25705 (May 29, 2009) (``CVD Order''). See... Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (``AD Orders''). On February 14, 2011, the Department issued...

  18. 76 FR 56158 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... Administrative Review, 76 FR 33219 (June 8, 2011) (``Preliminary Results''). In the Preliminary Results we stated..., and inputs supplied for less than adequate remuneration. See Preliminary Results, 76 FR at 33238... sections 751(a) and 777(i)(1) of the Act. Dated: September 6, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  19. 76 FR 4288 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). This review covers the... sections 751(a)(3)(A) and 777(i) of the Act. Dated: January 18, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  20. 77 FR 22560 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781, 37785 (June 28, 2011... Limit for the Preliminary Results of the Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 1455 (January 10...)(A) and 777(i) of the Act. Dated: April 9, 2012. Christian Marsh, Deputy Assistant Secretary...

  1. 76 FR 82275 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... and Certain Citrate Salts, 74 FR 25705 (May 29, 2009). On May 2, 2011, the Department published a... Administrative Review, 76 FR 24460 (May 2, 2011). In accordance with 19 CFR 351.221(c)(1)(i), we published a... Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 37781 (June 28, 2011). The preliminary...

  2. 77 FR 74171 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... of Administrative Review, 77 FR 33399 (June 6, 2012) (``Preliminary Results''). \\2\\ See Memorandum... Canada and the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009). Analysis... Modification, 77 FR 8101 (February 14, 2012). Cash Deposit Requirements The following cash deposit...

  3. 76 FR 2648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). The preliminary results of this administrative review are... 751(a)(3)(A) and 777(i)(1) of the Act. Dated: January 10, 2011. Christian Marsh, Deputy...

  4. Composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) seeds: phenolics, organic acids and free amino acids.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreres, Federico; Seabra, Rosa M; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2005-04-01

    Phenolic compounds, organic acids and free amino acids of quince seeds were determined by HPLC/DAD, HPLC/UV and GC/FID, respectively. Quince seeds presented a phenolic profile composed of 3-O-caffeoylquinic, 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids, lucenin-2, vicenin-2, stellarin-2, isoschaftoside, schaftoside, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-glucosyl chrysoeriol and 6-C-glucosyl-8-C-pentosyl chrysoeriol. Six identified organic acids constituted the organic acid profile of quince seeds: citric, ascorbic, malic, quinic, shikimic and fumaric acids. The free amino acid profile was composed of 21 identified free amino acids and the three most abundant were glutamic and aspartic acids and asparagine. PMID:15702641

  5. A deficiency of manganese ions in the presence of high sugar concentrations is the critical parameter for achieving high yields of itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, Levente; Díaz, Rafael; Papp, Benedek; Fekete, Erzsébet; Sándor, Erzsébet; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-10-01

    Itaconic acid (IA), an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid with a high potential as a platform for chemicals derived from sugars, is industrially produced by large-scale submerged fermentation by Aspergillus terreus. Although the biochemical pathway and the physiology leading to IA is almost the same as that leading to citric acid production in Aspergillus niger, published data for the volumetric (g L(-1)) and the specific yield (mol/mol carbon source) of IA are significantly lower than for citric acid. Citric acid is known to accumulate to high levels only when a number of nutritional parameters are carefully adjusted, of which the concentration of the carbon source and that of manganese ions in the medium are particularly important. We have therefore investigated whether a variation in these two parameters may enhance IA production and yield by A. terreus. We show that manganese ion concentrations < 3 ppb are necessary to obtain highest yields. Highest yields were also dependent on the concentration of the carbon source (D-glucose), and highest yields (0.9) were only obtained at concentrations of 12-20 % (w/v), thus allowing the accumulation of up to 130 g L(-1) IA. These findings perfectly mirror those obtained when these parameters are varied in citric acid production by A. niger, thus showing that the physiology of both processes is widely identical. Consequently, applying the fermentation technology established for citric acid production by A. niger citric acid production to A. terreus should lead to high yields of IA, too. PMID:26078111

  6. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil. PMID:26849837

  7. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12 h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic > citric > acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric > oxalic > acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil.

  8. Biochemistry of microbial itaconic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Matthias G.; Blumhoff, Marzena L.; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Itaconic acid is an unsaturated dicarbonic acid which has a high potential as a biochemical building block, because it can be used as a monomer for the production of a plethora of products including resins, plastics, paints, and synthetic fibers. Some Aspergillus species, like A. itaconicus and A. terreus, show the ability to synthesize this organic acid and A. terreus can secrete significant amounts to the media (>80 g/L). However, compared with the citric acid production process (titers >200 g/L) the achieved titers are still low and the overall process is expensive because purified substrates are required for optimal productivity. Itaconate is formed by the enzymatic activity of a cis-aconitate decarboxylase (CadA) encoded by the cadA gene in A. terreus. Cloning of the cadA gene into the citric acid producing fungus A. niger showed that it is possible to produce itaconic acid also in a different host organism. This review will describe the current status and recent advances in the understanding of the molecular processes leading to the biotechnological production of itaconic acid. PMID:23420787

  9. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  10. Mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common organic acids: Dosage and time effects.

    PubMed

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia

    2016-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to investigate the mobilization of soil-borne arsenic by three common low-molecular-weight organic acids with a focus on dosage and time effects. The results show that oxalic acid behaved differently from citric acid and malic acid in terms of mobilizing As that was bound to iron compounds. At an equivalent molar concentration, reactions between oxalic acid and soil-borne Fe were kinetically more favourable, as compared to those between either citric acid or malic acid and the soil-borne Fe. It was found that reductive dissolution of soil-borne Fe played a more important role in liberating As, as compared to non-reductive reactions. Prior to the 7th day of the experiment, As mobility increased with increasing dose of oxalic acid while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in mobilized As among the treatments with different doses of citric acid or malic acid. The dosage effect on soil-borne As mobilization in the citric acid and malic acid treatments became clear only after the 7th day of the experiment. Soluble Ca present in the soils could cause re-immobilization of As by competing with solution-borne Fe for available organic ligands to form practically insoluble organic compounds of calcium (i.e. calcium oxalate). This resulted in transformation of highly soluble organic complexes of iron (i.e. iron oxalate complexes) into slightly soluble organic compounds of iron (i.e. iron oxalate) or free ferric ion, which then reacted with the solution-borne arsenate ions to form practically insoluble iron arsenates in the latter part of the experiment. PMID:26774299

  11. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:25902192

  12. Changes on organic acid secretion and accumulation in Plantago almogravensis Franco and Plantago algarbiensis Samp. under aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Martins, Neusa; Gonçalves, Sandra; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; Romano, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Al (400μM) on organic acids secretion, accumulation and metabolism in Plantago almogravensis Franco and Plantago algarbiensis Samp. Al induced a significant reduction on root elongation only in P. algarbiensis. Both species accumulated considerable amounts of Al (>120μgg(-1)) in their tissues, roots exhibiting the highest contents (>900μgg(-1)). Al stimulated malonic acid secretion in P. algarbiensis, while citric, succinic and malic acids were secreted by P. almogravensis. Moreover, Al uptake was accompanied by substantial increases of citric, oxalic, malonic and fumaric acids contents in the plantlets of either species. Overall, the acid metabolizing enzymes were not directly involved in the Al induced organic acid secretion and accumulation. Our data suggest that Al detoxification in P. almogravensis implies both secretion of organic acids from roots and tolerance to high Al tissue concentrations, while in P. algarbiensis only the tolerance mechanism seems to be involved. PMID:23199681

  13. Treatment of broiler litter with organic acids.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, I E

    2001-04-01

    Experiments for treatment of contaminated broiler litter with citric, tartaric and salicylic acids were performed. At days 2 and 6 after the treatment, pH values (using a pH-meter), the ammonia concentrations (titration with 0.1 N HCl) and the microbial cells counts were determined in both experimental and control specimens of litter. The cost of acidification of litter was also determined. Our studies showed that the treatment of the contaminated litter with 5 per cent citric acid, 4 per cent tartaric acid and 1.5 per cent salicylic acid created an acid medium with pH under 5.0 and thus reduced the microbial counts to 2.2 x 10(3)colony forming units per gram manure litter. The treatment reduced the content of ammonia in the litter and in the air under the hygienic limits, i.e. 25-50 ppm. The cost of acidification of litter with these organic acids amounted to 0.1 $ per bird and 1.5 $ per 15 birds on one square metre in a growth period of 50 days. PMID:11356097

  14. Hormonal Regulation of Organic and Phosphoric Acid Release by Barley Aleurone Layers and Scutella.

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowicz, Y. M.; Jones, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The release of acid from the aleurone layer and scutellum of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) was investigated. Aleurone layers isolated from mature barley grains acidify the external medium by releasing organic and phosphoric acids. Gibberellic acid and abscisic acid stimulate acid release 2-fold over control tissue incubated in 10 mM CACl2. Gibberellic acid causes medium acidification by stimulating the release of phosphoric and citric acids, whereas abscisic acid stimulates the release of malic acid. The accumulation of these acids in the incubation medium buffers the medium against changes in pH, particularly between pH 4 and 5. The amounts of amino acids that accumulate in the medium are low (2-12 nmol/layer) compared to other organic and phosphoric acids (100-500 nmol/layer). The scutellum does not play a major role in medium acidification but participates in the uptake of organic acids. The organic acid composition of the starchy endosperm changes after 3 d of imbibition; malic, succinic, and lactic acids decrease, whereas citric and phosphoric acids remain unchanged or increase. These results indicate that during postgerminative growth, the acidity of the starchy endosperm is maintained by acid production by the aleurone layer. PMID:12228509

  15. Advantages of using glycolic acid as a retardant in a brushite forming cement.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Faleh Tamimi; Torres, Jesús; Hamdan, Mohammad; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2007-11-01

    In this study we have compared the effect of using acetic, glycolic, and citric acids on the brushite cement setting reaction and the properties of the resultant cement. The cement solid phase was made by mixing beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), monocalcium dihydrogen phosphate anhydrate (MCPA), and sodium pyrophosphate, whereas the cement liquid phase consisted of aqueous solutions of carboxy acids at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.5M. Cements were prepared by mixing the solid phase with the liquid phase to form a workable paste. The cement setting time was longer for glycolic and citric acids. The best mechanical properties in dry environments were obtained using glycolic and citric acid liquid phases. In a wet environment at 37 degrees C, the cement set with glycolic acid was the strongest one. Brushite cement diametral tensile strength seems to be affected by the calcium-carboxyl phase produced in the setting reaction. The acceptable setting time and mechanical properties of cements set in glycolic acid solutions are attributed to the additional hydrophilic groups in the carboxylic acid and the low solubility in water of the calcium salt produced in the reaction. Moreover, at high concentrations, carboxylic acids add chemically to the cement matrix becoming reactants themselves. PMID:17465024

  16. The possible role of hydrothermal vents in chemical evolution: Succinic acid radiolysis and thermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Castañeda, J.; Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the behavior under a high radiation field or high temperature of succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid clue in metabolic routes, is studied. For this purpose, the molecule was irradiated with gamma rays in oxygen-free aqueous solutions, and the thermal decomposition was studied in a static system at temperatures up to 90 °C, simulating a white hydrothermal vent. Our results indicate that a succinic acid is a relatively stable compound under irradiation. The gamma radiolysis yields carbon dioxide and di- and tricarboxylic acids such as malonic, carboxysuccinic, and citric acids. The main products obtained by the thermal treatment were CO2 and propionic acid.

  17. Adhesion to and decalcification of hydroxyapatite by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Van Meerbeek, B; Nakayama, Y; Yoshioka, M; Snauwaert, J; Abe, Y; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G; Okazaki, M

    2001-06-01

    Fundamental to the processes of decalcification of or adhesion to mineralized tissues is the molecular interaction of acids with hydroxyapatite. This study was undertaken to chemically analyze the interaction of 1 mono-, 2 di-, 1 tri-, and 2 polycarboxylic acids with hydroxyapatite in an attempt to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Maleic, citric, and lactic acid decalcified hydroxyapatite, in contrast to oxalic acid and the two polycarboxylic acids that were chemically bonded to hydroxyapatite. Solubility tests showed that the calcium salts of the former were very soluble, whereas those of the latter could hardly be dissolved in the respective acid solutions. Based on these data, an adhesion/decalcification concept was advanced that predicts that carboxylic acids, regardless of concentration/pH, either adhere to or decalcify hydroxyapatite, depending on the dissolution rate of the respective calcium salts in the acid solution. This contrasting behavior of organic acids most likely results from their differential structural conformations. PMID:11499514

  18. Recovery of vanadium from spent catalysts of sulfuric acid plant by using inorganic and organic acids: Laboratory and semi-pilot tests.

    PubMed

    Erust, Ceren; Akcil, Ata; Bedelova, Zyuldyz; Anarbekov, Kuanysh; Baikonurova, Aliya; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2016-03-01

    Catalysts are used extensively in industry to purify and upgrade various feeds and to improve process efficiency. These catalysts lose their activity with time. Spent catalysts from a sulfuric acid plant (main elemental composition: 5.71% V2O5, 1.89% Al2O3, 1.17% Fe2O3 and 61.04% SiO2; and the rest constituting several other oxides in traces/minute quantities) were used as a secondary source for vanadium recovery. Experimental studies were conducted by using three different leaching systems (citric acid with hydrogen peroxide, oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid with hydrogen peroxide). The effects of leaching time, temperature, concentration of reagents and solid/liquid (S/L) ratio were investigated. Under optimum conditions (1:25 S/L ratio, 0.1 M citric acid, 0.1 M hydrogen peroxide, 50°C and 120 min), 95% V was recovered in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in citric acid leaching. PMID:26711187

  19. Chemical Speciation Analysis of Sports Drinks by Acid-Base Titrimetry and Ion Chromatography: A Challenging Beverage Formulation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossman, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Students have standardized a sodium hydroxide solution and analyzed commercially available sports drinks by titrimetric analysis of the triprotic citric acid, dihydrogen phosphate, and dihydrogen citrate and by ion chromatography for chloride, total phosphate and citrate. These experiments are interesting examples of analyzing real-world food and…

  20. Implication of organic acids in the long-distance transport and the accumulation of lead in Sesuvium portulacastrum and Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Ghnaya, Tahar; Zaier, Hanen; Baioui, Raoudha; Sghaier, Souhir; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly

    2013-01-01

    The implication of organic acids in Pb translocation was studied in two species varying in shoot lead accumulation, Sesuvium portulacastrum and Brassica juncea. Citric, fumaric, malic and α-cetoglutaric acids were separated and determined by HPLC technique in shoots, roots and xylem saps of the both species grown in nutrient solutions added with 200 and 400 μM of Pb(II). The lead content of the xylem saps was determined by ICP-MS. Results showed that S. portulacastrum is more tolerant to Pb than B. juncea. Lead concentration in xylem sap of the S. portulacastrum was significantly greater than in that of B. juncea. For both species, a positive correlation was established between lead and citrate concentrations in xylem sap. However minor relationship was observed for fumaric, malic and α-cetoglutaric acids. In the shoots lead treatment also induced a significant increase in citric acid concentration. Both observations suggest the implication of citric acid in lead translocation and shoot accumulation in S. portulacastrum and B. juncea. The relatively high accumulation of citric acid in xylem sap and shoot of S. portulacastrum could explain its high potential to translocate and accumulate this metal in shoot suggesting their possible use to remediate Pb polluted soils. PMID:23026160

  1. Organic acids composition of Cydonia oblonga Miller leaf.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andreia P; Pereira, José A; Andrade, Paula B; Valentão, Patrícia; Seabra, Rosa M; Silva, Branca M

    2008-11-15

    Organic acid profiles of 36 Cydonia oblonga Miller leaf samples, from three different geographical origins of northern (Bragança and Carrazeda de Ansiães) and central Portugal (Covilhã), harvested in three collection months (June, August and October of 2006), were determined by HPLC/UV (214nm). Quince leaves presented a common organic acid profile, composed of six constituents: oxalic, citric, malic, quinic, shikimic and fumaric acids. C. oblonga leaves total organic acid content varied from 1.6 to 25.8g/kg dry matter (mean value of 10.5g/kg dry matter). Quinic acid was the major compound (72.2%), followed by citric acid (13.6%). Significant differences were found in malic and quinic acids relative abundances and total organic acid contents according to collection time, which indicates a possible use of these compounds as maturity markers. Between June and August seems to be the best period to harvest quince leaves for preparation of decoctions or infusions, since organic acids total content is higher in this season. PMID:26047441

  2. Cu/Cu direct bonding by metal salt generation bonding technique with organic acid and persistence of reformed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Shinji; Hagiwara, Naoki; Shohji, Ikuo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the effect of the metal salt generation bonding technique on the strength of a direct-bonded copper-copper interface was investigated. Copper surfaces were modified by boiling in several types of organic acids, and direct bonding was performed at a bonding temperature of 423-673 K under a load of 588 N (for a bonding time of 0.9 ks). As a result of the surface modification, bonded joints were obtained at bonding temperatures of 150 K (after treatment with formic acid) and 100 K (after citric acid treatment) lower than that required for the unmodified surfaces. In addition, the duration of the modification effects was investigated by exposing the modified surface to an air atmosphere furnace kept at 323 K. The bonding strength of the citric acid-modified surface remained unchanged even after 168 h, whereas that of the surface modified with formic acid decreased within 6 h.

  3. Biobased organic acids production by metabolically engineered microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-02-01

    Bio-based production of organic acids via microbial fermentation has been traditionally used in food industry. With the recent desire to develop more sustainable bioprocesses for production of fuels, chemicals and materials, the market for microbial production of organic acids has been further expanded as organic acids constitute a key group among top building block chemicals that can be produced from renewable resources. Here we review the current status for production of citric acid and lactic acid, and we highlight the use of modern metabolic engineering technologies to develop high performance microbes for production of succinic acid and 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Also, the key limitations and challenges in microbial organic acids production are discussed. PMID:26748037

  4. Enamel erosion in dietary acids: inhibition by food proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, C A; White, A J; Shellis, R P; Addy, M; Parker, D M; Barbour, M E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two common food proteins on human enamel erosion in vitro. Erosion was measured by non-contact profilometry in citric, malic and lactic acids at pH 2.8, 3.2 and 3.8 and five commercially available soft drinks, in the presence of a salivary pellicle. Whole milk casein or hen egg ovalbumin was added to the acid solutions and drinks at 0.2% w/v, and the effect on erosion was determined by comparison with the corresponding solution without protein. Casein significantly reduced erosion in all but two solutions. The effects of the individual subfractions of casein in citric acid at pH 3.2 were similar to that of whole casein. Ovalbumin reduced erosion in some solutions, but the magnitude of the reduction was less than that with casein. A greater proportional reduction in erosion was seen in citric acid than in malic or lactic acids. We postulate that the mechanism involves adsorption of proteins to the pellicle or the enamel surface, forming a protein film with enhanced erosion-inhibiting properties. The citrate ion may play an active stabilising role, since erosion reduction was less in the other acids. In conclusion, casein and, to a lesser extent, ovalbumin show promise as potential anti-erosive additives to drinks. PMID:20980757

  5. A Dysfunctional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enhances Fitness of Staphylococcus epidermidis During β-Lactam Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chittezham Thomas, Vinai; Kinkead, Lauren C.; Janssen, Ashley; Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Woods, Keith M.; Lindgren, Jill K.; Peaster, Jonathan M.; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Sadykov, Marat; Jones, Joselyn; Mohamadi AbdelGhani, Sameh M.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Somerville, Greg A.; Fey, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recent controversial hypothesis suggested that the bactericidal action of antibiotics is due to the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), a process requiring the citric acid cycle (tricarboxylic acid [TCA] cycle). To test this hypothesis, we assessed the ability of oxacillin to induce ROS production and cell death in Staphylococcus epidermidis strain 1457 and an isogenic citric acid cycle mutant. Our results confirm a contributory role for TCA-dependent ROS in enhancing susceptibility of S. epidermidis toward β-lactam antibiotics and also revealed a propensity for clinical isolates to accumulate TCA cycle dysfunctions presumably as a way to tolerate these antibiotics. The increased protection from β-lactam antibiotics could result from pleiotropic effects of a dysfunctional TCA cycle, including increased resistance to oxidative stress, reduced susceptibility to autolysis, and a more positively charged cell surface. PMID:23963176

  6. Effects of low molecular-weight organic acids and dehydrogenase activity in rhizosphere sediments of mangrove plants on phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Fang, Ling; Lin, Li; Luan, Tiangang; Tam, Nora F Y

    2014-03-01

    This work evaluated the roles of the low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) from root exudates and the dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere sediments of three mangrove plant species on the removal of mixed PAHs. The results showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity changed species-specifically with the levels of PAH contamination. In all plant species, the concentration of citric acid was the highest, followed by succinic acid. For these acids, succinic acid was positively related to the removal of all the PAHs except Chr. Positive correlations were also found between the removal percentages of 4-and 5-ring PAHs and all LMWOAs, except citric acid. LMWOAs enhanced dehydrogenase activity, which positively related to PAH removal percentages. These findings suggested that LMWOAs and dehydrogenase activity promoted the removal of PAHs. Among three mangrove plants, Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, the plant with the highest root biomass, dehydrogenase activity and concentrations of LMWOAs, was most efficient in removing PAHs. PMID:24287262

  7. Effects of Acid Treatment on Dental Zirconia: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Haifeng; Shen, Shuping; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Feimin; Chen, Chen; Tay, Franklin R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric (HF) acid, acetic acid, and citric acid treatments on the physical properties and structure of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) at ambient temperature. In total, 110 bar-shaped zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to 11 groups. The specimens in the control group (C) received no surface treatment, while those in the Cage group were hydrothermally aged at 134°C and 0.2 MPa for 20 h. Ten specimens each were immersed at ambient temperature in 5% and 40% HF acid for 2 h (40HF0), 1 day (5HF1, 40HF1), and 5 days (5HF5, 40HF5), while 10 each were immersed at ambient temperature in 10% acetic acid and 20% citric acid for 7 (AC7, CI7) and 14 days (AC14, CI14). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to quantitatively estimate the monoclinic phase. Furthermore, flexural strength, surface roughness, and surface Vickers hardness were measured after treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the surface morphology. The Cage group specimens exhibited an increased monoclinic phase and flexural strength. Furthermore, 40% HF acid immersion decreased the flexural strength and surface hardness and deteriorated the surface finish, while 5% HF acid immersion only decreased the surface hardness. All the HF acid-immersed specimens showed an etched surface texture on SEM observations, while the other groups did not. These findings suggest that the treatment of Y-TZP with 40% HF acid at ambient temperature causes potential damage, while treatment with 5% HF acid, acetic acid, and citric acid is safe. PMID:26301413

  8. A new sol-gel synthesis of 45S5 bioactive glass using an organic acid as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Faure, J; Drevet, R; Lemelle, A; Ben Jaber, N; Tara, A; El Btaouri, H; Benhayoune, H

    2015-02-01

    In this paper a new sol-gel approach was explored for the synthesis of the 45S5 bioactive glass. We demonstrate that citric acid can be used instead of the usual nitric acid to catalyze the sol-gel reactions. The substitution of nitric acid by citric acid allows to reduce strongly the concentration of the acid solution necessary to catalyze the hydrolysis of silicon and phosphorus alkoxides. Two sol-gel powders with chemical compositions very close to that of the 45S5 were obtained by using either a 2M nitric acid solution or either a 5mM citric acid solution. These powders were characterized and compared to the commercial Bioglass®. The surface properties of the two bioglass powders were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET). The Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed a partial crystallization associated to the formation of crystalline phases on the two sol-gel powders. The in vitro bioactivity was then studied at the key times during the first hours of immersion into acellular Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). After 4h immersion into SBF we clearly demonstrate that the bioactivity level of the two sol-gel powders is similar and much higher than that of the commercial Bioglass®. This bioactivity improvement is associated to the increase of the porosity and the specific surface area of the powders synthesized by the sol-gel process. Moreover, the nitric acid is efficiently substituted by the citric acid to catalyze the sol-gel reactions without alteration of the bioactivity of the 45S5 bioactive glass. PMID:25492213

  9. Organic acid contents in onion cultivars (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Galdón, Beatriz; Tascón Rodríguez, Catalina; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Elena; Díaz Romero, Carlos

    2008-08-13

    The following organic acids (glutamic, oxalic, pyruvic, malic, tartaric, citric, and fumaric), pungency, Brix degree, acidity, and pH were determined in onion cultivars (Texas, Guayonje, San Juan de la Rambla, Carrizal Alto, Carrizal Bajo, and Masca) harvested in the same agroclimatic conditions. Glutamic acid was the most abundant organic acid (325 +/- 133 mg/100 g) followed by citric acid (48.5 +/- 24.1 mg/100 g) and malic acid (43.6 +/- 10.4 mg/100 g). There were significant differences between the onion cultivars in the mean concentrations of all of the analyzed parameters. The San Juan de la Rambla and Masca cultivars presented, in general, higher concentrations of the organic acids than the other cultivars. Significant differences in most of the analyzed parameters were observed between the two seed origins for the Masca and San Juan de la Rambla cultivars. The onion samples tended to be classified according to the cultivar and, in the case of San Juan de la Rambla cultivar, according to the precedence of the seeds after applying discriminant analysis. PMID:18616262

  10. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  11. One-pot assembly of metal/organic-acid sites on amine-functionalized ligands of MOFs for photocatalytic hydrogen peroxide splitting.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Li, Zhaowen; Hu, Qiong; Xu, Zehai; Guo, Xinwen; Zhang, Guoliang

    2016-06-01

    A one-pot organic-acid-directed post-synthetic modification allows molecular iron/citric acid complexes to be anchored into amine-functionalized MOFs by a simple and rapid liquid spraying method. Amidation between organic acid and -NH2 groups of ligands can lead to more small nanoparticles (NPs) that are well-dispersed into MOFs and exhibit high activity for photocatalytic H2O2 splitting. PMID:27166081

  12. Use of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria starters to ferment mango juice for promoting its probiotic roles.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xue-Yi; Guo, Li-Qiong; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Qiu, Ling-Yan; Gu, Feng-Wei; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2016-05-18

    Strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis were identified from mango fruits by partial 16S rDNA gene sequence. Based on the ability of producing mannitol and diacetyl, Leuconostoc mesenteroides MPL18 and MPL39 were selected within the lactic acid bacteria isolates, and used as mixed starters to ferment mango juice (MJ). Both the autochthonous strains grew well in fermented mango juice (FMJ) and remained viable at 9.81 log cfu mL(-1) during 30 days of storage at 4°C. The content of total sugar of FMJ was lower than that of MJ, while the concentration of mannitol was higher than that of MJ, and the concentration of diacetyl was 3.29 ± 0.12 mg L(-1). Among detected organic acids including citric acid, gallic acid, lactic acid, and acetic acid, only citric acid and gallic acid were found in MJ, while all detected organic acids were found in FMJ. The concentration of lactic acid of FMJ was the highest (78.62 ± 13.66 mM) among all detected organic acids. The DPPH radical scavenging capacity of FMJ was higher than that of MJ. Total phenolic compounds were better preserved in FMJ. The acidity and sweetness had a noticeable impact on the overall acceptance of the treated sample. PMID:26176886

  13. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  14. Desorption of copper and cadmium from soils enhanced by organic acids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Songhu; Xi, Zhimin; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Jinzhong; Wu, Chan; Zheng, Zhonghua; Lu, Xiaohua

    2007-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of copper and cadmium on soils was investigated in this study. The adsorption isotherm of copper and cadmium conformed to Langmuir equation better than Freundlich equation. The effect of ionic strength, pH, and organic acid, including ethylenediamine tetraacetic disodium acid salt (EDTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid, on the desorption of copper and cadmium was studied. The desorption of copper and cadmium increased with the increase of ionic strength, while the desorption decreased with the rise of pH. The desorption of copper and cadmium enhanced by organic acids was influenced by pH. EDTA showed excellent enhancement on the desorption of both copper and cadmium; citric acid demonstrated great enhancement on the desorption of copper but negligible enhancement on the desorption of cadmium; oxalic acid enhanced the desorption of copper only at pH around 6.4 and enhanced the desorption of cadmium in the pH range from 6.4 to 10.7; tartaric acid slightly enhanced the desorption of copper but negligibly enhanced the desorption of cadmium. The desorption mechanism in the presence of organic acids were explained as the competition of complexation, adsorption and precipitation. The net effect determined the desorption efficiency. This study provided guidance for the selection of organic acids to enhance the electrokinetic (EK) remediation of copper and cadmium from contaminated soils. PMID:17349675

  15. Acid-coated Textiles (pH 5.5-6.5)--a New Therapeutic Strategy for Atopic Eczema?

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Teresa; Rothmaier, Markus; Zander, Holger; Ring, Johannes; Gutermuth, Jan; Anliker, Mark D

    2015-07-01

    Increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and decreased skin capacitance are characteristic features of the disturbed epidermal barrier in atopic eczema (AE). The "acid mantle", which is a slightly acidic film on the surface of the skin has led to the development of acidic emollients for skin care. In this context, the effect of citric acid-coated textiles on atopic skin has not been examined to date. A textile carrier composed of cellulose fibres was coated with a citric acid surface layer by esterification, ensuring a constant pH of 5.5-6.5. Twenty patients with AE or atopic diathesis were enrolled in the study. In a double-blind, half-side experiment, patients had to wear these textiles for 12 h a day for 14 days. On day 0 (baseline), 7 and 14, tolerability (erythema, pruritus, eczema, wearing comfort) and efficacy on skin barrier were assessed by TEWL skin hydration (corneometry/capacitance), pH and clinical scoring of eczema (SCORAD). Citric acid-coated textiles were well tolerated and improved eczema and objective parameters of skin physiology, including barrier function and a reduced skin surface pH, with potential lower pathogenic microbial colonisation. PMID:24953993

  16. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathways and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase.

  17. Extraction chemistry of fermentation product carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kertes, A.S.; King, C.J.

    1986-02-01

    Within the framework of a program aiming to improve the existing extractive recovery technology of fermentation products, the state of the art is critically reviewed. The acids under consideration are propionic, lactic, pyruvic, succinic, fumaric, maleic, malic, itaconic, tartaric, citric, and isocitric, all obtained by the aerobic fermentation of glucose via the glycolytic pathway and glyoxylate bypass. With no exception, it is the undissociated monomeric acid that is extracted into carbon-bonded and phosphorus-bonded oxygen donor extractants. In the organic phase, the acids are usually dimerized. The extractive transfer process obeys the Nernst law, and the measured partition coefficients range from about 0.003 for aliphatic hydrocarbons to about 2 to 3 for aliphatic alcohols and ketones to about 10 or more for organophosphates. Equally high distribution ratios are measured when long-chain tertiary amines are employed as extractants, forming bulky salts preferentially soluble in the organic phase. 123 references.

  18. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the β-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large

  19. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  20. Effect of storage time and temperature on the survival of Clostridium botulinum spores in acid media.

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1977-01-01

    Clostridium-botulinum type A and type B spores were stored in tomato juice (pH 4.2) and citric acid-phosphate buffer (pH 4.2) at 4, 22, and 32 degrees C for 180 days. The spore count was determined at different intervals over the 180-day storage period. There was no significant decrease in the number of type A spores in either the tomato juice or citric acid-phosphate buffer stored for 180 days at 4, 22, and 32 degrees C. The number of type B spores did not decrease when storage was at 4 degrees C, but there was an approximately 30% decrease in the number of spores after 180 days of storage at 22 and 32 degrees C. PMID:18990

  1. Resistant starch improvement of rice starches under a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatments.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Vien, Ngo Lam; Lan Phi, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-15

    The effects of a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatment on formation of resistant starch (RS) and characteristics of high-amylose, normal and waxy rice starches were investigated in this study. The degrees of polymerization of the rice starches treated with citric acid, lactic acid or acetic acid were significantly reduced as compared to the native starches. The RS contents of acid and heat-moisture treated rice starches were in a range of 30.1-39.0%, significantly higher than those of native rice starches (6.3-10.2%) and those of heat-moisture treated rice starches (18.5-23.9%). The acid and heat-moisture treatments reduced swelling power and viscosity, but increased solubility of the starches, while the crystalline structure did not change. Among the organic acids used, citric acid had the most impact on starch characteristics and RS formation, followed by lactic acid and acetic acid. The results are useful in production of RS for functional food application. PMID:26258703

  2. Biosynthesis of pyruvic acid from glucose by Blastobotrys adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Morgunov, Igor G

    2016-09-01

    The ability of taxonomically different yeasts to synthesize pyruvic acid (PA) from glucose was studied. The study showed that many yeasts are able to produce PA from glucose under the condition of growth limitation by thiamine. This ability was found in the yeast Blastobotrys adeninivorans for the first time. The production (oversynthesis) of PA in this yeast can be explained by disturbance in the function of thiamine-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase. Namely, the partial inhibition of this enzyme brings about the excretion of PA from the yeast cells. Due to incomplete inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, the formation of acetyl-CoA continues, although at a lower level, maintaining the synthesis of α-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. KGA is no longer oxidized in the TCA cycle, because thiamine limitation inhibits α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. As a result, KGA is excreted from the yeast cells as a byproduct of PA oversynthesis. Furthermore, the increased level of KGA in the yeast cells inhibits NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle and enhances the production and excretion of citric acid, another byproduct of PA oversynthesis. During cultivation in a fermentor, the strain Blastobotrys adeninivorans VKM Y-2677 produced 43.2 g l(-1) PA from glucose with a product yield (YPA) of 0.77 g PA/g glucose. The proportion of PA to byproducts was 18:1 for KGA and 8:1 for citric acid. PMID:27221290

  3. Cd and Ni transport and accumulation in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum: implication of organic acids in these processes

    PubMed Central

    Mnasri, Mejda; Ghabriche, Rim; Fourati, Emna; Zaier, Hanen; Sabally, Kebba; Barrington, Suzelle; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    The implication of organic acids in Cd and Ni translocation was studied in the halophyte species Sesuvium portulacastrum. Citric, fumaric, malic, and ascorbic acids were separated and quantified by HPLC technique in shoots, roots and xylem saps of plants grown on nutrient solutions added with 50 μM Cd, 100 μM Ni and the combination of 50 μM Cd + 100 μM Ni. Results showed that Cd had no significant impact on biomass production while Ni and the combination of both metals drastically affected plant development. Cadmium and Ni concentrations in tissues and xylem sap were higher in plants subjected to individual metal application than those subjected to the combined effect of Cd and Ni suggesting a possible competition between these metals for absorption. Both metals applied separately or in combination induced an increase in citrate concentration in shoots and xylem sap but a decrease of this concentration in the roots. However, a minor relationship was observed between metal application and fumaric, malic, and ascorbic acids. Both observations suggest the implication of citric acid in Cd, Ni translocation and shoot accumulation in S. portulacastrum. The relatively high accumulation of citric acid in xylem sap and shoot of S. portulacastrum could be involved in metal chelation and thus contributes to heavy metal tolerance in this species. PMID:25821455

  4. Cd and Ni transport and accumulation in the halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum: implication of organic acids in these processes.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, Mejda; Ghabriche, Rim; Fourati, Emna; Zaier, Hanen; Sabally, Kebba; Barrington, Suzelle; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2015-01-01

    The implication of organic acids in Cd and Ni translocation was studied in the halophyte species Sesuvium portulacastrum. Citric, fumaric, malic, and ascorbic acids were separated and quantified by HPLC technique in shoots, roots and xylem saps of plants grown on nutrient solutions added with 50 μM Cd, 100 μM Ni and the combination of 50 μM Cd + 100 μM Ni. Results showed that Cd had no significant impact on biomass production while Ni and the combination of both metals drastically affected plant development. Cadmium and Ni concentrations in tissues and xylem sap were higher in plants subjected to individual metal application than those subjected to the combined effect of Cd and Ni suggesting a possible competition between these metals for absorption. Both metals applied separately or in combination induced an increase in citrate concentration in shoots and xylem sap but a decrease of this concentration in the roots. However, a minor relationship was observed between metal application and fumaric, malic, and ascorbic acids. Both observations suggest the implication of citric acid in Cd, Ni translocation and shoot accumulation in S. portulacastrum. The relatively high accumulation of citric acid in xylem sap and shoot of S. portulacastrum could be involved in metal chelation and thus contributes to heavy metal tolerance in this species. PMID:25821455

  5. The effect of hyaluronic acid on brushite cement cohesion.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, M H; Rueda, C; Mariño, F T; Torres, J; Jerez, L B; Gbureck, U; Cabarcos, E L

    2009-10-01

    The improvement of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) cohesion is essential for its application in highly blood perfused regions. This study reports the effectiveness of hyaluronic acids of different molecular weights in the enhancement of brushite cement cohesion. The cement was prepared using a powder phase composed of a mixture of beta-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, whereas the liquid phase was formed by 0.5M citric acid solution modified by the addition of hyaluronic acid of different molecular weights. It was found that medium and high molecular weight hyaluronic acid enhances the cement cohesion and scarcely affects the cement mechanical properties. However, concentrations >0.5% (w/v) were less efficient to prevent the cement disintegration. It is concluded that hyaluronic acid could be applied efficiently to reduce brushite cement disintegration. PMID:19409871

  6. A Thermostable Salmonella Phage Endolysin, Lys68, with Broad Bactericidal Properties against Gram-Negative Pathogens in Presence of Weak Acids

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Hugo; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Walmagh, Maarten; Sillankorva, Sanna; Lavigne, Rob; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Kluskens, Leon D.; Azeredo, Joana

    2014-01-01

    Resistance rates are increasing among several problematic Gram-negative pathogens, a fact that has encouraged the development of new antimicrobial agents. This paper characterizes a Salmonella phage endolysin (Lys68) and demonstrates its potential antimicrobial effectiveness when combined with organic acids towards Gram-negative pathogens. Biochemical characterization reveals that Lys68 is more active at pH 7.0, maintaining 76.7% of its activity when stored at 4°C for two months. Thermostability tests showed that Lys68 is only completely inactivated upon exposure to 100°C for 30 min, and circular dichroism analysis demonstrated the ability to refold into its original conformation upon thermal denaturation. It was shown that Lys68 is able to lyse a wide panel of Gram-negative bacteria (13 different species) in combination with the outer membrane permeabilizers EDTA, citric and malic acid. While the EDTA/Lys68 combination only inactivated Pseudomonas strains, the use of citric or malic acid broadened Lys68 antibacterial effect to other Gram-negative pathogens (lytic activity against 9 and 11 species, respectively). Particularly against Salmonella Typhimurium LT2, the combinatory effect of malic or citric acid with Lys68 led to approximately 3 to 5 log reductions in bacterial load/CFUs after 2 hours, respectively, and was also able to reduce stationary-phase cells and bacterial biofilms by approximately 1 log. The broad killing capacity of malic/citric acid-Lys68 is explained by the destabilization and major disruptions of the cell outer membrane integrity due to the acidity caused by the organic acids and a relatively high muralytic activity of Lys68 at low pH. Lys68 demonstrates good (thermo)stability properties that combined with different outer membrane permeabilizers, could become useful to combat Gram-negative pathogens in agricultural, food and medical industry. PMID:25290100

  7. Keto-acids in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, G.; Chang, P. M.; Dugas, A.; Byrd, A.; Chang, P. M.; Washington, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry and are generally used as references for organic compounds in extraterrestrial material. Among the classes of organic compounds found in these meteorites are amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds, important in contemporary biochemistry, are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in early life and/or the origin of life. Absent among (today's) critically important biological compounds reported in carbonaceous meteorites are keto acids, i.e., pyruvic acid, acetoacetic acid, and higher homologs. These compounds are key intermediates in such critical processes as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. In this study several individual meteoritic keto acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (see figure below). All compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), isopropyl ester (ISP), and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (tBDMS) derivatives. In general, the compounds follow the abiotic synthesis pattern of other known meteorite classes of organic compounds [1,2]: a general decrease in abundance with increasing carbon number within a class of compounds and many, if not all, possible isomers present at a given carbon number. The majority of the shown compounds was positively identified by comparison of their mass spectra to commercially available standards or synthesized standards.

  8. Content and Vacuole/Extravacuole Distribution of Neutral Sugars, Free Amino Acids, and Anthocyanin in Protoplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Neutral sugar, free amino acid, and anthocyanin levels and vacuole/extravacuole distribution were determined for Hippeastrum and Tulipa petal and Tulipa leaf protoplasts. Glucose and fructose, the predominant neutral monosaccharides observed, were primarily vacuolar in location. Glutamine, the predominant free amino acid found, was primarily extravacuolar. γ-Methyleneglutamate was identified as a major constituent of Tulipa protoplasts. Qualitative characterization of Hippeastrum petal and vacuole organic acids indicated the presence of oxalic, malic, citric, and isocitric acids. Data are presented which indicate that vacuoles obtained by gentle osmotic shock of protoplasts in dibasic phosphate have good purity and retain their contents. Images PMID:16660921

  9. Enhanced Extracorporeal CO2 Removal by Regional Blood Acidification: Effect of Infusion of Three Metabolizable Acids.

    PubMed

    Scaravilli, Vittorio; Kreyer, Stefan; Linden, Katharina; Belenkiy, Slava; Pesenti, Antonio; Zanella, Alberto; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Batchinsky, Andriy I

    2015-01-01

    Acidification of blood entering a membrane lung (ML) with lactic acid enhances CO2 removal (VCO2ML). We compared the effects of infusion of acetic, citric, and lactic acids on VCO2ML. Three sheep were connected to a custom-made circuit, consisting of a Hemolung device (Alung Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA), a hemofilter (NxStage, NxStage Medical, Lawrence, MA), and a peristaltic pump recirculating ultrafiltrate before the ML. Blood flow was set at 250 ml/min, gas flow (GF) at 10 L/min, and recirculating ultrafiltrate flow at 100 ml/min. Acetic (4.4 M), citric (0.4 M), or lactic (4.4 M) acids were infused in the ultrafiltrate at 1.5 mEq/min, for 2 hours each, in randomized fashion. VCO2ML was measured by the Hemolung built-in capnometer. Circuit and arterial blood gas samples were collected at baseline and during acid infusion. Hemodynamics and ventilation were monitored. Acetic, citric, or lactic acids similarly enhanced VCO2ML (+35%), from 37.4 ± 3.6 to 50.6 ± 7.4, 49.8 ± 5.6, and 52.0 ± 8.2 ml/min, respectively. Acids similarly decreased pH, increased pCO2, and reduced HCO3 of the post-acid extracorporeal blood sample. No significant effects on arterial gas values, ventilation, or hemodynamics were observed. In conclusion, it is possible to increase VCO2ML by more than one-third using any one of the three metabolizable acids. PMID:26273934

  10. Effects of organic acids on cadmium and copper sorption and desorption by two calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    Low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) present in soil alter equilibrium pH of soil, and consequently, affect heavy metal sorption and desorption on soil constitutes. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different concentrations (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, 30, 40, 50, 70, and 100 mM) of citric, malic, and oxalic acids on sorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in two calcareous soils. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs decreased the equilibrium pH of soil solutions. The results indicated that increase in organic acids concentrations generally reduced Cd and Cu sorption in soils. Increase concentrations of LMWOAs generally promoted Cd and Cu desorption from soils. A valley-like curve was observed for desorption of Cu after the citric acid concentration increment in soil 2. Increasing the concentrations of three LMWOAs caused a marked decrease in Kd(sorp) values of Cd and Cu in soils. In general, citric acid was the most effective organic acid in reducing sorption and increasing desorption of both metals, and oxalic acid had the minimal impact. The results indicated that LMWOAs had a greater impact on Cu sorption and desorption than Cd, which can be attributed to higher stability constants of organic acids complexes with Cu compared to Cd. It can be concluded that by selecting suitable type and concentration of LMWOAs, mobility, and hence, bioavailability of heavy metals can be changed. So, environmental implications concerning heavy metals mobility might be derived from these findings. PMID:26298186

  11. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  12. Application of edible coating and acidic washing for extending the storage life of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Naser; Zahedi, Younes

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocolloid-based materials have been extensively used to coat fruit and vegetables to prolong shelf-life. The effects of different concentrations of acidic washing (acetic, ascorbic, citric and malic acids) followed by coating with gum arabic (GA), carboxymethyl cellulose and emulsified gum arabic (EGA) were evaluated on the weight loss (WL), firmness and color of mushroom. The WL of the uncoated mushrooms was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that of the coated ones, and the minimum WL was obtained with EGA coating. The mushrooms washed with malic and ascorbic acids showed minimum and maximum of WL, respectively. Loss in firmness of the EGA-coated mushrooms was by 21% (the minimum of loss), while loss value of the uncoated ones was by 39% (the maximum of loss). Firmness of mushrooms was not influenced by the acid type. Concentration of the acid significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the firmness of mushrooms, and at the lowest concentration of acid (1%), the mushrooms tissue was firmest. The L* value of the mushrooms coated with GA was higher than that of others. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in L* value and a significant (p < 0.05) increase in a* and b* values occurred in the mushrooms washed with acetic acid. Overall, washing with 1% citric or malic acid followed by coating with EGA resulted in minimum decrease in WL and firmness of the mushrooms. PMID:23175781

  13. Acidic leaching and precipitation of zinc and manganese from spent battery powders using various reductants.

    PubMed

    Sayilgan, E; Kukrer, T; Yigit, N O; Civelekoglu, G; Kitis, M

    2010-01-15

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of reductive acidic leaching and further precipitation on the recovery of manganese and zinc from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon battery powders. Ascorbic acid (AA), citric acid (CA) and oxalic acid (OA) were tested as the reductants. Sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide were used as precipitating agents. OA with H(2)SO(4) or HCl was not effective on the leaching of zinc due to the formation of zinc oxalate precipitates. However, the other reducing agents (CA and AA) tested under various experimental conditions were effective in the acidic leaching of both zinc and manganese. Leaching yields of both manganese and zinc were higher at leach temperature of 90 degrees C than those at 30 degrees C. Leach solutions were purified by the selective precipitation of manganese and zinc using KOH or NaOH. Complete precipitation was obtained for Mn at pH 9-10 and for Zn at pH 7-8. The use of ascorbic acid or citric acid as reductants in acidic leaching appears to be effective in the simultaneous leaching and further recovery of zinc and manganese from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon battery powders. PMID:19744786

  14. [Inhibitory effects of organic acids and salts on selected micromycetes].

    PubMed

    Láníková, A; Toulová, M

    1992-12-01

    Inhibitory effects of two fungistatic preparations (A and B) and of propionic acid were tested in a complete feed mixture for broiler chickens (starter mixture). The water content of this mixture was 25.4%, environmental temperature was 24 degrees C and relative air humidity 90%. Propionic acid, which has a high fungistatic effect, served as a standard. The composition of the preparation A was as follows: propionic acid, acetic acid, sorbic acid, citric acid and calcium propionate. The preparation B contained: sorbic acid, citric acid and calcium propionate. Examinations were performed in a naturally contaminated and subsequently sterilized (25 kGy) feed mixture; it was then infected with Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger, A. parasiticus and Penicillium purpurogenum from the Collection of Animal Pathogenic Microorganisms, Brno. A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. glaucus, Penicillium sp., Absidia corymbifera, Mucor sp., Rhizomucor pusillus were detected in the naturally contaminated feed mixture. The mycoflora which was found in the native substrate was resistant to both tested fungistatic preparations; and this resulted in mycelium growth from 7th day of incubation. The efficiency of the preparations A,B and of propionic acid in the feed mixture was identical at concentrations of 4 mg/kg, 7 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg, respectively, and their inhibitory effects were lowest at these concentrations (Fig. 2). A high water content in the nutrient substrate resulted in the rapid growth of fungi of the Mucorales species. The relative humidity of the environment (90%) and water content of tested samples affected markedly micromycetes growth in this experiment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1297244

  15. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ. PMID:24751382

  16. Phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils: Role of organic acids in triggering uranium hyperaccumulation in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.W.; Blaylock, M.J.; Kapulnik, Y.; Ensley, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Uranium phytoextraction, the use of plants to extract U from contaminated soils, is an emerging technology. The authors report on the development of this technology for the cleanup of U-contaminated soils. In this research, they investigated the effects of various soil amendments on U desorption from soil to soil solution, studied the physiological characteristics of U uptake and accumulation in plants, and developed techniques to trigger U hyperaccumulation in plants. A key to the success of U phytoextraction is to increase soil U availability to plants. The authors have found that some organic acids can be added to soils to increase U desorption from soil to soil solution and to trigger a rapid U accumulation in plants. Of the organic acids (acetic acid, citric acid, and malic acid) tested, citric acid was the most effective in enhancing U accumulation in plants. Shoot U concentrations of Brassica juncea and Brassica chinensis grown in a U-contaminated soil increased from less than 5 mg kg{sup {minus}1} to more than 5,000 mg kg{sup {minus}1} in citric acid-treated soils. To their knowledge, this is the highest shoot U concentration reported for plants grown on U-contaminated soils. Using this U hyperaccumulation technique, they are now able to increase U accumulation in shoots of selected plant species grown in two U-contaminated soils by more than 1,000-fold within a few days. The results suggest that U phytoextraction may provide an environmentally friendly alternative for the cleanup of U-contaminated soils.

  17. Ligand-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of metal-contaminated marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity.

    PubMed

    Masi, Matteo; Iannelli, Renato; Losito, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    The suitability of electrokinetic remediation for removing heavy metals from dredged marine sediments with high acid buffering capacity was investigated. Laboratory-scale electrokinetic remediation experiments were carried out by applying two different voltage gradients to the sediment (0.5 and 0.8 V/cm) while circulating water or two different chelating agents at the electrode compartments. Tap water, 0.1 M citric acid and 0.1 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solutions were used respectively. The investigated metals were Zn, Pb, V, Ni and Cu. In the unenhanced experiment, the acid front could not propagate due to the high acid buffering capacity of the sediments; the production of OH(-) ions at the cathode resulted in a high-pH environment causing the precipitation of CaCO3 and metal hydroxides. The use of citric acid prevented the formation of precipitates, but solubilisation and mobilisation of metal species were not sufficiently achieved. Metal removal was relevant when EDTA was used as the conditioning agent, and the electric potential was raised up to 0.8 V/cm. EDTA led to the formation of negatively charged complexes with metals which migrated towards the anode compartment by electromigration. This result shows that metal removal from sediments with high acid buffering capacity may be achieved by enhancing the electrokinetic process by EDTA addition when the acidification of the medium is not economically and/or environmentally sustainable. PMID:26490900

  18. Antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of phosphoric acid solution compared to other root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    PRADO, Maíra; da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; DUQUE, Thais Mageste; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto; FERRAZ, Caio Cezar Randi; de ALMEIDA, José Flávio Affonso; GOMES, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoric acid has been suggested as an irrigant due to its effectiveness in removing the smear layer. Objectives : The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects of a 37% phosphoric acid solution to other irrigants commonly used in endodontics. Material and Methods : The substances 37% phosphoric acid, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid, 2% chlorhexidine (solution and gel), and 5.25% NaOCl were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was tested against Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Actinomyces meyeri, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella nigrescens according to the agar diffusion method. The cytotoxicity of the irrigants was determined by using the MTT assay. Results : Phosphoric acid presented higher antimicrobial activity compared to the other tested irrigants. With regard to the cell viability, this solution showed results similar to those with 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution), whereas 17% EDTA and 10% citric acid showed higher cell viability compared to other irrigants. Conclusion : Phosphoric acid demonstrated higher antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine (gel and solution). PMID:26018307

  19. Effects of organic acids, amino acids and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin in an aqueous model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Cheorun; Chung, Jinwoo; Kim, Soohyun; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Dongho

    2008-06-01

    The effects of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin by gamma irradiation in an aqueous model system were investigated. The patulin, dissolved in distilled water at a concentration of 50 ppm, was practically degraded by the gamma irradiation at the dose of 1.0 kGy, while 33% of the patulin remained in apple juice. In the aqueous model system, the radio-degradation of patulin was partially inhibited by the addition of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol. The proportions of remaining patulin after irradiation with the dose of 1.0 kGy in the 1% solution of malic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, ascorbic acid, and ethanol were 31.4%, 2.3%, 31.2%, 6.1%, 50.8%, and 12.5%, respectively. During 30 days of storage, the remaining patulin was reduced gradually in the solution of ascorbic acid and malic acid compared to being stable in other samples. The amino acids, serine, threonine, and histidine, inhibited the radio-degradation of patulin. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1 kGy of gamma irradiation (recommended radiation doses for radicidation and/or quarantine in fruits) is effective for the reduction of patulin, but the nutritional elements should be considered because the radio-degradation effects are environment dependent.

  20. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contam...

  1. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and nonpathogenic E. coli in strawberry juice by pulsed electric field, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and citric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Current regulations require that juice processors effect a 5 log CFU/ml reduction of a target pathogen prior to distributing products. Whereas thermal pasteurization reduces the sensory characteristics of juice by altering flavor components, pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment may ...

  2. Tamibarotene-loaded citric acid-crosslinked alkali-treated collagen matrix as a coating material for a drug-eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Motoki; Takayanagi, Mariko; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Manabe, Ichiro; Nagai, Ryozo; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2012-12-01

    Tamibarotene-loaded biodegradable matrices with antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties were prepared in a crosslinking reaction between amino groups of alkali-treated collagen (AlCol) and active ester groups of trisuccinimidyl citrate. The resulting matrices were characterized by their residual amino group concentrations, swelling ratios and thermal, antithrombogenic and drug-releasing properties. It was clarified that the addition of tamibarotene does not inhibit matrix formation. After immersion in water, the swelling ratio of a matrix became lower than that prior to immersion. Thermal analysis indicated that AlCol interacted with tamibarotene. The addition of tamibarotene to the matrix did not influence the antithrombogenic property of the resulting matrix. A matrix with a high crosslinking density had a prolonged tamibarotene elution time. These results demonstrate that tamibarotene-loaded matrices have great potential as a coating material for drug-eluting stents.

  3. A Mechanistic Study on the Formation of Silver Nanoplates in the Presence of Silver Seeds and Citric Acid or Citrate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Tao, J.; Li, W.; Grant, J.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.; Xia, Y.

    2011-02-01

    The world on a plate: In addition to their role as a capping agent that selectively binds to the {l_brace}111{r_brace} faces of silver, the carboxylate group can coordinate with Ag+ ions to form complexes and thus substantially reduce the reduction rate of Ag+ ions, leading to the formation of silver seeds with both twin planes and stacking faults.

  4. Absorption and retention of aluminum from drinking water. 1. Effect of citric and ascorbic acids on aluminum tissue levels in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, B.; Jeffery, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Adult, male New Zealand rabbits (three per group) were administered drinking water containing aluminum chloride (0, 100, or 500 mg Al/liter) together with citrate (0.11 M), ascorbate (0.11 M), or no added ligand ad libitum for 12 weeks. They were fed ad libitum regular rabbit chow analyzed to contain 297 mg Al/kg. Treatment had no effect upon food and water intake or weight gain during the experimental period. No effect of aluminum was observed on tissue levels of the essential metals zinc, copper, and iron, or on hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Aluminum levels were found to increase in a dose-dependent manner in stomach and intestinal mucosa, kidney, bone, urine, and feces. There was only a slight accumulation in liver, and no accumulation in brain (cerebral cortex or hippocampus). Although plasma aluminum was directly related to aluminum intake, whole blood aluminum bore no relation to aluminum dose. Citrate had no effect on aluminum accumulation in the stomach or intestine, but significantly enhanced plasma and bone aluminum levels. Ascorbate did not enhance aluminum accumulation in any tissue studied and even prevented accumulation in bone. Both citrate and ascorbate enhanced excretion of aluminum. Ascorbate therapy may be of potential clinical use to enhance aluminum excretion.

  5. HPLC method for the simultaneous quantification of the major organic acids in Angeleno plum fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Wei; Zhao, Zhilei; Cao, Jiankang

    2014-08-01

    A method was developed to profile major organic acids in Angeleno fruit by high performance liquid chromatography. Organic acids in plum were extracted by water with ultra- sonication at 50°C for 30 min. The extracts were chromatographed on Waters Atlantis T3 C18 column (4.6 mm×250 mm, 5 μm) with 0.01mol/L sulfuric acid and water as mobile phase, and flow rate was 0.5 ml/min. The column temperature was 40C, and chromatography was monitored by a diode array detector at 210 nm. The result showed that malic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid, succinic acid in Angeleno plum, and the malic acid was the major organic acids. The coefficient of determination of the standard calibration curve is R2 > 0.999. The organic acids recovery ranged from 99.11% for Malic acid to 106.70% for Oxalic acid, and CV (n=6) ranged from 0.95% for Malic acid to 6.23% for Oxalic acid, respectively. The method was accurate, sensitive and feasible in analyzing the organic acids in Angeleno plum.

  6. [Influence of Three Low-Molecular-Weight Organic Acids on the Adsorption of Phenanthrene in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Chen, Ben-shou; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Tao

    2016-03-15

    The effects of three low-molecular-weight organic acids (citric acid, malic acid and oxalic acid) on the adsorption of phenanthrene in purple soil were studied by static adsorption experiment. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process of phenanthrene in purple soil could be described by the second-order kinetic model, and the adsorption rate constant would significantly decrease in the presence of the three low-molecular-weight organic acids ( LMWOAs). The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by linear adsorption model, which was dominated by distribution role. The three LMWOAs could promote the adsorption of phenantherene in purple soil when their concentrations were less than 5 mmol · L⁻¹, whereas inhibit the adsorption when their concentrations were more than 10 mmol · L⁻¹, and the inhibition would increase with increasing concentrations. Moreover, the inhibitory ability displayed a decreasing order of citric acid, oxalic acid, and malic acid when their concentrations were 20 mmol · L⁻¹, which is related to the molecular structure and acidity of the three LMWOAs. Compared with the control, the content of dissolved organic matter (DOM) released from purple soil showed a trend of first decrease and then increase with increasing LMWOAs concentration, and the adsorption capacity of phenanthrene in purple soil was negatively related to DOM content. PMID:27337897

  7. α-hydroxy acids mediated synthesis of hollow silver nanoshells and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadhich, B.; Saha, A.; Priyam, A.

    2016-05-01

    The α-hydroxy-acids (i.e. glycolic, malic, citric) plays crucial role in the formation of hollow silver nanoshells and in its plasmonic properties. The SPR peak varied in a wide range from 400-527 nm with variation in chain length and molar concentration or ratio of the acids. The stability was also affected by chain length. Zeta potential analyzed for the stability of hollow silver nanoshells (HAgNS). The hollow structure of these nanocrystals with aspect ratio (Outer diameter/ shell thickness) 2 to 5 is confirmed by HR-TEM.

  8. Vapor pressures of substituted polycarboxylic acids are much lower than previously reported

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2013-07-01

    The partitioning of compounds between the aerosol and gas phase is a primary focus in the study of the formation and fate of secondary organic aerosol. We present measurements of the vapor pressure of 2-methylmalonic (isosuccinic) acid, 2-hydroxymalonic (tartronic) acid, 2-methylglutaric acid, 3-hydroxy-3-carboxy-glutaric (citric) acid and DL-2,3-dihydroxysuccinic (DL-tartaric) acid, which were obtained from the evaporation rate of supersaturated liquid particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. Our measurements indicate that the pure component liquid vapor pressures at 298.15 K for tartronic, citric and tartaric acids are much lower than the same quantity that was derived from solid state measurements in the only other room temperature measurement of these materials (made by Booth et al., 2010). This strongly suggests that empirical correction terms in a recent vapor pressure estimation model to account for the inexplicably high vapor pressures of these and similar compounds should be revisited, and that due caution should be used when the estimated vapor pressures of these and similar compounds are used as inputs for other studies.

  9. Interactions between hydrated cement paste and organic acids: Thermodynamic data and speciation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Bertron, Alexandra; Larreur-Cayol, Steeves; Escadeillas, Gilles

    2015-03-15

    Interactions of short-chain organic acids with hydrated cement phases affect structure durability in the agro-food and nuclear waste industries but can also be used to modify cement properties. Most previous studies have been experimental, performed at fixed concentrations and pH, without quantitatively discriminating among polyacidity effects, or complexation and salt precipitation processes. This paper addresses such issues by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for acetic, citric, oxalic, succinic acids and a simplified hydrated CEM-I. The thermodynamic constants collected from the literature allow the speciation to be modeled over a wide range of pH and concentrations. Citric and oxalic had a stronger chelating effect than acetic acid, while succinic acid was intermediate. Similarly, Ca-citrate and Ca-oxalate salts were more insoluble than Ca-acetate and Ca-succinate salts. Regarding aluminium complexation, hydroxyls, sulfates, and acid competition was highlighted. The exploration of acid mixtures showed the preponderant effect of oxalate and citrate over acetate and succinate.

  10. Vapor pressures of substituted polycarboxylic acids are much lower than previously reported

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, A. J.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2013-01-01

    The partitioning of compounds between the aerosol and gas phase is a primary focus in the study of the formation and fate of secondary organic aerosol. We present measurements of the vapor pressure of 2-Methylmalonic (isosuccinic) acid, 2-Hydroxymalonic (tartronic) acid, 2-Methylglutaric acid, 3-Hydroxy-3-carboxy-glutaric (citric) acid and 2,3-Dihydroxysuccinic (tartaric) acid which were obtained from the evaporation rate of supersaturated liquid particles levitated in an electrodynamic balance. Our measurements indicate that the pure component liquid vapor pressures at 298.15 K for tartronic, citric and tartaric acids are much lower than the same quantity which was derived from solid state measurements in the only other room temperature measurement of these materials (made by Booth et al., 2010). This strongly suggests that empirical correction terms in vapor pressure estimation models to account for the inexplicably high vapor pressures of these and similar compounds should be revisited, and that due caution should be used when the estimated vapor pressures of these and similar compounds are used as inputs for other studies.

  11. Study of the organic acids composition of quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) fruit and jam.

    PubMed

    Silva, Branca M; Andrade, Paula B; Mendes, Gisela C; Seabra, Rosa M; Ferreira, Margarida A

    2002-04-10

    The organic acids present in several samples of quince fruit (pulp and peel) and quince jam (homemade and industrially manufactured) were analyzed by HPLC. The sample preparation was simple, involving only extraction with methanol (40 degrees C) and filtration through a Sep-pack C18 cartridge. The chromatographic separation was achieved using an ion exclusion column, Nucleogel Ion 300 OA (300 x 7.7 mm), in conjunction with a column heating device at 30 degrees C. An isocratic elution with H(2)SO(4) 0.01 N as the mobile phase, with a flow rate of 0.1 mL/min, and UV detection at 214 nm were used. These analyses showed that all samples presented a similar profile composed of at least six identified organic acids: citric, ascorbic, malic, quinic, shikimic, and fumaric acids. Several samples also contained oxalic acid. This study suggests that the organic acids levels and ratios may be useful for the determination of percent fruit content of quince jams. The citric acid value can also be used in the differentiation of the type of manufacture of the commercial quince jams (homemade or industrially manufactured). PMID:11929290

  12. Itaconic Acid: The Surprising Role of an Industrial Compound as a Mammalian Antimicrobial Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Thekla; Michelucci, Alessandro; Hiller, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Itaconic acid is well known as a precursor for polymer synthesis and has been involved in industrial processes for decades. In a recent surprising discovery, itaconic acid was found to play a role as an immune-supportive metabolite in mammalian immune cells, where it is synthesized as an antimicrobial compound from the citric acid cycle intermediate cis-aconitic acid. Although the immune-responsive gene 1 protein (IRG1) has been associated to immune response without a mechanistic function, the critical link to itaconic acid production through an enzymatic function of this protein was only recently revealed. In this review, we highlight the history of itaconic acid as an industrial and antimicrobial compound, starting with its biotechnological synthesis and ending with its antimicrobial function in mammalian immune cells. PMID:25974697

  13. Slight Fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium Improves the Taste (Sugar:Acid Ratio) of Citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. chachiensis) Juice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuanshan; Xiao, Gengsheng; Xu, Yujuan; Wu, Jijun; Fu, Manqin; Wen, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium, which can metabolize citric acid, could be applied in improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice. During fermentation, the strain of L. fermentium can preferentially utilize citric acid of citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. Chachiensis) juice to support the growth without the consumption of sugar. After 6 h of fermentation with L. fermentium at 30 °C, the sugar:acid ratio of citrus juice increased to 22:1 from 12:1, which resulted in that the hedonic scores of sweetness, acidity and overall acceptability of fermented-pasteurized citrus juice were higher than the unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice, the ORAC value and total amino acid showed a reduction, and no significant change (P > 0.05) in the L*, a*, b*, total soluble phenolics and ascorbic acid (Vc) content in the fermented-pasteurized citrus juice was observed as compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Hence, slight fermentation with L. fermentium can be used for improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice with the well retaining of quality. PMID:26447635

  14. Effect of Organic Acid Additions on the General and Localized Corrosion Susceptibility of Alloy 22 in Chloride Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Giordano, C M; Rodr?guez, M A; Ilevbare, G O; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-28

    Electrochemical studies such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to determine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 22 (N06022) in 1M NaCl solutions at various pH values from acidic to neutral at 90 C. All the tested material was wrought Mill Annealed (MA). Tests were also performed in NaCl solutions containing weak organic acids such as oxalic, acetic, citric and picric. Results show that the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 was significantly higher in solutions containing oxalic acid than in solutions of pure NaCl at the same pH. Citric and picric acids showed a slightly higher corrosion rate, and acetic acid maintained the corrosion rate of pure chloride solutions at the same pH. Organic acids revealed to be weak inhibitors for crevice corrosion. Higher concentration ratios, compared to nitrate ions, were needed to completely inhibit crevice corrosion in chloride solutions. Results are discussed considering acid dissociation constants, buffer capacity and complex formation constants of the different weak acids.

  15. Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for itaconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Blazeck, John; Hill, Andrew; Jamoussi, Mariam; Pan, Anny; Miller, Jarrett; Alper, Hal S

    2015-11-01

    Itaconic acid is a naturally produced organic acid with diverse applications as a replacement for petroleum derived products. However, its industrial viability as a bio-replacement has been restricted due to limitations with native producers. In this light, Yarrowia lipolytica is an excellent potential candidate for itaconic acid production due to its innate capacity to accumulate citric acid cycle intermediates and tolerance to lower pH. Here, we demonstrate the capacity to produce itaconic acid in Y. lipolytica through heterologous expression of the itaconic acid synthesis enzyme, resulting in an initial titer of 33 mg/L. Further optimizations of this strain via metabolic pathway engineering, enzyme localization, and media optimization strategies enabled 4.6g/L of itaconic acid to be produced in bioreactors, representing a 140-fold improvement over initial titer. Moreover, these fermentation conditions did not require additional nutrient supplementation and utilized a low pH condition that enabled the acid form of itaconic acid to be produced. Overall yields (0.058 g/g yield from glucose) and maximum productivity of 0.045 g/L/h still provide areas for future strain improvement. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates that Y. lipolytica has the potential to serve as an industrially relevant platform for itaconic acid production. PMID:26384571

  16. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass. PMID:25342454

  17. Phragmites australis response to Cu in terms of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) exudation: Influence of the physiological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere for several purposes, including in response to metal contamination. Despite this, little is yet known about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots in response to metal exposure. This work aimed at assessing the influence of the physiological cycle of marsh plants on the exudation of ALMWOAs in response to Cu contamination. In vitro experiments were carried out with Phragmites australis specimens, collected in different seasons. Plant roots were exposed to freshwater contaminated with two different Cu concentrations (67 μg/L and 6.9 mg/L), being the ALMWOAs released by the roots measured. Significant differences (both qualitative and quantitative) were observed during the Phragmites australis life cycle. At growing stage, Cu stimulated the exudation of oxalic and formic acids but no significant stimulation was observed for citric acid. At developing stage, exposure to Cu caused inhibition of oxalic acid exudation whereas citric acid liberation was stimulated but only in the media spiked with the lowest Cu concentration tested. At the decaying stage, no significant variation on oxalic acid was observed, whereas the citric and formic acids release increased as a consequence of the plant exposure to Cu. The physiological cycle of Phragmites australis, and probably also of other marsh plants, is therefore an important feature conditioning plants response to Cu contamination, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation. Hence this aspect should be considered when conducting studies on rhizodeposition involving marsh plants exposed to metals and in the event of using marsh plants for phytoremediation purposes in contaminated estuarine areas.

  18. Effects of Water Stress on the Organic Acid and Carbohydrate Compositions of Cotton Plants

    PubMed Central

    Timpa, Judy D.; Burke, John J.; Quisenberry, Jerry E.; Wendt, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Two photoperiodic cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) strains (T185 and T466) which had been empirically selected because of poor performance and two strains (T25 and T256) selected because of enhanced performance under field water stress were evaluated for stress-induced changes in their organic acids and carbohydrates. Profiles and quantitation of organic acids and carbohydrates from aqueous extractions of cotton leaf tissue were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. In all cases, the water-stressed plants showed two to five times greater amounts of organic acids and carbohydrates over the values determined for the irrigated samples. Under stress, sucrose accumulation was observed in wilting strains (poor performers) probably related to rate of translocation out of the leaf. The most dramatic response to water stress was the accumulation of citric acid in strains T25 and T256 as compared to T185 and T466. Citric/malic acid ratios for both the irrigated and water-stressed samples of T25 and T256 were twice those of T185 and T466. PMID:16665100

  19. Growth and Metabolism of Lactic Acid Bacteria during and after Malolactic Fermentation of Wines at Different pH

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. R.; Wibowo, D. J.; Lee, T. H.; Fleet, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Commercially produced red wines were adjusted to pH 3.0, 3.2, 3.5, 3.7, or 4.0 and examined during and after malolactic fermentation for growth of lactic acid bacteria and changes in the concentrations of carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, and acetaldehyde. With one exception, Leuconostoc oenos conducted the malolactic fermentation in all wines and was the only species to occur in wines at pH below 3.5. Malolactic fermentation by L. oenos was accompanied by degradation of malic, citric, and fumaric acids and production of lactic and acetic acids. The concentrations of arginine, histidine, and acetaldehyde also decreased at this stage, but the behavior of hexose and pentose sugars was complicated by other factors. Pediococcus parvulus conducted the malolactic fermentation in one wine containing 72 mg of total sulfur dioxide per liter. Fumaric and citric acids were not degraded during this malolactic fermentation, but hexose sugars were metabolized. P. parvulus and species of Lactobacillus grew after malolactic fermentation in wines with pH adjusted above 3.5. This growth was accompanied by the utilization of wine sugars and production of lactic and acetic acids. PMID:16347015

  20. [Determination of organic acids in rice wine by ion-exclusion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojie; Wei, Wei; He, Zhigang; Lin, Xiaozi

    2014-03-01

    An ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of organic acids in rice wine was developed. An IC-Pak Ion Exclusion column (300 mm x 7.8 mm, 7 microm) was used at 50 degrees C. The mobile phases were H2SO4 (phase A) and acetonitrile (phase B) (98:2, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The gradient elution program was as follows: 0-40 min, 0.01 mol/L H2SO4 to 0.02 mol/L H2SO4; 40-50 min, 0.01 mol/L H2SO4. The injection volume was 10 microL. The detection wavelength was set at 210 nm. The results showed that oxalic acid, maleic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, malic acid, ascorbic acid, succinic acid, lactic, fumaric acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid and butyric acid were completely separated and determined in 30 min. The linear correlation coefficients were above 0.999 7 in the range of 0.001- 1.000 g/L. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of organic acids in rice wine were in the range of 93.4% - 103.8% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) of 0.1% - 1.5%. This method is feasible, convenient, fast, accurate and applicable for the quantitative analysis of the organic acids in rice wine. PMID:24984473

  1. Enhanced itaconic acid production in Aspergillus niger using genetic modification and medium optimization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus niger was selected as a host for producing itaconic acid due to its versatile and tolerant character in various growth environments, and its extremely high capacity of accumulating the precursor of itaconic acid: citric acid. Expressing the CAD gene from Aspergillus terreus opened the metabolic pathway towards itaconic acid in A. niger. In order to increase the production level, we continued by modifying its genome and optimizing cultivation media. Results Based on the results of previous transcriptomics studies and research from other groups, two genes : gpdA encoding the glyceraldehyde −3-dehydrogenase (GPD) and hbd1 encoding a flavohemoglobin domain (HBD) were overexpressed in A. niger. Besides, new media were designed based on a reference medium for A. terreus. To analyze large numbers of cultures, we developed an approach for screening both fungal transformants and various media in 96-well micro-titer plates. The hbd1 transformants (HBD 2.2/2.5) did not improve itaconic acid titer while the gpdA transformant (GPD 4.3) decreased the itaconic acid production. Using 20 different media, copper was discovered to have a positive influence on itaconic acid production. Effects observed in the micro-titer plate screening were confirmed in controlled batch fermentation. Conclusions The performance of gpdA and hbd1 transformants was found not to be beneficial for itaconic acid production using the tested cultivation conditions. Medium optimization showed that, copper was positively correlated with improved itaconic acid production. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for itaconic acid clearly differ from conditions optimal for citric- and oxalic acid production. PMID:22925689

  2. Nematicidal Activity of Kojic Acid Produced by Aspergillus oryzae against Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Yoon; Jang, Ja Yeong; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Lee, Hye Won; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Yeo, Joo Hong; Lee, Hyang Burm; Kim, In Seon; Park, Hae Woong; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2016-08-28

    The fungal strain EML-DML3PNa1 isolated from leaf of white dogwood (Cornus alba L.) showed strong nematicidal activity with juvenile mortality of 87.6% at a concentration of 20% fermentation broth filtrate at 3 days after treatment. The active fungal strain was identified as Aspergillus oryzae, which belongs to section Flavi, based on the morphological characteristics and sequence analysis of the ITS rDNA, calmodulin (CaM), and β-tubulin (BenA) genes. The strain reduced the pH value to 5.62 after 7 days of incubation. Organic acid analysis revealed the presence of citric acid (515.0 mg/kg), malic acid (506.6 mg/kg), and fumaric acid (21.7 mg/kg). The three organic acids showed moderate nematicidal activities, but the mixture of citric acid, malic acid, and fumaric acid did not exhibit the full nematicidal activity of the culture filtrate of EML- DML3PNa1. Bioassay-guided fractionation coupled with (1)H- and (13)C-NMR and EI-MS analyses led to identification of kojic acid as the major nematicidal metabolite. Kojic acid exhibited dose-dependent mortality and inhibited the hatchability of M. incognita, showing EC50 values of 195.2 µg/ml and 238.3 µg/ml, respectively, at 72 h postexposure. These results suggest that A. oryzae EML-DML3PNa1 and kojic acid have potential as a biological control agent against M. incognita. PMID:27197670

  3. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil as affected by low molecular weight organic acids and root exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Tesch, Silke; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    Availability of elements in soil to plant is generally dependent on the solubility and mobility of elements in soil solution which is controlled by soil, elemental properties and plant-soil interactions. Low molecular organic acids or other root exudates may increase mobility and availability of certain elements for plants as an effect of lowering pH in the rhizosphere and complexation. However, these processes take place in a larger volume in soil, therefore to understand their nature, it is also important to know in which layers of the soil what factors modify these processes. In this work the influence of citric acid and root exudates of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) on bioavailable concentrations of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and uptake in root and shoot of rape (Brassica napus L.), comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.), common millet (Panicum milliaceum L.) and oat (Avena sativa L.) was investigated. Two different pot experiments were conducted: (1) the mentioned plant species were treated with nutrient solutions containing various amount of citric acid; (2) white lupin was cultivated in mixed culture (0 % lupin, 33 % lupin) with oat (Avena sativa L.) and soil solution was obtained by plastic suction cups placed at various depths. As a result, addition of citric acid significantly increased germanium concentrations in plant tissue of comfrey and rape and increased translocation of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium from root to shoot. The cultivation of white lupin in mixed culture with oat led to significantly higher concentrations of germanium and increasing concentrations of lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and aboveground plant tissue. In these pots concentrations of citric acid in soil solution were significantly higher than in the control. The results show, that low molecular organic acids exuded by plant roots are of great importance for the mobilization of germanium

  4. Acidity-Facilitated Mobilization of Surface Clay Colloid from Natural Sand Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid mobilization and migration in a soil system has attracted increasing scrutiny for its role in facilitating colloid-borne transport of contaminants in the environments. In many previous studies, pH was evoked as a major factor in mobilizing surface colloids through inducing favorable surface charge and electrostatic conditions. The possible direct role of acidity with H+ as a chemical agent has remained largely obscured behind the indirect role of pH. In this study, we demonstrated through column flow-through tests that cyclical elution of natural sand media with weak acid and base solutions can greatly facilitate detachment and transport of surface clay colloids. We found that while elevating pH to an alkaline condition helped release the loosely-attached surface clays, a pretreatment with H+ could facilitate the mobilization of chemically-bonded clay colloids through lysing of labile Ca and Mg ions. A quantitative relation was observed that 1 mmol H+ could lyse about 0.5 mmol Ca2+ and Mg2+ and subsequently resulted in a release of about 1,200 mg clay during base elution when repulsive force between particles dominated. Natural organic acids such as citric acid and acetic acid in environment-relevant low concentrations (<1mM and pH>5.0) were as effective as HCl with a stronger acidic condition. The small mass ratio of Ca and Mg over colloid released and the nature of weak acid used suggest that the mobilization was less likely due to dissolution of cement casing than lysing of labile interstitial Ca and Mg by H+, which severed Ca and Mg bridging bonds between particles. Natural acidity is generated in abundance from various bio- and geochemical processes; e.g., many plants produce citric acid through citric acid cycle metabolism; biodegradation of dead organic matter forms humic acids. We postulate that natural proton dynamics in tendon with pH oscillation accompanied with various soil biogeochemical processes could play a major role in subsurface clay

  5. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  6. A novel sono-assisted acid pretreatment of chili post harvest residue for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Raveendran; Binod, Parameswaran; Pandey, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a sono-assisted acid pretreatment strategy for the effective removal of lignin and hemicelluloses and to improve the sugar yield from chili post harvest residue. Operational parameters that affect the pretreatment efficiency were studied and optimized. Inhibitor analysis of the hydrolyzate revealed that major fermentation inhibitors like furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural and organic acids like citric acid, succinic acid and propionic acid were absent. Changes in structural properties of the biomass were studied in relation to the pretreatment process using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the changes in chemical composition was also monitored. The biomass pretreated with the optimized novel method yielded 0.465g/g of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Fermentation of the non-detoxified hydrolysate yielded 2.14% of bioethanol with a fermentation efficiency of 71.03%. PMID:26949055

  7. Nickel deficiency disrupts metabolism of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids of young pecan foliage.

    PubMed

    Bai, Cheng; Reilly, Charles C; Wood, Bruce W

    2006-02-01

    The existence of nickel (Ni) deficiency is becoming increasingly apparent in crops, especially for ureide-transporting woody perennials, but its physiological role is poorly understood. We evaluated the concentrations of ureides, amino acids, and organic acids in photosynthetic foliar tissue from Ni-sufficient (Ni-S) versus Ni-deficient (Ni-D) pecan (Carya illinoinensis [Wangenh.] K. Koch). Foliage of Ni-D pecan seedlings exhibited metabolic disruption of nitrogen metabolism via ureide catabolism, amino acid metabolism, and ornithine cycle intermediates. Disruption of ureide catabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of xanthine, allantoic acid, ureidoglycolate, and citrulline, but total ureides, urea concentration, and urease activity were reduced. Disruption of amino acid metabolism in Ni-D foliage resulted in accumulation of glycine, valine, isoleucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, arginine, and total free amino acids, and lower concentrations of histidine and glutamic acid. Ni deficiency also disrupted the citric acid cycle, the second stage of respiration, where Ni-D foliage contained very low levels of citrate compared to Ni-S foliage. Disruption of carbon metabolism was also via accumulation of lactic and oxalic acids. The results indicate that mouse-ear, a key morphological symptom, is likely linked to the toxic accumulation of oxalic and lactic acids in the rapidly growing tips and margins of leaflets. Our results support the role of Ni as an essential plant nutrient element. The magnitude of metabolic disruption exhibited in Ni-D pecan is evidence of the existence of unidentified physiological roles for Ni in pecan. PMID:16415214

  8. Amino acid metabolism in patients with propionic acidaemia.

    PubMed

    Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Zschocke, Johannes; Karall, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Propionic acidaemia (PA) is an inborn error of intermediary metabolism caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The metabolic block leads to a profound failure of central metabolic pathways, including the urea and the citric acid cycles. This review will focus on changes in amino acid metabolism in this inborn disorder of metabolism. The first noted disturbance of amino acid metabolism was hyperglycinaemia, which is detectable in nearly all PA patients. Additionally, hyperlysinaemia is a common observation. In contrast, concentrations of branched chain amino acids, especially of isoleucine, are frequently reported as decreased. These non-proportional changes of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) compared with aromatic amino acids are also reflected by the Fischer's ratio (concentration ratio of BCAAs to aromatic amino acids), which is decreased in PA patients. As restricted dietary intake of valine and isoleucine as precursors of propionyl-CoA is part of the standard treatment in PA, decreased plasma concentrations of BCAAs may be a side effect of treatment. The concentration changes of the nitrogen scavenger glutamine have to be interpreted in the light of ammonia levels. In contrast to other hyperammonaemic syndromes, in PA plasma glutamine concentrations do not increase in hyperammonaemia, whereas CSF glutamine concentrations are elevated. Despite lactic acidaemia in PA patients, hyperalaninaemia is only rarely reported. The mechanisms underlying the observed changes in amino acid metabolism have not yet been elucidated, but most of the changes can be at least partly interpreted as consequence of disturbance of anaplerosis. PMID:21113738

  9. Gastric emptying of organic acids in the dog.

    PubMed

    Blum, A L; Hegglin, J; Krejs, G J; Largiadèr, F; Säuberli, H; Schmid, P

    1976-10-01

    Test meals of 300 ml. of six different organic acids were instilled into the stomach of six healthy mongrel dogs. Citric, acetic, propionic, lactic, tartaric and succinic acid were given in 50, 100, 150, and 200 mN concentrations. 2. During the emptying process, the gastric contents were aspirated and immediately re-instilled at 10 min intervals, and the following parameters were recorded: volume, concentration of the organic anion, pH, hydrogen ion concentration and osmolarity. 3. By multiple stepwise regression analysis, the combination of parameters which most effectively determines gastric emptying rate was found to be: concentration of the organic anion, followed by intragastric volume and number of previous test meals given on the same day. These three parameters appear in the equation for gastric emptying rate in which the individual characteristic of each acid is expressed by a constant. 4. Among the various acids, inhibition of emptying rate increases with rising number of carboxylic groups of the acid and its molecular weight. 5. After proximal gastric vagotomy, emptying rate of organic acids is independent of volume, and emptying approaches an exponential pattern. 6. A model for gastric emptying of organic acids with at least three different receptors is proposed: one for the structure of the organic acid, one for concentration and one for intragastric volume. PMID:10436

  10. Gastric emptying of organic acids in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, A L; Hegglin, J; Krejs, G J; Largiadèr, F; Säuberli, H; Schmid, P

    1976-01-01

    Test meals of 300 ml. of six different organic acids were instilled into the stomach of six healthy mongrel dogs. Citric, acetic, propionic, lactic, tartaric and succinic acid were given in 50, 100, 150, and 200 mN concentrations. 2. During the emptying process, the gastric contents were aspirated and immediately re-instilled at 10 min intervals, and the following parameters were recorded: volume, concentration of the organic anion, pH, hydrogen ion concentration and osmolarity. 3. By multiple stepwise regression analysis, the combination of parameters which most effectively determines gastric emptying rate was found to be: concentration of the organic anion, followed by intragastric volume and number of previous test meals given on the same day. These three parameters appear in the equation for gastric emptying rate in which the individual characteristic of each acid is expressed by a constant. 4. Among the various acids, inhibition of emptying rate increases with rising number of carboxylic groups of the acid and its molecular weight. 5. After proximal gastric vagotomy, emptying rate of organic acids is independent of volume, and emptying approaches an exponential pattern. 6. A model for gastric emptying of organic acids with at least three different receptors is proposed: one for the structure of the organic acid, one for concentration and one for intragastric volume. PMID:10436

  11. Purification of organic acids by chromatography with strong anionic resins: Investigation of uptake mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Julien; Blanc, Claire-Line; Lutin, Florence; Théoleyre, Marc-André; Stambouli, Moncef; Pareau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    Bio-based organic acids are promising renewable carbon sources for the chemical industry. However energy-consuming purification processes are used, like distillation or crystallization, to reach high purities required in some applications. That is why preparative chromatography was studied as an alternative separation technique. In a previous work dealing with the purification of lactic, succinic and citric acids, the Langmuir model was insufficient to explain the elution profiles obtained with a strong anionic resin. Consequently the Langmuir model was coupled with a usual ion-exchange model to take into account the retention of their conjugate bases (<2%), which are commonly neglected at low pH (<1.5). Elution simulations with both uptake mechanisms fitted very well with experimental pulse tests. Only two parameters were optimized (equilibrium constant of acid uptake and ion-exchange selectivity coefficient of conjugate base) and their value were coherent with experimental and resin suppliers' data. These results confirmed that the singular tailing and apparent delay observed with succinic and citric acids can be explained by the high affinity of succinate and citrate for resin cationic sites. The model was implemented in a preparative chromatography simulation program in order to optimize operating parameters of our pilot-scale ISMB unit (Improved Simulated Moving Bed). The comparison with experimental ISMB profiles was conclusive. PMID:27373374

  12. Compositional Variation in Sugars and Organic Acids at Different Maturity Stages in Selected Small Fruits from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Tahir; Anwar, Farooq; Abbas, Mateen; Boyce, Mary C.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    Selected soluble sugars and organic acids were analyzed in strawberry, sweet cherry, and mulberry fruits at different ripening stages by HPLC. The amounts of fructose, glucose and sucrose were found to be: strawberry (1.79–2.86, 1.79–2.25 and 0.01–0.25 g/100 g FW), sweet cherry (0.76–2.35, 0.22–3.39 and 0.03–0.13 g/100 g) and mulberry (3.07–9.41, 1.53–4.95 and 0.01–0.25 g/100 g) at un-ripened to fully-ripened stages, respectively. The strawberry, sweet cherry and mulberry mainly contained tartaric, citric and ascorbic acids in the range of 16–55, 70–1934 and 11–132 mg/100 g; 2–8, 2–10 and 10–17 mg/100 g; 2–118, 139–987 and 2–305 mg/100 g at un-ripened to fully-ripened stages, respectively. Fructose and glucose were established to be the major sugars in all the tested fruit while citric and ascorbic acid were the predominant organic acids in strawberry and mulberry while tartaric acid was mainly present in sweet cherry. The tested fruits mostly showed an increase in the concentration of sugars and organic acids with ripening. PMID:22408396

  13. Effect of mitochondrial ascorbic acid synthesis on photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Senn, M E; Gergoff Grozeff, G E; Alegre, M L; Barrile, F; De Tullio, M C; Bartoli, C G

    2016-07-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is synthesized in plant mitochondria through the oxidation of l-galactono-1,4-lactone (l-GalL) and then distributed to different cell compartments. AA-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana mutants (vtc2) and exogenous applications of l-GalL were used to generate plants with different AA content in their leaves. This experimental approach allows determining specific AA-dependent effects on carbon metabolism. No differences in O2 uptake, malic and citric acid and NADH content suggest that AA synthesis or accumulation did not affect mitochondrial activity; however, l-GalL treatment increased CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport rate in vtc2 (but not wt) leaves demonstrating a stimulation of photosynthesis after l-GalL treatment. Increased CO2 assimilation correlated with increased leaf stomatal conductance observed in l-GalL-treated vtc2 plants. PMID:27010742

  14. Spectrophotometric method for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples with iron(III) and 2-thiobarbituric acid as reagents.

    PubMed

    Lau, O W; Luk, S F; Lam, R K

    1989-02-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of sorbic acid in various food samples based on the oxidation of sorbic acid by iron(III) at 100 degrees C to malonaldehyde, which then reacts with 2-thiobarbituric acid to form a reddish brown product. The optimum experimental conditions for colour development have been assessed. Absorbance measurements were made at 529 nm in the presence of 0.4% m/V citric acid. The calibration graph was linear for 0-6 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid with a slope of 0.131 A micrograms-1 ml. The recoveries of sorbic acid at concentrations of 164-557 micrograms ml-1 ranged from 96 to 103%. The relative standard deviations of ten replicate determinations of sorbic acid in a synthetic cream soda sample spiked with 573 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid and in an onion juice sample containing 82 micrograms ml-1 of sorbic acid were 1.6 and 1.9%, respectively. Interferences from several common food additives can be minimised by extracting sorbic acid with diethyl ether and then back-extracting the acid with sodium hydrogen carbonate. The method has been applied successfully to the determination of sorbic acid in a wide range of food samples including beverages, cake, cake mate, garlic bread sprinkle, onion juice, oyster flavoured sauce and grenadine syrup. PMID:2712320

  15. Determination of the strong acidity of atmospheric fine-particles (<2. 5 mum) using annular denuder technology. Standard method, enhanced method

    SciTech Connect

    Purdue, L.J.

    1992-11-01

    The report is a standardized methodology description for the determination of strong acidity of fine particles (less than 2.5 micrometers) in ambient air using annular denuder technology. The methodology description includes two parts: Part A - Standard Method and Part B - Enhanced Method. The Standard Method utilizes a denuder for removing ammonia and a filter assembly for determination of atmospheric strong acidity fine particle aerosols in ambient air, but does not account for potential interferences from nitric acid, ammonium nitrate aerosol or other ammonium salts which might bias the acidity measurement. The Enhanced Method adds an additional denuder upstream of the filter assembly to selectively remove acid gases (nitric acid vapors, nitrous acid and sulfur dioxide) from the gas stream prior to filtration. In addition, backup nylon and citric acid impregnated filters are used to correct for biases due to the dissociation of ammonium nitrate aerosol.

  16. Association Mapping of Main Tomato Fruit Sugars and Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Ding, Qin; Huang, Xinli; Zhang, Yating; Zou, Zhirong; Li, Mingjun; Cui, Lu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping has been widely used to map the significant associated loci responsible for natural variation in complex traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Sugars and organic acids are the most important metabolites in tomato fruits. We used a collection of 174 tomato accessions composed of Solanum lycopersicum (123 accessions) and S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme (51 accessions) to detect significantly associated loci controlling the variation of main sugars and organic acids. The accessions were genotyped with 182 SSRs spreading over the tomato genome. Association mapping was conducted on the main sugars and organic acids detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) over 2 years using the mixed linear model (MLM). We detected a total of 58 significantly associated loci (P < 0.001) for the 17 sugars and organic acids, including fructose, glucose, sucrose, citric acid, malic acid. These results not only co-localized with several reported QTLs, including fru9.1/PV, suc9.1/PV, ca2.1/HS, ca3.1/PV, ca4.1/PV, and ca8.1/PV, but also provided a list of candidate significantly associated loci to be functionally validated. These significantly associated loci could be used for deciphering the genetic architecture of tomato fruit sugars and organic acids and for tomato quality breeding. PMID:27617019

  17. Association Mapping of Main Tomato Fruit Sugars and Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Ding, Qin; Huang, Xinli; Zhang, Yating; Zou, Zhirong; Li, Mingjun; Cui, Lu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping has been widely used to map the significant associated loci responsible for natural variation in complex traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Sugars and organic acids are the most important metabolites in tomato fruits. We used a collection of 174 tomato accessions composed of Solanum lycopersicum (123 accessions) and S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme (51 accessions) to detect significantly associated loci controlling the variation of main sugars and organic acids. The accessions were genotyped with 182 SSRs spreading over the tomato genome. Association mapping was conducted on the main sugars and organic acids detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) over 2 years using the mixed linear model (MLM). We detected a total of 58 significantly associated loci (P < 0.001) for the 17 sugars and organic acids, including fructose, glucose, sucrose, citric acid, malic acid. These results not only co-localized with several reported QTLs, including fru9.1/PV, suc9.1/PV, ca2.1/HS, ca3.1/PV, ca4.1/PV, and ca8.1/PV, but also provided a list of candidate significantly associated loci to be functionally validated. These significantly associated loci could be used for deciphering the genetic architecture of tomato fruit sugars and organic acids and for tomato quality breeding. PMID:27617019

  18. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes. PMID:21641455

  19. Determination of aliphatic organic acids by high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Casella, Innocenzo G; Gatta, Maria

    2002-01-01

    A new ion exclusion HPLC procedure accomplished with a pulsed electrochemical detection for the determination of several common aliphatic acids is described. A triple-step waveform of the applied potentials, based on the formation/inhibition of PtOH species on the electrode surface, is successfully used for sensitive detection of several aliphatic acids in flowing systems avoiding pre- or postcolumn derivatization and/or cleanup procedures. Under optimal chromatographic conditions (i.e., 50 mM HClO(4)) the proposed method allowed detection limits between 0.5 and 7 microM for all investigated acids, and the dynamic linear range spanned generally over 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. Determination of citric, malic, tartaric, lactic, formic, and acetic acids in several foods and beverages was performed, in approximately 15 min, without the necessity of any sample pretreatment. PMID:11754537

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...