Science.gov

Sample records for a-center defect complex

  1. Investigation of the oxygen-vacancy (A-center) defect complex profile in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon junction particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W. ); Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Ivanov, A. . Physico-Technical Inst.); Rattaggi, M.; Rancoita, P.G. ); Rubinelli, F.A.; Fonash, S.J. . Center for Electronic Materials a

    1992-02-01

    Distributions of the A-center (oxygen-vacancy) in neutron silicon detectors have been studied using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. A-centers have been found to be nearly uniformly distributed in the silicon water depth for medium resistivity (0.1 {minus} 0.2 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors. A positive filling pulse was needed to detect the A-centers in high resistivity (>4 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, and this effect was found to be dependent on the oxidation temperature. A discussion of this effect is presented. 16 refs.

  2. Investigation of the oxygen-vacancy (A-center) defect complex profile in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon junction particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.; Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Ivanov, A.; Rattaggi, M.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rubinelli, F.A.; Fonash, S.J.; Dale, C.; Marshall, P.

    1992-02-01

    Distributions of the A-center (oxygen-vacancy) in neutron silicon detectors have been studied using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. A-centers have been found to be nearly uniformly distributed in the silicon water depth for medium resistivity (0.1 {minus} 0.2 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors. A positive filling pulse was needed to detect the A-centers in high resistivity (>4 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, and this effect was found to be dependent on the oxidation temperature. A discussion of this effect is presented. 16 refs.

  3. Point defect engineering strategies to suppress A-center formation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chroneos, A.; Londos, C. A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Pochet, P.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the impact of tin doping on the formation of vacancy-oxygen pairs (VO or A-centers) and their conversion to VO2 clusters in electron-irradiated silicon. The experimental results are consistent with previous reports that Sn doping suppresses the formation of the A-center. We introduce a model to account for the observed differences under both Sn-poor and Sn-rich doping conditions. Using density functional theory calculations, we propose point defect engineering strategies to reduce the concentration of the deleterious A-centers in silicon. We predict that doping with lead, zirconium, or hafnium will lead to the suppression of the A-centers.

  4. Defect complexes in semiconductors and insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raebiger, Hannes

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of isolated defects and impurities (concentration upto ˜10^18 cm-3) is usually rationalized as that of point charges in a dielectric medium, but as defect concentrations are in the order of atomic percent (˜10^21 cm-3), the statistical probability for two or more defects to sit on neighboring sites, forming a cluster or complex, becomes significant [1]. The formation of such clusters changes the local chemical environment, which in turn affects the electronic (and optical and magnetic) properties of the constituent defects non-trivially. To understand these changes, I study a variety of bound defect complexes in wide-gap semiconductors, composed of both deep and shallow defects, focusing on the shifting of the gap levels caused by defect--defect chemical interactions. First the electronic structure is calculated from first principles calculations, and then I will outline a simple theory that describes the level shifts due to cluster formation qualitatively and semi-quantitatively in terms local atomic shielding constants derived from local charge self-regulation [2].[4pt] [1] R. Behringer, J. Chem. Phys. 29, 537 (1958).[0pt] [2] H. Raebiger, S. Lany, and A. Zunger, Nature 453, 763 (2008).

  5. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  6. The role of variation, error, and complexity in manufacturing defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C.M.; Barkan, P.

    1994-03-01

    Variation in component properties and dimensions is a widely recognized factor in product defects which can be quantified and controlled by Statistical Process Control methodologies. Our studies have shown, however, that traditional statistical methods are ineffective in characterizing and controlling defects caused by error. The distinction between error and variation becomes increasingly important as the target defect rates approach extremely low values. Motorola data substantiates our thesis that defect rates in the range of several parts per million can only be achieved when traditional methods for controlling variation are combined with methods that specifically focus on eliminating defects due to error. Complexity in the product design, manufacturing processes, or assembly increases the likelihood of defects due to both variation and error. Thus complexity is also a root cause of defects. Until now, the absence of a sound correlation between defects and complexity has obscured the importance of this relationship. We have shown that assembly complexity can be quantified using Design for Assembly (DFA) analysis. High levels of correlation have been found between our complexity measures and defect data covering tens of millions of assembly operations in two widely different industries. The availability of an easily determined measure of complexity, combined with these correlations, permits rapid estimation of the relative defect rates for alternate design concepts. This should prove to be a powerful tool since it can guide design improvement at an early stage when concepts are most readily modified.

  7. Complex defects in crystal scintillation materials and phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyn, V.; Lisitsyna, L.; Polisadova, E.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of the existence of complex defects in pure and doped crystal phosphor discussed in work. The luminescent properties of mono- and nanocrystals of zinc tungstate, the powders of YAG with various compositions are studied. It is shown that the intrinsic defects, impurities, oxygen vacancies, the hydroxyl groups may be present in the structure of the complex defects (nanodefects). Nanodefects form during synthesis and have high efficiency of the transfer of excitation energy to the emission centres.

  8. Nanoparticle Controlled Soft Complex Structures with Topological Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    topological defects stabilized by adaptive targeting nanoparticles. In our experiments we used as NPs magic quantum dots CdSe [19] exhibiting size...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0002 Nanoparticle controlled soft complex structures with topological defects Samo Kralj...From – To) 15 July 2012 – 14 October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nanoparticle controlled soft complex structures with topological defects 5a

  9. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the summary of the third workshop on the role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. The workshop was organized: (1) to discuss recent progress in the material quality produced by photovoltaic Si manufacturers, (2) to foster the understanding of point defect issues in Si device processing, (3) to review the effects of inhomogeneities on large- area solar cell performance, (4) to discuss how to improve Si solar cell processing, and (5) to develop a new understanding of gettering, defect passivation, and defect annihilation. Separate abstract were prepared for the individual papers, for the database.

  10. Influence of oxygen-vacancy complex /A center/ on piezoresistance of n-type silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Loggins, C. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in both magnitude and temperature dependence of the piezoresistance of electron-irradiated n-type silicon, induced by the latter's oxygen-vacancy complex (A center), are shown to be due to the fact that the presence of the A center causes the total conduction-band electron concentration to change with an applied stress. This change in electron concentration leads to an additional piezoresistance contribution that is expected to be important in certain many-valley semiconductors. This offers the possibility of tailoring the thermal variations of semiconductor mechanical sensors to more desirable values over limited temperature ranges.

  11. Influence of oxygen-vacancy complex /A center/ on piezoresistance of n-type silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littlejohn, M. A.; Loggins, C. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in both magnitude and temperature dependence of the piezoresistance of electron-irradiated n-type silicon, induced by the latter's oxygen-vacancy complex (A center), are shown to be due to the fact that the presence of the A center causes the total conduction-band electron concentration to change with an applied stress. This change in electron concentration leads to an additional piezoresistance contribution that is expected to be important in certain many-valley semiconductors. This offers the possibility of tailoring the thermal variations of semiconductor mechanical sensors to more desirable values over limited temperature ranges.

  12. Scalp Rotation Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Soft Tissue Defects.

    PubMed

    Costa, Dary J; Walen, Scott; Varvares, Mark; Walker, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Importance Scalp reconstructions may be required after tumor resection or trauma. The inherent anatomy of the scalp presents challenges and may limit reconstructive options. Objective To describe and investigate the scalp rotation flap as a reconstructive technique for complex soft tissue defects. Design Retrospective case series with a mean follow-up of 13 months. Setting Tertiary academic center. Participants A total of 22 patients with large scalp soft tissue defects undergoing scalp rotation flap reconstruction. Interventions The flap is designed adjacent to the defect and elevated in the subgaleal plane. The flap is rotated into the defect, and a split-thickness skin graft is placed over the donor site periosteum. Main Outcomes and Measure Data points collected included defect size, operative time, hospital stay, and patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcome. Results Mean patient age was 71 years. Mean American Society of Anesthesiologist classification was 2.8. Mean defect size was 41 cm(2) (range: 7.8-120 cm(2)), and 19 of 22 defects resulted from a neoplasm resection. Mean operative time was 181 minutes, and mean hospital stay was 2.4 days. There were no intraoperative complications. Three patients with previous radiation therapy had distal flap necrosis. Twenty-one patients (95%) reported an acceptable cosmetic result. Conclusions and Relevance The scalp rotation flap is an efficient and reliable option for reconstructing complex soft tissue defects. This can be particularly important in patients with significant medical comorbidities who cannot tolerate a lengthy operative procedure.

  13. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H. ); Fong, C.Y. . Dept. of Physics); Nichols, C.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-11-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) -- a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping -- have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculation in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results, we have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. We demonstrate that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Reconstruction of segmental defects of Achilles tendon: Is it a must in infected complex defects?

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, S Raja; Venkataramani, Hari; Latheef, Latheesh; Bhardwaj, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Loss of Achilles tendon combined with overlying soft tissue loss is a challenging problem. Multiple techniques like tendon graft with coverage by soft tissue flap or composite flaps have been used. All these options are technically demanding. Reports do exist whereby muscle flaps bridging the defect used as cover in course of time could transmit the tendon force across the defect. We are presenting a case where a free gracilis muscle flap used to cover the soft tissue defect at the Achilles tendon at 2 years follow up provided stable cover and produced active function of the Achilles tendon allowing the patient to stand tip toe. Mechanism of its action has been analysed by MRI and M-mode ultrasound. While in primary Achilles tendon injury reconstruction is still the recommended option, in complex situations mere filling of the gap with the flap without formal reconstruction of the tendon could give good functional outcome. This technique can be used in demanding situations.

  15. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain.

  16. Defect Chemistry and Microstructure of Complex Perovskite Barium Zinc Niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping

    1991-02-01

    This dissertation presents a systematic study of the characterization of the phase transitions, microstructures, defects and transport properties of undoped and doped complex perovskite barium zinc niobate (BZN). Complex perovskite BZN is a paraelectric material while its parent material barium titanate is ferroelectric. With codoping of (Zn + 2Nb) into Ti site, BaTiO_3 shows three distinguished features. First, the Curie temperature is lowered; second, the three phase transitions (cubic-tetragonal-orthorhombic-rhombohedral) coalesce; and lastly, the transition becomes diffuse showing a typical 2nd order phase transition compared with 1st order in undoped BaTiO_3. Complex microchemical ordering is another characteristic of BZN. Stoichiometric BZN shows a mixture of two types of ordering schemes. 1:1, 1:2 ordered microdomains and the disordered matrix co-exist. The 1:1 type ordering involves an internal charge imbalance which inhibits the growth of 1:1 type of ordered microdomains. The 1:2 type ordering is consistent with the chemical composition of BZN. These ordering patterns can be modified by either adjustment of the Zn/Nb ratio or by doping. The defect structure of the stoichiometric BZN is closely related to that of BaTiO_3. Stoichiometric BZN is an insulator with wide band gap (~ 3.70 eV). Undoped BZN has a high oxygen vacancy concentration which comes from three possible sources, such as unavoidable acceptor impurities, due to their natural abundance, Zn/Nb ratio uncertainty due to processing limitations, and high temperature ZnO loss due to sintering process. The oxygen vacancy concentration for undoped BZN lays in the neighborhood of 1500 ppm (atm.). The compensation defects for various dopants have also been identified. Both electrons and holes conduct by a small polaron mechanism. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpies of oxidation and reduction, mass action constants for intrinsic electronic disorder, oxidation and reduction have been

  17. Influence of Neutrophil Defects on Burkholderia cepacia Complex Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Laura A.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2011-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of Gram-negative bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and have emerged as opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The primary patient populations infected with Bcc include individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as those with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). While Bcc infection in CF is better characterized than in CGD, these two genetic diseases are not obviously similar and it is currently unknown if there is any commonality in host immune defects that is responsible for the susceptibility to Bcc. CF is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, resulting in manifestations in various organ systems, however the major cause of morbidity and mortality is currently due to bacterial respiratory infections. CGD, on the other hand, is a genetic disorder that is caused by defects in phagocyte NADPH oxidase. Because of the defect in CGD, phagocytes in these patients are unable to produce reactive oxygen species, which results in increased susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections. Despite this significant defect in microbial clearance, the spectrum of pathogens frequently implicated in infections in CGD is relatively narrow and includes some bacterial species that are considered almost pathognomonic for this disorder. Very little is known about the cause of the specific susceptibility to Bcc over other potential pathogens more prevalent in the environment, and a better understanding of specific mechanisms required for bacterial virulence has become a high priority. This review will summarize both the current knowledge and future directions related to Bcc virulence in immunocompromised individuals with a focus on the roles of bacterial factors and neutrophil defects in pathogenesis. PMID:22919575

  18. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects.

    PubMed

    Reinard, Kevin; Basheer, Azam; Jones, Lamont; Standring, Robert; Lee, Ian; Rock, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Modern microsurgical techniques enable en bloc resection of complex skull base tumors. Anterior cranial base surgery, particularly, has been associated with a high rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. We introduce simple modifications to already existing surgical strategies designed to minimize the incidence of postoperative CSF leak and associated morbidity and mortality. Medical records from 1995 to 2013 were reviewed in accordance with the Institutional Review Board. We identified 21 patients who underwent operations for repair of large anterior skull base defects following removal of sinonasal or intracranial pathology using standard craniofacial procedures. Patient charts were screened for CSF leak, meningitis, or intracranial abscess formation. A total of 15 male and 6 female patients with an age range of 26-89 years were included. All patients were managed with the same operative technique for reconstruction of the frontal dura and skull base defect. Spinal drainage was used intraoperatively in all cases but the lumbar drain was removed at the end of each case in all patients. Only one patient required re-operation for repair of persistent CSF leak. None of the patients developed meningitis or intracranial abscess. There were no perioperative mortalities. Median follow-up was 10 months. The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons.

  19. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects

    PubMed Central

    Reinard, Kevin; Basheer, Azam; Jones, Lamont; Standring, Robert; Lee, Ian; Rock, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modern microsurgical techniques enable en bloc resection of complex skull base tumors. Anterior cranial base surgery, particularly, has been associated with a high rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and pneumocephalus. We introduce simple modifications to already existing surgical strategies designed to minimize the incidence of postoperative CSF leak and associated morbidity and mortality. Methods: Medical records from 1995 to 2013 were reviewed in accordance with the Institutional Review Board. We identified 21 patients who underwent operations for repair of large anterior skull base defects following removal of sinonasal or intracranial pathology using standard craniofacial procedures. Patient charts were screened for CSF leak, meningitis, or intracranial abscess formation. Results: A total of 15 male and 6 female patients with an age range of 26–89 years were included. All patients were managed with the same operative technique for reconstruction of the frontal dura and skull base defect. Spinal drainage was used intraoperatively in all cases but the lumbar drain was removed at the end of each case in all patients. Only one patient required re-operation for repair of persistent CSF leak. None of the patients developed meningitis or intracranial abscess. There were no perioperative mortalities. Median follow-up was 10 months. Conclusion: The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons. PMID:25722926

  20. Second workshop role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of 24 papers, arranged under the following session/panel headings: defects and impurities in commercial photovoltaic Si substrates, point defects and point defect processes, impurity gettering for Si solar cells, gettering in Si solar cells, and passivation of impurities and defects.

  1. Energetics and Defect Interactions of Complex Oxides for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Jonathan Michael

    The goal of this dissertation is to employ computational methods to gain greater insights into the energetics and defect interactions of complex oxides that are relevant for today's energy challenges. To achieve this goal, the development of novel computational methodologies are required to handle complex systems, including systems containing nearly 650 ions and systems with tens of thousands of possible atomic configurations. The systems that are investigated in this dissertation are aliovalently doped lanthanum orthophosphate (LaPO4) due to its potential application as a proton conducting electrolyte for intermediate temperature fuel cells, and aliovalently doped uranium dioxide (UO2) due to its importance in nuclear fuel performance and disposal. First we undertake density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations on the relative energetics of pyrophosphate defects and protons in LaPO4, including their binding with divalent dopant cations. In particular, for supercell calculations with 1.85 mol% Sr doping, we investigate the dopant-binding energies for pyrophosphate defects to be 0.37 eV, which is comparable to the value of 0.34 eV calculated for proton-dopant binding energies in the same system. These results establish that dopant-defect interactions further stabilize proton incorporation, with the hydration enthalpies when the dopants are nearest and furthest from the protons and pyrophosphate defects being -1.66 eV and -1.37 eV, respectively. Even though our calculations show that dopant binding enhances the enthalpic favorability of proton incorporation, they also suggest that such binding is likely to substantially lower the kinetic rate of hydrolysis of pyrophosphate defects. We then shift our focus to solid solutions of fluorite-structured UO 2 with trivalent rare earth fission product cations (M3+=Y, La) using a combination of ionic pair potential and DFT based methods. Calculated enthalpies of formation with respect to constituent oxides show higher

  2. Transcatheter Closure of Atrial Septal Defects in a Center With Limited Resources: Outcomes and Short Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Putra, Sukman T.; Djer, Mulyadi M.; Idris, Nikmah S.; Samion, Hasri; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects (ASD) has been accepted world-wide as an alternative to surgical closure with excellent results. This interventional, non-surgical technique plays an important role in the treatment of ASD mostly in the developing world where resources are limited. Objectives: To report the outcomes and short term follow-up of transcatheter closure of ASD over a 12-year period at our institution with limited resources. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included all patients with the diagnosis of secundum ASD and significant shunting (Qp/Qs > 1.5:1) as well as dilated right atrium and right ventricle who had transcatheter closure at Integrated Cardiovascular Center (PJT), Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital between October 2002 and October 2014. One hundred fifty-two patients enrolled in this study were candidates for device closure. Right and left heart cardiac catheterization was performed before the procedure. All patients underwent physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray and transthoracal echocardiography (TTE) prior to device implantation. Results: A total of 152 patients with significant ASD underwent device implantation. Subjects’ age ranged from 0.63 to 69.6 years, with median 9.36 years and mean 16.30 years. They consisted of 33 (21.7%) males and 119 (78.3%) females, with mean body weight of 29.9 kg (range 8 to 75; SD 18.2). The device was successfully implanted in 150 patients where the majority of cases received the Amplatzer septal occluder (147/150; 98%) and the others received the Heart Lifetech ASD occluder (3/150, 2%), whereas two other cases were not suitable for device closure and we decided for surgical closure. The mean ASD size was 19.75 (range 14 - 25) mm. During the procedure, 5 (4.9%) patients had bradycardia and 3 (2.9%) patients had supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), all of which resolved. Conclusions: In our center with limited facilities and manpower, transcatheter closure of atrial

  3. Transcatheter Closure of Atrial Septal Defects in a Center With Limited Resources: Outcomes and Short Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Putra, Sukman T; Djer, Mulyadi M; Idris, Nikmah S; Samion, Hasri; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo

    2015-12-01

    Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects (ASD) has been accepted world-wide as an alternative to surgical closure with excellent results. This interventional, non-surgical technique plays an important role in the treatment of ASD mostly in the developing world where resources are limited. To report the outcomes and short term follow-up of transcatheter closure of ASD over a 12-year period at our institution with limited resources. This retrospective study included all patients with the diagnosis of secundum ASD and significant shunting (Qp/Qs > 1.5:1) as well as dilated right atrium and right ventricle who had transcatheter closure at Integrated Cardiovascular Center (PJT), Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital between October 2002 and October 2014. One hundred fifty-two patients enrolled in this study were candidates for device closure. Right and left heart cardiac catheterization was performed before the procedure. All patients underwent physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray and transthoracal echocardiography (TTE) prior to device implantation. A total of 152 patients with significant ASD underwent device implantation. Subjects' age ranged from 0.63 to 69.6 years, with median 9.36 years and mean 16.30 years. They consisted of 33 (21.7%) males and 119 (78.3%) females, with mean body weight of 29.9 kg (range 8 to 75; SD 18.2). The device was successfully implanted in 150 patients where the majority of cases received the Amplatzer septal occluder (147/150; 98%) and the others received the Heart Lifetech ASD occluder (3/150, 2%), whereas two other cases were not suitable for device closure and we decided for surgical closure. The mean ASD size was 19.75 (range 14 - 25) mm. During the procedure, 5 (4.9%) patients had bradycardia and 3 (2.9%) patients had supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), all of which resolved. In our center with limited facilities and manpower, transcatheter closure of atrial septal defect was effective and safe as an alternative treatment to

  4. Perventricular device closure of residual muscular ventricular septal defects after repair of complex congenital heart defects in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Da; Tao, Kaiyu; An, Qi; Luo, Shuhua; Gan, Changping; Lin, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Residual muscular ventricular septal defects are surgical challenges, especially after the repair of complex congenital heart defects. We investigated perventricular device closure as a salvage technique in pediatric patients who had postoperative residual muscular ventricular septal defects. From February 2009 through June 2011, 14 pediatric patients at our hospital had residual muscular ventricular septal defects after undergoing surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects. Ten patients met our criteria for perventricular device closure of the residual defects: significant left-to-right shunting (Qp/Qs >1.5) or substantial hemodynamic instability (a defect ≥2 mm in size). The patients' mean age was 20.4 ± 13.5 months, and their mean body weight was 10 ± 3.1 kg. The median diameter of the residual defects was 4.2 mm (range, 2.5-5.1 mm). We deployed a total of 11 SQFDQ-II Muscular VSD Occluders (Shanghai Shape Memory Alloy Co., Ltd.; Shanghai, China) in the 10 patients, in accord with conventional techniques of perventricular device closure. The mean procedural duration was 31.1 ±9.1 min. We recorded the closure and complication rates perioperatively and during a 12-month follow-up period. Complete closure was achieved in 8 patients; 2 patients had persistent trivial residual shunts. No deaths, conduction block, device embolism, or other complications occurred throughout the study period. We conclude that perventricular device closure is a safe, effective salvage treatment for postoperative residual muscular ventricular septal defects in pediatric patients. Long-term studies with larger cohorts might further confirm this method's feasibility.

  5. Role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Book of abstracts, fourth workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The 41 abstracts are arranged into 6 sessions: impurities and defects in commercial substrates: their sources, effects on material yield, and material quality; impurity gettering in silicon: limits and manufacturability of impurity gettering and in silicon solar cells; impurity/defect passivation; new concepts in silicon growth: improved initial quality and thin films; and silicon solar cell design opportunities.

  6. Reconstruction of complex scalp defects: the "Banana Peel" revisited.

    PubMed

    Frodel, John L; Ahlstrom, Karen

    2004-01-01

    To demonstrate the use of multiple, large, local flaps in the reconstruction of large scalp defects. A retrospective review of 4 cases in which the "banana peel" method of scalp reconstruction, originally described by Orticochea, was used as a method for closure of moderately large to extensive scalp defects. In all 4 cases, closure of the scalp defects was accomplished. Major morbidity included hair-bearing skin in the forehead in 1 patient, an inconsequential small flap dehiscence requiring closure in the same patient, and a partial loss of a small skin graft to a donor site defect in 1 patient. While other techniques may be optimal for the management of most scalp defects, such as 1- to 2-flap rotation-advancement flaps in small to moderate-size defects and microvascular free tissue transfer and secondary tissue expansion for larger defects, we conclude that the multiple-flap reconstruction method as described by Orticochea may be useful in a small subset of patients. The latter includes older, severely debilitated patients who would be optimally treated with microvascular tissue transfer but cannot tolerate lengthy general anesthesia and young patients who will not accept a significant area of alopecia that might exist with other techniques, such as secondary intention, skin grafts, or free flaps.

  7. Scattering of guided waves from complex defects in plates in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves are successfully employed for rapid screening of plate-like structures and pipelines. Imaging techniques allow to identify and localize areas of the structure with possible defects. However, inverse problem of defect characterization and sizing still represents a considerable challenge. In this paper the efficient FE model is used to simulate the scattering response from various corrosion defects with complex realistic depth and surface profiles. The data is then analyzed in order to determine the defect geometrical parameters (lateral size, depth, etc). The results of analysis are presented and its implications to practical remote defect characterization are discussed.

  8. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of a workshop hold on August 24--26, 1992. Session 1 of the conference discussed characteristics of various commercial photovoltaic silicon substrates, the nature of impurities and defects in them, and how they are related to the material growth. Session 2 on point defects reviewed the capabilities of theoretical approaches to determine equilibrium structure of defects in the silicon lattice arising from transitional metal impurities and hydrogen. Session 3 was devoted to a discussion of the surface photovoltaic method for characterizing bulk wafer lifetimes, and to detailed studies on the effectiveness of various gettering operations on reducing the deleterious effects of transition metals. Papers presented at the conference are also included in this summary report.

  9. Structure and segregation of dopant-defect complexes at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline doped ceria.

    PubMed

    Dholabhai, Pratik P; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Wu, Longjia; Holesinger, Terry G; Aoki, Toshihiro; Castro, Ricardo H R; Uberuaga, Blas P

    2015-06-21

    Grain boundaries (GBs) dictate vital properties of nanocrystalline doped ceria. Thus, to understand and predict its properties, knowledge of the interaction between dopant-defect complexes and GBs is crucial. Here, we report atomistic simulations, corroborated with first principles calculations, elucidating the fundamental dopant-defect interactions at model GBs in gadolinium-doped and manganese-doped ceria. Gadolinium and manganese are aliovalent dopants, accommodated in ceria via a dopant-defect complex. While the behavior of isolated dopants and vacancies is expected to depend on the local atomic structure at GBs, the added structural complexity associated with dopant-defect complexes is found to have key implications on GB segregation. Compared to the grain interior, energies of different dopant-defect arrangements vary significantly at the GBs. As opposed to bulk, the stability of oxygen vacancy is found to be sensitive to the dopant arrangement at GBs. Manganese exhibits a stronger propensity for segregation to GBs than gadolinium, revealing that accommodation of dopant-defect clusters depends on the nature of dopants. Segregation strength is found to depend on the GB character, a result qualitatively supported by our experimental observations based on scanning transmission electron microscopy. The present results indicate that segregation energies, availability of favorable sites, and overall stronger binding of dopant-defect complexes would influence ionic conductivity across GBs in nanocrystalline doped ceria. Our comprehensive investigation emphasizes the critical role of dopant-defect interactions at GBs in governing functional properties in fluorite-structured ionic conductors.

  10. Fumonisins, Tortillas and Neural Tube Defects: Untangling a Complex Issue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fumonisin mycotoxins are found in corn and corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1), the most common, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism thereby causing species-specific diseases in animals that include cancer in rodents and (birth) neural tube defects (NTD) in LM/Bc mice. Fumonisins’ affect on human heal...

  11. Interplay between strain, defect charge state, and functionality in complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschauer, Ulrich; Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2016-07-01

    We use first-principles calculations to investigate the interplay between strain and the charge state of point defect impurities in complex oxides. Our work is motivated by recent interest in using defects as active elements to provide novel functionality in coherent epitaxial films. Using oxygen vacancies as model point defects, and CaMnO3 and MnO as model materials, we calculate the changes in internal strain caused by changing the charge state of the vacancies, and conversely the effect of strain on charge-state stability. Our results show that the charge state is a degree of freedom that can be used to control the interaction of defects with strain and hence the concentration and location of defects in epitaxial films. We propose the use of field-effect gating to reversibly change the charge state of defects and hence the internal strain and corresponding strain-induced functionalities.

  12. Omphalocele-Exstrophy-Imperforate Anus-Spinal Defects Complex: Associated Malformations in 12 New Cases.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Michael Rudolf; Reutter, Heiko; Müller, Annette Margarete; Geipel, Annegret; Berg, Christoph; Gembruch, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The omphalocele-exstrophy-imperforate anus-spinal defects (OEIS) complex is a rare variant of the bladder exstrophy epispadias complex with in most cases unknown etiology. Due to the rarity of the disease, no large series exist that describe the prenatal spectrum of disease or additional malformations. In this study, we present the prenatal findings in a series of 12 cases. All fetuses showed exstrophy of the bladder, 9/12 omphalocele, 9/12 anal atresia, 10/12 neural tube defects, 4/12 vertebral defects, 5/12 lower extremity defects including clubfeet, and 4/12 a single umbilical artery. Additional malformations included hydrocephalus, hypertelorism, aplasia of the gall bladder, heart defects and kidney malformations. All karyotyped fetuses (11/11) showed a normal karyotype. These findings illustrate the spectrum of disease in prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Severe respiratory complex III defect prevents liver adaptation to prolonged fasting.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Laura S; L'hermitte-Stead, Caroline; Lesimple, Pierre; Gilleron, Mylène; Filaut, Sandrine; Jardel, Claude; Haack, Tobias B; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Azzouz, Hatem; Tebib, Neji; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Touati, Guy; Prokisch, Holger; Lombès, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Next generation sequencing approaches have tremendously improved the diagnosis of rare genetic diseases. It may however be faced with difficult clinical interpretation of variants. Inherited enzymatic diseases provide an invaluable possibility to evaluate the function of the defective enzyme in human cell biology. This is the case for respiratory complex III, which has 11 structural subunits and requires several assembly factors. An important role of complex III in liver function is suggested by its frequent impairment in human cases of genetic complex III defects. We report the case of a child with complex III defect and acute liver dysfunction with lactic acidosis, hypoglycemia, and hyperammonemia. Mitochondrial activities were assessed in liver and fibroblasts using spectrophotometric assays. Genetic analysis was done by exome followed by Sanger sequencing. Functional complementation of defective fibroblasts was performed using lentiviral transduction followed by enzymatic analyses and expression assays. Homozygous, truncating, mutations in LYRM7 and MTO1, two genes encoding essential mitochondrial proteins were found. Functional complementation of the complex III defect in fibroblasts demonstrated the causal role of LYRM7 mutations. Comparison of the patient's clinical history to previously reported patients with complex III defect due to nuclear DNA mutations, some actually followed by us, showed striking similarities allowing us to propose common pathophysiology. Profound complex III defect in liver does not induce actual liver failure but impedes liver adaptation to prolonged fasting leading to severe lactic acidosis, hypoglycemia, and hyperammonemia, potentially leading to irreversible brain damage. The diagnosis of rare genetic disease has been tremendously accelerated by the development of high throughput sequencing technology. In this paper we report the investigations that have led to identify LYRM7 mutations causing severe hepatic defect of respiratory

  14. Complex cardiac defects after ethanol exposure during discrete cardiogenic events in zebrafish: Prevention with folic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) describes a range of birth defects including various congenital heart defects (CHDs). Mechanisms of FASD-associated CHDs are not understood. Whether alcohol interferes with a single critical event or with multiple events in heart formation is not known. RESULTS Our zebrafish embryo experiments showed that ethanol interrupts different cardiac regulatory networks and perturbed multiple steps of cardiogenesis (specification, myocardial migration, looping, chamber morphogenesis and endocardial cushion formation). Ethanol exposure during gastrulation until cardiac specification or during myocardial midline migration did not produce severe or persistent heart development defects. However, exposure comprising gastrulation until myocardial precursor midline fusion or during heart patterning stages produced aberrant heart looping and defective endocardial cushions. Continuous exposure during entire cardiogenesis produced complex cardiac defects leading to severely defective myocardium, endocardium, and endocardial cushions. Supplementation of retinoic acid with ethanol partially rescued early heart developmental defects, but the endocardial cushions did not form correctly. In contrast, supplementation of folic acid rescued normal heart development, including the endocardial cushions. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that ethanol exposure interrupted divergent cardiac morphogenesis events causing heart defects. Folic acid supplementation was effective in preventing a wide spectrum of ethanol-induced heart developmental defects. PMID:23832875

  15. Energetics of intrinsic defects and their complexes in ZnO investigated by density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Vidya, R.; Ravindran, P.; Fjellvaag, H.; Svensson, B. G.; Monakhov, E.; Ganchenkova, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2011-01-15

    Formation energies of various intrinsic defects and defect complexes in ZnO have been calculated using a density-functional-theory-based pseudopotential all-electron method. The various defects considered are oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}), zinc vacancy (V{sub Zn}), oxygen at an interstitial site (O{sub i}), Zn at an interstitial site (Zn{sub i}), Zn at V{sub O} (Zn{sub O}), O at V{sub Zn}(O{sub Zn}), and an antisite pair (combination of the preceding two defects). In addition, defect complexes like (V{sub O}+Zn{sub i}) and Zn-vacancy clusters are studied. The Schokkty pair (V{sub O}+V{sub Zn}) and Frenkel pairs [(V{sub O}+O{sub i}) and (V{sub Zn}+Zn{sub i})] are considered theoretically for the first time. Upon comparing the formation energies of these defects, we find that V{sub O} would be the dominant intrinsic defect under both Zn-rich and O-rich conditions and it is a deep double donor. Both Zn{sub O} and Zn{sub i} are found to be shallow donors. The low formation energy of donor-type intrinsic defects could lead to difficulty in achieving p-type conductivity in ZnO. Defect complexes have charge transitions deep inside the band gap. The red, yellow, and green photoluminescence peaks of undoped samples can be assigned to some of the defect complexes considered. It is believed that the red luminescence originates from an electronic transition in V{sub O}, but we find that it can originate from the antisite Zn{sub O} defect. Charge density and electron-localization function analyses have been used to understand the effect of these defects on the ZnO lattice. The electronic structure of ZnO with intrinsic defects has been studied using density-of-states and electronic band structure plots. The acceptor levels introduced by V{sub Zn} are relatively localized, making it difficult to achieve p-type conductivity with sufficient hole mobility.

  16. Defect-mediated spatial complexity and chaos in a phase-conjugate resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Liu, Siuying R.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of a phase-conjugate resonator. The cavity Fresnel number is used to vary the degree of transverse confinement of the system. The generation and subsequent motion of the phase defects in the wave front are seen to mediate the system's dynamics. The number of defects and the complexity of their motion increases as the confinement is relaxed, leading the system through a sequence of bifurcations and eventually to chaos.

  17. Selective laser melted titanium implants: a new technique for the reconstruction of extensive zygomatic complex defects.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Horatiu; Schumacher, Ralf; Kim, Seong-Gon; Dinu, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    The restoration of extensive zygomatic complex defects is a surgical challenge owing to the difficulty of accurately restoring the normal anatomy, symmetry, proper facial projection and facial width. In the present study, an extensive post-traumatic zygomatic bone defect was reconstructed using a custom-made implant that was made with a selective laser melting (SLM) technique. The computer-designed implant had the proper geometry and fit perfectly into the defect without requiring any intraoperative adjustments. A one-year follow-up revealed a stable outcome with no complications.

  18. Microvascular reconstruction of complex foot defects, a new anatomo-functional classification.

    PubMed

    Santanelli di Pompeo, Fabio; Pugliese, Pierfrancesco; Sorotos, Michail; Rubino, Corrado; Paolini, Guido

    2015-08-01

    Up until recently severe foot defects have been underestimated and amputation considered the treatment of choice. Inadequate treatment of foot defects is generally responsible for impaired deambulation resulting in physical and psychological handicap to the patient and producing a negative impact on social life. Foot reconstruction represents a recent advancement but is still a great challenge to the plastic surgeon; indeed the absence of a comprehensive anatomical classification of foot defects makes sharing clinical experiences difficult, slowing down the progress in this field. We report a single surgeon experience on a consecutive series of 47 complex foot reconstructions performed on 45 patients with microvascular free flaps over a 27-year period. A retrospective review of the cases was performed, a detailed analysis of the defects is presented and possible solutions debated so as to outline the key points in the diagnosis and treatment of foot defects. In the decision making process, soft tissue defect location, dimension, and functional relevance have proven to be as important as the exact definition of the bone defect. A new anatomical classification scheme for composite defects of the foot, involving both bone and soft tissue, is proposed in order to allow for a correct evaluation of the wound and an easier identification of the ideal treatment.

  19. Revision of complex acetabular defects using cages with the aid of rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiwu; Wang, Liao; Mao, Yuanqing; Wang, You; Dai, Kerong; Zhu, Zhenan

    2013-12-01

    This study details a method using rapid prototyping (RP) technique to assist in acetabular revision with complex bone defects. Hemi-pelvic RP models were built among 25 patients with complex acetabular bone defects. Each patient was scheduled to undergo revision using either commercially available or customized cages based on individualized RP models. Average follow-up was 4.4 years (range, 1 to 9 years). The average Harris hip score was 36.1 (range, 20 to 58) preoperatively and reached an average of 82.6 (range, 60-96) at the last follow-up. No mechanical failure or loosening was observed. One patient experienced hip dislocation 4 days postoperatively. The resultant findings of this study merit consideration of RP as a helpful clinical complement for dealing with some complex bone defect of acetabulum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reconstruction of complex oro-facial defects using the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap.

    PubMed

    Saleh, D B; Fourie, L; Mizen, K D

    2014-07-01

    Oro-facial defects require reconstruction that provides suitable colour match and texture. Moreover inner and outer cheek lining and bulk are key considerations. In cases of severe oro-facial infections concomitant mandibular abnormality, for example trismus, can mandate the need for tissue to obturate mandibular defects. We assessed the use of the myocutaneous sub-mental artery flap (MSA) in non-oncological patients with such defects. Twenty two consecutive patients were included in this case series. All patients were survivors of Cancrum Oris (NOMA). Demographic details, nutritional status and co-morbidities were recorded. Defects were classified according to the tissues destroyed; cheek, mandible, oral cavity, lip(s), nose and eye(s). Simultaneous procedures carried out were recorded. The surgical anatomy of the MSA is described. All patients had composite defects of the cheek and oral cavity plus another local anatomical structure. Adjunct procedures such as trismus release were carried out in 18/22 patients. Four patients required a return to theatre. There was no trismus recurrence observed. No flap losses were incurred. The MSA is a robust flap with minimal incidence of major complications. The MSA negates the need for microsurgical tissue transfer. Furthermore the MSA provides adequate bulk to obturate these defects. Future applications of the MSA may include complex oro-facial oncological defects.

  1. Reconstruction of Complex Facial Defects Using Cervical Expanded Flap Prefabricated by Temporoparietal Fascia Flap.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Qinghua; Jiang, Haiyue; Liu, Ge; Huang, Wanlu; Dong, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of complex facial defects using cervical expanded flap prefabricated by temporoparietal fascia flap. Complex facial defects are required to restore not only function but also aesthetic appearance, so it is vital challenge for plastic surgeons. Skin grafts and traditional flap transfer cannot meet the reconstructive requirements of color and texture with recipient. The purpose of this sturdy is to create an expanded prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap to repair complex facial defects. Two patients suffered severe burns on the face underwent complex facial resurfacing with prefabricated cervical flap. The vasculature of prefabricated flap, including the superficial temporal vessel and surrounding fascia, was used as the vascular carrier. The temporoparietal fascia flap was sutured underneath the cervical subcutaneous tissue, and expansion was begun in postoperative 1 week. After 4 to 6 months of expansion, the expander was removed, facial scars were excised, and cervical prefabricated flap was elevated and transferred to repair the complex facial defects. Two complex facial defects were repaired successfully by prefabricated temporoparietal fascia flap, and prefabricated flaps survived completely. On account of donor site's skin was thinner and expanded too fast, 1 expanded skin flap was rupture during expansion, but necrosis was not occurred after the 2nd operation. Venous congestion was observed in 1 patient, but after dressing, flap necrosis was not happened. Donor site was closed primarily. Postoperative follow-up 6 months, the color, texture of prefabricated flap was well-matched with facial skin. This method of expanded prefabricated flap may provide a reliable solution to the complex facial resurfacing.

  2. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  3. Assembly defects induce oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial complex I deficiency.

    PubMed

    Leman, Géraldine; Gueguen, Naïg; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Kane, Mariame Selma; Wettervald, Céline; Chupin, Stéphanie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Barth, Magalie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Verny, Christophe; Henrion, Daniel; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (CI) deficiency is the most common respiratory chain defect representing more than 30% of mitochondrial diseases. CI is an L-shaped multi-subunit complex with a peripheral arm protruding into the mitochondrial matrix and a membrane arm. CI sequentially assembled into main assembly intermediates: the P (pumping), Q (Quinone) and N (NADH dehydrogenase) modules. In this study, we analyzed 11 fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with inherited CI deficiency resulting from mutations in the nuclear or mitochondrial DNA and impacting these different modules. In patient cells carrying a mutation located in the matrix arm of CI, blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed a significant reduction of fully assembled CI enzyme and an accumulation of intermediates of the N module. In these cell lines with an assembly defect, NADH dehydrogenase activity was partly functional, even though CI was not fully assembled. We further demonstrated that this functional N module was responsible for ROS production through the reduced flavin mononucleotide. Due to the assembly defect, the FMN site was not re-oxidized leading to a significant oxidative stress in cell lines with an assembly defect. These findings not only highlight the relationship between CI assembly and oxidative stress, but also show the suitability of BN-PAGE analysis in evaluating the consequences of CI dysfunction. Moreover, these data suggest that the use of antioxidants may be particularly relevant for patients displaying a CI assembly defect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions of defect complexes and domain walls in CuO-doped ferroelectric (K,Na)NbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Erünal, Ebru; Jakes, Peter; Körbel, Sabine; Elsässer, Christian; Kungl, Hans; Acker, Jérôme; Hoffmann, Michael J.

    2013-06-01

    "Lead-free" piezoelectric sodium potassium niobate has been studied with respect to its defect structure when doping with CuO. The results indicate that two kinds of mutually compensating charged defect complexes are formed, (Cu'''Nb-VO••)' and (VO••-Cu'''Nb-VO••)•. Concerning the interplay of these defect complexes with the piezoelectric materials properties, the trimeric (VO••-Cu'''Nb-VO••)• defect complex primarily has an elastic dipole moment and thus is proposed to impact the electromechanical properties, whereas the dimeric (Cu'''Nb-VO••)' defect possesses an electric dipole moment in addition to an elastic distortion. Both types of defect complexes can impede domain-wall motion and may contribute to ferroelectric "hardening."

  5. A case of prenatally diagnosed extrapulmonary arteriovenous malformation associated with a complex heart defect

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ba-Da; An, Suah; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lee, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun Na; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Chong Jai

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are rare vascular anomalies of the lung, only a few cases of which have been diagnosed prenatally. The diagnostic clue for prenatal diagnosis was cardiomegaly with a particularly enlarged left atrium. All previous cases of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations diagnosed prenatally have been reported as an isolated anomaly or in association with simple heart defects. We here describe the first case of a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation with a complex heart defect that was diagnosed prenatally at 21.0 weeks of gestation and confirmed by postmortem autopsy. PMID:27896260

  6. Implantation of sepiolite-collagen complexes in surgically created rat calvaria defects.

    PubMed

    Herrera, J I; Olmo, N; Turnay, J; Sicilia, A; Bascones, A; Gavilanes, J G; Lizarbe, M A

    1995-05-01

    The response of osseous tissue to the implantation of sepiolite-collagen complexes has been studied. Sepiolite, sepiolite-collagen complex and 0.5% glutaraldehyde-treated sepiolite-collagen complex were implanted in created circular defects in rat calvaria. The tissue reactions were analysed using light, transmission and scanning electron microscopies. The patterns of bone growth were radiographically analysed and the bone activity was indirectly quantified by using a point-count method. The reaction against the three implanted materials is characteristic of a foreign body reaction with abundant macrophages and giant cells. Implanted products have been detected in macrophages, which suggest the involvement of phagocytosis in the resorptive process. Bone grew at the implantation sites originating excrescences or sometimes a thin bridge at the defect margins. The studied materials, after implantation in contact with bone tissue, did not produce any toxic effect or necrosis, allowing bone activity.

  7. Defect complexes in congruent LiNbO3 and their optical signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanlu; Schmidt, W. G.; Sanna, S.

    2015-05-01

    The structure and stability of defect clusters in LiNbO3, as well as their influence on the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities, are calculated within density functional theory (DFT) using semilocal and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In particular, the complexes modeling the Li shortage during the crystal growth, the Li-vacancy model and the Nb-vacancy model, are examined in detail. It is found that clustering significantly decreases the formation energies of all considered defects with respect to the dilute limit. The Li-vacancy model is energetically preferred with respect to the total formation energy, while the Nb-vacancy model has the lowest formation energy per single point defect. The independent-particle approximation based on the hybrid DFT electronic structure describes the LiNbO3 optical response much better than semilocal DFT. A further improvement between the calculated optical absorption and second-harmonic generation spectra with experiment is achieved if the calculations take defect complexes into account. Nb antisite polarons give rise to optical absorption within the band gap.

  8. Dynamics of spatiotemporal line defects and chaos control in complex excitable systems.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Blanchard, François; Isomura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2017-08-10

    Spatiotemporal pattern formation governs dynamics and functions in various biological systems. In the heart, excitable waves can form complex oscillatory and chaotic patterns even at an abnormally higher frequency than normal heart beats, which increase the risk of fatal heart conditions by inhibiting normal blood circulation. Previous studies suggested that line defects (nodal lines) play a critical role in stabilizing those undesirable patterns. However, it remains unknown if the line defects are static or dynamically changing structures in heart tissue. Through in vitro experiments of heart tissue observation, we reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of line defects in rotating spiral waves. We combined a novel signaling over-sampling technique with a multi-dimensional Fourier analysis, showing that line defects can translate, merge, collapse and form stable singularities with even and odd parity while maintaining a stable oscillation of the spiral wave in the tissue. These findings provide insights into a broad class of complex periodic systems, with particular impact to the control and understanding of heart diseases.

  9. Reconstruction of a complex midfacial defect with the folded fibular free flap and osseointegrated implants.

    PubMed

    Anthony, J P; Foster, R D; Sharma, A B; Kearns, G J; Hoffman, W Y; Pogrel, M A

    1996-08-01

    Refinements in microsurgical techniques, plate fixation, and osseointegration have changed the conceptual approach to midface reconstruction. Free tissue transfer has emerged as the ideal method of reconstructing complex midfacial defects. Single-stage bony restoration of the palate and orbital rim using the folded fibular osteocutaneous free flap is described. The fibular free flap is our first choice for reconstructing complex midfacial defects. The thin, soft, pliable tissue is ideal for intraoral and palatal reconstructions. The bone can be tailored precisely to fit any desired shape, and forms a sturdy support for both orbital and dental prostheses. With a single flap, rapid and reliable restoration of midfacial appearance, orbital support, and palatal function can be achieved.

  10. Osteogenic potential for replacing cells in rat cranial defects implanted with a DNA/protamine complex paste.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masako; Ohno, Jun; Shinozaki, Yosuke; Ozaki, Masao; Fukushima, Tadao

    2014-10-01

    Osteoinductive scaffolds are required for bone tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to assess the osteoinductive capacity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)/protamine complexes in a rat model of critical-size calvarial defects. In addition, we investigated whether cultured mesenchymal-like cells (DP-cells) outgrown from DNA/protamine complex engrafted defects could differentiate to become osteogenic cells in vitro. DNA/protamine complexes were prepared by reactions between DNA and protamine sulfate solutions with stirring. Critical-sized (8mm) calvarial defects were created in the central parietal bones of adult rats. Defects were either left empty or treated with DNA/protamine complex scaffolds. Subsequently, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Micro-CT and histological assays showed that DNA/protamine complex engrafted defects had enhanced bone regeneration. DP-cells were expanded from explants of DNA/protamine complex engrafted defects using an explant outgrowth culture system. Osteogenesis-related factors were assessed in DP-cells after treatment with an osteoblast-inducing reagent (OIR). After 3months, nearly complete healing was observed for DNA/protamine complex engrafted calvarial defects. Increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Alizarin red staining were found for cultured DP-cells. These cells had high expression levels of osteogenic genes, including those for RUNX-2, ALP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. These results indicated that DNA/protamine complexes could facilitate bone regeneration in calvarial defects. Moreover, in vitro osteogenic induction experiments showed that DP-cells outgrown from DNA/protamine engrafted defects had an osteogenic potential. Based on these results, we suggest that DNA/protamine complexes may recruit osteocompetent cells in these defects, where they differentiate to osteogenic cells.

  11. [A method for treating mandibular defects with a complex autograft based on the trapezius muscle].

    PubMed

    Novgorodskiĭ, S V; Tat'ianchenko, V K; Novogorodskiĭ, V E; Skorniakov, Iu Iu

    2000-01-01

    Study of surgical anatomy of musculus trapezius with the adjacent skin and spine of the scapula helped determine the main neurovascular "port" of the muscle. The data were used for developing a method for treating mandibular defects with complex grafts on a mobile neurovascular pedicle. The site and port do not depend on sex but are related to age and constitution and determine the type of the transplant cut.

  12. Indium donor/metal vacancy defect complexes in cadmium telluride studied with perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, John Warren

    Semi-insulating, powder samples of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) have been studied using 111In Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) Spectroscopy. The samples have been lightly doped (˜10 12 cm-3) with 111In atoms, which occupy well-defined metal (Cd) lattice sites and act as probes of the local environment. These substitutional donors form a single defect complex in CdTe. This complex has been identified and characterized as a function of temperature. Those indium probes that are not complexed occupy metal lattice sites with no defect in the local vicinity. Samples containing metal vacancy concentrations as large as 500 ppm have been prepared by a high temperature anneal and quench. The defect complex involves the trapping of a cadmium metal vacancy bound to the indium probe. The electric field gradient (EFG) experienced by probe atoms has a coupling constant of nuQ = 61.5(5) MHz and is not axially symmetric, with the asymmetry parameter given by eta = 0.16(4). It is believed that this asymmetry results from a relaxation of the chalcogen (Te) atoms adjacent to the metal vacancy, with the tellurium atom shared by the probe atom and the vacancy providing the dominant contribution. The fraction of complexed probe atoms increases as the sample temperature is decreased, and is still increasing at room temperature. Complexed fractions are reproducible on cycling within the temperature range 40 to 200°C. The binding energy of the complex has been measured to be 0.15(2) eV and is independent of metal vacancy concentration, which varies and is dependent on the details of the quench. In rapidly cooled samples, a non-equilibrium number of these defect complexes is observed. This state equilibrates with a time constant of 45(5) hours at 15°C, implying that at least one of the two constituents involved in the complex has a significant diffusion rate at this temperature. Under the assumption that vacancy diffusion mechanisms dominate at this temperature, it is

  13. Using 3D Physical Modeling to Plan Surgical Corrections of Complex Congenital Heart Defects.

    PubMed

    Vodiskar, Janez; Kütting, Maximilian; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Vazquez-Jimenez, Jaime Francisco; Sonntag, Simon J

    2017-01-01

    Background Understanding the anatomy and physiology of congenital heart defects is crucial for planning interventions in these patients. Congenital heart procedures often involve complex three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. Excellent imaging techniques are required to depict all anatomical details. We have used and evaluated fast 3D prototyping technology for reconstruction and planning of corrections of complex congenital heart defects. Materials and Methods 3D physical models were constructed from contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) datasets of patients with complex congenital heart defect. Two different commercially available printing technologies were used and their clinical application compared. Results Physical models of three different patients were used for preoperative surgical planning. All models showed good correspondence to patient anatomy. Both printing technologies gave excellent results. Conclusion Physical models could be easily constructed with the use of CT datasets. The printing process could be done efficiently, quite rapidly, and cost effectively. Surgical corrections could be planned based on these models. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. The first defective extended chromium atom chain complex with amine ligand containing naphthyridine and pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Zhen; Geng, Shu-Bo; Liu, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Jia, Xin-Gang; Wei, Hai-Long; Ismayilov, Rayyat H.; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Peng, Shie-Ming

    2017-06-01

    Through a pyrazine and naphthyridine-containing diamino ligand, N2,N7-di(pyrazin-2-yl)-1,8-naphthyridine-2,7-diamine (H2dpznda), defective extended metal atom chain complexes with one chromium(II) metal absent in centre, [Cr5(μ5-dpznda)4Cl2] (1) and [Cr5(μ5-dpznda)4(NCS)2] (2) were obtained. An electrochemistry research showed that the pentachromium(II) complexes were quite resistant to reduction although accessible to oxidation, with two reversible redox couples at E1/2 = +0.59 and +0.30 V.

  15. Defect chaos and bursts: hexagonal rotating convection and the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

    PubMed

    Madruga, Santiago; Riecke, Hermann; Pesch, Werner

    2006-02-24

    We employ numerical computations of the full Navier-Stokes equations to investigate non-Boussinesq convection in a rotating system using water as the working fluid. We identify two regimes. For weak non-Boussinesq effects the Hopf bifurcation from steady to oscillating (whirling) hexagons is supercritical and typical states exhibit defect chaos that is systematically described by the cubic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. For stronger non-Boussinesq effects the Hopf bifurcation becomes subcritical and the oscillations exhibit localized chaotic bursting, which is modeled by a quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  16. Platelet-rich fibrin/aspirin complex promotes alveolar bone regeneration in periodontal defect in rats.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Mei, S; Guo, L; Su, Y; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Zhao, Z; Wang, S; Liu, Y

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy and outcomes of aspirin in local defects and the use of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in periodontal defects were investigated. Whether the PRF/aspirin complex is a suitable scaffold and delivery system to carry sustained-release aspirin/salicylic acid to promote periodontal bone regeneration was determined. PRF and PRF/aspirin complex were prepared. The concentrations of aspirin/salicylic acid released from the PRF/aspirin complex were calculated at 37°C. Periodontal ligament mesenchymal cells were cultured on six-well plates with PRF or PRF/aspirin complex gel to analyze proliferation and migration. The alveolar bone between the inferior buccal mesial root and anterior buccal distal root of the first maxillary molar was removed in 15 rats randomly divided into three groups: no treatment, PRF or PRF/aspirin complex. Twelve weeks post-transplantation, 2D/3D micro-computed tomography and histomorphometric technique were used for quantitative analyses. The PRF/aspirin complex provided a sustained-release aspirin/salicylic acid. Peak concentrations occurred 4 hours after transplantation and were sustained to 48 hours at 37°C; the total concentration of released aspirin/salicylic acid was 83.5 mg/mL, respectively. The sustained-release promoted the proliferation and migration of periodontal ligament mesenchymal cells. Micro-computed tomography and histological data showed that both the PRF and PRF/aspirin complex enhanced periodontal bone formation (P<.05). Moreover, the new bone formation was two times greater in the PRF/aspirin complex group than the PRF group. Aspirin/salicylic acid could be sustained-released from PRF/aspirin complex, which could inhibit inflammation and improve the function of mesenchymal cells. The data might provide a new safe and easy clinical therapeutic strategy to promote periodontal bone reparation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Complex scalp, skull, and dural defect reconstruction using a turnover "tournedos" myocutaneous free flap.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Lucie; Tahiri, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is one of the most commonly used flaps for calvarial defect reconstruction. In the setting of radiation and/or chronic infection and when skeletal reconstruction of the cranium is not recommended, standard calvarial reconstruction needs to be refined. The standard use of the latissimus dorsi only was associated with potential dead space over the dura, limited skin paddle size, and potential external contour irregularities. In this study, we present our approach to complex calvarial reconstruction with free tissue transfer without bone grafting while avoiding contour deformities in 1 efficient surgical procedure. We propose the "tournedos" turnover de-epithelialized latissimus dorsi flap, which provides stable dermal and subdermal tissue that will not undergo atrophy over time over the dura. To reach an adequate aesthetic result, we used a uniform, unmeshed, thick split-thickness skin graft over the muscular portion of the tournedos flap. Patients who underwent this procedure, from March 1992 to March 2012, at McGill University Health Center and the Montreal Neurological Institute were included. Thirty-three complex microsurgical procedures for oncologic calvarial defect reconstructions were performed from March 1992 to March 2012. Among them, 6 patients benefited from the tournedos procedure. The average age was 74 years. Scalp defects sizes ranged from 4 × 10 to 16 × 18 cm (40-288 cm). All latissimus dorsi flap donor sites were closed primarily. Patients kept their donor-site drains for approximately 18 days (±5 days). One patient developed a seroma at the donor site after drain removal that was treated conservatively. All patients were satisfied with their reconstructions, and no secondary procedures were necessary. We present our most recent case with good photographic documentation. Our approach using the tournedos turnover de-epithelialized free flap provides durable and stable coverage for irradiated and/or previously infected

  18. Defect control of conventional and anomalous electron transport at complex oxide interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Gunkel, F.; Bell, Chris; Inoue, Hisashi; ...

    2016-08-30

    Using low-temperature electrical measurements, the interrelation between electron transport, magnetic properties, and ionic defect structure in complex oxide interface systems is investigated, focusing on NdGaO3/SrTiO3 (100) interfaces. Field-dependent Hall characteristics (2–300 K) are obtained for samples grown at various growth pressures. In addition to multiple electron transport, interfacial magnetism is tracked exploiting the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). These two properties both contribute to a nonlinearity in the field dependence of the Hall resistance, with multiple carrier conduction evident below 30 K and AHE at temperatures ≲10 K. Considering these two sources of nonlinearity, we suggest a phenomenological model capturing themore » complex field dependence of the Hall characteristics in the low-temperature regime. Our model allows the extraction of the conventional transport parameters and a qualitative analysis of the magnetization. The electron mobility is found to decrease systematically with increasing growth pressure. This suggests dominant electron scattering by acceptor-type strontium vacancies incorporated during growth. The AHE scales with growth pressure. In conclusion, the most pronounced AHE is found at increased growth pressure and, thus, in the most defective, low-mobility samples, indicating a correlation between transport, magnetism, and cation defect concentration.« less

  19. Defect Control of Conventional and Anomalous Electron Transport at Complex Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, F.; Bell, Chris; Inoue, Hisashi; Kim, Bongju; Swartz, Adrian G.; Merz, Tyler A.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Harashima, Satoshi; Sato, Hiroki K.; Minohara, Makoto; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using low-temperature electrical measurements, the interrelation between electron transport, magnetic properties, and ionic defect structure in complex oxide interface systems is investigated, focusing on NdGaO3 /SrTiO3 (100) interfaces. Field-dependent Hall characteristics (2-300 K) are obtained for samples grown at various growth pressures. In addition to multiple electron transport, interfacial magnetism is tracked exploiting the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). These two properties both contribute to a nonlinearity in the field dependence of the Hall resistance, with multiple carrier conduction evident below 30 K and AHE at temperatures ≲10 K . Considering these two sources of nonlinearity, we suggest a phenomenological model capturing the complex field dependence of the Hall characteristics in the low-temperature regime. Our model allows the extraction of the conventional transport parameters and a qualitative analysis of the magnetization. The electron mobility is found to decrease systematically with increasing growth pressure. This suggests dominant electron scattering by acceptor-type strontium vacancies incorporated during growth. The AHE scales with growth pressure. The most pronounced AHE is found at increased growth pressure and, thus, in the most defective, low-mobility samples, indicating a correlation between transport, magnetism, and cation defect concentration.

  20. Defects in the COG complex and COG-related trafficking regulators affect neuronal Golgi function

    PubMed Central

    Climer, Leslie K.; Dobretsov, Maxim; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is an evolutionarily conserved hetero-octameric protein complex that has been proposed to organize vesicle tethering at the Golgi apparatus. Defects in seven of the eight COG subunits are linked to Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG)-type II, a family of rare diseases involving misregulation of protein glycosylation, alterations in Golgi structure, variations in retrograde trafficking through the Golgi and system-wide clinical pathologies. A troublesome aspect of these diseases are the neurological pathologies such as low IQ, microcephaly, and cerebellar atrophy. The essential function of the COG complex is dependent upon interactions with other components of trafficking machinery, such as Rab-GTPases and SNAREs. COG-interacting Rabs and SNAREs have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Defects in Golgi maintenance disrupts trafficking and processing of essential proteins, frequently associated with and contributing to compromised neuron function and human disease. Despite the recent advances in molecular neuroscience, the subcellular bases for most neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. This article gives an overview of the potential contributions of the COG complex and its Rab and SNARE partners in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26578865

  1. Preparing Heart and Mind Following Prenatal Diagnosis of Complex Congenital Heart Defect

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Pridham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on attachment and caregiving theory and the concept of motivation, the purpose of this descriptive study was to examine parents’ retrospective accounts of their prenatal experiences after receiving the diagnosis of a fetal heart defect. These parents constituted a subgroup of participants in a larger longitudinal study of parenting an infant with a complex congenital heart defect. Data were derived from 14 semistructured interviews with 13 mothers and 3 fathers in the home or hospital setting. A directed content analysis yielded a central category of preparing heart and mind for infant caregiving. Preparing heart and mind is a preliminary caregiving goal within the caregiving system that generates intentions and expectations indicative of specific caregiving motivations to relate to the baby, handle circumstances practically, and manage infant medical care. A theoretical model illustrates the prenatal process these parents engaged in to provide care to their infants with life-threatening medical conditions. PMID:22927700

  2. A new custom made bioceramic implant for the repair of large and complex craniofacial bone defects.

    PubMed

    Brie, Joël; Chartier, Thierry; Chaput, Christophe; Delage, Cyrille; Pradeau, Benjamin; Caire, François; Boncoeur, Marie-Paule; Moreau, Jean-Jacques

    2013-07-01

    Neurosurgery and Maxillofacial Surgery Departments of Limoges University Hospital Centre have developed a new concept of a custom made ceramic implant in hydroxyapatite (HA) for the reconstruction of large and complex craniofacial bone defects (more than 25 cm(2)). The manufacturing process of the implants used a stereolithography technique that produces implants with three-dimensional shapes derived directly from the scan file of the patient's skull without moulding or machining. Eight patients received 8 implants between 2005 and 2008. The surgical procedure is simple and fast. The post-operative follow-up was 12 months. No major complications (infection or fracture of the implant) were observed. The cosmetic result was considered satisfactory by both patients and surgeons. These new implants are well suited for reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects (greater than 25 cm(2)) in adults and children over 8 years. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the hypertensive rat brain: respiratory complexes exhibit assembly defects in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Campistrous, Ana; Hao, Li; Xiang, Wang; Ton, Dong; Semchuk, Paul; Sander, Joerg; Ellison, Michael J; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos

    2008-02-01

    The central nervous system plays a critical role in the normal control of arterial blood pressure and in its elevation in virtually all forms of hypertension. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been increasingly associated with the development of hypertension. Therefore, we examined whether mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in the brain in hypertension and characterized it at the molecular scale. Mitochondria from whole brain and brain stem from 12-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats with elevated blood pressure (190+/-5 mm Hg) were compared against those from age-matched normotensive (134+/-7 mm Hg) Wistar Kyoto rats (n=4 in each group). Global differential analysis using 2D electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry-based protein identification suggested a downregulation of enzymes involved in cellular energetics in hypertension. Targeted differential analysis of mitochondrial respiratory complexes using the classical blue-native SDS-PAGE/Western method and a complementary combination of sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation/tandem mass spectrometry revealed previously unknown assembly defects in complexes I, III, IV, and V in hypertension. Interestingly, targeted examination of the brain stem, a regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis and systemic blood pressure, further showed the occurrence of mitochondrial complex I dysfunction, elevated reactive oxygen species production, decreased ATP synthesis, and impaired respiration in hypertension. Our findings suggest that in already-hypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats, the brain respiratory complexes exhibit previously unknown assembly defects. These defects impair the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This mitochondrial dysfunction localizes to the brain stem and is, therefore, likely to contribute to the development, as well as to pathophysiological complications, of hypertension.

  4. First principles study of the ternary complex model of EL2 defect in GaAs saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechun; Yang, Ming; Cai, Yongqing; Zhao, Shengzhi; Feng, Yuanping

    2012-03-12

    First principles calculations are performed for the perfect GaAs crystal, the double Ga vacancies (VGa)₂, and the ternary complex defect (AsGaVAsVGa), using the state-of-the-art computational method with the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional to correct the band gap and account for a proper description of the interaction between defects states and bulk states. Three shallow acceptor defect levels are found due to the creation of (VGa)₂ with nearest-neighbor As dangling bonds. However, for GaAs with the ternary complex defects (AsGaVAsVGa), the As antisite AsGa and the VAs'S nearest-neighbor Ga dangling bonds provoke several donor defect states. The lowest donor defect state locates at 0.85 eV below the bottom of conduction band, which is very close to the experimental observation of the EL2 defect level. In addition, structual evolution from (VGa)₂ defect to the ternary defect complex (AsGaVAsVGa) is simulated by ab initio molecular dynamic (MD) calculation at different temperatures. The MD results demonstrate that the ternary complex defect (AsGaVAsVGa) can be converted from the double Ga vacancies (VGa)₂ at room temperature, and it can exist stably at higher temperature. The present work is helpful to unravel the microstructure and the forming mechanism of the EL2 defect, to find out methods to improve the performance of the GaAs saturable absorber by changing the growth conditions of GaAs crystal.

  5. Carbon as a source for yellow luminescence in GaN: Isolated C{sub N} defect or its complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, Sayre G.; Xie, Weiyu; Sun, Y. Y. Zhang, S. B.

    2015-10-07

    We study three carbon defects in GaN, isolated C{sub N} and its two complexes with donors C{sub N}–O{sub N}, and C{sub N}–Si{sub Ga}, as a cause of the yellow luminescence using accurate hybrid density functional calculation, which includes the semi-core Ga 3d electrons as valence electrons and uses a larger 300-atom supercell. We show that the isolated C{sub N} defect yields good agreement with experiment on the photoluminescence (PL) peak position, zero-phonon line, and thermodynamic defect transition level. We find that the defect state of the complexes that is involved in the PL process is the same as that of the C{sub N} defect. The role of the positively charged donors (O{sub N} or Si{sub Ga}) next to C{sub N} is to blue-shift the PL peak. Therefore, the complexes cannot be responsible for the same PL peak as isolated C{sub N}. Our detailed balance analysis further suggests that under thermal equilibrium at typical growth temperature, the concentration of isolated C{sub N} defect is orders of magnitude higher than the defect complexes, which is a result of the small binding energy in these complexes.

  6. NDUFA9 point mutations cause a variable mitochondrial complex I assembly defect.

    PubMed

    Baertling, Fabian; Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; van den Brand, Mariël Am; Fung, Cheuk-Wing; Chan, Sophelia Hoi-Shan; Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei; Hellebrekers, Debby M E; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Smeitink, Jan Am; Rodenburg, Richard Jt; Nijtmans, Leo Gj

    2017-07-03

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I consists of 44 different subunits and contains three functional modules: the Q-, the N- and the P-module. NDUFA9 is a Q-module subunit required for complex I assembly or stability. However, its role in complex I biogenesis has not been studied in patient fibroblasts. So far, a single patient carrying an NDUFA9 variant with a severe neonatally fatal phenotype has been reported. Via exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous NDUFA9 missense variant in another patient with a milder phenotype including childhood-onset progressive generalized dystonia and axonal peripheral neuropathy. We performed complex I assembly analysis using primary skin fibroblasts of both patients. Reduced complex I abundance and an accumulation of Q-module subassemblies were present in both patients but more pronounced in the severe clinical phenotype patient. The latter displayed additional accumulation of P-module subassemblies, which was not present in the milder-phenotype patient. Lentiviral complementation of both patient fibroblast cell lines with wild-type NDUFA9 rescued complex I deficiency and the assembly defects. Our report further characterizes the phenotypic spectrum of NDUFA9 deficiency and demonstrates that the severity of the clinical phenotype correlates with the severity of the effects of the different NDUFA9 variants on complex I assembly. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Utilisation of three-dimensional printed heart models for operative planning of complex congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Olejník, Peter; Nosal, Matej; Havran, Tomas; Furdova, Adriana; Cizmar, Maros; Slabej, Michal; Thurzo, Andrej; Vitovic, Pavol; Klvac, Martin; Acel, Tibor; Masura, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) printing of cardiovascular structures. To explore whether utilisation of 3D printed heart replicas can improve surgical and catheter interventional planning in patients with complex congenital heart defects. Between December 2014 and November 2015 we fabricated eight cardiovascular models based on computed tomography data in patients with complex spatial anatomical relationships of cardiovascular structures. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the accuracy of 3D printing by comparing dimension measurements at analogous anatomical locations between the printed models and digital imagery data, as well as between printed models and in vivo surgical findings. The contribution of 3D printed heart models for perioperative planning improvement was evaluated in the four most representative patients. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the high accuracy of 3D cardiovascular printing. Each printed model offered an improved spatial anatomical orientation of cardiovascular structures. Current 3D printers can produce authentic copies of patients` cardiovascular systems from computed tomography data. The use of 3D printed models can facilitate surgical or catheter interventional procedures in patients with complex congenital heart defects due to better preoperative planning and intraoperative orientation.

  8. Complete congenital heart block in a neonate with a complex congenital heart defect in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wawo, Edvine Yonta; Mfeukeu, Liliane Kuate; Makamte, Larissa; Edie, Sandrine Dikosso; Balana, Flore Esiene

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is rare disorder that has a higher mortality when associated with structural congenital heart defects. Very few cases have been reported in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We present a case of complete CHB associated with a complex congenital heart defect in a neonate in Cameroon. A 1-month-old neonate in Cameroon was referred for the evaluation of bradycardia. The obstetrical ultrasound done during pregnancy revealed fetal bradycardia without further evaluation. Clinical examination showed well a developed neonate with bradycardia at 62 beats/minute, and mild cyanosis with oxygen saturation at 93% at room air. There were no signs of heart failure. Twelve lead electrocardiogram (ECG) demonstrated a complete atrioventricular conduction block with a junctional escape rhythm at 59/minute, left axis deviation and bi-ventricular hypertrophy. Two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a complex congenital heart disease with the following abnormalities: dextrocardia, complete atrioventricular canal with a single atrium and mild atrioventricular valve regurgitation and malposition of the great vessels with a posterior aorta and an anterior pulmonary artery. This case report highlights the challenges in the diagnosis and management of complex CHBs in low resource settings. A properly performed pregnancy follow-up with serial echocardiograms could aid in antenatal diagnosis and plan perinatal management when appropriate in order to optimize outcome. This emphasizes the clinical value of high quality antenatal care and proper screening. PMID:27904846

  9. Enhanced photoluminescence from single nitrogen-vacancy defects in nanodiamonds coated with phenol-ionic complexes.

    PubMed

    Bray, Kerem; Previdi, Rodolfo; Gibson, Brant C; Shimoni, Olga; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-21

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds are attracting major attention in the field of bio-sensing and bio-labeling. In this work we demonstrate a robust approach to achieve an encapsulation of individual nanodiamonds with phenol-ionic complexes that enhance the photoluminescence from single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers. We show that single NV centres in the coated nanodiamonds also exhibit shorter lifetimes, opening another channel for high resolution sensing. We propose that the nanodiamond encapsulation reduces the non-radiative decay pathways of the NV color centers. Our results provide a versatile and assessable way to enhance photoluminescence from nanodiamond defects that can be used in a variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  10. Loop quantum gravity simplicity constraint as surface defect in complex Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Muxin; Huang, Zichang

    2017-05-01

    The simplicity constraint is studied in the context of four-dimensional spinfoam models with a cosmological constant. We find that the quantum simplicity constraint is realized as the two-dimensional surface defect in SL (2 ,C ) Chern-Simons theory in the construction of spinfoam amplitudes. By this realization of the simplicity constraint in Chern-Simons theory, we are able to construct the new spinfoam amplitude with a cosmological constant for an arbitrary simplicial complex (with many 4-simplices). The semiclassical asymptotics of the amplitude is shown to correctly reproduce the four-dimensional Einstein-Regge action with a cosmological constant term.

  11. Heterotaxy and complex structural heart defects in a mutant mouse model of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y.; Rosenthal, Julie; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Richard J.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Sabol, Steven L.; Linask, Kaari L.; Bracero, Luciann; Connelly, Patricia S.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Yu, Qing; Omran, Heymut; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2007-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with ciliary defects and situs inversus totalis, the complete mirror image reversal of internal organ situs (positioning). A variable incidence of heterotaxy, or irregular organ situs, also has been reported in PCD patients, but it is not known whether this is elicited by the PCD-causing genetic lesion. We studied a mouse model of PCD with a recessive mutation in Dnahc5, a dynein gene commonly mutated in PCD. Analysis of homozygous mutant embryos from 18 litters yielded 25% with normal organ situs, 35% with situs inversus totalis, and 40% with heterotaxy. Embryos with heterotaxy had complex structural heart defects that included discordant atrioventricular and ventricular outflow situs and atrial/pulmonary isomerisms. Variable combinations of a distinct set of cardiovascular anomalies were observed, including superior-inferior ventricles, great artery alignment defects, and interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation. The surprisingly high incidence of heterotaxy led us to evaluate the diagnosis of PCD. PCD was confirmed by EM, which revealed missing outer dynein arms in the respiratory cilia. Ciliary dyskinesia was observed by videomicroscopy. These findings show that Dnahc5 is required for the specification of left-right asymmetry and suggest that the PCD-causing Dnahc5 mutation may also be associated with heterotaxy. PMID:18037990

  12. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, C. Martin

    1994-01-01

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  13. Enhanced photoluminescence from single nitrogen-vacancy defects in nanodiamonds coated with phenol-ionic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Kerem; Previdi, Rodolfo; Gibson, Brant C.; Shimoni, Olga; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds are attracting major attention in the field of bio-sensing and bio-labeling. In this work we demonstrate a robust approach to achieve an encapsulation of individual nanodiamonds with phenol-ionic complexes that enhance the photoluminescence from single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers. We show that single NV centres in the coated nanodiamonds also exhibit shorter lifetimes, opening another channel for high resolution sensing. We propose that the nanodiamond encapsulation reduces the non-radiative decay pathways of the NV color centers. Our results provide a versatile and assessable way to enhance photoluminescence from nanodiamond defects that can be used in a variety of sensing and imaging applications.Fluorescent nanodiamonds are attracting major attention in the field of bio-sensing and bio-labeling. In this work we demonstrate a robust approach to achieve an encapsulation of individual nanodiamonds with phenol-ionic complexes that enhance the photoluminescence from single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers. We show that single NV centres in the coated nanodiamonds also exhibit shorter lifetimes, opening another channel for high resolution sensing. We propose that the nanodiamond encapsulation reduces the non-radiative decay pathways of the NV color centers. Our results provide a versatile and assessable way to enhance photoluminescence from nanodiamond defects that can be used in a variety of sensing and imaging applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07510b

  14. Field induced modification of defect complexes in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Nadège; Granzow, Torsten; Nataf, Guillaume F.

    2014-12-28

    Dielectric constant, thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), and conductivity of undoped and 5% Mg-doped LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals between −100 °C and 200 °C have been investigated. A Debye-like dielectric relaxation with an activation energy of 135 meV is observed in the Mg-doped material, but not in undoped crystals. On heating this relaxation disappears near 140 °C and does not reappear after cooling. Anomalies observed in TSDC around this temperature are attributed to the motion of lithium vacancies, in agreement with conductivity measurements. It is proposed that in thermal equilibrium the electrons from the Mg{sub Li}{sup •} donors are trapped in (4Mg{sub Li}{sup •}+4V{sub Li}{sup ′}) defect complexes. High-temperature poling breaks these defect complexes. The transition of the liberated electrons between the Mg{sub Li}{sup •} donor centers and the Nb{sub Nb} forming the conduction band gives rise to the observed dielectric relaxation.

  15. DJ-1 Null Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells Exhibit Defects in Mitochondrial Function and Structure: Involvement of Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Seo, Kang Sik; Han, Jeong Su; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung Kiel; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung Doo; Shong, Minho; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a Parkinson's disease-associated gene whose protein product has a protective role in cellular homeostasis by removing cytosolic reactive oxygen species and maintaining mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear how DJ-1 regulates mitochondrial function and why mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by DJ-1 deficiency. In a previous study we showed that DJ-1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells exhibit defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. In the present article we investigated the role of DJ-1 in complex I formation by using blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-dimensional gel analysis to assess native complex status. On the basis of these experiments, we concluded that DJ-1 null cells have a defect in the assembly of complex I. Concomitant with abnormal complex I formation, DJ-1 null cells show defective supercomplex formation. It is known that aberrant formation of the supercomplex impairs the flow of electrons through the channels between respiratory chain complexes, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. We took two approaches to study these mitochondrial defects. The first approach assessed the structural defect by using both confocal microscopy with MitoTracker staining and electron microscopy. The second approach assessed the functional defect by measuring ATP production, O2 consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, we showed that the assembly defect as well as the structural and functional abnormalities in DJ-1 null cells could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DJ-1, demonstrating the specificity of DJ-1 on these mitochondrial properties. These mitochondrial defects induced by DJ-1mutation may be a pathological mechanism for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22403686

  16. Transesophageal echocardiography for incremental value of Amplatezer cribriform septal occluder for percutaneous transcatheter closure of complex septal defects: Case series.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shen Kou; Hsiung, Ming C; Wei, Jeng; Lee, Yang-Tsai; Yu, Ho-Ping; Ou, Ching-Huei; Yin, Wei-Hsian

    2017-06-01

    The anatomy of septal defects can be complex and morphologically unpredictable. Balloon sizing of such defects may not be feasible, and an appropriately sized commercial occluder may not be available. Therefore, percutaneous transcatheter closure of such defects can be challenging because of an increased risk of complications. In this study, we have described the efficacy and safety of transcatheter closure of complex septal defects using Amplatzer cribriform occluder devices, assessed by real time three-dimensional (RT 3D) color Doppler transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Four complex septal defects were involved in this investigation: (1) reimplanted multiple atrial septal defects (ASD) with one device embolization; (2) postinfarction ventricular septal defect; (3) long tunnel patent foramen ovale; and (4) postoperative residual ASD. All patients underwent percutaneous transcatheter interventions due to the high risk of surgical complications, and one of the three available cribriform ASD device sizes (18 mm, 25 mm, or 35 mm) was implanted. Perioperative RT 3D TEE combined with fluoroscopy was used for monitoring during the procedure. All defects were successfully occluded by cribriform septal occluder devices using the transcatheter technique. Our patients with complex septal defects were successfully treated by transcatheter closure using an Amplazter cribriform septal occluder device with careful planning based on patient presentation and close interdisciplinary collaboration. RT 3D color Doppler TEE provided precise information for the selection of the appropriate occluder device and facilitated the procedure by guiding the catheter through the often challenging patient anatomy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  17. Preoperative Botulinum toxin A enabling defect closure and laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Elstner, Kristen E; Jacombs, Anita S W; Read, John W; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Arduini, Fernando; Wehrhahm, Michael; Craft, Colette; Cosman, Peter H; Dardano, Anthony N; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2017-07-21

    Operative management of complex ventral hernia still remains a significant challenge for surgeons. Closure of large defects in the unprepared abdomen has serious pathophysiological consequences due to chronic contraction and retraction of the lateral abdominal wall muscles. We report outcomes of 56 consecutive patients who had preoperative Botulinum toxin A (BTA) abdominal wall relaxation facilitating closure and repair. This was a prospective observational study of 56 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided BTA into the lateral abdominal oblique muscles prior to elective ventral hernia repair between November 2012 and January 2017. Serial non-contrast abdominal CT imaging was performed to evaluate changes in lateral oblique muscle length and thickness. All hernias were repaired laparoscopically, or laparoscopic-open-laparoscopic (LOL) using intraperitoneal onlay mesh. 56 patients received BTA injections at predetermined sites to the lateral oblique muscles, which were well tolerated. Mean patient age was 59.7 years, and mean BMI was 30.9 kg/m(2) (range 21.8-54.0). Maximum defect size was 24 × 27 cm. A subset of 18 patients underwent preoperative pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct procedure. A comparison of pre-BTA to post-BTA imaging demonstrated an increase in mean lateral abdominal wall length from 16.1 cm to 20.1 cm per side, a mean gain of 4.0 cm/side (range 1.0-11.7 cm/side) (p < 0.0001). This corresponds to an unstretched mean length gain of 8.0 cm of the lateral abdominal wall. Laparoscopic/LOL primary closure was achieved in all cases, with no clinical evidence of raised intra-abdominal pressures. One patient presented with a new fascial defect 26 months post-operative. Preoperative BTA to the lateral abdominal wall muscles is a safe and effective technique for the preparation of patients prior to operative management of complex ventral hernias. BTA temporary flaccid paralysis relaxes, elongates and thins the chronically contracted abdominal

  18. Adhesive complex coacervate inspired by the sandcastle worm as a sealant for fetoscopic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sarbjit

    Inspired by the Sandcastle Worm, biomimetic of the water-borne adhesive was developed by complex coacervation of the synthetic copolyelectrolytes, mimicking the chemistries of the worm glue. The developed underwater adhesive was designed for sealing fetal membranes after fetoscopic surgery in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and sealing neural tissue of a fetus in aminiotic sac for spina bifida condition. Complex coacervate with increased bond strength was created by entrapping polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-dA) monomer within the cross-linked coacervate network. Maximum shear bond strength of ~ 1.2 MPa on aluminum substrates was reached. The monomer-filled coacervate had complex flow behavior, thickening at low shear rates and then thinning suddenly with a 16-fold drop in viscosity at shear rates near 6 s-1. The microscale structure of the complex coacervates resembled a three-dimensional porous network of interconnected tubules. This complex coacervate adhesive was used in vitro studies to mimic the uterine wall-fetal membrane interface using a water column with one end and sealed with human fetal membranes and poultry breast, and a defect was created with an 11 French trocar. The coacervate adhesive in conjunction with the multiphase adhesive was used to seal the defect. The sealant withstood an additional traction of 12 g for 30-60 minutes and turbulence of the water column without leakage of fluid or slippage. The adhesive is nontoxic when in direct contact with human fetal membranes in an organ culture setting. A stable complex coacervate adhesive for long-term use in TTTS and spina bifida application was developed by methacrylating the copolyelectrolytes. The methacrylated coacervate was crosslinked chemically for TTTS and by photopolymerization for spina bifida. Tunable mechanical properties of the adhesive were achieved by varying the methacrylation of the polymers. Varying the amine to phosphate (A/P) ratio in the coacervate formation

  19. The scapular, parascapular, and latissimus dorsi flap as a single osteomyocutaneous flap for repair of complex oral defects.

    PubMed

    Janus, Jeffrey R; Carlson, Matthew L; Moore, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Complex composite defects of the oral cavity are often created due to en bloc resection of malignant tumors. These defects can involve bone, soft tissue, oral mucosa, and external skin, posing a reconstructive challenge to the microvascular surgeon. Though advances have been made in free tissue transfer via piggybacking techniques and double free-flaps, increases in operative time and morbidity remain limiting factors. Likewise, advancements in single composite flaps (e.g., double-skin paddle fibular free-flap) allow for a single donor site, but limit workable tissue. This report describes our experience with the scapular, parascapular, and latissimus dorsi (SPLD) as a combined single unit osteomyocutaneous flap for composite reconstruction of complex oral defects. A case example is subsequently reviewed for clinical correlation. This is an operative techniques article describing the use of the SPLD single multi-tissue flap for repair of complex oral defects. Cadaveric dissection was performed for instructional purposes. Case example was given for clinical correlation. Relevant history, anatomy, procedural details, and possible complications are presented and subsequently correlated to the case example. A SPLD free-flap as a single multi-tissue flap is a viable and beneficial option for reconstruction of complex oral defects. It provides the volume of tissue necessary to fill composite defects and exists as an alternative to multi-flap procedures, which carry a longer operative time and multiple donor site morbidity.

  20. Fourth workshop on the role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, T.; Jastrzebski, L.; Sopori, B.

    1994-07-01

    The 4th Point Defect Workshop was aimed at reviewing recent new understanding of the defect engineering techniques that can improve the performance of solar cells fabricated on low-cost silicon substrates. The theme of the workshop was to identify approaches that can lead to 18% commercial silicon solar cells in the near future. These approaches also define the research tasks for the forthcoming new DOE/NREL silicon materials research program. It was a consensus of the workshop attendees that the goal of 18%-efficient multicrystalline silicon solar cells is right on target, and the payoff for the investment by DOE will manifest itself in the next few years as reduced costs for high-efficiency cell fabrication.

  1. Genetic Defects in TAPT1 Disrupt Ciliogenesis and Cause a Complex Lethal Osteochondrodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Symoens, Sofie; Barnes, Aileen M; Gistelinck, Charlotte; Malfait, Fransiska; Guillemyn, Brecht; Steyaert, Wouter; Syx, Delfien; D'hondt, Sanne; Biervliet, Martine; De Backer, Julie; Witten, Eckhard P; Leikin, Sergey; Makareeva, Elena; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Huysseune, Ann; Vleminckx, Kris; Willaert, Andy; De Paepe, Anne; Marini, Joan C; Coucke, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane anterior posterior transformation 1 protein, encoded by TAPT1, is involved in murine axial skeletal patterning, but its cellular function remains unknown. Our study demonstrates that TAPT1 mutations underlie a complex congenital syndrome, showing clinical overlap between lethal skeletal dysplasias and ciliopathies. This syndrome is characterized by fetal lethality, severe hypomineralization of the entire skeleton and intra-uterine fractures, and multiple congenital developmental anomalies affecting the brain, lungs, and kidneys. We establish that wild-type TAPT1 localizes to the centrosome and/or ciliary basal body, whereas defective TAPT1 mislocalizes to the cytoplasm and disrupts Golgi morphology and trafficking and normal primary cilium formation. Knockdown of tapt1b in zebrafish induces severe craniofacial cartilage malformations and delayed ossification, which is shown to be associated with aberrant differentiation of cranial neural crest cells. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MTO1-Deficient Mouse Model Mirrors the Human Phenotype Showing Complex I Defect and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Lore; Kling, Eva; Schiller, Evelyn; Zeh, Ramona; Schrewe, Anja; Hölter, Sabine M.; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Strecker, Valentina; Wittig, Ilka; Dumitru, Iulia; Wenz, Tina; Bender, Andreas; Aichler, Michaela; Janik, Dirk; Neff, Frauke; Walch, Axel; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Floss, Thomas; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Wurst, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Klopstock, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1) were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients. PMID:25506927

  3. Double free flaps for reconstruction of complex/composite defects in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Mo, Kevin W L; Vlantis, Alexander; Wong, Eddy W Y; Chiu, T W

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To demonstrate the feasibility of double free flap surgery in head and neck reconstruction. DESIGN. Descriptive case series. SETTING. A university-affiliated hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer (encountered over a 2.5-year period) who had reconstructive surgery with planned simultaneous double free flaps. RESULTS. The mean total operating time was 660 minutes and there were no flap failures. Postoperative stays ranged from 11 to 82 days; nine patients were discharged within 3 weeks and seven were able to maintain their weight with oral feeding. The survival rate up to 1 year was 64%. CONCLUSION. The use of double free flaps is an option worth considering for complex head and neck defects in carefully selected patients.

  4. Soft-tissue coverage of complex dorsal hand and finger defects using the turnover adipofascial flap.

    PubMed

    Deal, D Nicole; Barnwell, Jonathan; Li, Zhongyu

    2011-02-01

    Complex hand wounds with exposed tendon or bone often require free tissue transfer. We report results in 13 patients with complex dorsal hand or digital wounds who underwent soft-tissue reconstruction using a turnover adipofascial flap and skin grafting over a 35-month period. The mean patient age was 44 years. Mechanism of injury included the following: three gunshot, four degloving, one table saw, three chain saw, one thumb avulsion, and one crush. Flap sizes varied from 2 × 4 to 10 × 18 cm, involving the dorsum of the hand in four patients, thumb in two patients, index finger in one patient, long finger in three patients, long and ring fingers in one patient, and web space in two patients. Skin graft survival was 100% in 12 patients. One patient died of sepsis from unrelated medical conditions. All fractures were healed at follow-up, and there were no donor site complications. The adipofascial flap is a good alternative to free tissue transfer for the coverage of complex dorsal hand and finger soft-tissue defects and is associated with technical ease, good cosmetic results, and minimal donor site morbidity.

  5. Feasibility of a Team Approach to Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chorna, Olena; Baldwin, H. Scott; Neumaier, Jamie; Gogliotti, Shirley; Powers, Deborah; Mouvery, Amanda; Bichell, David; Maitre, Nathalie L.

    2017-01-01

    Infants with complex congenital heart disease are at high risk for poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. However, implementation of dedicated congenital heart disease follow-up programs presents important infrastructure, personnel, and resource challenges. We present the development, implementation, and retrospective review of 1- and 2-year outcomes of a Complex Congenital Heart Defect Neurodevelopmental Follow-Up program. This program was a synergistic approach between the Pediatric Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pediatric Intensive Care, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Follow-Up teams to provide a feasible and responsible utilization of existing infrastructure and personnel, to develop and implement a program dedicated to children with congenital heart disease. Trained developmental testers administered the Ages and Stages Questionnaire-3 over the phone to the parents of all referred children at least once between 6 and 12 months’ corrected age. At 18 months’ corrected age, all children were scheduled in the Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Follow-Up Clinic for a visit with standardized neurological exams, Bayley III, multidisciplinary therapy evaluations and continued follow-up. Of the 132 patients identified in the Cardiothoracic Surgery database and at discharge from the hospital, a total number of 106 infants were reviewed. A genetic syndrome was identified in 23.4% of the population. Neuroimaging abnormalities were identified in 21.7% of the cohort with 12.8% having visibly severe insults. As a result, 23 (26.7%) received first-time referrals for early intervention services, 16 (13.8%) received referrals for new services in addition to their existing ones. We concluded that utilization of existing resources in collaboration with established programs can ensure targeted neurodevelopmental follow-up for all children with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:27220370

  6. Renal defects associated with improper polarization of the CRB and DLG polarity complexes in MALS-3 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Olav; Funke, Lars; Long, Jia-fu; Fukata, Masaki; Kazuta, Toshinari; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Moore, Kimberly A; Misawa, Hidemi; Welling, Paul A; Burlingame, Alma L; Zhang, Mingjie; Bredt, David S

    2007-10-08

    Kidney development and physiology require polarization of epithelia that line renal tubules. Genetic studies show that polarization of invertebrate epithelia requires the crumbs, partition-defective-3, and discs large complexes. These evolutionarily conserved protein complexes occur in mammalian kidney; however, their role in renal development remains poorly defined. Here, we find that mice lacking the small PDZ protein mammalian LIN-7c (MALS-3) have hypomorphic, cystic, and fibrotic kidneys. Proteomic analysis defines MALS-3 as the only known core component of both the crumbs and discs large cell polarity complexes. MALS-3 mediates stable assembly of the crumbs tight junction complex and the discs large basolateral complex, and these complexes are disrupted in renal epithelia from MALS-3 knockout mice. Interestingly, MALS-3 controls apico-basal polarity preferentially in epithelia derived from metanephric mesenchyme, and defects in kidney architecture owe solely to MALS expression in these epithelia. These studies demonstrate that defects in epithelial cell polarization can cause cystic and fibrotic renal disease.

  7. Complex photonic lattices embedded with tailored intrinsic defects by a dynamically reconfigurable single step interferometric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Jolly Joseph, Joby

    2014-02-24

    We report sculptured diverse photonic lattices simultaneously embedded with intrinsic defects of tunable type, number, shape as well as position by a single-step dynamically reconfigurable fabrication approach based on a programmable phase spatial light modulator-assisted interference lithography. The presented results on controlled formation of intrinsic defects in periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic lattices, irrespective and independent of their designed lattice geometry, portray the flexibility and versatility of the approach. The defect-formation in photonic lattices is also experimentally analyzed. Further, we also demonstrate the feasibility of fabrication of such defects-embedded photonic lattices in a photoresist, aiming concrete integrated photonic applications.

  8. Transperineal three-dimensional ultrasound imaging for detection of anatomic defects in the anal sphincter complex muscles.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Milena M; Pretorius, Dolores H; Jung, Sung-Ai; Nager, Charles W; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2009-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) imaging is a powerful tool to visualize various components of the anal sphincter complex, that is, the internal anal sphincter (IAS), the external anal sphincter (EAS), and the puborectalis muscle (PRM). Our goal was to determine the reliability of the 3D-US imaging technique in detecting morphologic defects in the IAS, EAS, and PRM. Transperineal 3D-US images were obtained in 3 groups of women: nulliparous (n = 13), asymptomatic parous (n = 20), and patients with fecal incontinence (FI) (n = 25). The IAS and EAS were assessed to determine the craniocaudal length of defects and were scored as follows: 0 = normal, 1 = less than 25%, 2 = 25% to 50%, 3 = 50% to 75%, and 4 = greater than 75%. The 2 PRM hemislings were scored separately as follows: 0 = normal, 1 = less than 50% abnormal, and 2 = greater than 50% length abnormal. Subjects were grouped according to the score as follows: normal (score 0), minor abnormality (scores of 1 and 2), and major abnormality (scores of 3 and 4). Three observers performed the scoring. The 3D-US allowed detailed evaluation of the IAS, EAS, and PRM. The inter-rater reliability for detecting the defects ranged between 0.80 and 0.95. Nullipara women did not show any significant defect but the defects were quite common in asymptomatic parous and FI patients. The prevalence of defects was greater in the FI patients as compared with the asymptomatic parous women. 3D-US yields reliable assessment of morphologic defects in the anal sphincter complex muscles.

  9. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  10. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus and spinal defect (OEIS Complex) with overlapping features of body stalk anomaly (limb body wall complex).

    PubMed

    Mandrekar, Suresh R S; Amoncar, Sangeeta; Banaulikar, Siddhartha; Sawant, Vishal; Pinto, R G W

    2014-04-01

    OEIS is an extremely rare constellation of malformations, which includes omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect. We report here autopsy findings in a case of OEIS complex, which apart from the major anomalies of the complex had bilateral club foot that is, congenital talipes equinovarus, right hydroureter, and body stalk anomaly. The umbilical cord was absent, and the umbilical vessels were embedded in an amniotic sheet, which connected the skin margin of the anterior body wall defect to the placenta, this feature being the hallmark of limb body wall complex (LBWC). This case further supports the view that OEIS and LBWC represent a continuous spectrum of abnormalities rather than separate conditions and may share a common etiology and pathogenetic mechanism as proposed by some authors.

  11. Omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus and spinal defect (OEIS Complex) with overlapping features of body stalk anomaly (limb body wall complex)

    PubMed Central

    Mandrekar, Suresh R. S.; Amoncar, Sangeeta; Banaulikar, Siddhartha; Sawant, Vishal; Pinto, R. G. W.

    2014-01-01

    OEIS is an extremely rare constellation of malformations, which includes omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defect. We report here autopsy findings in a case of OEIS complex, which apart from the major anomalies of the complex had bilateral club foot that is, congenital talipes equinovarus, right hydroureter, and body stalk anomaly. The umbilical cord was absent, and the umbilical vessels were embedded in an amniotic sheet, which connected the skin margin of the anterior body wall defect to the placenta, this feature being the hallmark of limb body wall complex (LBWC). This case further supports the view that OEIS and LBWC represent a continuous spectrum of abnormalities rather than separate conditions and may share a common etiology and pathogenetic mechanism as proposed by some authors. PMID:25400352

  12. The two gap transitions in Ge1 -xSnx : Effect of non-substitutional complex defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querales-Flores, J. D.; Ventura, C. I.; Fuhr, J. D.; Barrio, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    The existence of non-substitutional β-Sn defects in Ge1 -xSnx alloys was confirmed by emission channeling experiments [Decoster et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 155204 (2010)], which established that, although most Sn enters substitutionally (α-Sn) in the Ge lattice, a second significant fraction corresponds to the Sn-vacancy defect complex in the split-vacancy configuration (β-Sn), in agreement with our previous theoretical study [Ventura et al., Phys. Rev. B 79, 155202 (2009)]. Here, we present the electronic structure calculations for Ge1 -xSnx , including the substitutional α-Sn as well as the non-substitutional β-Sn defects. To include the presence of the non-substitutional complex defects in the electronic structure calculation for this multi-orbital alloy problem, we extended the approach for the purely substitutional alloy by Jenkins and Dow [Phys. Rev. B 36, 7994 (1987)]. We employed an effective substitutional two-site cluster equivalent to the real non-substitutional β-Sn defect, which was determined by a Green's functions calculation. We then calculated the electronic structure of the effective alloy purely in terms of substitutional defects, embedding the effective substitutional clusters in the lattice. Our results describe the two transitions of the fundamental gap of Ge1 -xSnx as a function of the total Sn-concentration: namely, from an indirect to a direct gap, first, and the metallization transition at a higher x. They also highlight the role of β-Sn in the reduction of the concentration range, which corresponds to the direct-gap phase of this alloy of interest for the optoelectronics applications.

  13. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Pires, Inês; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-03-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials.

  14. More sensitive correlation of afferent pupillary defect with ganglion cell complex.

    PubMed

    Besada, Eulogio; Frauens, Barry J; Makhlouf, Rim; Shechtman, Diana; Rodman, Julie; Demeritt, Marlon; Hardigan, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the correlation between the relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in optic neuropathy. RAPD assessment was performed using a log unit neutral density filter bar. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography RTVue-100 (Optovue) was used to examine the subjects. The optic nerve head pattern (ONH) was subdivided and identified for the purpose of the study into circumpapillary RNFLT (cpRNFLT) and peripheral circumpapillary RNFLT (pcpRNFLT). The cpRNFLT, pcpRNFLT and ganglion cell complex (GCC) parameters were analyzed. Eighteen females and twenty three males with asymmetric optic neuropathy and a RAPD participated. Thirty-three subjects had glaucoma and eight had optic neuropathy other than glaucoma. Significant correlations (p<0.02) were obtained for the RAPD and the percentage difference loss of the GCC and RNFLT parameters. The grouped mean percentage difference loss for RNFLT was significantly different from that of the GCC (p<0.001). At a 0.6log unit RAPD, the average mean percentage difference loss was 23% for the CRNFLT, 15% for the GCC, 12% for the global loss volume percentage and 6% for the focal loss volume percentage (FLV%). Significant correlations between RNFLT loss for cpRNFLT, pcpRNFLT and GCC parameters with RAPD were observed. Approximately a 35% higher sensitivity was obtained using GCC compared to CRNFL parameters. The expected change in GCC average for every 0.3log unit increment was approximately 8.49μm. The FLV% corresponded more sensitively to a RAPD but appeared to be influenced by disease severity. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Complex skull defects reconstruction with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants].

    PubMed

    Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Predictable and stable functional and aesthetic result is the aim of priority for the neurosurgeon dealing with the reconstruction of large cranial bone defects and complex-formed skull defects involving cranio-orbital region. the paper presents the experience with САD/САМ titanium and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants for complex-formed and large skull bone defects reconstruction. Between 2005 and 2013 nine patients (5 females and 4 males) underwent cranioplasty and cranio-facial reconstruction with insertion of the customized САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants. Computer-assisted preoperative planning was undertaken by the surgeon and the engineer together in 3 cases to provide accurate implant design. Eight patients had complex-formed and large posttraumatic defects of fronto-orbital (7 cases) and parietal (one case) regions. In two of these cases one-step reconstruction surgery for posttraumatic fronto-orbital defects combined with adjacent orbital roof (one case) and orbito-zygomatic (one case) deformities was performed. One patient underwent one-step primary cranioplasty after cranio-orbital fibrous dysplasia focus resection. Titanium implants were used in 4 cases while PEEK implants - in 5 ones. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months till 8,5 years (median 4,4 years). The accuracy of the implant intraoperative fit was perfect in all cases. Postoperative wounds healed primary and there were no any complications in the series presented. Post-op clinical assessment and CT data testified to high implants precision, good functional and aesthetic outcomes in all patients. САD/САМ titanium and PEEK implants application should allow for optimal reconstruction in the challenging patients with complex-formed and large skull bone defects providing predictable good functional and aesthetic result together with surgery morbidity and duration reduction. Computer-assisted preoperative planning should be undertaken for САD/САМ implants creation in

  16. RSPH3 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Central-Complex Defects and a Near Absence of Radial Spokes

    PubMed Central

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Copin, Bruno; Papon, Jean-François; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Cadranel, Jacques; Corvol, Harriet; Coste, André; Désir, Julie; Souayah, Anissa; Kott, Esther; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Louis, Bruno; Tamalet, Aline; de Blic, Jacques; Clement, Annick; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal-recessive condition resulting from structural and/or functional defects of the axoneme in motile cilia and sperm flagella. The great majority of mutations identified so far involve genes whose defects result in dynein-arm anomalies. By contrast, PCD due to CC/RS defects (those in the central complex [CC] and radial spokes [RSs]), which might be difficult to diagnose, remains mostly unexplained. We identified non-ambiguous RSPH3 mutations in 5 of 48 independent families affected by CC/RS defects. RSPH3, whose ortholog in the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes a RS-stalk protein, is mainly expressed in respiratory and testicular cells. Its protein product, which localizes within the cilia of respiratory epithelial cells, was undetectable in airway cells from an individual with RSPH3 mutations and in whom RSPH23 (a RS-neck protein) and RSPH1 and RSPH4A (RS-head proteins) were found to be still present within cilia. In the case of RSPH3 mutations, high-speed-videomicroscopy analyses revealed the coexistence of immotile cilia and motile cilia with movements of reduced amplitude. A striking feature of the ultrastructural phenotype associated with RSPH3 mutations is the near absence of detectable RSs in all cilia in combination with a variable proportion of cilia with CC defects. Overall, this study shows that RSPH3 mutations contribute to disease in more than 10% of PCD-affected individuals with CC/RS defects, thereby allowing an accurate diagnosis to be made in such cases. It also unveils the key role of RSPH3 in the proper building of RSs and the CC in humans. PMID:26073779

  17. Intrinsic point defects and complexes in the quaternary kesterite semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiyou; Yang, Ji-Hui; Gong, X. G.; Walsh, Aron; Wei, Su-Huai

    2010-06-01

    Current knowledge of the intrinsic defect properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is limited, which is hindering further improvement of the performance of CZTS-based solar cells. Here, we have performed first-principles calculations for a series of intrinsic defects and defect complexes in CZTS, from which we have the following observations. (i) It is important to control the elemental chemical potentials during crystal growth to avoid the formation of secondary phases such as ZnS, CuS, and Cu2SnS3 . (ii) The intrinsic p -type conductivity is attributed to the CuZn antisite which has a lower formation energy and relatively deeper acceptor level compared to the Cu vacancy. (iii) The low formation energy of many of the acceptor defects will lead to the intrinsic p -type character, i.e., n -type doping is very difficult in this system. (iv) The role of electrically neutral defect complexes is predicted to be important, because they have remarkably low formation energies and electronically passivate deep levels in the band gap. For example, [CuZn-+ZnCu+] , [VCu-+ZnCu+] , and [ZnSn2-+2ZnCu+] may form easily in nonstoichiometric samples. The band alignment between Cu2ZnSnS4 , CuInSe2 and the solar-cell window layer CdS has also been calculated, revealing that a type-II band alignment exists for the CdS/Cu2ZnSnS4 heterojunction. The fundamental differences between CZTS and CuInSe2 for use in thin-film photovoltaics are discussed. The results are expected to be relevant to other I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductors.

  18. Use of customized polyetheretherketone (PEEK) implants in the reconstruction of complex maxillofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael M; Boahene, Kofi D O; Byrne, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    Extensive maxillofacial defects resulting from trauma or oncologic resection present reconstructive challenges. Various autografts and alloplastic materials in conjunction with standard soft-tissue techniques have been used in the reconstruction of these types of defects. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a semicrystalline polyaromatic linear polymer exhibiting an excellent combination of strength, stiffness, durability, and environmental resistance. Recent investigations of PEEK as a biomaterial resulted in the successful treatment of cervical disk disease. We describe a series of 4 patients whose defects were reconstructed using customized PEEK implants. All had excellent postoperative aesthetic and functional results without complications such as infections or extrusions. Because PEEK implants are customizable, easily workable, inert, and nonporous, they represent an ideal alloplastic material for maxillofacial reconstruction.

  19. Development of phased array techniques to improve characterization of defect located in a component of complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Mahaut, Steve; Roy, Olivier; Beroni, Claude; Rotter, Bernhard

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of complex geometry components has to cope with different problems: limited access of the area assumed to be insonified, beam misorientation and distortions, loss of sensitivity. Those harmful effects can lead to inspection performance degradations, especially in terms of defect detection and characterization. Phased array techniques may be used to overcome such difficulties, as they can provide an optimal mastering of the ultrasonic beam radiated through the inspected component. This paper presents some applications of phased array inspections carried out by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French Company of Electricity (EDF) in the framework of R&D studies. Inspections of components with varying profile (of planar and cylindrical parts, misalignment and local depression), and containing artificial reflectors have been carried out with pulse echo immersion techniques, using standard and phased arrays transducers. Optimal delay laws have been applied to preserve the beam characteristics in spite of the varying profile geometry encountered as the phased array transducer was moved over the component. Those delay laws allow to efficiently compensate the beam distortions generated by the profile geometry. They were computed using a specific model and compared to experimental delays obtained using through transmission tests. Experimental and simulation results showed that the defect detection and characterization performances were greatly enhanced using phased array techniques. In the presented examples, with standard transducers, defects located below the irregular parts of the specimen were partially detected, in accurately located or even missed, whereas phased array inspections enabled to detect and locate all of these defects.

  20. Complex superstructure patterns near defect sites of carbon nanotubes and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapasztó, L.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Osváth, Z.; Bein, M. C.; Darabont, Al.; Biró, L. P.

    2008-05-01

    Atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of native and artificially created defect sites on graphite and carbon nanotubes were compared. The presence of position-dependent coexisting superstructure patterns was identified on all of the investigated samples. The results indicate that superstructure patterns are mainly determined by the available scattered states of the system rather than the detailed structure of the defect site. We propose an interference model, which can explain the presence of coexisting superstructures both on graphite and carbon nanotubes. The model predicts reduced corrugation amplitude for the case of graphite as compared to carbon nanotubes due to the wave-vector averaging on the Fermi circle.

  1. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart defects with shunt: a heterogeneous and complex constellation].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, R; Schranz, D; Ewert, P; Kaemmerer, H

    2013-06-01

    It will be explained how pulmonary vascular disease can develop in congenital heart defects with primary left-to-right shunt across the different ages and stages of development, with and without surgical, interventional or medical treatment. Furthermore it will be discussed, in which specific stages of pulmonary vascular disease "advanced therapy" can be used.

  2. An RMND1 Mutation causes encephalopathy associated with multiple oxidative phosphorylation complex deficiencies and a mitochondrial translation defect.

    PubMed

    Janer, Alexandre; Antonicka, Hana; Lalonde, Emilie; Nishimura, Tamiko; Sasarman, Florin; Brown, Garry K; Brown, Ruth M; Majewski, Jacek; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2012-10-05

    Mutations in the genes composing the mitochondrial translation apparatus are an important cause of a heterogeneous group of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) disorders. We studied the index case in a consanguineous family in which two children presented with severe encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and intractable seizures leading to an early fatal outcome. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (BN-PAGE) analysis showed assembly defects in all of the OXPHOS complexes with mtDNA-encoded structural subunits, and these defects were associated with a severe deficiency in mitochondrial translation. Immunoblot analysis showed reductions in the steady-state levels of several structural subunits of the mitochondrial ribosome. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1250G>A) in an uncharacterized gene, RMND1 (required for meiotic nuclear division 1). RMND1 localizes to mitochondria and behaves as an integral membrane protein. Retroviral expression of the wild-type RMND1 cDNA rescued the biochemical phenotype in subject cells, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of the protein recapitulated the defect. BN-PAGE, gel filtration, and mass spectrometry analyses showed that RMND1 forms a high-molecular-weight and most likely homopolymeric complex (∼240 kDa) that does not assemble in subject fibroblasts but that is rescued by expression of RMND1 cDNA. The p.Arg417Gln substitution, predicted to be in a coiled-coil domain, which is juxtaposed to a transmembrane domain at the extreme C terminus of the protein, does not alter the steady-state level of RMND1 but might prevent protein-protein interactions in this complex. Our results demonstrate that the RMND1 complex is necessary for mitochondrial translation, possibly by coordinating the assembly or maintenance of the mitochondrial ribosome. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    PubMed Central

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M.; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. Objective This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Methods Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. Results We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. Conclusion INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. PMID:25312759

  4. An inherited immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiency associated with a defect in the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex.

    PubMed

    Kracker, Sven; Di Virgilio, Michela; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Cuenin, Cyrille; Forveille, Monique; Deau, Marie-Céline; McBride, Kevin M; Majewski, Jacek; Gazumyan, Anna; Seneviratne, Suranjith; Grimbacher, Bodo; Kutukculer, Necil; Herceg, Zdenko; Cavazzana, Marina; Jabado, Nada; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination defects (CSR-D) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by impaired production of switched immunoglobulin isotypes and normal or elevated IgM levels. They are caused by impaired T:B cooperation or intrinsic B cell defects. However, many immunoglobulin CSR-Ds are still undefined at the molecular level. This study's objective was to delineate new causes of immunoglobulin CSR-Ds and thus gain further insights into the process of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR). Exome sequencing in 2 immunoglobulin CSR-D patients identified variations in the INO80 gene. Functional experiments were performed to assess the function of INO80 on immunoglobulin CSR. We identified recessive, nonsynonymous coding variations in the INO80 gene in 2 patients affected by defective immunoglobulin CSR. Expression of wild-type INO80 in patients' fibroblastic cells corrected their hypersensitivity to high doses of γ-irradiation. In murine CH12-F3 cells, the INO80 complex accumulates at Sα and Eμ regions of the IgH locus, and downregulation of INO80 as well as its partners Reptin and Pontin impaired CSR. In addition, Reptin and Pontin were shown to interact with activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Finally, an abnormal separation of sister chromatids was observed upon INO80 downregulation in CH12-F3 cells, pinpointing its role in cohesin activity. INO80 deficiency appears to be associated with defective immunoglobulin CSR. We propose that the INO80 complex modulates cohesin function that may be required during immunoglobulin switch region synapsis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction between a steady detonation wave in nitromethane and geometrical complex confinement defects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, Blandine; Carion, Noel; Manczur, Philippe

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that detonation propagation is altered if the explosive is encased in an inert confining material. But in practice, explosives are rarely used without confinement and particular attention must be paid to the problem of explosive/confinement interactions. In this work, we have carried out two copper cylinder expansion tests on nitromethane. They differ from the classical cylinder test in that the liner includes evenly-spaced protruding circular defects. The aim is to study how a detonation front propagating in the liquid explosive interacts with the confining material defects. The subsequent motion of the metal, accelerated by the expanding detonation products, is measured using a range of diagnostic techniques: electrical probes, rapid framing camera, glass block associated with streak camera and velocity laser interferometers. The different experimental records have been examined in the light of a simple 2D theoretical shock polar analysis and 2D numerical simulations.

  6. Interaction Between a Steady Detonation Wave in Nitromethane and Geometrical Complex Confinement Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, B.; Soulard, L.; Carion, N.; Manczur, P.

    2007-12-01

    Two copper cylinder expansion tests were carried out on nitromethane. They differ from the classical cylinder test in that the liner includes evenly-spaced protruding circular defects. The aim is to study how a detonation front propagating in the liquid explosive interacts with the confining material defects. The subsequent motion of the metal, accelerated by the expanding detonation products, is measured using a range of diagnostic techniques: electrical probes, a rapid framing camera, a glass block associated with a streak camera and velocity laser interferometers. The different experimental records have been examined in the light of previous classical cylinder test measurements, simple 2D theoretical shock polar analysis results and 2D numerical simulations.

  7. Genetic complexity of regulatory mutants defective for HLA class II gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, C.; Saraiya, C.; Osterweil, Z.; Fu, Y. Ping; Lee, J.S. )

    1992-03-01

    MHC (called HLA in man) class II genes play an essential role in cell-mediated immunity. Absence of HLA class II Ag on B lymphocytes is the basis of some congenital immunodeficiencies (CID). The authors have studied CID by generating transient heterokaryons from cell lines of such patients, and report that the mutations fall into four complementation groups. In addition, fusions with the HLA class II deletion mutant 721.180 indicate that the genetic defects for each group in HLA class II expression map outside the HLA class II region. A small HLA-DRA promoter fragment is sufficient to drive expression of a reporter gene in normal B cell lines, but expression from the same construct is clearly reduced in mutant cell lines representative of all four complementation groups. This confirms earlier results that indicate defective transcription of HLA class II genes in the class II[sup [minus

  8. Numerical simulation of casting process to assist in defects reduction in complex steel tidal power component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, E. J.; Zhao, S. C.; Wang, L. P.; Wu, T.; Xin, B. P.; Tan, J. J.; Jia, H. L.

    2016-03-01

    In order to reduce defects and improve casting quality, ProCAST software is performed to study the solidification process of discharge bowl. Simulated results of original casting process show that the hot tearing is serious at the intersection of blades and outer or inner rings. The shrinkage porosity appears at the bottom of discharge bowl and the transition area of wall thickness. Based on the formation mechanisms of the defects, the structure of chills attached on the outer surface of discharge bowl casting is optimized. The thickness of chills ranges from 25mm to 35mm. The positions of chills corresponded to the outer surface of the T-shaped parts. Compared to the original casting design (without chills), the hot tearing and shrinkage porosity of the discharge bowl are greatly improved with addition of chills.

  9. Cancellous impaction bone grafting of acetabular defects in complex primary and revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Hwang, Katherine; Goodman, Stuart B

    2012-03-07

    The reconstruction of major acetabular bone defects during revision, conversion, and primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) is challenging. We reviewed a consecutive series of 168 THAs (108 revisions, 8 conversions, and 52 primary THAs) performed by 1 surgeon (S.B.G.) between 1997 and 2008 using impaction bone grafting for acetabular reconstruction. Autograft, cancellous allograft croutons, and demineralized bone matrix were used to fill bone defects as needed. The acetabular bone deficiency was classified according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: type I, segmental deficiency with significant rim defect; type II, cavitary defects medially or posteriorly; type III, combined cavitary and segmental deficiency; type IV, pelvic discontinuity; and type V, arthrodesis. According to this method, 56 hips had type I, 31 hips had type II, 48 hips had type III, and 27 hips had type IV deficiencies. Of the 168 patients, 19 subsequently died of causes unrelated to the THA, and 11 were lost to follow-up. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Average Harris Hip Score improved from 45.5±17.9 preoperatively to 81.1±16.5 postoperatively (P<.05) for revision THAs, from 40.0±11.3 preoperatively to 85.0±12.8 postoperatively (P<.05) for conversion THAs, and from 42.3±14.9 preoperatively to 85.0±12.0 postoperatively (P<.05) for primary THAs. All impaction grafted bone (allograft, autograft, or a combination) incorporated radiographically, thus restoring bone stock. Complications included 1 early infection, which was managed successfully with debridement and liner exchange, and 2 late infections that were managed successfully with staged revision. Two revisions required subsequent re-revision for late loosening. Two hip dislocations occurred, 1 of which required surgical treatment to place a constrained liner. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. An Intertypic Herpes Simplex Virus Helicase-Primase Complex Associated with a Defect in Neurovirulence Has Reduced Primase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, I.; Bloom, D.; Challberg, M.

    1998-01-01

    R13-1 is an intertypic recombinant virus in which the left-hand 18% of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genome is replaced by homologous sequences from HSV-2. R13-1 is nonneurovirulent and defective in DNA replication in neurons. The defect was localized to the UL5 open reading frame by using marker rescue analysis (D. C. Bloom and J. G. Stevens, J. Virol. 68:3761–3772, 1994). To provide conclusive evidence that UL5 is the only HSV-2 gene involved in the restricted replication phenotype of R13-1, we have characterized the phenotype of a recombinant virus (IB1) in which only the UL5 gene of HSV-1 was replaced by HSV-2 UL5. Data from 50% lethal dose determinations and the in vivo yields of virus suggested that IB1 has the same phenotypic characteristics as R13-1. UL5 is the helicase component of a complex with helicase and primase activities. All three subunits of this complex (UL5, UL8, and UL52) are required for viral DNA replication in all cell types. The intertypic complex HSV-2 UL5–HSV-1 UL8–HSV-1 UL52 was purified and biochemically characterized. The primase activity of the intertypic complex was 10-fold lower than that of HSV-1 UL5–HSV-1 UL8–HSV-1 UL52. The ATPase activity was comparable to that of the HSV-1 enzyme complex, and although the helicase activity was threefold lower, this did not interfere with the synthesis of leading strands by the HSV polymerase. One explanation for these findings is that the interactions between the subunits of the helicase-primase intertypic complex that are important for the full function of each subunit are inappropriate or weak. PMID:9445019

  11. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Pooja; Sarmah, Swapnalee; Zhou, Feng C.; Marrs, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection. PMID:24961433

  12. An Innovative Solution to Complex Inguinal Defect: Deepithelialized SIEA Flap With Mini Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Daggett, Justin; Harrington, Michael; Dayicioglu, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: We describe a novel technique of contralateral pedicled deepithelialized superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps, followed by abdominal advancement coverage, as an alternative treatment of radiated complicated inguinal or lower abdominal defects, avoiding the donor-site defect typically seen with other methods of coverage. Methods: Two male patients with histories of liposarcoma after excision and radiation to one side of lower abdomen/inguinal area presented with complicated wounds that were reconstructed with this technique. Results: Successful obliteration of dead space and wound closure were achieved with the combination of a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap with an abdominal advancement flap. In each case, patients went on to heal uneventfully without need for any secondary procedures. Discussion: The use of a superficial inferior epigastric artery flap for lower abdomen/groin defect closure is an option as an alternative to rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap and anterolateral thigh flaps and should be considered in patients with vascular anatomy conducive for this muscle-sparing procedure. Conclusions: A second layer-overlay coverage with an abdominal advancement flap creates a more durable repair in the complicated radiated wound and a well-concealed abdominoplasty scar. PMID:28197296

  13. Optimizing Ga-profiles for highly efficient Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells in simple and complex defect models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, C.; Platzer-Björkman, C.; Olsson, J.; Szaniawski, P.; Wätjen, J. T.; Fjällström, V.; Salomé, P.; Edoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Highly efficient Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 photovoltaic thin film solar cells often have a compositional variation of Ga to In in the absorber layer, here described as a Ga-profile. In this work, we have studied the role of Ga-profiles in four different models based on input data from electrical and optical characterizations of an in-house state-of-the-art Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cell with power conversion efficiency above 19%. A simple defect model with mid-gap defects in the absorber layer was compared with models with Ga-dependent defect concentrations and amphoteric defects. In these models, optimized single-graded Ga-profiles have been compared with optimized double-graded Ga-profiles. It was found that the defect concentration for effective Shockley-Read-Hall recombination is low for high efficiency CIGS devices and that the doping concentration of the absorber layer, chosen according to the defect model, is paramount when optimizing Ga-profiles. For optimized single-graded Ga-profiles, the simulated power conversion efficiency (depending on the model) is 20.5-20.8%, and the equivalent double-graded Ga-profiles yield 20.6-21.4%, indicating that the bandgap engineering of the CIGS device structure can lead to improvements in efficiency. Apart from the effects of increased doping in the complex defect models, the results are similar when comparing the complex defect models to the simple defect models.

  14. Defect Prediction and Control for Ultra-high-strength Steel Complex Structure in Hot Forming Based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xin; Zhou, Jie; Zhuo, Fang; Luo, Yan; Li, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Cracking is the main defect in ultra-high-strength steel (UHSS) forming products. In order to avoid cracking, either adjusting process parameters or changing die's design is usually applied. However, under the condition of forming parts with unreasonable structure design, it makes little difference through the traditional methods of modifying process parameters. In this paper, true stress-strain curves under different strain rates and temperatures are obtained via the hot tensile tests. Then, the material constitutive model of UHSS is introduced into software CAE; this step is used to analyze and predict defects of UHSS hot forming complex structural parts based on FEM. In addition, simulation results of changed structure (open end) are compared with original structure (closed end). The results have shown that both maximum reduction ratio and stress in all directions are sharply reduced, i.e., the forming quality is improved significantly after changing the end structure. Finally, the prediction and control methods of forming defects are verified to be feasible in actual production.

  15. Brain maturation is delayed in infants with complex congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Daniel J.; Shera, David M.; Clancy, Robert R.; Wernovsky, Gil; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Spray, Thomas L.; Gaynor, J. William; Vossough, Arastoo

    2009-01-01

    Objective Small head circumferences and white matter injury in the form of periventricular leukomalacia have been observed in populations of infants with severe forms of congenital heart defects. This study tests the hypothesis that congenital heart defects delay in utero structural brain development. Methods Full-term infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome or transposition of the great arteries were prospectively evaluated with preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with independent risk factors for abnormal brain development (shock, end-organ injury, or intrauterine growth retardation) were excluded. Outcome measures included head circumferences and the total maturation score on magnetic resonance imaging. Total maturation score is a previously validated semiquantitative anatomic scoring system used to assess whole brain maturity. The total maturation score evaluates 4 parameters of maturity: (1) myelination, (2) cortical infolding, (3) involution of glial cell migration bands, and (4) presence of germinal matrix tissue. Results The study cohort included 29 neonates with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and 13 neonates with transposition of the great arteries at a mean gestational age of 38.9 ± 1.1 weeks. Mean head circumference was 1 standard deviation below normal. The mean total maturation score for the cohort was 10.15 ± 0.94, significantly lower than reported normative data in infants without congenital heart defects, corresponding to a delay of 1 month in structural brain development. Conclusion Before surgery, term infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and transposition of the great arteries have brains that are smaller and structurally less mature than expected. This delay in brain development may foster susceptibility to periventricular leukomalacia in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. PMID:19258059

  16. Anatomically realistic patient-specific surgical planning of complex congenital heart defects using MRI and CFD.

    PubMed

    Sundareswaran, Kartik S; de Zelicourt, Diane; Pekkan, Kerem; Jayaprakash, Gopinath; Kim, David; Whited, Brian; Rossignac, Jarek; Fogel, Mark A; Kanter, Kirk R; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2007-01-01

    Single ventricle congenital heart defects, which are characterized by cyanotic mixing between the oxygenated and de-oxygenated blood, afflict 2 per every 1000 live births. These defects are surgically treated by connecting the superior and inferior vena cava to the pulmonary arteries. However, such a configuration (also known as the total cavopulmonary connection), results in high energy losses and therefore the optimization of this connection prior to the surgery could significantly improve post-operative performance. In this paper, a surgical planning framework is proposed. It is exemplified on a patient with pre and post surgical MRI data. A pediatric surgeon performed a "virtual surgery" on the reconstruction of the patient's anatomy prior to the actual surgery. Post-operative hemodynamics in the virtually designed post-surgical anatomy and in the actual one are computed using computational fluid dynamics and compared to each other. This framework provides the surgeon to envision numerous scenarios of possible surgical options, and accordingly predict the post operative hemodynamics.

  17. Reconstruction of a Complex Scalp Defect after the Failure of Free Flaps: Changing Plans and Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Kim, Gyeong Hoe

    2017-01-01

    The ideal scalp reconstruction involves closure of the defect with similar hair-bearing local tissue in a single step. Various reconstructions can be used including primary closure, secondary healing, skin grafts, local flaps, and microvascular tissue transfer. A 53-year-old female patient suffered glioblastoma, which had recurred for the second time. The neurosurgeons performed radial debridement and an additional resection of the tumor, followed by reconstruction using a serratus anterior muscle flap with a split-thickness skin graft. Unfortunately, the flap became completely useless and a bilateral rotation flap was used to cover the defect. Two month later, seroma with infection was found due to recurrence of the tumor. Additional surgery was performed using multiple perforator based island flap. The patient was discharged two weeks after surgery without any complications, but two months later, the patient died. Radical surgical resection of tumor is the most important curative option, followed by functional and aesthetic reconstruction. We describe a patient with a highly malignant tumor that required multiple resections and subsequent reconstruction. Repeated recurrences of the tumor led to the failure of reconstruction and our strategy inevitably changed, from reconstruction to palliative treatment involving fast and stable wound closure for the patient's comfort. PMID:28913317

  18. Complex congenital heart defect, heterotaxy, imperforate anus, and other congenital anomalies in a 27-week infant: a case study.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Angela

    2014-01-01

    According to multiple researchers and studies, congenital heart disease (CHD) occurs in approximately 4.8-12.0 of 1,000 live births in the general population, and 2.4 per 1,000 cases are serious enough to require surgery or cardiac catheterization in the first year of life.1 Historically, it has been assumed that the earlier the gestational age with CHD, the poorer the outcome; however, with continued improvements in neonatal care, this hypothesis should be looked at more closely. This case illustrates the challenges associated with prematurity, complex cardiac defects, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and other congenital anomalies that increase the risk of infection and/or surgical intervention. It will discuss the hospital course of a twin, born at 27 weeks gestation, who was found to have all of these diagnoses, yet, despite the complexity of his case, he had a predominantly uncomplicated hospital course.

  19. Evaluation of bone formation guided by DNA/protamine complex with FGF-2 in an adult rat calvarial defect model.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Yosuke; Toda, Masako; Ohno, Jun; Kawaguchi, Minoru; Kido, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Tadao

    2014-11-01

    DNA/protamine complex paste (D/P) and D/P complex paste with Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2) (D/P-FGF) were prepared to investigate their new bone formation abilities using an ∼40-week-old rat calvarial defect model. It was found that D/P could release FGF-2 proportionally in an in vitro experiment with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was also found that aging adversely affected self-bone healing of rats by comparison with the results in a previous study using 10-week-old rats. Microcomputed tomography and histopathological examinations showed that new bone formation abilities of D/P and D/P-FGF were superior to that of the control (sham operation). Control, D/P and D/P-FGF showed newly formed bone areas of 6.7, 58.3, and 67.0%, respectively, 3 months after the operation. Moreover, it was found that FGF-2 could support the osteoanagenesis ability of D/P. It was considered that FGF-2 could play an important role in new bone formation at early stages because it induced the genes such as collagen I, CBFA, OSX, and OPN, which are initiated first in the process of osteogenesis. Therefore, D/P-FGF will be a useful injectable biomaterial with biodegradable properties for the repair of bone defects in the elderly.

  20. [Defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Homza, B V; Vasyl'kovs'ka, R A; Semchyshyn, H M

    2014-01-01

    TOR signaling pathway first described in yeast S. cerevisiae is the highly conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth, aging and stress resistance. The effect of nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, on the activity of TOR signaling pathway is well studied, however its relation to carbohydrates is poor understood. The aim of the present study is expanding of our understanding of potential role of TOR regulatory complexes in development of carbonyl/oxidative stress that can result from yeast cultivation on glucose and fructose. It has been shown that the level of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds and protein carbonyl groups increased with time of yeast cultivation and was higher in cells grown on fructose that demonstrated their accelerated aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development as compared with cells grown on glucose. The strains defective in TOR proteins cultivated in the presence of glucose as well as fructose demonstrated lower markers of the stress and aging than parental strain. Thus these data confirmed the previous conclusion on fructose more potent ability to cause carbonyl/oxidative stress and accelerated aging in S. cerevisiae as compared with glucose. However, defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and development of the stress in yeast independent on the type of carbohydrate in the cultivation medium.

  1. Hydrogen interstitial defects in acceptor-type CuO-doped PbTiO3—Uptake and dissolution of water vapor and formation of ( CuTi ″ - (OH ) O • ) ' defect complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakes, Peter; Kungl, Hans; Schierholz, Roland; Granwehr, Josef; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.

    2016-09-01

    The defect structure of CuO-doped PbTiO3 has been analyzed using the Hyperfine Sublevel Correlation Experiment to identify hydrogen interstitials. The formation of ( CuTi ″ - (OH ) O • ) ' defect complexes has been observed, which exist in addition to the ( CuTi ″ - VO • • ) × complexes. On this basis, modified reorientation characteristics are proposed due to a change in hopping mechanism from an oxygen-vacancy mediated migration mechanism to a proton hopping process. Furthermore, mobile hydrogen interstitials are generated that increase conductivity in terms of a "Grotthuss"-type charge-transport mechanism.

  2. Anesthesia for major general surgery in neonates with complex cardiac defects.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy; Stokes, Monica; Moriarty, Anthony

    2009-02-01

    Centers with large cardiac workloads may be presented with neonates who need major general surgery before correction or palliation of a serious cardiac defect. This is still a rare situation with only three short case reports available in the medical literature (1-3). We have reviewed the anesthetic and analgesic regimens of 18 such neonates who presented to the Birmingham Children's Hospital in the 4-year period 2004-2007. These children require meticulous preoperative evaluation and although it might be anticipated that they would pose a serious challenge to anesthetists, in reality with thorough investigation, preparation, and careful management, they tolerate general anesthesia well. These children may be transferred to centers of specialist pediatric cardiac anesthesia to be benefited from experience obtained there.

  3. Synthesis and Defect Structure Analysis of Complex Oxides for Li-Ion Battery Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaoguang

    Lithium-ion batteries have attracted increased attention for energy storage development due to the vast demand from portable electronics, (hybrid) electric vehicles and future power grids. The research in this dissertation is focused on the development of oxide electrodes for lithium-ion batteries with high power density and improved stability. One of the promising cathodes for lithium-ion batteries is lithium manganospinel (LiMn2O4). However, this compound suffers from manganese dissolution and a Jahn-Teller distortion due to Mn3+, especially in oxygen deficient LiMn2O4-delta. Hydrothermal based synthesis methods were developed to eliminate oxygen vacancies to enable high power in cathodes composed of nano-sized spinel particles. The relationship between oxygen defects and the capacity fading mechanism was demonstrated, and collapse of the mechanical structure was identified in defect-rich LiMn 2O4-delta. Next, the nickel substituted manganospinel, LiNi0.5Mn 1.5O4 shows unexpected high voltage side reactions. To overcome this drawback, a thin and chemically inert titanate was used as an artificial SEI (solid electrolyte interface) coating to prohibit transition-metal dissolution and parasitic side reactions, which led to a 200% improvement of the capacity retention at 55°C and negligible polarization losses. Finally, the spinel-structured lithium titanate (Li 4Ti5O12) is introduced as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries due to its higher operating potential and excellent structural stability compared to current graphite anodes. However, the poor electronic conductivity and low lithium diffusion coefficient hinder its wide application. Given these advantages, a facile, low-cost solution method is explored to synthesize nano-sized titanates. Rapid charge/ discharge was achieved up to rates of 100 C (36 second charge/ discharge) due to a shorter lithium mean-free path and better contact between the active material and conductive agents.

  4. Riboflavin-responsive oxidative phosphorylation complex I deficiency caused by defective ACAD9: new function for an old gene.

    PubMed

    Gerards, Mike; van den Bosch, Bianca J C; Danhauser, Katharina; Serre, Valérie; van Weeghel, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Sluiter, Wim; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Scholte, Hans R; Prokisch, Holger; Rötig, Agnès; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Smeets, Hubert J M

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I deficiency is the most common oxidative phosphorylation defect. Mutations have been detected in mitochondrial and nuclear genes, but the genetics of many patients remain unresolved and new genes are probably involved. In a consanguineous family, patients presented easy fatigability, exercise intolerance and lactic acidosis in blood from early childhood. In muscle, subsarcolemmal mitochondrial proliferation and a severe complex I deficiency were observed. Exercise intolerance and complex I activity was improved by a supplement of riboflavin at high dosage. Homozygosity mapping revealed a candidate region on chromosome three containing six mitochondria-related genes. Four genes were screened for mutations and a homozygous substitution was identified in ACAD9 (c.1594 C>T), changing the highly conserved arginine-532 into tryptophan. This mutation was absent in 188 ethnically matched controls. Protein modelling suggested a functional effect due to the loss of a stabilizing hydrogen bond in an α-helix and a local flexibility change. To test whether the ACAD9 mutation caused the complex I deficiency, we transduced fibroblasts of patients with wild-type and mutant ACAD9. Wild-type, but not mutant, ACAD9 restored complex I activity. An unrelated patient with the same phenotype was compound heterozygous for c.380 G>A and c.1405 C>T, changing arginine-127 into glutamine and arginine-469 into tryptophan, respectively. These amino acids were highly conserved and the substitutions were not present in controls, making them very probably pathogenic. Our data support a new function for ACAD9 in complex I function, making this gene an important new candidate for patients with complex I deficiency, which could be improved by riboflavin treatment.

  5. Effect of the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect doping on properties of the semi-insulating GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Deming Qiao, Hongbo; Shi, Wei; Li, Enling

    2014-04-21

    The different position V{sub As}V{sub Ga} cluster defect doping in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs has been studied by first-principles calculation based on hybrid density functional theory. Our calculated results show that EL6 level is formed due to the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect, which is very close to the experimental result. It provides the explanation of the absorption of laser with the wavelength beyond in semi-insulating GaAs. The formation energy of V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect is found to decrease from surface to interior gradually. The conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs (001) surface with the V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are all located at Γ point, and some defect levels are produced in the forbidden band. In contrast, the conduction band minima and valence band maxima of GaAs with the interior V{sub As}V{sub Ga} complex defect are not located at the same k-point, so it might involve the change of momentum in the electron transition process. The research will help strengthen the understanding of photoelectronic properties and effectively guide the preparation of the SI-GaAs materials.

  6. OC21 - Psychosocial functioning of parents of infants diagnosed with complex congenital heart defect.

    PubMed

    Petsios, Konstantinos; Matziou, Vassiliki; Voutoufianaki, Ioanna; Manatou, Anna; Azariadis, Prodromos; Rammos, Spiros

    2016-05-09

    Theme: Parenting/parenthood. The diagnosis of complex CHD impacts the psychosocial status of parents and their functioning. A critical evaluation of the literature concerning the psychosocial parental response to their infant's diagnosis of complex CHD. Systematic review of 18 articles published after 2000 in PubMed and CINAHL. The impact of an infant's CHD on the family functioning is determined both by child's medical condition and family's psychosocial factors. The majority of parents experience intense loss and numerous stressors. Nurses and physicians need to be sensitive to the needs, thoughts and experiences of the parents when discussing treatment options. Families with poor social support networks may have the greatest need for professional interventions. Appropriate interventions assist the majority of parents to adapt to the diagnosis of complex CHD. However, there are a number of parents with an increased psychosocial risk associated with higher rates of emotional distress.

  7. Defect engineering of complex semiconductor alloys: Cu2-2xMxO1-yXy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan

    2013-03-01

    The electrical properties of semiconductors are generally controlled via doping, i.e., the incorporation of dilute concentrations of aliovalent impurity atoms, whereas the band structure properties (gap, effective masses, optical properties) are manipulated by alloying, i.e., the incorporation of much larger amounts of isovalent elements. Theoretical approaches usually address either doping or alloying, but rarely both problems at the same time. By combining defect supercell calculations, GW quasi-particle energy calculation, and thermodynamic modeling, we study the range of electrical and band structure properties accessible by alloying aliovalent cations (M = Mg, Zn, Cd) and isovalent anions (X = S, Se) in Cu2O. In order to extend dilute defect models to higher concentrations, we take into account the association/dissociation of defect pairs and complexes, as well as the composition dependence of the band gap and the band edge energies. Considering a composition window for the Cu2-2xMxO1-yXy alloys of 0 <= (x,y) <= 0.2, we predict a wide range of possible band gaps from 1.7 to 2.6 eV, and net doping concentrations between p = 1019 cm-3 and n = 1017cm-3, notably achieving type conversion from p- to n-type at Zn or Cd compositions around x = 0.1. This work is supported as part of the SunShot initiative by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to NREL.

  8. Phenotypic Spectrum in Osteogenesis Imperfecta Due to Mutations in TMEM38B: Unraveling a Complex Cellular Defect.

    PubMed

    Webb, Emma A; Balasubramanian, Meena; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Cabral, Wayne A; Titheradge, Hannah; Alsaedi, Atif; Saraff, Vrinda; Vogt, Julie; Cole, Trevor; Stewart, Susan; Crabtree, Nicola J; Sargent, Brandi M; Gamsjaeger, Sonja; Paschalis, Eleftherios P; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Shaw, Nick J; Marini, Joan C; Högler, Wolfgang

    2017-06-01

    Recessive mutations in TMEM38B cause type XIV osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) by dysregulating intracellular calcium flux. Clinical and bone material phenotype description and osteoblast differentiation studies. Natural history study in pediatric research centers. Eight patients with type XIV OI. Clinical examinations included bone mineral density, radiographs, echocardiography, and muscle biopsy. Bone biopsy samples (n = 3) were analyzed using histomorphometry, quantitative backscattered electron microscopy, and Raman microspectroscopy. Cellular differentiation studies were performed on proband and control osteoblasts and normal murine osteoclasts. Type XIV OI clinical phenotype ranges from asymptomatic to severe. Previously unreported features include vertebral fractures, periosteal cloaking, coxa vara, and extraskeletal features (muscular hypotonia, cardiac abnormalities). Proband lumbar spine bone density z score was reduced [median -3.3 (range -4.77 to +0.1; n = 7)] and increased by +1.7 (1.17 to 3.0; n = 3) following bisphosphonate therapy. TMEM38B mutant bone has reduced trabecular bone volume, osteoblast, and particularly osteoclast numbers, with >80% reduction in bone resorption. Bone matrix mineralization is normal and nanoporosity low. We demonstrate a complex osteoblast differentiation defect with decreased expression of early markers and increased expression of late and mineralization-related markers. Predominance of trimeric intracellular cation channel type B over type A expression in murine osteoclasts supports an intrinsic osteoclast defect underlying low bone turnover. OI type XIV has a bone histology, matrix mineralization, and osteoblast differentiation pattern that is distinct from OI with collagen defects. Probands are responsive to bisphosphonates and some show muscular and cardiovascular features possibly related to intracellular calcium flux abnormalities.

  9. GSK3 inactivation is involved in mitochondrial complex IV defect in transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1-induced senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Yong-Hak; Lee, Young-Kyoung; Hwang, Sung-Chul; Seong Hwang, Eun; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2012-09-10

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF {beta}1) induces Mv1Lu cell senescence by persistently producing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) through decreased complex IV activity. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of TGF {beta}1 on mitochondrial complex IV activity. TGF {beta}1 progressively phosphorylated the negative regulatory sites of both glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) {alpha} and {beta}, corresponding well to the intracellular ROS generation profile. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, did not alter this GSK3 phosphorylation (inactivation), whereas pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 by SB415286 significantly increased mitochondrial ROS, implying that GSK3 phosphorylation is an upstream event of the ROS generation. GSK3 inhibition by SB415286 decreased complex IV activity and cellular O{sub 2} consumption rate and eventually induced senescence of Mv1Lu cell. Similar results were obtained with siRNA-mediated knockdown of GSK3. Moreover, we found that GSK3 not only exists in cytosol but also in mitochondria of Mv1Lu cell and the mitochondrial GSK3 binds complex IV subunit 6b which has no electron carrier and is topologically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Involvement of subunit 6b in controlling complex IV activity and overall respiration rate was proved with siRNA-mediated knockdown of subunit 6b. Finally, TGF {beta}1 treatment decreased the binding of the subunit 6b to GSK3 and subunit 6b phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 inactivation is importantly involved in TGF {beta}1-induced complex IV defects through decreasing phosphorylation of the subunit 6b, thereby contributing to senescence-associated mitochondrial ROS generation.

  10. Complex dynamics of defective interfering baculoviruses during serial passage in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Mark P; Pijlman, Gorben P; Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-03-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses are thought to cause oscillations in virus levels, known as the 'Von Magnus effect'. Interference by DI viruses has been proposed to underlie these dynamics, although experimental tests of this idea have not been forthcoming. For the baculoviruses, insect viruses commonly used for the expression of heterologous proteins in insect cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying DI generation have been investigated. However, the dynamics of baculovirus populations harboring DIs have not been studied in detail. In order to address this issue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to determine the levels of helper and DI viruses during 50 serial passages of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in Sf21 cells. Unexpectedly, the helper and DI viruses changed levels largely in phase, and oscillations were highly irregular, suggesting the presence of chaos. We therefore developed a simple mathematical model of baculovirus-DI dynamics. This theoretical model reproduced patterns qualitatively similar to the experimental data. Although we cannot exclude that experimental variation (noise) plays an important role in generating the observed patterns, the presence of chaos in the model dynamics was confirmed with the computation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, and a Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse route to chaos was identified at decreasing production of DI viruses, using mutation as a control parameter. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of DI baculoviruses, and suggest that changes in virus levels over passages may exhibit chaos.

  11. Influence of defect-impurity complexes on slow positron yield of a tungsten moderator: Positron annihilation, Auger, and SIMS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarendra, G.; Rajaraman, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2004-03-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten foil annealed at successively higher temperature up to ˜2300 K has been investigated for slow positron moderation yield. LINAC-based intense positron beam lifetime studies have revealed that reemitted slow positron and positronium fractions gradually improve upon high-temperature annealing. So as to correlate the presence of defects and chemical impurities with the improvement in slow positron yield, positron annihilation, Auger electron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), studies have been carried out on virgin and high-temperature (˜2300 K) annealed W foils. The positron beam S parameter shows a large value throughout the sample depth corresponding to the virgin sample, while it is lower for annealed samples. This indicates that, as compared to virgin sample, the annealed W sample has a lower concentration of vacancylike defects. Auger studies revealed that in virgin state the surface is fully contaminated with carbon, while the annealed foil shows prominent W peaks. Corroborative SIMS concentration profiles have indicated that the carbon content is much lower in an annealed sample over a large depth region. From these studies, it is concluded that improvement in slow positron yield upon high-temperature annealing is obtained due to the removal of the surface tungsten-carbide layer as well as carbon-vacancy complexes present throughout the sample depth.

  12. The Pch2 AAA+ ATPase promotes phosphorylation of the Hop1 meiotic checkpoint adaptor in response to synaptonemal complex defects

    PubMed Central

    Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; González-Arranz, Sara; Cavero, Santiago; Lechuga, Ana; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic cells possess surveillance mechanisms that monitor critical events such as recombination and chromosome synapsis. Meiotic defects resulting from the absence of the synaptonemal complex component Zip1 activate a meiosis-specific checkpoint network resulting in delayed or arrested meiotic progression. Pch2 is an evolutionarily conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the checkpoint-induced meiotic block in the zip1 mutant, where Pch2 is only detectable at the ribosomal DNA array (nucleolus). We describe here that high levels of the Hop1 protein, a checkpoint adaptor that localizes to chromosome axes, suppress the checkpoint defect of a zip1 pch2 mutant restoring Mek1 activity and meiotic cell cycle delay. We demonstrate that the critical role of Pch2 in this synapsis checkpoint is to sustain Mec1-dependent phosphorylation of Hop1 at threonine 318. We also show that the ATPase activity of Pch2 is essential for its checkpoint function and that ATP binding to Pch2 is required for its localization. Previous work has shown that Pch2 negatively regulates Hop1 chromosome abundance during unchallenged meiosis. Based on our results, we propose that, under checkpoint-inducing conditions, Pch2 also possesses a positive action on Hop1 promoting its phosphorylation and its proper distribution on unsynapsed chromosome axes. PMID:27257060

  13. Birth-death process of local structures in defect turbulence described by the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yusuke; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2014-04-01

    Defect turbulence described by the one-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is investigated and analyzed via a birth-death process of the local structures composed of defects, holes, and modulated amplitude waves (MAWs). All the number statistics of each local structure, in its stationary state, are subjected to Poisson statistics. In addition, the probability density functions of interarrival times of defects, lifetimes of holes, and MAWs show the existence of long-memory and some characteristic time scales caused by zigzag motions of oscillating traveling holes. The corresponding stochastic process for these observations is fully described by a non-Markovian master equation.

  14. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  15. Defective Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression in a Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Michael K.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Cohen, Peter A.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Cheshire, L. Bryan; Linehan, W. Marston; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Alexander, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We studied major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in 12 tumor cell culture lines established from patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In one of these cell culture lines, UOK 123, we found no surface expression of β2-microglobulin (β2m) and MHC class I by flow cytometry. Immunofluorescence staining using three different monoclonal antibodies to β2m revealed no detectable β2m in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, cytoplasm, or on the cell surface. There was no evidence of folded class I molecules inside or on the surface of the cells; however, the ER stained intensively for unfolded class I molecules. Transient expression of β2m by UOK 123 after infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the gene for β2m resulted in normal expression of both β2m and class I (HLA-A, B, C) determinants assessed by flow cytometry analysis. No expression of class I or β2m was seen with the recombinant vaccinia vector carrying a control gene. The inability of class I molecules to reach the cell surface is due to the requirement of β2m for proper folding and presentation of the class I MHC complex. The failure to assemble and express MHC class I complex on the cell surface renders these cells incapable of antigen presentation to cyto-toxic T cells and provides a mechanism for escape from immune recognition by the tumor. PMID:7582258

  16. A qualitative study exploring the psychosocial value of weekend camping experiences for children and adolescents with complex heart defects.

    PubMed

    Desai, P P; Sutton, L J; Staley, M D; Hannon, D W

    2014-07-01

    Children living with complex heart defects (CHD) are likely to have ongoing social, emotional, physical, and health concerns, and are in need of additional psychosocial support. Summer camps can provide therapeutic benefits. Little research exists regarding the value of shorter camping experiences from the perspectives of children with CHD. The aim of our study was to explore what children and adolescents with CHD considered meaningful when attending a therapeutic camping weekend in the company of peers with similar medical diagnoses. Engaging a phenomenological approach we used participant generated photography and reflective semi-structured interviews to explore participants' lived experience and value derived from their weekend camping experiences. The study was completed with thirteen participants ranging in age from 9 to 16 years. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using Van Manen's guidelines. Three themes reflecting the camp experiences were generated from the data. Meaningful experiences spanned three outcomes which had some overlapping influences: (i) Developing relationships and feeling accepted by peers and counsellors at camp; (ii) Enjoying and learning during the weekend; and (iii) Experiencing the natural and human-built therapeutic environmental features of camp. The camping programme features, inputs, and processes as identified by the participants in contributing to these outcomes are described. This qualitative study showed that children living with complex CHD valued the opportunity for participating in weekend camping experiences in the company of peers with similar heart defects. Findings contribute to a better understanding of what programme features and processes were considered meaningful. Given the scarcity of resources to devote to such social support activities, the findings may help professionals to plan effective interventions to maximize benefits during a shorter camping experience. © 2013 John Wiley

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Elastic Wave Propagation and Defect Interaction in Large, Complex Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J.; Cawley, P.; Drozdz, M.; Lowe, M.; Habgood, N.

    2008-02-01

    Rolls-Royce Marine and Imperial College, London are working together to develop a conformable phased array membrane probe for the inspection of components with complex surface geometry. This device will allow inspection of welded components without the need to remove the weld cap. To assess the performance of the membrane device it must be benchmarked against conventional inspection techniques. As an aid to inspection qualification (IQ) a range of advanced modelling techniques are also under investigation. This paper reports on the experimental results obtained form this benchmark testing and compares these results to simulated data.

  18. Defects in the adherens junction complex (E-cadherin/ β-catenin) in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shameer; Nijhuis, Anke; Kumagai, Tomoko; Lindsay, James; Silver, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial monolayer of the intestine is a selective barrier permitting nutrient and electrolyte absorption yet acting to protect the underlying tissue compartments and cellular components from attack and infiltration by antigens, bacteria and bacterial products present in the lumen. Disruption of this barrier has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The adherens junction (AJ), together with tight junctions (TJ) and desmosomes, form an apical junction complex that controls epithelial cell-to-cell adherence and barrier function as well as regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, intracellular signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation. Numerous studies and reviews highlight the responses of TJs to physiological and pathological stimuli. By comparison, the response of AJ proteins, and the subsequent consequences for barrier function, when exposed to the IBD inflammatory milieu, is less well studied. In this review, we will highlight the roles and responses of the AJ proteins in IBD and provide suggestions for future studies. We will also consider recently proposed therapeutic strategies to preserve or restore epithelial barrier functions to prevent and treat IBD.

  19. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis: A Complex Defect in Immune Responsiveness to Human Papillomavirus-6 and -11

    PubMed Central

    Bonagura, Vincent R.; Hatam, Lynda J.; Rosenthal, David W.; DeVoti, James A.; Lam, Fung; Steinberg, Bettie M.; Abramson, Allan L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP) is a rare disease of the larynx caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) -6 or -11, associated with significant morbidity and on occasion mortality. Here we summarized our current understanding of the permissive adaptive and innate responses made by patients with RRP that support chronic HPV infection and prevent immune clearance of these viruses. Furthermore, we provide new evidence of TH2-like polarization in papillomas and blood of patients with RRP, restricted CD4 and CD8 Vβ repertoires, the effect of HPV-11 early protein E6 on T-cell alloreactivity, enriched Langerhans cell presence in papillomas, and evidence that natural killer (NK) cells are dysfunctional in RRP. We review the immunogenetics that regulate the dysfunctional responses made by patients with RRP in response to HPV infection of the upper airway. In addition, we are identifying T-cell epitopes on HPV-11 early proteins, in the context of HLA class II alleles enriched in RRP that should help generate a therapeutic vaccine. Taken together, RRP is a complex, multigene disease manifest as a tissue and HPV-specific, immune deficiency that prevents effective clearance and/or control of HPV-6 and -1 infection. PMID:20553528

  20. A mitochondrial complex I defect impairs cold-regulated nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Lee, Hojoung; Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-06-01

    To study low-temperature signaling in plants, we previously screened for cold stress response mutants using bioluminescent Arabidopsis plants that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the stress-responsive RD29A promoter. Here, we report on the characterization and cloning of one mutant, frostbite1 (fro1), which shows reduced luminescence induction by cold. fro1 plants display reduced cold induction of stress-responsive genes such as RD29A, KIN1, COR15A, and COR47. fro1 leaves have a reduced capacity for cold acclimation, appear water-soaked, leak electrolytes, and accumulate reactive oxygen species constitutively. FRO1 was isolated through positional cloning and found to encode a protein with high similarity to the 18-kD Fe-S subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, EC 1.6.5.3) in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Confocal imaging shows that the FRO1:green fluorescent protein fusion protein is localized in mitochondria. These results suggest that cold induction of nuclear gene expression is modulated by mitochondrial function.

  1. Axonopathy is associated with complex axonal transport defects in a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Mihaela; Seehusen, Frauke; Kreutzer, Robert; Pringproa, Kidsadagorn; Kummerfeld, Maren; Claus, Peter; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkul, Arno; Beineke, Andreas; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2012-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease characterized by myelin and axonal pathology. In a viral model of MS, we tested whether axonopathy initiation and development are based on an impaired transport of neurofilaments. Spinal cords of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-infected and mock-infected mice and TMEV infected neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were analyzed by microarray analysis, light microscopy and electron and laser confocal microscopy. In vivo axonal accumulation of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments after TMEV infection revealed a temporal development caused by the impairments of the axonal traffic consisting of the downregulation of kinesin family member 5A, dynein cytoplasmic heavy chain 1, tau-1 and β-tubulin III expression. In addition, alterations of the protein metabolism were also noticed. In vitro, the TMEV-infected N1E-115 cells developed tandem-repeated swellings similar to in vivo alterations. Furthermore, the hypothesis of an underlying axonal self-destruction program involving nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide depletion was supported by molecular findings. The obtained data indicate that neurofilament accumulation in TME is mainly the result of dysregulation of their axonal transport machinery and impairment of neurofilament phosphorylation and protein metabolism. The present findings allow a more precise understanding of the complex interactions responsible for initiation and development of axonopathies in inflammatory degenerative diseases.

  2. ESR study of photoinduced defects in isotopically enriched quasi-one-dimensional chlorine-bridged platinum complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Johnson, S. R.; Swanson, B. I.; Donohoe, R. J.

    1997-10-01

    Photoinduced defects in the quasi-one-dimensional chlorine-bridged platinum complex, [PtII(en)2][PtIV(en)2Cl2](ClO4)4, where en=ethylenediamine, C2N2H8, were investigated by light-induced electron-spin resonance (LESR). Using samples prepared with enriched nuclear isotopes including 194Pt (I=0), 2H (I=1), and 37Cl (I=3/2, magnetogyric ratio ~83% that of 35Cl), the hyperfine and superhyperfine (SHF) patterns in the LESR spectra were fully characterized. The SHF structure (16 G average spacing) is unequivocally assigned to the bridging chlorines by comparison of the LESR spectra from samples with natural abundance Cl with samples enriched with 37Cl. The LESR spectra were analyzed at g⊥, g∥, and intermediate angles by simulation of both the polaron and soliton-spin distributions. The results at temperatures above 6 K were found to be in better agreement with the neutral soliton assignment advanced by Kuroda and co-workers. The spectra from 6 to 140 K do not indicate motional narrowing as has been previously suggested. Below 6 K, surprisingly, the LESR spectra of both the natural and isotopically enriched samples exhibit an unusual dependence on temperature, modulation frequency, or microwave power, which indicates the presence of a localized dynamic process. Two other types of defect which exhibit strong sample-to-sample variability were also discovered in the LESR spectra: one is likely a spin triplet, and the other appears only at temperatures above approximately 120 K and is quite intense and stable at room temperature.

  3. Robotic Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR): is it possible to offer minimally invasive surgery for abdominal wall complex defects?

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Vitória França DO; Guimarães, José Ricardo; Volpe, Paula; Oliveira, Flávio Malcher Martins DE; Domene, Carlos Eduardo; Roll, Sérgio; Cavazzola, Leandro Totti

    2017-01-01

    We describe the preliminary national experience and the early results of the use of robotic surgery to perform the posterior separation of abdominal wall components by the Transversus Abdominis Release (TAR) technique for the correction of complex defects of the abdominal wall. We performed the procedures between 04/2/2015 and 06/15/2015 and the follow-up time was up to six months, with a minimum of two months. The mean surgical time was five hours and 40 minutes. Two patients required laparoscopic re-intervention, since one developed hernia by peritoneal migration of the mesh and one had mesh extrusion. The procedure proved to be technically feasible, with a still long surgical time. Considering the potential advantages of robotic surgery and those related to TAR and the results obtained when these two techniques are associated, we conclude that they seem to be a good option for the correction of complex abdominal wall defects. RESUMO Descrevemos a experiência preliminar nacional na utilização da cirurgia robótica para realizar a separação posterior de componentes da parede abdominal pela técnica transversus abdominis release (TAR) na correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal e seus resultados precoces. As cirurgias foram realizadas entre 02/04/2015 e 15/06/2015 e o tempo de acompanhamento dos resultados foi de até seis meses, com tempo mínimo de dois meses. O tempo cirúrgico médio foi de cinco horas e 40 minutos. Dois pacientes necessitaram reintervenção por laparoscopia, pois um desenvolveu hérnia por migração peritoneal da tela e um teve escape da tela. A cirurgia provou ser factível do ponto de vista técnico, com um tempo cirúrgico ainda elevado. Tendo em vista as vantagens potenciais da cirurgia robótica e aquelas relacionadas ao TAR e os resultados obtidos ao se associar essas duas técnicas, conclui-se que elas parecem ser uma boa opção para a correção de defeitos complexos da parede abdominal.

  4. Defective pairing and synaptonemal complex formation in a Sordaria mutant (spo44) with a translocated segment of the nucleolar organizer.

    PubMed

    Zickler, D; de Lares, L; Moreau, P J; Leblon, G

    1985-01-01

    The recessive meiotic mutant spo44 of Sordaria macrospora, with 90% ascospore abortion, exhibits striking effects on recombination (67% decrease), irregular segregation of the almost unpaired homologues, and a decrease in chiasma frequency in the few cases where bivalents are formed. Three-dimensional reconstructions of ten prophase nuclei indicate that pairing, as judged by the absence of fully formed synaptonemal complexes (SC), is not achieved although lateral elements (LE) assemble. The pairing failure is attributable to defects in the alignment of homologous chromosomes. The leptotene alignment seen in the wild type before SC formation was not observed in the spo44 nuclei. Dense material, considered to be precursor of SC central elements, was found scattered among the LE in two nuclei. The behaviour of spo44 substantiates the hypothesis that chromosome matching and SC formation are separable events. - The total length of the LE in the mutant is the same as in the wild type, but due to variable numbers and length of the individual LE, homologues cannot be lined up. Light microscopic observations indicate that the irregular length and number of LE is due to extensive chromosome breakage. The wild-type function corresponding to spo44 is required for both LE integrity and chromosome matching. Reconstructions of heterozygous nuclei reveal the presence of a supernumerary nucleolar organizer in one arm of chromosome 7. It is suggested that rDNA has been inserted into a gene whose function is involved in pairing or into a controlling sequence that interacts with the pairing process.

  5. Rehabilitation of a complex midfacial defect by means of a zygoma-implant-supported prosthesis and nasal epithesis: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Procacci, Pasquale; D'Agostino, Antonio; Ferrari, Francesca; De Santis, Daniele; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Several authors have described zygoma implants as a reliable surgical option to rehabilitate severe maxillary defects in case of extreme atrophy or oncological resections. The aim of this study is to report a new technical approach to the rehabilitation of a complex oronasal defect by means of a zygoma-implant-supported full-arch dental prosthesis combined with a nasal epithesis. The patient presented with a subtotal bilateral maxillectomy and total rhinectomy defect because of a squamous cell carcinoma of the nose. No reconstructive surgery was performed because of the high risk of recurrence; moreover, the patient refused any secondary procedure. After surgery, the patient presented a wide palatal defect associated to the absence of the nasal pyramid. Zygoma-retained prostheses are well documented, and they offer good anchorage in rehabilitating wide defects after oncological surgery and a good chance for patients to improve their quality of life. We hereby describe two prosthetic devices rehabilitating two iatrogenic defects by means of a single intraoral implant-supported bar extending throughout the oronasal communication, thus offering nasal epithesis anchorage. At 1-year follow-up after functional prosthetic loading, no implant failure has been reported. Clinical and radiological follow-up showed no sign of nasal infection or peri-implantitis. The patient reported a sensitive improvement of his quality of life. Simultaneous oral and nasal rehabilitation of complex oronasal defects with zygoma-implant-supported dental prosthesis and nasal epithesis represents a reliable surgical technique. According to this clinical report, the above-mentioned technique seems to be a valuable treatment option as it is safe, reliable and easy to handle for both surgeon and patient.

  6. Identification of vacancy defect complexes in transparent semiconducting oxides ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkonen, Ilja; Korhonen, Esa; Prozheeva, Vera; Tuomisto, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy, when combined with supporting high-quality modeling of positron states and annihilation in matter, is a powerful tool for detailed defect identification of vacancy-type defects in semiconductors and oxides. Here we demonstrate that the Doppler broadening of the positron annihilation radiation is a very sensitive means for observing the oxygen environment around cation vacancies, the main open-volume defects trapping positrons in measurements made for transparent semiconducting oxides. Changes in the positron annihilation signal due to external manipulation such as irradiation and annealing can be correlated with the associated changes in the sizes of the detected vacancy clusters. Our examples for ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2 demonstrate that oxygen vacancies in oxides can be detected directly using positron annihilation spectroscopy when they are complexed with cation vacancies.

  7. Comparisons between intrinsic bonding defects in d 0 transition metal oxide such as HfO 2, and impurity atom defects in d 0 complex oxides such as GdScO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucovsky, Gerald; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Miotti, Leonardi; Bastos, Karen Pas; Amado, Carolina; Schlom, Darrell

    2009-12-01

    This article addresses O-atom vacancy defects in the d 0 transition metal (TM) oxides HfO 2 and TiO 2, and Ti substitutions for Sc in the d 0 complex oxide GdScO 3. In each instance this results in occupied TM atoms with d 1 state representations. These are important for different aspects of the ultimate scaling limits for performance and functionality in nano-scale Si devices. The occupancy of d 1 states is cast in terms of many-electron theory in order to determine the effects of correlation on device performance and functionality. The first section of this article identifies equivalent d-state representations using on an ionic model for the effective valence states of Ti and Hf atoms bordering on O-atom vacancy defects. Removal of an O atom to create a neutral vacancy; this is equivalent to the bonding of two electrons to each vacancy site. This give rise to two coupled d 1 states for a mono-vacancy defect. Transitions from these occupied states generate spectroscopic features in the (i) pre-edge shake-up, and (ii) virtual bound state (VBS) shake-off energy regimes in O K edge XAS spectra. The number of states confirm that these are mono-vacancy defects. The second section addresses incorporation of Ti tetravalent impurities into trivalent GdScO 3, forcing Ti into a Ti 3+ state and generating a d 1 electronic structure. Vacancy defect concentrations in HfO 2 are generally <10 19 cm -3. However, the Ti solubility in GdScO 3 is higher, and relative concentrations in excess of 16-17% lead to an insulator to metal transition with a ferri-magnetic electronic structure.

  8. A unique missense allele of BAF155, a core BAF chromatin remodeling complex protein, causes neural tube closure defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L; Pavan, William J; Salbaum, J Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2014-05-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155(msp3) , a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155(mps3) embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development.

  9. Utility and Scope of Rapid Prototyping in Patients with Complex Muscular Ventricular Septal Defects or Double-Outlet Right Ventricle: Does it Alter Management Decisions?

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Puneet; Tretter, Justin T; Ludomirsky, Achi; Argilla, Michael; Latson, Larry A; Chakravarti, Sujata; Barker, Piers C; Yoo, Shi-Joon; McElhinney, Doff B; Wake, Nicole; Mosca, Ralph S

    2017-01-01

    Rapid prototyping facilitates comprehension of complex cardiac anatomy. However, determining when this additional information proves instrumental in patient management remains a challenge. We describe our experience with patient-specific anatomic models created using rapid prototyping from various imaging modalities, suggesting their utility in surgical and interventional planning in congenital heart disease (CHD). Virtual and physical 3-dimensional (3D) models were generated from CT or MRI data, using commercially available software for patients with complex muscular ventricular septal defects (CMVSD) and double-outlet right ventricle (DORV). Six patients with complex anatomy and uncertainty of the optimal management strategy were included in this study. The models were subsequently used to guide management decisions, and the outcomes reviewed. 3D models clearly demonstrated the complex intra-cardiac anatomy in all six patients and were utilized to guide management decisions. In the three patients with CMVSD, one underwent successful endovascular device closure following a prior failed attempt at transcatheter closure, and the other two underwent successful primary surgical closure with the aid of 3D models. In all three cases of DORV, the models provided better anatomic delineation and additional information that altered or confirmed the surgical plan. Patient-specific 3D heart models show promise in accurately defining intra-cardiac anatomy in CHD, specifically CMVSD and DORV. We believe these models improve understanding of the complex anatomical spatial relationships in these defects and provide additional insight for pre/intra-interventional management and surgical planning.

  10. Complex technique of large sural flap: an alternative option for free flap in large defect of the traumatized foot.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhah, Naser; Motamed, Sadrollah; Hosseini, Seyed Nejat; Hallajmofrad, Hamid Reza; Abdolzadeh, Madjid; Afzali Borujeni, Lotfallah; Mousavinasab, Seyednouraddin

    2011-01-01

    The distally based sural fasciocutaneous flap has become a main part of the reconstruction of the lower leg, heel and foot. However, perfusion problems and venous congestion have been reported. Over the past decade, several flap modifications have been reported to improve flap viability and to solve a myriad of reconstructive needs. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience in harvesting the reversed large sural flap from the proximal and middle third of the leg for large defects on the foot. We applied the extended reversed sural flap from the proximal third of the leg in traumatized patients which had large defects on their foot. The technique was done in 3 parts: 1- the flaps were designed in the proximal third of the leg five centimeter lipofascial tissue was protected around the pedicle in distal part; 3- The pivot point was located in seven to eight cm proximal the lateral malleolus before the first fasciocutaneous perforators arising from the peroneal artery. Sural flaps from the proximal and middle third of the leg were designed in13 patients who had large defects on their foot. No flap necrosis or split thickness skin graft loss occurred. The flaps healed by the 3rd week excluding two patients. This study supports the application of our technique as a safe, easy and useable method in large defects of the foot. The results showed low rates of ischemia, venous congestion, dehiscence, infection and flap necrosis. Proximal extended and large distally based sural flap is an alternative to free tissue transfer for large defect reconstruction of the foot.

  11. A Study of BMP-2-Loaded Bipotential Electrolytic Complex around a Biphasic Calcium Phosphate-Derived (BCP) Scaffold for Repair of Large Segmental Bone Defect

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Kallyanashis; Padalhin, Andrew R.; Linh, Nguyen Thuy Ba; Kim, Boram; Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byong Taek

    2016-01-01

    A bipotential polyelectrolyte complex with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) powder dispersion provides an excellent option for protein adsorption and cell attachment and can facilitate enhanced bone regeneration. Application of the bipotential polyelectrolyte complex embedded in a spongy scaffold for faster healing of large segmental bone defects (LSBD) can be a promising endeavor in tissue engineering application. In the present study, a hollow scaffold suitable for segmental long bone replacement was fabricated by the sponge replica method applying the microwave sintering process. The fabricated scaffold was coated with calcium alginate at the shell surface, and genipin-crosslinked chitosan with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) dispersion was loaded at the central hollow core. The chitosan core was subsequently loaded with BMP-2. The electrolytic complex was characterized using SEM, porosity measurement, FTIR spectroscopy and BMP-2 release for 30 days. In vitro studies such as MTT, live/dead, cell proliferation and cell differentiation were performed. The scaffold was implanted into a 12 mm critical size defect of a rabbit radius. The efficacy of this complex is evaluated through an in vivo study, one and two month post implantation. BV/TV ratio for BMP-2 loaded sample was (42±1.76) higher compared with hollow BCP scaffold (32±0.225). PMID:27711142

  12. Oral everolimus treatment in a preterm infant with multifocal inoperable cardiac rhabdomyoma associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and a structural heart defect.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ibrahim; Ethier, Guillaume; Goyer, Isabelle; Major, Philippe; Dahdah, Nagib

    2014-11-26

    Rhabdomyoma (RHM) is a benign cardiac tumour usually associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Most RHMs are asymptomatic and regress spontaneously during the first years of life. Haemodynamically significant RHMs are classically treated with surgical excision. We present a case of a premature infant, born to a mother having TSC, with a prenatal diagnosis of pulmonary valve atresia and a large ventricular septal defect. Multiple cardiac RHMs were also present, including a large tumour affecting the right ventricular filling. Owing to the prematurity and low birth weight, the infant was inoperable. In this report, we describe our approach to pharmacologically reduce the RHM size using oral everolimus in preparation for a two-ventricle surgical repair of the structural cardiac defect. We also specifically describe the dose of everolimus that was used in this case to achieve therapeutic serum levels, which was seven times lower than the conventional dose applicable for older infants.

  13. Complexes of Sendai virus NP-P and P-L proteins are required for defective interfering particle genome replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Horikami, S M; Curran, J; Kolakofsky, D; Moyer, S A

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that the formation of NP-P and P-L protein complexes is essential for replication of the genome of Sendai defective interfering (DI-H) virus in vitro, using extracts of cells expressing these viral proteins from plasmids. Optimal replication of DI-H nucleocapsid RNA required extracts of cells transfected with critical amounts and ratios of each of the plasmids and was three- to fivefold better than replication with a control extract prepared from a natural virus infection. Extracts in which NP and P proteins were coexpressed supported replication of the genome of purified DI-H virus which contained endogenous polymerase proteins, but extracts in which NP and P were expressed separately and then mixed were inactive. Similarly, the P and L proteins must be coexpressed for biological activity. The replication data thus suggest that two protein complexes, NP-P and P-L, are required for nucleocapsid RNA replication and that these complexes must form during or soon after synthesis of the proteins. Biochemical evidence in support of the formation of each complex includes coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins of each complex with an antibody specific for one component and cosedimentation of the subunits of each complex. We propose that the P-L complex serves as the RNA polymerase and NP-P is required for encapsidation of newly synthesized RNA. Images PMID:1321276

  14. Pyoderma gangrenosum following complex reconstruction of a large-scale lower limb defect by combined Parascapular and latissimus dorsi flap

    PubMed Central

    Cordts, Tomke; Bigdeli, Amir K.; Harhaus, Leila; Hirche, Christoph; Kremer, Thomas; Kneser, Ulrich; Schmidt, Volker J.

    2017-01-01

    A female patient with a critical soft tissue defect after elective knee replacement surgery was transferred to our department for reconstruction. As wounds were rapidly progressing, necrotizing fasciitis was initially suspected but eventually ruled out by histopathological analysis. A 50 × 15 cm defect was then reconstructed by means of a combined Parascapular and latissimus dorsi flap before, a couple days later, the patient developed tender pustules and ulcers involving the flap as well as the donor site. Attempts of excising necrotic areas not only continued to fail but seemed to worsen the patient's wound and overall condition. Eventually, pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) was diagnosed and local and systemic therapy was initiated but treatment proved to be challenging and insufficient at first. Being an extremely aggressive disease, early diagnosis is crucial and PG should always be suspected when rapidly progressive ulceration on surgical sites is observed. PMID:28096323

  15. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) mutations in pituitary tumors: could this be a new role for mitochondrial complex II and/or Krebs cycle defects?

    PubMed

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or mitochondrial complex II is a multimeric enzyme that is bound to the inner membrane of mitochondria and has a dual role as it serves both as a critical step of the tricarboxylic acid or Krebs cycle and as a member of the respiratory chain that transfers electrons directly to the ubiquinone pool. Mutations in SDH subunits have been implicated in the formation of familial paragangliomas (PGLs) and/or pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and in Carney-Stratakis syndrome. More recently, SDH defects were associated with predisposition to a Cowden disease phenotype, renal, and thyroid cancer. We recently described a kindred with the coexistence of familial PGLs and an aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, harboring an SDHD mutation. The pituitary tumor showed loss of heterozygosity at the SDHD locus, indicating the possibility that SDHD's loss was causatively linked to the development of the neoplasm. In total, 29 cases of pituitary adenomas presenting in association with PHEOs and/or extra-adrenal PGLs have been reported in the literature since 1952. Although a number of other genetic defects are possible in these cases, we speculate that the association of PHEOs and/or PGLs with pituitary tumors is a new syndromic association and a novel phenotype for SDH defects.

  16. Drosophila variable nurse cells encodes Arrest defective 1 (ARD1), the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Mijares, Michelle; Gall, Megan D.; Turan, Tolga; Javier, Anna; Bornemann, Douglas J; Manage, Kevin; Warrior, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila variable nurse cells (vnc) gene result in female sterility and oogenesis defects, including egg chambers with too many or too few nurse cells. We show that vnc corresponds to Arrest Defective1 (Ard1) and encodes the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major N-terminal acetyl-transferase complex. While N-terminal acetylation is one of the most prevalent covalent protein modifications in eukaryotes, analysis of its role in development has been challenging since mutants that compromise NatA activity have not been described in any multicellular animal. Our data show that reduced ARD1 levels result in pleiotropic oogenesis defects including abnormal cyst encapsulation, desynchronized cystocyte division, disrupted nurse cell chromosome dispersion and abnormal chorion patterning, consistent with the wide range of predicted NatA substrates. Further we find that loss of Ard1 affects cell survival/proliferation and is lethal for the animal, providing the first demonstration that this modification is essential in higher eukaryotes. PMID:20882681

  17. Succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) mutations in pituitary tumors: could this be a new role for mitochondrial complex II and/or Krebs cycle defects?

    PubMed Central

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2013-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or mitochondrial complex II is a multimeric enzyme that is bound to the inner membrane of mitochondria and has a dual role as it serves both as a critical step of the tricarboxylic acid or Krebs cycle and as a member of the respiratory chain that transfers electrons directly to the ubiquinone pool. Mutations in SDH subunits have been implicated in the formation of familial paragangliomas (PGLs) and/or pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and in Carney–Stratakis syndrome. More recently, SDH defects were associated with predisposition to a Cowden disease phenotype, renal, and thyroid cancer. We recently described a kindred with the coexistence of familial PGLs and an aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, harboring an SDHD mutation. The pituitary tumor showed loss of heterozygosity at the SDHD locus, indicating the possibility that SDHD’s loss was causatively linked to the development of the neoplasm. In total, 29 cases of pituitary adenomas presenting in association with PHEOs and/or extra-adrenal PGLs have been reported in the literature since 1952. Although a number of other genetic defects are possible in these cases, we speculate that the association of PHEOs and/or PGLs with pituitary tumors is a new syndromic association and a novel phenotype for SDH defects. PMID:22889736

  18. Visual field defects and changes in macular retinal ganglion cell complex thickness in eyes with intrachoroidal cavitation are similar to those in early glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Shinichi; Mizoue, Shiro; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To examine the characteristics of visual field defects and optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in eyes with intrachoroidal cavitation (ICC) and investigate the similarities between these results and glaucomatous changes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with ICC based on peripapillary radial cross-sectional scans performed with OCT. Visual field was measured with the Humphrey automated visual field analyzer SITA standard central 24-2 program, and macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness was measured in 9×9 mm areas on OCT. The positive rates for the Anderson criteria, site of visual field defect, and mean GCC thickness in each quadrant were compared; the association between these results and ICC location was assessed. Results Fifteen eyes from eleven patients (five males and six females; mean age, 54.6±10.7 years) were selected for investigation. ICC was detected in the inferior temporal side of the optic disc in all studied eyes. The positive rate for the Anderson criteria was 73.3% (11/15 eyes). Visual field defects were most commonly observed in the cluster that corresponded to the superior Bjerrum area (53.3%; 8/15 eyes). GCC thickness was significantly lower in the inferior side, where the ICC was located, than the superior side, where the ICC was absent (P=0.0001). GCC thinning that correlated with ICC was observed in 66.7% (10/15 eyes) of the ICC eyes. Conclusion Visual field and GCC findings on OCT in ICC eyes are extremely similar to those observed in superior visual field defect-type early glaucoma, indicating a possible difficulty in distinguishing the two conditions. PMID:27418805

  19. [Lung pathology of complex congenital heart defect with diminished pulmonary blood flow but without aortopulmonary collateral artery and patent ductus arteriosus in infants and young children].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Tong; Liu, Ying-Long; Ruan, Ying-Mao; Yu, Cun-Tao; Liu, Lei

    2008-06-01

    The development of pulmonary vascular bed is strongly flow-dependent. Abnormal pulmonary blood flow leads to pulmonary pathological changes. This study aimed to observe the pathological changes of small pulmonary arteries and alveoli in complex congenital heart defect with diminished pulmonary blood flow but without aortopulmonary collateral artery (APCA) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in infants and young children. Autopsy pulmonary specimens obtained from 5 children who died of non-cardiovascular diseases were used as the control group (age: 4-18 months). Fifty-six children (age: 4-36 months) with complex congenital heart defect with diminished pulmonary blood flow but without APCA and PDA served as the study group, including 34 cases of tetralogy of Fallot, 7 cases of double outlet right ventricle with pulmonary stenosis, 9 cases of single ventricle with pulmonary stenosis, 4 cases of tricuspid atresia with pulmonary stenosis and 2 cases of complete atrioventricular septal defect with pulmonary stenosis. Pulmonary specimen sections were stained by hematoxylin-eosin and Weigert-Van Gieson. Percentage of media thickness (MT%), percentage of media section area (MS%), number of small arterial per square centimeter (APSC), mean alveolar number (MAN), mean linear intercept (MLI), proportion of parenchyma area in total area (PPA%) and alveolar to small arterial ratio per unit area (AAR) were measured by morphologic quantitative analysis. MT% (10.93+/-2.87% vs 15.08+/-2.51%), MS% (18.97+/-5.56% vs 25.04+/-3.87%) and APSC (202.43+/-67.45 vs 441.69+/-65.29) decreased significantly in the study group compared with the control group (P<0.01). The internal diameter of small pulmonary artery (80.26+/-21.57 microm vs 58.53+/-10.29 microm; P<0.05), AAR (46.59+/-14.43 vs 34.46+/-4.98; P<0.01) and MLI (144.98+/-44.87 microm vs 108.39+/-20.76 microm; P<0.05) increased significantly compared with the control group. The media of small pulmonary arteries becomes thinner, the

  20. Complex oncologic reconstruction of a mandibular and floor of mouth defect with a fibula free flap in an achondroplastic patient.

    PubMed

    García-Rozado, Alvaro; Martín Sastre, Roberto J; López Cedrún, José L

    2003-01-01

    The fibular free flap is seen as one of the foremost technical options in mandibular reconstruction, especially in those defects where long bone is required. Cases with squamous-cell carcinoma of the floor of the mouth with mandibular spread and subsequent segmentary mandibular removal are the cornerstone examples. A case of squamous-cell carcinoma of the whole floor of the mouth with mandibular invasion is reported. Radical resection of the floor of the mouth and bilateral mandibular horizontal ramus was performed, with a bony defect extending from angle to angle. The patient revealed an achondroplastic condition, with remarkable dwarfism and long-bone morphological alterations, that minimized the potential fibular length to transfer. A microsurgical reconstruction with an osteocutaneous fibular free flap was undertaken. The flap design was technically compromised by the forward bowing of the fibula and the ossification of the interosseous membrane. Specific intraoperative strategies for dealing with anatomic variations are discussed. The fibular free flap is an excellent technique for mandibular reconstruction. Morphological deviations can modify the design of the flap. Achondroplasia is not a deterrent in successful use of the free fibula flap for reconstruction of the head and neck in adequately selected cases.

  1. Construction of "Toxin Complex" in a Mutant Serotype C Strain of Clostridium botulinum Harboring a Defective Neurotoxin Gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    A non-toxigenic mutant of the toxigenic serotype C Clostridium botulinum strain Stockholm (C-St), C-N71, does not produce the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). However, the original strain C-St produces botulinum toxin complex, in which BoNT is associated with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin proteins (HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17). Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of bont gene knockout on the formation of the "toxin complex." Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that a premature stop codon was introduced in the bont gene, whereas other genes were not affected by this mutation. Moreover, we successfully purified the "toxin complex" produced by C-N71. The "toxin complex" was identified as a mixture of NTNHA/HA-70/HA-17/HA-33 complexes with intact NTNHA or C-terminally truncated NTNHA, without BoNT. These results indicated that knockout of the bont gene does not affect the formation of the "toxin complex." Since the botulinum toxin complex has been shown to play an important role in oral toxin transport in the human and animal body, a non-neurotoxic "toxin complex" of C-N71 may be valuable for the development of an oral drug delivery system.

  2. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  3. Cloning of the major histocompatibility complex class II promoter binding protein affected in a hereditary defect in class II gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Reith, W; Barras, E; Satola, S; Kobr, M; Reinhart, D; Sanchez, C H; Mach, B

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression is directly involved in the control of normal and abnormal immune responses. In humans, HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP class II heterodimers are encoded by a family of alpha- and beta-chain genes clustered in the major histocompatibility complex. Their expression is developmentally controlled and normally restricted to certain cell types. This control is mediated by cis-acting sequences in class II promoters and by trans-acting regulatory factors. Several nuclear proteins bind to class II promoter sequences. In a form of hereditary immunodeficiency characterized by a defect in a trans-acting regulatory factor controlling class II gene transcription, we have observed that one of these nuclear factors (RF-X) does not bind to its target sequence (the class II X box). A cDNA encoding RF-X was isolated by screening a phage expression library with an X-box binding-site probe. The recombinant protein has the binding specificity of RF-X, including a characteristic gradient of affinity for the X boxes of HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ promoters. RF-X mRNA is present in the regulatory mutants, indicating a defect in the synthesis of a functional form of the RF-X protein. Images PMID:2498880

  4. Mutations in NDUFB11, Encoding a Complex I Component of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain, Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Rahden, Vanessa A.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject’s mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  6. Loss of Pink1 modulates synaptic mitochondrial bioenergetics in the rat striatum prior to motor symptoms: concomitant complex I respiratory defects and increased complex II-mediated respiration.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Kelly L; Villeneuve, Lance M; Purnell, Phillip R; Ottemann, Brendan M; Emanuel, Katy; Fox, Howard S

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1), a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, cause a recessive inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD). Pink1 deletion in rats results in a progressive PD-like phenotype, characterized by significant motor deficits starting at 4 months of age. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, the pathogenic mechanism underlying disease due to Pink1-deficiency remains obscure. Striatal synaptic mitochondria from 3-month-old Pink1-deficient rats were characterized using bioenergetic and mass spectroscopy (MS)-based proteomic analyses. Striatal synaptic mitochondria from Pink1-deficient rats exhibit decreased complex I-driven respiration and increased complex II-mediated respiration compared with wild-type rats. MS-based proteomics revealed 69 of the 811 quantified mitochondrial proteins were differentially expressed between Pink1-deficient rats and controls. Down-regulation of several electron carrier proteins, which shuttle electrons to reduce ubiquinone at complex III, in the Pink1-knockouts suggests disruption of the linkage between fatty acid, amino acid, and choline metabolism and the mitochondrial respiratory system. These results suggest that complex II activity is increased to compensate for loss of electron transfer mechanisms due to reduced complex I activity and loss of electron carriers within striatal nerve terminals early during disease progression. This may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The Proteome of BLOC-1 Genetic Defects Identifies the Arp2/3 Actin Polymerization Complex to Function Downstream of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Factor Dysbindin at the Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Cortnie; Freeman, Amanda H.; Das, Ravi; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Vistein, Rachel; Burch, Amelia; Carrot, Guillemette; Lewis, Arielle F.; Nelms, Sheldon; Dickman, Dion K.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Cox, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Proteome modifications downstream of monogenic or polygenic disorders have the potential to uncover novel molecular mechanisms participating in pathogenesis and/or extragenic modification of phenotypic expression. We tested this idea by determining the proteome sensitive to genetic defects in a locus encoding dysbindin, a protein required for synapse biology and implicated in schizophrenia risk. We applied quantitative mass spectrometry to identify proteins expressed in neuronal cells the abundance of which was altered after downregulation of the schizophrenia susceptibility factor dysbindin (Bloc1s8) or two other dysbindin-interacting polypeptides, which assemble into the octameric biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1). We found 491 proteins sensitive to dysbindin and BLOC-1 loss of function. Gene ontology of these 491 proteins singled out the actin cytoskeleton and the actin polymerization factor, the Arp2/3 complex, as top statistical molecular pathways contained within the BLOC-1-sensitive proteome. Subunits of the Arp2/3 complex were downregulated by BLOC-1 loss of function, thus affecting actin dynamics in early endosomes of BLOC-1-deficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arp2/3, dysbindin, and subunits of the BLOC-1 complex biochemically and genetically interact, modulating Drosophila melanogaster synapse morphology and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate that ontologically prioritized proteomics identifies novel pathways that modify synaptic phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorder gene defects. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanisms associated with schizophrenia are mostly unknown despite the increasing number of genetic loci identified that increase disease risk. We present an experimental strategy that impartially and comprehensively interrogates the proteome of neurons to identify effects of genetic mutations in a schizophrenia risk factor, dysbindin. We find that the expression of the

  8. The Proteome of BLOC-1 Genetic Defects Identifies the Arp2/3 Actin Polymerization Complex to Function Downstream of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Factor Dysbindin at the Synapse.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Avanti; Hartwig, Cortnie; Freeman, Amanda H; Das, Ravi; Zlatic, Stephanie A; Vistein, Rachel; Burch, Amelia; Carrot, Guillemette; Lewis, Arielle F; Nelms, Sheldon; Dickman, Dion K; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; Cox, Daniel N; Faundez, Victor

    2016-12-07

    Proteome modifications downstream of monogenic or polygenic disorders have the potential to uncover novel molecular mechanisms participating in pathogenesis and/or extragenic modification of phenotypic expression. We tested this idea by determining the proteome sensitive to genetic defects in a locus encoding dysbindin, a protein required for synapse biology and implicated in schizophrenia risk. We applied quantitative mass spectrometry to identify proteins expressed in neuronal cells the abundance of which was altered after downregulation of the schizophrenia susceptibility factor dysbindin (Bloc1s8) or two other dysbindin-interacting polypeptides, which assemble into the octameric biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex 1 (BLOC-1). We found 491 proteins sensitive to dysbindin and BLOC-1 loss of function. Gene ontology of these 491 proteins singled out the actin cytoskeleton and the actin polymerization factor, the Arp2/3 complex, as top statistical molecular pathways contained within the BLOC-1-sensitive proteome. Subunits of the Arp2/3 complex were downregulated by BLOC-1 loss of function, thus affecting actin dynamics in early endosomes of BLOC-1-deficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arp2/3, dysbindin, and subunits of the BLOC-1 complex biochemically and genetically interact, modulating Drosophila melanogaster synapse morphology and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Our results indicate that ontologically prioritized proteomics identifies novel pathways that modify synaptic phenotypes associated with neurodevelopmental disorder gene defects. The mechanisms associated with schizophrenia are mostly unknown despite the increasing number of genetic loci identified that increase disease risk. We present an experimental strategy that impartially and comprehensively interrogates the proteome of neurons to identify effects of genetic mutations in a schizophrenia risk factor, dysbindin. We find that the expression of the actin polymerization

  9. Controversies in Parotid Defect Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tamplen, Matthew; Knott, P Daniel; Fritz, Michael A; Seth, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the parotid defect is a complex topic that encompasses restoration of both facial form and function. The reconstructive surgeon must consider facial contour, avoidance of Frey syndrome, skin coverage, tumor surveillance, potential adjuvant therapy, and facial reanimation when addressing parotid defects. With each defect there are several options within the reconstructive ladder, creating controversies regarding optimal management. This article describes surgical approaches to reconstruction of parotid defects, highlighting areas of controversy.

  10. Role of defects and their complexes on the dependence of photoconductivity on dark resistivity of single ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafuerte, M.; Zamora, D. J.; Bridoux, G.; Ferreyra, J. M.; Meyer, M.; Heluani, S. P.

    2017-02-01

    We have studied the correlation between the photoconductivity and the dark resistivity of single ZnO microwires. We found that as-grown microwires with higher dark resistivities have higher photoconductivities. However, when the microwires are thermal treated in vacuum, this correlation is inverted. We have also analyzed the behavior of photoconductivity on protonated as-grown samples. We discuss the origin of these behaviors in terms of the interplay of oxygen and zinc vacancies and their complexes acting as recombination or trapping centers.

  11. Association of Sjögren's syndrome with C4 deficiency, defective reticuloendothelial function and circulating immune complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Hersey, P; Lawrence, S; Prendergast, D; Bindon, C; Benson, W; Valk, P

    1983-01-01

    A case of Sjögren's syndrome with the sicca complex is presented which was associated with persistently low or absent C4 levels, high levels of circulating immune complexes and abnormal reticuloendothelial clearance of damaged or IgG antibody sensitized autologous red blood cells (RBCs). Investigation of normal relatives of the patient revealed low C4 levels and abnormal reticuloendothelial clearance of damaged or sensitized RBCs. HLA, A, B, DR typing revealed a high incidence of the HLA B8, DR3 haplotype and of homozygous null alleles at the C4A locus in the family members. These results suggest that the C4 deficiency and the abnormal reticuloendothelial function in the patient was in part genetically determined and may have predisposed to the development of Sjögren's syndrome. These findings serve to emphasize the possible importance of abnormal macrophage function in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome and suggest that further investigation of these aspects may increase understanding of this disease. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6872316

  12. [Complex plasty of the atrioventricular valve in defects with a functional single ventricle--surgical technic and midterm results].

    PubMed

    Tláskal, T; Chaloupecký, V; Reich, O; Marek, J

    2002-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases with a functionally single ventricle can be surgically treated using total cavopulmonary connection. Regurgitation of atrioventricular valves represents one of risk factors for death and unfavourable long-term result after this operation. During 1996-2001 total cavopulmonary connection with a complex plastic repair of atrioventricular valves was performed in 8 patients at the age from 1.4 to 13.3 years (median 7.8 years). All patients had very complex congenital heart diseases with severe malformation of atrioventricular valves. All but one had pulmonary stenosis or atresia. Six patients had common atrioventricular orifice, 5 patients had bilateral superior caval veins and 4 patients had dextrocardia or mesocardia. In 6 (75%) patients one or two palliative operations had been performed earlier. Before surgery all patients were cyanotic with severe hypoxemia and polyglobulia. All patients had regurgitant atrioventricular valves. The surgery was performed from the midline sternotomy approach, in extracorporeal circulation and moderate hypothermia. The surgery consisted in excision of the atrial septum, construction of a direct connection of all superior and inferior caval veins with the pulmonary artery, transsection of the pulmonary trunk and complex plastic repair of atrioventricular valves. The inferior caval vein was derived to the pulmonary artery using an intraatrial lateral tunnel in 3 patients and using an external conduit from a Goretex vascular prosthesis in 5 patients. In 5 patients a fenestration in tunnel or conduit permitting decompression of the systemic venous return was done. Individualized plastic repair of atrioventricular valves consisted in the suture of the central portions of both common leaflets. Four patients required also commissuroplasty of one to four commissures and two patients required annuloplasty. All patients survived the early postoperative period. In the majority of them complications occurred: hypoxemia

  13. Ab-initio studies on Li doping, Li-pairs, and complexes between Li and intrinsic defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidya, R.; Ravindran, P.; Fjellvâg, H.

    2012-06-01

    First-principles density functional calculations have been performed on Li-doped ZnO using all-electron projector augmented plane wave method. Li was considered at six different interstitial sites (Lii), including anti-bonding and bond-center sites and also in substitutional sites such as at Zn-site (Lizn) and at oxygen site (Lio) in the ZnO matrix. Stability of LiZn over Lii is shown to depend on synthetic condition, viz., LiZn is found to be more stable than Lii under O-rich conditions. Hybrid density functional calculations performed on LiZn indicate that it is a deep acceptor with (0/-) transition taking place at 0.74 eV above valence band maximum. The local vibrational frequencies for Li-dopants are calculated and compared with reported values. In addition, we considered the formation of Li-pair complexes and their role on electronic properties of ZnO. Present study suggests that at extreme oxygen-rich synthesis condition, a pair of acceptor type LiZn-complex is found to be stable over the compensating Lii + LiZn pair. The stability of complexes formed between Li impurities and various intrinsic defects is also investigated and their role on electronic properties of ZnO has been analyzed. We have shown that a complex between LiZn and oxygen vacancy has less formation energy and donor-type character and could compensate the holes generated by Li-doping in ZnO.

  14. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  15. The Role of Defect Complexes in the Magneto-Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Brandon

    been concluded to contain a nitrogen vacancy (V N) in its immediate structure. The nitrogen vacancy can appear in two symmetries, which has a profound impact on the luminescence and magnetic properties of the sample. The structure of the minority site has also been identified. For both sites, we give substantial evidence that the excitation efficiency of the red Eu emission is improved by the presence of donor-acceptor pairs in the vicinity of the Eu. Furthermore, when Mg was co-doped into GaN:Eu, additional incorporation environments were discovered that show high excitation efficiency at room temperature. These have been attributed to the coupling of Mg-H complexes to the majority Eu site. Electron beam irradiation, indirect and resonant (direct) laser excitation were found to modify these complexes, indicating that vibrational energy alone can trigger the migration of the H, while the presence of additional charges and excess energy controls the type of reconfiguration and the activation of non-radiative decay channels. We identify, experimentally, a two-step process in the dissociation of Mg-H complexes and propose, based on density functional theory, that the presence of minority carriers and the resulting charge states of complexes can also influence this process. In GaN:Er, we have given a more thorough overview of the optical and magneto-optical properties by extending to the 800nm excitation range and drastically improving the signal-to-noise ratio in the magnetic measurements, as well as applying a perpendicular magnetic field. This has allowed us to calculate g-factors for the parallel case, but revealed that the Zeeman interaction is not quite linear for perpendicular magnetic fields. We were able to assign crystal field numbers of mu = 3/2 to two crystal field levels. We have also given strong evidence that the strain in the sample, which results from lattice mismatch, enhances its magnetization, as seen through fluorescence line narrowing and asymmetry

  16. Complex interactions among several nucleotide positions determine phenotypes defective for long-distance transport in the satellite RNA of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Bernal, J J; Garcia-Arenal, F

    1994-04-01

    Ix-satRNA is a CMV-satRNA necrogenic on tomato that is defective for long-distance systemic movement when coinoculated in tobacco with V-TAV. To analyze the determinants for this defective phenotype, full-length cDNA clones of Ix-satRNA and of the closely related, nondefective I17N-satRNA were obtained. Infectious transcripts from these clones (Ix5-satRNA and I17N1-satRNA) had the same phenotypes as the original satRNAs and differed only in four positions: positions 20 (Ix5, C; I17N1, U), 102 (Ix5, C; I17N1, U), 224 (Ix5, deleted; I17N1, A), 327 (Ix5, G; I17N1, A). By site-directed mutagenesis at positions 224 and 327 and by recombination using two common restriction sites, satRNAs in which the bases at these four positions were changed from the composition at Ix5-satRNA to the composition at I17N1-satRNA were obtained. A comparison of the phenotypes of the 13 single, double, and triple mutants (respective to Ix5-satRNA) showed that the defective phenotype of Ix5-satRNA is determined by the nature of the four positions analyzed; mutants at any of the positions 102, 224, and 327 accumulated as efficiently as I17N1-satRNA in systemically infected tobacco leaves when coinoculated with V-TAV. The change C20-->U also restored systemic movement, albeit imperfectly, giving rise to a phenotype that moved systemically less efficiently than I17N1-satRNA. This phenotype determined by U20 is expressed irrespective of the base at position 102, indicating an epistatic interaction between determinants 20 and 102; this interaction does not occur with position 224 or 327. That differences in the analyzed satRNAs are due to their being able, or not, to move systemically is shown by the fact that all of them (including Ix5-satRNA) accumulated to the same high level in directly inoculated leaves. The similarity in the sequences of the analyzed satRNAs and the complexity of the interactions among the effects of base changes at four positions scattered over the satRNA molecule suggest

  17. Calculation of the High-Temperature Point Defects Structure in Te-Rich CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shujun; Wang, Tao; Liu, Huimin; He, Yihui; Jie, Wanqi

    2016-10-01

    A thermodynamic equilibrium model for CdTe annealed under Te vapor is established, in which possible point defects and a defect reaction existing in undoped and In-doped Te-rich CdTe crystals are taken into consideration. Independent point defects, such as VCd, Cdi, and Tei, as well as defect complexes, namely TeCd-VCd (B complex), {Te}_{{Cd}}^{2 + } - {V}_{{Cd}}^{2 - } (D complex), {In}_{{Cd}}^{ + } - {V}_{{Cd}}^{ - } (A-center) and Tei-VCd (TeCd), are discussed based on the defect chemistry theory. More specially, the mass action law and quasi-chemical equations are used to calculate defects concentration and Fermi level in undoped and doped CdTe crystals with different indium concentrations. It is found that the Fermi level is controlled by a {V}_{{Cd}}^{2 - } , TeCd, and B/D-complex in undoped crystal. The concentration of VCd drops down in an obvious manner and that of TeCd rises for doped crystal with increasing [In].

  18. Nanoscale determinant to brighten up GaN:Eu red light-emitting diode: Local potential of Eu-defect complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Masashi; Koizumi, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2015-04-21

    Emission sites in GaN:Eu red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated using a new spectroscopy technique, namely, site-selective pulse-driven emission spectroscopy (PDES). The PDES, in which the emission intensity of a pulse-driven LED is recorded with respect to the pulse frequency, revealed the charge-trapping dynamics of the Eu emission sites. We found that a determinant of the emission intensity of the sites was not their relative abundance, but rather the spatial extent of the local potential, which determines the effectiveness of the capture of injection charges. Minor sites with wider potentials enhanced the emission intensity of the LED, resulting in emission spectra that differ from those obtained using the photoluminescence of a GaN:Eu thin film. The potential curve is determined by the atomic structure of the complexes, which consist of a Eu dopant and nearby defects in the GaN host. The extent was characterized by a parameter, namely, cutoff frequency, and the emission sites with the wider and narrower potentials in the GaN:Eu LED were found to have cutoff frequencies of 400 kHz and 3 MHz, respectively. The cutoff frequency of 3 MHz was found to be the upper limit for emission sites in the LED. The emission site with the wider potential is useful for slower devices such as light fixtures, while the site with the narrower potential is useful for faster devices such as opto-isolators.

  19. Atomic-level imaging of Mo-V-O complex oxide phase intergrowth, grain boundaries, and defects using HAADF-STEM

    PubMed Central

    Pyrz, William D.; Blom, Douglas A.; Sadakane, Masahiro; Kodato, Katsunori; Ueda, Wataru; Vogt, Thomas; Buttrey, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we structurally characterize defects, grain boundaries, and intergrowth phases observed in various Mo-V-O materials using aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging within a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Atomic-level imaging of these preparations clearly shows domains of the orthorhombic M1-type phase intergrown with the trigonal phase. Idealized models based on HAADF imaging indicate that atomic-scale registry at the domain boundaries can be seamless with several possible trigonal and M1-type unit cell orientation relationships. The alignment of two trigonal domains separated by an M1-type domain or vice versa can be predicted by identifying the number of rows/columns of parallel symmetry operators. Intergrowths of the M1 catalyst with the M2 phase or with the Mo5O14-type phase have not been observed. The resolution enhancements provided by aberration-correction have provided new insights to the understanding of phase equilibria of complex Mo-V-O materials. This study exemplifies the utility of STEM for the characterization of local structure at crystalline phase boundaries. PMID:20308579

  20. Repair of segmental radial defects in dogs using tailor-made titanium mesh cages with plates combined with calcium phosphate granules and basic fibroblast growth factor-binding ion complex gel.

    PubMed

    Honnami, Muneki; Choi, Sungjin; Liu, I-Li; Kamimura, Wataru; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Ichimura, Makoto; Urushisaki, Yukinori; Hojo, Hironori; Shimohata, Nobuyuki; Ohba, Shinsuke; Amaya, Koichi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Ryohei; Chung, Ung-Il; Sasaki, Nobuo; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2017-03-01

    Repair of large segmental defects of long bones are a tremendous challenge that calls for a novel approach to supporting immediate weight bearing and bone regeneration. This study investigated the functional and biological characteristics of a combination of a tailor-made titanium mesh cage with a plate (tTMCP) with tetrapod-shaped alpha tricalcium phosphate granules (TB) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-binding ion complex gel (f-IC gel) to repair 20-mm segmental radial defects in dogs. The defects were created surgically in 18 adult beagle dogs and treated by implantation of tTMCPs with TB with (TB-gel group) or without (TB group) f-IC gel. Each tTMCP fitted the defect well, and all dogs could bear weight on the affected limb immediately after surgery. Dogs were euthanized 4, 8 and 24 weeks after implantation. Histomorphometry showed greater infiltration of new vessels and higher bone union rate in the TB-gel group than in the TB group. The lamellar bone volume and mineral apposition rate did not differ significantly between the groups, indicating that neovascularization may be the primary effect of f-IC gel on bone regeneration. This combination method which is tTMCP combined with TB and f-IC gel, would be useful for the treatment of segmental long bone defects.

  1. Playing with defects in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuyan; Lu, K.

    2017-07-01

    Xiuyan Li and K. Lu discuss a strategy, alternative to alloying, to tailor the mechanical properties of metals. By engineering defects, metals with bespoke performance might be obtained while reducing the materials' compositional complexity.

  2. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  3. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  4. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-04-11

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. 20 figures.

  5. Defect mapping system

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline materials in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a laser for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate rastor mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities.

  6. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  7. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  8. Creating a center for nursing excellence.

    PubMed

    Knos, Sally; Gharrity, Jan

    2004-01-01

    A center for nursing excellence provides a structure for organizing professional nursing within an organization. It gives nursing leadership a method of explaining, demonstrating, and showcasing nursing. A center for nursing excellence provides a method of interpreting the primary and multiple roles of nursing, including patient care delivery, education, research, leadership, and management. A center for nursing excellence can be used as a base for the development of practice models, education and development programs, nurse recruitment strategies and retention, and leadership and management programs.

  9. Genetic sperm defects.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Genetic sperm defects are specific sperm defects, which have been shown to have a genetic mode of transmission. Such genetic linkage, either direct or indirect, has been associated with a number of sperm defects in different species, with this number increasing with improved diagnostic capabilities. A number of sperm defects, which have proven or suspected genetic modes of transmission are discussed herein, with particular emphasis on cattle. These include: 1. Acrosome defects (knobbed, ruffled and incomplete); 2. Head defects (abnormal condensation, decapitated, round head, rolled head, nuclear crest); 3. Midpiece abnormalities ("Dag" defect, "corkscrew" defect, "pseudo-droplet" defect); 4. Tail defects ("tail stump" defect, primary ciliary dyskinesia).

  10. Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Topics Cerebral Palsy Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) Down Syndrome All related topics NICHD News and Spotlights No benefit in treating mildly low thyroid function in pregnancy, NIH Network study finds NIH workshop identifies complex health problems among ...

  11. Estimating the Probability of Human Error by Incorporating Component Failure Data from User-Induced Defects in the Development of Complex Electrical Systems.

    PubMed

    Majewicz, Peter J; Blessner, Paul; Olson, Bill; Blackburn, Timothy

    2017-04-05

    This article proposes a methodology for incorporating electrical component failure data into the human error assessment and reduction technique (HEART) for estimating human error probabilities (HEPs). The existing HEART method contains factors known as error-producing conditions (EPCs) that adjust a generic HEP to a more specific situation being assessed. The selection and proportioning of these EPCs are at the discretion of an assessor, and are therefore subject to the assessor's experience and potential bias. This dependence on expert opinion is prevalent in similar HEP assessment techniques used in numerous industrial areas. The proposed method incorporates factors based on observed trends in electrical component failures to produce a revised HEP that can trigger risk mitigation actions more effectively based on the presence of component categories or other hazardous conditions that have a history of failure due to human error. The data used for the additional factors are a result of an analysis of failures of electronic components experienced during system integration and testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The analysis includes the determination of root failure mechanisms and trend analysis. The major causes of these defects were attributed to electrostatic damage, electrical overstress, mechanical overstress, or thermal overstress. These factors representing user-induced defects are quantified and incorporated into specific hardware factors based on the system's electrical parts list. This proposed methodology is demonstrated with an example comparing the original HEART method and the proposed modified technique. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. A Mutation in the Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Oxidoreductase FOXRED1 Results in Cell-Type-Specific Assembly Defects in Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes I and II

    PubMed Central

    Zurita Rendón, Olga; Antonicka, Hana; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a large multisubunit enzyme that catalyzes the first step in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In mammals, complex I biogenesis occurs in a stepwise manner, a process that requires the participation of several nucleus-encoded accessory proteins. The FAD-dependent oxidoreductase-containing domain 1 (FOXRED1) protein is a complex I assembly factor; however, its specific role in the assembly pathway remains poorly understood. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1308 G→A (p.V421M) in FOXRED1 in a patient who presented with epilepsy and severe psychomotor retardation. A patient myoblast line showed a severe reduction in complex I, associated with the accumulation of subassemblies centered around ∼340 kDa, and a milder decrease in complex II, all of which were rescued by retroviral expression of wild-type FOXRED1. Two additional assembly factors, AIFM1 and ACAD9, coimmunoprecipitated with FOXRED1, and all were associated with a 370-kDa complex I subassembly that, together with a 315-kDa subassembly, forms the 550-kDa subcomplex. Loss of FOXRED1 function prevents efficient formation of this midassembly subcomplex. Although we could not identify subassemblies of complex II, our results establish that FOXRED1 function is both broader than expected, involving the assembly of two flavoprotein-containing OXPHOS complexes, and cell type specific. PMID:27215383

  13. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Methods Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. Results HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3

  14. Cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by metallo-intercalator ruthenium(II) complexes containing chloro-substituted phenylazopyridine.

    PubMed

    Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Temboot, Pornvichai; Hansongnern, Kanidtha; Ratanaphan, Adisorn

    2014-02-07

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Breast cancers with a BRCA1 mutation are also frequently triple-negative. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies and known specific molecular targets for this aggressive breast cancer subtype. To address this concern, we have explored the cellular responses of BRCA1-defective and triple-negative breast cancer cells, and in vitro BRCA1 interactions induced by the ruthenium(II) complexes containing the bidentate ligand, 5-chloro-2-(phenylazo)pyridine. Triple-negative MDA-MB-231, BRCA1-defective HCC1937 and BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were treated with ruthenium(II) complexes. The cytoxoxicity of ruthenium-induced breast cancer cells was evaluated by a real time cellular analyzer (RTCA). Cellular uptake of ruthenium complexes was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed using propidium iodide and Annexin V flow cytometry. The N-terminal BRCA1 RING protein was used for conformational and functional studies using circular dichroism and in vitro ubiquitination. HCC1937 cells were significantly more sensitive to the ruthenium complexes than the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. Treatment demonstrated a higher degree of cytotoxicity than cisplatin against all three cell lines. Most ruthenium atoms were retained in the nuclear compartment, particularly in HCC1937 cells, after 24 h of incubation, and produced a significant block at the G2/M phase. An increased induction of apoptotic cells as well as an upregulation of p53 mRNA was observed in all tested breast cancer cells. It was of interest that BRCA1 mRNA and replication of BRCA1-defective cells were downregulated. Changes in the conformation and binding constants of ruthenium-BRCA1 adducts were observed, causing inactivation of the RING heterodimer BRCA1/BARD1-mediated E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

  15. Solvent-induced structural diversity in tetranuclear Ni(ii) Schiff-base complexes: the first Ni4 single-molecule magnet with a defective dicubane-like topology.

    PubMed

    Herchel, Radovan; Nemec, Ivan; Machata, Marek; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2016-11-22

    Two tetranuclear Ni(II) complexes, namely [Ni4(L)4(CH3OH)3(H2O)]·CH3OH (1) and (Pr3NH)2[Ni4(L)4(CH3COO)2] (2, Pr3N = tripropylamine), were synthesized from a tridentate Schiff base ligand H2L (2-[(E)-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]phenol) and Ni(CH3COO)2·4H2O, using different solvents and their ratios (CH3OH and/or CH2Cl2). The prepared Ni4 complexes are of different structural types, involving an Ni4O4 cubane-like core (1) and Ni4O6 defective dicubane-like core (2), with all the Ni atoms hexacoordinated. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, variable temperature and field magnetic measurements, and single crystal X-ray analysis. The DFT and CASSCF/NEVPT2 theoretical calculations were utilized to reveal information about the isotropic exchange parameters (Jij) and single-ion zero-field splitting parameters (Di, Ei). The variable temperature magnetic data suggested the competition of the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic intracluster interactions in compound 1, which is in contrast to compound 2, where all intracluster interactions are ferromagnetic resulting in the ground spin state S = 4 with an easy-axis type of anisotropy quantified by the axial zero-field splitting parameter D = -0.81 cm(-1). This resulted in the observation of a field-induced slow-relaxation of magnetization (U = 3.3-6.7 K), which means that the complex 2 represents the first Ni4 single-molecule magnet with the defective dicubane-like topology.

  16. In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence screening allows the isolation of a Chlamydomonas mutant defective for NDUFAF3, an assembly factor involved in mitochondrial complex I assembly.

    PubMed

    Massoz, S; Hanikenne, M; Bailleul, B; Coosemans, N; Radoux, M; Miranda-Astudillo, H; Cardol, P; Larosa, V; Remacle, C

    2017-08-30

    The qualitative screening method to select complex I mutants in the microalga Chlamydomonas, based on reduced growth under heterotrophic condition, is not suited for high throughput screening. In order to develop a fast screening method based on measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence, we first demonstrated that complex I mutants displayed decreased photosystem II efficiency in the genetic background of a photosynthetic mutation leading to reduced formation of the electrochemical proton gradient in the chloroplast (pgrl1 mutation). In contrast, single mutants (complex I and pgrl1 mutants) could not be distinguished from wild type by their photosystem II efficiency in the tested conditions. We next performed an insertional mutagenesis on the pgrl1 mutant. Out of ~3000 hygromycin-resistant insertional transformants, 46 had decreased photosystem II efficiency and three were complex I mutants. One of the mutants was tagged and whole genome sequencing identified the resistance cassette in NDUFAF3, a homolog of the human NDUFAF3 gene, encoding for an assembly factor involved in complex I assembly. Complemented strains showed restored complex I activity and assembly. Overall, we described here a screening method which is fast and particularly suited for identification of Chlamydomonas complex I mutants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Transient correction of the basic defect in sweat glands in an individual with cystic fibrosis carrying the complex CFTR allele F508del-R553Q.

    PubMed

    Tümmler, B; Stanke, F; Bronsveld, I; Veeze, H; Ballmann, M

    2009-02-01

    The molecular pathology of mutant F508del CFTR is partially corrected in vitro by the secondary amino acid substitution R553Q in the ABC signature motif. An individual with the CFTR genotype R553X/F508del-R553Q showed the typical symptoms and electrophysiological anomalies of cystic fibrosis in the airways and intestine. Sweat chloride concentrations were normal early in life, but were later raised into the range that is diagnostic for cystic fibrosis, suggesting that R553Q could temporarily correct the basic defect in sweat glands. R553Q caused a delay in diagnosis because of false negative sweat tests but was not a disease reverting suppressor mutation as had been inferred from cellular models.

  18. Family of defect-dicubane Ni4Ln2 (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and Ni4Y2 complexes: rare Tb(III) and Ho(III) examples showing SMM behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Ke, Hongshan; Tang, Jinkui

    2014-04-07

    Reactions of Ln(III) perchlorate (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho), NiCl2·6H2O, and a polydentate Schiff base resulted in the assembly of novel isostructural hexanuclear Ni4Ln2 complexes [Ln = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3), Ho (4)] with an unprecedented 3d-4f metal topology consisting of two defect-dicubane units. The corresponding Ni4Y2 (5) complex containing diamagnetic Y(III) atoms was also isolated to assist the magnetic studies. Interestingly, complexes 2 and 3 exhibit SMM characteristics and 4 shows slow relaxation of the magnetization. The absence of frequency-dependent in-phase and out-of-phase signals for the Ni-Y species suggests that the Ln ions' contribution to the slow relaxation must be effectual as previously observed in other Ni-Dy samples. However, the observation of χ″ signals with zero dc field for the Ni-Tb and Ni-Ho derivatives is notable. Indeed, this is the first time that such a behavior is observed in the Ni-Tb and Ni-Ho complexes.

  19. Defective Expression of the Mitochondrial-tRNA Modifying Enzyme GTPBP3 Triggers AMPK-Mediated Adaptive Responses Involving Complex I Assembly Factors, Uncoupling Protein 2, and the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Esteve, Juan M.; Villarroya, Magda; Aguado, Carmen; Enríquez, J. Antonio; Knecht, Erwin; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    GTPBP3 is an evolutionary conserved protein presumably involved in mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) modification. In humans, GTPBP3 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lactic acidosis, and have been associated with a defect in mitochondrial translation, yet the pathomechanism remains unclear. Here we use a GTPBP3 stable-silencing model (shGTPBP3 cells) for a further characterization of the phenotype conferred by the GTPBP3 defect. We experimentally show for the first time that GTPBP3 depletion is associated with an mt-tRNA hypomodification status, as mt-tRNAs from shGTPBP3 cells were more sensitive to digestion by angiogenin than tRNAs from control cells. Despite the effect of stable silencing of GTPBP3 on global mitochondrial translation being rather mild, the steady-state levels and activity of Complex I, and cellular ATP levels were 50% of those found in the controls. Notably, the ATPase activity of Complex V increased by about 40% in GTPBP3 depleted cells suggesting that mitochondria consume ATP to maintain the membrane potential. Moreover, shGTPBP3 cells exhibited enhanced antioxidant capacity and a nearly 2-fold increase in the uncoupling protein UCP2 levels. Our data indicate that stable silencing of GTPBP3 triggers an AMPK-dependent retrograde signaling pathway that down-regulates the expression of the NDUFAF3 and NDUFAF4 Complex I assembly factors and the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), while up-regulating the expression of UCP2. We also found that genes involved in glycolysis and oxidation of fatty acids are up-regulated. These data are compatible with a model in which high UCP2 levels, together with a reduction in pyruvate transport due to the down-regulation of MPC, promote a shift from pyruvate to fatty acid oxidation, and to an uncoupling of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. These metabolic alterations, and the low ATP levels, may negatively affect heart function. PMID:26642043

  20. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  1. Facts about Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  2. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is a problem with a baby's body chemistry, it is called a metabolic birth defect. Metabolic defects prevent the body from properly breaking down food to create energy. Examples of metabolic defects include ...

  3. Atrial septal defect (ASD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other heart defects of the ventricular septum and mitral valve . Secundum defects can be a single, small ... Sometimes, open-heart surgery may be needed to repair the defect. The type of surgery is more ...

  4. Improvement in accuracy of defect size measurement by automatic defect classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Bhamidipati; Pereira, Mark; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Chung, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Gi-Sung; Jung, Hong-Yul

    2015-10-01

    The blank mask defect review process involves detailed analysis of defects observed across a substrate's multiple preparation stages, such as cleaning and resist-coating. The detailed knowledge of these defects plays an important role in the eventual yield obtained by using the blank. Defect knowledge predominantly comprises of details such as the number of defects observed, and their accurate sizes. Mask usability assessment at the start of the preparation process, is crudely based on number of defects. Similarly, defect size gives an idea of eventual wafer defect printability. Furthermore, monitoring defect characteristics, specifically size and shape, aids in obtaining process related information such as cleaning or coating process efficiencies. Blank mask defect review process is largely manual in nature. However, the large number of defects, observed for latest technology nodes with reducing half-pitch sizes; and the associated amount of information, together make the process increasingly inefficient in terms of review time, accuracy and consistency. The usage of additional tools such as CDSEM may be required to further aid the review process resulting in increasing costs. Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ provides an automated software alternative, in the form of a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of blank defects. Elaborate post-processing algorithms are applied on defect images generated by inspection machines, to extract and report significant defect information such as defect size, affecting defect printability and mask usability. The algorithm's capabilities are challenged by the variety and complexity of defects encountered, in terms of defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect [1]. This paper mainly focuses on the results from the evaluation of Calibre® MDPAutoClassify™ product. The main objective of this evaluation is to assess the capability of

  5. Development of a Center for Teaching Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Andurkar, Shridhar; Sincak, Carrie; Todd, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and assessment of a Center for Teaching Excellence at Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy. The purpose of the Center was to create a systematic framework to promote, enhance, and assess the scholarship of teaching and learning. Assessment of the Center's activities suggests a positive impact on the teaching abilities of faculty. This report is intended to offer other schools or colleges of pharmacy considerations for center development. PMID:21088728

  6. Putting 3D modelling and 3D printing into practice: virtual surgery and preoperative planning to reconstruct complex post-traumatic skeletal deformities and defects

    PubMed Central

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Block, Steve; Glatt, Vaida

    2017-01-01

    3D printing technology has revolutionized and gradually transformed manufacturing across a broad spectrum of industries, including healthcare. Nowhere is this more apparent than in orthopaedics with many surgeons already incorporating aspects of 3D modelling and virtual procedures into their routine clinical practice. As a more extreme application, patient-specific 3D printed titanium truss cages represent a novel approach for managing the challenge of segmental bone defects. This review illustrates the potential indications of this innovative technique using 3D printed titanium truss cages in conjunction with the Masquelet technique. These implants are custom designed during a virtual surgical planning session with the combined input of an orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic engineering professional and a biomedical design engineer. The ability to 3D model an identical replica of the original intact bone in a virtual procedure is of vital importance when attempting to precisely reconstruct normal anatomy during the actual procedure. Additionally, other important factors must be considered during the planning procedure, such as the three-dimensional configuration of the implant. Meticulous design is necessary to allow for successful implantation through the planned surgical exposure, while being aware of the constraints imposed by local anatomy and prior implants. This review will attempt to synthesize the current state of the art as well as discuss our personal experience using this promising technique. It will address implant design considerations including the mechanical, anatomical and functional aspects unique to each case. PMID:28220752

  7. Design and Fabrication of Complex Scaffolds for Bone Defect Healing: Combined 3D Plotting of a Calcium Phosphate Cement and a Growth Factor-Loaded Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Tilman; Akkineni, Ashwini Rahul; Förster, Yvonne; Köhler, Tino; Knaack, Sven; Gelinsky, Michael; Lode, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing enables the fabrication of scaffolds with defined architecture. Versatile printing technologies such as extrusion-based 3D plotting allow in addition the incorporation of biological components increasing the capability to restore functional tissues. We have recently described the fabrication of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds by 3D plotting of an oil-based CPC paste under mild conditions. In the present study, we have developed a strategy for growth factor loading based on multichannel plotting: a biphasic scaffold design was realised combining CPC with VEGF-laden, highly concentrated hydrogel strands. As hydrogel component, alginate and an alginate-gellan gum blend were evaluated; the blend exhibited a more favourable VEGF release profile and was chosen for biphasic scaffold fabrication. After plotting, two-step post-processing was performed for both, hydrogel crosslinking and CPC setting, which was shown to be compatible with both materials. Finally, a scaffold was designed and fabricated which can be applied for testing in a rat critical size femur defect. Optimization of CPC plotting enabled the fabrication of highly resolved structures with strand diameters of only 200 µm. Micro-computed tomography revealed a precise strand arrangement and an interconnected pore space within the biphasic scaffold even in swollen state of the hydrogel strands.

  8. Putting 3D modelling and 3D printing into practice: virtual surgery and preoperative planning to reconstruct complex post-traumatic skeletal deformities and defects.

    PubMed

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Block, Steve; Glatt, Vaida

    2017-01-01

    3D printing technology has revolutionized and gradually transformed manufacturing across a broad spectrum of industries, including healthcare. Nowhere is this more apparent than in orthopaedics with many surgeons already incorporating aspects of 3D modelling and virtual procedures into their routine clinical practice. As a more extreme application, patient-specific 3D printed titanium truss cages represent a novel approach for managing the challenge of segmental bone defects. This review illustrates the potential indications of this innovative technique using 3D printed titanium truss cages in conjunction with the Masquelet technique. These implants are custom designed during a virtual surgical planning session with the combined input of an orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic engineering professional and a biomedical design engineer. The ability to 3D model an identical replica of the original intact bone in a virtual procedure is of vital importance when attempting to precisely reconstruct normal anatomy during the actual procedure. Additionally, other important factors must be considered during the planning procedure, such as the three-dimensional configuration of the implant. Meticulous design is necessary to allow for successful implantation through the planned surgical exposure, while being aware of the constraints imposed by local anatomy and prior implants. This review will attempt to synthesize the current state of the art as well as discuss our personal experience using this promising technique. It will address implant design considerations including the mechanical, anatomical and functional aspects unique to each case.

  9. Reconstruction of Small Soft Tissue Nasal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Cheng, David; Thornton, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal defect repair has been one of the more challenging areas of reconstructive surgery due to the lack of uniform nasal skin thickness and complex contours. Currently, algorithms for medium to large nasal soft tissue defects have been well defined by various authors. Small defects, arbitrarily defined as 1 cm or less, still present significant challenges. In this article, the authors examine the options available to repair small soft tissue nasal defects and the appropriate situations in which each method is best suited. PMID:24872751

  10. Mutations in the MGAT2 gene controlling complex N-glycan synthesis cause carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type II, an autosomal recessive disease with defective brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, J.; Schachter, H.; Dunn, J.

    1996-10-01

    Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome (CDGS) type II is a multisystemic congenital disease with severe involvement of the nervous system. Two unrelated CDGS type II patients are shown to have point mutations (one patient having Ser{r_arrow}Phe and the other having His{r_arrow}Arg) in the catalytic domain of the gene MGAT2, encoding UDP-GlcNAc:{alpha}-6-D-mannoside {Beta}-1,2-N-ace-tylglucosaminyltransferase II (GnT II), an enzyme essential for biosynthesis of complex Asn-linked glycans. Both mutations caused both decreased expression of enzyme protein in a baculovirus/insect cell system and inactivation of enzyme activity. Restriction-endonuclease analysis of DNA from 23 blood relatives of one of these patients showed that 13 donors were heterozygotes; the other relatives and 21 unrelated donors were normal homozygotes. All heterozygotes showed a significant reduction (33%-68%) in mononuclear-cell GnT II activity. The data indicate that CDGS type II is an autosomal recessive disease and that complex Asn-linked glycans are essential for normal neurological development. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Ribosome recycling defects modify the balance between the synthesis and assembly of specific subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Panozzo, Cristina; Bourand-Plantefol, Alexa; Herbert, Christopher J; Dujardin, Geneviève; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2016-07-08

    Mitochondria have their own translation machinery that produces key subunits of the OXPHOS complexes. This machinery relies on the coordinated action of nuclear-encoded factors of bacterial origin that are well conserved between humans and yeast. In humans, mutations in these factors can cause diseases; in yeast, mutations abolishing mitochondrial translation destabilize the mitochondrial DNA. We show that when the mitochondrial genome contains no introns, the loss of the yeast factors Mif3 and Rrf1 involved in ribosome recycling neither blocks translation nor destabilizes mitochondrial DNA. Rather, the absence of these factors increases the synthesis of the mitochondrially-encoded subunits Cox1, Cytb and Atp9, while strongly impairing the assembly of OXPHOS complexes IV and V. We further show that in the absence of Rrf1, the COX1 specific translation activator Mss51 accumulates in low molecular weight forms, thought to be the source of the translationally-active form, explaining the increased synthesis of Cox1. We propose that Rrf1 takes part in the coordination between translation and OXPHOS assembly in yeast mitochondria. These interactions between general and specific translation factors might reveal an evolutionary adaptation of the bacterial translation machinery to the set of integral membrane proteins that are translated within mitochondria. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The Na+ transport in gram-positive bacteria defect in the Mrp antiporter complex measured with 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2014-01-15

    (23)Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has previously been used to monitor Na(+) translocation across membranes in gram-negative bacteria and in various other organelles and liposomes using a membrane-impermeable shift reagent to resolve the signals resulting from internal and external Na(+). In this work, the (23)Na NMR method was adapted for measurements of internal Na(+) concentration in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, with the aim of assessing the Na(+) translocation activity of the Mrp (multiple resistance and pH) antiporter complex, a member of the cation proton antiporter-3 (CPA-3) family. The sodium-sensitive growth phenotype observed in a B. subtilis strain with the gene encoding MrpA deleted could indeed be correlated to the inability of this strain to maintain a lower internal Na(+) concentration than an external one.

  13. Defects formation and wave emitting from defects in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Tang, Jun; Wang, Chunni

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal electrical activities in neuronal system could be associated with some neuronal diseases. Indeed, external forcing can cause breakdown even collapse in nervous system under appropriate condition. The excitable media sometimes could be described by neuronal network with different topologies. The collective behaviors of neurons can show complex spatiotemporal dynamical properties and spatial distribution for electrical activities due to self-organization even from the regulating from central nervous system. Defects in the nervous system can emit continuous waves or pulses, and pacemaker-like source is generated to perturb the normal signal propagation in nervous system. How these defects are developed? In this paper, a network of neurons is designed in two-dimensional square array with nearest-neighbor connection type; the formation mechanism of defects is investigated by detecting the wave propagation induced by external forcing. It is found that defects could be induced under external periodical forcing under the boundary, and then the wave emitted from the defects can keep balance with the waves excited from external forcing.

  14. Immune response genes controlling responsiveness to major transplantation antigens. Specific major histocompatibility complex-linked defect for antibody responses to class I alloantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, G.W.; Corvalan, J.R.; Licence, D.R.; Howard, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have identified two major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked Ir genes that control the antibody response made by rats against class I major alloantigens. We have named these genes Ir-RT1Aa and Ir-RT1Ac. These Ir genes determine responsiveness of the immunized animal in a typical codominant fashion. There is no evidence so far for trans-complementation between low-responder haplotypes. Detailed studies of Ir-RT1Aa indicate that it controls the antibody response to at least two distinct alloantigenic determinants on RT1Aa molecules. These class I molecules thus behave like hapten-carrier conjugates when the response against the carrier is under Ir gene control. Analysis of the origin of alloantibody-forming cells in tetraparental radiation chimeras indicates that Ir-RT1Aa must control the provision of effective help to B cells. In many respects therefore, the properties of Ir-RT1Aa are broadly similar to those described for Ir genes controlling antibody responses to conventional antigens. The existence of apparently conventional Ir genes controlling the antibody response to major alloantigens strongly suggest that the processing of these transmembrane molecules by host antigen-presenting cells is a prerequisite for immune induction, and that it is the MHC of the responder rather than that of the allograft to which T helper cells are restricted in alloimmune responses in vivo.

  15. Characterization of a new oda3 allele, oda3-6, defective in assembly of the outer dynein arm-docking complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Berrueta, Daniela; Hou, Yuqing; Yang, Fan; Scarbrough, Chasity; Witman, George B.

    2017-01-01

    We have used an insertional mutagenesis approach to generate new C. reinhardtii motility mutants. Of 56 mutants isolated, one is a new allele at the ODA3 locus, called oda3-6. Similar to the previously characterized oda3 alleles, oda3-6 has a slow-jerky swimming phenotype and reduced swimming speed. The oda3-6 mutant fails to assemble the outer dynein arm motor and outer dynein arm—docking complex (ODA-DC) in the ciliary axoneme due to an insertion in the 5’ end of the DCC1 gene, which encodes the DC1 subunit of the ODA-DC. Transformation of oda3-6 with the wild-type DCC1 gene rescues the mutant swimming phenotype and restores assembly of the ODA-DC and the outer dynein arm in the cilium. This is the first oda3 mutant to be characterized at the molecular level and is likely to be very useful for further analysis of DC1 function. PMID:28291812

  16. The new neuromuscular disease related with defects in the ASC-1 complex: report of a second case confirms ASCC1 involvement.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge; Martins, Márcia; Leite, Rosário Pinto; Sousa, Mário; Santos, Rosário

    2017-02-20

    Next-generation sequencing technology aided the identification of the underlying genetic cause in a female newborn with a severe neuromuscular disorder. The patient presented generalized hypotonia, congenital bone fractures, lack of spontaneous movements and poor respiratory effort. She died within the first days of life. Karyotyping and screening for several genes related with neuromuscular diseases all tested negative. A male sibling was subsequently born with the same clinical presentation. Whole-exome sequencing was performed with variant filtering assuming a recessive disease model. Analysis focused on genes known to be related firstly with congenital myopathies, extended to muscle diseases and finally to other neuromuscular disorders. No disease-causing variants were identified. A similar disorder was described in patients with recessive variants in two genes: TRIP4 (three families) and ASCC1 (one family), both encoding subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. Our patient was also found to have a homozygous frameshift variant (c.157dupG, p.Glu53Glyfs*19) in ASCC1, thereby representing the second known case. This confirms ASCC1 involvement in a severe neuromuscular disease lying within the spinal muscular atrophy or primary muscle disease spectra.

  17. A complex chromosome rearrangement involving four chromosomes, nine breakpoints and a cryptic 0.6-Mb deletion in a boy with cerebellar hypoplasia and defects in skull ossification.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, R S; Cernach, M C S P; Sfakianakis, T E; Takeno, S S; Nardozza, L M M; Rossi, C; Bhatt, S S; Liehr, T; Melaragno, M I

    2013-01-01

    Constitutional complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are considered rare cytogenetic events. Most apparently balanced CCRs are de novo and are usually found in patients with abnormal phenotypes. High-resolution techniques are unveiling genomic imbalances in a great percentage of these cases. In this paper, we report a patient with growth and developmental delay, dysmorphic features, nervous system anomalies (pachygyria, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellum), a marked reduction in the ossification of the cranial vault, skull base sclerosis, and cardiopathy who presents a CCR with 9 breakpoints involving 4 chromosomes (3, 6, 8 and 14) and a 0.6-Mb deletion in 14q24.1. Although the only genomic imbalance revealed by the array technique was a deletion, the clinical phenotype of the patient most likely cannot be attributed exclusively to haploinsufficiency. Other events must also be considered, including the disruption of critical genes and position effects. A combination of several different investigative approaches (G-banding, FISH with different probes and SNP array techniques) was required to describe this CCR in full, suggesting that CCRs may be more frequent than initially thought. Additionally, we propose that a chain chromosome breakage mechanism may have occurred as a single rearrangement event resulting in this CCR. This study demonstrates the importance of applying different cytogenetic and molecular techniques to detect subtle rearrangements and to delineate the rearrangements at a more accurate level, providing a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in CCR formation and a better correlation with phenotype. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Ssz1 restores endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation in cells expressing defective cdc48-ufd1-npl4 complex by upregulating cdc48.

    PubMed

    Bosis, Eran; Salomon, Dor; Ohayon, Orit; Sivan, Gilad; Bar-Nun, Shoshana; Rabinovich, Efrat

    2010-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway eliminates aberrant proteins from the ER. The key role of Cdc48p-Ufd1p-Npl4p is indicated by impaired ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in any of this complex's genes. We identified SSZ1 in genetic screens for cdc48-10 suppressors and show that it upregulates Cdc48p via the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) network. A pSSZ1 plasmid restored impaired ERAD-M of 6myc-Hmg2 in cdc48-10, ufd1-2, and npl4-1, while SSZ1 deletion had no effect. Ssz1p activates Pdr1p, the PDR master regulator. Indeed, plasmids of PDR1 or its target gene RPN4 increased cdc48-10p levels and restored ERAD-M in cdc48-10. Rpn4p regulates transcription of proteasome subunits and CDC48, thus RPN4 deletion abolished ERAD. However, the diminished proteasome level in Deltarpn4 was sufficient for degrading a cytosolic substrate, whereas the impaired ERAD-M was the result of diminished Cdc48p and was restored by expression of pCDC48. The corrected ERAD-M in the hypomorphic strains of the Cdc48 partners ufd1-2 and npl4-1 by the pCDC48 plasmid, and in cdc48-10 cells by the pcdc48-10 plasmid, combined with the finding that neither pSSZ1 nor pcdc48-10 restored ERAD-L of CPY*-HA, support our conclusion that Ssz1p suppressing effects is brought about by upregulating Cdc48p.

  19. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth (congenital). The condition is often associated with Down syndrome. Atrioventricular canal defect allows extra blood to flow ... baby's heart is developing. Some factors, such as Down syndrome, might increase the risk of atrioventricular canal defect. ...

  20. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to create energy. Examples of metabolic defects include Tay-Sachs disease , a fatal disease that affects the central nervous ... called recessive inheritance and includes conditions such as Tay-Sachs disease and cystic fibrosis . A disease or defect also ...

  1. Duralumin - Defects and Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    It is proposed in this paper to identify some of the defects and failures in duralumin most frequently encountered by the aircraft industry with a view to indicate their importance. The defects and failures in duralumin may be classified into the following groups: 1) defects produced during manufacture; 2) defects produced during fabrication; 3) corrosion and erosion; and 4) fatigue failures. Only the first two will be covered in this report.

  2. Congenital defects of sheep.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S M

    1993-03-01

    With increasing incrimination of viruses, plants, and drugs as causes of ovine congenital defects, concerted efforts are required to identify environmental teratogens. Expanding knowledge of congenital defects requires studying as many defective lambs as possible; recording and documenting; detailed diagnostic examinations; genetic analyses and chromosomal examinations, whenever possible; and field investigations. Adopting standardized classification, terminology, and diagnostic procedures should improve descriptions, diagnoses, and interdisciplinary exchange of information. That, in turn, should improve our knowledge of and diagnosis of congenital defects of sheep in the future. Finally, veterinary clinicians and diagnosticians are encouraged to take an interest in congenital defects and teratology.

  3. Defect production in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Kinoshita, C.

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  4. Topological defect lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knitter, Sebastian; Fatt Liew, Seng; Xiong, Wen; Guy, Mikhael I.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Cao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a topological defect to a regular photonic crystal defect cavity with anisotropic unit cell. Spatially localized resonances are formed and have high quality factor. Unlike the regular photonic crystal defect states, the localized resonances in the topological defect structures support powerflow vortices. Experimentally we realize lasing in the topological defect cavities with optical pumping. This work shows that the spatially inhomogeneous variation of the unit cell orientation adds another degree of freedom to the control of lasing modes, enabling the manipulation of the field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  5. Defect interactions in GaAs single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The two-sublattice structural configuration of GaAs and deviations from stoichiometry render the generation and interaction of electrically active point defects (and point defect complexes) critically important for device applications and very complex. Of the defect-induced energy levels, those lying deep into the energy band are very effective lifetime ""killers". The level 0.82 eV below the condition band, commonly referred to as EL2, is a major deep level, particularly in melt-grown GaAs. This level is associated with an antisite defect complex (AsGa - VAS). Possible mechanisms of its formation and its annihilation were further developed.

  6. Defect interactions in GaAs single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The two-sublattice structural configuration of GaAs and deviations from stoichiometry render the generation and interaction of electrically active point defects (and point defect complexes) critically important for device applications and very complex. Of the defect-induced energy levels, those lying deep into the energy band are very effective lifetime ""killers". The level 0.82 eV below the condition band, commonly referred to as EL2, is a major deep level, particularly in melt-grown GaAs. This level is associated with an antisite defect complex (AsGa - VAS). Possible mechanisms of its formation and its annihilation were further developed.

  7. Postdevelopment defect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Osamu; Kiba, Yukio; Ono, Yuko

    2001-08-01

    Reduction of defects after development is a critical issue in photolithography. A special category of post development defects is the satellite defect which is located in large exposed areas generally in proximity to large unexposed regions of photoresist. We have investigated the formation of this defect type on ESCAP and ACETAL DUV resists with and without underlying organic BARCs, In this paper, we will present AFM and elemental analysis data to determine the origin of the satellite defect. Imaging was done on a full-field Nikon 248nm stepper and resist processing was completed on a TEL CLEAN TRACK ACT 8 track. Defect inspection and review were performed on a KLA-Tencor and Hitachi SEM respectively. Results indicate that the satellite defect is generated on both BARC and resist films and defect counts are dependent on the dark erosion. Elemental analysis indicates that the defects are composed of sulfur and nitrogen compounds. We suspect that the defect is formed as a result of a reaction between PAG, quencher and TMAH. This defect type is removed after a DIW re-rinse.

  8. Ventricular Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System ECG (Electrocardiogram) Anesthesia - What to Expect Tetralogy of ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  9. Ventricular Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System ECG (Electrocardiogram) Anesthesia - What to Expect Tetralogy of ... Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal Defect Heart and Circulatory System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  10. Defect-free switchable phase grating.

    PubMed

    Lester, Garry A; Coulston, Stephen J; Strudwick, Adrian M

    2006-01-01

    Liquid-crystal-filled polymer structure devices offer a very low cost switchable spatial phase modulator. The phase profile set by the polymer structure may be varied or switched on/off with an applied field. Defects have been observed in some devices giving rise to spurious diffraction peaks. Computational modeling of the liquid-crystal director profile suggests that these defects might be suppressed if the dimensions of the liquid-crystal region are small. Experimental measurements confirm that this approach is effective in controlling the defects. This provides a route to fabrication of low-cost switchable complex diffractive devices.

  11. Automatic classification and accurate size measurement of blank mask defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamidipati, Samir; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2015-07-01

    complexity of defects encountered. The variety arises due to factors such as defect nature, size, shape and composition; and the optical phenomena occurring around the defect. This paper focuses on preliminary characterization results, in terms of classification and size estimation, obtained by Calibre MDPAutoClassify tool on a variety of mask blank defects. It primarily highlights the challenges faced in achieving the results with reference to the variety of defects observed on blank mask substrates and the underlying complexities which make accurate defect size measurement an important and challenging task.

  12. Localization of defects using checkerboard test structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Sven-Olaf

    2001-04-01

    Defects in semiconductor industry become more important by shrinking structures and increasing complexity of process. Therefore the size of a killer defect becomes smaller and it is not easy to find them with optical inspection tools. In addition Inspection tools are not able to say something about electrical effects from defects which are found. With Checkerboard Test Structures it is possible to locate electrical defects. In fact these special test structures will be tested at the end of the process, like an usual function test. A special developed algorithm allows low quantity of pads. This gives a high spatial resolution and on the other hand we have good ratio between active and passive area. A reduction of a statistical failure could be reached, because it is not necessary to calculate the defect density from a small region. In particular special defect distribution like cluster can be considered. With this structures different layers can be examined for disconnections and short-circuits. Therefore it is possible to locate defects in one layer or between two layers. So the defect density for the sensitive dielectrica between two layers, like any kind of oxide can be calculated. The karree test structures can be used very good as an inline-defectmonitoring, because there is no difference from the original technology of proces. There are also no differences in time for processing and for testing, so Karreeteststructures is an optimal representation for your process.

  13. Native defects in Tl6SI4: Density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Tl6SI4 is a promising room-temperature semiconductor radiation detection material. Here, we report density functional calculations of native defects and dielectric properties of Tl6SI4. Formation energies and defect levels of native point defects and defect complexes are calculated. Donor-acceptor defect complexes are shown to be abundant in Tl6SI4. High resistivity can be obtained by Fermi level pinning by native donor and acceptor defects. Deep donors that are detrimental to electron transport are identified and methods to mitigate such problem are discussed. Furthermore, we show that mixed ionic-covalent character of Tl6SI4 gives rise to enhanced Born effective charges and large static dielectric constant, which provides effective screening of charged defects and impurities.

  14. Native defects in Tl6SI4: Density functional calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2015-05-05

    In this study, Tl6SI4 is a promising room-temperature semiconductor radiation detection material. Here, we report density functional calculations of native defects and dielectric properties of Tl6SI4. Formation energies and defect levels of native point defects and defect complexes are calculated. Donor-acceptor defect complexes are shown to be abundant in Tl6SI4. High resistivity can be obtained by Fermi level pinning by native donor and acceptor defects. Deep donors that are detrimental to electron transport are identified and methods to mitigate such problem are discussed. Furthermore, we show that mixed ionic-covalent character of Tl6SI4 gives rise to enhanced Born effective charges andmore » large static dielectric constant, which provides effective screening of charged defects and impurities.« less

  15. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    At advanced technology nodes mask complexity has been increased because of large-scale use of resolution enhancement technologies (RET) which includes Optical Proximity Correction (OPC), Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and Source Mask Optimization (SMO). The number of defects detected during inspection of such mask increased drastically and differentiation of critical and non-critical defects are more challenging, complex and time consuming. Because of significant defectivity of EUVL masks and non-availability of actinic inspection, it is important and also challenging to predict the criticality of defects for printability on wafer. This is one of the significant barriers for the adoption of EUVL for semiconductor manufacturing. Techniques to decide criticality of defects from images captured using non actinic inspection images is desired till actinic inspection is not available. High resolution inspection of photomask images detects many defects which are used for process and mask qualification. Repairing all defects is not practical and probably not required, however it's imperative to know which defects are severe enough to impact wafer before repair. Additionally, wafer printability check is always desired after repairing a defect. AIMSTM review is the industry standard for this, however doing AIMSTM review for all defects is expensive and very time consuming. Fast, accurate and an economical mechanism is desired which can predict defect printability on wafer accurately and quickly from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. Predicting defect printability from such images is challenging due to the fact that the high resolution images do not correlate with actual mask contours. The challenge is increased due to use of different optical condition during inspection other than actual scanner condition, and defects found in such images do not have correlation with actual impact on wafer. Our automated defect simulation tool predicts

  16. Repair of Auricular Defects.

    PubMed

    Watson, Deborah; Hecht, Avram

    2017-08-01

    Repairing defects of the auricle requires an appreciation of the underlying 3-dimensional framework, the flexible properties of the cartilages, and the healing contractile tendencies of the surrounding soft tissue. In the analysis of auricular defects and planning of their reconstruction, it is helpful to divide the auricle into subunits for which different techniques may offer better functional and aesthetic outcomes. This article reviews many of the reconstructive options for defects of the various auricular subunits. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Multiscale simulations of defect dipole-enhanced electromechanical coupling at dilute defect concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    The role of defects in solids of mixed ionic-covalent bonds such as ferroelectric oxides is complex. Current understanding of defects on ferroelectric properties at the single-defect level remains mostly at the empirical level, and the detailed atomistic mechanisms for many defect-mediated polarization-switching processes have not been convincingly revealed quantum mechanically. We simulate the polarization-electric field (P-E) and strain-electric field (ɛ-E) hysteresis loops for BaTiO3 in the presence of generic defect dipoles with large-scale molecular dynamics and provide a detailed atomistic picture of the defect dipole-enhanced electromechanical coupling. We develop a general first-principles-based atomistic model, enabling a quantitative understanding of the relationship between macroscopic ferroelectric properties and dipolar impurities of different orientations, concentrations, and dipole moments. We find that the collective orientation of dipolar defects relative to the external field is the key microscopic structure feature that strongly affects materials hardening/softening and electromechanical coupling. We show that a small concentration (≈0.1 at. %) of defect dipoles dramatically improves electromechanical responses. This offers the opportunity to improve the performance of inexpensive polycrystalline ferroelectric ceramics through defect dipole engineering for a range of applications including piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and transducers.

  18. Defects in hardwood timber

    Treesearch

    Roswell D. Carpenter; David L. Sonderman; Everette D. Rast; Martin J. Jones

    1989-01-01

    Includes detailed information on all common defects that may aRect hardwood trees and logs. Relationships between manufactured products and those forms of round material to be processed from the tree for conversion into marketable products are discussed. This handbook supersedes Agriculture Handbook No. 244, Grade defects in hardwood timber and logs, by C.R. Lockard, J...

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Midfacial Developmental Defects

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Sangani, Dhruvee R.; Ansari, Afreen; Iwata, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    The morphogenesis of midfacial processes requires the coordination of a variety of cellular functions of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells to develop complex structures. Any failure or delay in midfacial development as well as any abnormal fusion of the medial and lateral nasal and maxillary prominences will result in developmental defects in the midface with a varying degree of severity, including cleft, hypoplasia, and midline expansion. In spite of the advances in human genome sequencing technology, the causes of nearly 70 percent of all birth defects, which include midfacial development defects, remain unknown. Recent studies in animal models have highlighted the importance of specific signaling cascades and genetic-environmental interactions in the development of the midfacial region. This review will summarize the current understanding of the morphogenetic processes and molecular mechanisms underlying midfacial birth defects based on mouse models with midfacial developmental abnormalities. PMID:26562615

  20. Reconstruction of Peripelvic Oncologic Defects.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Katie E; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the anatomy of the peripelvic area. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of performing peripelvic reconstruction in patients undergoing oncologic resection. 3. Select the appropriate local, pedicled, or free-flap reconstruction based on the location of the defect and donor-site characteristics. Peripelvic reconstruction most commonly occurs in the setting of oncologic ablative surgery. The peripelvic area contains several distinct reconstructive regions, including vagina, vulva, penis, and scrotum. Each area provides unique reconstructive considerations. In addition, prior or future radiation therapy or chemotherapy along with cancer cachexia can increase the complexity of reconstruction.

  1. Microtubule defects & Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Baird, Fiona J; Bennett, Craig L

    2013-12-06

    One of the major challenges facing the long term survival of neurons is their requirement to maintain efficient axonal transport over long distances. In humans as large, long-lived vertebrates, the machinery maintaining neuronal transport must remain efficient despite the slow accumulation of cell damage during aging. Mutations in genes encoding proteins which function in the transport system feature prominently in neurologic disorders. Genes known to cause such disorders and showing traditional Mendelian inheritance have been more readily identified. It has been more difficult, however, to isolate factors underlying the complex genetics contributing to the more common idiopathic forms of neurodegenerative disease. At the heart of neuronal transport is the rail network or scaffolding provided by neuron specific microtubules (MTs). The importance of MT dynamics and stability is underscored by the critical role tau protein plays in MT-associated stabilization versus the dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and other tauopathies. Another example of the requirement for tight regulation of MT dynamics is the need to maintain balanced levels of post-translational modification of key MT building-blocks such as α-tubulin. Tubulins require extensive polyglutamylation at their carboxyl-terminus as part of a novel post-translational modification mechanism to signal MT growth versus destabilization. Dramatically, knock-out of a gene encoding a deglutamylation family member causes an extremely rapid cell death of Purkinje cells in the ataxic mouse model, pcd. This review will examine a range of neurodegenerative conditions where current molecular understanding points to defects in the stability of MTs and axonal transport to emphasize the central role of MTs in neuron survival.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and birth defects

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Adolfo; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Besser, Lilah M.; Botto, Lorenzo D.; Moore, Cynthia A.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Cleves, Mario A.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany J.; Waller, D. Kim; Reece, E. Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to examine associations between diabetes mellitus and 39 birth defects. STUDY DESIGN This was a multicenter case-control study of mothers of infants who were born with (n = 13,030) and without (n = 4895) birth defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997–2003). RESULTS Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGDM) was associated significantly with noncardiac defects (isolated, 7/23 defects; multiples, 13/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 11/16 defects; multiples, 8/16 defects). Adjusted odds ratios for PGDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 3.17 (95% CI, 2.20–4.99) and 8.62 (95% CI, 5.27–14.10), respectively. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was associated with fewer noncardiac defects (isolated, 3/23 defects; multiples, 3/23 defects) and cardiac defects (isolated, 3/16 defects; multiples, 2/16 defects). Odds ratios between GDM and all isolated and multiple defects were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.17–1.73) and 1.50 (95% CI, 1.13–2.00), respectively. These associations were limited generally to offspring of women with prepregnancy body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. CONCLUSION PGDM was associated with a wide range of birth defects; GDM was associated with a limited group of birth defects. PMID:18674752

  3. Defects in Calcite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-13

    AD-A245 645 A TRIDENT SCHOLAR PROJECT REPORT NO. 181 "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " DTTC %N FEB 5-1912 UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND 92-02841...report; no. 181 (1991) "DEFECTS IN CALCITE " A Trident Scholar Project Report by Midshipman Anthony J. Kotarski, Class of 1991 U. S. Naval Academy Annapolis...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 13 May 1991 Final 1990/91 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE s. FUNDING NUMBERS DEFECTS IN CALCITE 6. AUTHOR(S) Anthony J. Kotarski 7

  4. Oxygen defects in GaAs: A hybrid functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Using hybrid density functional calculations, we address the structural properties, formation energies, and charge transition levels of a variety of oxygen defects in GaAs. The set of considered defects comprises the bridging O atom in a As-O-Ga configuration, interstitial O atoms in tetrahedral sites, and O atoms substitutional to either Ga (OGa) or As atoms (OAs). In addition, we consider an As vacancy containing two O atoms, for which the most stable configurations are found through the use of molecular dynamics simulations, and defect complexes involving a OAs defect bound to either one or two AsGa antisites, denoted AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs , respectively. We find that the bridging O defect and the AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs complexes are the most stable oxygen defects in GaAs. The actual occurrence of these defects is examined against two criteria. The first criterion concerns the stability against O dissociation and is evaluated via the calculation of dissociation energies. The second criterion involves the defect formation at thermodynamic equilibrium and is inferred from the comparison between the formation energy of the oxygen defect and that of its O-related dissociation product (bridging O defect). Both the AsGa-OAs and (AsGa)2-OAs complexes satisfy these criteria and are stable against O dissociation. Further analysis in cooled-down conditions leads us to dismiss the AsGa-OAs defect due to the more favorable bonding of two rather than one AsGa antisites. The conclusion that only the bridging O defect and the (AsGa)2-OAs complex are expected to occur is in accord with experimental observations.

  5. Computational mask defect review for contamination and haze inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Paul; Rost, Daniel; Price, Daniel; Corcoran, Noel; Satake, Masaki; Hu, Peter; Peng, Danping; Yonenaga, Dean; Tolani, Vikram; Wolf, Yulian; Shah, Pinkesh

    2013-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into sub-0.35 k1 regime, mask defect inspection and subsequent review has become tremendously challenging, and indeed the largest component to mask manufacturing cost. The routine use of various resolution enhancement techniques (RET) have resulted in complex mask patterns, which together with the need to detect even smaller defects due to higher MEEFs, now requires an inspection engineer to use combination of inspection modes. This is achieved in 193nm AeraTM mask inspection systems wherein masks are not only inspected at their scanner equivalent aerial exposure conditions, but also at higher Numerical Aperture resolution, and special reflected-light, and single-die contamination modes, providing better coverage over all available patterns, and defect types. Once the required defects are detected by the inspection system, comprehensively reviewing and dispositioning each defect then becomes the Achilles heel of the overall mask inspection process. Traditionally, defects have been reviewed manually by an operator, which makes the process error-prone especially given the low-contrast in the convoluted aerial images. Such manual review also limits the quality and quantity of classifications in terms of the different types of characterization and number of defects that can practically be reviewed by a person. In some ways, such manual classification limits the capability of the inspection tool itself from being setup to detect smaller defects since it often results in many more defects that need to be then manually reviewed. Paper 8681-109 at SPIE Advanced Lithography 2013 discussed an innovative approach to actinic mask defect review using computational technology, and focused on Die-to-Die transmitted aerial and high-resolution inspections. In this approach, every defect is characterized in two different ways, viz., quantitatively in terms of its print impact on wafer, and qualitatively in terms of its nature and origin in

  6. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  7. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... specially sized mesh device to close the hole. Hybrid procedure. A hybrid procedure uses surgical and catheter-based techniques. Access ... clinicalkey.com. Accessed Sept. 15, 2014. Konetti NR. Hybrid muscular ventricular defect closure: Surgeon or physician. Indian ...

  8. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... you exert yourself or when you lie down Rapid or irregular heartbeat Fatigue or weakness Causes Congenital heart defects arise from problems early in the heart's development, but there's often no clear cause. Genetics and ...

  9. Single Ventricle Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery and blood reaches the aorta through a patent ductus arteriosus (see diagram). How does the defect ... only source of lung blood flow is the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), an open passageway between the ...

  10. Detecting Speech Defects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryza, Frank T., II

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the importance of early detection of speech defects and briefly describes the activities of the Pre-School Diagnostic Center for Severe Communication Disorders in New Haven, Connecticut. (ED)

  11. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  12. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  13. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  14. Birth defects monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Klingberg, M.A.; Papier, C.M.; Hart, J.

    1983-01-01

    Population monitoring of birth defects provides a means for detecting relative changes in their frequency. Many varied systems have been developed throughout the world since the thalidomide tragedy of the early 1960s. Although it is difficult to pinpoint specific teratogenic agents based on rises in rates of a particular defect or a constellation of defects, monitoring systems can provide clues for hypothesis testing in epidemiological investigations. International coordination of efforts in this area resulted in the founding of the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems (ICBDMS) in 1974. In this paper we will describe the functions and basic requirements of monitoring systems in general, and look at the development and activities of the ICBDMS. A review of known and suspected environmental teratogenic agents (eg, chemical, habitual, biological, physical, and nutritional) is also presented.

  15. Identification of surface defects on glass by parallel spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyan; Shen, Yi; Bao, Wen; Li, Peng; Wang, Xiaoping; Ding, Zhihua

    2015-09-07

    Defects can dramatically degrade glass quality, and automatic inspection is a trend of quality control in modern industry. One challenge in inspection in an uncontrolled environment is the misjudgment of fake defects (such as dust particles) as surface defects. Fortunately, optical changes within the periphery of a surface defect are usually introduced while those of a fake defect are not. The existence of changes within the defect peripheries can be adopted as a criterion for defect identification. However, modifications within defect peripheries can be too small to be noticeable in intensity based optical image of the glass surface, and misjudgments of modifications may occur due to the incorrectness in defect demarcation. Thus, a sensitive and reliable method for surface defect identification is demanded. To this end, a nondestructive method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is proposed to precisely demarcate surface defects and sensitively measure surface deformations. Suspected surface defects are demarcated using the algorithm based on complex difference from expectation. Modifications within peripheries of suspected surface defects are mapped by phase information from complex interface signal. In this way, surface defects are discriminated from fake defects using a parallel spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. Both simulations and experiments are conducted, and these preliminary results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method to identify glass surface defects.

  16. Defect classification in sparsity-based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golato, Andrew; Ahmad, Fauzia; Santhanam, Sridhar; Amin, Moeness G.

    2017-05-01

    Guided waves have gained popularity in structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their ability to inspect large areas with little attenuation, while providing rich interactions with defects. For thin-walled structures, the propagating waves are Lamb waves, which are a complex but well understood type of guided waves. Recent works have cast the defect localization problem of Lamb wave based SHM within the sparse reconstruction framework. These methods make use of a linear model relating the measurements with the scene reflectivity under the assumption of point-like defects. However, most structural defects are not perfect points but tend to assume specific forms, such as surface cracks or internal cracks. Knowledge of the "type" of defects is useful in the assessment phase of SHM. In this paper, we present a dual purpose sparsity-based imaging scheme which, in addition to accurately localizing defects, properly classifies the defects present simultaneously. The proposed approach takes advantage of the bias exhibited by certain types of defects toward a specific Lamb wave mode. For example, some defects strongly interact with the anti-symmetric modes, while others strongly interact with the symmetric modes. We build model based dictionaries for the fundamental symmetric and anti-symmetric wave modes, which are then utilized in unison to properly localize and classify the defects present. Simulated data of surface and internal defects in a thin Aluminum plate are used to validate the proposed scheme.

  17. Intrinsic point defects and their interaction with impurities in mono-crystalline zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a direct and wide band-gap semiconductor with several attractive features, like an exciton binding energy of ~ 60 meV, for light emitting devices, photovoltaics and spintronics. In the past decade, ZnO has received tremendous attention by the semiconductor physics community and many challenging issues have been addressed, especially the ``native'' n-type conductivity, the role of intrinsic point defects, and the realization of reproducible p-type doping. The latter is, indeed, decisive for a true breakthrough of ZnO-based optoelectronics. In this contribution, recent progress in our understanding of the interaction between intrinsic point defects and impurities in ZnO will be discussed. Aluminum (Al) is often introduced intentionally to accomplish high n-type conductivity since Al on Zn-site (AlZn) acts as a shallow donor. However, AlZn was recently found to react strongly with Zn vacancies (VZn) and the resulting complex (AlZn-VZn) is energetically favorable. The AlZn-VZn complex is a deep acceptor limiting the n-type doping efficiency and this finding is expected to hold in general for complexes between VZn and group-III elements. Further, implantation of self-ions (Zn and O) has been demonstrated to affect radically the balance of intrinsic point defects where an excess of Zn interstitials gives rise to a dramatic depletion of residual Li impurities on Zn-site (LiZn) whilst the opposite holds for an excess of O interstitials. In fact, this behavior appears to be of general validity and Li depletion occurs for a wide variety of implanted elements incorporated into the Zn sub-lattice while Li pile-up occurs for elements residing on O-site. Finally, the most prominent deep-level defect in ZnO, labelled E3, will be shown to involve hydrogen. E3 exists in most ZnO materials, irrespective of the growth method used, and evidence for a center formed by reaction between interstitial hydrogen and primary defects on the Zn sub-lattice will be given.

  18. Birth Defects. Matrix No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, Robert L.

    This report discusses the magnitude of the problem of birth defects, outlines advances in the birth defects field in the past decade, and identifies those areas where research is needed for the prevention, treatment, and management of birth defects. The problem of birth defects has consumed a greater portion of our health care resources because of…

  19. Echocardiography for the Assessment of Congenital Heart Defects in Calves.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katharyn Jean; Schwarzwald, Colin Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Congenital heart disease should be considered when evaluating calves with chronic respiratory signs, failure to thrive, poor growth, or if a murmur is heard on physical examination. Echocardiography is currently the gold standard for diagnosing congenital heart defects. A wide variety of defects, either alone or in combination with a ventricular septal defect, are possible. A standardized approach using sequential segmental analysis is required to fully appreciate the nature and severity of more complex malformations. The prognosis for survival varies from guarded to poor and depends on the hemodynamic relevance of the defects and the degree of cardiac compensation.

  20. Structural birth defects associated with neural tube defects in Hawai'i from 1986 until 2001.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B; Merz, Ruth D

    2007-09-01

    Using birth defects registry data, this study identified birth defects associated with anencephaly, spina bifida, and encephalocele. Musculoskeletal defects were associated with anencephaly; central nervous system defects, gastrointestinal atresia/stenosis, genitourinary system defects, and musculoskeletal system defects with spina bifida; and central nervous system defects, respiratory defects, oral clefts, genitourinary system defects, and musculoskeletal system defects with encephalocele.

  1. Analysis of submicron defects using an SEM-Auger defect review tool

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton D.; Watson, David G.; Paul, Dennis F.; Clough, Stephen P.

    1998-11-24

    The challenges associated with analyzing semiconductor defects become greater as the device design rule decreases. According to the SIA National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, the current metrology requirement for particle analysis is 90 nm with the need to analyze 75 nm particles by the year 2001. These dimensional requirements are beyond the typical capabilities of current SEM/EDX defect review tools. Auger Electron Spectroscopy is a powerful method for measuring the surface composition of localized regions, and has been identified in the SIA roadmap as a primary technique for particle analysis. The ability of a state-of-the-art Auger defect review tool (DRT) to provide secondary electron and high spatial resolution elemental images is particularly effective in characterizing the often complex structure of semiconductor defects. Examples of Auger analysis from defects found at various process steps, on both unpatterned and patterned whole wafers, are shown. These examples highlight the ability of Auger to analyze both thin and laterally small or complex defects.

  2. Characterization of point defects in CdTe by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M.; Kanda, G. S.; Keeble, D. J.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2016-06-13

    Positron lifetime measurements on CdTe 0.15% Zn-doped by weight are presented, trapping to monovacancy defects is observed. At low temperatures, localization at shallow binding energy positron traps dominates. To aid defect identification density functional theory, calculated positron lifetimes and momentum distributions are obtained using relaxed geometry configurations of the monovacancy defects and the Te antisite. These calculations provide evidence that combined positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler spectroscopy measurements have the capability to identify neutral or negative charge states of the monovacancies, the Te antisite, A-centers, and divacancy defects in CdTe.

  3. Advances in surgery for abdominal wall defects: gastroschisis and omphalocele.

    PubMed

    Islam, Saleem

    2012-06-01

    Abdominal wall defects (AWDs) are a common congenital surgical problem in fetuses and neonates. The incidence of these defects has steadily increased over the past few decades due to rising numbers of gastroschisis. Most of these anomalies are diagnosed prenatally and then managed at a center with available pediatric surgical, neonatology, and high-risk obstetric support. Omphaloceles and gastroschisis are distinct anomalies that have different management and outcomes. There have been a number of recent advances in the care of patients with AWDs, both in the fetus and the newborn, which will be discussed in this article.

  4. Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Defects requiring reconstruction in the mandible are commonly encountered and may result from resection of benign or malignant lesions, trauma, or osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular defects can be classified according to location and extent, as well as involvement of mucosa, skin, and tongue. Vascularized bone flaps, in general, provide the best functional and aesthetic outcome, with the fibula flap remaining the gold standard for mandible reconstruction. In this review, we discuss classification and approach to reconstruction of mandibular defects. We also elaborate upon four commonly used free osteocutaneous flaps, inclusive of fibula, iliac crest, scapula, and radial forearm. Finally, we discuss indications and use of osseointegrated implants as well as recent advances in mandibular reconstruction. PMID:22550439

  5. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  6. Assessing EUV mask defectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Tchikoulaeva, Anna; Ackmann, Paul; Wood, Obert; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bubke, Karsten; Holfeld, Christian; Peters, Jan Hendrik; Kini, Sumanth; Watson, Sterling; Lee, Isaac; Mu, Bo; Lim, Phillip; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Boye, Carol

    2010-04-01

    This paper assesses the readiness of EUV masks for pilot line production. The printability of well characterized reticle defects, with particular emphasis on those reticle defects that cause electrical errors on wafer test chips, is investigated. The reticles are equipped with test marks that are inspected in a die-to-die mode (using DUV inspection tool) and reviewed (using a SEM tool), and which also comprise electrically testable patterns. The reticles have three modules comprising features with 32 nm ground rules in 104 nm pitch, 22 nm ground rules with 80 nm pitch, and 16 nm ground rules with 56 nm pitch (on the wafer scale). In order to determine whether specific defects originate from the substrate, the multilayer film, the absorber stack, or from the patterning process, the reticles were inspected after each fabrication step. Following fabrication, the reticles were used to print wafers on a 0.25 NA full-field ASML EUV exposure tool. The printed wafers were inspected with state of the art bright-field and Deep UV inspection tools. It is observed that the printability of EUV mask defects down to a pitch of 56 nm shows a trend of increased printability as the pitch of the printed pattern gets smaller - a well established trend at larger pitches of 80 nm and 104 nm, respectively. The sensitivity of state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools is greatly improved over that of the previous generation of tools. There appears to be no apparent decline in the sensitivity of these state-of-the-art reticle inspection tools for higher density (smaller) patterns on the mask, even down to 56nm pitch (1x). Preliminary results indicate that a blank defect density of the order of 0.25 defects/cm2 can support very early learning on EUV pilot line production at the 16nm node.

  7. The red and near-infrared resonance Raman spectroscopy of photo-induced defects in the mixed-valence linear chain complex [Pt II(en) 2][Pt IV(en) 2Cl 2][ClO 4] 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Robert J.; Brian Dyer, R.; Swanson, Basil I.

    1990-02-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the quasi-one-dimensional solid [Pt II(en) 2][Pt IV(en) 2Cl 2][ClO 4] 4 were obtained wth red excitations (1.65 and 1.41 eV) as a function of photolysis of the solid with energy within the intervalence charge transfer band (2.41 eV). The 1.65 eV excitation corresponds to a polaronic local gap absorption which is known to increase in intensity upon photolysis [S. Kurita & M. Haruki, Synthetic Metals29, F129 (1989)]. However, the RR spectrum which best reveals the photo-induced defects is obtained with 1.41 eV excitation and indicates the presence of both hole and electron polaron defects.

  8. Scanning electron microscope automatic defect classification of process induced defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Scott; McGarvey, Steve

    2017-03-01

    With the integration of high speed Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) based Automated Defect Redetection (ADR) in both high volume semiconductor manufacturing and Research and Development (R and D), the need for reliable SEM Automated Defect Classification (ADC) has grown tremendously in the past few years. In many high volume manufacturing facilities and R and D operations, defect inspection is performed on EBeam (EB), Bright Field (BF) or Dark Field (DF) defect inspection equipment. A comma separated value (CSV) file is created by both the patterned and non-patterned defect inspection tools. The defect inspection result file contains a list of the inspection anomalies detected during the inspection tools' examination of each structure, or the examination of an entire wafers surface for non-patterned applications. This file is imported into the Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM). Following the defect inspection result file import, the DRSEM automatically moves the wafer to each defect coordinate and performs ADR. During ADR the DRSEM operates in a reference mode, capturing a SEM image at the exact position of the anomalies coordinates and capturing a SEM image of a reference location in the center of the wafer. A Defect reference image is created based on the Reference image minus the Defect image. The exact coordinates of the defect is calculated based on the calculated defect position and the anomalies stage coordinate calculated when the high magnification SEM defect image is captured. The captured SEM image is processed through either DRSEM ADC binning, exporting to a Yield Analysis System (YAS), or a combination of both. Process Engineers, Yield Analysis Engineers or Failure Analysis Engineers will manually review the captured images to insure that either the YAS defect binning is accurately classifying the defects or that the DRSEM defect binning is accurately classifying the defects. This paper is an exploration of the feasibility of the

  9. First-principles studies of native defects in olivine phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khang; Johannes, Michelle

    2011-03-01

    Olivine phosphates Li M PO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) are promising candidates for rechargeable Li-ion battery electrodes because of their energy storage capacity and electrochemical and thermal stability. It is known that native defects have strong effects on the performance of olivine phosphates. Yet, the formation and migration of these defects are not fully understood, and we expect that once such understanding has been established, one can envisage a solution for improving the materials' performance. In this talk, we present our first-principles density-functional theory studies of native point defects and defect complexes in Li M PO4 , and discuss the implications of these defects on the performance of the materials. Our results also provide guidelines for obtaining different native defects in experiments.

  10. Supersymmetric k-defects

    DOE PAGES

    Koehn, Michael; Trodden, Mark

    2016-03-03

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. Furthermore, we find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  11. Supersymmetric k-defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Michael; Trodden, Mark

    2016-04-01

    In supersymmetric theories, topological defects can have nontrivial behaviors determined purely by whether or not supersymmetry is restored in the defect core. A well-known example of this is that some supersymmetric cosmic strings are automatically superconducting, leading to important cosmological effects and constraints. We investigate the impact of nontrivial kinetic interactions, present in a number of particle physics models of interest in cosmology, on the relationship between supersymmetry and supercurrents on strings. We find that in some cases it is possible for superconductivity to be disrupted by the extra interactions.

  12. Coarsening dynamics of topological defects in thin permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Ilari; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of topological defects in the magnetic texture of rectangular permalloy thin-film elements during relaxation from random magnetization initial states. Our full micromagnetic simulations reveal complex defect dynamics during relaxation towards the stable Landau closure domain pattern, manifested as temporal power-law decay, with a system-size-dependent cutoff time, of various quantities. These include the energy density of the system and the number densities of the different kinds of topological defects present in the system. The related power-law exponents assume nontrivial values and are found to be different for the different defect types. The exponents are robust against a moderate increase in the Gilbert damping constant and introduction of quenched structural disorder. We discuss details of the processes allowed by conservation of the winding number of the defects, underlying their complex coarsening dynamics.

  13. Simultaneous hyper- and hypomethylation at imprinted loci in a subset of patients with GNAS epimutations underlies a complex and different mechanism of multilocus methylation defect in pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b.

    PubMed

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Azzi, Salah; Steunou, Virginie; Sakakini, Nathalie; Silve, Caroline; Reynes, Christelle; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Keren, Boris; Chantot, Sandra; Barlier, Anne; Linglart, Agnès; Netchine, Irène

    2013-08-01

    Most patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (PHP-1b) display a loss of imprinting (LOI) encompassing the GNAS locus resulting in PTH resistance. In other imprinting disorders, such as Russell-Silver or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, we and others have shown that the LOI is not restricted to one imprinted locus but may affect other imprinted loci for some patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with PHP-1b might present multilocus imprinting defects. We investigated, in 63 patients with PHP-1b, the methylation pattern of eight imprinted loci: GNAS, ZAC1, PEG1/MEST, ICR1, and ICR2 on chromosome 11p15, SNRPN, DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR, and L3MBTL1. We found multilocus imprinting defects in four PHP-1b patients carrying broad LOI at the GNAS locus (1) simultaneous hypermethylation at L3MBTL1 differentially methylated region 3 (DMR3), and hypomethylation at PEG1/MEST DMR (n = 1), (2) hypermethylation at the L3MBTL1 (DMR3) (n = 1) and at the DLK1/GTL2 IG-DMR (n = 1), and (3) hypomethylation at the L3MBTL1 DMR3 (n = 1). We suggest that mechanisms underlying multilocus imprinting defects in PHP-1b differ from those of other imprinting disorders having only multilocus loss of methylation. Furthermore, our results favor the hypothesis of "epidominance", that is, the phenotype is controlled by the most severely affected imprinted locus. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Point-defect-mediated dehydrogenation of alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars

    2011-03-01

    For the engineering of better hydrogen storage materials a systematic understanding of their hydrogen sorption kinetics is crucial. Theoretical studies on metal hydrides have indicated that in many cases point defects control mass transport and hence hydrogen uptake and release. Manipulating point-defect concentrations thus allows control over hydrogen sorption kinetics, opening up new engineering strategies. However, in some cases the relevance of kinetic limitations due to point defects is still under debate; kinetic inhibition of hydrogen sorption has also been attributed to surface effects, e.g. oxide layers or low recombination rates. We present a systematic analysis of the dehydrogenation kinetics of alane (AlH3), one of the prime candidate materials for hydrogen storage. Using hybrid-density functional calculations we determine the concentrations and mobilities of point defects and their complexes. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the full dehydrogenation reaction. We show that under dehydrogenation conditions charged hydrogen vacancy defects form in the crystal, which have a strong tendency towards clustering. The vacancy clusters denote local nuclei of Al phase, and the growth of these nuclei eventually drives the AlH3/Al transformation. However, the low concentration of vacancy defects limits the transport of hydrogen across the bulk, and hence acts as the rate-limiting part of the process. The dehydrogenation is therefore essentially inactive at room temperature, explaining why AlH3 is metastable for years, even though it is thermodynamically unstable. Our derived activation energy and dehydrogenation curves are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, providing evidence for the relevance of bulk point-defect kinetics. Work performed in collaboration with A. Janotti and C. G. Van de Walle, and supported by DOE.

  15. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  16. Quantum computing with defects

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. R.; Koehl, W. F.; Varley, J. B.; Janotti, A.; Buckley, B. B.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center stands out for its robustness—its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. PMID:20404195

  17. Defects in flexoelectric solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng; Purohit, Prashant K.

    2015-11-01

    A solid is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in proportion to strain gradients. Since strain gradients are large near defects, we expect the flexoelectric effect to be prominent there and decay away at distances much larger than a flexoelectric length scale. Here, we quantify this expectation by computing displacement, stress and polarization fields near defects in flexoelectric solids. For point defects we recover some well known results from strain gradient elasticity and non-local piezoelectric theories, but with different length scales in the final expressions. For edge dislocations we show that the electric potential is a maximum in the vicinity of the dislocation core. We also estimate the polarized line charge density of an edge dislocation in an isotropic flexoelectric solid which is in agreement with some measurements in ice. We perform an asymptotic analysis of the crack tip fields in flexoelectric solids and show that our results share some features from solutions in strain gradient elasticity and piezoelectricity. We also compute the energy release rate for cracks using simple crack face boundary conditions and use them in classical criteria for crack growth to make predictions. Our analysis can serve as a starting point for more sophisticated analytic and computational treatments of defects in flexoelectric solids which are gaining increasing prominence in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  18. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... repair; Tetralogy of Fallot repair; Coarctation of the aorta repair; Atrial septal defect repair; Ventricular septal defect ... the pulmonary valve and removing the thickened muscle (stenosis). Placing a patch on the right ventricle and ...

  19. Birth Defects Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Data & Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... of birth defects in the United States. For data on specific birth defects, please visit the specific ...

  20. Guidance for Preventing Birth Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention. Commit to Healthy Choices to Help Prevent Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Tweet Share Compartir We know that not all birth defects can be prevented. But, we also know ...

  1. Atrial Septal Defect (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Defect Preparing Your Child for Surgery Heart and Circulatory System Anesthesia Basics Congenital Heart Defects Activity: The Heart ... EKG (Video) Going to the Hospital Your Heart & Circulatory System Quiz: Heart & Circulatory System EKG (Video) What's It ...

  2. A Call for the Creation of a Center for Infinity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Licata, Joseph W.

    The theoretical framework for a center for infinity is based on four propositions: (1) Untapped human resources in educational leadership are infinite. (2) The dimensions of effective educational leadership approach infinity and, as a result, leadership development should be based on diagnostic specification of instruction. (3) A seemingly…

  3. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies.

  4. Molecular defects in the chondrodysplasias

    SciTech Connect

    Rimoin, D.L.

    1996-05-03

    There has been a recent explosion of knowledge concerning the biochemical and molecular defects in the skeletal dysplasia. Through both the candidate gene approach and positional cloning, specific gene defects that produce the skeletal dysplasia have been identified and may be classified into several general categories: (1) qualitative or quantitative abnormalities in the structural proteins of cartilage; (2) inborn errors of cartilage metabolism; (3) defects in local regulators of cartilage growth; and (4) systemic defects influencing cartilage development. 35 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Composite Defect Significance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-13

    A12i 299 COMPOSITE DEFECT SIGNIFICANCE(U) MATERIALS SCIENCES 1/1 \\ CORP SPRING HOUSE PA S N CHATTERJEE ET AL. 13 JUL 82 MSC/TFR/1288/il87 NADC-80848...Directorate 30 Sensors & Avionics Technology Directorate 40 Communication & Navigation Technology Directorate 50 Software Computer Directorate 60 Aircraft ...instructions concerning commercial products herein do not constitute an endorsement by the Government nor do they convey or imply the license or right to use

  6. Defects at semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzler, Martin

    1985-04-01

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is widely used for detection of periodicity at the surface and of atom arrangement within the unit cell. Experiments and results, however, are increasing, which use the spot profile analysis (SPA-LEED) for the study of nonperiodic surfaces. Here the kinematical approximation provides a wider range of validity than expected. For semiconductors defects are especially important, since the surface states in the gap are determined or strongly influenced by almost any kind of defects at the surface. Atomic steps at the interface {Si}/{SiO2} have been shown to be correlated with many electronic properties of MOS devices like mobility, interface states and fixed charge. The epitaxy on Si and GaAs has been studied with LEED and RHEED, showing the density of the nuclei during formation of a layer and the layer-by-layer growth. The formation of metal suicides in the monolayer range is accompanied by many different superstructures and other rearrangements. It is demonstrated, that the new high resolution instruments provide additional qualitative and quantitative informations on any kind of surface defects.

  7. Mask Blank Defect Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M A; Sommargren, G E

    2000-02-04

    Mask blanks are the substrates that hold the master patterns for integrated circuits. Integrated circuits are semiconductor devices, such as microprocessors (mPs), dynamic random access memory (DRAMs), and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that are central to the computer, communication, and electronics industries. These devices are fabricated using a set of master patterns that are sequentially imaged onto light-sensitive coated silicon wafers and processed to form thin layers of insulating and conductive materials on top of the wafer. These materials form electrical paths and transistors that control the flow of electricity through the device. For the past forty years the semiconductor industry has made phenomenal improvements in device functionality, compactness, speed, power, and cost. This progress is principally due to the exponential decrease in the minimum feature size of integrated circuits, which has been reduced by a factor of {radical}2 every three years. Since 1992 the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has coordinated the efforts of producing a technology roadmap for semiconductors. In the latest document, ''The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors: 1999'', future technology nodes (minimum feature sizes) and targeted dates were specified and are summarized in Table 1. Lithography is the imaging technology for producing a de-magnified image of the mask on the wafer. A typical de-magnification factor is 4. Mask blank defects as small as one-eighth the equivalent minimum feature size are printable and may cause device failure. Defects might be the result of the surface preparation, such as polishing, or contamination due to handling or the environment. Table 2 shows the maximum tolerable defect sizes on the mask blank for each technology node. This downward trend puts a tremendous burden on mask fabrication, particularly in the area of defect detection and reduction. A new infrastructure for mask inspection will be

  8. Study of lattice defect vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report on the vibrations of defects in crystals relates how defects, well localized in a crystal but interacting strongly with the other atoms, change the properties of a perfect crystal. The methods used to solve defect problems relate the properties of an imperfect lattice to the properties of a perfect lattice.

  9. Defects in Carbon-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Two distinctly different carbon based semiconducting materials were investigated as to how point defects can influence the electric properties. SiC is a high power electronic material with high bulk mobility. The interface between SiC and SiO2 is generally considered to be the cause for the reduced mobility of SiC devices compared to bulk SiC. We investigated this interface with atomic resolution Z-contrast and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We come to the conclusion that the previously observed interface layer is due to the miscut and does not exhibit any stoichiometric change. The structure of the interface which is limiting the device performance is caused by the steps and facets at the interface introduced by the miscut. We observed a high number of carbon in the oxide right next to the interface. Aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy enabled the investigation of the atomic structure of this highly stepped interface and the impact of geometry and chemistry on the electronic properties of this material. Graphene is an emerging electronic material also with high mobility. We investigated the defects and dopants in graphene were investigated. We observed point and extended defects in this 2D material. Due to the clear observation of all atoms involved, this material can serve as a model material to study point defects directly. We observe a electronegativity doping of substitutional Si. We observed a remarkable resistance to oxidation of a variety of point defects of elements that readily oxidize in normal circumstances. Boron and nitrogen doped graphene was investigated and the exact nature of the dopant sites and interactions will be shown. Generally speaking modern electron microscopy can directly visualize the full atomic structures in geometrically simple materials like graphene. The knowledge of point defects can be the basis to understand the electronic property structure relationship of structurally complex materials like SiC.

  10. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  11. Thermal properties of defective fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the thermal conductivity of defective fullerene (C60) by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is found that the thermal conductivity of C60 with one defect is lower than the thermal conductivity of perfect C60. However, double defects in C60 have either positive or negative influence on the thermal conductivity, which depends on the positions of the defects. The phonon spectra of perfect and defective C60 are also provided to give corresponding supports. Our results can be extended to long C60 chains, which is helpful for the thermal management of C60.

  12. Endoscopic Adipofascial Radial Forearm Flap Reconstruction of a Clival Defect

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Skull base surgical defects present unique challenges to anatomic and functional reconstruction. Fortunately, many endonasal skull base defects are successfully managed with a variety of local and regional reconstructive techniques. However, when prior surgery or radiotherapy eliminates the use of these local and regional reconstructive options, more elaborate free tissue transfer techniques are required. Managing endoscopic skull base defects of the anterior cranial fossa and clivus is further complicated by the limited access afforded for flap inset. The following case report describes durable reconstruction of a clival defect with an endoscopically-tunneled adipofascial radial forearm tissue transfer. The case highlights importance of a multidisciplinary surgical team approach with strong foundations in endonasal skull base and reconstructive surgery to achieve successful reconstruction of complex endonasal defects. PMID:27975017

  13. Orientational order of motile defects in active nematics

    SciTech Connect

    DeCamp, Stephen J.; Redner, Gabriel S.; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael F.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-08-17

    The study of equilibrium liquid crystals has led to fundamental insights into the nature of ordered materials, as well as many practical applications such as display technologies. Active nematics are a fundamentally different class of liquid crystals, which are driven away from equilibrium by the autonomous motion of their constituent rodlike particles. This internally-generated activity powers the continuous creation and annihilation of topological defects, leading to complex streaming flows whose chaotic dynamics appear to destroy long-range order. Here, we study these dynamics in experimental and computational realizations of active nematics. By tracking thousands of defects over centimeter distances in microtubule-based active nematics, we identify a non-equilibrium phase characterized by system-spanning orientational order of defects. This emergent order persists over hours despite defect lifetimes of only seconds. Lastly, similar dynamical structures are observed in coarse-grained simulations, suggesting that defect-ordered phases are a generic feature of active nematics.

  14. Topological Defects by Size Polydispersity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2014-03-01

    The engineering of defects in crystalline matter introduces entirely new physical properties of materials. The fascinating possible applications of defects, known as topological defects, provide great motivations to perform fundamental investigations to uncover their role on the physical properties of various systems. Here we investigate topological defects in size polydispersity on flat surfaces. Our simulations show that in polydispersed systems topological defects play the role of order-restoring. The perfect hexagonal lattice beyond a small defective region around the impurity particle is well protected. Moreover, size polydispersity is shown numerically here to be an essential ingredient to understand short-range attractions between like-charge disclinations. Our study suggests the promising potential of size polydispersity to engineer defects in real systems. We thank the support of the Office of the Secretary of Defense under the NSSEFF program award number FA9550-10-1-0167.

  15. A Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Gerald G.

    1992-01-01

    A group of knowledgeable scientists and engineers in New Mexico has recognized the need for such a testing capability and has proposed a project to evelop an extraterrestrial surface simulation facility. A group of universities, national laboratories, and private industrial firms is proposing to establish a Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC) and to develop large extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities in which this needed testing can be realistically performed. The CETEC is envisioned to be both a center of knowledge and data regarding engineering, construction, mining, and material process operations on extraterrestrial bodies and a set of extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities. The primary CETEC facility is proposed to be a large domed building made of steel reinforced concrete with more than one acre of test floor area covered with several feet of simulated lunar soil and dust. Various aspects of the project are presented in viewgraph form.

  16. A Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, Gerald G.

    1992-01-01

    A group of knowledgeable scientists and engineers in New Mexico has recognized the need for such a testing capability and has proposed a project to evelop an extraterrestrial surface simulation facility. A group of universities, national laboratories, and private industrial firms is proposing to establish a Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC) and to develop large extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities in which this needed testing can be realistically performed. The CETEC is envisioned to be both a center of knowledge and data regarding engineering, construction, mining, and material process operations on extraterrestrial bodies and a set of extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities. The primary CETEC facility is proposed to be a large domed building made of steel reinforced concrete with more than one acre of test floor area covered with several feet of simulated lunar soil and dust. Various aspects of the project are presented in viewgraph form.

  17. A Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Gerald G.

    A group of knowledgeable scientists and engineers in New Mexico has recognized the need for such a testing capability and has proposed a project to evelop an extraterrestrial surface simulation facility. A group of universities, national laboratories, and private industrial firms is proposing to establish a Center for Extraterrestrial Engineering and Construction (CETEC) and to develop large extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities in which this needed testing can be realistically performed. The CETEC is envisioned to be both a center of knowledge and data regarding engineering, construction, mining, and material process operations on extraterrestrial bodies and a set of extraterrestrial surface simulation facilities. The primary CETEC facility is proposed to be a large domed building made of steel reinforced concrete with more than one acre of test floor area covered with several feet of simulated lunar soil and dust. Various aspects of the project are presented in viewgraph form.

  18. Biomechanics of complex shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Giles, Joshua W; Thompson, Stephen R; Litchfield, Robert B; Athwal, George S

    2013-10-01

    Identification and treatment of the osseous lesions associated with complex shoulder instability remains challenging. Further biomechanical testing is required to delineate critical defect values and determine which treatments provide improved glenohumeral joint stability for the various defect sizes, while minimizing the associated complications.

  19. Single ventricle cardiac defect.

    PubMed

    Eren, Bulent; Turkmen, Nursel; Turkmen, Nurset; Fedakar, Recep; Senel, Berna; Cetin, Volkan; Cetin, Volkn

    2010-05-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view.

  20. Impact of isovalent doping on radiation defects in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londos, C. A.; Sgourou, E. N.; Timerkaeva, D.; Chroneos, A.; Pochet, P.; Emtsev, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Isovalent doping is an important process for the control of point defects in Si. Here, by means of infrared spectroscopy, we investigated the properties of the two main radiation-induced defects in Czochralski-Si (Cz-Si) the oxygen-vacancy (VO) and the carbon-oxygen (CiOi) centres. In particular, we investigated the effect of isovalent doping on the production, the thermal evolution, and the thermal stability of the VO and the CiOi defects. Additionally, we studied the reactions that participate upon annealing and the defects formed as a result of these reactions. Upon annealing VO is converted to VO2 defect although part of the CiOi is converted to CsO2i complexes. Thus, we studied the conversion ratios [VO2]/[VO] and [CsO2i]/[CiOi] with respect to the isovalent dopant. Additionally, the role of carbon in the above processes was discussed. A delay between the temperature characterizing the onset of the VO decay and the temperature characterizing the VO2 growth as well the further growth of VO2 after the complete disappearance of VO indicate that the VO to VO2 conversion is a complex phenomenon with many reaction processes involved. Differences exhibited between the effects of the various dopants on the properties of the two defects were highlighted. The results are discussed in view of density functional theory calculations involving the interaction of isovalent dopants with intrinsic defects, the oxygen and carbon impurities in Si.

  1. Modern reconstructive techniques for abdominal wall defects after oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Khansa, Ibrahim; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2015-04-01

    Resection of abdominal wall tumors often leaves patients with debilitating soft tissue defects. Modern reconstructive techniques can be used to restore abdominal wall integrity. In this article, we present an overview of preoperative patient evaluation, analysis of the defect, surgical planning, and the spectrum of available surgical techniques, ranging from simple to complex. The established clinical evidence in the field of abdominal wall reconstruction is summarized and a case example is provided.

  2. Liability for Personal Injury Caused by Defective Medical Computer Programs

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, Vincent M.

    1980-01-01

    Defective medical computer programs can cause personal injury. Financial responsibility for the injury under tort law will turn on several factors: whether the program is a product or a service, what types of defect exist in the product, and who produced the program. The factors involved in making these decisions are complex, but knowledge of the relevant issues can assist computer personnel in avoiding liability.

  3. Gene-Environment Interactions and the Etiology of Birth Defects.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Robert S; Hong, Mingi

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that most structural birth defects are caused by a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors that interact to interfere with morphogenetic processes. It is important not only to identify individual genetic and environmental risk factors for particular defects but also to identify which environmental factors interact specifically with which genetic variants that predispose to the same defect. Genomic and epidemiological studies are critical to this end. Development and analysis of model systems will also be essential for this goal, as well as for understanding the mechanisms that underlie specific gene-environment interactions.

  4. New paramagnetic defects in synthetic diamonds grown using nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. J.; Pereira, R.; Sobolev, N. A.; Nazaré, M. H.; Gehlhoff, W.; Näser, A.; Kanda, H.

    1999-12-01

    We report four new EPR spectra found in high-pressure synthetic diamonds with high nitrogen content, grown using nickel, and annealed at 1600°C. Analyzing the complex spectra around g≈2 two trigonal and two orthorhombic defects, all with S={1}/{2}, were identified from the angular dependence and the different saturation behavior of the transitions. Besides optical and EPR investigations reveal several centers which have been previously ascribed to defects containing nickel and nitrogen. However, nitrogen is not involved in the new centers, since no evidence of an 14N hyperfine structure could be found. Possible relations of the new defects with Ni are discussed.

  5. Ultrasound anal sphincter defects and 3D anal pressure defects.

    PubMed

    Mion, F; Garros, A; Damon, H; Roman, S

    2017-04-13

    We read with interest the paper by Rezaie et al. on the use of 3D high definition anorectal manometry (3DARM) to detect anal sphincter defects in patients with faecal incontinence [1]. In their series of 39 patients, they described a new metrics to define anal pressure defect (defect of at least 18° of the 25 mmHg isobaric contour on anal resting pressures), and then compared the results of pressure defects determined by 3DARM and 3D anal ultrasound results. They found a rather good negative predictive value of manometry to eliminate the presence of ultrasound anal sphincter defects (92%), and suggested the possibility to use 3DARM to rule out anal sphincter defects and avoid the need of anal ultrasound in selected patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. [Congenital defects and incapacity].

    PubMed

    Jouve de la Barreda, Nicolás

    2009-01-01

    As a whole the congenital defects constitute an important section of the medical attention affecting near 3% of the population. A 15% of spontaneous abortions take place of which the greater frequency corresponds to the chromosome anomalies (25%) and the monogenic mutations (20%) and in a lesser extent to the effects of teratogenic agents. Between the genetic causes determining the congenital defects the mutations that affect genes acting in the early stages of development occupy a main place. These alterations can affect to homeotic genes or monogenic systems that act during the critical phases of the organogenesis. It seems evident that an alteration in the expression of a necessary gene for the appearance of a morphogenetic change constitutes the angular stone to understand resurging of a malformation or discapacity. In the last years has been demonstrated the importance of the teratogenic or environmental agents on the delicate internal physiological balance during the critical stages of the development. In this context must be included the inductive environmental factors inducing epigenetic modifications in the early stage of the development of the embryos produced by fertilization in vitro.

  7. Dipole defects in beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Blak, A. R.

    2010-11-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  8. Reconstruction of perineal defects

    PubMed Central

    Baker, RJ; Muneer, A; Mosahebi, A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Perineal defects are commonly encountered in an oncological setting although they may also present as a result of trauma and infection (eg following Fournier’s gangrene). Reconstruction of these poses functional as well as aesthetic challenges. Skin coverage and tissue volume may both be required in addition to anogenital preservation or reconstruction. General prerequisites of an adequate reconstruction of perineal defects include provision of skin cover, well vascularised tissue to fill the dead space (reducing fluid collection and infection), vulvovaginal reconstruction and no faecal or urinary contamination. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE®. The search terms included ‘perineal defects’, ‘perineal reconstruction’, ‘perforator flaps for perineum’, ‘vulval flaps’, ‘secondary healing of wound’ and ‘vacuum assisted closure’. Backward chaining of reference lists from retrieved papers was also used to expand the search. Findings Modern developments have led to an increased expectation in improved quality of life as the main goal of reconstruction, therefore necessitating surgery with less morbidity and early return to normal activity. Progress in microsurgical procedures has been the main recent advance in perineal reconstruction and, in future, refinements in perforator flap design and tissue engineering techniques will lead to even better reconstructions. PMID:24165333

  9. Defect formation and coarsening in hexagonal 2D curved crystals.

    PubMed

    García, Nicolás A; Pezzutti, Aldo D; Register, Richard A; Vega, Daniel A; Gómez, Leopoldo R

    2015-02-07

    In this work we study the processes of defect formation and coarsening of two-dimensional (2D) curved crystal structures. These processes are found to strongly deviate from their counterparts in flat systems. In curved backgrounds the process of defect formation is deeply affected by the curvature, and at the onset of a phase transition the early density of defects becomes highly inhomogeneous. We observe that even a single growing crystal can produce varying densities of defects depending on its initial position and local orientation with regard to the substrate. This process is completely different from flat space, where grain boundaries are formed due to the impingement of different propagating crystals. Quenching the liquid into the crystal phase leads to the formation of a curved polycrystalline structure, characterized by complex arrays of defects. During annealing, mechanisms of geodesic curvature-driven grain boundary motion and defect annihilation lead to increasing crystalline order. Linear arrays of defects diffuse to regions of high curvature, where they are absorbed by disclinations. At the early stage of coarsening the density of dislocations is insensitive to the geometry while the population of isolated disclinations is deeply affected by curvature. The regions with high curvature act as traps for the diffusion of different structures of defects, including disclinations and domain walls.

  10. Native defects in Tl6SI4: Density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2015-05-05

    In this study, Tl6SI4 is a promising room-temperature semiconductor radiation detection material. Here, we report density functional calculations of native defects and dielectric properties of Tl6SI4. Formation energies and defect levels of native point defects and defect complexes are calculated. Donor-acceptor defect complexes are shown to be abundant in Tl6SI4. High resistivity can be obtained by Fermi level pinning by native donor and acceptor defects. Deep donors that are detrimental to electron transport are identified and methods to mitigate such problem are discussed. Furthermore, we show that mixed ionic-covalent character of Tl6SI4 gives rise to enhanced Born effective charges and large static dielectric constant, which provides effective screening of charged defects and impurities.

  11. Native defects in Tl{sub 6}SI{sub 4}: Density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-05-07

    Tl{sub 6}SI{sub 4} is a promising room-temperature semiconductor radiation detection material. Here, we report density functional calculations of native defects and dielectric properties of Tl{sub 6}SI{sub 4}. Formation energies and defect levels of native point defects and defect complexes are calculated. Donor-acceptor defect complexes are shown to be abundant in Tl{sub 6}SI{sub 4}. High resistivity can be obtained by Fermi level pinning by native donor and acceptor defects. Deep donors that are detrimental to electron transport are identified and methods to mitigate such problem are discussed. Furthermore, we show that mixed ionic-covalent character of Tl{sub 6}SI{sub 4} gives rise to enhanced Born effective charges and large static dielectric constant, which provides effective screening of charged defects and impurities.

  12. Facilitating triple rhomboid flaps for meningomyelocele defect closure using a honeycomb structure as a template.

    PubMed

    Karacor-Altuntas, Zeynep; Dadaci, Mehmet; Erdi, Fatih; Ince, Bilsev; Uyar, Ilker; Yarar, Serhat

    2016-05-01

    Various reconstruction options are available for the soft-tissue coverage of meningomyelocele defects. For small defects, primary closure or local single flaps may be sufficient, while large defects require more complex reconstructive techniques. This study suggests an easy way for surgeons to close large meningomyelocele defects using triple rhomboid flaps. The hexagonal structure of a honeycomb was considered when planning for the coverage of large meningomyelocele defects. The intact skin around the defect was imagined as multiple hexagons, which allowed us to plan triple rhomboid flaps correctly and more easily. This technique was used in seven patients with defects ranging from 7 × 5 to 12 × 8 cm in size. No major postoperative complications were seen. Minimal dehiscence was observed in two patients and healed secondarily. The honeycomb modification for planning triple rhomboid flaps is an easy, practical, and memorable approach for surgeons reconstructing large meningomyelocele defects.

  13. Density functional theory study of defects in unalloyed δ-Pu

    DOE PAGES

    Hernandez, S. C.; Freibert, F. J.; Wills, J. M.

    2017-03-19

    Using density functional theory, we explore in this paper various classical point and complex defects within the face-centered cubic unalloyed δ-plutonium matrix that are potentially induced from self-irradiation. For plutonium only defects, the most energetically stable defect is a distorted split-interstitial. Gallium, the δ-phase stabilizer, is thermodynamically stable as a substitutional defect, but becomes unstable when participating in a complex defect configuration. Finally, complex uranium defects may thermodynamically exist as uranium substitutional with neighboring plutonium interstitial and stabilization of uranium within the lattice is shown via partial density of states and charge density difference plots to be 5f hybridization betweenmore » uranium and plutonium.« less

  14. Birth defects: Risk factors and consequences.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila Ive Ferreira; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina

    2013-06-01

    Birth defects (BDs) or congenital anomalies include all structural and functional alterations in embryonic or fetal development resulting from genetic, environmental or unknown causes, which result in physical and/or mental impairment. BDs occur in about 3% of newborn babies and in most cases of pregnancy loss. BDs are a very complex and heterogeneous group of single or multiple changes that, in most cases, are of unknown etiology. Among the risk factors are advanced maternal and paternal ages, parental consanguinity, teratogenic agents such as infectious agents and drugs, and poor nutrition, in particular folic acid deficiency. One of the consequences of these defects is the high death rate within the first year of life. Information on BDs is becoming increasingly more important throughout the world so that preventive measures can be taken. Knowledge of BDs enables the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies besides adequate genetic counseling.

  15. Transport on a lattice with dynamical defects.

    PubMed

    Turci, Francesco; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Pitard, Estelle; Romano, M Carmen; Ciandrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically nonstatic: Affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport not only in biology but also in more general contexts.

  16. Skin Barrier Defects in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity, or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of anti-microbial peptides and proteases are also discussed. PMID:24633617

  17. Transport on a lattice with dynamical defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turci, Francesco; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Pitard, Estelle; Romano, M. Carmen; Ciandrini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically nonstatic: Affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport not only in biology but also in more general contexts.

  18. Skin barrier defects in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2014-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder, and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of antimicrobial peptides and proteases, are also discussed.

  19. Topological defects in extended inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Kolb, Edward W.; Liddle, Andrew R.

    1990-01-01

    The production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models was considered. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large scale structure via cosmic strings.

  20. FGF signaling directs a center-to-pole expansion of tubulogenesis in mouse testis differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Harikae, Kyoko; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Matsuo, Isao; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2010-01-01

    In mouse embryogenesis, Sry is transiently activated in a center-to-pole wavelike manner along the anteroposterior (AP) axis of developing XY gonads. However, the mechanism and significance of the center-to-pole expansion of testis initiation pathways downstream of Sry expression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that FGF9 can act as a diffusible conductor for a poleward expansion of tubulogenic programs at early phases of testis differentiation. In XY genital ridge cultures of anterior, middle and posterior segments at 11.0-11.25 days post-coitum, male-specific activation of Sry and its target gene, Sox9, was still observed in both anterior and posterior pole segments despite their isolation from the central domain. However, high-level Sox9 expression was not maintained, resulting in the failure of testis cord organization in most pole segments. A reconstruction experiment using ROSA:lacZ middle segments showed rescue of the tubulogenic defect in the poles without any appreciable contribution of lacZ-positive gonadal parenchyma cells. A partition culture assay also showed a possible contribution of soluble/diffusible factors secreted from the gonadal center domain to proper tubulogenesis in the poles. Among various signaling factors, Fgf9 expression was significantly lower in both anterior and posterior pole segments than in the central domain. The supportive role of the central domain could be substituted by exogenous FGF9 supply, whereas reduction of Wnt4 activity did not rescue the tubulogenesis defect in the pole segments. These observations imply that center-to-pole FGF9 diffusion directs a poleward expansion of testiculogenic programs along the AP axis of developing XY gonads.

  1. Who named the quantum defect?

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, A.R.P.; Inokuti, M.

    1997-08-01

    The notion of the quantum defect is important in atomic and molecular spectroscopy and also in unifying spectroscopy with collision theory. In the latter context, the quantum defect may be viewed as an ancestor of the phase shift. However, the origin of the term quantum defect does not seem to be explained in standard textbooks. It occurred in a 1921 paper by Schroedinger, preceding quantum mechanics, yet giving the correct meaning as an index of the short-range interactions with the core of an atom. The authors present the early history of the quantum-defect idea, and sketch its recent developments.

  2. Defective endometrial receptivity.

    PubMed

    Revel, Ariel

    2012-05-01

    The endometrium is one of the most fascinating tissues in the human body. Its sole purpose is to enable implantation of an embryo during a relatively short window of opportunity in the menstrual cycle. It is becoming clear that overcoming the current bottleneck in improvements to assisted reproductive techniques will require a closer look at the interface between uterus and embryo. Indeed, embryo implantation requires a cross talk with a receptive endometrium. Using sonography, hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy we can learn about anatomical and functional markers of endometrial receptivity. This article reviews the factors which might cause defective endometrial receptivity. These include uterine polyps, septa, leiomyomata and adhesions. The effect of thin endometrium, endometriosis and hydrosalpinx is also described. Finally contemporary investigation of molecular markers of endometrial receptivity is described. Improving embryo implantation by a closer look inside the uterus is the key to increasing pregnancy rates in IVF.

  3. Epidemiology of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Frey, Lauren; Hauser, W Allen

    2003-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs)-malformations secondary to abnormal neural tube closure between the third and fourth weeks of gestational age-have a complex and imperfectly understood etiology in which both genetic and environmental factors appear to be involved. A number of specific chromosomal or single-gene disorders, presumably not affected by environmental influences, are associated with the development of NTDs, but such syndromal cases account for a small proportion of NTDs in live-born infants. Analysis of recurrence patterns within families and of twin-concordance data provides evidence of a genetic influence in nonsyndromal cases, but factors such as socioeconomic status and geographic area (independent of race or ethnicity) are also associated with variations in the incidence of NTDs. The prevalence at birth of both anencephaly and spina bifida has decreased, but the advent of antenatal diagnosis and elective termination of affected pregnancies has undermined the reliability of birth prevalence rate as an estimate of incidence. Some occupational and other exposures, including maternal use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), are associated with increased risk for NTDs. Among women who have had an NTD-affected pregnancy, recurrence risk is markedly higher than the risk for a first NTD-affected pregnancy in the general population. There is strong evidence, overall, for a protective effect of adequate folate consumption. In some high-risk groups, however, such as women taking AEDs, folate supplementation has not been proven to reduce NTD risk.

  4. Lumber defect detection by ultrasonics

    Treesearch

    K. A. McDonald

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonics, the technology of high-frequency sound, has been developed as a viable means for locating most defects In lumber for use in digital form in decision-making computers. Ultrasonics has the potential for locating surface and internal defects in lumber of all species, green or dry, and rough sawn or surfaced.

  5. Calculating charged defects using CRYSTAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Christine L.; Liborio, Leandro; Mallia, Giuseppe; Tomić, Stanko; Harrison, Nicholas M.

    2010-07-01

    The methodology for the calculation of charged defects using the CRYSTAL program is discussed. Two example calculations are used to illustrate the methodology: He+ ions in a vacuum and two intrinsic charged defects, Cu vacancies and Ga substitution for Cu, in the chalcopyrite CuGaS2.

  6. Atrial Septal Defect (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading 7 Videos: Kids Talk About Life Video: Am I Normal? (Girls ... Train Your Temper Atrial Septal Defect KidsHealth > For Kids > Atrial Septal Defect Print A A A What's ...

  7. Facts about Ventricular Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs forces the heart and lungs to work harder. Over time, if not repaired, this defect can increase the risk for other complications, including heart failure, high blood pressure in the lungs ... » Types of Ventricular Septal Defects Click here to ...

  8. Current perspectives on the genetic causes of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Mascelli, Samantha; Capra, Valeria

    2006-11-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of severe congenital abnormalities resulting from the failure of neurulation. The pattern of inheritance of these complex defects is multifactorial, making it difficult to identify the underlying causes. Scientific research has rapidly progressed in experimental embryology and molecular genetics to elucidate the basis of neurulation. Crucial mechanisms of neurulation include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is essential for the initiation of neural tube closure, and the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway, which regulates neural plate bending. Genes influencing neurulation have been investigated for their contribution to human neural tube defects, but only genes with well-established role in convergent extension provide an exciting new set of candidate genes. Biochemical factors such as folic acid appear to be the greatest modifiers of NTDs risk in the human population. Consequently, much research has focused on genes of folate-related metabolic pathways. Variants of several such genes have been found to be significantly associated with the risk of neural tube defects in more studies. In this manuscript, we reviewed the current perspectives on the causes of neural tube defects and highlighted that we are still a long way from understanding the etiology of these complex defects.

  9. Composition dependent intrinsic defect structures in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Cooper, Valentino R; Xu, Haixuan; Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic point defect complexes in SrTiO3 under different chemical conditions are studied using density functional theory. The Schottky defect complex consisting of nominally charged Sr, Ti and O vacancies is predicted to be the most stable defect structure in stoichiometric SrTiO3, with a relatively low formation energy of 1.64 eV/defect. In addition, the mechanisms of defect complex formation in nonstoichiometric SrTiO3 are investigated. Excess SrO leads to the formation of the oxygen vacancies and a strontium-titanium antisite defect, while a strontium vacancy together with an oxygen vacancy and the titanium-strontium antisite defect are produced in an excess TiO2 environment. Since point defects, such as oxygen vacancies and cation antisite defects, are intimately related to the functionality of SrTiO3, these results provide guidelines for controlling the formation of intrinsic point defects and optimizing the functionality of SrTiO3 by controlling nonstoichiometric chemical compositions of SrO and TiO2 in experiments.

  10. Antisite defects at oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanghui; Millis, Andrew

    We use ab initio calculations to estimate formation energies of cation (transition metal) antisite defects at oxide interfaces and to understand the basic physical effects that drive or suppress the formation of these defects. We find that antisite defects are favored in systems with substantial charge transfer across the interface, while Jahn-Teller distortions and itinerant ferromagnetism can prevent antisite defects and help stabilize atomically sharp interfaces. Our results enable identification of classes of systems that are more and less susceptible to the formation of antisite defects and motivate a range of experimental studies and further theoretical calculations to further explicate the oxide interface systems. This research was supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1120296 (H. Chen) and DOE-ER-046169 (A. J. Millis).

  11. Global topological k-defects

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.

    2006-10-15

    We consider global topological defects in symmetry-breaking models with a noncanonical kinetic term. Apart from a mass parameter entering the potential, one additional dimensional parameter arises in such models - a kinetic mass. The properties of defects in these models are quite different from standard global domain walls, vortices, and monopoles, if their kinetic mass scale is smaller than their symmetry-breaking scale. In particular, depending on the concrete form of the kinetic term, the typical size of such a defect can be either much larger or much smaller than the size of a standard defect with the same potential term. The characteristic mass of a nonstandard defect, which might have been formed during a phase transition in the early universe, depends on both the temperature of a phase transition and the kinetic mass.

  12. Surface defects and chiral algebras

    DOE PAGES

    Córdova, Clay; Gaiotto, Davide; Shao, Shu-Heng

    2017-05-26

    Here, we investigate superconformal surface defects in four-dimensional N = 2 superconformal theories. Each such defect gives rise to a module of the associated chiral algebra and the surface defect Schur index is the character of this module. Various natural chiral algebra operations such as Drinfield-Sokolov reduction and spectral flow can be interpreted as constructions involving four-dimensional surface defects. We compute the index of these defects in the free hypermultiplet theory and Argyres-Douglas theories, using both infrared techniques involving BPS states, as well as renormalization group flows onto Higgs branches. We find perfect agreement with the predicted characters, in eachmore » case.« less

  13. Toward Intelligent Software Defect Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2011-01-01

    Source code level software defect detection has gone from state of the art to a software engineering best practice. Automated code analysis tools streamline many of the aspects of formal code inspections but have the drawback of being difficult to construct and either prone to false positives or severely limited in the set of defects that can be detected. Machine learning technology provides the promise of learning software defects by example, easing construction of detectors and broadening the range of defects that can be found. Pinpointing software defects with the same level of granularity as prominent source code analysis tools distinguishes this research from past efforts, which focused on analyzing software engineering metrics data with granularity limited to that of a particular function rather than a line of code.

  14. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.; Meyer, René; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    We study SU( N ) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  15. Shaping solitons by lattice defects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Liangwei; Ye Fangwei

    2010-11-15

    We demonstrate the existence of shape-preserving self-localized nonlinear modes in a two-dimensional photonic lattice with a flat-topped defect that covers several lattice sites. The balance of diffraction, defocusing nonlinearity, and optical potential induced by lattices with various forms of defects results in novel families of solitons featuring salient properties. We show that the soliton shape can be controlled by varying the shape of lattice defects. The existence domains of fundamental and vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap expand with the defect amplitude. Vortex solitons in the semi-infinite gap with rectangular intensity distributions will break into dipole solitons when the propagation constant exceeds a critical value. In the semi-infinite and first-finite gaps, we find that lattices with rectangular defects can support stable vortex solitons which exhibit noncanonical phase structure.

  16. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.; Meyer, René; Sugimoto, Shigeki

    2016-06-28

    Here, we study SU(N ) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of the defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.

  17. Holographic Chern-Simons defects

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Mitsutoshi; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.; Meyer, René; ...

    2016-06-28

    Here, we study SU(N ) Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory in the presence of defects that shift the Chern-Simons level from a holographic point of view by embedding the system in string theory. The model is a D3-D7 system in Type IIB string theory, whose gravity dual is given by the AdS soliton background with probe D7 branes attaching to the AdS boundary along the defects. We holographically renormalize the free energy of the defect system with sources, from which we obtain the correlation functions for certain operators naturally associated to these defects. We find interesting phase transitions when the separation of themore » defects as well as the temperature are varied. We also discuss some implications for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect and for 2-dimensional QCD.« less

  18. Production evaluation of automated reticle defect printability prediction application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, William B.; Pomeroy, Scott; Moses, Raphael; Thaler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The growing complexity of reticles and continual tightening of defect specifications causes the reticle defect disposition function to become increasingly difficult. No longer can defect specifications be distilled to a single number, nor can past simple classification rules be employed due to the effects of MEEF on actual printing behavior. The mask maker now requires lithography-based rules and capabilities for making these go/no-go decisions at the reticle inspection step. We have evaluated an automated system that predicts the lithographic significance of reticle defects using PROLITHTM technology. This printability prediction tool was evaluated and tested in a production environment using both standard test reticles and production samples in an advanced reticle manufacturing environment. Reference measurements on Zeiss AIMSTM systems were used to assess the accuracy of predicted results. The application, called the Automated Mask Defect Disposition System, or AMDD, models defective and non-defective test and reference images generated by a high-resolution inspection system. The results were calculated according to the wafer exposure conditions given at setup such that the reticle could be judged for its 'fitness-for-use' from a lithographic standpoint rather than from a simple physical measurement of the film materials. We present the methods and empirical results comparing 1D and 2D Intensity Difference Metrics (IDMs) with respect to AIMS and discuss the results of usability and productivity studies as they apply to manufacturing environments.

  19. Mask defect verification using actinic inspection and defect mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric

    2009-04-14

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. The successful production of defect-free masks will depend on the timely development of defect inspection tools, including both mask blank inspection tools and absorber pattern inspection tools to meet the 22 nm half-pitch node. EUV mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360 is operated at SEMA TECH's Mask blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, with sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for the next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required in the development and mass production stages.

  20. Multiple congenital anomalies: issues for birth defects surveillance.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 200 individuals and 20 percent to 30 percent of those in whom any major structural malformation is found will have 2 or more serious and potentially unrelated birth defects. In addition to the challenges that multiple malformations create for affected persons, their families, and the health care system, appropriate surveillance of such complex patterns can be a concern for birth defects registries. This paper provides examples of how monitoring of multiple anomalies can be beneficial from clinical and public health perspectives; presents a staged approach to documentation of such defects, including suggestions for their coding; describes the types of patterns in which they occur; and discusses some of the unique issues that arise with respect to statistical analysis of multiple versus isolated birth defects.

  1. Defect-Stabilized Phases in Extensile Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel; Decamp, Stephen; Dogic, Zvonimir; Hagan, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Active nematics are liquid crystals which are driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these materials, leading to beautiful and surprising behaviors including the spontaneous generation of topological defect pairs which stream through the system and later annihilate, yielding a complex, seemingly chaotic dynamical steady-state. In this talk, I will describe the emergence of order from this chaos in the form of previously unknown broken-symmetry phases in which the topological defects themselves undergo orientational ordering. We have identified these defect-ordered phases in two realizations of an active nematic: first, a suspension of extensile bundles of microtubules and molecular motor proteins, and second, a computational model of extending hard rods. I will describe the defect-stabilized phases that manifest in these systems, our current understanding of their origins, and discuss whether such phases may be a general feature of extensile active nematics.

  2. Holographic Experiments on Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wapler, Matthias C.

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the anisotropic charge transport properties of both supersymmetric and nonsupersymmetric matter fields on (2+1)-dimensional defects coupled to a (3+1)-dimensional { N} = 4 SYM "heat bath." We focus on the cases of a finite external background magnetic field, finite net charge density and finite mass and their combinations. In this context, we also discuss the limitations due to operator mixing that appears in a few situations and that we ignore in our analysis. At high frequencies, we discover a spectrum of quasiparticle resonances due to the magnetic field and finite density and at small frequencies, we perform a Drude-like expansion around the DC limit. Both of these regimes display many generic features and some features that we attribute to strong coupling, such as a minimum DC conductivity and an unusual behavior of the "cyclotron" and plasmon frequencies, which become related to the resonances found in the conformal case in an earlier paper. We further study the hydrodynamic regime and the relaxation properties, from which the system displays a set of different possible transitions to the collisionless regime. The mass dependence can be cast in two regimes: a generic relativistic behavior dominated by the UV and a nonlinear hydrodynamic behavior dominated by the IR. In the massless case, we furthermore extend earlier results from the literature to find an interesting selfduality under a transformation of the conductivity and the exchange of density and magnetic field.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of nonsyndromic congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Ailes, Elizabeth C; Gilboa, Suzanne M; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Johnson, Candice Y; Hobbs, Charlotte A; Correa, Adolfo; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-03-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in nearly 1% of live births. We sought to assess factors associated with prenatal CHD diagnosis in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). We analyzed data from mothers with CHD-affected pregnancies from 1998 to 2005. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was defined as affirmative responses to questions about abnormal prenatal ultrasounds and fetal echocardiography obtained during a structured telephone interview. Fifteen percent (1097/7299) of women with CHD-affected pregnancies (excluding recognized syndromes and single-gene disorders) reported receiving a prenatal CHD diagnosis. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was positively associated with advanced maternal age, family history of CHD, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, twin or higher-order gestation, CHD complexity, and presence of extracardiac defects. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was inversely associated with maternal Hispanic race/ethnicity, prepregnancy overweight or obesity, and preexisting hypertension. Prenatal CHD diagnosis varied by time to NBDPS interview and NBDPS study site. Further work is warranted to identify reasons for the observed variability in maternal reports of prenatal CHD diagnosis and the extent to which differences in health literacy or health system factors such as access to specialized prenatal care and fetal echocardiography may account for such variability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. XH defects in nonmetallic solids: General properties of Morse oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, Arthur R.; Fowler, W. Beall

    1993-12-01

    As part of a program to investigate light-atom vibrations associated with defects in nonmetallic solids, we have developed a general, dimensionless procedure to solve for the energy levels, wave functions, and transition-matrix elements for Morse oscillators. We can thus readily investigate transition-strength anomalies associated with electrical anharmonicities such as those recently observed in certain OH- and OD- systems in alkali halides. A center-of-mass correction in adapting the OH- dipole moment function to OD- is of central importance in interpreting isotope effects on fundamental and overtone transition strengths.

  5. Biomaterials in periodontal osseous defects

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Nand; Dixit, Jaya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Osseous defects in periodontal diseases require osseous grafts and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using barrier membranes. The present study was undertaken with the objectives to clinically evaluate the osteogenic potential of hydroxyapatite (HA), cissus quadrangularis (CQ), and oxidized cellulose membrane (OCM) and compare with normal bone healing. Materials and Methods Twenty subjects with periodontitis in the age group ranging from 20 years to 40 years were selected from our outpatient department on the basis of presence of deep periodontal pockets, clinical probing depth ≥5 mm, vertical osseous defects obvious on radiograph and two- or three-walled involvement seen on surgical exposure. Infrabony defects were randomly divided into four groups on the basis of treatment to be executed, such that each group comprised 5 defects. Group I was control, II received HA, III received CQ and IV received OCM. Probing depth and attachment level were measured at regular months after surgery. Defects were re-exposed using crevicular incisions at 6 months. Results There was gradual reduction in the mean probing pocket depth in all groups, but highly significant in the site treated with HA. Gain in attachment level was higher in sites treated with HA, 3.2 mm at 6 months. Conclusion Hydroxyapatite and OCM showed good reduction in pocket depth, attachment level gain and osseous defect fill. Further study should be conducted by using a combination of HA and OCM in periodontal osseous defects with growth factors and stem cells. PMID:25756030

  6. Biomaterials in periodontal osseous defects.

    PubMed

    Lal, Nand; Dixit, Jaya

    2012-01-01

    Osseous defects in periodontal diseases require osseous grafts and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) using barrier membranes. The present study was undertaken with the objectives to clinically evaluate the osteogenic potential of hydroxyapatite (HA), cissus quadrangularis (CQ), and oxidized cellulose membrane (OCM) and compare with normal bone healing. Twenty subjects with periodontitis in the age group ranging from 20 years to 40 years were selected from our outpatient department on the basis of presence of deep periodontal pockets, clinical probing depth ≥5 mm, vertical osseous defects obvious on radiograph and two- or three-walled involvement seen on surgical exposure. Infrabony defects were randomly divided into four groups on the basis of treatment to be executed, such that each group comprised 5 defects. Group I was control, II received HA, III received CQ and IV received OCM. Probing depth and attachment level were measured at regular months after surgery. Defects were re-exposed using crevicular incisions at 6 months. There was gradual reduction in the mean probing pocket depth in all groups, but highly significant in the site treated with HA. Gain in attachment level was higher in sites treated with HA, 3.2 mm at 6 months. Hydroxyapatite and OCM showed good reduction in pocket depth, attachment level gain and osseous defect fill. Further study should be conducted by using a combination of HA and OCM in periodontal osseous defects with growth factors and stem cells.

  7. 2010 Defects in Semiconductors GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Shengbai Zhang

    2011-01-06

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, as well as an emphasis on the development of novel defect detection methods and first-principles defect theories. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference will deal with point and extended defects in a broad range of electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, oxides, sp{sup 2} carbon based-materials, and photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and in understanding important defect phenomena such as doping bottleneck in nanostructures and the diffusion of defects and impurities. The program consists of about twenty invited talks and a number of contributed poster sessions. The emphasis should be on work which has yet to be published. The large amount of discussion time provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  8. Disclinations, dislocations, and continuous defects: A reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleman, M.; Friedel, J.

    2008-01-01

    Disclinations were first observed in mesomorphic phases. They were later found relevant to a number of ill-ordered condensed-matter media involving continuous symmetries or frustrated order. Disclinations also appear in polycrystals at the edges of grain boundaries; but they are of limited interest in solid single crystals, where they can move only by diffusion climb and, owing to their large elastic stresses, mostly appear in close pairs of opposite signs. The relaxation mechanisms associated with a disclination in its creation, motion, and change of shape involve an interplay with continuous or quantized dislocations and/or continuous disclinations. These are attached to the disclinations or are akin to Nye’s dislocation densities, which are particularly well suited for consideration here. The notion of an extended Volterra process is introduced, which takes these relaxation processes into account and covers different situations where this interplay takes place. These concepts are illustrated by a variety of applications in amorphous solids, mesomorphic phases, and frustrated media in their curved habit space. These often involve disclination networks with specific node conditions. The powerful topological theory of line defects considers only defects stable against any change of boundary conditions or relaxation processes compatible with the structure considered. It can be seen as a simplified case of the approach considered here, particularly suited for media of high plasticity or/and complex structures. It cannot analyze the dynamical properties of defects nor the elastic constants involved in their static properties; topological stability cannot guarantee energetic stability, and sometimes cannot distinguish finer details of the structure of defects.

  9. Lateral Manipulation of Single Defect on Insulating Surface Using Noncontact Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Insook; Nishi, Ryuji; Abe, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    A single atomic defect on an ionic crystal surface was manipulated at the atomic level using an atomic force microscope. During raster scanning, the defect was manipulated at near the tip-sample distance and at room temperature. The defect, which is imaged as a sharp half-moon shape, moves continuously if the tip is close to the sample surface. The defect randomly moves along a zigzag or straight path or jumps long distances. The movement of the defect on an insulator is complex in contrast to that on semiconductors. The defect moves suddenly owing to the tip approaching the surface when the distance feedback is overshot under the condition of a large difference in frequency shift between the feedback set point and a weak interaction on the defect.

  10. Metastable defects in a-Si:H from bond-length disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Biswas, R.

    1996-12-31

    A model of metastable defect formation via H-rebonding in hydrogenated amorphous silicon is developed where the defect density and defect formation energy are controlled by the bond-length disorder of the material. Dangling bond defects are created by H motion from SiH bonds to weak Si-Si bonds. The model predicts formation energies for thermal and light-induced defects in good agreement with experiment. The relaxation of thermal equilibrium defects is stretched exponential, with stretch parameters varying approximately linearly with temperature and relaxation times that are thermally activated -- in good agreement with experiment. The annealing of light-induced defect densities also shows relaxation behavior. The model accounts for barriers of {approx} 1.5 eV for H diffusion. The energetics of the H{sub 2}* complex will also be discussed. The rms bond-length deviation is a new parameter that controls the quality of the material.

  11. Point Defects in Pb-, Bi-, and In-Doped CdZnTe Detectors: Deep-Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, R.; Keeter, K.; Rodriguez, R.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Hossain, A.; Camarda, G. S.; Kim, K. H.; Yang, G.; Cui, Y.; Carcelen, V.; Franc, J.; Li, Z.; James, R. B.

    2012-03-01

    We studied, by current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), point defects induced in CdZnTe detectors by three dopants: Pb, Bi, and In. Pb-doped CdZnTe detectors have a new acceptor trap at around 0.48 eV. The absence of a VCd trap suggests that all Cd vacancies are compensated by Pb interstitials after they form a deep-acceptor complex [[PbCd]+-V{Cd/2-}]-. Bi-doped CdZnTe detectors had two distinct traps: a shallow trap at around 36 meV and a deep donor trap at around 0.82 eV. In detectors doped with In, we noted three well-known traps: two acceptor levels at around 0.18 eV (A-centers) and 0.31 eV (VCd), and a deep trap at around 1.1 eV.

  12. Self healing of defected graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhui; Shi, Tuwan; Cai, Tuocheng; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng; Xu, Tao; Sun, Litao

    2013-03-11

    For electronics applications, defects in graphene are usually undesirable because of their ability to scatter charge carriers, thereby reduce the carrier mobility. It would be extremely useful if the damage can be repaired. In this work, we employ Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements to study defects in graphene introduced by argon plasma bombardment. We have found that majority of these defects can be cured by a simple thermal annealing process. The self-healing is attributed to recombination of mobile carbon adatoms with vacancies. With increasing level of plasma induced damage, the self-healing becomes less effective.

  13. First principle-based AKMC modelling of the formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters in a neutron irradiated complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngayam-Happy, R.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-09-01

    The formation and medium-term evolution of point defect and solute-rich clusters under neutron irradiation have been modelled in a complex Fe-CuMnNiSiP alloy representative of RPV steels, by means of first principle-based atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The results obtained reproduce most features observed in available experimental studies, highlighting the very good agreement between both series. According to simulation, solute-rich clusters form and develop via an induced segregation mechanism on either the vacancy or interstitial clusters, and these point defect clusters are efficiently generated only in cascade debris and not Frenkel pair flux. The results have revealed the existence of two distinct populations of clusters with different characteristic features. Solute-rich clusters in the first group are bound essentially to interstitial clusters and they are enriched in Mn mostly, but also Ni to a lesser extent. Over the low dose regime, their density increases in the alloy as a result of the accumulation of highly stable interstitial clusters. In the second group, the solute-rich clusters are merged with vacancy clusters, and they contain mostly Cu and Si, but also substantial amount of Mn and Ni. The formation of a sub-population of pure solute clusters has been observed, which results from annihilation of the low stable vacancy clusters on sinks. The results indicate finally that the Mn content in clusters is up to 50%, Cu, Si, and Ni sharing the other half in more or less equivalent amounts. This composition has not demonstrated any noticeable modification with increasing dose over irradiation.

  14. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  15. Effects of defects in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendeckyj, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of defects in composite structures is addressed. Defects in laminates such as wrinkles, foreign particles, scratches and breaks are discussed. Effects of plygap plywaviness and machining defects are also studied.

  16. Reproduction and Survival After Cardiac Defect Repair

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Defect, Congenital Heart; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Transposition of Great Vessels; Ductus Arteriosus, Patent; Heart Septal Defects, Atrial; Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular; Down Syndrome; Tetralogy of Fallot; Pulmonic Stenosis; Coarctation of Aorta

  17. [Use of platelet poor plasma for elimination of Schneider's membrane defects arising during sinus lifting].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S Iu; Iarmukova, N F; Muraev, A A; Migura, S A

    2010-01-01

    Topografical anatomical features of maxillary sinus structure create complexities for carrying out the sinus lifting operation. With Schneider's membrane defect from 3 to 6 mm the technique of its elimination with use of platelet poor plasma is offered. Defects in mucous membrane from 3 to 6 mm arise during operation in 7,9% of cases. In such cases bone window is expanding, mucous membrane is mobilizing and the defect is covered with platelet poor plasma received from patient's blood.

  18. CMOS standard cells characterization for open defects for test pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Andrzej; Pleskacz, Witold

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an extended method of CMOS standard cells characterization for defect based voltage testing. It allows to estimate the probabilities of physical open defects occurrences in a cell, describes its faulty behavior caused by the defects and finds the test sequences that detect those faults. Finally, the minimal set of test sequences is selected to cover all detectable faults and the optimal complex test sequence is constructed. Experimental results for cells from industrial standard cell library are presented as well.

  19. Frequent phosphodiesterase 11A gene (PDE11A) defects in patients with Carney complex (CNC) caused by PRKAR1A mutations: PDE11A may contribute to adrenal and testicular tumors in CNC as a modifier of the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Libé, Rossella; Horvath, Anelia; Vezzosi, Delphine; Fratticci, Amato; Coste, Joel; Perlemoine, Karine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Groussin, Lionel; Clauser, Eric; Raffin-Sanson, Marie-Laure; Siegel, Jennifer; Moran, Jason; Drori-Herishanu, Limor; Faucz, Fabio Rueda; Lodish, Maya; Nesterova, Maria; Bertagna, Xavier; Bertherat, Jerome; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-01-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant multiple neoplasia, caused mostly by inactivating mutations of the regulatory subunit 1A of the protein kinase A (PRKAR1A). Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is the most frequent endocrine manifestation of CNC with a great inter-individual variability. Germline, protein-truncating mutations of phosphodiesterase type 11A (PDE11A) have been described to predispose to a variety of endocrine tumors, including adrenal and testicular tumors. Our objective was to investigate the role of PDE11A as a possible gene modifier of the phenotype in a series of 150 patients with CNC. A higher frequency of PDE11A variants in patients with CNC compared with healthy controls was found (25.3 vs. 6.8%, P < 0.0001). Among CNC patients, those with PPNAD were significantly more frequently carriers of PDE11A variants compared with patients without PPNAD (30.8 vs. 13%, P = 0.025). Furthermore, men with PPNAD were significantly more frequently carriers of PDE11A sequence variants (40.7%) than women with PPNAD (27.3%) (P < 0.001). A higher frequency of PDE11A sequence variants was also found in patients with large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCT) compared with those without LCCSCT (50 vs. 10%, P = 0.0056). PDE11A variants were significantly associated with the copresence of PPNAD and LCCSCT in men: 81 vs. 20%, P < 0.004). The simultaneous inactivation of PRKAR1A and PDE11A by small inhibitory RNA led to an increase in cAMP-regulatory element-mediated transcriptional activity under basal conditions and after stimulation by forskolin. We demonstrate, in a large cohort of CNC patients, a high frequency of PDE11A variants, suggesting that PDE11A is a genetic modifying factor for the development of testicular and adrenal tumors in patients with germline PRKAR1A mutation.

  20. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  1. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  2. Reconstruction of periorbital soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Berli, Jens U; Merbs, Shannath L; Grant, Michael P

    2014-10-01

    Because of the complex anatomy and fine mechanics of the periorbital soft tissues, the reconstruction of this region can be particularly daunting. Through a structured assessment of the defect, based on subunit analysis and thorough understanding of the surgical layers, we believe to allow the reconstructive surgeon to develop an algorithmic approach to these complex problems. The sequela of a suboptimal reconstruction do not only result in an inferior aesthetic result, but also have the potential for long-term functional problems such as epiphora, dry eye, ptosis, eyelid retraction, and thus requiring secondary surgery. There is no better time to aim for a perfect reconstruction than at the time of the initial surgery. In this chapter, we hope to encourage the reader to strengthen and recapitulate these analytical skills and present the most commonly used and studied techniques to help achieve a reproducible functional and aesthetically appealing result. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Atrial Septal Defect (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... wall called the septum that normally separates the blue and red blood. In a person with an atrial septal defect, there's an opening in that wall. This hole in the wall lets oxygen-rich blood from ...

  4. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Stalker, K. Terry; Yee, Amy A.

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  5. Atrial Septal Defect (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... septal defect (pronounced: AY-tree-ul SEP-tul DEE-fekt), or ASD for short, is sometimes referred ... can be treated with cardiac catheterization (pronounced: CAR-dee-ack cath-uh-turr-ih-ZAY-shun), in ...

  6. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  7. Birth Defects Research and Tracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit Button Information For… Media Policy Makers Research and Tracking Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... to help prevent them. Importance of Tracking and Research Tracking: Birth defects tracking systems identify babies born ...

  8. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  9. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  10. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & Resources Frequently asked health questions Ask our ... experts Calculating your due date Ovulation calendar Order bereavement materials News Moms Need Blog News & Media News ...

  11. Low quantum defect laser performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Low quantum defect lasers are possible using near-resonant optical pumping. This paper examines the laser material performance as the quantum defect of the laser is reduced. A steady-state model is developed, which incorporates the relevant physical processes in these materials and predicts extraction efficiency and waste heat generation. As the laser quantum defect is reduced below a few percent, the impact of fluorescence cooling must be included in the analysis. The special case of a net zero quantum defect laser is examined in detail. This condition, referred to as the radiation balance laser (RBL), is shown to provide two orders of magnitude lower heat generation at the cost of roughly 10% loss in extraction efficiency. Numerical examples are presented with the host materials Yb:YAG and Yb:Silica. The general conditions, which yield optimal laser efficiency, are derived and explored.

  12. Mental Images and the Modification of Learning Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Bernard M.

    Because human memory and thought involve extremely complex processes, it is possible to employ unusual modalities and specific visual strategies for remembering and problem-solving to assist patients with memory defects. This three-part paper discusses some of the research in the field of human memory and describes practical applications of these…

  13. Mental Images and the Modification of Learning Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Bernard M.

    Because human memory and thought involve extremely complex processes, it is possible to employ unusual modalities and specific visual strategies for remembering and problem-solving to assist patients with memory defects. This three-part paper discusses some of the research in the field of human memory and describes practical applications of these…

  14. Mouse models for neural tube closure defects.

    PubMed

    Juriloff, D M; Harris, M J

    2000-04-12

    Neural tube closure defects (NTDs), in particular anencephaly and spina bifida, are common human birth defects (1 in 1000), their genetics is complex and their risk is reduced by periconceptional maternal folic acid supplementation. There are > 60 mouse mutants and strains with NTDs, many reported within the past 2 years. Not only are NTD mutations at loci widely heterogeneous in function, but also most of the mutants demonstrate variable low penetrance and some show complex inheritance patterns (e.g. SELH/Bc, Abl / Arg, Mena / Profilin1 ). In most of these mouse models, the NTDs are exencephaly (equivalent to anencephaly) or spina bifida or both, reflecting failure of neural fold elevation in well defined, mechanistically distinct elevation zones. NTD risk is reduced in various models by different maternal nutrient supplements, including folic acid ( Pax3, Cart1, Cd mutants), inositol ( ct ) and methionine ( Axd ). Lack of de novo methylation in embryos ( Dnmt3b -null) leads to NTD risk, and we suggest a potential link between methylation and the observed female excess among cranial NTDs in several models. Some surprising NTD mutants ( Gadd45a, Terc, Trp53 ) suggest that genes with a basic mitotic function also have a function specific to neural fold elevation. The genes mutated in several mouse NTD models involve actin regulation ( Abl/Arg, Macs, Mena/Profilin1, Mlp, Shrm, Vcl ), support the postulated key role of actin in neural fold elevation, and may be a good candidate pathway to search for human NTD genes.

  15. Mitochondrial Defects Confer Tolerance against Cellulose Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhubing; Vanderhaeghen, Rudy; Wang, Yan; Leroux, Olivier; Nguyen, Long; Belt, Katharina; Millar, A. Harvey; Audenaert, Dominique; Mouille, Grégory; Vernhettes, Samantha; Höfte, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Because the plant cell wall provides the first line of defense against biotic and abiotic assaults, its functional integrity needs to be maintained under stress conditions. Through a phenotype-based compound screening approach, we identified a novel cellulose synthase inhibitor, designated C17. C17 administration depletes cellulose synthase complexes from the plasma membrane in Arabidopsis thaliana, resulting in anisotropic cell elongation and a weak cell wall. Surprisingly, in addition to mutations in CELLULOSE SYNTHASE1 (CESA1) and CESA3, a forward genetic screen identified two independent defective genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR)-like proteins (CELL WALL MAINTAINER1 [CWM1] and CWM2) as conferring tolerance to C17. Functional analysis revealed that mutations in these PPR proteins resulted in defective cytochrome c maturation and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, as evidenced by the induction of an alternative oxidase. These mitochondrial perturbations increased tolerance to cell wall damage induced by cellulose deficiency. Likewise, administration of antimycin A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex III, resulted in tolerance toward C17. The C17 tolerance of cwm2 was partially lost upon depletion of the mitochondrial retrograde regulator ANAC017, demonstrating that ANAC017 links mitochondrial dysfunction with the cell wall. In view of mitochondria being a major target of a variety of stresses, our data indicate that plant cells might modulate mitochondrial activity to maintain a functional cell wall when subjected to stresses. PMID:27543091

  16. Formation, migration, and clustering of point defects in CuInSe2 from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikkonen, L. E.; Ganchenkova, M. G.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic properties of high-efficiency CuInSe2 (CIS)-based solar cells are affected by the microstructural features of the absorber layer, such as point defect types and their distribution. Recently, there has been controversy over whether some of the typical point defects in CIS—VCu, VSe, InCu, CuIn—can form stable complexes in the material. In this work, we demonstrate that the presence of defect complexes during device operational time can be justified by taking into account the thermodynamic and kinetic driving forces acting behind defect microstructure formation. Our conclusions are backed up by thorough state-of-the-art calculations of defect interaction potentials as well as the activation barriers surrounding the complexes. Defect complexes such as InCu-2VCu, InCu-CuIn, and VSe-VCu are shown to be stable against thermal dissociation at device operating temperatures, but can anneal out within tens of minutes at temperatures higher than 150-200 °C (VCu-related complexes) or 400 °C (antisite pair). Our results suggest that the presence of these complexes can be controlled via growth temperatures, which provides a mechanism for tuning the electronic activity of defects and the device altogether.

  17. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  18. A Project of a Center for Astronomy Popularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Alfaro, Hector

    At the Astronomy Department of Universidad de Guanajuato 400 km NW of Mexico City eight professional astronomers do research and undergraduate level teaching. In 2000 the facilities of a rudimentary observatory on the roof of the main building of the University were formally assigned to our Department. The site built in the late 1970s includes a 16-cm refractor in a dome and a classroom with capacity for 50 people. The refractor had been out of use for about twelve years. In general maintenance was inexistent and no up grade program had been considered at the time we took the site in charge. Since then with two portable 8-inch telescopes we organize astronomical observations for the general public specially scholars. However many repairs remain to be done of the building and refractor. So far we proposed a project to establish a Center for Popularization of Astronomy to get funds from the Regional Science Council with the aim to carry out the following activities: 1) Permanent program of astronomical observations for a wide audience. 2) Regular talks to the public in different science domains. 3) Summer schools in Astronomy for elementary and high-school teachers. 4) Foundation of an amateur society of astronomy.

  19. Identification of Complex Carbon Nanotube Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A variety of complex carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been observed experimentally. These include sharp bends, branches, tori, and helices. They are believed to be formed by using topological defects such as pentagons and heptagons to connect different CNT. The effects of type, number, and arrangement (separation and orientation) of defects on atomic structures and energetics of complex CNT are investigated using topology, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. Energetically stable models are derived for identification of observed complex CNT structures.

  20. Intrauterine infections and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yi-Fei; Xu, Chen; Chen, Gong; Xin, Ruo-Lei; Chen, Jia-Peng; Hu, Xu-Mei; Yang, Qing; Song, Xin-Ming; Pang, Li-Hua; Ji, Ying; Sun, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ju-Fen; Guo, Yan-Ling; Zhang, Yan

    2004-12-01

    Intrauterine infection is an important cause of some birth defects worldwide. The most common pathogens include rubella virus, cytomegaloviurs, ureaplasma urealyticum, toxoplasma, etc. General information about these pathogens in epidemiology, consequence of birth defects, and the possible mechanisms in the progress of birth defects, and the interventions to prevent or treat these pathogens' infections are described. The infections caused by rubella virus, cytomegaloviurs, ureaplasma urealyticum, toxoplasma, etc. are common, yet they are proved to be fatal during the pregnant period, especially during the first trimester. These infections may cause sterility, abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight, and affect multiple organs that may induce loss of hearing and vision, even fetal deformity and the long-term effects. These pathogens' infections may influence the microenvironment of placenta, including levels of enzymes and cytokines, and affect chondriosome that may induce the progress of birth defect. Early diagnosis of infections during pregnancy should be strengthened. There are still many things to be settled, such as the molecular mechanisms of birth defects, the effective vaccines to certain pathogens. Birth defect researches in terms of etiology and the development of applicable and sensitive pathogen detection technology and methods are imperative.

  1. Topological defects from the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Garriga, Jaume; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-05-28

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  2. Topological defects from the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Vilenkin, Alexander; Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.

    2015-05-01

    Many theories of the early universe predict the existence of a multiverse where bubbles continuously nucleate giving rise to observers in their interior. In this paper, we point out that topological defects of several dimensionalities will also be produced in de Sitter like regions of the multiverse. In particular, defects could be spontaneously nucleated in our parent vacuum. We study the evolution of these defects as they collide with and propagate inside of our bubble. We estimate the present distribution of defects in the observable part of the universe. The expected number of such nearby defects turns out to be quite small, even for the highest nucleation rate. We also study collisions of strings and domain walls with our bubble in our past light cone. We obtain simulated full-sky maps of the loci of such collisions, and find their angular size distribution. Similarly to what happens in the case of bubble collisions, the prospect of detecting any collisions of our bubble with ambient defects is greatly enhanced in the case where the cosmological constant of our parent vacuum is much higher than the vacuum energy density during inflation in our bubble.

  3. Optical manipulation and defect creation in a liquid crystal on a photoresponsive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibpourmoghadam, Atefeh; Jiao, Lin; Reshetnyak, Victor; Evans, Dean R.; Lorenz, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Light-induced modulations of the refractive index and pattern formation are desirable to generate complex photonic structures via exposure to light. Here we show that local modulations of the effective refractive index and reconfigurable defects can be locally induced in a hybridized thin birefringent film of a nematic liquid crystal (LC) on a photoresponsive (generating photoinduced electric fields) iron doped lithium niobate surface via exposure to a focused laser beam. Samples were studied with a tailored imaging approach, which provided the ability to investigate these optically excited, field-induced responses on a microscopic level. Upon exposure with a focused laser beam, the fluent LC was expanded on the substrate's surface and localized field-induced defects were optically created. Both umbilic (central) and line defects were observed. The formation of field-induced umbilic defects was modeled in numerical simulations. In addition, line defects were experimentally studied. It was seen that line defects interconnected the centers of two central defects (field-induced defects, which were present at the upper and lower surfaces of the LC layer). In addition, line disclinations separating reverse tilt domains (caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of the photogenerated fields) were seen. These line disclinations were pinned to the central defects. By exposure with two adjacent focused laser beams two umbilic defects were created side by side and interconnected with a line defect (the line defects pinned to each umbilic defect were joined in a single defect line). An alternative technique is presented to field-induce promising photonic motives (microlenses, resonators, line defects) in a liquid crystalline, hybridized birefringent film on a microscopic scale by using a low-power laser (opposed to the high power necessary to induce optical Kerr responses in a neat LC).

  4. Fe doping and anion defects in bismuth pyrochlore photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Cedric; Barker, David; Subramanian, Vaidyananthan; Huda, Muhammad

    2014-03-01

    To understand the change in photocatalytic properties of Bi2Ti2O7\\ after incorporating localized Fe 3d electrons, the electronic properties and formation energies of anion defects and cation substitutions have been systematically studied by first principles density functional theory. We have found for each type of doping, intrinsic or extrinsic, structural distortions are localized to the defect site. For the intrinsic defects, O vacancies (Ovac) are relatively shallow donors compared to O interstitials (Oint) . For the extrinsic defects, Fe substitutions at the Bi sites (FeBi) are more stable than Fe substitutions at the Ti sites (FeTi) , however they both promote the acceptor defect levels which are critical for band gap engineering. Complex doping (combined intrinsic and extrinsic doping) was also considered to examine the defect correlations at first nearest neighbor to third nearest neighbor distances. A detailed electronic structure analysis will be presented for both pristine and doped Bi2Ti2O7. National Science Foundation.

  5. Swelling Mechanisms of UO2 Lattices with Defect Ingrowths

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Seçkin D.

    2015-01-01

    The swelling that occurs in uranium dioxide as a result of radiation-induced defect ingrowth is not fully understood. Experimental and theoretical groups have attempted to explain this phenomenon with various complex theories. In this study, experimental lattice expansion and lattice super saturation were accurately reproduced using a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on their resemblance to experimental data, the simulation results presented here show that fission induces only oxygen Frenkel pairs while alpha particle irradiation results in both oxygen and uranium Frenkel pair defects. Moreover, in this work, defects are divided into two sub-groups, obstruction type defects and distortion type defects. It is shown that obstruction type Frenkel pairs are responsible for both fission- and alpha-particle-induced lattice swelling. Relative lattice expansion was found to vary linearly with the number of obstruction type uranium Frenkel defects. Additionally, at high concentrations, some of the obstruction type uranium Frenkel pairs formed diatomic and triatomic structures with oxygen ions in their octahedral cages, increasing the slope of the linear dependence. PMID:26244777

  6. Repairing native defects on EUV mask blanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawliss, Mark; Gallagher, Emily; Hibbs, Michael; Seki, Kazunori; Isogawa, Takeshi; Robinson, Tod; LeClaire, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    Mask defectivity is a serious problem for all lithographic masks, but especially for EUV masks. Defects in the EUV blank are particularly challenging because their elimination is beyond control of the mask fab. If defects have been identified on a mask blank, patterns can be shifted to place as many blank defects as possible in regions where printing impact will be eliminated or become unimportant. For those defects that cannot be mitigated through pattern shift, repair strategies must be developed. Repairing defects that occur naturally in the EUV blank is challenging because the printability of these defects varies widely. This paper describes some types of native defects commonly found and begins to outline a triage strategy for defects that are identified on the blank. Sample defects best suited to nanomachining repair are treated in detail: repairs are attempted, characterized using mask metrology and then tested for printability. Based on the initial results, the viability of repairing EUV blank native defects is discussed.

  7. The thermal stability of radiation-induced defects in illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, T.; Allard, T.; Beaufort, D.; Cantin, J.-L.; von Bardeleben, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    High-purity illite specimens from the Mesoproterozoic unconformity-related uranium deposits of Kiggavik, Thelon basin, Nunavut (Canada), and Shea Creek (Athabasca basin, Saskatchewan, Canada) have been studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the thermal stability of the main radiation-induced defects and question the potential of using illite as a natural dosimeter. The observed spectra are complex as they can show in the same region several contributions: (1) an unstable native defect, (2) the main stable defect named Ai by reference to a previous study (Morichon et al. in Phys Chem Minerals 35:339-346, 2008), (3) a signal at g = 2.063 assigned to a new defect, not yet fully characterized, named Ai2 center and (4) impurities such as vanadyl complex or divalent manganese. Isochronal heating shows that the new signal corresponds to a stable species. Isothermal heating experiments at 400 and 450 °C provide values of half-life extrapolated at room temperature and activation energy of 1.9-29,109 years and 1.3-1.4 eV, respectively, corresponding to the Ai center. These parameters allow the use of stable radiation-induced defects as a record of radioactivity down to the Paleoproterozoic period.

  8. A Center for Mideast Oceanographic Data in Muscat, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, S.; Belabbassi, L.; Du Vall, K.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Lighthouse designed and installed a real-time cabled ocean observing system off the northern coast of the Sultanate of Oman in 2005 and a second system, farther to the south, existed as autonomous moorings from 2005-2009 and was upgraded to a real-time cabled system in early 2010. Since 2005 Lighthouse has operated and maintained those systems to produce a wealth of data on a poorly understood region of the global oceans. The systems record data hourly on current velocities over a range of depths, and temperature, pressure, conductivity, dissolved oxygen and turbidity at the depth of the sensor; the northern system also collects seismic and bottom pressure (tsunami detection) information continuously. Processing codes for all data have been developed and honed over the years in cooperation with oceanographers from Texas A&M University. As a joint and complementary effort, ocean circulation and tsunami impact models have been developed for the regional waters near Oman. In Oman, our work is coordinated through the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries Wealth. From the beginning, Lighthouse has intended to transition data processing and analysis over to the Sultanate. To facilitate this transition, we propose to establish a Center for Mideast Oceanographic Data located in Muscat, Oman that may also serve as a regional oceanographic data depository and research center. Main activities to be carried out include: marine data processing and management, training of Omani professionals in data processing and analysis, facilitating regional and international collaboration by hosting workshops or short courses, and employing the models for research purposes. The center would work with the newly-established Hazard Monitoring Center to develop modeled now- and forecast products for marine operations and safety. The goal is to house, in a single location, datasets and models that will help Oman manage and maintain its marine environment and resources for generations to come.

  9. Succinate-cytochrome c reductase: assessment of its value in the investigation of defects of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R W; Birch-Machin, M A; Bartlett, K; Turnbull, D M

    1993-06-19

    Defects of the respiratory chain are important causes of human disease and one of the most commonly used assays in the investigation of these patients is the measurement of succinate-cytochrome c reductase. However, this assay measures several components of the respiratory chain and the ability to detect a partial defect in one enzyme complex will depend on the amount of control exerted by that enzyme step on overall electron flux. We show that measurement of succinate-cytochrome c reductase activity may fail to detect partial defects of complex III and therefore is of limited diagnostic value in the identification of complex III defects. However, complex II is a major point of control of flux through succinate-cytochrome reductase and it is likely that measurement of the latter will detect defects of complex II.

  10. Photo-induced Defects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, David; Bube, Richard H.

    2006-03-01

    1. Introduction: metastable defects; 2. III-V compounds: DX2 and EL2 centers; 3. Other crystalline materials; 4. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: properties of defects; 5. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: photo-induced defect kinetics and processes; 6. Other amorphous semiconductors; 7. Photo-induced defect effects in devices; References; Index.

  11. Effective actions for bosonic topological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    A gauge field theory is considered which admits p-dimensional topological defects, expanding the equations of motion in powers of the defect thickness. In this way an effective action and effective equation of motion is derived for the defect in terms of the coordinates of the p-dimensional worldsurface defined by the history of the core of the defect.

  12. An atomistic vision of the Mass Action Law: Prediction of carbon/oxygen defects in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Brenet, G.; Timerkaeva, D.; Caliste, D.; Pochet, P.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.

    2015-09-28

    We introduce an atomistic description of the kinetic Mass Action Law to predict concentrations of defects and complexes. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach accurately predicts carbon/oxygen related defect concentrations in silicon upon annealing. The model requires binding and migration energies of the impurities and complexes, here obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vacancy-oxygen complex kinetics are studied as a model system during both isochronal and isothermal annealing. Results are in good agreement with experimental data, confirming the success of the methodology. More importantly, it gives access to the sequence of chain reactions by which oxygen and carbon related complexes are created in silicon. Beside the case of silicon, the understanding of such intricate reactions is a key to develop point defect engineering strategies to control defects and thus semiconductors properties.

  13. An atomistic vision of the Mass Action Law: Prediction of carbon/oxygen defects in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenet, G.; Timerkaeva, D.; Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A.; Caliste, D.; Pochet, P.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an atomistic description of the kinetic Mass Action Law to predict concentrations of defects and complexes. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach accurately predicts carbon/oxygen related defect concentrations in silicon upon annealing. The model requires binding and migration energies of the impurities and complexes, here obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vacancy-oxygen complex kinetics are studied as a model system during both isochronal and isothermal annealing. Results are in good agreement with experimental data, confirming the success of the methodology. More importantly, it gives access to the sequence of chain reactions by which oxygen and carbon related complexes are created in silicon. Beside the case of silicon, the understanding of such intricate reactions is a key to develop point defect engineering strategies to control defects and thus semiconductors properties.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic studies of tetranuclear hydroxo and ligand bridged [Co4(μ3-OH)2(μ2-dea)2(L-L)4]4Cl·8H2O [L-L = 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline] complexes with mixed valence defect dicubane core.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Zafar A; Siddique, Armeen; Shahid, M; Khalid, Mohd; Sharma, Prashant K; Anjuli; Ahmad, Musheer; Kumar, Sarvendra; Lan, Yanhua; Powell, Annie K

    2013-07-14

    X-ray crystallography of the title complexes indicates a discrete mixed valence (Co2(II)-Co2(III)) defect dicubane molecular unit where each cobalt nucleus attains a distorted octahedral geometry. The α-diimine (L-L) chelator coordinated to each cobalt ion stops further polymerization or nuclearization. The water molecules in the lattice play a crucial role in the formation of the supramolecular architectures. Magnetic data were analyzed using the effective spin-1/2 Hamiltonian approach and the parameters are, J = 115(6) K, ΔJ = -57.0(1.2) K, g(xy) = 3.001(25), and g(z) = 7.214(7) for 1 and J = 115(12) K, ΔJ = -58.5(2.5) K, g(xy) = 3.34(5), and g(z) = 6.599(12) for 2 suggesting that only the g matrices are prone to the change of α-diimine chelator.

  15. Extended point defects in crystalline materials: Ge and Si.

    PubMed

    Cowern, N E B; Simdyankin, S; Ahn, C; Bennett, N S; Goss, J P; Hartmann, J-M; Pakfar, A; Hamm, S; Valentin, J; Napolitani, E; De Salvador, D; Bruno, E; Mirabella, S

    2013-04-12

    B diffusion measurements are used to probe the basic nature of self-interstitial point defects in Ge. We find two distinct self-interstitial forms--a simple one with low entropy and a complex one with entropy ∼30  k at the migration saddle point. The latter dominates diffusion at high temperature. We propose that its structure is similar to that of an amorphous pocket--we name it a morph. Computational modeling suggests that morphs exist in both self-interstitial and vacancylike forms, and are crucial for diffusion and defect dynamics in Ge, Si, and probably many other crystalline solids.

  16. Intrinsic Bonding Defects in Transition Metal Elemental Oxides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    deposition, ALD. Spectroscopic studies have also been performed on nanocrystalline TiO2 , ZrO2, HfO2, and complex mixed oxides such as ZrTiO4, LaAlO3 and...5d-state and defect features are identified. Figure 2(b). SXPS valence band spectrum of TiO2 . 5d-state and defect features... TiO2 . 3d-state features are identified. Figure 4. Ti L3 edge XAS spectrum of TiO2 . Ti 3d J-T term split states are

  17. First principles study of O defects in CdSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T-Thienprasert, J.; Limpijumnong, S.; Du, M.-H.; Singh, D. J.

    2012-08-01

    Recently, the vibrational signatures related to oxygen defects in oxygen-doped CdSe were measured using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy by Chen et al.(2008) [1]. They observed two absorption bands centered at ∼1991.77 and 2001.3 cm-1, which they attributed to the LVMs of OCd, in the samples grown with the addition of CdO and excess Se. For the samples claimed to be grown with even more excess Se, three high-frequency modes (1094.11, 1107.45, and 1126.33) were observed and assigned to the LVMs of OSe-VCd complex. In this work, we explicitly calculated the vibrational signatures of OCd and OSe-VCd complex defects based on first principles approach. The calculated vibrational frequencies of OCd and OSe-VCd complex are inconsistent with the frequencies observed by Chen et al., indicating that their observed frequencies are from other defects. Potential defects that could explain the experimentally observed modes are suggested.

  18. Luminescence properties of defects in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshchikov, Michael A.; Morkoç, Hadis

    2005-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and its allied binaries InN and AIN as well as their ternary compounds have gained an unprecedented attention due to their wide-ranging applications encompassing green, blue, violet, and ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors (in photon ranges inaccessible by other semiconductors) and high-power amplifiers. However, even the best of the three binaries, GaN, contains many structural and point defects caused to a large extent by lattice and stacking mismatch with substrates. These defects notably affect the electrical and optical properties of the host material and can seriously degrade the performance and reliability of devices made based on these nitride semiconductors. Even though GaN broke the long-standing paradigm that high density of dislocations precludes acceptable device performance, point defects have taken the center stage as they exacerbate efforts to increase the efficiency of emitters, increase laser operation lifetime, and lead to anomalies in electronic devices. The point defects include native isolated defects (vacancies, interstitial, and antisites), intentional or unintentional impurities, as well as complexes involving different combinations of the isolated defects. Further improvements in device performance and longevity hinge on an in-depth understanding of point defects and their reduction. In this review a comprehensive and critical analysis of point defects in GaN, particularly their manifestation in luminescence, is presented. In addition to a comprehensive analysis of native point defects, the signatures of intentionally and unintentionally introduced impurities are addressed. The review discusses in detail the characteristics and the origin of the major luminescence bands including the ultraviolet, blue, green, yellow, and red bands in undoped GaN. The effects of important group-II impurities, such as Zn and Mg on the photoluminescence of GaN, are treated in detail. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the effects of

  19. Frustration and defects in non-periodic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosseri, Rémy; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Geometrical frustration arises whenever a local preferred configuration (lower energy for atomic systems, or best packing for hard spheres) cannot be propagated throughout space without defects. A general approach, using unfrustrated templates defined in curved space, have been previously applied to analyse a large number of cases like complex crystals, amorphous materials, liquid crystals, foams, and even biological organizations, with scales ranging from the atomic level up to macroscopic scales. In this paper, we discuss the close sphere packing problem, which has some relevance to the structural problem in amorphous metals, quasicrystals and some periodic complex metallic structures. The role of sets of disclination line defects is addressed, in particular with comparison with the major skeleton occurring in complex large-cell metals (Frank-Kasper phases). An interesting example of 12-fold symmetric quasiperiodic Frank-Kasper phase, and its disclination network, is also described.

  20. Secretory Defect and Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Yang, Zhihui; Hu, Jane; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Haas, Arthur L.; Bok, Dean; Jin, Minghao

    2013-01-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) secreted by photoreceptors plays a pivotal role in photoreceptor survival and function. Recently, a D1080N mutation in IRBP was found in patients with retinitis pigmentosa, a frequent cause of retinal degeneration. The molecular and cellular bases for pathogenicity of the mutation are unknown. Here, we show that the mutation abolishes secretion of IRBP and results in formation of insoluble high molecular weight complexes via disulfide bonds. Co-expression of protein disulfide isomerase A2 that regulates disulfide bond formation or introduction of double Cys-to-Ala substitutions at positions 304 and 1175 in D1080N IRBP promoted secretion of the mutated IRBP. D1080N IRBP was not transported to the Golgi apparatus, but accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), bound with the ER-resident chaperone proteins such as BiP, protein disulfide isomerase, and heat shock proteins. Splicing of X-box-binding protein-1 mRNA, expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and cleavage of ATF6 were significantly increased in cells expressing D1080N IRBP. Moreover, D1080N IRBP induced up-regulation and nuclear translocation of the C/EBP homologous protein, a proapoptotic transcription factor associated with the unfolded protein response. These results indicate that loss of normal function (nonsecretion) and gain of cytotoxic function (ER stress) are involved in the disease mechanisms of D1080N IRBP. Chemical chaperones and low temperature, which help proper folding of many mutated proteins, significantly rescued secretion of D1080N IRBP, suggesting that misfolding is the molecular basis for pathogenicity of D1080N substitution and that chemical chaperones are therapeutic candidates for the mutation-caused blinding disease. PMID:23486466

  1. Characterization of oxygen defects in diamond by means of density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiering, Gergő; Gali, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Point defects in diamond are of high interest as candidates for realizing solid state quantum bits, bioimaging agents, or ultrasensitive electric or magnetic field sensors. Various artificial diamond synthesis methods should introduce oxygen contamination in diamond, however, the incorporation of oxygen into diamond crystal and the nature of oxygen-related point defects are largely unknown. Oxygen may be potentially interesting as a source of quantum bits or it may interact with other point defects which are well established solid state qubits. Here we employ plane-wave supercell calculations within density functional theory, in order to characterize the electronic and magneto-optical properties of various oxygen-related defects. Besides the trivial single interstitial and substitutional oxygen defects we also consider their complexes with vacancies and hydrogen atoms. We find that oxygen defects are mostly electrically active and introduce highly correlated orbitals that pose a challenge for density functional theory modeling. Nevertheless, we are able to identify the fingerprints of substitutional oxygen defect, the oxygen-vacancy and oxygen-vacancy-hydrogen complexes in the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum. We demonstrate that first principles calculations can predict the motional averaging of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of defects that are subject to Jahn-Teller distortion. We show that the high-spin neutral oxygen-vacancy defect exhibits very fast nonradiative decay from its optical excited state that might hinder applying it as a qubit.

  2. Defect CFTs and holographic multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Fiol, Bartomeu

    2010-07-01

    We investigate some aspects of a recent proposal for a holographic description of the multiverse. Specifically, we focus on the implications on the suggested duality of the fluctuations of a bubble separating two universes with different cosmological constants. We do so by considering a similar problem in a 2+1 CFT with a codimension one defect, obtained by an M5-brane probe embedding in AdS{sub 4} × S{sup 7}, and studying its spectrum of fluctuations. Our results suggest that the kind of behavior required by the spectrum of bubble fluctuations is not likely to take place in defect CFTs with an AdS dual, although it might be possible if the defect supports a non-unitary theory.

  3. Actin cytoskeletal defects in immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Moulding, Dale A; Record, Julien; Malinova, Dessislava; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the cytoskeleton in mounting a successful immune response is evident from the wide range of defects that occur in actin-related primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Studies of these PIDs have revealed a pivotal role for the actin cytoskeleton in almost all stages of immune system function, from hematopoiesis and immune cell development, through to recruitment, migration, intercellular and intracellular signaling, and activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. The major focus of this review is the immune defects that result from mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS), which have a broad impact on many different processes and give rise to clinically heterogeneous immunodeficiencies. We also discuss other related genetic defects and the possibility of identifying new genetic causes of cytoskeletal immunodeficiency. PMID:24117828

  4. Congenital heart defects and medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Gehin, Connie; Ragsdale, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists perform imaging studies that are useful in the diagnosis of congenital heart defects in infants and adults. These studies also help to monitor congenital heart defect repairs in adults. This article describes the development and functional anatomy of the heart, along with the epidemiology and anatomy of congenital heart defects. It also discusses the increasing population of adults who have congenital heart defects and the most effective modalities for diagnosing, evaluating, and monitoring congenital heart defects.

  5. Neural tube defects: pathogenesis and folate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pulikkunnel, Scaria T; Thomas, S V

    2005-02-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations with worldwide distribution and complex aetio-pathogenesis. Animal studies indicate that there may be four sites of initiation of neural tube closure (NTC). Selective involvement of these sites may lead to defects varying from anencephaly to spina bifida. The NTC involves formation of medial and dorsolateral hinge points, convergent extension and a zipper release process. Proliferation and migration of neuroectodermal cells and its morphological changes brought about by microfilaments and other cytoskeletal proteins mediate NTC. Genetic, nutritional and teratogenic mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Folate is an important component in one carbon metabolism that provides active moieties for synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins. Several gene defects affecting enzymes and proteins involved in transport and metabolism of folate have been associated with NTDs. It may be possible in future, to identify individuals at higher risk of NTDs by genetic studies. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that dietary supplementation or food fortification with folic acid would reduce the incidence of NTDs. The protective effect of folic acid may be by overcoming these metabolic blocks through unidentified mechanisms. Genetic and biochemical studies on foetal cells may supplement currently available prenatal tests to diagnose NTDs. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), particularly valproate and carbamazepine have been shown to increase the risk of NTDs by possibly increasing the oxidative stress and deranging the folate metabolism. Accordingly, it is recommended that all women taking AEDs may use 1-5 mg folic acid daily in the pre conception period and through pregnancy.

  6. Aging and defective lymphoid cell activation.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Activation of lymphocytes for proliferation is a crucial process in the immune response. Age-related deficiencies in this cellular response strongly correlate with deficiencies in the immune system response, with concomitant increase in disease severity and mortality. Defects associated with the transmission of the initial activation signal and with IL-2 production contribute to the depressed response, but defects in the IL-2 response mechanism also play important roles. A major factor in this area is the inability of the nuclei of these cells to respond to the intracellular factor ADR, which plays a crucial role in the initiation of DNA replication. These cells produce normal levels of ADR; thus, either the nuclei cannot bind ADR in a productive manner or the defect lies beyond the point of ADR binding, perhaps in one of the other proteins of the initiation complex. An interesting contrast to the age-related failure of nuclei to respond to ADR is the failure of neoplastic nuclei to respond to the ADR inhibitor. This inhibitor, found in the cytoplasm of quiescent cells, suppresses both the activation of quiescent nuclei by ADR and the ongoing DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei from activated cells. Nuclei from spontaneous proliferating cell lines were not affected by this inhibitor, which may be an important factor in the uncontrolled growth seen in neoplastic cells. The investigation of ADR has given hints that perhaps two of the fundamental questions in biology, namely why some cells don't proliferate and why some others won't stop proliferating, may be two sides of the same coin.

  7. Environmental causes of enamel defects.

    PubMed

    Brook, A H; Fearne, J M; Smith, J M

    1997-01-01

    A large number of causes of enamel defects, both environmental and genetic, have been described. However, many of these are derived from case histories and studies of individual conditions. What is needed now is a systematic investigation of the problem. The first requirement in exploring the aetiology further is the standardization of both the clinical diagnosis and the descriptive terminology. This has been provided by the Fédération Dentaire Internationale Developmental Defects of Enamel Index. Comparing studies using standardized methods, including this index, has highlighted areas for closer investigation. The total prevalence of enamel defects in a population needs to be established as a baseline for studies on aetiology. Sixty-eight per cent of 1518 school children in London have enamel defects in the permanent dentition, with 10.5% having 10 or more teeth affected and 14.6% having hypoplasia, i.e. missing enamel. These findings are in contrast to the 37% with hypoplasia found in a group of third to fifth century Romano-Britons from Dorset, England, suggesting further consideration of possible environmental and genetic differences between the two populations. An overall long-term study of dental development in low birth weight children has shown significantly more (P < 0.001) enamel defects related to major health problems during the neonatal period. By using standardized, reproducible criteria in prevalence studies to gain an overview of the problem and then studying specific groups or conditions, it is possible to identify general and specific factors in the aetiology of enamel defects and investigate further the varying role of genetic and environmental effects.

  8. Evolution of Defective State of Aluminum Oxide Irradiated with Chromium Ions after Annealing in Oxygen Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabyshev, A. V.; Konusov, F. V.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of interband and exponential optical absorption of leucosapphire and polycrystalline corundum (polycor) after irradiation with chromium ions and subsequent annealing in vacuum at 300–1800 K and in air at 300–800 K are studied. Contributions of defects with different thermal and chemical stability into optical parameters were established. The effect of intrinsic radiation defects, of substitutional defects and of complexes on base of oxygen and defects on formation the focal point in absorption spectra owing to fulfilment of the Urbach rule was determined. Heating in air of strongly defective material synthesized in surface layers of alumina by the ion–heat modification influences the characteristics of defects and the electronic structure of band gap negligibly.

  9. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-18

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  10. Simulation and analysis on ultrasonic testing for the cement grouting defects of the corrugated pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingbang, Han; Ling, Chen; Changping, Zhu

    2014-02-01

    The defects exist in the cement grouting process of prestressed corrugated pipe may directly impair the bridge safety. In this paper, sound fields propagation in concrete structures with corrugated pipes and the influence of various different defects are simulated and analyzed using finite element method. The simulation results demonstrate a much complex propagation characteristic due to multiple reflection, refraction and scattering, where the scattering signals caused by metal are very strong, while the signals scattered by an air bubble are weaker. The influence of defect both in time and frequency domain are found through deconvolution treatment. In the time domain, the deconvolution signals correspond to larger defect display a larger head wave amplitude and shorter arrive time than those of smaller defects; in the frequency domain, larger defect also shows a stronger amplitude, lower center frequency and lower cutoff frequency.

  11. Topological defects in liquid crystals as templates for molecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; Bukusoglu, Emre; de Pablo, Juan J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2016-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely used to organize colloidal dispersions and template polymerization, leading to a range of assemblies, elastomers and gels. However, little is understood about molecular-level assembly processes within defects. Here, we report that nanoscopic environments defined by LC topological defects can selectively trigger processes of molecular self-assembly. By using fluorescence microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and super-resolution optical microscopy, we observed signatures of molecular self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in topological defects, including cooperativity, reversibility and controlled growth. We also show that nanoscopic o-rings synthesized from Saturn-ring disclinations and other molecular assemblies templated by defects can be preserved by using photocrosslinkable amphiphiles. Our results reveal that, in analogy to other classes of macromolecular templates such as polymer-surfactant complexes, topological defects in LCs are a versatile class of three-dimensional, dynamic and reconfigurable templates that can direct processes of molecular self-assembly.

  12. Interface effects on calculated defect levels for oxide defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Arthur; Barnaby, Hugh; Schultz, Peter; Pineda, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has had impressive recent success predicting defect levels in insulators and semiconductors [Schultz and von Lillienfeld, 2009]. Such success requires care in accounting for long-range electrostatic effects. Recently, Komsa and Pasquarello have started to address this problem in systems with interfaces. We report a multiscale technique for calculating electrostatic energies for charged defects in oxide of the metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) system, but where account is taken of substrate doping density, oxide thickness, and gate bias. We use device modeling to calculate electric fields for a point charge a fixed distance from the interface, and used the field to numerically calculate the long-range electrostatic interactions. We find, for example, that defect levels in the oxide do depend on both the magnitude and the polarity the substrate doping density. Furthermore, below 20 Å, oxide thickness also has significant effects. So, transferring results directly from bulk calculations leads to inaccuracies up to 0.5 eV- half of the silicon band gap. We will present trends in defect levels as a function of device parameters. We show that these results explain previous experimental results, and we comment on their potential impact on models for NBTI. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under co.

  13. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snijders, Paul C.; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, T. Zac

    2016-07-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides.

  14. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, H.; Asakura, K.; Fukuda, J.; Ozaki, M.

    2015-01-01

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases. PMID:25994837

  15. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Asakura, K; Fukuda, J; Ozaki, M

    2015-05-21

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases.

  16. Dynamic defect correlations dominate activated electronic transport in SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Paul C.; Şen, Cengiz; McConnell, Michael P.; Ma, Ying-Zhong; May, Andrew F.; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony T.; Ward, T. Zac

    2016-01-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3, STO) is a critically important material for the study of emergent electronic phases in complex oxides, as well as for the development of applications based on their heterostructures. Despite the large body of knowledge on STO, there are still many uncertainties regarding the role of defects in the properties of STO, including their influence on ferroelectricity in bulk STO and ferromagnetism in STO-based heterostructures. We present a detailed analysis of the decay of persistent photoconductivity in STO single crystals with defect concentrations that are relatively low but significantly affect their electronic properties. The results show that photo-activated electron transport cannot be described by a superposition of the properties due to independent point defects as current models suggest but is, instead, governed by defect complexes that interact through dynamic correlations. These results emphasize the importance of defect correlations for activated electronic transport properties of semiconducting and insulating perovskite oxides. PMID:27443503

  17. Thermodynamics of surface defects at the aspirin/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Julian; Zheng, Chen; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    We present a simulation scheme to calculate defect formation free energies at a molecular crystal/water interface based on force-field molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we adopt and modify existing approaches to calculate binding free energies of biological ligand/receptor complexes to be applicable to common surface defects, such as step edges and kink sites. We obtain statistically accurate and reliable free energy values for the aspirin/water interface, which can be applied to estimate the distribution of defects using well-established thermodynamic relations. As a show case we calculate the free energy upon dissolving molecules from kink sites at the interface. This free energy can be related to the solubility concentration and we obtain solubility values in excellent agreement with experimental results.

  18. Defect controlled magnetism in FeP/graphene/Ni(111)

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Sumanta; Eriksson, Olle; Sanyal, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Spin switching of organometallic complexes by ferromagnetic surfaces is an important topic in the area of molecular nanospintronics. Moreover, graphene has been shown as a 2D surface for physisorption of molecular magnets and strain engineering on graphene can tune the spin state of an iron porphyrin (FeP) molecule from S = 1 to S = 2. Our ab initio density functional calculations suggest that a pristine graphene layer placed between a Ni(111) surface and FeP yields an extremely weak exchange interaction between FeP and Ni whereas the introduction of defects in graphene shows a variety of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. Moreover, these defects control the easy axes of magnetization, strengths of magnetic anisotropy energies and spin-dipolar contributions. Our study suggests a new way of manipulating molecular magnetism by defects in graphene and hence has the potential to be explored in designing spin qubits to realize logic operations in molecular nanospintronics. PMID:24296980

  19. Resolvability of defect ensembles with positron annihilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1984-11-12

    Recent advances in the use of positron annihilation to study defect ensembles in and on the surfaces of metals, are pointing the way towards studies where particular positron-electron annihilation modes may be identified and studied in the presence of one another. Although a great deal is understood about the annihilation of positrons in ostensibly defect-free metals, much less is understood when the positron annihilates in complex defect systems such as liquid metals, amorphous solids, or at or near the vacuum-solid interface. In this paper the results of three experiments, all of which demonstrate means by which we can resolve various poistron annihilation channels from one another, are discussed.

  20. Defect dynamics and ordering in compressible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prashant; Srivastava, Pragya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Active nematics, such as suspensions of biopolymers activated by molecular motors or bacteria swimming in passive liquid crystals, exhibit complex self-sustained flow, excitability and defect generation. Activity renders the defect themselves self-propelled particles, capable of organizing in emergent ordered structures. We have developed a minimal model of compressible active nematics on a substrate. We eliminate the flow velocity in favor of the nematic order parameter via the balance of frictional dissipation and active driving to obtain a dynamical description entirely in terms of the nematic alignment order parameter. Activity renormalizes the bend and splay elastic constants rendering them anisotropic and driving them to zero or even negative, resulting in the appearance of modulated states and defective structures. Using linear stability analysis and numerics we organize the various regimes into a phase diagram and discuss the relation to experiments. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184.

  1. Impact of point defects on III-nitride tunnel devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Lyons, John; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Heterostructures using GaN and InGaN are being pursued in designs of tunnel field-effect-transistors (TFETs) to enable low-power switching devices. Point defects and impurities in these heterostructures can adversely affect the performance of these devices through Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) and Trap-Assisted-Tunneling (TAT) processes. Using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid functional, we calculate the thermodynamic and charge-state switching levels as well as nonradiative recombination rates of point defects and impurities in GaN and InGaN. Gallium vacancies and their complexes, in particular, are found to be potentially detrimental centers. We then investigate how these defects can contribute to SRH and TAT processes in a nitride TFET device. This work was supported by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  2. Neural tube defects, folic acid and methylation.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Blom, Henk J

    2013-09-17

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s) underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects.

  3. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Blom, Henk J.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s) underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects. PMID:24048206

  4. Risk of drug-induced congenital defects.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Marco; Straface, Gianluca; Carducci, Brigida; Cavaliere, Anna Franca; De Santis, Lidia; Lucchese, Angela; Merola, Anna Maria; Caruso, Alessandro

    2004-11-10

    Defects attributable to drug therapy represent about 1% of congenital defects of known aetiology. This means that a precautionary attitude and correct use of drugs in fertile, and especially pregnant, women is a feasible form of prevention. Drugs currently in use with proven teratogenic effect number approximately 25, but new pharmaceutical drugs are constantly in preparation. Recognition of a drug-induced teratogenic effect is a complex procedure taking into account not only experimental animal data but also experience in humans. Considering that 40% of pregnancies are not planned, it follows that any drug with known or suspected teratogenic potential must be used only under strict medical control. Also, adequate knowledge on potential teratogenicity of a drug permits modification of therapy before conception. It goes without saying that any drug should be used during pregnancy only if it is essential, and it would be prudent to use only those where adequate information is provided and prior clinical experience is available. Teratology Information Services can assist both physicians and patients when any doubt exists.

  5. Carrier providers or killers: The case of Cu defects in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2017-07-01

    Defects play important roles in semiconductors for optoelectronic applications. Common intuition is that defects with shallow levels act as carrier providers and defects with deep levels are carrier killers. Here, taking the Cu defects in CdTe as an example, we show that relatively shallow defects can play both roles. Using first-principles calculation methods combined with thermodynamic simulations, we study the dialectic effects of Cu-related defects on hole density and lifetime in bulk CdTe. Because CuCd can form a relatively shallow acceptor, we find that increased Cu incorporation into CdTe indeed can help achieve high hole density; however, too much Cu can cause significant non-radiative recombination. We discuss strategies to balance the contradictory effects of Cu defects based on the calculated impact of Cd chemical potential, copper defect concentrations, and annealing temperature on lifetime and hole density. These findings advance the understanding of the potential complex defect behaviors of relatively shallow defect states in semiconductors.

  6. Carney Complex: an update

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Salpea, Paraskevi; Stratakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Carney Complex (CNC) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome, characterized by pigmented lesions of the skin and mucosa, cardiac, cutaneous and other myxomas, and multiple endocrine tumors. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations or large deletions of the PRKAR1A gene located at 17q22–24 coding for the regulatory subunit type I alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) gene. Most recently, components of the complex have been associated with defects of other PKA subunits, such as the catalytic subunits PRKACA (adrenal hyperplasia) and PRKACB (pigmented spots, myxomas, pituitary adenomas). In this report, we review CNC, its clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and molecular etiology including PRKAR1A mutations and the newest on PRKACA and PRKACB defects especially as they pertain to adrenal tumors and Cushing’s syndrome. PMID:26130139

  7. Lithographic plane review (LPR) for sub-32nm mask defect disposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolani, Vikram; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Hwa, George; Chang, Hsien-Min; Dai, Grace; Corcoran, Noel; Dam, Thuc; Pang, Linyong; Tuo, Laurent C.; Chen, C. J.; Lai, Rick

    2010-09-01

    As optical lithography continues to extend into low-k1 regime, resolution of mask patterns under mask inspection optical conditions continues to diminish. Furthermore, as mask complexity and MEEF has also increased, it requires detecting even smaller defects in the already narrower pitch mask patterns. This leaves the mask inspection engineer with the option to either purchase a higher resolution mask inspection tool or increase the detector sensitivity on the existing inspection system or maybe even both. In order to meet defect sensitivity requirements in critical features of sub-32nm node designs, increasing sensitivity typically results in increased nuisance (i.e., small sub-specification) defect detection by 5-20X defects making post-inspection defect review non-manufacturable. As a solution for automatically dispositioning the increased number of nuisance and real defects detected at higher inspection sensitivity, Luminescent has successfully extended Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) and its patented level-set methods to reconstruct the defective mask from its inspection image, and then perform simulated AIMS dispositioning on the reconstructed mask. In this technique, named Lithographic Plane Review (LPR), inspection transmitted and reflected light images of the test (i.e. defect) and reference (i.e., corresponding defect-free) regions are provided to the "inversion" engine which then computes the corresponding test and reference mask patterns. An essential input to this engine is a well calibrated model incorporating inspection tool optics, mask processing and 3D effects, and also the subsequent AIMS tool optics to be able to then simulate the aerial image impact of the defects. This flow is equivalent to doing an actual AIMS tool measurement of every defect detected during mask inspection, while at the same time maintaining inspection at high enough resolution. What makes this product usable in mask volume production is the high degree of accuracy of

  8. Improving reticle defect disposition via fully automated lithography simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Raunak; Goodman, Eliot; Lao, Keith; Ha, Steven; Vacca, Anthony; Fiekowsky, Peter; Fiekowsky, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Most advanced wafer fabs have embraced complex pattern decoration, which creates numerous challenges during in-fab reticle qualification. These optical proximity correction (OPC) techniques create assist features that tend to be very close in size and shape to the main patterns as seen in Figure 1. A small defect on an assist feature will most likely have little or no impact on the fidelity of the wafer image, whereas the same defect on a main feature could significantly decrease device functionality. In order to properly disposition these defects, reticle inspection technicians need an efficient method that automatically separates main from assist features and predicts the resulting defect impact on the wafer image. Analysis System (ADAS) defect simulation system[1]. Up until now, using ADAS simulation was limited to engineers due to the complexity of the settings that need to be manually entered in order to create an accurate result. A single error in entering one of these values can cause erroneous results, therefore full automation is necessary. In this study, we propose a new method where all needed simulation parameters are automatically loaded into ADAS. This is accomplished in two parts. First we have created a scanner parameter database that is automatically identified from mask product and level names. Second, we automatically determine the appropriate simulation printability threshold by using a new reference image (provided by the inspection tool) that contains a known measured value of the reticle critical dimension (CD). This new method automatically loads the correct scanner conditions, sets the appropriate simulation threshold, and automatically measures the percentage of CD change caused by the defect. This streamlines qualification and reduces the number of reticles being put on hold, waiting for engineer review. We also present data showing the consistency and reliability of the new method, along with the impact on the efficiency of in

  9. Defects in metals. [Positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    The application of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to the study of defects in metals has led to increased knowledge on lattice-defect properties during the past decade in two areas: the determination of atomic defect properties, particularly those of monovacancies, and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development during post-irradiation and post-quench annealing. The study of defects in metals by PAS is reviewed within the context of the other available techniques for defect studies. The strengths and weaknesses of PAS as a method for the characterization of defect microstructures are considered. The additional possibilities for using the positron as a localized probe of the atomic and electronic structures of atomic defects are discussed, based upon theoretical calculations of the annihilation characteristics of defect-trapped positrons and experimental observations. Finally, the present status and future potential of PAS as a tool for the study of defects in metals is considered. 71 references, 9 figures.

  10. Facts about Atrial Septal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... Developmental Disabilities) be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image. Close × Atrial Septal Defect The images are ... Developmental Disabilities) be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image. Close Information For... ... Makers Language: English ...

  11. Photographic Screening for Eye Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Images of retinas examined for characteristic patterns. Color photographs of retinas taken. Proper alinement of eye obtained by asking subject to gaze at light-emitting diode. "Red-eye" patterns in resulting color photographs examined by trained observers for signs of ocular defects. System used to check power of contact lenses and eyeglasses by taking photographs with these items in place.

  12. Birth Defects and Adolescent Pregnancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, James

    1975-01-01

    Home economists who work with adolescents can help prepare them for responsible parenthood later in life by explaining the known causes of various birth defects; providing basic information about human genetics, prenatal nutrition, and drug and alcohol effects; and motivating adolescents to exercise increased responsibility in their sexual…

  13. Water chlorination and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Magnus, P; Jaakkola, J J; Skrondal, A; Alexander, J; Becher, G; Krogh, T; Dybing, E

    1999-09-01

    Chlorination of drinking water that contains organic compounds leads to the formation of by-products, some of which have been shown to have mutagenic or carcinogenic effects. As yet, too little is known about the possible teratogenic effects on the human fetus. We linked the Norwegian waterwork registry, containing 1994 data on chlorination practice and color (an indicator for natural organic matter), with the Medical Birth Registry for 1993-1995. The proportion of the population exposed to chlorination and a weighted mean color number in drinking water was computed for each municipality. Among 141,077 births, 2,608 (1.8%) had birth defects. In a comparison between exposed (high color; chlorination) and reference groups (low color; no chlorination), the adjusted odds ratio was 1.14 (0.99-1.31) for any malformation, 1.26 (0.61-2.62) for neural tube defects, and 1.99 (1.10-3.57) for urinary tract defects. This study provides further evidence of the role of chlorination of humic water as a potential cause of birth defects, in a country with relatively low levels of chlorination byproducts.

  14. Photographic Screening for Eye Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J.

    1985-01-01

    Images of retinas examined for characteristic patterns. Color photographs of retinas taken. Proper alinement of eye obtained by asking subject to gaze at light-emitting diode. "Red-eye" patterns in resulting color photographs examined by trained observers for signs of ocular defects. System used to check power of contact lenses and eyeglasses by taking photographs with these items in place.

  15. Genetic defects of iron transport.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, R M

    1976-09-01

    Five genetic traits in man and laboratory animals have major effects on iron transport. The heterogeneous condition, hemochromatosis, in some families appears to segregate as a Mendelian trait, and is associated with defective control of intestinal iron absorption. In the very rare human autosomal recessive trait, atransferrinemia, there is an almost total lack of transferrin and gross maldistribution of iron through the body. In mice, sex-linked anemia (an X-linked recessive trait) causes iron deficiency through defective iron absorption, at the "exit" step; a similar defect probably exists in placental iron transfer. In microcytic anemia of mice, an autosomal recessive trait, iron absorption is also impaired because of a defect of iron entry into cells, which is probably generalized. Belgrade rat anemia, less understood at present, also may involve a major disorder of iron metabolism. Study of these mutations has provided new knowledge of iron metabolism and its genetic control Their phenotypic interaction with nutritional factors, especially the form and quantity of iron in the diet, may provide new insights for the study of nutrition.

  16. Delamination initiated by a defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, A.; Toftegaard, H.

    2016-07-01

    Composite materials in wind turbines are mainly joined with adhesives. Adhesive joining is preferable since it distributes the stresses over a larger area. This study shows how a defect can influence the fracture behaviour of adhesively joined composite. Repeated experiments are performed using double cantilever beam specimens loaded with bending moments. The specimens consist of two 8 mm thick GFRP-laminates which are joined by a 3 mm thick epoxy adhesive. A thin foil close to one of the laminates is used to start the crack. For some of the specimens a defect is created by an initial load-unload operation. During this operation, a clamp is used in order to prevent crack propagation in the main direction. For the specimens without defect, the crack propagates in the middle of the adhesive layer. For the specimens with defect, the crack directly deviates into the laminate. After about 25 mm propagation in the laminate, the crack returns to the adhesive. Compared to the adhesive the fracture energy for the laminate is significantly higher.

  17. Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the heart, where a doctor can take measurements and pictures, do tests, or repair the problem. Sometimes the heart defect can’t be fully repaired, but these procedures can improve blood flow and the way the heart works. Causes The ...

  18. Birth Defects and Adolescent Pregnancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, James

    1975-01-01

    Home economists who work with adolescents can help prepare them for responsible parenthood later in life by explaining the known causes of various birth defects; providing basic information about human genetics, prenatal nutrition, and drug and alcohol effects; and motivating adolescents to exercise increased responsibility in their sexual…

  19. Analyzing the defect structure of CuO-doped PZT and KNN piezoelectrics from electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jakes, Peter; Kungl, Hans; Schierholz, Roland; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2014-09-01

    The defect structure for copper-doped sodium potassium niobate (KNN) ferroelectrics has been analyzed with respect to its defect structure. In particular, the interplay between the mutually compensating dimeric (Cu(Nb)'''-V(O)··) and trimeric (V(O)··-Cu(Nb)'''-V(O)··)· defect complexes with 180° and non-180° domain walls has been analyzed and compared to the effects from (Cu'' - V(O)··)(x)× dipoles in CuO-doped lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Attempts are made to relate the rearrangement of defect complexes to macroscopic electromechanical properties.

  20. Closed-Form 3-D Localization for Single Source in Uniform Circular Array with a Center Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eun-Hyon; Lee, Kyun-Kyung

    A novel closed-form algorithm is presented for estimating the 3-D location (azimuth angle, elevation angle, and range) of a single source in a uniform circular array (UCA) with a center sensor. Based on the centrosymmetry of the UCA and noncircularity of the source, the proposed algorithm decouples and estimates the 2-D direction of arrival (DOA), i.e. azimuth and elevation angles, and then estimates the range of the source. Notwithstanding a low computational complexity, the proposed algorithm provides an estimation performance close to that of the benchmark estimator 3-D MUSIC.

  1. Orientational Order of Motile Defects in Active Nematics

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Stephen J.; Redner, Gabriel S.; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael F.; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    The study of equilibrium liquid crystals has led to fundamental insights into the nature of ordered materials, as well as many practical applications such as display technologies. Active nematics are a fundamentally different class of liquid crystals, which are driven away from equilibrium by the autonomous motion of their constituent rodlike particles1–4. This internally-generated activity powers the continuous creation and annihilation of topological defects, leading to complex streaming flows whose chaotic dynamics appear to destroy long-range order5–11. Here, we study these dynamics in experimental and computational realizations of active nematics. By tracking thousands of defects over centimeter distances in microtubule-based active nematics, we identify a non-equilibrium phase characterized by system-spanning orientational order of defects. This emergent order persists over hours despite defect lifetimes of only seconds. Similar dynamical structures are observed in coarse-grained simulations, suggesting that defect-ordered phases are a generic feature of active nematics. PMID:26280224

  2. Hybrid functional studies of defects in layered transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khang; Johannes, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    Layered oxides LiMO2 (M is a transition metal) have been studied extensively for Li-ion battery cathodes. It is known that defects have strong impact on the electrochemical performance. A detailed understanding of native point defects in LiMO2 is however still lacking, thus hindering rational design of more complex materials for battery applications. In fact, first-principles defect calculations in LiMO2 are quite challenging because standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of the exchange-correlation functional fail to reproduce the correct physics. The GGA+U extension can produce reasonable results, but the transferability of U across the compounds is limited. In this talk, we present our DFT studies of defects in LiMO2 (M=Co, Ni) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened hybrid functional. The dominant point defects will be identified and compared with experiment; and their impact on the structural stability and the charge (electronic and ionic) and mass transport will be addressed. We will also discuss possible shortcomings of the HSE functional in the study of these electron-correlated materials.

  3. Tailoring spin defects in diamond by lattice charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Antonov, Denis; Wang, Ya; Neumann, Philipp; Momenzadeh, Seyed Ali; Häußermann, Timo; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Denisenko, Andrej; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-05-01

    Atomic-size spin defects in solids are unique quantum systems. Most applications require nanometre positioning accuracy, which is typically achieved by low-energy ion implantation. A drawback of this technique is the significant residual lattice damage, which degrades the performance of spins in quantum applications. Here we show that the charge state of implantation-induced defects drastically influences the formation of lattice defects during thermal annealing. Charging of vacancies at, for example, nitrogen implantation sites suppresses the formation of vacancy complexes, resulting in tenfold-improved spin coherence times and twofold-improved formation yield of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond. This is achieved by confining implantation defects into the space-charge layer of free carriers generated by a boron-doped diamond structure. By combining these results with numerical calculations, we arrive at a quantitative understanding of the formation and dynamics of the implanted spin defects. These results could improve engineering of quantum devices using solid-state systems.

  4. Orientational order of motile defects in active nematics

    DOE PAGES

    DeCamp, Stephen J.; Redner, Gabriel S.; Baskaran, Aparna; ...

    2015-08-17

    The study of equilibrium liquid crystals has led to fundamental insights into the nature of ordered materials, as well as many practical applications such as display technologies. Active nematics are a fundamentally different class of liquid crystals, which are driven away from equilibrium by the autonomous motion of their constituent rodlike particles. This internally-generated activity powers the continuous creation and annihilation of topological defects, leading to complex streaming flows whose chaotic dynamics appear to destroy long-range order. Here, we study these dynamics in experimental and computational realizations of active nematics. By tracking thousands of defects over centimeter distances in microtubule-basedmore » active nematics, we identify a non-equilibrium phase characterized by system-spanning orientational order of defects. This emergent order persists over hours despite defect lifetimes of only seconds. Lastly, similar dynamical structures are observed in coarse-grained simulations, suggesting that defect-ordered phases are a generic feature of active nematics.« less

  5. Ab-intitio Studies of Defects in Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poykko, Sami

    2000-03-01

    Defects, defect complexes and domain walls in PbTiO3 have been studied using a first-principles method. Platinum is a widely used electrode material for PZT. Due to relatively high deposition temperatures a large concentration of Pt atoms diffuse into PZT, where they occupy Ti-sites and act as acceptors. Platinum impurity is shown to form a tightly bond pair with oxygen vacancy. This complex can have a significant role in fatigue, since each of these strongly polar defect also pin a polarization of a surrounding lattice. This result implies that in order to increase fatigue resistance of PZT it is extremely important to minimize especially acceptor type impurities [1]. We have shown that oxygen and lead vacancies do not form strongly bound defect complexes in PZT and therefore their creation does not seem to be directly involved in fatigue or imprint. According to our calculations a formation of a oxygen-vacancy lead-vacancy pair (close or distant) becomes exothermic under certain conditions. Therefore large number of vacancies are produced to PZT leading to resistance degradation and overall crystal quality also becomes worse [2]. An 180 degree domain wall has been shown to have an energy density of 150 erg/cm^2 and is lead-centered (ie. symmetry plane goes along Pb-atoms). A minimum width of a domain is calculated to be 4 lattice constants, narrower domains are found to be thermodynamically unstable [3]. footnote[1]S. Poykko and D. J. Chadi, "Dipolar Defect Model for Fatigue in Ferroelectric Perovskites" Physical Review Letters 83, 1231 (1999). footnote[2]S. Poykko and D. J. Chadi, "First principles study of Pb-vacancies in PbTiO_3", Applied Physics Letters, in print (2000). footnote[3]S. Poykko and D. J. Chadi, "Ab initio study of 180 degree domain wall energy and structure in PbTiO_3" Applied Physics Letters, 75, 2830 (1999).

  6. Ordered defect compounds in CuInSe{sub 2} for photovoltaic solar cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Katayama-Yoshida, H.

    2014-02-21

    Due to the complete compensation, defect complex (2V{sub Cu}+In{sub Cu}), namely two Cu vacancies and In located at Cu site, is stable in CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS). It is known that the series of ordered defect compounds (ODC) are constracted by ordering the defect complex. Based on the total energy calcalation by using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approxiamtion (KKR-CPA) method, we discuss phase separation of the CIS with the defect complexes into ODC and CIS. Since the band alignment between ODC and CIS is calculated to be type 2, effective electron-hole separation at the interface between ODC and CIS can be expected. This causes the enhancement of conversion efficiency of CIS-based solar cell materials.

  7. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C.; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K.; Stoller, Roger E.; Samolyuk, German D.; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A grand challenge in materials research is to understand complex electronic correlation and non-equilibrium atomic interactions, and how such intrinsic properties and dynamic processes affect energy transfer and defect evolution in irradiated materials. Here we report that chemical disorder, with an increasing number of principal elements and/or altered concentrations of specific elements, in single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys can lead to substantial reduction in electron mean free path and orders of magnitude decrease in electrical and thermal conductivity. The subsequently slow energy dissipation affects defect dynamics at the early stages, and consequentially may result in less deleterious defects. Suppressed damage accumulation with increasing chemical disorder from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed. Understanding and controlling energy dissipation and defect dynamics by altering alloy complexity may pave the way for new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for energy applications. PMID:26507943

  8. Influence of chemical disorder on energy dissipation and defect evolution in concentrated solid solution alloys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanwen; Stocks, G Malcolm; Jin, Ke; Lu, Chenyang; Bei, Hongbin; Sales, Brian C; Wang, Lumin; Béland, Laurent K; Stoller, Roger E; Samolyuk, German D; Caro, Magdalena; Caro, Alfredo; Weber, William J

    2015-10-28

    A grand challenge in materials research is to understand complex electronic correlation and non-equilibrium atomic interactions, and how such intrinsic properties and dynamic processes affect energy transfer and defect evolution in irradiated materials. Here we report that chemical disorder, with an increasing number of principal elements and/or altered concentrations of specific elements, in single-phase concentrated solid solution alloys can lead to substantial reduction in electron mean free path and orders of magnitude decrease in electrical and thermal conductivity. The subsequently slow energy dissipation affects defect dynamics at the early stages, and consequentially may result in less deleterious defects. Suppressed damage accumulation with increasing chemical disorder from pure nickel to binary and to more complex quaternary solid solutions is observed. Understanding and controlling energy dissipation and defect dynamics by altering alloy complexity may pave the way for new design principles of radiation-tolerant structural alloys for energy applications.

  9. Instabilities, defects, and defect ordering in an overdamped active nematic†

    PubMed Central

    Putzig, Elias; Redner, Gabriel S.; Baskaran, Arvind; Baskaran, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    We consider a phenomenological continuum theory for an extensile, overdamped active nematic liquid crystal, applicable in the dense regime. Constructed from general principles, the theory is universal, with parameters independent of any particular microscopic realization. We show that it exhibits two distinct instabilities, one of which arises due to shear forces, and the other due to active torques. Both lead to the proliferation of defects. We focus on the active torque bend instability and find three distinct nonequilibrium steady states including a defect-ordered nematic in which +12 disclinations develop polar ordering. We characterize the phenomenology of these phases and identify the relationship of this theoretical description to experimental realizations and other theoretical models of active nematics. PMID:26983376

  10. Predicting internal red oak (Quercus rubra) log defect features using surface defect defect measurements

    Treesearch

    R. Edward. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Determining the defects located within a log is crucial to understanding the tree/log resource for efficient processing. However, existing means of doing this non-destructively requires the use of expensive x-ray/CT (computerized tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), or microwave technology. These methods do not lend themselves to fast, efficient, and cost-...

  11. Defect-related properties of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinbin; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-02-01

    Defects in optical coatings are a major factor degrading their performance. Based on the nature of defects, we classified them into two categories: visible defects and non-visible defects. Visible defects result from the replication of substrate imperfections or particulates within the coatings by subsequent layers and can increase scattering loss, produce critical errors in extreme ultraviolet lithography, weaken mechanical and environmental stability, and reduce laser damage resistance. Non-visible defects mainly involve a decrease in laser damage resistance but typically have no influence on other properties of optical coatings. In the case of widely used HfO2/SiO2 dielectric coatings, metallic Hf nano-clusters, off-stoichiometric HfO2 nano-clusters, or areas of high-density electronic defects have been postulated as possible sources for non-visible defects. The emphasis of this review is devoted to discussing localized defect-driven laser-induced damage (LID) in optical coatings used for nanosecond-scale pulsed laser applications, but consideration is also given to other properties of optical coatings such as scattering, environmental stability, etc. The low densities and diverse properties of defects make the systematic study of LID initiating from localized defects time-consuming and very challenging. Experimental and theoretical studies of localized defect-driven LID using artificial defects whose properties can be well controlled are highlighted.

  12. Engaging Hill-Sachs Defects

    PubMed Central

    Burns, David; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Shahrokhi, Shahram; Henry, Patrick; Wasserstein, David; Whyne, Cari; Theodoropoulos, John S.; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Dwyer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Anatomic studies have demonstrated that bipolar glenoid and humeral bone loss have a cumulative impact on shoulder instability, and that these defects may engage in functional positions depending on their size, location, and orientation, potentially resulting in failure of stabilization procedures. Determining which lesions pose a risk for engagement remains a challenge, with arthroscopic assessment and Itoi’s 3DCT based glenoid track method being the accepted approaches at this time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of humeral and glenoid bone defects on shoulder engagement in a cadaveric model. Two alternative approaches to predicting engagement were evaluated; 1) CT scanning the shoulder in abduction and external rotation 2) measurement of Bankart lesion width and a novel parameter, the intact anterior articular angle (IAAA), on conventional 2D multi-plane reformats. The results of these two approaches were compared to the results obtained using Itoi’s glenoid track method for predicting engagement. Methods: Hill-Sachs and Bony Bankart defects of varying size were created in 12 cadaveric upper limbs, producing 45 bipolar defect combinations. The shoulders were assessed for engagement using cone beam CT in various positions of function, from 30 to 90 degrees of both abduction and external rotation. The humeral and glenoid defects were characterized by measurement of their size, location, and orientation. Diagnostic performance measures for predicting engagement were calculated for both the abduction external rotation scan and 2D IAAA approaches using the glenoid track method as reference standard. Results: Engagement was predicted by Itoi’s glenoid track method in 24 of 45 specimens (53%). The abduction external rotation CT scan performed at 60 degrees of glenohumeral abduction (corresponding to 90 degrees of abduction relative to the trunk) and 90 degrees of external rotation predicted engagement accurately in 43 of

  13. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, Peter; Padavić, Karmela; Murray, Andy; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.; Levin, K.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate equilibration processes shortly after sudden perturbations are applied to ultracold trapped superfluids. We show the similarity of phase imprinting and localized density depletion perturbations, both of which initially are found to produce "phase walls." These planar defects are associated with a sharp gradient in the phase. Importantly they relax following a quite general sequence. Our studies, based on simulations of the complex time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation, address the challenge posed by these experiments: how a superfluid eventually eliminates a spatially extended planar defect. The processes involved are necessarily more complex than equilibration involving simpler line vortices. An essential mechanism for relaxation involves repeated formation and loss of vortex rings near the trap edge.

  14. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids

    DOE PAGES

    Scherpelz, Peter; Padavić, Karmela; Murray, Andy; ...

    2015-03-18

    Here, we investigate equilibration processes shortly after sudden perturbations are applied to ultracold trapped superfluids. We show the similarity of phase imprinting and localized density depletion perturbations, both of which initially are found to produce “phase walls”. These planar defects are associated with a sharp gradient in the phase. Importantly they relax following a quite general sequence. Our studies, based on simulations of the complex time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation, address the challenge posed by these experiments: how a superfluid eventually eliminatesa spatially extended planar defect. The processes involved are necessarily more complex than equilibration involving simpler line vortices. An essential mechanismmore » form relaxation involves repeated formation and loss of vortex rings near the trap edge.« less

  15. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, Peter; Padavić, Karmela; Murray, Andy; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.; Levin, K.

    2015-03-18

    Here, we investigate equilibration processes shortly after sudden perturbations are applied to ultracold trapped superfluids. We show the similarity of phase imprinting and localized density depletion perturbations, both of which initially are found to produce “phase walls”. These planar defects are associated with a sharp gradient in the phase. Importantly they relax following a quite general sequence. Our studies, based on simulations of the complex time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation, address the challenge posed by these experiments: how a superfluid eventually eliminatesa spatially extended planar defect. The processes involved are necessarily more complex than equilibration involving simpler line vortices. An essential mechanism form relaxation involves repeated formation and loss of vortex rings near the trap edge.

  16. 7 CFR 52.780 - Defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.780 Defects. (a) General. The factor of defects refers to the degree of freedom from harmless extraneous...

  17. 7 CFR 52.780 - Defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... United States Standards for Grades of Canned Red Tart Pitted Cherries 1 Factors of Quality § 52.780 Defects. (a) General. The factor of defects refers to the degree of freedom from harmless extraneous...

  18. 7 CFR 51.2659 - Condition defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2659 Condition defects. Condition defects means... soft cherries and such factors as pitting, shriveling, sunken areas, brown discoloration and...

  19. Atrioventricular canal (endocardial cushion defect) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Endocardial cushion defect is an abnormal heart condition which occurs during the development of the baby. In this condition ... mix causing the heart to work harder. Endocardial cushion defect is strongly associated with several genetic abnormalities.

  20. Defect Levels of Indium-doped CdMnTe Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    K Kim; A Bolotinikov; G Camarda; R Gul; A Hossain; G Yang; Y Cui; R James

    2011-12-31

    Using photoluminescence (PL) and current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), we investigated the electronic defects of indium-doped detector-grade CdMnTe:In (CMT:In) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. We similarly analyzed CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) and undoped CdMnTe (CMT) crystals grown under the amount of same level of excess Te and/or indium doping level to detail the fundamental properties of the electronic defect structure more readily. Extended defects, existing in all the samples, were revealed by synchrotron white beam x-ray diffraction topography and scanning electron microscopy. The electronic structure of CMT is very similar to that of CZT, with shallow traps, A-centers, Cd vacancies, deep levels, and Te antisites. The 1.1-eV deep level, revealed by PL in earlier studies of CZT and CdTe, were attributed to dislocation-induced defects. In our I-DLTS measurements, the 1.1-eV traps showed different activation energies with applied bias voltage and an exponential dependence on the trap-filling time, which are typical characteristics of dislocation-induced defects. We propose a new defect-trap model for indium-doped CMT crystals.

  1. Defect levels of semi-insulating CdMnTe:In crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Bolotinikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Gul, R.; Yang, G.; Cui, Y.; Prochazka, J.; Franc, J.; Hong, J.; James, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    Using photoluminescence (PL) and current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), we investigated the electronic defects of indium-doped detector-grade CdMnTe:In (CMT:In) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. We similarly analyzed CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) and undoped CdMnTe (CMT) crystals grown under the amount of same level of excess Te and/or indium doping level to detail the fundamental properties of the electronic defect structure more readily. Extended defects, existing in all the samples, were revealed by synchrotron white beam x-ray diffraction topography and scanning electron microscopy. The electronic structure of CMT is very similar to that of CZT, with shallow traps, A-centers, Cd vacancies, deep levels, and Te antisites. The 1.1-eV deep level, revealed by PL in earlier studies of CZT and CdTe, were attributed to dislocation-induced defects. In our I-DLTS measurements, the 1.1-eV traps showed different activation energies with applied bias voltage and an exponential dependence on the trap-filling time, which are typical characteristics of dislocation-induced defects. We propose a new defect-trap model for indium-doped CMT crystals.

  2. Automatic classification of blank substrate defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, Tom; Buck, Peter; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Ronald, Rob; Rost, Dan; Samir, Bhamidipati

    2014-10-01

    Mask preparation stages are crucial in mask manufacturing, since this mask is to later act as a template for considerable number of dies on wafer. Defects on the initial blank substrate, and subsequent cleaned and coated substrates, can have a profound impact on the usability of the finished mask. This emphasizes the need for early and accurate identification of blank substrate defects and the risk they pose to the patterned reticle. While Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) is a well-developed technology for inspection and analysis of defects on patterned wafers and masks in the semiconductors industry, ADC for mask blanks is still in the early stages of adoption and development. Calibre ADC is a powerful analysis tool for fast, accurate, consistent and automatic classification of defects on mask blanks. Accurate, automated classification of mask blanks leads to better usability of blanks by enabling defect avoidance technologies during mask writing. Detailed information on blank defects can help to select appropriate job-decks to be written on the mask by defect avoidance tools [1][4][5]. Smart algorithms separate critical defects from the potentially large number of non-critical defects or false defects detected at various stages during mask blank preparation. Mechanisms used by Calibre ADC to identify and characterize defects include defect location and size, signal polarity (dark, bright) in both transmitted and reflected review images, distinguishing defect signals from background noise in defect images. The Calibre ADC engine then uses a decision tree to translate this information into a defect classification code. Using this automated process improves classification accuracy, repeatability and speed, while avoiding the subjectivity of human judgment compared to the alternative of manual defect classification by trained personnel [2]. This paper focuses on the results from the evaluation of Automatic Defect Classification (ADC) product at MP Mask

  3. Window defect planar mapping technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, F. R.; Minton, U. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of planar mapping defects in a window having an edge surface and a planar surface. The method is comprised of steps for mounting the window on a support surface. Then a light sensitive paper is placed adjacent to the window surface. A light source is positioned adjacent to the window edge. The window is then illuminated with the source of light for a predetermined interval of time. Defects on the surface of the glass, as well as in the interior of the glass are detected by analyzing the developed light sensitive paper. The light source must be in the form of optical fibers or a light tube whose light transmitting ends are placed near the edge surface of the window.

  4. Defect tolerant transmission lithography mask

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    A transmission lithography mask that utilizes a transparent substrate or a partially transparent membrane as the active region of the mask. A reflective single layer or multilayer coating is deposited on the membrane surface facing the illumination system. The coating is selectively patterned (removed) to form transmissive (bright) regions. Structural imperfections and defects in the coating have negligible effect on the aerial image of the mask master pattern since the coating is used to reflect radiation out of the entrance pupil of the imaging system. Similarly, structural imperfections in the clear regions of the membrane have little influence on the amplitude or phase of the transmitted electromagnetic fields. Since the mask "discards," rather than absorbs, unwanted radiation, it has reduced optical absorption and reduced thermal loading as compared to conventional designs. For EUV applications, the mask circumvents the phase defect problem, and is independent of the thermal load during exposure.

  5. Reconstructive options for periocular defects.

    PubMed

    Jewett, B S; Shockley, W W

    2001-06-01

    Reconstruction of the periorbital area following skin cancer excision requires a thorough knowledge of orbital anatomy and eyelid function. Reconstructive procedures should maintain the function of periorbital structures while attempting to achieve optimal cosmesis. Generally, eyelid reconstruction can be considered in terms of the thickness and overall size of the defect. Both the anterior and posterior lamella should be restored, and at least one of these layers needs to be vascularized. The integrity of the canthal tendons should also be addressed. If severed, the tendons should be attached to bony landmarks in order to recreate the proper curvature of the eyelid against the globe. Finally, defects involving the lacrimal system should be assessed and properly reconstituted.

  6. Why Search for Congenital Defects?

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John F.

    1966-01-01

    The causation of congenital malformation is receiving increased study. In Canada, epidemiologic surveys are being planned, based upon the institution of Provincial Registries to which physicians and other agencies will voluntarily report cases coming to their attention. The literature in regard to prevalence studies of congenital cardiac defects in school children is reviewed. Over the past 25 years, studies employing the proposed technique demonstrated a rising trend, from 1.4 per 1000 to 2.6 per 1000. By contrast, specific surveys for congenital cardiac defect carried out by expert personnel using radiographs and electrocardiographs, resulted in essentially uniform rates, approximating 5 to 6 per 1000. It is concluded that the latter is a superior technique of epidemiologic survey over the “Central Registry” method, and should command a due proportion of health resources directed towards congenital malformation research. PMID:5914837

  7. Cooperation and Defection in Ghetto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    We consider ghetto as a community of people ruled against their will by an external power. Members of the community feel that their laws are broken. However, attempts to leave ghetto makes their situation worse. We discuss the relation of the ghetto inhabitants to the ruling power in context of their needs, organized according to the Maslow hierarchy. Decisions how to satisfy successive needs are undertaken in cooperation with or defection the ruling power. This issue allows to construct the tree of decisions and to adopt the pruning technique from the game theory. Dynamics of decisions can be described within the formalism of fundamental equations. The result is that the strategy of defection is stabilized by the estimated payoff.

  8. Stabilization of primary mobile radiation defects in MgF2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitsyn, V. M.; Lisitsyna, L. A.; Popov, A. I.; Kotomin, E. A.; Abuova, F. U.; Akilbekov, A.; Maier, J.

    2016-05-01

    Non-radiative decay of the electronic excitations (excitons) into point defects (F-H pairs of Frenkel defects) is main radiation damage mechanism in many ionic (halide) solids. Typical time scale of the relaxation of the electronic excitation into a primary, short-lived defect pair is about 1-50 ps with the quantum yield up to 0.2-0.8. However, only a small fraction of these primary defects are spatially separated and survive after transformation into stable, long-lived defects. The survival probability (or stable defect accumulation efficiency) can differ by orders of magnitude, dependent on the material type; e.g. ∼10% in alkali halides with f.c.c. or b.c.c. structure, 0.1% in rutile MgF2 and <0.001% in fluorides MeF2 (Me: Ca, Sr, Ba). The key factor determining accumulation of stable radiation defects is stabilization of primary defects, first of all, highly mobile hole H centers, through their transformation into more complex immobile defects. In this talk, we present the results of theoretical calculations of the migration energies of the F and H centers in poorely studied MgF2 crystals with a focus on the H center stabilization in the form of the interstitial F2 molecules which is supported by presented experimental data.

  9. Inspection of lithographic mask blanks for defects

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2001-01-01

    A visible light method for detecting sub-100 nm size defects on mask blanks used for lithography. By using optical heterodyne techniques, detection of the scattered light can be significantly enhanced as compared to standard intensity detection methods. The invention is useful in the inspection of super-polished surfaces for isolated surface defects or particulate contamination and in the inspection of lithographic mask or reticle blanks for surface defects or bulk defects or for surface particulate contamination.

  10. COMPARISON OF SELECTED WELD DEFECT EXTRACTION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, R.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Rucinski, W.; Swiadek, K.; Caryk, M.; Lopato, P.

    2008-02-28

    This paper presents three different methods of welding defects detection from radiographs. First two methods are dedicated for extraction of flaws directly from radiograms. Fuzzy logic system considers whether the pixel belongs to crack (or background) using defects probability maps together with simple fuzzy rules. Neural network method uses knowledge gathered from radiographs with known defects. Indirect method extracts defects by subtracting background from the radiograph and next using various local thresholding methods.

  11. Comparison of Selected Weld Defect Extraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, R.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Ruciński, W.; Świadek, K.; Caryk, M.; Lopato, P.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents three different methods of welding defects detection from radiographs. First two methods are dedicated for extraction of flaws directly from radiograms. Fuzzy logic system considers whether the pixel belongs to crack (or background) using defects probability maps together with simple fuzzy rules. Neural network method uses knowledge gathered from radiographs with known defects. Indirect method extracts defects by subtracting background from the radiograph and next using various local thresholding methods.

  12. Sinus Venosus Atrial Septal Defect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    chest CT was performed to evaluate for pulmonary embolism (figure 2). The chest radiograph (figure 1) demonstrates increased central pulmonary ...Fig. 5 Sinus venosus defect at birth . The shaded area in purple represents the sinus venosum. The anomalous right pulmonary venous anatomy...department (ED) with chest pain and an ankle fracture after being hit by a car while riding a horse. Chest imaging noted enlarged central pulmonary

  13. Echocardiographic evaluation of patent foramen ovale and atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Hari, Pawan; Pai, Ramdas G; Varadarajan, Padmini

    2015-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common variant present in up to 25% of the population. Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a direct communication between the 2 atrial chambers, of which the ostium secundum variety is the most common. This manuscript is an in depth review of the complex atrial septation, the diagnosis of PFO and ASD and its clinical and therapeutic implications. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Point Defect Concentrations in Metastable Fe-C Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Foerst, Clemens J.; Yip, Sidney; Slycke, Jan; Vliet, Krystyn J. van

    2006-05-05

    Point defect species and concentrations in metastable Fe-C alloys are determined using density functional theory and a constrained free-energy functional. Carbon interstitials dominate unless iron vacancies are in significant excess, whereas excess carbon causes greatly enhanced vacancy concentration. Our predictions are amenable to experimental verification; they provide a baseline for rationalizing complex microstructures known in hardened and tempered steels, and by extension other technological materials created by or subjected to extreme environments.

  15. Abdominal wall defects: prenatal diagnosis, newborn management, and long-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Piergiorgio; Midrio, Paola

    2014-10-01

    Omphalocele and gastroschisis represent the most frequent congenital abdominal wall defects a pediatric surgeon is called to treat. There has been an increased reported incidence in the past 10 years mainly due to the diffuse use of prenatal ultrasound. The early detection of these malformations, and related associated anomalies, allows a multidisciplinary counseling and planning of delivery in a center equipped with high-risk pregnancy assistance, pediatric surgery, and neonatology. At present times, closure of defects, even in multiple stages, is always possible as well as management of most of cardiac-, urinary-, and gastrointestinal-associated malformations. The progress, herein discussed, in the care of newborns with abdominal wall defects assures most of them survive and reach adulthood. Some aspects of transition of medical care will also be considered, including fertility and cosmesis.

  16. Visual field defects in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B; Tønjum, A M

    1978-01-01

    Lesions in the posterior segment of the eye in onchocerciasis may give visual field defects, but so far no detailed investigation has been done to determine the functional visual loss. Examination of the visual fields in 18 selected cases of onchocerciasis by means of a tangent screen test revealed important visual field defects associated with lesions in the posterior segment of the eye. Involvement of the optic nerve seemed to be important, giving rise to severely constricted visual fields. Cases of postneuritic optic atrophy showed a very uniform pattern of almost completely constricted visual fields, with only 5 to 10 degree central rest spared. Papillitis gave a similar severe constriction of the visual fields. The pattern of visual fields associated with optic neuropathy in onchocerciasis indicates that a progressive lesion of the optic nerve from the periphery may be responsible for the loss of vision. The visual field defects in onchocerciasis constitute a serious handicap, which must be taken into consideration when estimating the socioeconomic importance of the disease. Images PMID:678499

  17. Photonic crystals with topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Knitter, Sebastian; Xiong, Wen; Cao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    We introduce topological defects to a square lattice of elliptical cylinders. Despite the broken translational symmetry, the long-range positional order of the cylinders leads to a residual photonic band gap in the local density of optical states. However, the band-edge modes are strongly modified by the spatial variation of the ellipse orientation. The Γ -X band-edge mode splits into four regions of high intensity and the output flux becomes asymmetric due to the formation of crystalline domains with different orientation. The Γ -M band-edge mode has the energy flux circulating around the topological defect center, creating an optical vortex. By removing the elliptical cylinders at the center, we create localized defect states, which are dominated by either clockwise or counterclockwise circulating waves. The flow direction can be switched by changing the ellipse orientation. The deterministic aperiodic variation of the unit cell orientation adds another dimension to the control of light in photonic crystals, enabling the creation of a diversified field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  18. Templates Aid Removal Of Defects From Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    Templates used to correlate defects in castings with local wall thicknesses. Placed on part to be inspected after coated with penetrant dye. Positions of colored spots (indicative of defects) noted. Ultrasonic inspector measures thickness of wall at unacceptable defects only - overall inspection not necessary.

  19. Electroneutral intrinsic point defects in cadmium chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Kharif, Ya.L.; Kudryashov, N.I.; Strunilina, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    Low-mobility electrically neutral intrinsic point defects were observed in cadmium chalcogenides. It was shown that the concentration of these defects is proportional to the cadmium vapor pressure to the 1/3 power at a constant temperature, and a mechanism for the formation of these defects were proposed.

  20. 7 CFR 51.2659 - Condition defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Condition defects. 51.2659 Section 51.2659 Agriculture... Standards for Grades for Sweet Cherries 1 Definitions § 51.2659 Condition defects. Condition defects means... soft cherries and such factors as pitting, shriveling, sunken areas, brown discoloration and bruising...

  1. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOEpatents

    Sweeney, Donald W.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  2. Comparison of neutron and electron irradiation on the EL2 defect in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, S. T.; Nener, B. D.; Alexiev, D.; Faraone, L.; Ku, T. C.; Dytlewski, N.

    1995-04-01

    The deep level transient spectroscopy technique has been used to study the EL2 defect in n-type semiconducting GaAs subjected to 1 MeV fast neutrons at room temperature. After neutron irradiation, the EL3 defect which is usually detected between 180 and 210 K disapperared and the EL2 defect measured between 280 and 320 K was found to remain single exponential (Ec-0.820 eV) despite the creation of a broad U band measured between 100 and 270 K. From this result, together with our earlier reports on the double exponential capacitance transient of the EL2 defect after 1 MeV electron irradiation [Lai, Nener, Faraone, Nassibian, and Hotchkis, J. Appl. Phys. 73, 640 (1993)] and the behavior of the electron irradiated EL2 defect upon isochronal annealing [Lai and Nener, J. Appl. Phys. 75, 2354 (1994)], we observe a difference in the behavior of the EL2 defect after neutron and electron irradiation. The results of the present study indicate that the EL2-B level reported in an earlier work is not due to any interaction of the stable EL2 (or EL2-A) level with either the U-band or EL6 defect. The EL2 defect is likely to be a complex defect which can manifest itself as a number of different defect levels depending on the particular details of the irradiation used. The U band is likely to be a cluster defect caused by the large number of atoms displaced from lattice sites by the fast neutrons, and is not likely to be due to any interaction mechanism between the EL2 and EL6 defects.

  3. Infrared absorption related to the metastable state of arsenic antisite defects in electron-irradiated GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuisma, S.; Saarinen, K.; Hautojaervi, P.; Corbel, C.

    1996-12-31

    A metastable irradiation-induced vacancy is detected by positrons in semi-insulating GaAs. The vacancy is associated with the metastable state of an irradition-induced As-antisite-related defect. This metastable state absorbs IR light in contrast to the metastable state of the As-antisite-related native EL2 defect. This property can be explained by the presence of other defects complexed with the As antisite in electron-irradiated GaAs.

  4. Prevalence of Levator Ani Defects in Urogynecological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Albrich, S.; Rommens, K.; Steetskamp, J.; Weyer, V.; Hoffmann, G.; Skala, C.; Zahn, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Defects of the levator ani muscle complex could represent a pathophysiological link between vaginal birth trauma and urogynecological symptoms many years later. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of levator ani muscle defects using 3D or 4D ultrasound and palpation in urogynecological patients. Material and Methods: Urogynecological patients were retrospectively investigated using 3D or 4D ultrasound. Clinical examination consisted of palpation and 3D or 4D imaging of the levator ani muscle. Results: A total of 319 women were included in the analysis. Mean age was 64.9 years, average parity was 2.1. Stress incontinence was present in 50.8 %, overactive bladder symptoms in 69.3 % and pelvic organ prolapse in 42.3 % of patients. A levator ani defect was found on ultrasound in 76 patients (23.8 %) and on palpation in 64 women (20.0 %). In the group of patients with pelvic organ prolapse, levator ani defects were found in 32.6 % of patients using ultrasound and in 26.7 % of patients using palpation. The odds ratio (OR) for levator ani defects in women with pelvic organ prolapse was 2.3 (95 % CI [CI: confidence interval]: 1.36–3.88], p = 0.002). Conclusion: In a cohort of urogynecological patients seen at a tertiary urogynecological unit, the prevalence of levator ani defects was significantly higher in women with pelvic organ prolapse compared to women with stress incontinence or urge symptoms. PMID:27635090

  5. Mitochondrial defects in acute multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mahad, Don; Ziabreva, Iryna; Turnbull, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to focal plaques of demyelination and tissue injury in the CNS. The structural and immunopathological patterns of demyelination suggest that different immune mechanisms may be involved in tissue damage. In a subtype of lesions, which are mainly found in patients with acute fulminant multiple sclerosis with Balo's type concentric sclerosis and in a subset of early relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, the initial myelin changes closely resemble those seen in white matter stroke (WMS), suggesting a hypoxia-like tissue injury. Since mitochondrial injury may be involved in the pathogenesis of such lesions, we analysed a number of mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins in active lesions from acute multiple sclerosis and from WMS using immunohistochemistry. Functionally important defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV [cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] including its catalytic component (COX-I) are present in Pattern III but not in Pattern II multiple sclerosis lesions. The lack of immunohistochemically detected COX-I is apparent in oligodendrocytes, hypertrophied astrocytes and axons, but not in microglia. The profile of immunohistochemically detected mitochondrial respiratory chain complex subunits differs between multiple sclerosis and WMS. The findings suggest that hypoxia-like tissue injury in Pattern III multiple sclerosis lesions may be due to mitochondrial impairment. PMID:18515320

  6. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in yellow birch

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for yellow birch. Eleven types of external...

  7. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in sugar maple

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for sugar maple. Eleven types of external...

  8. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in northern red oak

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast

    1982-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide aids the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and also shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development. It illustrates and describes eight types...

  9. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in white oak

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman; David L. Sonderman

    1989-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and also shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for white oak. It illustrates and...

  10. Photographic guide to selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in black walnut

    Treesearch

    Everette D.Beaton John A. Rast; David L. Sonderman; David L. Sonderman

    1988-01-01

    To properly classify qr grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide aids the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and also shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its develqpment for black walnut. It illustrates and...

  11. Photographic guide of selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; David L. Sonderman

    1991-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide assists the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for yellow-poplar. Twelve types of external...

  12. Photographic guide to selected external defect indicators and associated internal defects in black cherry

    Treesearch

    Everette D. Rast; John A. Beaton; John A. Beaton

    1985-01-01

    To properly classify or grade logs or trees, one must be able to correctly identify defect indicators and assess the effect of the underlying defect on possible end products. This guide aids the individual in identifying the surface defect indicator and also shows the progressive stages of the defect throughout its development for black cherry. It illustrates and...

  13. ENDEAVOUR to understand EUV buried defect printability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazunori; Isogawa, Takeshi; Kagawa, Masayuki; Akima, Shinji; Kodera, Yutaka; Badger, Karen; Qi, Zhengqing J.; Lawliss, Mark; Rankin, Jed; Bonam, Ravi

    2015-07-01

    NAP-PD (Native Acting Phase - Programmed Defects), otherwise known as buried program defects, with attributes very similar to native defects, are successfully fabricated using a high accuracy overlay technique. The defect detectability and visibility are analyzed with conventional phase contrast blank inspection @193 nm wavelength, pattern inspection @193 nm wavelength and SEM. The mask is also printed on wafer and printability is discussed. Finally, the inspection sensitivity and wafer printability are compared, leading to the observation that the current blank and pattern inspection sensitivity is not enough to detect all of the printable defects.

  14. The defect variance of random spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Domenico; Wigman, Igor

    2011-09-01

    The defect of a function f:M\\rightarrow {R} is defined as the difference between the measure of the positive and negative regions. In this paper, we begin the analysis of the distribution of defect of random Gaussian spherical harmonics. By an easy argument, the defect is non-trivial only for even degree and the expected value always vanishes. Our principal result is evaluating the defect variance, asymptotically in the high-frequency limit. As other geometric functionals of random eigenfunctions, the defect may be used as a tool to probe the statistical properties of spherical random fields, a topic of great interest for modern cosmological data analysis.

  15. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  16. Tight-binding calculation studies of vacancy and adatom defects in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Zhang, Hong-Xing; ...

    2016-02-19

    Computational studies of complex defects in graphene usually need to deal with a larger number of atoms than the current first-principles methods can handle. We show a recently developed three-center tight-binding potential for carbon is very efficient for large scale atomistic simulations and can accurately describe the structures and energies of various defects in graphene. Using the three-center tight-binding potential, we have systematically studied the stable structures and formation energies of vacancy and embedded-atom defects of various sizes up to 4 vacancies and 4 embedded atoms in graphene. In conclusion, our calculations reveal low-energy defect structures and provide a moremore » comprehensive understanding of the structures and stability of defects in graphene.« less

  17. Tight-binding calculation studies of vacancy and adatom defects in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Ho, K. M.; Wang, C. Z.

    2016-02-19

    Computational studies of complex defects in graphene usually need to deal with a larger number of atoms than the current first-principles methods can handle. We show a recently developed three-center tight-binding potential for carbon is very efficient for large scale atomistic simulations and can accurately describe the structures and energies of various defects in graphene. Using the three-center tight-binding potential, we have systematically studied the stable structures and formation energies of vacancy and embedded-atom defects of various sizes up to 4 vacancies and 4 embedded atoms in graphene. In conclusion, our calculations reveal low-energy defect structures and provide a more comprehensive understanding of the structures and stability of defects in graphene.

  18. [An example of multi-stage reconstruction of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarzyk, Janusz; Elsaftawy, Ahmed; Jabłecki, Jerzy; Kaczmarzyk, Leszek

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction is a highly complex procedure that may requires a multiple stages surgical operations. The aim of a such reconstruction is to close the abdominal wall defect and to create a support for the internal organs. It's a challenge for both general and reconstructive surgery. An incomplete thickness defects of the abdominal wall are so much easier to challenge than complete ones. Also the size of the primary defect determines the way and stages of the operation. Such defects can occur in necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall, after abdominal walls tumors removal, in traffic accidents or after "open abdomen" procedures (acute severe pancreatitis). In this paper the authors present a case of 62-yo patient which was operated because of large intestine perforation with various complications of which the most serious was the abdominal wall defect.

  19. Weak scratch detection and defect classification methods for a large-aperture optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xian; Xu, De; Zhang, Zheng-Tao; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xi-Long; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2017-03-01

    Surface defects on optics cause optic failure and heavy loss to the optical system. Therefore, surface defects on optics must be carefully inspected. This paper proposes a coarse-to-fine detection strategy of weak scratches in complicated dark-field images. First, all possible scratches are detected based on bionic vision. Then, each possible scratch is precisely positioned and connected to a complete scratch by the LSD and a priori knowledge. Finally, multiple scratches with various types can be detected in dark-field images. To classify defects and pollutants, a classification method based on GIST features is proposed. This paper uses many real dark-field images as experimental images. The results show that this method can detect multiple types of weak scratches in complex images and that the defects can be correctly distinguished with interference. This method satisfies the real-time and accurate detection requirements of surface defects.

  20. Secondary defects detected by transmission electron microscopy in primary ciliary dyskinesia diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mellisa; Shoemark, Amelia

    2017-09-18

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is predominantly an autosomal recessively inherited condition that affects ~1 in 15,000 people. Diagnosis of PCD can be complex and is ordinarily based on the results of multiple investigations. These investigations include nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video microscopy, genotyping, and electron microscopy analysis of ciliary ultrastructure. A diagnosis is ultimately confirmed by the presence of a hallmark defect identified by transmission electron microscopy or biallelic variants in a known PCD gene. Secondary ciliary defects are commonly seen in samples submitted for diagnosis of PCD. Acquired secondary ciliary ultrastructural abnormalities, which are not caused by a variant in a ciliary gene, are usually transient and reversible however failure to separate primary versus secondary defects can lead to misdiagnosis. In this review, we describe causes of secondary ciliary defects, identify the ultrastructural appearances associated with secondary ciliary dyskinesia and finally suggest methods to avoid misdiagnosis of PCD due to these acquired ciliary defects.