Science.gov

Sample records for a-deficient apre mutant

  1. aroA-Deficient Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Is More Than a Metabolically Attenuated Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Frahm, Michael; Kocijancic, Dino; Rohde, Manfred; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Bielecka, Agata; Bueno, Emilio; Cava, Felipe; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Curtiss, Roy; Häussler, Susanne; Erhardt, Marc; Weiss, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains are believed to act as powerful live vaccine carriers that are able to elicit protection against various pathogens. Auxotrophic mutations, such as a deletion of aroA, are commonly introduced into such bacteria for attenuation without incapacitating immunostimulation. In this study, we describe the surprising finding that deletion of aroA dramatically increased the virulence of attenuated Salmonella in mouse models. Mutant bacteria lacking aroA elicited increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) after systemic application. A detailed genetic and phenotypic characterization in combination with transcriptomic and metabolic profiling demonstrated that ΔaroA mutants display pleiotropic alterations in cellular physiology and lipid and amino acid metabolism, as well as increased sensitivity to penicillin, complement, and phagocytic uptake. In concert with other immunomodulating mutations, deletion of aroA affected flagellin phase variation and gene expression of the virulence-associated genes arnT and ansB. Finally, ΔaroA strains displayed significantly improved tumor therapeutic activity. These results highlight the importance of a functional shikimate pathway to control homeostatic bacterial physiology. They further highlight the great potential of ΔaroA-attenuated Salmonella for the development of vaccines and cancer therapies with important implications for host-pathogen interactions and translational medicine. PMID:27601574

  2. A combination of p53-activating APR-246 and phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody potently inhibits tumor development in hormone-dependent mutant p53-expressing breast cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Hyder, Salman M

    2018-01-01

    Background Between 30 and 40% of human breast cancers express a defective tumor suppressor p53 gene. Wild-type p53 tumor suppressor protein promotes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor–dependent angiogenesis, whereas mutant p53 protein (mtp53) lacks these functions, resulting in tumor cell survival and metastasis. Restoration of p53 function is therefore a promising drug-targeted strategy for combating mtp53-expressing breast cancer. Methods In this study, we sought to determine whether administration of APR-246, a small-molecule drug that restores p53 function, in combination with 2aG4, an antibody that targets phosphatidylserine residues on tumor blood vessels and disrupts tumor vasculature, effectively inhibits advanced hormone-dependent breast cancer tumor growth. Results APR-246 reduced cell viability in mtp53-expressing BT-474 and T47-D human breast cancer cells in vitro, and significantly induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, APR-246 did not reduce cell viability in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express wild-type p53. We next examined APR-246’s anti-tumor effects in vivo using BT-474 and T47-D tumor xenografts established in female nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with APR-246 and/or 2aG4 and tumor volume followed over time. Tumor growth was more effectively suppressed by combination treatment than by either agent alone, and combination therapy completely eradicated some tumors. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tumor tissue sections demonstrated that combination therapy more effectively induced apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation in tumor xenografts than either agent alone. Importantly, combination therapy dramatically reduced the density of blood vessels, which serve as the major route for tumor metastasis, in tumor xenografts compared with either agent alone. Conclusion Based on our findings, we contend that breast tumor growth might effectively be controlled by simultaneous

  3. Chemical studies on damages of Escherichea coli by the immune bactericidal reaction. II. Release of phosphatidylethanolamine from a phospholipase A-deficient mutant of E. coli during the immune bactericidal reaction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yano, K; Amano, T

    1974-12-01

    When an antibody-sensitized, phospholipase A-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli B/SM was treated with complement in the absence of lysozyme, bacterial phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was liberated into the lipid fraction of the surrounding medium, but only traces of its degradation products were found in this fraction. Therefore, most of the degradation of bacterial PE to FFA and LPE observed in the usual immune bactericidal reaction (Inoue et al., 1974) must be the result of the action of bacterial phospholipase A which is activated or becomes accessible to its substrate on formation of lesions by complement. The mechanism of complement-mediated formation of membrane lesions is discussed on the basis of these results.

  4. The effects of modeled microgravity on growth kinetics, antibiotic susceptibility, cold growth, and the virulence potential of a Yersinia pestis ymoA-deficient mutant and its isogenic parental strain.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Abidat; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2013-09-01

    Previously, we reported that there was no enhancement in the virulence potential (as measured by cell culture infections) of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis (YP) following modeled microgravity/clinorotation growth. We have now further characterized the effects of clinorotation (CR) on YP growth kinetics, antibiotic sensitivity, cold growth, and YP's virulence potential in a murine model of infection. Surprisingly, none of the aforementioned phenotypes were altered. To better understand why CR did not enhance YP's virulence potential as it did for other bacterial pathogens, a YP ΔymoA isogenic mutant in the KIM/D27 background strain that is unable to produce the histone-like YmoA protein and influences DNA topography was used in both cell culture and murine models of infection. YmoA represses type three secretion system (T3SS) virulence gene expression in the yersiniae. Similar to our CR-grown parental YP strain data, the CR-grown ΔymoA mutant induced reduced HeLa cell cytotoxicity with concomitantly decreased Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) and low calcium response V (LcrV) antigen production and secretion. Important, however, were our findings that, although no significant differences were observed in survival of mice infected intraperitoneally with either normal gravity (NG)- or CR-grown parental YP, the ΔymoA mutant induced significantly more mortality in infected mice than did the parental strain following CR growth. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CR did enhance the virulence potential of the YP ΔymoA mutant in a murine infection model (relative to the CR-grown parental strain), despite inducing less HeLa cell rounding in our cell culture infection assay due to reduced T3SS activity. Therefore, CR, which induces a unique type of bacterial stress, might be enhancing YP's virulence potential in vivo through a T3SS-independent mechanism when the histone-like YmoA protein is absent.

  5. Selective IgA Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... immunoglobulins. Videos: Choosing Wisely » Selective IgA Deficiency Treatment & Management The underlying cause for Selective IgA Deficiency is ... the Evidence » Practice Parameter for the Diagnosis and Management of Primary Immunodefiency » 2017 Non-CME Recordings » Vaccination ...

  6. Evaluating SPP/APR Improvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to assist State Education Agency (SEA) and Lead Agency (LA) staff and technical assistance providers in designing a meaningful evaluation for the State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR) improvement activities. It provides: (1) information about the relevance of evaluation in the context of improvement…

  7. New tools for NTD vaccines: A case study of quality control assays for product development of the human hookworm vaccine Na-APR-1M74.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Mark S; Jariwala, Amar R; Abbenante, Giovanni; Plieskatt, Jordan; Wilson, David; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Keegan, Brian; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Na-APR-1(M74) is an aspartic protease that is rendered enzymatically inactive by site-directed mutagenesis and is a candidate antigen component in the Human Hookworm Vaccine. The mutant protease exerts vaccine efficacy by inducing antibodies that neutralize the enzymatic activity of wild type enzyme (Na-APR-1wt) in the gut of the hookworm, thereby depriving the worm of its ability to digest its blood meal. Previously, canines immunized with Na-APR-1(M74) and challenged with Ancylostoma caninum were partially protected against hookworm challenge infection, especially from the loss in hemoglobin observed in control canines and canine immunoglobulin (Ig) G raised against Na-APR-1 was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1 wt in vitro, thereby providing proof of concept of Na-APR-1(M74) as a vaccine antigen. The mutated version, Na-APR-1(M74), was then expressed at the cGMP level using a Nicotiana benthamiana expression system (Fraunhofer, CMB, Delaware, MD), formulated with Alhydrogel®, and used to immunize mice in a dose-ranging study to explore the enzyme-neutralizing capacity of the resulting anti- Na-APR-1(M74) IgG. As little as 0.99 μg of recombinant Na-APR-1(M74) could induce anti Na-APR-1(M74) IgG in mice that were capable of inhibiting Na-APR-1w t-mediated digestion of a peptide substrate by 89%. In the absence of enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1(M74) as a surrogate marker of protein functionality, we developed an assay based on the binding of a quenched fluorescence-labeled inhibitor of aspartic proteases, BODIPY-FL pepstatin A (BDP). Binding of BDP in the active site of Na-APR-1 wt was demonstrated by inhibition of enzymatic activity, and competitive binding with unlabelled pepstatin A. BDP also bound to Na-APR-1(M74) which was assessed by fluorescence polarization, but with an ∼ 50-fold reduction in the dissociation constant. Taken together, these assays comprise a "toolbox" that could be useful for the analyses of Na-APR-1(M74) as it

  8. New tools for NTD vaccines: A case study of quality control assays for product development of the human hookworm vaccine Na-APR-1M74

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Mark S; Jariwala, Amar R; Abbenante, Giovanni; Plieskatt, Jordan; Wilson, David; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Keegan, Brian; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Loukas, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Na-APR-1M74 is an aspartic protease that is rendered enzymatically inactive by site-directed mutagenesis and is a candidate antigen component in the Human Hookworm Vaccine. The mutant protease exerts vaccine efficacy by inducing antibodies that neutralize the enzymatic activity of wild type enzyme (Na-APR-1wt) in the gut of the hookworm, thereby depriving the worm of its ability to digest its blood meal. Previously, canines immunized with Na-APR-1M74 and challenged with Ancylostoma caninum were partially protected against hookworm challenge infection, especially from the loss in hemoglobin observed in control canines and canine immunoglobulin (Ig) G raised against Na-APR-1 was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1wt in vitro, thereby providing proof of concept of Na-APR-1M74 as a vaccine antigen. The mutated version, Na-APR-1M74, was then expressed at the cGMP level using a Nicotiana benthamiana expression system (Fraunhofer, CMB, Delaware, MD), formulated with Alhydrogel®, and used to immunize mice in a dose-ranging study to explore the enzyme-neutralizing capacity of the resulting anti- Na-APR-1M74 IgG. As little as 0.99 μg of recombinant Na-APR-1M74 could induce anti Na-APR-1M74 IgG in mice that were capable of inhibiting Na-APR-1wt-mediated digestion of a peptide substrate by 89%. In the absence of enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1M74 as a surrogate marker of protein functionality, we developed an assay based on the binding of a quenched fluorescence-labeled inhibitor of aspartic proteases, BODIPY-FL pepstatin A (BDP). Binding of BDP in the active site of Na-APR-1wt was demonstrated by inhibition of enzymatic activity, and competitive binding with unlabelled pepstatin A. BDP also bound to Na-APR-1M74 which was assessed by fluorescence polarization, but with an ∼50-fold reduction in the dissociation constant. Taken together, these assays comprise a “toolbox” that could be useful for the analyses of Na-APR-1M74 as it proceeds through the

  9. [Strategies to control vitamin A deficiency].

    PubMed

    Traoré, L; Banou, A A; Sacko, D; Malvy, D; Schémann, J F

    1998-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a major public health problem in the countries of the Sahel. It causes xerophthalmia and high rates of child mortality and it occurs mostly in underdeveloped regions. People of all ages may suffer from vitamin A deficiency but it is a particular problem in pre-school-age children. Each year, about 250,000 children throughout the world become blind due to vitamin A deficiency. Measles, pneumonia and diarrhea reduce the child's reserves of retinol and increase the dietary requirement for vitamin A. Improvement of social conditions is a radical approach to preventing vitamin A deficiency. Three strategies are currently in use: horticultural activities and health education; fortification of food products; distribution of high-dose vitamin A capsules.

  10. Hematopoietic studies in vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hodges, R E; Sauberlich, H E; Canham, J E; Wallace, D L; Rucker, R B; Mejia, L A; Mohanram, M

    1978-05-01

    Recent studies of experimental vitamin A deficiency in man led the authors to conclude that anemia may result from lack of vitamin A. A review of numerous nutrition surveys in underdeveloped countries enhanced the suspicion that deficiency of vitamin A does contribute to the prevalence of anemia. Preliminary studies of vitamin A-deficient rats confirmed previous observations that anemia may result from lack of this vitamin. The livers of these animals had very low concentrations of vitamin A but normal or increased concentrations of iron. The finding of anemia is in contrast with other reports that vitamin A deficiency may cause elevated values for hemoglobin and hematocrit. The authors suggest that loss of taste and smell as a result of deficiency may account for refusal of experimental animals to eat and drink enough to prevent inanitation and dehydration. The resulting hemoconcentration may mask the true hematological picture, which is one of anemia.

  11. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. 1, 1939 (i) INT.- STAIR HALL, 1st. FLOOR, LOOKING NORTH - M.I.T., Rogers Building, 491 Boylston Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  12. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Arthur C. Haskell, Photographer Apr. 1, 1939 (l) INT.- STAIRWAY, 4th FLOOR, LOOKING SOUTH - M.I.T., Rogers Building, 491 Boylston Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  13. Exercise Limitation Imposed by an Approved Air Purifying Respirator (APR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    mentioned that they did not have enough time to inhale, that inspiratory muscles were fatigued , that they got out of rhythm with their breathing and...with APR decreased with time during APR use, a decrease suggesting fatigue of respiratory muscles . Another two subjects did not continue long enough... muscle fatigue , the difference they noted may have been caused by the increase in VE during endurance exercise. The other investigators compared at

  14. Development of Nanosatellite Technology with APRS Module for Disaster Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahyang, S. Y.; Dhiya’Ulhaq, M. Z.; Golim, O. P.; Gunawan, R.; Suhandinata; Jahja, E.; Nelwan, E. R. G.; Ananta, C.; Chow, I. M.; Mali, N. D. F.

    2018-05-01

    Development of nanosatellite technology has enabled satellites to be developed with multiple capabilities for a specific mission in a short time with a low cost. Satellite communications are proved to be more effective in delivering information due to its large coverage area. Surya Satellite-1 will become the first Indonesian nanosatellite developed by undergraduate students. It is designed with low-cost commercial payloads, including an APRS module for communication and operated on VHF and UHF amateur radio frequencies. The mission of the satellites focused on disaster mitigation through APRS communication network with remote stations located on disaster-prone areas.

  15. IgA deficiency in wolves.

    PubMed

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Hellman, Lars; Zhao, Yaofeng; Arnemo, Jon M; Lin, Miaoli; Tengvall, Katarina; Møller, Torsten; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Hammarström, Lennart

    2013-06-01

    Low mean concentrations of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) and an increased frequency of overt IgA deficiency (IgAD) in certain dog breeds raises the question whether it is a breeding-enriched phenomenon or a legacy from the dog's ancestor, the gray wolf (Canis lupus). The IgA concentration in 99 serum samples from 58 free-ranging and 13 captive Scandinavian wolves, was therefore measured by capture ELISA. The concentrations were markedly lower in the wolf serum samples than in the dog controls. Potential differences in the IgA molecule between dogs and wolves were addressed by sequencing the wolf IgA heavy chain constant region encoding gene (IGHA). Complete amino acid sequence homology was found. Detection of wolf and dog IgA was ascertained by showing identity using double immunodiffusion. We suggest that the vast majority of wolves, the ancestor of the dog, are IgA deficient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 78 FR 37531 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Annual Performance Reporting (APR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ...; Comment Request; Annual Performance Reporting (APR) System for NIDRR Grantees (RERCs, RRTCS, FIPs, ARRTs... of Collection: Annual Performance Reporting (APR) System for NIDRR Grantees (RERCs, RRTCS, FIPs... requests an extension of the Annual Performance Reporting (APR) System for NIDRR Grantees (RERCs, RRTCS...

  17. APR3 modulates oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in ARPE-19 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Zou, Xuan; Gao, Jing; Cao, Ke; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang

    2018-05-24

    Impairment of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is considered a key contributor to the development of age-related macular degeneration. Apoptosis-related protein 3 (APR3) was recently discovered after treatment with all- trans retinoic acid, a pivotal molecule in RPE cells. However, the function of APR3 remains poorly understood. In the present study, we found that APR3 could interact with nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, which is a regulator of phase II enzymes, and that knockdown of APR3 promoted nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 nuclear translocation and activated expression of phase II enzymes, which was accompanied by improved redox status and mitochondrial activity. Overexpression of APR3 revealed its mitochondrial localization and induced a robust production of reactive oxygen species that was accompanied by impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption, complex activity, and lower ATP content, resulting in significant changes in mitochondrial structure, which may contribute to cell apoptosis. High doses of all- trans retinoic acid treatment were found to significantly induce APR3 expression, increase reactive oxygen species levels, and decrease ATP content, which were abolished by knockdown of APR3. These results indicate that APR3 plays a vital role in regulating redox status and mitochondrial activity and thus suggest APR3 might be a potential novel target for study of treatment of age-related macular degeneration.-Li, Y., Zou, X., Gao, J., Cao, K., Feng, Z., Liu, J. APR3 modulates oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in ARPE-19 cells.

  18. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  19. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, John R.; Mubayi, Vinod; Pratt, W. Trevor

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Informationmore » (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.« less

  20. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  1. Anti-leukaemic effects induced by APR-246 are dependent on induction of oxidative stress and the NFE2L2/HMOX1 axis that can be targeted by PI3K and mTOR inhibitors in acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Dina; Mohammad, Dara K; Mujahed, Huthayfa; Jonson-Videsäter, Kerstin; Nore, Beston; Paul, Christer; Lehmann, Sören

    2016-07-01

    The small molecule APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET) ) is a novel drug that restores the activity of mutated and unfolded TP53 protein. However, the mechanisms of action and potential off-target effects are not fully understood. Gene expression profiling in TP53 mutant KMB3 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells showed that genes which protected cells from oxidative stress to be the most up-regulated. APR-246 exposure also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione in AML cells. The genes most up-regulated by APR-246, confirmed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, were heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, also termed HO-1), SLC7A11 and RIT1. Up-regulation of HMOX1, a key regulator of cellular response to ROS, was independent of TP53 mutational status. NFE2L2 (also termed Nrf2), a master regulator of HMOX1 expression, showed transcriptional up-regulation and nuclear translocation by APR-246. Down-regulation of NFE2L2 by siRNA in AML cells significantly increased the antitumoural effects of APR-246. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibited APR-246-induced nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 and counteracted the protective cellular responses to APR-246, resulting in synergistic cell killing together with APR-246. In conclusion, ROS induction is important for antileukaemic activities of APR-246 and inhibiting the protective response of the Nrf-2/HMOX1 axis using PI3K inhibitors, enhances the antileukaemic effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 48 CFR 1552.235-76 - Treatment of Confidential Business Information (APR 1996).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-76 Section 1552.235-76 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Provisions and Clauses 1552.235-76 Treatment of Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007-70(c), insert the following clause: Treatment of Confidential Business Information (TSCA...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 23 - Installation of An Automatic Power Reserve (APR) System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Installation of An Automatic Power Reserve (APR) System H Appendix H to Part 23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... AIRPLANES Pt. 23, App. H Appendix H to Part 23—Installation of An Automatic Power Reserve (APR) System H23.1...

  4. Vitamin A Deficiency Induces Congenital Spinal Deformities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Wu, William Ka Kei; Wang, Xiaojuan; Liang, Jinqian; Qiu, Guixing; Liu, Jiaming

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of congenital spinal deformities were sporadic and without strong evidence of heritability. The etiology of congenital spinal deformities is still elusive and assumed to be multi-factorial. The current study seeks to elucidate the effect of maternal vitamin A deficiency and the production of congenital spinal deformities in the offsping. Thirty two female rats were randomized into two groups: control group, which was fed a normal diet; vitamin A deficient group, which were given vitamin A-deficient diet from at least 2 weeks before mating till delivery. Three random neonatal rats from each group were killed the next day of parturition. Female rats were fed an AIN-93G diet sufficient in vitamin A to feed the rest of neonates for two weeks until euthanasia. Serum levels of vitamin A were assessed in the adult and filial rats. Anteroposterior (AP) spine radiographs were obtained at week 2 after delivery to evaluate the presence of the skeletal abnormalities especially of spinal deformities. Liver and vertebral body expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDHs) and RARs mRNA was assessed by reverse transcription-real time PCR. VAD neonates displayed many skeletal malformations in the cervical, thoracic, the pelvic and sacral and limbs regions. The incidence of congenital scoliosis was 13.79% (8/58) in the filial rats of vitamin A deficiency group and 0% in the control group. Furthermore, vitamin A deficiency negatively regulate the liver and verterbral body mRNA levels of RALDH1, RALDH2, RALDH3, RAR-α, RAR-β and RAR-γ. Vitamin A deficiency in pregnancy may induce congenital spinal deformities in the postnatal rats. The decreases of RALDHs and RARs mRNA expression induced by vitamin A deprivation suggest that vertebral birth defects may be caused by a defect in RA signaling pathway during somitogenesis. PMID:23071590

  5. The trauma registry compared to All Patient Refined Diagnosis Groups (APR-DRG).

    PubMed

    Hackworth, Jodi; Askegard-Giesmann, Johanna; Rouse, Thomas; Benneyworth, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Literature has shown there are significant differences between administrative databases and clinical registry data. Our objective was to compare the identification of trauma patients using All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Groups (APR-DRG) as compared to the Trauma Registry and estimate the effects of those discrepancies on utilization. Admitted pediatric patients from 1/2012-12/2013 were abstracted from the trauma registry. The patients were linked to corresponding administrative data using the Pediatric Health Information System database at a single children's hospital. APR-DRGs referencing trauma were used to identify trauma patients. We compared variables related to utilization and diagnosis to determine the level of agreement between the two datasets. There were 1942 trauma registry patients and 980 administrative records identified with trauma-specific APR-DRG during the study period. Forty-two percent (816/1942) of registry records had an associated trauma-specific APR-DRG; 69% of registry patients requiring ICU care had trauma APR-DRGs; 73% of registry patients with head injuries had trauma APR-DRGs. Only 21% of registry patients requiring surgical management had associated trauma APR-DRGs, and 12.5% of simple fractures had associated trauma APR-DRGs. APR-DRGs appeared to only capture a fraction of the entire trauma population and it tends to be the more severely ill patients. As a result, the administrative data was not able to accurately answer hospital or operating room utilization as well as specific information on diagnosis categories regarding trauma patients. APR-DRG administrative data should not be used as the only data source for evaluating the needs of a trauma program. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Citrus can help prevent vitamin A deficiency in developing countries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    California is a major producer of tangerines and oranges, which contain carotenoids that form vitamin A. Deficiencies of this vitamin are common in southern Asia and Africa, causing blindness and more than one-half million deaths each year. We evaluated the potential of tangerines and oranges to pre...

  7. 48 CFR 1552.235-75 - Access to Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). 1552.235-75 Section 1552.235-75 Federal... Confidential Business Information (APR 1996). As prescribed in 1535.007(b), insert the following provision: Access to Toxic Substances Control Act Confidential Business Information (APR 1996) In order to perform...

  8. Fuel assembly design for APR1400 with low CBC

    SciTech Connect

    Hah, Chang Joo, E-mail: changhah@kings.ac.kr

    2015-04-29

    APR 1400 is a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) with rated power of 3983 MWth and 241 assemblies. Recently, demand for extremely longer cycle up to 24 months is increasing with challenge of higher critical boron concentration (CBC). In this paper, assembly design method of selecting Gd-rods is introduced to reduce CBC. The purpose of the method is to lower the critical boron concentration of the preliminary core loading pattern (PLP), and consequently to achieve more negative or less positive moderator temperature coefficient (MTC). In this method, both the ratio of the number of low-Gd rod to the number of high-Gdmore » rod (r) and assembly average Gd wt% (w) are the decision variables. The target function is the amount of soluble boron concentration reduction, which can be converted to Δk{sub TARGET}. A set of new designed fuel assembly satisfies an objective function, min [f=∑{sub i}(Δk{sub FA}−Δk{sub i})], and enables a final loading pattern to reach a target CBC. The constraints required to determine a set of Δk are physically realizable pair, (r,w), and the sum of Δk of new designed assemblies as close to Δk{sub TARGET} as possible. New Gd-bearing assemblies selected based on valid pairs of (r,w) are replaced with existing assemblies in a PLP. This design methodology is applied to Shin-Kori Unit 3 Cycle 1 used as a reference model. CASMO-3/MASTER code is used for depletion calculation. CASMO-3/MASTER calculations with new designed assemblies produce lower CBC than the expected CBC, proving that the proposed method works successful.« less

  9. 15 CFR 782.1 - Overview of reporting requirements under the APR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL... (see § 782.5 of the APR). In addition, forms may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. ...

  10. 15 CFR 782.1 - Overview of reporting requirements under the APR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL... (see § 782.5 of the APR). In addition, forms may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. ...

  11. 15 CFR 782.1 - Overview of reporting requirements under the APR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL... (see § 782.5 of the APR). In addition, forms may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. ...

  12. 15 CFR 782.1 - Overview of reporting requirements under the APR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL... (see § 782.5 of the APR). In addition, forms may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. ...

  13. 82. Neg. No. F66A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, TRIM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. Neg. No. F-66A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, TRIM LINE AND GLASS DEPARTMENTS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 83. Neg. No. F53, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, BACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. Neg. No. F-53, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BACK TRIM LINE - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 85. Neg. No. F51, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    85. Neg. No. F-51, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY AND CUSHION LINE - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 79. Neg. No. F61A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. Neg. No. F-61A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY CONSTRUCTION - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 76. Neg. No. F58, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, BURNOFF, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Neg. No. F-58, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BURNOFF, LOAD END OF ENAMEL OVEN - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 86. Neg. No. F64, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Neg. No. F-64, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, BODY STORAGE CONVEYOR - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 77. Neg. No. F65A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Neg. No. F-65A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, UNLOADING THE ENAMEL OVEN - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 78. Neg. No. F143A, Apr 1, 1932, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. Neg. No. F-143A, Apr 1, 1932, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, CONVEYOR LINE WITH CAR CHASSIS - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 81. Neg. No. F63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. Neg. No. F-63, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, HOOD DEPARTMENT - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 90. Neg. No. F59A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, CHASSIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. Neg. No. F-59A, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, CHASSIS LINE, LOOKING SOUTH - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 84. Neg. No. F62, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. Neg. No. F-62, Apr 13, 1930, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FRAME AND MOTOR STORAGE CONVEYOR - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  5. Subclinical vitamin A deficiency in Israeli-Bedouin toddlers.

    PubMed

    Coles, C L; Levy, A; Gorodischer, R; Dagan, R; Deckelbaum, R J; Blaner, W S; Fraser, D

    2004-05-01

    This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of and evaluate risk factors for subclinical vitamin A deficiency in Arab-Bedouin children at age 18 months, followed from birth. Community-based, prospective, cohort study conducted in Rahat, a large Arab-Bedouin township, located near the city of Beer Sheva in the Negev region of southern Israel. Healthy Bedouin infants (n=117) from the township, born at Soroka University Medical Center (SUMC) in Beer Sheva, were randomly recruited at birth. Enrollment was restricted to well infants born weighing >2500 g at birth. More than 15% of the children had serum retinol concentrations below 0.7 micromol/l. Male sex (odds ratio (OR) 4.17 [1.14-15.32], P=0.031), stunting at age 12 months (OR 10.09 [2.00-50.97], P=0.05) and warm season at age 18 months (OR 6.20 [1.36-28.28], P=0.018) were associated with vitamin A deficiency. Maternal education decreased the risk of vitamin A deficiency (OR 0.81 [0.68-0.95], P=0.011). Study results indicate a significant vitamin A deficiency problem among Bedouin children. Deficiency may be prevented by increasing dietary intake of vitamin A, especially during the warm season. Other interventions include preventing and controlling diarrheal diseases in order to avert nutritional stunting, and providing nutritional education to women of childbearing age. This study received financial support from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (AI-26497), the US-Israel Bi-national Science Foundation (BSF 90-00257), and the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine (AID/ANE 0158-G-SS-9035-00).

  6. Reliability enhancement of APR + diverse protection system regarding common cause failures

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yim, H. S.

    2012-07-01

    The Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR +) nuclear power plant design has been developed on the basis of the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) to further enhance safety and economics. For the mitigation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) as well as Common Cause Failures (CCF) within the Plant Protection System (PPS) and the Emergency Safety Feature - Component Control System (ESF-CCS), several design improvement features have been implemented for the Diverse Protection System (DPS) of the APR + plant. As compared to the APR1400 DPS design, the APR + DPS has been designed to provide the Safety Injectionmore » Actuation Signal (SIAS) considering a large break LOCA accident concurrent with the CCF. Additionally several design improvement features, such as channel structure with redundant processing modules, and changes of system communication methods and auto-system test methods, are introduced to enhance the functional reliability of the DPS. Therefore, it is expected that the APR + DPS can provide an enhanced safety and reliability regarding possible CCF in the safety-grade I and C systems as well as the DPS itself. (authors)« less

  7. Malacoplakia associated with vesicoureteral reflux and selective immunoglobulin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Witherington, R; Branan, W J; Wray, B B; Best, G K

    1984-11-01

    A case of malacoplakia involving the lower urinary tract of a young black boy, with associated bilateral vesicoureteral reflux, hydronephrosis and selective immunoglobulin A deficiency is reported. Reflux was caused by the malacoplakia. Reflux and hydronephrosis persisted despite elimination of bacterial infection and malacoplakia by drug therapy. These abnormalities were corrected by a conventional antireflux operation. Malacoplakia appears to be related to immunologic incompetence and diminished levels of intracellular cyclic 3',5' guanine monophosphate. Cholinergic agonists reverse or prevent the pathological changes of malacoplakia.

  8. Thymopentin treatment of selective IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, M; Quinti, I; Russi, G; Seminara, R; Ensoli, B; Aiuti, F

    1985-01-01

    Thymic hormones have been shown to modulate immunoglobulin production in a number of experiments and it is generally agreed that this action is mediated by modulation of helper and/or suppressor T cell activities. The possibility of upregulating the immunoglobulins is of particular relevance in patients with hypogammaglobulinemias and this paper reports on the results of thymopentin treatment in 9 patients with selective IgA deficiency. Two out of 4 patients responded positively in an open-label trial; in one the serum IgA values remained stable up to 8 weeks after discontinuation of treatment whereas there was a rapid fall in the other. Both responders had consistently normal T4/T8 ratios during the treatment, whereas the nonresponders revealed high ratios with large fluctuations of the T4/T8 ratio. In a subsequent (still ongoing) double-blind trial in 5 patients (3 thymopentin, 2 placebo) no significant change of serum or secretory IgA levels has been observed. Taken together, the data suggest that the tested dose regimen of thymopentin (i.e. daily i.m. injections of 1 mg/kg for 2 weeks, then same dose 3 time weekly for 10 weeks) may only work in a subset of patients with selective IgA deficiency. In the present study we did not attempt to distinguish to which of the three known subgroups the 9 patients belonged, nor did we try alternative dose regimens of thymopentin.

  9. Microbial ecology perturbation in human IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fadlallah, Jehane; El Kafsi, Hela; Sterlin, Delphine; Juste, Catherine; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Autaa, Gaëlle; Gouas, Doriane; Almeida, Mathieu; Lepage, Patricia; Pons, Nicolas; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Kennedy, Sean; Galleron, Nathalie; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Malphettes, Marion; Galicier, Lionel; Boutboul, David; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Oksenhendler, Eric; Amoura, Zahir; Doré, Joel; Fieschi, Claire; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Larsen, Martin; Gorochov, Guy

    2018-05-02

    Paradoxically, loss of immunoglobulin A (IgA), one of the most abundant antibodies, does not irrevocably lead to severe infections in humans but rather is associated with relatively mild respiratory infections, atopy, and autoimmunity. IgA might therefore also play covert roles, not uniquely associated with control of pathogens. We show that human IgA deficiency is not associated with massive quantitative perturbations of gut microbial ecology. Metagenomic analysis highlights an expected pathobiont expansion but a less expected depletion in some typically beneficial symbionts. Gut colonization by species usually present in the oropharynx is also reminiscent of spatial microbiota disorganization. IgM only partially rescues IgA deficiency because not all typical IgA targets are efficiently bound by IgM in the intestinal lumen. Together, IgA appears to play a nonredundant role at the forefront of the immune/microbial interface, away from the intestinal barrier, ranging from pathobiont control and regulation of systemic inflammation to preservation of commensal diversity and community networks. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in western Yemen.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D S; al Sharif, Z; Bashir, M; al Shabooti, A; Pizzarello, L D

    1996-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of xerophthalmia and the extent of vitamin A deficiency in western Yemen. A stratified cluster sample of children aged 1-5 years with clinical examination for signs of xerophthalmia as well as blood serum survey. The 18 districts of western Yemen, of which 10 clusters were chosen at random. All children aged 1-5 years resident in the cluster sites (n = 2438). Clinical signs of xerophthalmia, a history of night blindness, serum retinol levels in a random sample of clinically normal children (n =338) in addition to all children with xerophthalmia. Night blindness was found in 0.5% of the children, Bitot's spots in 1.7%, corneal ulceration in 0.04% and corneal scars in 0.04% Of the subsample, 7.2% (95% confidence interval [c.i.] 4.4-10.0%) had serum retinol values below 10 micrograms/dl; 63.0% (95% c.i. 57.6- 68.4%) had values below 20 micrograms/dl. Xerophthalmia and vitamin A deficiency are public health problems in western Yemen.

  11. Assistant Personal Robot (APR): Conception and Application of a Tele-Operated Assisted Living Robot.

    PubMed

    Clotet, Eduard; Martínez, Dani; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Palacín, Jordi

    2016-04-28

    This paper presents the technical description, mechanical design, electronic components, software implementation and possible applications of a tele-operated mobile robot designed as an assisted living tool. This robotic concept has been named Assistant Personal Robot (or APR for short) and has been designed as a remotely telecontrolled robotic platform built to provide social and assistive services to elderly people and those with impaired mobility. The APR features a fast high-mobility motion system adapted for tele-operation in plain indoor areas, which incorporates a high-priority collision avoidance procedure. This paper presents the mechanical architecture, electrical fundaments and software implementation required in order to develop the main functionalities of an assistive robot. The APR uses a tablet in order to implement the basic peer-to-peer videoconference and tele-operation control combined with a tactile graphic user interface. The paper also presents the development of some applications proposed in the framework of an assisted living robot.

  12. The Ongoing Rediscovery of Après-Coup as a Central Freudian Concept.

    PubMed

    House, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Après-coup, Freud's Nachträglichkeit, is an essential psychoanalytic concept structuring each of four concepts, four mental processes that lie at the foundation of Freud's thinking: psychic trauma, repression, the creation of the unconscious, and the creation of infantile sexuality. It is argued here that infantile sexual drives, in contrast to the self-preservative instincts, arise from a two-step process of translation and repression in which the residues of failed translation become source-objects of the drives. These residues of failed translation have an associative resonance with adult sexuality, and the child is driven to ongoing attempts to translate them, to make them meaningful après coup. Thus, après-coup is at the heart of the human subject as a sexual creature who requires, desires, and creates meaning.

  13. APR-246/PRIMA-1Met Inhibits and Reverses Squamous Metaplasia in Human Conjunctival Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Cheng; Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Pei; Yang, Qichen; Dong, Nuo; Wu, Huping; Liu, Zuguo; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Squamous metaplasia is a common pathologic condition in ocular surface diseases for which there is no therapeutic medication in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of a small molecule, APR-246/PRIMA-1(Met), on squamous metaplasia in human conjunctival epithelium. Human conjunctival explants were cultured for up to 12 days under airlifting conditions. Epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation were assessed by Cytokeratin 10 (K10), K14, K19, Pax6, MUC5AC, and p63 immunostaining patterns. β-catenin and TCF-4 immunofluorescent staining and real-time PCR characterized Wnt signaling pathway involvement. Pterygium clinical samples were cultured under airlifting conditions with or without APR-246 for 4 days. p63, K10, β-catenin, and TCF-4 expression in pterygial epithelium was determined by immunofluorescent staining and real-time PCR. Airlift conjunctival explants resulted in increased stratification and intrastromal epithelial invagination. Such pathology was accompanied by increases in K10, K14, and p63 expression, whereas K19 and Pax6 levels declined when compared to those in freshly isolated tissue. On the other hand, APR-246 reversed all of these declines in K10, K14, and p63 expression. Furthermore, K19 and Pax6 increased along with rises in goblet cell density. These effects of APR-246 were accompanied by near restoration of normal conjunctival epithelial histology. APR-246 also reversed squamous metaplasia in pterygial epithelium that had developed after 4 days in ex vivo culture. Reductions in squamous metaplasia induced by APR-246 suggest it may provide a novel therapeutic approach in different squamous metaplasia-associated ocular surface diseases.

  14. IgA deficiency in wolves from Canada and Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Frankowiack, Marcel; Olsson, Mia; Cluff, H Dean; Evans, Alina L; Hellman, Lars; Månsson, Johan; Arnemo, Jon M; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-05-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in both humans and selected breeds of domestic dogs. In both species, IgAD is associated with recurrent infections and immune mediated diseases. Previous results imply that IgAD is also common in the wild ancestor of domestic dogs, the gray wolf. Here, we report that serum IgA concentrations are significantly different in Scandinavian and Canadian wolves (p = 3.252e-15) with an increased prevalence for IgAD in Scandinavian wolves (60%), which is as high as those found in high-risk dog breeds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impaired local immune response in vitamin A-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sirisinha, S; Darip, M D; Moongkarndi, P; Ongsakul, M; Lamb, A J

    1980-01-01

    The functional integrity of the local immune system in vitamin A-deficient (A-) rats was investigated. Secretory IgA levels in the intestinal fluid of A- rats were significantly lower than in controls. This and the decrease in intensity of immunofluorescent staining for secretory component (SC) in the intestinal cells was related to the duration of vitamin A deprivation. IgG levels in the intestinal fluid, and serum IgA and IgG levels were unaffected in deficiency. Moreover, when the response of animals to DNP50-BGG was evaluated, the local anti-DNP response in the intestine was markedly depressed. These defects may result from impaired synthesis of SC by epithelial cells. On the other hand, the serum antibody response in deficient animals was not noticeably different from that of the controls; if any, htere was a slight reduction in the affinity of antibody. PMID:7389210

  16. 23. "GAFFTC 20 APR 60, H65A F106A; ESCAPE SYSTEM RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. "G-AFFTC 20 APR 60, H-6-5A F-106A; ESCAPE SYSTEM RUN 5A." Testing the ejection system on a Convair sled. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 15 CFR 782.5 - Where to obtain APR report forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS GENERAL... forms required by the APR may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. You also may obtain these forms by contacting: Treaty Compliance Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department...

  18. 15 CFR 782.5 - Where to obtain APR report forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS GENERAL... forms required by the APR may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. You also may obtain these forms by contacting: Treaty Compliance Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department...

  19. 15 CFR 782.5 - Where to obtain APR report forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS GENERAL... forms required by the APR may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. You also may obtain these forms by contacting: Treaty Compliance Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department...

  20. 15 CFR 782.5 - Where to obtain APR report forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS GENERAL... forms required by the APR may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. You also may obtain these forms by contacting: Treaty Compliance Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department...

  1. 15 CFR 782.5 - Where to obtain APR report forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL REGULATIONS GENERAL... forms required by the APR may be downloaded from the Internet at http://www.ap.gov. You also may obtain these forms by contacting: Treaty Compliance Division, Bureau of Industry and Security, U.S. Department...

  2. 15 CFR 782.1 - Overview of reporting requirements under the APR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overview of reporting requirements under the APR. 782.1 Section 782.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL...

  3. Using a Classroom Response System to Improve Multiple-Choice Performance in AP[R] Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Participation in rigorous high school courses such as Advanced Placement (AP[R]) Physics increases the likelihood of college success, especially for students who are traditionally underserved. Tackling difficult multiple-choice exams should be part of any AP program because well-constructed multiple-choice questions, such as those on AP exams and…

  4. 91. Neg. No. F174A, Apr 24, 1936, INTERIORASSEMBLY BUILDING, FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. Neg. No. F-174A, Apr 24, 1936, INTERIOR-ASSEMBLY BUILDING, FINISHED CARS AT THE END OF THE ASSEMBLY LINE - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Privacy Impact Assessment for the TRIO Programs Annual Performance Report (APR) System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The TRIO Programs Annual Performance Report (APR) System collects individual student records on individuals served by the following Federal TRIO Programs: Upward Bound (which includes regular Upward Bound (UB), Upward Bound Math-Science (UBMS), and Veterans Upward Bound (VUB)); Student Support Services (SSS); and the Ronald E. McNair Post…

  6. Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system

    PubMed Central

    Ellouzi, Hasna; Hamed, Karim Ben; Cela, Jana; Müller, Maren; Abdelly, Chedly; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance. PMID:23299430

  7. [Evaluation of the capacity of the APR-DRG classification system to predict hospital mortality].

    PubMed

    De Marco, Maria Francesca; Lorenzoni, Luca; Addari, Piero; Nante, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Inpatient mortality has increasingly been used as an hospital outcome measure. Comparing mortality rates across hospitals requires adjustment for patient risks before making inferences about quality of care based on patient outcomes. Therefore it is essential to dispose of well performing severity measures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability of the All Patient Refined DRG system to predict inpatient mortality for congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, pneumonia and ischemic stroke. Administrative records were used in this analysis. We used two statistics methods to assess the ability of the APR-DRG to predict mortality: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (referred to as the c-statistic) and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The database for the study included 19,212 discharges for stroke, pneumonia, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure from fifteen hospital participating in the Italian APR-DRG Project. A multivariate analysis was performed to predict mortality for each condition in study using age, sex and APR-DRG risk mortality subclass as independent variables. Inpatient mortality rate ranges from 9.7% (pneumonia) to 16.7% (stroke). Model discrimination, calculated using the c-statistic, was 0.91 for myocardial infarction, 0.68 for stroke, 0.78 for pneumonia and 0.71 for congestive heart failure. The model calibration assessed using the Hosmer-Leme-show test was quite good. The performance of the APR-DRG scheme when used on Italian hospital activity records is similar to that reported in literature and it seems to improve by adding age and sex to the model. The APR-DRG system does not completely capture the effects of these variables. In some cases, the better performance might be due to the inclusion of specific complications in the risk-of-mortality subclass assignment.

  8. p53 Reactivation by PRIMA-1(Met) (APR-246) sensitises (V600E/K)BRAF melanoma to vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Krayem, Mohammad; Journe, Fabrice; Wiedig, Murielle; Morandini, Renato; Najem, Ahmad; Salès, François; van Kempen, Leon C; Sibille, Catherine; Awada, Ahmad; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Ghanem, Ghanem

    2016-03-01

    Intrinsic and acquired resistance of metastatic melanoma to (V600E/K)BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors, which is often caused by activation of the PI3K/AKT survival pathway, represents a major clinical challenge. Given that p53 is capable of antagonising PI3K/AKT activation we hypothesised that pharmacological restoration of p53 activity may increase the sensitivity of BRAF-mutant melanoma to MAPK-targeted therapy and eventually delay and/or prevent acquisition of drug resistance. To test this possibility we exposed a panel of vemurafenib-sensitive and resistant (innate and acquired) (V600E/K)BRAF melanomas to a (V600E/K)BRAF inhibitor (vemurafenib) alone or in combination with a direct p53 activator (PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246). Strikingly, PRIMA-1(Met) synergised with vemurafenib to induce apoptosis and suppress proliferation of (V600E/K)BRAF melanoma cells in vitro and to inhibit tumour growth in vivo. Importantly, this drug combination decreased the viability of both vemurafenib-sensitive and resistant melanoma cells irrespectively of the TP53 status. Notably, p53 reactivation was invariably accompanied by PI3K/AKT pathway inhibition, the activity of which was found as a dominant resistance mechanism to BRAF inhibition in our lines. From all various combinatorial modalities tested, targeting the MAPK and PI3K signalling pathways through p53 reactivation or not, the PRIMA-1(Met)/vemurafenib combination was the most cytotoxic. We conclude that PRIMA-1(Met) through its ability to directly reactivate p53 regardless of the mechanism causing its deactivation, and thereby dampen PI3K signalling, sensitises (V600E/K)BRAF-positive melanoma to BRAF inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The vicious cycle of vitamin a deficiency: A review.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Elina Manusevich; Bar-El Dadon, Shimrit; Reifen, Ram

    2017-11-22

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is a serious and widespread public health problem and the leading cause of preventable blindness in young children. It is also associated with increased rates of death from severe infections, especially in developing countries. Over the past 35 years, researchers have examined the numerous activities of vitamin A in different tissues of the human body. VAD can lead to a series of ocular symptoms, anemia, and weak resistance to infection, which can increase the severity of infectious diseases and the risk of death. Cell development, vision, growth, and normal metabolism are among the vital processes that are insufficiently supported in the presence of VAD. VAD leads to impaired tissue function especially during the developmental periods of infancy, childhood, pregnancy, and lactation. We describe a multidirectional model of VAD that demonstrates how VAD can have progressive, negative effects on vital processes of the human body throughout the life cycle. This model starts with impaired intake and its link to decreased absorption and digestion and includes outcomes such as malnutrition, inflammation, and improper growth processes, including possible mechanisms. Together, these clinical and biochemical manifestations contribute to the vicious cycle of VAD.

  10. Vitamin A deficiency in the Sudan: a call for a surveillance system.

    PubMed

    el Bushra, H E

    1992-05-01

    This short review summarizes all the published and unpublished reports on vitamin A deficiency in the Sudan in the last four decades. Different local terms used by people to indicate vitamin A deficiency were enlisted. There is evidence that vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem in eastern Sudan and among communities from western and southern Sudan living around Greater Khartoum, who were displaced from their homelands because of drought, famine conditions and civil unrest. There are reports indicative of vitamin A deficiency problem in the central and the far western provinces. There were no reports from the northern provinces. The need for a surveillance system was discussed.

  11. SCN3A deficiency associated with increased seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Tyra; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Calhoun, Jeffrey; Wong, Jennifer C.; Dutton, Stacey B.B.; Jorge, Benjamin S.; Velinov, Milen; Escayg, Andrew; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels expressed highly in the brain (SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN8A) are responsible for an increasing number of epilepsy syndromes. In particular, mutations in the SCN3A gene, encoding the pore-forming Nav1.3 α subunit, have been identified in patients with focal epilepsy. Biophysical characterization of epilepsy-associated SCN3A variants suggests that both gain- and loss-of-function SCN3A mutations may lead to increased seizure susceptibility. In this report, we identified a novel SCN3A variant (L247P) by whole exome sequencing of a child with focal epilepsy, developmental delay, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Voltage clamp analysis showed no detectable sodium current in a heterologous expression system expressing the SCN3A-L247P variant. Furthermore, cell surface biotinylation demonstrated a reduction in the amount of SCN3A-L247P at the cell surface, suggesting the SCN3A-L247P variant is a trafficking-deficient mutant. To further explore the possible clinical consequences of reduced SCN3A activity, we investigated the effect of a hypomorphic Scn3a allele (Scn3aHyp) on seizure susceptibility and behavior using a gene trap mouse line. Heterozygous Scn3a mutant mice (Scn3a+/Hyp) did not exhibit spontaneous seizures nor were they susceptible to hyperthermia-induced seizures. However, they displayed increased susceptibility to electroconvulsive (6 Hz) and chemiconvulsive (flurothyl and kainic acid) induced seizures. Scn3a+/Hyp mice also exhibited deficits in locomotor activity and motor learning. Taken together, these results provide evidence that loss-of-function of SCN3A caused by reduced protein expression or deficient trafficking to the plasma membrane may contribute to increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:28235671

  12. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort study: rationale and methods.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bonnie J; Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Leung, Brenda M Y; Field, Catherine J; Dewey, Deborah; Bell, Rhonda C; Manca, Donna P; O'Beirne, Maeve; Johnston, David W; Pop, Victor J; Singhal, Nalini; Gagnon, Lisa; Bernier, Francois P; Eliasziw, Misha; McCargar, Linda J; Kooistra, Libbe; Farmer, Anna; Cantell, Marja; Goonewardene, Laki; Casey, Linda M; Letourneau, Nicole; Martin, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    The Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study is an ongoing prospective cohort study that recruits pregnant women early in pregnancy and, as of 2012, is following up their infants to 3 years of age. It has currently enrolled approximately 5000 Canadians (2000 pregnant women, their offspring and many of their partners). The primary aims of the APrON study were to determine the relationships between maternal nutrient intake and status, before, during and after gestation, and (1) maternal mood; (2) birth and obstetric outcomes; and (3) infant neurodevelopment. We have collected comprehensive maternal nutrition, anthropometric, biological and mental health data at multiple points in the pregnancy and the post-partum period, as well as obstetrical, birth, health and neurodevelopmental outcomes of these pregnancies. The study continues to follow the infants through to 36 months of age. The current report describes the study design and methods, and findings of some pilot work. The APrON study is a significant resource with opportunities for collaboration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Main steam line break accident simulation of APR1400 using the model of ATLAS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekariansyah, A. S.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, Geni R.

    2018-02-01

    A main steam line break simulation for APR1400 as an advanced design of PWR has been performed using the RELAP5 code. The simulation was conducted in a model of thermal-hydraulic test facility called as ATLAS, which represents a scaled down facility of the APR1400 design. The main steam line break event is described in a open-access safety report document, in which initial conditions and assumptionsfor the analysis were utilized in performing the simulation and analysis of the selected parameter. The objective of this work was to conduct a benchmark activities by comparing the simulation results of the CESEC-III code as a conservative approach code with the results of RELAP5 as a best-estimate code. Based on the simulation results, a general similarity in the behavior of selected parameters was observed between the two codes. However the degree of accuracy still needs further research an analysis by comparing with the other best-estimate code. Uncertainties arising from the ATLAS model should be minimized by taking into account much more specific data in developing the APR1400 model.

  15. Human factors engineering verification and validation for APR1400 computerized control room

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y. C.; Moon, H. K.; Kim, J. H.

    2006-07-01

    This paper introduces the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400) HFE V and V activities the Korea Hydro Nuclear Plant Co. LTD. (KHNP) has performed for the last 10 years and some of the lessons learned through these activities. The features of APR1400 main control room include large display panel, redundant compact workstations, computer-based procedure, and safety console. Several iterations of human factors evaluations have been performed from small scale proof of concept tests to large scale integrated system tests for identifying human engineering deficiencies in the human system interface design. Evaluations in the proof of concept test were focused onmore » checking the presence of any show stopper problems in the design concept. Later evaluations were mostly for finding design problems and for assuring the resolution of human factors issues of advanced control room. The results of design evaluations were useful not only for refining the control room design, but also for licensing the standard design. Several versions of APR1400 mock-ups with dynamic simulation models of currently operating Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP) have been used for the evaluations with the participation of operators from KSNP plants. (authors)« less

  16. Enhanced mucosal delivery of antigen with cell wall mutants of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grangette, Corinne; Müller-Alouf, Heide; Hols, Pascal; Goudercourt, Denise; Delcour, Jean; Turneer, Mireille; Mercenier, Annick

    2004-05-01

    The potential of recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to deliver heterologous antigens to the immune system and to induce protective immunity has been best demonstrated by using the C subunit of tetanus toxin (TTFC) as a model antigen. Two types of LAB carriers have mainly been used, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis, which differ substantially in their abilities to resist passage through the stomach and to persist in the mouse gastrointestinal tract. Here we analyzed the effect of a deficiency in alanine racemase, an enzyme that participates in cell wall synthesis, in each of these bacterial carriers. Recombinant wild-type and mutant strains of L. plantarum NCIMB8826 and L. lactis MG1363 producing TTFC intracellularly were constructed and used in mouse immunization experiments. Remarkably, we observed that the two cell wall mutant strains were far more immunogenic than their wild-type counterparts when the intragastric route was used. However, intestinal TTFC-specific immunoglobulin A was induced only after immunization with the recombinant L. plantarum mutant strain. Moreover, the alanine racemase mutant of either LAB strain allowed induction of a much stronger serum TTFC-specific immune response after immunization via the vagina, which is a quite different ecosystem than the gastrointestinal tract. The design and use of these mutants thus resulted in a major improvement in the mucosal delivery of antigens exhibiting vaccine properties.

  17. A cadmium-sensitive, glutathione-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Andersen, C R; Goldsbrough, P B; Cobbett, C S

    1995-01-01

    The roots of the cadmium-sensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, cad1-1, become brown in the presence of cadmium. A new cadmium-sensitive mutant affected at a second locus, cad2, has been identified using this phenotype. Genetic analysis has grown that the sensitive phenotype is recessive to the wild type and segregates as a single Mendelian locus. Assays of cadmium accumulation by intact plants indicated that the mutant is deficient in its ability to sequester cadmium. Undifferentiated callus tissue was also cadmium sensitive, suggesting that the mutant phenotype is expressed at the cellular level. The level of cadmium-binding complexes formed in vivo was decreased compared with the wild type and accumulation of phytochelatins was about 10% of that in the wild type. The level of glutathione, the substrate for phytochelatin biosynthesis, in tissues of the mutant was decreased to about 15 to 30% of that in the wild type. Thus, the deficiency in phytochelatin biosynthesis can be explained by a deficiency in glutathione. PMID:7770518

  18. Honey-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants are impaired in catalase A.

    PubMed

    Bolognese, Fabrizio; Bistoletti, Michela; Barbieri, Paola; Orlandi, Viviana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The antimicrobial power of honey seems to be ascribable to several factors, including oxidative and osmotic stress. The aim of this study was to find genetic determinants involved in the response to honey stress in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, chosen as model micro-organism. A library of transposon mutants of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was constructed and only four mutants unable to grow in presence of fir honeydew honey were selected. All four mutants were impaired in the major H2O2-scavenging enzyme catalase A (KatA). The knockout of katA gene caused sensitivity, as expected, not only to hydrogen peroxide but also to different types of honey including Manuka GMO 220 honey. Genetic complementation, as well as the addition of PAO1 supernatant containing extracellular catalase, restored tolerance to honey stress in all the mutants. As P. aeruginosa PAO1 catalase KatA copes with H2O2 stress, it is conceivable that the antimicrobial activity of honey is, at least partially, due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide in honey or the ability of honey to induce production of hydrogen peroxide. The katA-deficient mutants could be used as tester micro-organisms to compare the power of different types of natural and curative honeys in eliciting oxidative stress mediated by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  20. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  1. Impaired epithelial differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from ectodermal dysplasia-related patients is rescued by the small compound APR-246/PRIMA-1MET.

    PubMed

    Shalom-Feuerstein, Ruby; Serror, Laura; Aberdam, Edith; Müller, Franz-Josef; van Bokhoven, Hans; Wiman, Klas G; Zhou, Huiqing; Aberdam, Daniel; Petit, Isabelle

    2013-02-05

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a group of congenital syndromes affecting a variety of ectodermal derivatives. Among them, ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate (EEC) syndrome is caused by single point mutations in the p63 gene, which controls epidermal development and homeostasis. Phenotypic defects of the EEC syndrome include skin defects and limbal stem-cell deficiency. In this study, we designed a unique cellular model that recapitulated major embryonic defects related to EEC. Fibroblasts from healthy donors and EEC patients carrying two different point mutations in the DNA binding domain of p63 were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. EEC-iPSC from both patients showed early ectodermal commitment into K18(+) cells but failed to further differentiate into K14(+) cells (epidermis/limbus) or K3/K12(+) cells (corneal epithelium). APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET)), a small compound that restores functionality of mutant p53 in human tumor cells, could revert corneal epithelial lineage commitment and reinstate a normal p63-related signaling pathway. This study illustrates the relevance of iPSC for p63 related disorders and paves the way for future therapy of EEC.

  2. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-06-01

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. MicroRNA-146a Deficiency Protects against Listeria monocytogenes Infection by Modulating the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Du, Chong-Tao; Gao, Wei; Ma, Ke; Yu, Shui-Xing; Li, Na; Yan, Shi-Qing; Zhou, Feng-Hua; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Wei; Lei, Lian-Cheng; Yang, Yong-Jun; Han, Wen-Yu

    2018-03-26

    The gut microbiota and microRNAs play important roles in the defense against infection. However, the role of miR-146a in L. monocytogenes infection and gut microbiota remains unclear. We tried to determine whether miR-146a controlled L. monocytogenes infection by regulating the gut microbiota. Wild-type and miR-146a-deficient mice or macrophages were used to characterize the impact of miR-146a on animal survival, cell death, bacterial clearance, and gut microbiota following L. monocytogenes challenge. We found that L. monocytogenes infection induced miR-146a expression both in vitro and in vivo. When compared to wild-type mice, miR-146a-deficient mice were more resistant to L. monocytogenes infection. MiR-146a deficiency in macrophages resulted in reduced invasion and intracellular survival of L. monocytogenes . High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA revealed that the gut microbiota composition differed between miR-146a-deficient and wild-type mice. Relative to wild-type mice, miR-146a-deficient mice had decreased levels of the Proteobacteria phylum, Prevotellaceae family, and Parasutterella genus, and significantly increased short-chain fatty acid producing bacteria, including the genera Alistipes , Blautia , Coprococcus_1, and Ruminococcus_1 . Wild-type mice co-housed with miR-146a-deficient mice had increased resistance to L. monocytogenes , indicating that miR-146a deficiency guides the gut microbiota to alleviate infection. Together, these results suggest that miR-146a deficiency protects against L. monocytogenes infection by regulating the gut microbiota.

  4. Identifying areas with vitamin A deficiency: the validity of a semiquantitative food frequency method.

    PubMed

    Sloan, N L; Rosen, D; de la Paz, T; Arita, M; Temalilwa, C; Solomons, N W

    1997-02-01

    The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency has traditionally been assessed through xerophthalmia or biochemical surveys. The cost and complexity of implementing these methods limits the ability of nonresearch organizations to identify vitamin A deficiency. This study examined the validity of a simple, inexpensive food frequency method to identify areas with a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency. The validity of the method was tested in 15 communities, 5 each from the Philippines, Guatemala, and Tanzania. Serum retinol concentrations of less than 20 micrograms/dL defined vitamin A deficiency. Weighted measures of vitamin A intake six or fewer times per week and unweighted measures of consumption of animal sources of vitamin A four or fewer times per week correctly classified seven of eight communities as having a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (i.e., 15% or more preschool-aged children in the community had the deficiency) (sensitivity = 87.5%) and four of seven communities as having a low prevalence (specificity = 57.1%). This method correctly classified the vitamin A deficiency status of 73.3% of the communities but demonstrated a high false-positive rate (42.9%).

  5. Advanced Design Features of APR1400 and Realization in Shin Kori Construction Project

    SciTech Connect

    OH, S.J.; Park, K.C.; Kim, H.G.

    2006-07-01

    APR1400 adopted several advanced design features. To ensure their proper operation as a part of ShinKori 3,4 project, both experimental and analytical work are continuing. In this paper, work on the advanced design features related to enhanced safety is examined. APR1400 safety injection system consists of four independent trains which include four safety injection pump and tanks. A passive flow regulating device called fluidic device is installed in the safety injection tanks. Separate effect tests including a full scale fluidic device tests have been conducted. Integral system tests are in progress. Combination of these work with the analytical work usingmore » RELAP5/Mod3 would ensure the proper operation of the new safety injection systems. To mitigate severe accidents, hydrogen mitigation system using PARs and igniters is adopted. Also, active injection system and the streamlined insulation design are adopted to enhance the in-vessel retention capability with the external cooling of RPV strategy. Analytic work with supporting experiments is performed. We are certain that these preparatory work would help the successful adaptation of ADF in ShinKori project. (authors)« less

  6. ARID1B is a specific vulnerability in ARID1A-mutant cancers.

    PubMed

    Helming, Katherine C; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wilson, Boris G; Vazquez, Francisca; Haswell, Jeffrey R; Manchester, Haley E; Kim, Youngha; Kryukov, Gregory V; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Aguirre, Andrew J; Jagani, Zainab; Wang, Zhong; Garraway, Levi A; Hahn, William C; Roberts, Charles W M

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that ARID1A, encoding AT-rich interactive domain 1A (SWI-like), is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers and also has bona fide tumor suppressor properties. Consequently, identification of vulnerabilities conferred by ARID1A mutation would have major relevance for human cancer. Here, using a broad screening approach, we identify ARID1B, an ARID1A homolog whose gene product is mutually exclusive with ARID1A in SWI/SNF complexes, as the number 1 gene preferentially required for the survival of ARID1A-mutant cancer cell lines. We show that loss of ARID1B in ARID1A-deficient backgrounds destabilizes SWI/SNF and impairs proliferation in both cancer cells and primary cells. We also find that ARID1A and ARID1B are frequently co-mutated in cancer but that ARID1A-deficient cancers retain at least one functional ARID1B allele. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A and ARID1B alleles cooperatively promotes cancer formation but also results in a unique functional dependence. The results further identify ARID1B as a potential therapeutic target for ARID1A-mutant cancers.

  7. ARID1B is a specific vulnerability in ARID1A-mutant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Helming, Katherine C.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wilson, Boris G.; Vazquez, Francisca; Haswell, Jeffrey R.; Manchester, Haley E.; Kim, Youngha; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Aguirre, Andrew J.; Jagani, Zainab; Wang, Zhong; Garraway, Levi A.; Hahn, William C.; Roberts, Charles W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have revealed that ARID1A is frequently mutated across a wide variety of human cancers and also has bona fide tumor suppressor properties. Consequently, identification of vulnerabilities conferred by ARID1A mutation would have major relevance for human cancer. Here, using a broad screening approach, we identify ARID1B, a related but mutually exclusive homolog of ARID1A in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, as the number one gene preferentially required for the survival of ARID1A-mutant cancer cell lines. We show that loss of ARID1B in ARID1A-deficient backgrounds destabilizes SWI/SNF and impairs proliferation. Intriguingly, we also find that ARID1A and ARID1B are frequently co-mutated in cancer, but that ARID1A-deficient cancers retain at least one ARID1B allele. These results suggest that loss of ARID1A and ARID1B alleles cooperatively promotes cancer formation but also results in a unique functional dependence. The results further identify ARID1B as a potential therapeutic target for ARID1A-mutant cancers. PMID:24562383

  8. Après-Coup in French Psychoanalysis: The Long Afterlife of Nachträglichkeit: The First Hundred Years, 1893 to 1993.

    PubMed

    House, Jonathan; Slotnick, Julie

    2015-10-01

    Après-coup finds its origins in Freud's earliest psychoanalytic writings, but it was only half a century ago that French psychoanalysts rediscovered, clarified, and developed the concept and so brought it recognition as an essential Freudian concept. Because the history of après-coup is embedded in the French reading of Freud, this article will give an account of that reading in relation to après-coup.

  9. Estimating the burden of disease attributable to vitamin A deficiency in South Africa in 2000.

    PubMed

    Nojilana, Beatrice; Norman, Rosana; Bradshaw, Debbie; van Stuijvenberg, Martha E; Dhansay, Muhammad A; Labadorios, Demetre

    2007-08-01

    To estimate the burden of disease attributable to vitamin A deficiency in children aged 0 - 4 years and pregnant women aged 15 - 49 years in South Africa in 2000. The framework adopted for the most recent World Health Organization comparative risk assessment (CRA) methodology was followed. Population-attributable fractions were calculated from South African Vitamin A Consultative Group (SAVACG) survey data on the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children and the relative risks of associated health problems, applied to revised burden of disease estimates for South Africa in the year 2000. Small community studies were used to derive the prevalence in pregnant women. Monte Carlo simulation-modelling techniques were used for the uncertainty analysis. South Africa. Children under 5 years and pregnant women 15 - 49 years. Direct sequelae of vitamin A deficiency, including disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), as well as mortality associated with measles, diarrhoeal diseases and other infections, and mortality and DALYs associated with malaria in children and all-cause maternal mortality. One-third of children aged 0 - 4 years and 1 - 6% of pregnant women were vitamin A-deficient. Of deaths among young children aged 0 - 4 years in 2000, about 28% of those resulting from diarrhoeal diseases, 23% of those from measles, and 21% of those from malaria were attributed to vitamin A deficiency, accounting for some 3,000 deaths. Overall, about 110,467 ( 95% uncertainty interval 86,388 - 136,009) healthy years of life lost, or between 0.5% and 0.8% of all DALYs in South Africa in 2000 were attributable to vitamin A deficiency. The vitamin A supplementation programme for children and the recent food fortification programme introduced in South Africa in 2003 should prevent future morbidity and mortality related to vitamin A deficiency. Monitoring the effectiveness of these interventions is strongly recommended.

  10. Alterations in the lipid metabolism of rat aorta: effects of vitamin a deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gatica, Laura V; Vega, Verónica A; Zirulnik, Fanny; Oliveros, Liliana B; Gimenez, María S

    2006-01-01

    Antioxidants are known to reduce cardiovascular disease by reducing the concentration of free radicals in the vessel wall and by preventing the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins. The prooxidative effect of a vitamin-A-deficient diet on the aorta has previously been demonstrated by us. In this study, the lipid metabolism in the aorta of rats fed on a vitamin-A-deficient diet was evaluated. Vitamin A deficiency induced a hypolipidemic effect (lower serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels) and a decreased serum paraoxonase 1/arylesterase activity. The concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, free and esterified cholesterol, and phospholipids were increased in the aorta of vitamin-A-deficient rats. The phospholipid compositions showed an increase in phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol plus phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, a decrease in sphingomyelin, and no change in phosphatidylglycerol. In the aorta, the increase in triglycerides was associated with an increased fatty acid synthesis and mRNA expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1. The increased PC content was attributed to an increased synthesis, as measured by [methyl-(14)C]choline incorporation into PC and high CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase-alpha mRNA expression. The cholesterol synthesis, evaluated by [1-(14)C]acetate incorporated into cholesterol and mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, did not change. The lipoprotein lipase and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 mRNA expression levels increased in the aorta of vitamin-A-deficient animals. The incorporation of vitamin A into the diet of vitamin-A-deficient rats reverted all the changes observed. These results indicate that a vitamin-A-deficient diet,in addition to having a prooxidative effect, alters the aorta lipid metabolism.

  11. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDB

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been no central location for storing generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or for data associated with these mutants. Instead researchers relied on several independent, non-integrated databases. FgMutantDB was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web th...

  12. Escherichia coli mutants impaired in maltodextrin transport.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, C; Schwartz, M; Ferenci, T

    1979-10-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 was found to grow equally well on maltose and on maltodextrins containing up to seven glucose residues. Three classes of mutants unable to grow on maltodextrins, but still able to grow on maltose, were investigated in detail. The first class, already known, was composed of phage lambda-resistant mutants, which lack the outer membrane protein coded by gene lamB. These mutants grow on maltose and maltotriose but not at all on maltotetraose and longer maltodextrins which cannot cross the outer membrane. A second class of mutants were affected in malE, the structural gene of the periplasmic maltose binding protein. The maltose binding proteins isolated from the new mutants were altered in their substrate binding properties, but not in a way that could account for the mutant phenotypes. Rather, the results of growth experiments and transport studies suggest that these malE mutants are impaired in their ability to transport maltodextrins across the outer membrane. This implies that the maltose binding protein (in wild-type strains) cooperates with the lambda receptor in permeation through the outer membrane. The last class of mutants described in this paper were affected in malG, or perhaps in an as yet undetected gene close to malG. They were defective in the transfer of maltodextrins from the periplasmic space to the cytoplasm but only slightly affected in the transport of maltose.

  13. Misfolded rhodopsin mutants display variable aggregation properties.

    PubMed

    Gragg, Megan; Park, Paul S-H

    2018-06-08

    The largest class of rhodopsin mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) is mutations that lead to misfolding and aggregation of the receptor. The misfolding mutants have been characterized biochemically, and categorized as either partial or complete misfolding mutants. This classification is incomplete and does not provide sufficient information to fully understand the disease pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic strategies. A Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) method was utilized to directly assess the aggregation properties of misfolding rhodopsin mutants within the cell. Partial (P23H and P267L) and complete (G188R, H211P, and P267R) misfolding mutants were characterized to reveal variability in aggregation properties. The complete misfolding mutants all behaved similarly, forming aggregates when expressed alone, minimally interacting with the wild-type receptor when coexpressed, and were unresponsive to treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis retinal. In contrast, variability was observed between the partial misfolding mutants. In the opsin form, the P23H mutant behaved similarly as the complete misfolding mutants. In contrast, the opsin form of the P267L mutant existed as both aggregates and oligomers when expressed alone and formed mostly oligomers with the wild-type receptor when coexpressed. The partial misfolding mutants both reacted similarly to the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis retinal, displaying improved folding and oligomerization when expressed alone but aggregating with wild-type receptor when coexpressed. The observed differences in aggregation properties and effect of 9-cis retinal predict different outcomes in disease pathophysiology and suggest that retinoid-based chaperones will be ineffective or even detrimental. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Response Time Analysis and Test of Protection System Instrument Channels for APR1400 and OPR1000

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang Jae; Han, Seung; Yun, Jae Hee

    2015-07-01

    Safety limits are required to maintain the integrity of physical barriers designed to prevent the uncontrolled release of radioactive materials in nuclear power plants. The safety analysis establishes two critical constraints that include an analytical limit in terms of a measured or calculated variable, and a specific time after the analytical limit is reached to begin protective action. Keeping with the nuclear regulations and industry standards, satisfying these two requirements will ensure that the safety limit will not be exceeded during the design basis event, either an anticipated operational occurrence or a postulated accident. Various studies on the setpoint determinationmore » methodology for the safety-related instrumentation have been actively performed to ensure that the requirement of the analytical limit is satisfied. In particular, the protection setpoint methodology for the advanced power reactor 1400 (APP1400) and the optimized power reactor 1000 (OPR1000) has been recently developed to cover both the design basis event and the beyond design basis event. The developed setpoint methodology has also been quantitatively validated using specific computer programs and setpoint calculations. However, the safety of nuclear power plants cannot be fully guaranteed by satisfying the requirement of the analytical limit. In spite of the response time verification requirements of nuclear regulations and industry standards, it is hard to find the studies on the systematically integrated methodology regarding the response time evaluation. In cases of APR1400 and OPR1000, the response time analysis for the plant protection system is partially included in the setpoint calculation and the response time test is separately performed via the specific plant procedure. The test technique has a drawback which is the difficulty to demonstrate completeness of timing test. The analysis technique has also a demerit of resulting in extreme times that not actually possible

  15. Analysis and improvements of Adaptive Particle Refinement (APR) through CPU time, accuracy and robustness considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiron, L.; Oger, G.; de Leffe, M.; Le Touzé, D.

    2018-02-01

    While smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations are usually performed using uniform particle distributions, local particle refinement techniques have been developed to concentrate fine spatial resolutions in identified areas of interest. Although the formalism of this method is relatively easy to implement, its robustness at coarse/fine interfaces can be problematic. Analysis performed in [16] shows that the radius of refined particles should be greater than half the radius of unrefined particles to ensure robustness. In this article, the basics of an Adaptive Particle Refinement (APR) technique, inspired by AMR in mesh-based methods, are presented. This approach ensures robustness with alleviated constraints. Simulations applying the new formalism proposed achieve accuracy comparable to fully refined spatial resolutions, together with robustness, low CPU times and maintained parallel efficiency.

  16. Appraisal of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire in a perinatal cohort: The APrON study.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brenda; Letourneau, Nicole; Bright, Katherine; Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Ntanda, Henry; Gagnon, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Depression and anxiety are routinely screened as part of perinatal care. However, other Axis 1 disorders and specific anxiety disorders are less likely to be screened or assessed as part of obstetric care. The objective of this study was to determine whether the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (PDSQ) is a potentially useful tool to screen for psychiatric conditions in pregnant and postpartum women in a community setting. We compared the prevalence of DSM Axis I disorders obtained on the PDSQ with: (1) the prevalence of these disorders reported in previous studies of pregnant and postpartum women, and (2) scores obtained on the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90R) anxiety scale. Data were obtained from the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study. The PDSQ was completed by 1575 women prenatally and 1481 postnatally. The three most prevalent PDSQ conditions were social phobia, somatic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The prevalence of social phobia, alcohol disorder, OCD and psychosis were higher in the APrON cohort compared with statistics in the literature. The proportion of women meeting depression and anxiety cut-offs on the PDSQ were lower than for the EPDS and the SCL-90R. The Cohens Kappa index ( k) indicated poor to fair agreement between the measures in classifying pregnant women as depressed or anxious. The PDSQ subscales may not be appropriate for the pregnant population. Research into instruments more specific to pregnant and postpartum women are needed to determine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in this population.

  17. Use case driven approach to develop simulation model for PCS of APR1400 simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Wook, Kim; Hong Soo, Kim; Hyeon Tae, Kang

    2006-07-01

    The full-scope simulator is being developed to evaluate specific design feature and to support the iterative design and validation in the Man-Machine Interface System (MMIS) design of Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400. The simulator consists of process model, control logic model, and MMI for the APR1400 as well as the Power Control System (PCS). In this paper, a use case driven approach is proposed to develop a simulation model for PCS. In this approach, a system is considered from the point of view of its users. User's view of the system is based on interactions with the system and themore » resultant responses. In use case driven approach, we initially consider the system as a black box and look at its interactions with the users. From these interactions, use cases of the system are identified. Then the system is modeled using these use cases as functions. Lower levels expand the functionalities of each of these use cases. Hence, starting from the topmost level view of the system, we proceeded down to the lowest level (the internal view of the system). The model of the system thus developed is use case driven. This paper will introduce the functionality of the PCS simulation model, including a requirement analysis based on use case and the validation result of development of PCS model. The PCS simulation model using use case will be first used during the full-scope simulator development for nuclear power plant and will be supplied to Shin-Kori 3 and 4 plant. The use case based simulation model development can be useful for the design and implementation of simulation models. (authors)« less

  18. Differences in wood density and growth of fertilized and nonfertilized loblolly pine associated with a mutant gene, cad-n1

    Treesearch

    Q. Yu; S.E. McKeand; C.D. Nelson; B. Li; J.R. Sherrill; T.J. Mullin

    2005-01-01

    A rare mutant allele (cad-n1) of the cad gene in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) causes a deficiency in the production of cinnamyl alcohol dehydroganase (CAD). Effects associated with this allele were examined by comparing wood density and growth traits of cad-n1 heterozygous trees with those of wild-type trees in a 10-year-old open-pollinated family...

  19. Multiplex PCR to detect bacteriophages from natural whey cultures of buffalo milk and characterisation of two phages active against Lactococcus lactis, ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Giuseppe; Mullan, William Michael; Murru, Nicoletta; Fitzgerald, Gerald; Buonanno, Marialuisa; Cortesi, Maria Luisa; Prencipe, Vincenza Annunziata; Migliorati, Giacomo

    2017-09-30

    This work investigated bacteriophage induced starter failures in artisanal buffalo Mozzarella production plants in Southern Italy. Two hundred and ten samples of whey starter cultures were screened for bacteriophage infection. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed phage infection in 28.56% of samples, all showing acidification problems during cheese making. Based on DNA sequences, bacteriophages for Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), Lactobacillus delbruekii (L. delbruekii) and Streptococcus thermophilus (S. thermophilus) were detected. Two phages active against L. lactis, ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2, were isolated and characterised. The genomes, approximately 31.4 kb and 31 kb for ΦApr-1 and ΦApr-2 respectively, consisted of double-stranded linear DNA with pac-type system. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS‑PAGE) showed one major structural protein of approximately 32.5 kDa and several minor proteins. This is the first report of phage isolation in buffalo milk and of the use of multiplex PCR to screen and study the diversity of phages against Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains in artisanal Water Buffalo Mozzarella starters.

  20. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency and celiac disease: let's give serology a chance.

    PubMed

    Valletta, E; Fornaro, M; Pecori, S; Zanoni, G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with selective immunoglobulin (Ig) A deficiency have a 10- to 20-fold increased risk of celiac disease. In these patients, serological diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult, since specific IgA-based assays are usually negative and IgG-specific antibody tests are insufficiently reliable. We describe a girl with selective IgA deficiency who had a troublesome diagnosis of celiac disease that was established only after an unexpected positive test result for antitransglutaminase IgA and antiendomysium IgA. Our observation indicates that IgA-based serology should not be forgotten in patients with selective IgA deficiency, since positive results for antitransglutaminase IgA, antiendomysium IgA, or both can be observed at any time during diagnostic investigations.

  1. Kasugamycin-dependent mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, E R

    1978-01-01

    Kasugamycin-dependent mutants have been isolated from Escherichia coli B. They were obtained through mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate or nitrosoguanidine in conjunction with an antibiotic underlay technique. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, dependent mutants were obtained at a frequency of about 3% of survivors growing up in the selection. In the case of ethyl methane sulfonate, the corresponding value was 1%. Nineteen mutants showing a kasugamycin-dependent phenotype were studied. In terms of response to various temperatures and antibiotic concentrations, they were very heterogeneous, although most fell into two general classes. Genetic analysis indicated that in at least some cases, the kasugamycin-dependent phenotype was the product of two mutations. Two-dimensional gel electropherograms revealed alterations in the ribosomal proteins of seven mutants. One mutant had an alteration in protein S13, and one had an alteration in protein L14. Three showed changes in protein S9. Each of two mutants had changes in two proteins, S18 and L11. Three of these mutants additionally had protein S18 occurring in a partly altered, partly unaltered form. Images PMID:363701

  2. Abnormal lignin in a loblolly pine mutant.

    PubMed

    Ralph, J; MacKay, J J; Hatfield, R D; O'Malley, D M; Whetten, R W; Sederoff, R R

    1997-07-11

    Novel lignin is formed in a mutant loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) severely depleted in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.195), which converts coniferaldehyde to coniferyl alcohol, the primary lignin precursor in pines. Dihydroconiferyl alcohol, a monomer not normally associated with the lignin biosynthetic pathway, is the major component of the mutant's lignin, accounting for approximately 30 percent (versus approximately 3 percent in normal pine) of the units. The level of aldehydes, including new 2-methoxybenzaldehydes, is also increased. The mutant pines grew normally indicating that, even within a species, extensive variations in lignin composition need not disrupt the essential functions of lignin.

  3. 78 FR 47051 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms 943, 943-PR, 943-A, and 943A-PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ..., 943-PR, Planilla Para La Declarcion Anual De La Contribucion Federal Del Patrono De Empleados Agricolas, 943-A, Agricultural Employer's Record of Federal Tax Liability, and 943A-PR, Registro De La...: Employer's Annual Tax Return for Agricultural Employees (Form 943), Planilla Para La Declarcion Anual De La...

  4. 75 FR 44847 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Forms 943, 943-PR, 943-A, and 943A-PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... Para La Declarcion Anual De La Contribucion Federal Del Patrono De Empleados Agricolas, 943-A, Agricultural Employer's Record of Federal Tax Liability, and 943A-PR, Registro De La Obligacion Contributiva...: Employer's Annual Tax Return for Agricultural Employees (Form 943), Planilla Para La Declarcion Anual De La...

  5. Mimicking acute and chronic stress exposure in naive beef steers alters the acute phase response (APR) associated with vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine the effect of an acute versus chronic stress model on the APR associated with vaccination in naïve beef steers. Steers (n=32; 209 +/- 8 kg) were blocked by body weight and assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: 1) Chronic stress (CHR), 0.5 mg/kg body weight dexamethasone...

  6. The Experience of Staging Nijinsky's "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune" in a Higher Education Dance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Tina

    2010-01-01

    This study documented the experiences of staging Vaslav Nijinsky's "L'Apres-midi d'un Faune" in a higher education dance program. The ballet was staged from Labanotation. Research questions focused on teaching and learning pedagogy, characterization of the process over time, experiences of the participants and teaching approaches. The project…

  7. The zebrafish mutant vps18 as a model for vesicle-traffic related hypopigmentation diseases.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Ernesto; Hernandez, Fabiola; Lozano, Carlos; Castro, Marta E; Navarro, Rosa E

    2006-08-01

    Hypopigmentation is a characteristic of several diseases associated with vesicle traffic defects, like the Hermansky-Pudlak, Chediak-Higashi, and Griscelli syndromes. Hypopigmentation is also a characteristic of the zebrafish mutant vps18(hi2499A), which is affected in the gene vps18, a component of the homotypic fusion and protein sorting complex that is involved in tethering during vesicular traffic. Vps18, as part of this complex, participates in the formation of early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes. Here, we show that Vps18 is also involved in the formation of melanosomes. In the zebrafish mutant vps18(hi2499A) the retroviral insertion located at exon 4 of vps18, leads to the formation of two abnormal splicing variants lacking the coding sequence for the clathrin repeat and the RING finger conserved domains. A deficiency of Vps18 in zebrafish larvae results in hepatomegaly and skin hypopigmentation. We also observed a drastic reduction in the number of melanosomes in the eye's retinal pigmented epithelium along with the accumulation of immature melanosomes. A significant reduction in the vps18(hi2499A) larvae visual system capacity was found using the optokinetic response assay. We propose that the insertional mutant vps18(hi2499A) can be used as a model for studying hypopigmentation diseases in which vesicle traffic problems exist.

  8. Isolation and properties of a Bacillus subtilis mutant unable to produce fructose-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Y; Freese, E

    1981-01-01

    A Bacillus subtilis mutation (gene symbol fdpA1), producing a deficiency of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate 1-phosphohydrolase (EC 3.1.3.11, fructose-bisphosphatase), was isolated and genetically purified. An fdpA1-containing mutant did not produce cross-reacting material. It grew on any carbon source that allowed growth of the standard strain except myo-inositol and D-gluconate. Because the mutant could grow on D-fructose, glycerol, or L-malate as the sole carbon source, B. subtilis can produce fructose-6-phosphate and the derived cell wall precursors from these carbon sources in the absence of fructose-bisphosphatase. In other words, during gluconeogenesis B. subtilis must be able to bypass this reaction. Fructose-bisphosphatase is also not needed for the sporulation of B., subtilis. The fdpA1 mutation has the pleiotropic consequence that mutants carrying it cannot produce inositol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.18) and gluconate kinase (EC 2.7.1.12) under conditions that normally induce these enzymes. Images PMID:6257649

  9. Defective anti-polysaccharide IgG vaccine responses in IgA deficient mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    IgA deficient patients often show defects in antibody responses following immunization with polysaccharide vaccines. We now show that IgA-/- mice exhibit specific defects in IgG antibody responses to various polysaccharide vaccines, but not protein vaccines. Defects in anti-polysaccharide IgG resp...

  10. Red palm oil as an intervention food to prevent vitamin A deficiency.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is an important cause of blindness. Red palm oil (RPO) is the richest food source of VA-forming carotenoids. We evaluated RPO carotenoid concentration and bioavailability, and used this data to estimate the amount of RPO needed to meet VA requirements. Amounts ranged fr...

  11. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The hypothesis of this proposal is that LBD mutations in ESR1 promote resistance to

  12. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0360 TITLE: Targeting ESR1 -Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey L. Greene, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE September 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2014 - 31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1 -Mutant...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The hypothesis of this proposal is that LBD mutations in ESR1 promote resistance to current FDA

  13. Polarity-defective mutants of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Osherov, N; Mathew, J; May, G S

    2000-12-01

    We have identified two polarity-defective (pod) mutants in Aspergillus nidulans from a collection of heat-sensitive lethal mutants. At restrictive temperature, these mutants are capable of nuclear division but are unable to establish polar hyphal growth. We cloned the two pod genes by complementation of their heat-sensitive lethal phenotypes. The libraries used to clone the pod genes are under the control of the bidirectional niaD and niiA promoters. Complementation of the pod mutants is dependent on growth on inducing medium. We show that rescue of the heat-sensitive phenotype on inducing media is independent of the orientation of the gene relative to the niaD or niiA promoters, demonstrating that the intergenic region between the niaD and the niiA genes functions as an orientation-independent enhancer and repressor that is capable of functioning over long distances. The products of the podG and the podH genes were identified as homologues of the alpha subunit of yeast mitochondrial phenylalanyl--tRNA synthetase and transcription factor IIF interacting component of the CTD phosphatase. Neither of these gene products would have been predicted to produce a pod mutant phenotype based on studies of cellular polarity mutants in other organisms. The implications of these results are discussed. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: Hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption. PMID:25559441

  15. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption.

  16. Vitamin A deficiency in Bangladesh: a review and recommendations for improvement.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F

    1999-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of the change in vitamin A status and the extent of vitamin A deficiency among different population groups in Bangladesh up to the present time. The result of experience with different strategies and interventions designed to improve vitamin A status are then reviewed, leading to a discussion of key options for action, as well as important areas for research and evaluation. All the available data have been examined in detail, including data from nationally representative samples and nationwide surveys, as well as small studies in different population groups. Reports on the effectiveness of different intervention programmes have been used. Over the past three decades a number of studies, which include national nutrition surveys, have been carried out to investigate the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency among different population groups in Bangladesh, and they have demonstrated a significant public health problem. Studies have shown that the prevalence of severe deficiency, based on the prevalence of night blindness in preschool children, decreased from 3.6% in 1982-83 to 1.78% in 1989 and 0.6% in 1996. However, there is still a high prevalence of subclinical vitamin A deficiency, based on the biochemical assessment of serum retinol levels in preschool children, estimated mainly from hospital-based groups. Night blindness and Bitot's spot are also found to exist among school-age children and adolescents. Recent reports indicate that night blindness among rural mothers is as high as 1.4%. Only a limited number of studies, with small sample sizes, are available where serum retinol has been reported for school-age children, adolescents and pregnant women. Nevertheless, these studies confirm the presence of low levels of serum retinol and hence, the existence of subclinical vitamin A deficiency. Furthermore, the dietary intake of vitamin A in each population group has been found to be less than the Recommended Daily Allowance

  17. Carotenoid status among preschool children with vitamin A deficiency in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Mary V; Palafox, Neal A; Dancheck, Barbara; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Although carotenoids are known to be important dietary sources of vitamin A, there have been few epidemiological studies that have characterized the serum concentrations of major dietary carotenoids among preschool children with vitamin A deficiency. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study of serum pro-vitamin A carotenoids (alpha -carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin), non-provitamin A carotenoids (lutein/zeaxanthin, and lycopene), and retinol among 278 children, aged 1-5 y, in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Vitamin A deficiency was defined as serum retinol <0.70 micromol/L. Geometric mean serum concentrations of carotenoids among children with and without vitamin A deficiency were 0.003 vs 0.006 micromol/L for alpha-carotene (P = 0.0017), 0.011 vs 0.023 micromol/L for beta-carotene (P <0.0001), 0.023 vs 0.034 micromol/L for beta-cryptoxanthin (P = 0.0075), 0.007 vs 0.012 micromol/L for lycopene (P = 0.037), 0.044 vs 0.052 micromol/L for lutein/zeaxanthin (P = 0.2), and 0.045 vs 0.074 micromol/L for total provitamin A carotenoids (P <0.0001) respectively. In a multivariate analysis adjusting for sex, age (Odds Ratio [O.R.] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.16-1.78), and serum provitamin A carotenoids (O.R. 0.49, 95% C.I. 0.34-0.71) were associated with vitamin A deficiency, but serum non-provitamin A carotenoids were not associated with vitamin A deficiency (O.R. 0.93, 95% C.I. 0.67-1.28). Preschool children with vitamin A deficiency in the Republic of the Marshall Islands have extremely low serum concentrations of provitamin A carotenoids and interventions are needed to improve the dietary intake of provitamin A carotenoids among Marshallese children.

  18. Accelerated bang recovery in Drosophila genderblind mutants.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, David E; Yanoga, Fatoumata; Grosjean, Yael

    2008-07-01

    Cystine-glutamate transporters import cystine into cells for glutathione synthesis and protection from oxidative stress, but also export significant amounts of glutamate. Increasing evidence suggests that 'ambient extracellular glutamate' secreted by cystine-glutamate transporters in the nervous system modulates glutamatergic synapse strength and behavior. To date, the only cystine-glutamate transporter mutants examined behaviorally are Drosophila genderblind mutants. These animals contain loss-of-function mutations in the 'genderblind' gene, which encodes an xCT subunit essential for cystine-glutamate transporter function. Genderblind was named based on a mutant courtship phenotype: male genderblind mutants are attracted to normally aversive male pheromones and thus court and attempt to copulate with both male and female partners equally. However, genderblind protein is expressed in many parts of the fly brain and thus might be expected to also regulate other behaviors, including behaviors not related to male courtship or chemosensation. Here, we show that genderblind mutants display faster recovery and increased negative geotaxis after strong mechanical stimuli (e.g., they climb faster and farther after vial banging). This phenotype is displayed by both males and females, consistent with strong genderblind expression in both sexes.

  19. Computing border bases using mutant strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, E.; Abbas Khan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Border bases, a generalization of Gröbner bases, have actively been addressed during recent years due to their applicability to industrial problems. In cryptography and coding theory a useful application of border based is to solve zero-dimensional systems of polynomial equations over finite fields, which motivates us for developing optimizations of the algorithms that compute border bases. In 2006, Kehrein and Kreuzer formulated the Border Basis Algorithm (BBA), an algorithm which allows the computation of border bases that relate to a degree compatible term ordering. In 2007, J. Ding et al. introduced mutant strategies bases on finding special lower degree polynomials in the ideal. The mutant strategies aim to distinguish special lower degree polynomials (mutants) from the other polynomials and give them priority in the process of generating new polynomials in the ideal. In this paper we develop hybrid algorithms that use the ideas of J. Ding et al. involving the concept of mutants to optimize the Border Basis Algorithm for solving systems of polynomial equations over finite fields. In particular, we recall a version of the Border Basis Algorithm which is actually called the Improved Border Basis Algorithm and propose two hybrid algorithms, called MBBA and IMBBA. The new mutants variants provide us space efficiency as well as time efficiency. The efficiency of these newly developed hybrid algorithms is discussed using standard cryptographic examples.

  20. Vitamin A deficiency and hepatic retinol levels in sea otters, Enhydra lutris.

    PubMed

    St Leger, Judy A; Righton, Alison L; Nilson, Erika M; Fascetti, Andrea J; Miller, Melissa A; Tuomi, Pamela A; Goertz, Caroline E C; Puschner, Birgit

    2011-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiency has rarely been reported in captive or free-ranging wildlife species. Necropsy findings in two captively housed southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) included irregular thickening of the calvaria characterized by diffuse hyperostoses on the internal surface. One animal also had moderate squamous metaplasia of the seromucinous glands of the nose. There was no measurable retinol in the liver of either sea otter. For comparison, hepatic retinol concentration was determined for 23 deceased free-ranging southern and northern (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) sea otters from California and Alaska. Free-ranging otters were found to have similar hepatic retinol concentrations (316 +/- 245 mg/kg wet weight) regardless of their location and subspecies. All of these values were significantly higher than the levels in the affected animals. Consumption of a diet with very low vitamin A concentrations and noncompliance in daily supplementation are hypothesized as the causes of vitamin A deficiency in these two sea otters.

  1. Risk factors for vitamin A deficiency in rural areas of the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D S; Sloan, N L; del Rosario, A; de la Paz, T C

    1994-04-01

    A survey of vitamin A deficiency was conducted in January and February 1991 on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines. Demographic, serum retinol, conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), anthropometric, and dietary data were collected from 248 preschool children in five randomly selected rural communities on the outskirts of Davao City. Twenty-nine per cent [95 per cent confidence interval (CI) 23-35 per cent] of preschool children had serum retinol levels below 20 micrograms/dl. Nearly 6 per cent (95 per cent CI 3-9 per cent) had serum retinol levels below 10 micrograms/dl. Thirty-two per cent (95 per cent CI 25-38 per cent) had abnormal CIC findings. The correlation between serum retinol and CIC results was poor. Recent history of diarrheal disease, reported night blindness, maternal education less than 9 years, and infrequent consumption of eggs, mangoes, and liver were associated with increased risk of vitamin A deficiency.

  2. Targeted inactivation of the mouse locus encoding coagulation factor XIII-A: hemostatic abnormalities in mutant mice and characterization of the coagulation deficit.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Peter; Metzner, Hubert J; Zettlmeissl, Gerd; Li, Meng; Smith, Austin G; Lathe, Richard; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2002-12-01

    Blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) promotes cross-linking of fibrin during blood coagulation; impaired clot stabilization in human genetic deficiency is associated with marked pathologies of major clinical impact, including bleeding symptoms and deficient wound healing. To investigate the role of FXIII we employed homologous recombination to generate a targeted deletion of the inferred exon 7 of the FXIII-A gene. FXIII transglutaminase activity in plasma was reduced to about 50% in mice heterozygous for the mutant allele, and was abolished in homozygous null mice. Plasma fibrin gamma-dimerization was also indetectable in the homozygous deficient animals, confirming the absence of activatable FXIII. Homozygous mutant mice were fertile, although reproduction was impaired. Bleeding episodes, hematothorax, hematoperitoneum and subcutaneous hemorrhage in mutant mice were associated with reduced survival. Arrest of tail-tip bleeding in FXIII-A deficient mice was markedly and significantly delayed; replacement of mutant mice with human plasma FXIII (Fibrogammin P) restored bleeding time to within the normal range. Thrombelastography (TEG) experiments demonstrated impaired clot stabilization in FXIII-A mutant mice, replacement with human FXIII led to dose-dependent TEG normalization. The mutant mice thus reiterate some key features of the human genetic disorder: they will be valuable in assessing the role of FXIII in other associated pathologies and the development of new therapies.

  3. Autolytic defective mutant of Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, J B; Redman, B E; Shockman, G D

    1978-01-01

    Properties of a variant of Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790 with defective cellular autolysis are described. The mutant strain was selected as a survivor from a mutagenized cell population simultaneously challenged with two antibiotics which inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, penicillin G and cycloserine. Compared to the parental strain, the mutant strain exhibited: (i) a thermosensitive pattern of cellular autolysis; (ii) an autolytic enzyme activity that had only a slightly increased thermolability when tested in solution in the absence of wall substrate; and (iii) an isolated autolysin that had hydrolytic activity on isolated S. faecalis wall substrate indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but that was inactive when tested on walls of Micrococcus lysodeikticus as a substrate. These data indicate an alteration in the substrate specificity of the autolytic enzyme of the mutant which appears to result from the synthesis of an altered form of autolytic enzyme. PMID:415045

  4. Flavonoids and Auxin Transport Inhibitors Rescue Symbiotic Nodulation in the Medicago truncatula Cytokinin Perception Mutant cre1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Hassan, Samira; Truong, Thy T.; Hocart, Charles H.; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of symbiotic nodules in legumes requires cytokinin signaling, but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Here, we tested whether the failure to initiate nodules in the Medicago truncatula cytokinin perception mutant cre1 (cytokinin response1) is due to its altered ability to regulate auxin transport, auxin accumulation, and induction of flavonoids. We found that in the cre1 mutant, symbiotic rhizobia cannot locally alter acro- and basipetal auxin transport during nodule initiation and that these mutants show reduced auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) accumulation and auxin responses compared with the wild type. Quantification of flavonoids, which can act as endogenous auxin transport inhibitors, showed a deficiency in the induction of free naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, quercetin, and hesperetin in cre1 roots compared with wild-type roots 24 h after inoculation with rhizobia. Coinoculation of roots with rhizobia and the flavonoids naringenin, isoliquiritigenin, and kaempferol, or with the synthetic auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5,-triiodobenzoic acid, rescued nodulation efficiency in cre1 mutants and allowed auxin transport control in response to rhizobia. Our results suggest that CRE1-dependent cytokinin signaling leads to nodule initiation through the regulation of flavonoid accumulation required for local alteration of polar auxin transport and subsequent auxin accumulation in cortical cells during the early stages of nodulation. PMID:26253705

  5. Impaired responses to sweet taste in vitamin A-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Reifen, R; Agami, O; Weiser, H; Biesalski, H; Naim, M

    1998-01-01

    In brief-exposure, two-choice preference tests (sucrose solution v water), vitamin A-deficient (VAD) rats exhibited a decreased preference for sucrose relative to control rats. There was no difference in total fluid intake from both choices between the two groups, nor was any significant difference found in circumvallate taste papilla keratin size. It is concluded that the impaired preference for sucrose in VAD rats is due to a specific impairment in taste sensation rather than general malaise.

  6. Low Prevalence of Iron and Vitamin A Deficiency among Cambodian Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Wieringa, Frank T.; Sophonneary, Prak; Whitney, Sophie; Mao, Bunsoth; Berger, Jacques; Conkle, Joel; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A.; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of women of reproductive age (WRA) in Cambodia are anemic. To guide interventions, national data on nutritional causes of anemia, including iron deficiency and vitamin A deficiency, are needed. In 2012, a national household survey in WRA on antibodies to routine vaccine-preventable disease immunity was performed. We used serum samples from this survey to estimate the prevalence of iron and vitamin A deficiency in 2112 Cambodian WRA, aged 15 to 39 years. Iron deficiency was classified as low or marginal iron stores (ferritin concentrations corrected for inflammation <15 μg/L and <50 μg/L respectively; Fer), iron deficient erythropoiesis (soluble transferrin receptor concentrations >8.3 mg/L; sTfR), or low total body iron (TBI) derived from Fer and sTfR concentrations (<0 mg/kg). Vitamin A status was classified using retinol binding protein (RBP) concentrations corrected for inflammation as deficient (<0.70 μmol/L) or marginal (<1.05 μmol/L. Overall, the prevalence of low iron stores, low TBI and iron deficient erythropoiesis was 8.1%, 5.0% and 9.3% respectively. Almost 40% of the women had marginal iron stores. Iron status was better in women living in urban areas compared to rural areas (p < 0.05 for TBI and sTfR). The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was <1%. These findings suggest that the contribution of iron and vitamin A deficiency to the high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian WRA may be limited. The etiology of anemia in Cambodia needs to be elucidated further to guide current policies on anemia. PMID:27043624

  7. Hyperreactivity of junctional adhesion molecule A-deficient platelets accelerates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Karshovska, Ela; Zhao, Zhen; Blanchet, Xavier; Schmitt, Martin M N; Bidzhekov, Kiril; Soehnlein, Oliver; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Mattheij, Nadine J; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Megens, Remco T A; Koeppel, Thomas A; Schober, Andreas; Hackeng, Tilman M; Weber, Christian; Koenen, Rory R

    2015-02-13

    Besides their essential role in hemostasis, platelets also have functions in inflammation. In platelets, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A was previously identified as an inhibitor of integrin αIIbβ3-mediated outside-in signaling and its genetic knockdown resulted in hyperreactivity. This gain-of-function was specifically exploited to investigate the role of platelet hyperreactivity in plaque development. JAM-A-deficient platelets showed increased aggregation and cellular and sarcoma tyrosine-protein kinase activation. On αIIbβ3 ligation, JAM-A was shown to be dephosphorylated, which could be prevented by protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 1 inhibition. Mice with or without platelet-specific (tr)JAM-A-deficiency in an apolipoprotein e (apoe(-/-)) background were fed a high-fat diet. After ≤12 weeks of diet, trJAM-A(-/-)apoe-/- mice showed increased aortic plaque formation when compared with trJAM-A(+/+) apoe(-/-) controls, and these differences were most evident at early time points. At 2 weeks, the plaques of the trJAM-A(-/-) apoe(-/-) animals revealed increased macrophage, T cell, and smooth muscle cell content. Interestingly, plasma levels of chemokines CC chemokine ligand 5 and CXC-chemokine ligand 4 were increased in the trJAM-A(-/-) apoe(-/-)mice, and JAM-A-deficient platelets showed increased binding to monocytes and neutrophils. Whole-blood perfusion experiments and intravital microscopy revealed increased recruitment of platelets and monocytes to the inflamed endothelium in blood of trJAM-A(-/-) apoe(-/-)mice. Notably, these proinflammatory effects of JAM-A-deficient platelets could be abolished by the inhibition of αIIbβ3 signaling in vitro. Deletion of JAM-A causes a gain-of-function in platelets, with lower activation thresholds and increased inflammatory activities. This leads to an increase of plaque formation, particularly in early stages of the disease. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Bacterio-opsin mutants of Halobacterium halobium

    PubMed Central

    Betlach, Mary; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Friedman, James; Boyer, Herbert W.

    1983-01-01

    The bacterio-opsin (bop) gene of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been cloned with about 40 kilobases of flanking genomic sequence. The 40-kilobase segment is derived from the (G+C)-rich fraction of the chromosome and is not homologous to the major (pHH1) or minor endogenous covalently closed circular DNA species of H. halobium. A 5.1-kilobase Pst I fragment containing the bop gene was subcloned in pBR322 and a partial restriction map was determined. Defined restriction fragments of this clone were used as probes to analyze the defects associated with the bop gene in 12 bacterio-opsin mutants. Eleven out of 12 of the mutants examined had inserts ranging from 350 to 3,000 base pairs either in the bop gene or up to 1,400 base pairs upstream. The positions of the inserts were localized to four regions in the 5.1-kilobase genomic fragment: within the gene (one mutant), in a region that overlaps the 5′ end of the gene (seven mutants), and in two different upstream regions (three mutants). Two revertants of the mutant with the most distal insert had an additional insert in the same region. The polar effects of these inserts are discussed in terms of inactivation of a regulatory gene or disruption of part of a coordinately expressed operon. Given the defined nature of the bop mRNA—i.e., it has a 5′ leader sequence of three ribonucleotides—these observations indicate that the bop mRNA might be processed from a large mRNA transcript. Images PMID:16593291

  9. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  10. Clinical comparison between patients with selective immunoglobulin A deficiency and other primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Natalia A; Lozano, Alejandro; Sasia, Laura V; Saranz, Ricardo J; Agresta, María Fernanda; del Pilar Bovina Martijena, María; Ianiero, Luciano; Grenat, Andrés R

    2015-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are low-prevalence diseases. There are warning signs that may raise clinical suspicion. The objectives of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics and warning signs of patients with PID and to compare the clinical differences between selective immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency and other PIDs. Eighty-nine patients were studied; their median age at the time of diagnosis was 6 years old (4.08-11.67). Fifty-three (59.5%) patients were male. Fifty-four (60.7%) patients had selective IgA deficiency, and 35 (39.3%) had other PIDs. The main clinical manifestations were rhinopharyngitis in 65 (73.03%) patients and atopy in 39 (43.82%). Twenty- four (26.97%) patients showed warning signs, and none had selective IgA deficiency. Patients with other PIDs had a higher incidence of lower respiratory tract infection, sepsis, skin infections, mucocutaneous candidiasis, dental alterations, cardiovascular malformations, angioedema, hospitalizations and death. Ten (28.57%) patients received intravenous gammaglobulin, 15 (42.85%) antibiotic prophylaxis, and 2 (2.24%) antifungal prophylaxis.

  11. Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years in Wukro, northern Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Kassaye, T.; Receveur, O.; Johns, T.; Becklake, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years in northern Ethiopia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out and the data were analysed for 824 (61.5%) of 1339 eligible children for whom there was complete information on biochemical vitamin A status, dietary vitamin A intake, ocular examination for xerophthalmia, and anthropometry. FINDINGS: The prevalence of xerophthalmia was 5.8%; serum retinol levels were below 0.35 mumol/l and between 0.35 and 0.70 mumol/l in 8.4% and 51.1% of the children respectively. The liver vitamin A reserve (modified relative dose response ratio > or = 0.06) was low in 41.0% of the children. CONCLUSION: The high prevalence of severe vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6-9 years indicates the need to reevaluate the practice of targeting vitamin A supplementation programmes on children under 6 years of age in areas where vitamin A deficiency is endemic. PMID:11417037

  12. Fundus white spots and acquired night blindness due to vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Genead, Mohamed A; Fishman, Gerald A; Lindeman, Martin

    2009-12-01

    To report a successfully treated case of acquired night blindness associated with fundus white spots secondary to vitamin A deficiency. An ocular examination, electrophysiologic testing, as well as visual field and OCT examinations were obtained on a 61-year-old man with vitamin A deficiency who had previously undergone gastric bypass surgery. The patient had a re-evaluation after treatment with high doses of oral vitamin A. The patient was observed to have numerous white spots in the retina of each eye. Best-corrected visual acuity was initially 20/80 in each eye, which improved to 20/40-1 OU after oral vitamin A therapy for 2 months. Full field electroretinogram (ERG) testing, showed non-detectable rod function and a 34 and 41% reduction for 32-Hz flicker and single flash cone responses, respectively, below the lower limits of normal. Both rod and cone functions markedly improved after initiation of vitamin A therapy. Vitamin A deficiency needs to be considered in a patient with white spots of the retina in the presence of poor night vision.

  13. Vitamin A deficiency among children in a periurban South African settlement.

    PubMed

    Coutsoudis, A; Mametja, D; Jinabhai, C C; Coovadia, H M

    1993-06-01

    Preschool children (aged 3-6 y) who were living in an informal settlement within metropolitan Durban, South Africa, were assessed for vitamin A status. The serum retinol concentration of 169 children tested was 0.73 +/- 0.26 mumol/L (mean +/- SD). Nine children (5%) had vitamin A deficiency (< 0.35 mumol/L) and 75 children (44%) had low vitamin A concentrations (< 0.70 mumol/L). Conjunctival impression cytology (CIC) in 185 children revealed that 18% had poor vitamin A status as defined by two abnormal conjunctival specimens. The CIC test was a feasible and reproducible method; however, it correlated poorly with the traditionally accepted serum retinol threshold of deficiency in this population where overt vitamin A deficiency is not prevalent. This survey demonstrated that regardless of the measurement tool, there is a prevalence of subclinical vitamin A deficiency in this typical periurban informal settlement and accordingly we suggest that these children should be targeted for vitamin A-intervention strategies.

  14. Degenerative myelopathy and vitamin A deficiency in a young black-maned lion (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Maratea, Kimberly A; Hooser, Stephen B; Ramos-Vara, José A

    2006-11-01

    Degenerative myelopathy and vitamin A deficiency were diagnosed in a 1-year-old, female, black-maned lion (Panthera leo). Diffuse white matter degeneration characterized by dilated myelin sheaths, Wallerian degeneration, and reactive astrocytosis was present at all levels of the spinal cord. With luxol fast blue-resyl echt violet stain, bilaterally symmetrical demyelination was observed in the fasciculus cuneatus of the cervical spinal cord and in peripheral white matter of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar segments. Additionally, the ventral gray columns and brain stem nuclei contained rare chromatolytic neurons with abnormal neurofilament accumulation. Leptomeninges of the cervical spinal cord were focally adhered to the dura and thickened by fibrosis and osseous metaplasia. Vitamin A deficiency was diagnosed based on hepatic vitamin A concentration of 1.71 microg/g dry weight. Adequate hepatic vitamin A concentration for yearling to adult domestic animals ranges between 150 and 1000 microg/g dry weight. Lesions were distinct from those previously described in young captive lions with vitamin A deficiency, which had thickened skull bones and cerebellar herniation. The pathogenesis of vitamin A-associated myelopathy in this lion may be similar to that described in adult cattle, which is believed to result from spinal cord compression secondary to elevated pressure of cerebrospinal fluid.

  15. Relationships between starch synthase I and branching enzyme isozymes determined using double mutant rice lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    elongation found in the single mutant. The fact that a deficiency of SSI, BEI, or BEIIb affected the affinity of other starch biosynthetic isozymes for the starch granule implies that there is a close interaction among SSI, BEI and BEIIb during amylopectin biosynthesis in rice endosperm. PMID:24670252

  16. Relationships between starch synthase I and branching enzyme isozymes determined using double mutant rice lines.

    PubMed

    Abe, Natsuko; Asai, Hiroki; Yago, Hikari; Oitome, Naoko F; Itoh, Rumiko; Crofts, Naoko; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-03-26

    that a deficiency of SSI, BEI, or BEIIb affected the affinity of other starch biosynthetic isozymes for the starch granule implies that there is a close interaction among SSI, BEI and BEIIb during amylopectin biosynthesis in rice endosperm.

  17. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M.; Elfenbein, Johanna R.; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M. Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used by Salmonella to colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182 S. Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks. STM0580, STM1295, STM1297, STM3612, STM3615, and STM3734 are needed for Salmonella to colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes, STM1297 (selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  18. Genotyping-by-sequencing of glossy mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glossy mutants are a common occurrence in Brassica oleracea L. and they have been documented in most crop varieties of the species including cabbage, kale, broccoli, and collard. Glossy phenotypes have been of particular interest to researchers due to observations that they influence insect behavior...

  19. Nicotinamide ribosyl uptake mutants in Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiss, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-09-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease.

  20. Nicotinamide Ribosyl Uptake Mutants in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Mark; Sauer, Elizabeta; Smethurst, Graeme; Kraiβ, Anita; Hilpert, Anna-Karina; Reidl, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    The gene for the nicotinamide riboside (NR) transporter (pnuC) was identified in Haemophilus influenzae. A pnuC mutant had only residual NR uptake and could survive in vitro with high concentrations of NR, but could not survive in vivo. PnuC may represent a target for the development of inhibitors for preventing H. influenzae disease. PMID:12933892

  1. Phenotypic mutant library: potential for gene discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rapid development of high throughput and affordable Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques has renewed interest in gene discovery using forward genetics. The conventional forward genetic approach starts with isolation of mutants with a phenotype of interest, mapping the mutation within a s...

  2. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  3. Quantitative genetics and utilization of mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relatively low level of genetic variability currently available in cotton makes mutagenesis attractive to overcome this problem. Mutations can occur either spontaneously or be induced. The majority of the genes we use today are spontaneous mutants that developed over a long period of time. Induc...

  4. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study.

    PubMed

    Jessri, Mahsa; Farmer, Anna P; Maximova, Katerina; Willows, Noreen D; Bell, Rhonda C

    2013-05-16

    Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. Even though there was a high rate of "ever having breastfed" (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95% CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95% CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend < 0.001) and 6 months (95% CI: 2.75-10.60; P-trend < 0.001), respectively. The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding is less likely to take place among lower

  5. Predictors of exclusive breastfeeding: observations from the Alberta pregnancy outcomes and nutrition (APrON) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite growing evidence that supports the importance of 6-month exclusive breastfeeding, few Canadian mothers adhere to this, and early weaning onto solids is a common practice. This study assessed infant feeding transitions during the first 6 months postpartum and factors that predicted exclusive breastfeeding to 3 and 6 months. Methods This prospective cohort study was part of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition study (APrON). From an initial sample of 600 pregnant women recruited from Edmonton and Calgary, 402 mothers provided complete details at 3 months postpartum; 300 stayed on to provide information at 6 months postpartum. During pregnancy and at 3 and 6 months postpartum, data on maternal and infant socio-demographic, behavior, and feeding were collected. Results Even though there was a high rate of “ever having breastfed” (98.6%), exclusive breastfeeding rates for 3 and 6 months were 54.0% and 15.3%, respectively. After controlling for potential confounders, the study showed that mothers who held post-graduate university degrees were 3.76 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months than those without a university degree (95% CI: 1.30-10.92; p = 0.015). In addition, mother of previous children were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months (OR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.08-4.52; p = 0.031). Mothers who were in the highest quartile of the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Score were 4.29 and 5.40 times more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 3 months (95% CI: 1.31-14.08; p-trend < 0.001) and 6 months (95% CI: 2.75-10.60; P-trend < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions The 6-month exclusive breastfeeding rate in Alberta is considerably below national and international breastfeeding recommendations. Professional advice that focuses on prenatal maternal knowledge, attitudes, and misperceptions may promote adherence to World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines. Knowing that exclusive breastfeeding

  6. Suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein

    PubMed Central

    Sisler, Jeffrey; Chaput, Geneviève; Sussman, Jonathan; Ozokwelu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Offrir aux médecins de famille un résumé des recommandations fondées sur les données probantes pour guider les soins aux survivantes traitées pour le cancer du sein. Qualité des données Une recherche documentaire a été effectuée dans MEDLINE entre 2000 et 2016 à l’aide des mots-clés anglais suivants : breast cancer, survivorship, follow-up care, aftercare, guidelines et survivorship care plans, en se concentrant sur la revue des lignes directrices publiées récemment par les organismes nationaux de cancérologie. Les données étaient de niveaux I à III. Message principal Les soins aux survivantes comportent 4 facettes : surveillance et dépistage, prise en charge des effets à long terme, promotion de la santé et coordination des soins. La surveillance des récidives ne se traduit que par une mammographie annuelle, et le dépistage d’autres cancers doit suivre les lignes directrices basées sur la population. La prise en charge des effets à long terme du cancer et de son traitement aborde des problèmes courants tels la douleur, la fatigue, le lymphœdème, la détresse et les effets indésirables des médicaments, de même que les préoccupations à long terme comme la santé du cœur et des os. La promotion de la santé met en relief les bienfaits de l’activité chez les survivantes du cancer, avec l’accent mis sur l’activité physique. Les soins aux survivantes sont de meilleure qualité lorsque divers services et professionnels de la santé participent aux soins, et le médecin de famille joue un rôle important dans la coordination des soins. Conclusion Les médecins de famille sont de plus en plus souvent les principaux fournisseurs de soins de suivi après le traitement du cancer du sein. Le cancer du sein doit être considéré comme une affection médicale chronique, même chez les femmes en rémission, et les patientes profitent de la même approche que celle utilisée pour les autres affections chroniques en

  7. Morphological changes in the tracheal epithelium of guinea pigs in conditions of "marginal" vitamin A deficiency. A light, scanning- and transmission-electron microscopic study under special breeding conditions appropriate to early vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stofft, E; Biesalski, H K; Zschaebitz, A; Weiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out the influence of marginal vitamin A deficiency on morphological structures in the tracheobronchial epithelium in guinea pigs. The tracheobronchial epithelium of animals with vitamin A deficiency (n = 15) and control animals (n = 7), kept under optimal laboratory conditions, was evaluated by light and electron microscopy. The cellular ultrastructure was morphometrically analyzed. The height of the respiratory epithelium was slightly increased. The basal cells were arranged in a loose cell band of three to four layers. The quantity of cytofilaments in their cytoplasm was enhanced. Goblet cells were significantly reduced in vitamin A deficiency. There was also a significant decrease in their secretory granules. The number of ciliated cells was almost unchanged. They showed a significant reduction in mitochondria. The kinocilia often contained an atypical structure of the microtubules. Our findings confirm multiple ultrastructural dysplasias in early vitamin A deficiency which may lead to a disturbance of mucociliary clearance.

  8. Superior triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in starchless mutants of Scenedesmus obliquus: (I) mutant generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microalgae are a promising platform for producing neutral lipids, to be used in the application for biofuels or commodities in the feed and food industry. A very promising candidate is the oleaginous green microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, because it accumulates up to 45% w/w triacylglycerol (TAG) under nitrogen starvation. Under these conditions, starch is accumulated as well. Starch can amount up to 38% w/w under nitrogen starvation, which is a substantial part of the total carbon captured. When aiming for optimized TAG production, blocking the formation of starch could potentially increase carbon allocation towards TAG. In an attempt to increase TAG content, productivity and yield, starchless mutants of this high potential strain were generated using UV mutagenesis. Previous studies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that blocking the starch synthesis yields higher TAG contents, although these TAG contents do not surpass those of oleaginous microalgae yet. So far no starchless mutants in oleaginous green microalgae have been isolated that result in higher TAG productivities. Results Five starchless mutants have been isolated successfully from over 3,500 mutants. The effect of the mutation on biomass and total fatty acid (TFA) and TAG productivity under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions was studied. All five starchless mutants showed a decreased or completely absent starch content. In parallel, an increased TAG accumulation rate was observed for the starchless mutants and no substantial decrease in biomass productivity was perceived. The most promising mutant showed an increase in TFA productivity of 41% at 4 days after nitrogen depletion, reached a TAG content of 49.4% (% of dry weight) and had no substantial change in biomass productivity compared to the wild type. Conclusions The improved S. obliquus TAG production strains are the first starchless mutants in an oleaginous green microalga that show enhanced TAG content under

  9. Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis and Vitamin A Deficiency: Two Problems, One Policy.

    PubMed

    Strunz, Eric C; Suchdev, Parminder S; Addiss, David G

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) represent two widely prevalent and often overlapping global health problems. Approximately 75% of countries with moderate or severe VAD are coendemic for STH. We reviewed the literature on the complex relationship between STH and VAD. Treatment for STH significantly increases provitamin A (e.g., β-carotene) levels but is associated with minimal increases in preformed vitamin A (retinol). Interpretation of the data is complicated by variations in STH infection intensity and limitations of vitamin A biomarkers. Despite these challenges, increased coordination of STH and VAD interventions represents an important public health opportunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in pregnant and lactating women in the Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Samba, Claude; Tchibindat, Félicité; Gourmel, Bernard; Houzé, Patrick; Malvy, Denis

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin A status in a sample of pregnant and lactating women living in several representative regions of Congo was assessed and compared between August and September 2004. This survey was conducted using a randomized two-stage cluster-sampling method with stratification on 90 clusters, each consisting of at least 15 women. Vitamin A status was determined in a total of 1,054 individuals, using the impression cytology with transfer (ICT) test, the modified relative dose response test (MRDR test) on dried blood spots (DBS), and clinical examination to detect signs of xerophthalmia. The clinical criterion defining vitamin A deficiency was the presence of active xerophthalmia (Bitot's spots [X1B]), active corneal disease), and/or night blindness (XN stage). The prevalence of clinical signs of stage XN and X1B xerophthalmia in the Republic of Congo was found to be 16% and 19% respectively. The prevalence of clinical signs (X1B) was greater in the rural north than in urban areas, with a gradient running from urban (5%) to rural area (33%); 27% of all the ICT tests showed that the subjects were suffering from vitamin A deficiency. The deficiency rates were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in urban surroundings (Brazzaville) than in the rural northern regions. The biochemical MRDR test showed the presence of vitamin A deficiency (> or = 0.06) in 26% of the mothers in Brazzaville compared to 6% in the town of Kouilou; 44% of the women had retinol levels of < 10 microg/dL in the rural north whereas these percentages were significantly lower in the urban areas surveyed (chi-square = 62.30, p < 0.001). A significant correlation was found to exist (p < 0.001) between the ICT test and the MRDR test on DBS. In the population as a whole, 30% of the mothers suffering from malarial attack had abnormally low MRDR levels (> or = 0.06) compared to no malaria. The results of the present study confirm that vitamin A deficiency is a serious public-health issue in pregnant and lactating

  11. Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency in Pregnant and Lactating Women in the Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Tchibindat, Félicité; Gourmel, Bernard; Houzé, Patrick; Malvy, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A status in a sample of pregnant and lactating women living in several representative regions of Congo was assessed and compared between August and September 2004. This survey was conducted using a randomized two-stage cluster-sampling method with stratification on 90 clusters, each consisting of at least 15 women. Vitamin A status was determined in a total of 1,054 individuals, using the impression cytology with transfer (ICT) test, the modified relative dose response test (MRDR test) on dried blood spots (DBS), and clinical examination to detect signs of xerophthalmia. The clinical criterion defining vitamin A deficiency was the presence of active xerophthalmia (Bitot's spots [X1B]), active corneal disease), and/or night blindness (XN stage). The prevalence of clinical signs of stage XN and X1B xerophthalmia in the Republic of Congo was found to be 16% and 19% respectively. The prevalence of clinical signs (X1B) was greater in the rural north than in urban areas, with a gradient running from urban (5%) to rural area (33%); 27% of all the ICT tests showed that the subjects were suffering from vitamin A deficiency. The deficiency rates were significantly higher (p<0.001) in urban surroundings (Brazzaville) than in the rural northern regions. The biochemical MRDR test showed the presence of vitamin A deficiency (≥0.06) in 26% of the mothers in Brazzaville compared to 6% in the town of Kouilou; 44% of the women had retinol levels of <10 μg/dL in the rural north whereas these percentages were significantly lower in the urban areas surveyed (chi-square=62.30, p<0.001). A significant correlation was found to exist (p<0.001) between the ICT test and the MRDR test on DBS. In the population as a whole, 30% of the mothers suffering from malarial attack had abnormally low MRDR levels (≥0.06) compared to no malaria. The results of the present study confirm that vitamin A deficiency is a serious public-health issue in pregnant and lactating mothers in the Republic

  12. Effects on vitamin A deficiency in children of periodic high-dose supplements and of fortified oil promotion in a deficient area of the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Mason, John B; Ramirez, Maria A; Fernandez, Chona M; Pedro, Regina; Lloren, Tina; Saldanha, Lisa; Deitchler, Megan; Eisele, T

    2011-09-01

    Regular semi-annual distribution of high-dose (200,000 IU) vitamin A capsules (VACs) to children 1 - 5 years of age (previously identified as underweight), in Leyte Province, the Philippines, was compared to providing extra VACs to give three-monthly dosing, and to vitamin A-fortified cooking oil (VAFO) promotion (with continued VACs every 6 months). Serum retinol (SR) was measured at baseline and after 12 or 18 months (for VAFO). No sustained increase in SR was determined from the three-month VAC dosing regimen, and the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) as assessed by SR (< 20 mcg / dL) remained around 30 % (in line with national survey estimates over the previous 15 years). The major difference found was that 18 months of VAFO (of which 9 months had sustained promotion) was associated with reducing the prevalence of VAD to < 10 %. The effective fortification and lack of effect of semi-annual VAC results are in line with previous studies; testing with dosing of VAC every three months is a new intervention. The results imply that promotion of fortified oil would reduce VAD in these conditions; whether it can replace or needs to be added to semi-annual VAC dosing remains to be determined. A phased changeover to reliance on fortified commodities (including oil) with careful monitoring of VAD trends is indicated.

  13. Processing of High Resolution, Multiparametric Radar Data for the Airborne Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar APR-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Following the successful Precipitation Radar (PR) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, a new airborne, 14/35 GHz rain profiling radar, known as Airborne Precipitation Radar - 2 (APR-2), has been developed as a prototype for an advanced, dual-frequency spaceborne radar for a future spaceborne precipitation measurement mission. . This airborne instrument is capable of making simultaneous measurements of rainfall parameters, including co-pol and cross-pol rain reflectivities and vertical Doppler velocities, at 14 and 35 GHz. furthermore, it also features several advanced technologies for performance improvement, including real-time data processing, low-sidelobe dual-frequency pulse compression, and dual-frequency scanning antenna. Since August 2001, APR-2 has been deployed on the NASA P3 and DC8 aircrafts in four experiments including CAMEX-4 and the Wakasa Bay Experiment. Raw radar data are first processed to obtain reflectivity, LDR (linear depolarization ratio), and Doppler velocity measurements. The dataset is then processed iteratively to accurately estimate the true aircraft navigation parameters and to classify the surface return. These intermediate products are then used to refine reflectivity and LDR calibrations (by analyzing clear air ocean surface returns), and to correct Doppler measurements for the aircraft motion. Finally, the the melting layer of precipitation is detected and its boundaries and characteristics are identifIed at the APR-2 range resolution of 30m. The resulting 3D dataset will be used for validation of other airborne and spaceborne instruments, development of multiparametric rain/snow retrieval algorithms and melting layer characterization and statistics.

  14. Outcomes of patients with abdominoperineal resection (APR) and low anterior resection (LAR) who had very low rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seung-Seop; Park, In Ja; Jung, Sung Woo; Oh, Se Heon; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Nayoung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2017-10-01

    We compared the oncological outcomes of sphincter-saving resection (SSR) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in 409 consecutive patients with very low rectal cancer (i.e., tumors within 3 cm from the anal verge); 335 (81.9%) patients underwent APR and 74 (18.1%) underwent SSR. The APR group comprised higher proportions of men (67.5% vs 55.4%, P = .049) and advanced-stage patients (P < .001). Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) was more frequently administered in the SSR group (83.8% vs 52.8%, P < .001). Overall, the systemic and local recurrence rates were 29.1% and 6.1%, respectively. On stratification according to PCRT and pathologic stage, the mode of surgery did not affect the recurrence type. Moreover, recurrence-free survival (RFS) did not differ according to the mode of surgery in different cancer stages. RFS was associated with ypT and ypN stages in patients who received PCRT, while pN stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement were risk factors for RFS in those who did not receive PCRT. Notably, SSR was not found to be a risk factor for RFS in either subgroup. Patients who were stratified according to cancer stage and PCRT also showed no differences in RFS according to the mode of surgery. Our results demonstrate that, regardless of PCRT administration, SSR is an effective treatment for very low rectal cancer, while CRM is an important prognostic factor for patients who did not receive PCRT.

  15. Mutant KRAS promotes malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Αgalioti, Theodora; Giannou, Anastasios D.; Krontira, Anthi C.; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Kati, Danai; Vreka, Malamati; Pepe, Mario; Spella, Μagda; Lilis, Ioannis; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Nikolouli, Eirini; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Papadakis, Andreas; Papadia, Konstantina; Voulgaridis, Apostolos; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Stamou, Panagiota; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Snyder, Linda A.; Antimisiaris, Sophia G.; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Psallidas, Ioannis; Μarazioti, Antonia; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is the lethal consequence of various human cancers metastatic to the pleural cavity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the development of MPE are still obscure. Here we show that mutant KRAS is important for MPE induction in mice. Pleural disseminated, mutant KRAS bearing tumour cells upregulate and systemically release chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) into the bloodstream to mobilize myeloid cells from the host bone marrow to the pleural space via the spleen. These cells promote MPE formation, as indicated by splenectomy and splenocyte restoration experiments. In addition, KRAS mutations are frequently detected in human MPE and cell lines isolated thereof, but are often lost during automated analyses, as indicated by manual versus automated examination of Sanger sequencing traces. Finally, the novel KRAS inhibitor deltarasin and a monoclonal antibody directed against CCL2 are equally effective against an experimental mouse model of MPE, a result that holds promise for future efficient therapies against the human condition. PMID:28508873

  16. Intact interval timing in circadian CLOCK mutants.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C R

    2008-08-28

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval-timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/- and -/- mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing.

  17. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  18. Defeat mutant KRAS with synthetic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingyao

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ras proteins are considered as the founding members of a large superfamily of small GTPases that control fundamental cellular functions. Mutationally activated RAS genes were discovered in human cancer cells more than 3 decades ago, but intensive efforts on Ras structure, biochemistry, function and signaling continue even now. Because mutant Ras proteins are inherently difficult to inhibit and have yet been therapeutically conquered, it was designated as “the Everest of oncogenes” in the cancer genome landscape, further promoting a “renaissance” in RAS research. Different paths to directly or indirectly targeting mutant Ras signaling are currently under investigation in the hope of finding an efficacious regimen. Inhibitors directly binding to KRASG12C to block its downstream signaling have been revealed, supporting the notion of Ras' druggability. An alternative indirect approach by targeting synthetic lethal interactors of mutant RAS is underway. We recently employed a synthetic lethal drug screen plus a combinatorial strategy using a panel of clinical agents and discovered that KRAS-mutant cancers were fragile to the combined inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK). The combined regimen of BI-2536 (a Plk1 inhibitor) and fasudil (a ROCK inhibitor) promoted a significant inhibition of patient-derived lung cancer xenografts and prolonged the survival of LSL-KRASG12D mice. In this commentary, we will summarize the state-of-the art for the direction of synthetic lethality, and also speculate on the future development of this approach. PMID:27463838

  19. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    Cambridge, MA). pLPC-12S coexpresses an E1A 12S cDNA with puromycin phosphotransferase (puro) and pWZL-12S coexpresses E1A with hygromycin phospho...retinoblastoma; CR1, -2, -3, conserved regions 1, 2, and 3; MEF, mouse embryonic fibroblast; puro, puromycin; hygro, hygromycin . To whom reprint requests...ml hygromycin B (Boehringer Mannheim) to elim- inate uninfected cells. When two separate E1A mutants were coexpressed, they were introduced

  20. Sleep restores behavioral plasticity to Drosophila mutants

    PubMed Central

    Dissel, Stephane; Angadi, Veena; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Suzuki, Yasuko; Donlea, Jeff; Klose, Markus; Koch, Zachary; English, Denis; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; van Swinderen, Bruno; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Given the role that sleep plays in modulating plasticity, we hypothesized that increasing sleep would restore memory to canonical memory mutants without specifically rescuing the causal molecular-lesion. Sleep was increased using three independent strategies: activating the dorsal Fan Shaped Body (FB), increasing the expression of Fatty acid binding protein (dFabp) or by administering the GABA-A agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). Short-term memory (STM) or Long-term memory (LTM) was evaluated in rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc) mutants using Aversive Phototaxic Suppression (APS) and courtship conditioning. Each of the three independent strategies increased sleep and restored memory to rut and dnc mutants. Importantly, inducing sleep also reverses memory defects in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer’s disease. Together these data demonstrate that sleep plays a more fundamental role in modulating behavioral plasticity than previously appreciated and suggests that increasing sleep may benefit patients with certain neurological disorders. PMID:25913403

  1. Phenotypic characterization of a photomorphogenic mutant.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J

    2004-09-01

    Light is arguably the most important abiotic factor controlling plant growth and development throughout their life cycle. Plants have evolved sophisticated light-sensing mechanisms to monitor fluctuations in light quality, intensity, direction and periodicity (day length). In Arabidopsis, three families of photoreceptors have been identified by molecular genetic studies. The UV-A/blue light receptors cryptochromes and the red/far-red receptors phytochromes control an overlapping set of responses including photoperiodic flowering induction and de-etiolation. Phototropins are the primary photoreceptors for a set of specific responses to UV-A/blue light such as phototropism, chloroplast movement and stomatal opening. Mutants affecting a photoreceptor have a characteristic phenotype. It is therefore possible to determine the specific developmental responses and the photoreceptor pathway(s) affected in a mutant by performing an appropriate set of photobiological and genetic experiments. In this paper, we outline the principal and easiest experiments that can be performed to obtain a first indication about the nature of the photobiological defect in a given mutant.

  2. Defective anti-polysaccharide IgG vaccine responses in IgA deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoichi; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S; Roberts, Sean; Racine, Rachael; Wilson-Welder, Jennifer; Sanfilippo, Alan M; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W

    2017-09-05

    We report that IgA -/- mice exhibit specific defects in IgG antibody responses to various polysaccharide vaccines (Francisella tularensis LPS and Pneumovax), but not protein vaccines such as Fluzone. This defect further included responses to polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (Prevnar and Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid vaccine). In agreement with these findings, IgA -/- mice were protected from pathogen challenge with protein- but not polysaccharide-based vaccines. Interestingly, after immunization with live bacteria, IgA +/+ and IgA -/- mice were both resistant to lethal challenge and their IgG anti-polysaccharide antibody responses were comparable. Immunization with live bacteria, but not purified polysaccharide, induced production of serum B cell-activating factor (BAFF), a cytokine important for IgG class switching; supplementing IgA -/- cell cultures with BAFF enhanced in vitro polyclonal IgG production. Taken together, these findings show that IgA deficiency impairs IgG class switching following vaccination with polysaccharide antigens and that live bacterial immunization can overcome this defect. Since IgA deficient patients also often show defects in antibody responses following immunization with polysaccharide vaccines, our findings could have relevance to the clinical management of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PATHOGENESIS OF THE OCULAR LESIONS PRODUCED BY A DEFICIENCY OF VITAMINE A

    PubMed Central

    Yudkin, Arthur M.; Lambert, Robert A.

    1923-01-01

    The earliest lesions in ophthalmia of rats resulting from a deficiency of vitamine A consist in focal inflammatory lesions in the conjunctivæ of the lids and nictitating membrane. The involvement of the cornea, which constitutes the most conspicuous feature of the well developed ophthalmia, is a secondary phenomenon. The characteristic corneal plaque consists of keratinized epithelium beneath which the deeper layers of epithelium are generally found intact. Pathologically, the ocular manifestations of a deficiency of vitamine A are referable to a low grade inflammatory process, originating in the palpebral conjunctiva and spreading to the cornea. The rapidity of development and the degree of destruction probably depend in large part on the type of bacterial infection. The specific changes which lead to the establishment of such an infection have not been determined. It is conceivable that they may be either physiological or anatomical. There is some evidence in favor of a general disturbance of antibody formation in animals on deficient diets. The possibility of a disturbed function in the paraocular glands must be considered. PMID:19868767

  4. Expression, purification, and characterization of the Necator americanus aspartic protease-1 (Na-APR-1 (M74)) antigen, a component of the bivalent human hookworm vaccine.

    PubMed

    Seid, Christopher A; Curti, Elena; Jones, R Mark; Hudspeth, Elissa; Rezende, Wanderson; Pollet, Jeroen; Center, Lori; Versteeg, Leroy; Pritchard, Sonya; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Yusibov, Vidadi; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2015-01-01

    Over 400 million people living in the world's poorest developing nations are infected with hookworms, mostly of the genus Necator americanus. A bivalent human hookworm vaccine composed of the Necator americanus Glutathione S-Transferase-1 (Na-GST-1) and the Necator americanus Aspartic Protease-1 (Na-APR-1 (M74)) is currently under development by the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (Sabin PDP). Both monovalent vaccines are currently in Phase 1 trials. Both Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1 antigens are expressed as recombinant proteins. While Na-GST-1 was found to express with high yields in Pichia pastoris, the level of expression of Na-APR-1 in this host was too low to be suitable for a manufacturing process. When the tobacco plant Nicotiana benthamiana was evaluated as an expression system, acceptable levels of solubility, yield, and stability were attained. Observed expression levels of Na-APR-1 (M74) using this system are ∼300 mg/kg. Here we describe the achievements and obstacles encountered during process development as well as characterization and stability of the purified Na-APR-1 (M74) protein and formulated vaccine. The expression, purification and analysis of purified Na-APR-1 (M74) protein obtained from representative 5 kg reproducibility runs performed to qualify the Na-APR-1 (M74) production process is also presented. This process has been successfully transferred to a pilot plant and a 50 kg scale manufacturing campaign under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) has been performed. The 50 kg run has provided a sufficient amount of protein to support the ongoing hookworm vaccine development program of the Sabin PDP.

  5. An annotated database of Arabidopsis mutants of acyl lipid metabolism

    DOE PAGES

    McGlew, Kathleen; Shaw, Vincent; Zhang, Meng; ...

    2014-12-10

    Mutants have played a fundamental role in gene discovery and in understanding the function of genes involved in plant acyl lipid metabolism. The first mutant in Arabidopsis lipid metabolism ( fad4) was described in 1985. Since that time, characterization of mutants in more than 280 genes associated with acyl lipid metabolism has been reported. This review provides a brief background and history on identification of mutants in acyl lipid metabolism, an analysis of the distribution of mutants in different areas of acyl lipid metabolism and presents an annotated database (ARALIPmutantDB) of these mutants. The database provides information on the phenotypesmore » of mutants, pathways and enzymes/proteins associated with the mutants, and allows rapid access via hyperlinks to summaries of information about each mutant and to literature that provides information on the lipid composition of the mutants. Mutants for at least 30 % of the genes in the database have multiple names, which have been compiled here to reduce ambiguities in searches for information. Furthermore, the database should also provide a tool for exploring the relationships between mutants in acyl lipid-related genes and their lipid phenotypes and point to opportunities for further research.« less

  6. Registration of two allelic erect leaf mutants of sorghum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two allelic sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] erect leaf (erl) mutants were isolated from an Annotated Individually-pedigreed Mutagenized Sorghum (AIMS) mutant library developed at the Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Unit, at Lubbock, Texas. The two mutants, erl1-1 and erl1-2, were isol...

  7. A Bayesian inversion for slip distribution of 1 Apr 2007 Mw8.1 Solomon Islands Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Luo, H.

    2013-12-01

    On 1 Apr 2007 the megathrust Mw8.1 Solomon Islands earthquake occurred in the southeast pacific along the New Britain subduction zone. 102 vertical displacement measurements over the southeastern end of the rupture zone from two field surveys after this event provide a unique constraint for slip distribution inversion. In conventional inversion method (such as bounded variable least squares) the smoothing parameter that determines the relative weight placed on fitting the data versus smoothing the slip distribution is often subjectively selected at the bend of the trade-off curve. Here a fully probabilistic inversion method[Fukuda,2008] is applied to estimate distributed slip and smoothing parameter objectively. The joint posterior probability density function of distributed slip and the smoothing parameter is formulated under a Bayesian framework and sampled with Markov chain Monte Carlo method. We estimate the spatial distribution of dip slip associated with the 1 Apr 2007 Solomon Islands earthquake with this method. Early results show a shallower dip angle than previous study and highly variable dip slip both along-strike and down-dip.

  8. Monitoring the impact of an aspartic protease (MpAPr1) on grape proteins and wine properties.

    PubMed

    Theron, Louwrens Wiid; Bely, Marina; Divol, Benoit

    2018-04-23

    The perception of haze in wine is brought about when pathogenesis-related proteins become unstable and aggregate, subsequently resulting in crosslinking until it develops into light-dispersing particles. Elimination of these proteins is usually achieved via bentonite fining, which, although effective, suffers from several drawbacks. The utilization of proteases has been proposed as an ideal alternative. In a previous study, an aspartic protease (MpAPr1) from the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima was purified and shown to be partially active against grape proteins in synthetic medium. In this study, the effects of pure MpAPr1 supplemented to Sauvignon Blanc juice on subsequent fermentation were investigated. The juice was incubated for 48 h and thereafter inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results revealed that the enzyme had no observable effects on fermentation performance and retained activity throughout. Protein degradation could be detected and resulted in a significant modification of the wine composition and an increase in the presence of certain volatile compounds, especially those linked to amino acid metabolism.

  9. FUdR extends the lifespan of the short-lived AP endonuclease mutant in Caenorhabditis elegans in a fertility-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuichi; Miyaji, Masahiro; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2017-03-17

    The anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and its metabolite 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUdR) inhibit thymidylate synthase and induce uracil bases in DNA. FUdR is commonly used for inhibiting fertility when measuring the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. However, it is not known whether DNA damage induced by FUdR affects lifespan. EXO-3 is an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease in C. elegans, and we reported previously that deletion of the exo-3 gene causes reproductive abnormalities and decreased lifespan. In this study, we found that FUdR extended the lifespan of exo-3 mutants. We measured the lifespan of multiple germline mutants to examine whether this lifespan extension effect was dependent on fertility. In the presence of a fem-1 mutation, which causes a deficiency in sperm production, FUdR did not extend the lifespan of the exo-3 mutant. In glp-1 mutants, which do not develop gonads, the exo-3 mutant was not short-lived, and FUdR did not extend its lifespan. These results suggest that the lifespan extension effect of FUdR depends on fertility and the presence of gonads. fem-3 mutants, which do not produce oocytes, had increased lifespan in the presence of FUdR, independent of the exo-3 mutation. It is possible that the fem-3 mutant was susceptible to the lifespan extension effect of FUdR. From these results, we suggest that FUdR affects the lifespan of C. elegans in two ways: by interfering with fertility, which extends lifespan, and by inducing DNA base damage, which reduces lifespan.

  10. Vitamin-A deficiency and its determinants among preschool children: a community based cross-sectional study in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tariku, Amare; Fekadu, Abel; Ferede, Ayanaw Tsega; Mekonnen Abebe, Solomon; Adane, Akilew Awoke

    2016-06-24

    Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable visual impairments in children. It is also an underlying cause for nearly one-fourth of global child mortality associated with measles, diarrhea, and malaria. The limited literature available in Ethiopia shows severe public health significance of vitamin-A deficiency. Hence the aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence and factors determining vitamin-A deficiency among preschool children in Dembia District, northwest Ethiopia. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among preschool children of Dembia District from January to February, 2015. A multi-stage sampling, followed by a systematic sampling technique was employed to select study participants. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Using a binary logistic regression model, multivariable analysis was fitted to identify the associated factors of vitamin-A deficiency. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with a 95 % confidence interval was computed to assess the strength of the association, and variables with a p value of <0.05 in multivariable analysis were considered as statistically significant. Six hundred eighty-one preschool children were included in the study, giving a response rate of 96.5 %. The overall prevalence of xerophthalmia was 8.6 %. The result of the multivariable analysis revealed that nonattendance at the antenatal care clinic [AOR 2.65,95 % CI (1.39,5.07)], being male [AOR 1.81, 95 % CI (1.01,3.24)], and in the age group of 49-59 months [AOR 3.00, 95 % CI (1.49,6.02)] were significantly associated with vitamin-A deficiency. Vitamin-A deficiency is a severe public health problem in the study area. Further strengthening antenatal care utilization and giving emphasis to preschool children will help to mitigate vitamin-A deficiency in the study area.

  11. MDR1A deficiency restrains tumor growth in murine colitis-associated carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hennenberg, Eva Maria; Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC) have an increased risk to develop colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Here, we found that protein expression of ABCB1 (ATP Binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1) / MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1) was diminished in the intestinal mucosa of patients with active UC with or without CAC, but not in non-UC patients with sporadic colon cancer. We investigated the consequences of ABCB1/MDR1 loss-of-function in a common murine model for CAC (AOM/DSS). Mice deficient in MDR1A (MDR1A KO) showed enhanced intratumoral inflammation and cellular damage, which were associated with reduced colonic tumor size and decreased degree of dysplasia, when compared to wild-type (WT). Increased cell injury correlated with reduced capacity for growth of MDR1A KO tumor spheroids cultured ex-vivo. Gene expression analysis by microarray demonstrated that MDR1A deficiency shaped the inflammatory response towards an anti-tumorigenic microenvironment by downregulating genes known to be important mediators of cancer progression (PTGS2 (COX2), EREG, IL-11). MDR1A KO tumors showed increased gene expression of TNFSF10 (TRAIL), a known inducer of cancer cell death, and CCL12, a strong trigger of B cell chemotaxis. Abundant B220+ B lymphocyte infiltrates with interspersed CD138+ plasma cells were recruited to the MDR1A KO tumor microenvironment, concomitant with high levels of immunoglobulin light chain genes. In contrast, MDR1A deficiency in RAG2 KO mice that lack both B and T cells aggravated colonic tumor progression. MDR1A KO CD19+ B cells, but not WT CD19+ B cells, suppressed growth of colonic tumor-derived spheroids from AOM/DSS-WT mice in an ex-vivo co-culture system, implying that B-cell regulated immune responses contributed to delayed tumor development in MDR1A deficiency. In conclusion, we provide first evidence that loss of ABCB1/MDR1 function may represent an essential tumor-suppressive host defense mechanism in CAC. PMID:28686677

  12. MDR1A deficiency restrains tumor growth in murine colitis-associated carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hennenberg, Eva Maria; Eyking, Annette; Reis, Henning; Cario, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Ulcerative Colitis (UC) have an increased risk to develop colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Here, we found that protein expression of ABCB1 (ATP Binding Cassette Subfamily B Member 1) / MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1) was diminished in the intestinal mucosa of patients with active UC with or without CAC, but not in non-UC patients with sporadic colon cancer. We investigated the consequences of ABCB1/MDR1 loss-of-function in a common murine model for CAC (AOM/DSS). Mice deficient in MDR1A (MDR1A KO) showed enhanced intratumoral inflammation and cellular damage, which were associated with reduced colonic tumor size and decreased degree of dysplasia, when compared to wild-type (WT). Increased cell injury correlated with reduced capacity for growth of MDR1A KO tumor spheroids cultured ex-vivo. Gene expression analysis by microarray demonstrated that MDR1A deficiency shaped the inflammatory response towards an anti-tumorigenic microenvironment by downregulating genes known to be important mediators of cancer progression (PTGS2 (COX2), EREG, IL-11). MDR1A KO tumors showed increased gene expression of TNFSF10 (TRAIL), a known inducer of cancer cell death, and CCL12, a strong trigger of B cell chemotaxis. Abundant B220+ B lymphocyte infiltrates with interspersed CD138+ plasma cells were recruited to the MDR1A KO tumor microenvironment, concomitant with high levels of immunoglobulin light chain genes. In contrast, MDR1A deficiency in RAG2 KO mice that lack both B and T cells aggravated colonic tumor progression. MDR1A KO CD19+ B cells, but not WT CD19+ B cells, suppressed growth of colonic tumor-derived spheroids from AOM/DSS-WT mice in an ex-vivo co-culture system, implying that B-cell regulated immune responses contributed to delayed tumor development in MDR1A deficiency. In conclusion, we provide first evidence that loss of ABCB1/MDR1 function may represent an essential tumor-suppressive host defense mechanism in CAC.

  13. Vitamin A deficiency and inflammatory markers among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Maria; Dancheck, Barbara; Gamble, Mary V; Palafox, Neal A; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2004-12-08

    The exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins has been advocated in order to improve prevalence estimates of vitamin A deficiency in surveys, but it is unclear whether this will lead to sampling bias. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins is associated with sampling bias and to characterize inflammation in children with night blindness. In a survey in the Republic of the Marshall Islands involving 281 children, aged 1-5 years, serum retinol, C-reactive protein (CRP), and alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were measured. Of 281 children, 24 (8.5%) had night blindness and 165 (58.7%) had serum retinol < 0.70 micromol/L. Of 248 children with AGP and CRP measurements, 123 (49.6%) had elevated acute phase proteins (CRP > mg/L and/or AGP > 1000 mg/L). Among children with and without night blindness, the proportion with serum retinol < 0.70 micromol/L was 79.2% and 56.8% (P = 0.03) and with anemia was 58.3% and 35.7% (P = 0.029), respectively. The proportion of children with serum retinol < 0.70 micromol/L was 52.0% after excluding children with elevated acute phase proteins. Among children with and without elevated acute phase proteins, mean age was 2.8 vs 3.2 years (P = 0.016), the proportion of boys was 43.1% vs. 54.3% (P = 0.075), with no hospitalizations in the last year was 11.0% vs 23.6% (P = 0.024), and with anemia was 43.8% vs 31.7% (P = 0.05), respectively. Exclusion of children with inflammation in this survey of vitamin A deficiency does not improve prevalence estimates for vitamin A deficiency and instead leads to sampling bias for variables such as age, gender, anemia, and hospitalization history.

  14. Vitamin A deficiency and inflammatory markers among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Maqsood, Maria; Dancheck, Barbara; Gamble, Mary V; Palafox, Neal A; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Background The exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins has been advocated in order to improve prevalence estimates of vitamin A deficiency in surveys, but it is unclear whether this will lead to sampling bias. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the exclusion of individuals with elevated acute phase proteins is associated with sampling bias and to characterize inflammation in children with night blindness. Methods In a survey in the Republic of the Marshall Islands involving 281 children, aged 1–5 years, serum retinol, C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were measured. Results Of 281 children, 24 (8.5%) had night blindness and 165 (58.7%) had serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L. Of 248 children with AGP and CRP measurements, 123 (49.6%) had elevated acute phase proteins (CRP >5 mg/L and/or AGP >1000 mg/L). Among children with and without night blindness, the proportion with serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L was 79.2% and 56.8% (P = 0.03) and with anemia was 58.3% and 35.7% (P = 0.029), respectively. The proportion of children with serum retinol <0.70 μmol/L was 52.0% after excluding children with elevated acute phase proteins. Among children with and without elevated acute phase proteins, mean age was 2.8 vs 3.2 years (P = 0.016), the proportion of boys was 43.1% vs. 54.3% (P = 0.075), with no hospitalizations in the last year was 11.0% vs 23.6% (P = 0.024), and with anemia was 43.8% vs 31.7% (P = 0.05), respectively. Conclusions Exclusion of children with inflammation in this survey of vitamin A deficiency does not improve prevalence estimates for vitamin A deficiency and instead leads to sampling bias for variables such as age, gender, anemia, and hospitalization history. PMID:15588289

  15. Vitamin A deficiency among adolescent female garment factory workers in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F; Hasan, N; Kabir, Y

    1997-10-01

    To investigate the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency among adolescent female factory workers in Bangladesh, and examine the association between various factors and vitamin A status. A cross-sectional study. Garment factories in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Three hundred and eighty eight adolescent girls aged 12-19 y from ten garment factories were selected randomly for the present study. Information on socio-economic conditions and usual pattern of dietary intake were obtained by interview. Anthropometric data and blood samples were collected following the interview. By NCHS reference standard, 15.5% of the participants were thin (< 90% Wt/Ht) and about 7% overweight (> 120% Wt/Ht). In about 56%, serum vitamin A level was below the adequate level of 1.05 mumol/l, with 14% having vitamin A deficiency (< 0.70 mumol/l). Forty four per cent of the participants were found to be anaemic (haemoglobin < 120 g/l). Food frequency data on vitamin A rich foods revealed that a large percentage of the participants do not take eggs (41%), milk (64%), liver (85%) and sweet pumpkin (85%); while about 40% of the girls take dark green leafy vegetables (DGLV) and 17% take small fish at least four servings a week. The girls who consumed four or more servings per week of DGLV had significantly higher serum vitamin A level than the girls who took three servings or less. There was a significant positive association between the level of serum vitamin A and frequency of intake of DGLV (r = 0.12; P = 0.023). When age, level of education, percapita income, haemoglobin concentration, serum protein concentration, menstruation at the time of blood collection, prevalence of current morbidity, frequency of intake of egg, milk, small fish, DGLV, liver and sweet pumpkin were accounted for by multiple regression analysis, a strong relationship was found for serum vitamin A concentration with age, menstruation, haemoglobin level and frequency of intake of DGLV. For every unit change in the frequency of

  16. Immunity to Trichinella spiralis infection in vitamin A-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Vitamin A-deficient (A-) mice make strikingly poor IgG responses when they are immunized with purified protein antigens. Previously, we showed that A- T cells overproduce interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which then could inhibit interleukin 4 (IL-4)-stimulated B cell IgG responses. To determine if the altered IFN-gamma regulation pattern and its immunological consequences would extend to a natural infection, we studied mice infected with the parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis. The course of the infection was similar in A- and A-sufficient (A+) mice. These mice did not differ with respect to newborn larvae/female/hour produced in the intestine, or muscle larvae burden 5 wk postinfection. They also did not differ in the intestinal worm expulsion rate until day 15, when A- mice still harbored parasites, whereas A+ mice had cleared intestinal worms. Vitamin A deficiency reduced both the frequency of B lymphocytes secreting IgG1 antibodies to parasite antigens, and the bone marrow eosinophilia associated with helminth infection. The cytokine secretion patterns in infected mice were consistent with these observations and with previous studies. Mesenteric lymph node cells from infected A- mice secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and significantly less IL-2, IL-4, and IL- 5 than infected A+ controls. A- splenocytes secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and equivalent amounts of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 compared with A+ controls. Interestingly, CD4-CD8- cells secreted the majority of the IL-4 produced in the spleen. The IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 steady-state transcript levels correlated with secreted protein levels, but IFN- gamma transcripts did not. Although they secreted more protein, A- cells contained fewer IFN-gamma transcripts than A+ cells. These results suggest two vitamin A-mediated regulation steps in IFN-gamma gene expression: positive regulation of IFN-gamma transcript levels, and negative regulation posttranscriptionally. The essentially unaltered outcome of T

  17. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A deficiency exacerbates acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Department of Zoology, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, 144411, Punjab; Kim, Ki Young

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury via enhanced oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) depletion. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) acts as a reactive oxygen species scavenger by catalyzing the cyclic reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide. Herein, we investigated the protective role of MsrA against APAP-induced liver damage using MsrA gene-deleted mice (MsrA{sup −/−}). We found that MsrA{sup −/−} mice were more susceptible to APAP-induced acute liver injury than wild-type mice (MsrA{sup +/+}). The central lobule area of the MsrA{sup −/−} liver was more impaired with necrotic lesions. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels were significantly higher in MsrA{supmore » −/−} than in MsrA{sup +/+} mice after APAP challenge. Deletion of MsrA enhanced APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion and oxidative stress, leading to increased susceptibility to APAP-induced liver injury in MsrA-deficient mice. APAP challenge increased Nrf2 activation more profoundly in MsrA{sup −/−} than in MsrA{sup +/+} livers. Expression and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and its target gene expression were significantly elevated in MsrA{sup −/−} than in MsrA{sup +/+} livers after APAP challenge. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MsrA protects the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. The data provided herein constitute the first in vivo evidence of the involvement of MsrA in hepatic function under APAP challenge. - Highlights: • MsrA deficiency increases APAP-induced liver damage. • MsrA deletion enhances APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion and oxidative stress. • MsrA deficiency induces more profound activation of Nrf2 in response to APAP. • MsrA protects the liver from APAP-induced toxicity.« less

  18. Imaginal Disc Abnormalities in Lethal Mutants of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Allen; Rice, Thomas; Garen, Alan; Gehring, Walter

    1971-01-01

    Late lethal mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, dying after the larval stage of development, were isolated. The homozygous mutant larvae were examined for abnormal imaginal disc morphology, and the discs were injected into normal larval hosts to test their capacities to differentiate into adult structures. In about half of the mutants analyzed, disc abnormalities were found. Included among the abnormalities were missing discs, small discs incapable of differentiating, morphologically normal discs with limited capacities for differentiation, and discs with homeotic transformations. In some mutants all discs were affected, and in others only certain discs. The most extreme abnormal phenotype is a class of “discless” mutants. The viability of these mutant larvae indicates that the discs are essential only for the development of an adult and not of a larva. The late lethals are therefore a major source of mutants for studying the genetic control of disc formation. Images PMID:5002822

  19. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46

    DOE PAGES

    Balachandran, Manasi; Giannone, Richard J.; Bemis, David A.; ...

    2017-08-31

    Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A) gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig). The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA) enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins withmore » an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models.« less

  20. Delayed posthypoxic demyelination. Association with arylsulfatase A deficiency and lactic acidosis on proton MR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, J A; Mayer, S A; Shungu, D C; Chang, Y; Duyn, J H

    1997-11-01

    Delayed demyelination is a rare and poorly understood complication of hypoxic brain injury. A previous case report has suggested an association with mild-to-moderate deficiency of arylsulfatase A. We describe a 36-year-old man who recovered completely from an episode of hypoxia related to drug overdose, and 2 weeks later progressed from a confusional state to deep coma. MRI showed diffuse white matter signal changes, and brain biopsy demonstrated a noninflammatory demyelinating process. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed elevated choline and lactate and reduced N-acetyl aspartate signal in the affected white matter, consistent with demyelination and a shift to anaerobic metabolism. Arylsulfatase A activity from peripheral leukocytes was approximately 50% of normal, consistent with a "pseudodeficiency" phenotype. These findings confirm the hypothesis that relative arylsulfatase A deficiency predisposes susceptible individuals to delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy and implicates lactic acidosis in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  1. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, Manasi; Giannone, Richard J.; Bemis, David A.

    Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A) gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig). The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA) enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins withmore » an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models.« less

  2. Planning, implementation, and evaluation of a fortification program. Control of vitamin A deficiency in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Solon, F S; Fernandez, T L; Latham, M C; Popkin, B M

    1979-02-01

    In a three-year pilot project in the Philippines, the magnitude of vitamin A deficiency and its clinical manifestation (xerophthalmia) was determined, and three alternate programs for eliminating and preventing it in various ecologic zones were designed and implemented concurrently in separate areas in each ecologic zone. Results were evaluated, and costs and benefits of each program were determined. The results of the fortification program are reported. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) was selected as the ideal carrier was fortified at a level which provided 15,000 I.U. retinol palmitate to the average family each day. Significant increases in serum A, especially for children with more deficient vitamin A status, resulted. The program's economic benefits significantly outweighted the costs, and the MSG fortification program has been expanded to several additional pilot provinces in the Philippines.

  3. Herpetic keratouveitis mixed with bilateral Pseudomonas corneal ulcers in vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hung-Yuan; Tsai, I-Lun; Kuo, Li-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Liou, Shiow-Wen; Woung, Lin-Chung

    2015-02-01

    A 56-year-old woman complained of blurred vision and pain in her right eye for several days. Slit lamp examination revealed a large epithelial defect and disciform stromal edema with ring infiltration in her right cornea. Unfortunately, hypopyon and purulent discharge subsequently developed in both eyes. Herpetic keratouveitis and a superimposed pseudomonas infection were diagnosed. A systemic review on the patient showed malnutrition due to her dietary preference and vegetarianism. After the infection was controlled, bilateral epithelial defects persisted for a long time. We performed amniotic membrane transplantation on both eyes and the clinical status improved with administration of vitamin and protein supplements. Although rare in Taiwan, vitamin A deficiency should be kept in mind when conjunctival and corneal xerosis occurred. Vitamin A supplements are suggested because of the increased susceptibility to infection in patients with this clinical status. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Manasi; Giannone, Richard J; Bemis, David A; Kania, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A) gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig). The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA) enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins with an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models.

  5. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Manasi; Giannone, Richard J.; Bemis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A) gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig). The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA) enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins with an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models. PMID:28859130

  6. Selective Chemosensitization of Rb Mutant Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    MA). pLPC-12S coexpresses an E1A 12S cDNA with puromycin phosphotransferase (puro) and pWZL-12S coexpresses E1A with hygromycin phospho...expressing puromycin phosphotransferase (puro); LPC-12S, a 12S El A cDNA in LPC (McCurrach et al. 1997); LPC-12S.AN and LPC-12S.ACR2, El A mutants that...2, -3, conserved regions 1, 2, and 3; MEF, mouse embryonic fibroblast; puro, puromycin; hygro, hygromycin . To whom reprint requests should be

  7. Mutants of Yeast Defective in Sucrose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Marian; Osmond, Barbara C.; Botstein, David

    1981-01-01

    Utilization of sucrose as a source of carbon and energy in yeast (Saccharomyces) is controlled by the classical SUC genes, which confer the ability to produce the sucrose-degrading enzyme invertase (Mortimer and Hawthorne 1969). Mutants of S. cerevisiae strain S288C (SUC2+) unable to grow anaerobically on sucrose, but still able to use glucose, were isolated. Two major complementation groups were identified: twenty-four recessive mutations at the SUC2 locus (suc2-); and five recessive mutations defining a new locus, SNF1 (for sucrose nonfermenting), essential for sucrose utilization. Two minor complementation groups, each comprising a single member with a leaky sucrose-nonfermenting phenotype, were also identified. The suc2 mutations isolated include four suppressible amber mutations and five mutations apparently exhibiting intragenic complementation; complementation analysis and mitotic mapping studies indicated that all of the suc2 mutations are alleles of a single gene. These results suggest that SUC2 encodes a protein, probably a dimer or multimer. No invertase activity was detected in suc2 mutants.—The SNF1 locus is not tightly linked to SUC2. The snf1 mutations were found to be pleiotropic, preventing sucrose utilization by SUC2+ and SUC7+ strains, and also preventing utilization of galactose, maltose and several nonfermentable carbon sources. Although snf1 mutants thus display a petite phenotype, classic petite mutations do not interfere with utilization of sucrose, galactose or maltose. A common feature of all the carbon utilization systems affected by SNF1 is that all are regulated by glucose repression. The snf1 mutants were found to produce the constitutive nonglycosylated form of invertase, but failed to produce the glucose-repressible, glycosylated, secreted invertase. This failure cannot be attributed to a general defect in production of glycosylated and secreted proteins because synthesis of acid phosphatase, a glycosylated secreted protein not

  8. GM2-ganglioside metabolism in hexosaminidase A deficiency states: determination in situ using labeled GM2 added to fibroblast cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, S.S.; Krusell, A.; Krusell, J.

    1985-11-01

    To clarify the relationship between hexosaminidase A (HEX A) activity and GM2-ganglioside hydrolysis in atypical clinical situations of HEX A deficiency, we have developed a simple method to assess GM2-ganglioside metabolism in cultured fibroblasts utilizing GM2 labeled with tritium in the sphingosine portion of the molecule. The radioactive lipid is added to the media of cultured skin fibroblasts, and after 10 days the cells are thoroughly washed, then harvested, and their lipid composition analyzed by HPLC. The degree of hydrolysis of the ingested GM2 is determined by comparing the amount of radioactive counts recovered in undegraded substrate with total cellularmore » radioactivity. A deficiency in GM2-ganglioside hydrolysis was demonstrated in seven HEX A-deficient adults with neurological signs and in two healthy-appearing adolescents with older affected siblings. In each case, an analysis of endogenous monosialoganglioside composition revealed an increase in GM2-ganglioside, confirming the presence of a block in the metabolism of GM2. No defect in GM2-catabolism was found in four other healthy individuals with HEX A deficiency. This method of assay is especially helpful in the evaluation of atypical cases of HEX A deficiency for the definitive diagnosis of GM2-gangliosidosis.« less

  9. Impaired human responses to tetanus toxoid in vitamin A-deficient SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Molrine, D C; Polk, D B; Ciamarra, A; Phillips, N; Ambrosino, D M

    1995-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is associated with increased childhood morbidity and mortality from respiratory and diarrheal diseases. In order to evaluate the effect of vitamin A on human antibody responses, we developed a vitamin A-deficient severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Vitamin A-deficient mice were produced by depriving them of vitamin A at day 7 of gestation. Mice were reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from tetanus toxoid immune donors at 6 weeks of age and immunized with tetanus toxoid at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Secondary human antibody responses were determined 10 days later. The geometric mean human anti-tetanus toxoid immunoglobulin G concentrations were 3.75 micrograms/ml for the deficient mice and 148 micrograms/ml for controls (P = 0.0005). Vitamin A-deficient mice had only a 2.9-fold increase in human anti-tetanus toxoid antibody compared with a 74-fold increase in controls (P < 0.01). Supplementation with vitamin A prior to reconstitution restored human antibody responses to normal. These data suggest that vitamin A deficiency impairs human antibody responses. We speculate that impaired responses could increase susceptibility to certain infections. Furthermore, we propose that effects of other nutritional deficiencies on the human immune system could be evaluated in the SCID-huPBL model. PMID:7622207

  10. Variability of nursing care by APR-DRG and by severity of illness in a sample of nine Belgian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pirson, Magali; Delo, Caroline; Di Pierdomenico, Lionel; Laport, Nancy; Biloque, Veronique; Leclercq, Pol

    2013-10-10

    As soon as Diagnosis related Groups (DRG) were introduced in many hospital financing systems, most nursing research revealed that DRG were not very homogeneous with regard to nursing care. However, few studies are based on All Patient refined Diagnosis related Groups (APR-DRGs) and few of them use recent data. Objectives of this study are: (1) to evaluate if nursing activity is homogeneous by APR-DRG and by severity of illness (SOI) (2) to evaluate the outlier's rate associated with the nursing activity and (3) to compare nursing cost homogeneity per DRG and SOI. Study done in 9 Belgian hospitals on a selection of APR-DRG with more than 30 patients (7 638 inpatient stays). The evaluation of the homogeneity is based on coefficients of variation (CV). The 75th percentile + 1.5 × inter-quartile range was used to select high outliers. 25th percentile -1.5 × inter-quartile range was used to select low outliers. Nursing costs per ward were distributed on inpatient stays of each ward following two techniques (the LOS vs. the number of nursing care minutes per stay). The homogeneity of LOS by DRG and by SOI is relatively good (CV: 0.56). The homogeneity of the nursing activity by DRG is less good (CVs between 0.36 and 1.54) and is influenced by nursing activity outliers (high outliers' rate: 5.19%, low outliers' rate: 0.14%). The outlier's rate varies according to the studied variable. The high outliers' rate is higher for nursing activity than for LOS. The homogeneity of nursing costs is higher when costs are based on the LOS of patients than when based on minutes of nursing care (CVs between 0.26 and 1.46 for nursing costs based on LOS and between 0.49 and 2.04 for nursing costs based on minutes of nursing care). It is essential that the calculation of nursing cost by stay and by DRG for hospital financing purposes was based on nursing activity data, that more reflect resources used in wards, and not on LOS data. The only way to obtain this information is

  11. Variability of nursing care by APR-DRG and by severity of illness in a sample of nine Belgian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As soon as Diagnosis related Groups (DRG) were introduced in many hospital financing systems, most nursing research revealed that DRG were not very homogeneous with regard to nursing care. However, few studies are based on All Patient refined Diagnosis related Groups (APR-DRGs) and few of them use recent data. Objectives of this study are: (1) to evaluate if nursing activity is homogeneous by APR-DRG and by severity of illness (SOI) (2) to evaluate the outlier’s rate associated with the nursing activity and (3) to compare nursing cost homogeneity per DRG and SOI. Methods Study done in 9 Belgian hospitals on a selection of APR-DRG with more than 30 patients (7 638 inpatient stays). The evaluation of the homogeneity is based on coefficients of variation (CV). The 75th percentile + 1.5 × inter-quartile range was used to select high outliers. 25th percentile −1.5 × inter-quartile range was used to select low outliers. Nursing costs per ward were distributed on inpatient stays of each ward following two techniques (the LOS vs. the number of nursing care minutes per stay). Results The homogeneity of LOS by DRG and by SOI is relatively good (CV: 0.56). The homogeneity of the nursing activity by DRG is less good (CVs between 0.36 and 1.54) and is influenced by nursing activity outliers (high outliers’ rate: 5.19%, low outliers’ rate: 0.14%). The outlier’s rate varies according to the studied variable. The high outliers’ rate is higher for nursing activity than for LOS. The homogeneity of nursing costs is higher when costs are based on the LOS of patients than when based on minutes of nursing care (CVs between 0.26 and 1.46 for nursing costs based on LOS and between 0.49 and 2.04 for nursing costs based on minutes of nursing care). Conclusions It is essential that the calculation of nursing cost by stay and by DRG for hospital financing purposes was based on nursing activity data, that more reflect resources used in wards, and not on LOS

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  13. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, J.P.

    1997-07-29

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned. 15 figs.

  14. Auxin physiology of the tomato mutant diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. G.; Rayle, D. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant diageotropica (dgt) exhibits biochemical, physiological, and morphological abnormalities that suggest the mutation may have affected a primary site of auxin perception or action. We have compared two aspects of the auxin physiology of dgt and wild-type (VFN8) seedlings: auxin transport and cellular growth parameters. The rates of basipetal indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) polar transport are identical in hypocotyl sections of the two genotypes, but dgt sections have a slightly greater capacity for IAA transport. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid and ethylene reduce transport in both mutant and wild-type sections. The kinetics of auxin uptake into VFN8 and dgt sections are nearly identical. These results make it unlikely that an altered IAA efflux carrier or IAA uptake symport are responsible for the pleiotropic effects resulting from the dgt mutation. The lack of auxin-induced cell elongation in dgt plants is not due to insufficient turgor, as the osmotic potential of dgt cell sap is less (more negative) than that of VFN8. An auxin-induced increase in wall extensibility, as measured by the Instron technique, only occurs in the VFN8 plants. These data suggest dgt hypocotyls suffer a defect in the sequence of events culminating in auxin-induced cell wall loosening.

  15. Method for rapid isolation of sensitive mutants

    DOEpatents

    Freyer, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Sensitive mammalian cell mutants are rapidly isolated using flow cytometry. A first population of clonal spheroids is established to contain both normal and mutant cells. The population may be naturally occurring or may arise from mutagenized cells. The first population is then flow sorted by size to obtain a second population of clonal spheroids of a first uniform size. The second population is then exposed to a DNA-damaging agent that is being investigated. The exposed second population is placed in a growth medium to form a third population of clonal spheroids comprising spheroids of increased size from the mammalian cells that are resistant to the DNA-damaging agent and spheroids of substantially the first uniform size formed from the mammalian cells that are sensitive to the DNA-damaging agent. The third population is not flow sorted to differentiate the spheroids formed from resistant mammalian cells from spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells. The spheroids formed from sensitive mammalian cells are now treated to recover viable sensitive cells from which a sensitive cell line can be cloned.

  16. Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with Defects in Acetate Metabolism: Isolation and Characterization of Acn(-) Mutants

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    The two carbon compounds, ethanol and acetate, can be oxidatively metabolized as well as assimilated into carbohydrate in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The distribution of acetate metabolic enzymes among several cellular compartments, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and cytoplasm makes it an intriguing system to study complex metabolic interactions. To investigate the complex process of carbon catabolism and assimilation, mutants unable to grow on acetate were isolated. One hundred five Acn(-) (``ACetate Nonutilizing'') mutants were sorted into 21 complementation groups with an additional 20 single mutants. Five of the groups have defects in TCA cycle enzymes: MDH1, CIT1, ACO1, IDH1, and IDH2. A defect in RTG2, involved in the retrograde communication between the mitochondrion and the nucleus, was also identified. Four genes encode enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis: ICL1, MLS1, MDH2, and PCK1. Five other genes appear to be defective in regulating metabolic activity since elevated levels of enzymes in several metabolic pathways, including the glyoxylate cycle, gluconeogenesis, and acetyl-CoA metabolism, were detected in these mutants: ACN8, ACN9, ACN17, ACN18, and ACN42. In summary, this analysis has identified at least 22 and as many as 41 different genes involved in acetate metabolism. PMID:8878673

  17. Characterization of a Weak Allele of Zebrafish cloche Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Huang, Zhibin; Chen, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Linfeng; Xu, Xiangmin; Liao, Wangjun; Ruan, Hua; Luo, Shenqiu; Zhang, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complicated and dynamic process about which the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is an excellent vertebrate system for studying hematopoiesis and developmental mechanisms. In the previous study, we isolated and identified a cloche 172 (clo 172) mutant, a novel allele compared to the original cloche (clo) mutant, through using complementation test and initial mapping. Here, according to whole mount in-situ hybridization, we report that the endothelial cells in clo 172 mutant embryos, although initially developed, failed to form the functional vascular system eventually. In addition, further characterization indicates that the clo 172 mutant exhibited weaker defects instead of completely lost in primitive erythroid cells and definitive hematopoietic cells compared with the clo s5 mutant. In contrast, primitive myeloid cells were totally lost in clo 172 mutant. Furthermore, these reappeared definitive myeloid cells were demonstrated to initiate from the remaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clo 172 mutant, confirmed by the dramatic decrease of lyc in clo 172 runx1w84x double mutant. Collectively, the clo 172 mutant is a weak allele compared to the clo s5 mutant, therefore providing a model for studying the early development of hematopoietic and vascular system, as well as an opportunity to further understand the function of the cloche gene. PMID:22132109

  18. Molecular characterization of baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus polyhedron mutants.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, S; Noguchi, Y; Shimada, T; Nagata, M; Kobayashi, M; Maeda, S

    1999-01-01

    Four newly isolated and two previously isolated polyhedron mutants of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) were studied. Two polyhedron deficient mutants, #126 and #136, produced small uncrystallized particles of polyhedrin in the nuclei and cytoplasm of infected cells. Mutant #211 produced a large number of variably sized polyhedra in the nucleus and #220 produced a few large cuboidal polyhedra in the nucleus. Mutant #24 and #128 were previously isolated BmNPV mutants. Mutant #24 could not produce polyhedrin mRNA and polyhedra produced by mutant #128 lacked oral infectivity. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that five mutants (#126, #136, #211, #220 and #128) had amino acid substitutions in polyhedrin and mutant #24 had a point mutation only in the promoter region of the polyhedrin gene. Cotransfection experiments showed that the altered phenotypes were due to the mutations found in the polyhedrin gene regions. In mutants #126 and #136, amino acid sequences of the nuclear localization signal of polyhedrin were identical to those of wild-type BmNPV, suggesting that this sequence was necessary but not sufficient for nuclear localization of polyhedrin. Electron microscopic observation revealed that fewer occluded virions were contained in polyhedra of #128 and #220.

  19. Neurobehavioral Mutants Identified in an ENU Mutagenesis Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Melloni N.; Dunning, Jonathan P; Wiley, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    We report on a behavioral screening test battery that successfully identified several neurobehavioral mutants among a large-scale ENU-mutagenized mouse population. Large numbers of ENU mutagenized mice were screened for abnormalities in central nervous system function based on abnormal performance in a series of behavior tasks. We developed and employed a high-throughput screen of behavioral tasks to detect behavioral outliers. Twelve mutant pedigrees, representing a broad range of behavioral phenotypes, have been identified. Specifically, we have identified two open field mutants (one displaying hyper-locomotion, the other hypo-locomotion), four tail suspension mutants (all displaying increased immobility), one nociception mutant (displaying abnormal responsivenessmore » to thermal pain), two prepulse inhibition mutants (displaying poor inhibition of the startle response), one anxiety-related mutant (displaying decreased anxiety in the light/dark test), and one learning and memory mutant (displaying reduced response to the conditioned stimulus) These findings highlight the utility of a set of behavioral tasks used in a high throughput screen to identify neurobehavioral mutants. Further analysis (i.e., behavioral and genetic mapping studies) of mutants is in progress with the ultimate goal of identification of novel genes and mouse models relevant to human disorders as well as the identification of novel therapeutic targets.« less

  20. Granzyme A Deficiency Breaks Immune Tolerance and Promotes Autoimmune Diabetes Through a Type I Interferon-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mollah, Zia U A; Quah, Hong Sheng; Graham, Kate L; Jhala, Gaurang; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Dharma, Joanna Francisca M; Chee, Jonathan; Trivedi, Prerak M; Pappas, Evan G; Mackin, Leanne; Chu, Edward P F; Akazawa, Satoru; Fynch, Stacey; Hodson, Charlotte; Deans, Andrew J; Trapani, Joseph A; Chong, Mark M W; Bird, Phillip I; Brodnicki, Thomas C; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H

    2017-12-01

    Granzyme A is a protease implicated in the degradation of intracellular DNA. Nucleotide complexes are known triggers of systemic autoimmunity, but a role in organ-specific autoimmune disease has not been demonstrated. To investigate whether such a mechanism could be an endogenous trigger for autoimmunity, we examined the impact of granzyme A deficiency in the NOD mouse model of autoimmune diabetes. Granzyme A deficiency resulted in an increased incidence in diabetes associated with accumulation of ssDNA in immune cells and induction of an interferon response in pancreatic islets. Central tolerance to proinsulin in transgenic NOD mice was broken on a granzyme A-deficient background. We have identified a novel endogenous trigger for autoimmune diabetes and an in vivo role for granzyme A in maintaining immune tolerance. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  1. Inactivation and deficiency of core proteins of photosystems I and II caused by genetical phylloquinone and plastoquinone deficiency but retained lamellar structure in a T-DNA mutant of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shibata, Masaru; Ikegami, Isamu; Onai, Kiyoshi; Ohto, Masa-aki; Takamiya, Ken-ichiro

    2005-02-01

    Phylloquinone, a substituted 1,4-naphthoquinone with an 18-carbon-saturated phytyl tail, functions as a bound one-electron carrier cofactor at the A1 site of photosystem I (PSI). A Feldmann tag line mutant, no. 2755 (designated as abc4 hereafter), showed pale-green young leaves and white old leaves. The mutated nuclear gene encoded 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoic acid phytyltransferase, an enzyme of phylloquinone biosynthesis, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the abc4 mutant contained no phylloquinone, and only about 3% plastoquinone. Photooxidation of P700 of PSI in the abc4 mutant was not observed, and reduced-versus-oxidized difference spectroscopy indicated that the abc4 mutant had no P700. The maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) in the abc4 mutant was much decreased, and the electron transfer from PSII to PSI in the abc4 mutant did not occur. For the pale-green leaves of the abc4 mutant plant, the ultrastructure of the chloroplasts was almost the same as that of the wild-type plant. However, the chloroplasts in the albino leaves of the mutant were smaller and had a lot of grana thylakoids and few stroma thylakoids. The amounts of PSI and PSII core subunits in the abc4 mutant were significantly decreased compared with those in the wild type. These results suggested that a deficiency of phylloquinone in PSI caused the abolishment of PSI and a partial defect of PSII due to a significant decrease of plastoquinone, but did not influence the ultrastructure of the chloroplasts in young leaves.

  2. Sulphur flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway is differently controlled by adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase under stress and in transgenic poplar plants overexpressing gamma-ECS, SO, or APR.

    PubMed

    Scheerer, Ursula; Haensch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Kopriva, Stanislav; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herschbach, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Sulphate assimilation provides reduced sulphur for the synthesis of cysteine, methionine, and numerous other essential metabolites and secondary compounds. The key step in the pathway is the reduction of activated sulphate, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (APS), to sulphite catalysed by APS reductase (APR). In the present study, [(35)S]sulphur flux from external sulphate into glutathione (GSH) and proteins was analysed to check whether APR controls the flux through the sulphate assimilation pathway in poplar roots under some stress conditions and in transgenic poplars. (i) O-Acetylserine (OAS) induced APR activity and the sulphur flux into GSH. (ii) The herbicide Acetochlor induced APR activity and results in a decline of GSH. Thereby the sulphur flux into GSH or protein remained unaffected. (iii) Cd treatment increased APR activity without any changes in sulphur flux but lowered sulphate uptake. Several transgenic poplar plants that were manipulated in sulphur metabolism were also analysed. (i) Transgenic poplar plants that overexpressed the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) gene, the enzyme catalysing the key step in GSH formation, showed an increase in sulphur flux into GSH and sulphate uptake when gamma-ECS was targeted to the cytosol, while no changes in sulphur flux were observed when gamma-ECS was targeted to plastids. (ii) No effect on sulphur flux was observed when the sulphite oxidase (SO) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, which catalyses the back reaction of APR, that is the reaction from sulphite to sulphate, was overexpressed. (iii) When Lemna minor APR was overexpressed in poplar, APR activity increased as expected, but no changes in sulphur flux were observed. For all of these experiments the flux control coefficient for APR was calculated. APR as a controlling step in sulphate assimilation seems obvious under OAS treatment, in gamma-ECS and SO overexpressing poplars. A possible loss of control under certain conditions, that is Cd treatment

  3. Loss of TLR2 Worsens Spontaneous Colitis in MDR1A Deficiency through Commensally Induced Pyroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ey, Birgit; Eyking, Annette; Klepak, Magdalena; Salzman, Nita H.; Göthert, Joachim R.; Rünzi, Michael; Schmid, Kurt W.; Gerken, Guido; Podolsky, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    Variants of the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1/ABCB1) have been associated with increased susceptibility to severe ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we investigated the role of TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways including the common adaptor MyD88 in the pathogenesis of chronic colonic inflammation in MDR1A deficiency. Double- or triple-null mice lacking TLR2, MD-2, MyD88, and MDR1A were generated in the FVB/N background. Deletion of TLR2 in MDR1A deficiency resulted in fulminant pancolitis with early expansion of CD11b+ myeloid cells and rapid shift toward TH1-dominant immune responses in the lamina propria. Colitis exacerbation in TLR2/MDR1A double-knockout mice required the unaltered commensal microbiota and the LPS coreceptor MD-2. Blockade of IL-1β activity by treatment with IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra; Anakinra) inhibited colitis acceleration in TLR2/MDR1A double deficiency; intestinal CD11b+Ly6C+-derived IL-1β production and inflammation entirely depended on MyD88. TLR2/MDR1A double-knockout CD11b+ myeloid cells expressed MD-2/TLR4 and hyperresponded to nonpathogenic Escherichia coli or LPS with reactive oxygen species production and caspase-1 activation, leading to excessive cell death and release of proinflammatory IL-1β, consistent with pyroptosis. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species–mediated lysosome degradation suppressed LPS hyperresponsiveness. Finally, active UC in patients carrying the TLR2-R753Q and MDR1-C3435T polymorphisms was associated with increased nuclear expression of caspase-1 protein and cell death in areas of acute inflammation, compared with active UC patients without these variants. In conclusion, we show that the combined defect of two UC susceptibility genes, MDR1A and TLR2, sets the stage for spontaneous and uncontrolled colitis progression through MD-2 and IL-1R signaling via MyD88, and we identify commensally induced pyroptosis as a potential innate immune effector in severe UC pathogenesis. PMID:23636052

  4. Loss of TLR2 worsens spontaneous colitis in MDR1A deficiency through commensally induced pyroptosis.

    PubMed

    Ey, Birgit; Eyking, Annette; Klepak, Magdalena; Salzman, Nita H; Göthert, Joachim R; Rünzi, Michael; Schmid, Kurt W; Gerken, Guido; Podolsky, Daniel K; Cario, Elke

    2013-06-01

    Variants of the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1/ABCB1) have been associated with increased susceptibility to severe ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we investigated the role of TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways including the common adaptor MyD88 in the pathogenesis of chronic colonic inflammation in MDR1A deficiency. Double- or triple-null mice lacking TLR2, MD-2, MyD88, and MDR1A were generated in the FVB/N background. Deletion of TLR2 in MDR1A deficiency resulted in fulminant pancolitis with early expansion of CD11b(+) myeloid cells and rapid shift toward TH1-dominant immune responses in the lamina propria. Colitis exacerbation in TLR2/MDR1A double-knockout mice required the unaltered commensal microbiota and the LPS coreceptor MD-2. Blockade of IL-1β activity by treatment with IL-1R antagonist (IL-1Ra; Anakinra) inhibited colitis acceleration in TLR2/MDR1A double deficiency; intestinal CD11b(+)Ly6C(+)-derived IL-1β production and inflammation entirely depended on MyD88. TLR2/MDR1A double-knockout CD11b(+) myeloid cells expressed MD-2/TLR4 and hyperresponded to nonpathogenic Escherichia coli or LPS with reactive oxygen species production and caspase-1 activation, leading to excessive cell death and release of proinflammatory IL-1β, consistent with pyroptosis. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species-mediated lysosome degradation suppressed LPS hyperresponsiveness. Finally, active UC in patients carrying the TLR2-R753Q and MDR1-C3435T polymorphisms was associated with increased nuclear expression of caspase-1 protein and cell death in areas of acute inflammation, compared with active UC patients without these variants. In conclusion, we show that the combined defect of two UC susceptibility genes, MDR1A and TLR2, sets the stage for spontaneous and uncontrolled colitis progression through MD-2 and IL-1R signaling via MyD88, and we identify commensally induced pyroptosis as a potential innate immune effector in severe UC pathogenesis.

  5. Affective and cognitive behavior in the alpha-galactosidase A deficient mouse model of Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Franziska; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal storage disorder with intracellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) due to α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency. Fabry patients frequently report of anxiety, depression, and impaired cognitive function. We characterized affective and cognitive phenotype of male mice with α-Gal A deficiency (Fabry KO) and compared results with those of age-matched male wildtype (WT) littermates. Young (3 months) and old (≥ 18 months) mice were tested in the naïve state and after i.pl. injection of complete Freund`s adjuvant (CFA) as an inflammatory pain model. We used the elevated plus maze (EPM), the light-dark box (LDB) and the open field test (OF) to investigate anxiety-like behavior. The forced swim test (FST) and Morris water maze (MWM) were applied to assess depressive-like and learning behavior. The EPM test revealed no intergroup difference for anxiety-like behavior in naïve young and old Fabry KO mice compared to WT littermates, except for longer time spent in open arms of the EPM for young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05). After CFA injection, young Fabry KO mice showed increased anxiety-like behavior compared to young WT littermates (p<0.05) and naïve young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05) in the EPM as reflected by shorter time spent in EPM open arms. There were no relevant differences in the LDB and the OF test, except for longer time spent in the center zone of the OF by young WT mice compared to young Fabry KO mice (p<0.05). Complementary to this, depression-like and learning behavior were not different between genotypes and age-groups, except for the expectedly lower memory performance in older age-groups compared to young mice. Our results indicate that genetic influences on affective and cognitive symptoms in FD may be of subordinate relevance, drawing attention to potential influences of environmental and epigenetic factors. PMID:28662189

  6. Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0177 TITLE: Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Katerina Politi...CONTRACT NUMBER Cellular Plasticity and Heterogeneity of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0177 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Phenotypic changes have been observed in EGFR mutant lung cancers that become resistant to targeted

  7. Chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dusenbery, D B; Sheridan, R E; Russell, R L

    1975-06-01

    The technique of countercurrent separation has been used to isolate 17 independent chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants, selected to be relatively insensitive to the normally attractive salt NaCl, show varying degrees of residual sensitivity; some are actually weakly repelled by NaCl. The mutants are due to single gene defects, are autosomal and recessive, and identify at least five complementation groups.

  8. [Construction and stress tolerance of trehalase mutant in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Lv, Ye; Xiao, Dongguang; He, Dongqin; Guo, Xuewu

    2008-10-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is critical in improving the stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two enzymes are capable of hydrolyzing trehalose: a neutral trehalase (NTH1) and an acidic trehalase (ATH1). We constructed trehalase disruption mutants to provide a basis for future commercial application. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cell, we constructed diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Deltanth1), acid trehalase mutants (Deltaath1) and double mutants (Deltaath1Deltanth1) by using gene disruption. We tested mutants'trehalose content and their tolerance to freezing, heat, high-sugar and ethanol concentrations. These trehalase disruption mutants were further confirmed by PCR amplification and southern blot. All mutant strains accumulated higher levels of cellular trehalose and grew to a higher cell density than the isogenic parent strain. In addition, the levels of trehalose in these mutants correlated with increased tolerance to freezing, heat, high-sugar and ethanol concentration. The improved tolerance of trehalase mutants may make them useful in commercial applications, including baking and brewing protein.

  9. Characterization and classification of zebrafish brain morphology mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Laura Anne; De Rienzo, Gianluca; Gutzman, Jennifer H.; Sive, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the vertebrate brain achieves its three-dimensional structure are clearly complex, requiring the functions of many genes. Using the zebrafish as a model, we have begun to define genes required for brain morphogenesis, including brain ventricle formation, by studying 16 mutants previously identified as having embryonic brain morphology defects. We report the phenotypic characterization of these mutants at several time-points, using brain ventricle dye injection, imaging, and immunohistochemistry with neuronal markers. Most of these mutants display early phenotypes, affecting initial brain shaping, while others show later phenotypes, affecting brain ventricle expansion. In the early phenotype group, we further define four phenotypic classes and corresponding functions required for brain morphogenesis. Although we did not use known genotypes for this classification, basing it solely on phenotypes, many mutants with defects in functionally related genes clustered in a single class. In particular, class 1 mutants show midline separation defects, corresponding to epithelial junction defects; class 2 mutants show reduced brain ventricle size; class 3 mutants show midbrain-hindbrain abnormalities, corresponding to basement membrane defects; and class 4 mutants show absence of ventricle lumen inflation, corresponding to defective ion pumping. Later brain ventricle expansion requires the extracellular matrix, cardiovascular circulation, and transcription/splicing-dependent events. We suggest that these mutants define processes likely to be used during brain morphogenesis throughout the vertebrates. PMID:19051268

  10. Isolation of ntrA-like mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed Central

    Santero, E; Luque, F; Medina, J R; Tortolero, M

    1986-01-01

    A number of chlorate-resistant mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii affected in a general control of nitrogen metabolism were isolated. These mutants could not utilize dinitrogen, nitrate, or nitrite as a nitrogen source. The reason for this inability is that they were simultaneously deficient in nitrogenase and nitrate and nitrite reductase activities. They were complemented by a cosmid carrying a DNA fragment of A. vinelandii able to complement ntrA mutants of Escherichia coli, so they seemed to be ntrA-like mutants. PMID:3009406

  11. Diaminopurine-Resistant Mutants of Cultured, Diploid Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Harriet; DeMars, Robert

    1973-01-01

    Clones of cells resistant to 2,6-diaminopurine were detected in skin fibroblast cultures derived from 13 of 21 normal humans of both sexes from 17 unrelated families. Almost all of the cultures that yielded mutants were chosen for further study from among a total of 83 surveyed because they displayed a slight resistance to low concentrations of diaminopurine. The incidences of mutant colonies ranged between about 10-5 and 10-4 per cell surviving prior mutagenic treatment with MNNG. The incidences of spontaneous mutants were about 10-7 to 10-5 in three unrelated cultures. Most independent mutants had distinctly reduced activity of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase but some had apparently normal amounts of activity. Two mutants from unrelated boys had little or no detectable enzyme activity and were unable to effectively use exogenous adenine for growth when purine biosynthesis was blocked with azaserine. Most mutants could utilize exogenous adenine, just as most azaguanine-resistant fibroblast mutants can utilize exogenous hypoxanthine, even when their hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity is reduced. Diverse genetic changes conferred diaminopurine resistance but their specific natures are still undefined. Gross numerical or structural chromosome abnormalities were not observed in the mutants examined so far. Since at least one gene responsible for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity is on autosome No. 16 our results suggest that at least some of the cultures yielding mutants were heterozygous and that alleles conferring diaminopurine resistance may be frequent enough to comprise a polymorphism. PMID:4358687

  12. 78 FR 14155 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane; Use of Automatic Power Reserve (APR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Automatic Power Reserve (APR), an Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System (ATTCS), for Go-Around Performance... airplane will have novel or unusual design features associated with utilizing go-around performance credit...: Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov/ and follow the online instructions for...

  13. Synthesis of Key Points from the OSEP Early Childhood Transition FAQ (SPP/APR Indicators C-8, B-11 and B-12)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diefendorf, M.; Henson, J.; Lucas, A.; Whaley, K.

    2010-01-01

    This document is a synthesis of the key points provided in the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) Early Childhood Transition FAQs: SPP/APR indicators C-8 and B-12 released on December 1, 2009. It was developed to assist states with the implementation of effective transition policies and practices. The following is included: (1) Transition…

  14. 15 CFR 781.4 - U.S. Government requests for information needed to satisfy the requirements of the APR or the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Government requests for information needed to satisfy the requirements of the APR or the Act. 781.4 Section 781.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY...

  15. ASIC1a Deficient Mice Show Unaltered Neurodegeneration in the Subacute MPTP Model of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Komnig, Daniel; Imgrund, Silke; Reich, Arno; Gründer, Stefan; Falkenburger, Björn H

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation contributes to the death of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson disease and can be accompanied by acidification of extracellular pH, which may activate acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC). Accordingly, amiloride, a non-selective inhibitor of ASIC, was protective in an acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson disease. To complement these findings we determined MPTP toxicity in mice deficient for ASIC1a, the most common ASIC isoform in neurons. MPTP was applied i.p. in doses of 30 mg per kg on five consecutive days. We determined the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, assayed by stereological counting 14 days after the last MPTP injection, the number of Nissl positive neurons in the substantia nigra, and the concentration of catecholamines in the striatum. There was no difference between ASIC1a-deficient mice and wildtype controls. We are therefore not able to confirm that ASIC1a are involved in MPTP toxicity. The difference might relate to the subacute MPTP model we used, which more closely resembles the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, or to further targets of amiloride.

  16. Reduction of vitamin A deficiency and anemia in pregnancy after implementing proposed prenatal nutritional assistance.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Chagas, C; Ramalho, A; de Carvalho Padilha, P; Delia Libera, B; Saunders, C

    2011-01-01

    Micronutrient deficiency is an unquestionable public health problem, specially anemia and vitamin A deficiency (VAD). This is due to the collective dimension of these carencies, which reflects on morbimortality rates in the maternal and infant group. to evaluate the impact of a proposal for prenatal nutritional assistance, comparing the prevalence of anemia and VAD, in pre-intervention (GI) and intervention (GII) groups. this is a prospective intervention study in a cohort of pregnant women. The GI group was made up of 225 the GII group of 208 pregnant adults and their respective newborns, attended a Public Maternity Ward in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Concentration of hemoglobin was used to diagnose anemia and a standardized interview to diagnose night blindness (XN). after adjusting for confounding variables, through logistic regression, the protective effect of intervention at the onset of anemia (OR = 0.420; IC 95% = 0.251-0.702), with a significant reduction in prevalence, of 28.4% in the GI to 16.8% in the GII, also observed at the onset of XN (OR = 0.377; IC95% = 0.187- 0.759), with a reduction in prevalence of 18.7 % in the GI to 6.2% in the GII. Nutritional intervention has a beneficial effect on maternal health, reducing nutritional deficiencies most prevalent during pregnancy and the impact of these on the obstetric ailment.

  17. Potential contribution of mangoes to reduction of vitamin A deficiency in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muoki, Penina N; Makokha, Anselimo O; Onyango, Christine A; Ojijo, Nelson K O

    2009-01-01

    The β-carotene content of fresh and dried mangoes commonly consumed in Kenya was evaluated and converted to retinol equivalent (RE). Mango fruits of varieties Ngowe, Apple, and Tommy Atkins were harvested at mature green, partially ripe, and ripe stages and their β-carotene content analyzed. The stability of β-carotene in sun dried mangoes was also studied over 6 months under usual marketing conditions used in Kenya. The effect of using simple pretreatment methods prior to drying of mango slices on retention of β-carotene was as well evaluated. In amounts acceptable to children and women, fresh and dried mangoes can supply 50% or more of the daily required retinol equivalent for children and women. Stage of ripeness, variety, postharvest holding temperature, method of drying, and storage time of dried mango slices affected β-carotene content and consequently vitamin A value of the fruits. Apple variety grown in Machakos had the highest β-carotene. It exceeded the daily RE requirements by 11.8% and 21.5% for women and children respectively. Fresh or dried mangoes are a significant provitamin A source and should be included in food-based approaches aiming to reduce vitamin A deficiency.

  18. An evaluation of strategies to control vitamin A deficiency in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Solon, F; Fernandez, T L; Latham, M C; Popkin, B M

    1979-07-01

    Xerophthalmia has been found to be an important cause of blindness in the Philippines. An earlier study had investigated its prevalence and epidemiology on the island of Cebu. The research now presented consists of an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of three different intervention strategies to control vitamin A deficiency in Cebu. These interventions were 1) a public health and horticulture intervention, 2) the provision of 200,000 IU of vitamin A to children every 6 months (the "capsule intervention"), and 3) the fortification of monosodium glutamate with vitamin A. A total of 12 areas or barangays were included. Each intervention was monitored in four different barangays, two urban and two rural, for almost 2 years. Similar examinations were performed before and after the interventions. The monosodium glutamate fortification was the only intervention that resulted both in a significant reduction in clinical signs of xerophthalmia and in a significant rise in serum vitamin A levels. Fortification is now being planned in three Philippine provinces.

  19. Vitamin A deficiency in the Philippines: a study of xerophthalmia in Cebu.

    PubMed

    Solon, F S; Popkin, B M; Fernandez, T L; Latham, M C

    1978-02-01

    An investigation of xerophthalmia was undertaken in four ecological zones in Cebu in the Philippines. One thousand seven hundred fifteen children aged 1 to 16 years were examined in 12 barrios. Clinical, biochemical and anthropometric data were collected from the children. Dietary and socioeconomic information was obtained from the households. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to examine factors possibly associated with xerophthalmia. Of children 47% had deficient or low serum vitamin A levels and 4.5% had clinical signs of xerophthalmia. Approximately 2% had both low serum vitamin A levels and clinical eye signs and were then defined as having active xerophthalmia. Vitamin A deficiency was more prevalent in males than females. Xerophthalmia was most common in the 4 to 6 year old age group. Diarrhea, roundworm infestation and measles were not positively correlated with xerophthalmia but whooping cough and tuberculosis were. Low intakes of carotene and vitamin A were associated with xerophthalmia but protein and fat intakes were not. A higher incidence of xerophthalmia occurred in children of working than nonworking mothers. Data on home production and use of vegetables and fruits are presented. The results of this study are being used to introduce three alternate intervention strategies to control xerophthalmia.

  20. Development of type 2 diabetes caused by a deficiency of a tRNA(lys) modification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fan-Yan; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variations in the cdk5 regulator associated protein 1-like 1 (cdkal1) gene have been identified in whole genome association studies as a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). A recent study showed that Cdkal1 was a mammalian methythiotransferase, which specifically synthesizes 2-methylthio-N (6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms (2)t (6)A) at position 37 of tRNA(lys)(UUU). The ms (2)t (6)A modification in tRNA(lys)(UUU) was important for the accurate decoding of its cognate codon. In pancreatic β-cell-specific Cdkal1 knockout (Cdkal1 KO) mice, a deficiency of ms (2)t (6)A caused the mistranslation of a Lys codon in proinsulin, resulting in improper processing. The mice showed a decrease in insulin secretion and glucose intolerance. In addition, the mistranslation contributed to the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in Cdkal1-deficient β-cells. Furthermore, Cdkal1 KO mice were hypersensitive to high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, as well as the ER stress response. These findings might potentially explain the molecular pathogenesis of T2D in patients carrying Cdkal1 variations.

  1. Isolation of the synchronized A spermatogonia from adult vitamin A-deficient rat testes.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, A M; Morena, A R; van Dissel-Emiliani, F M; Boitani, C; Gaemers, I C; de Rooij, D G; Stefanini, M

    1996-08-01

    A method for isolating A spermatogonia from the adult vitamin A-deficient (VAD) rat testis is described. After removal, the testes were decapsulated and tubules were dissected. An enzymatic digestion with collagenase, hyaluronidase, and trypsin was performed first to eliminate most of the interstitial cells. A second digestion with collagenase and hyaluronidase was performed to obtain a cell suspension with a high number of A spermatogonia. The cell suspension was further enriched with A spermatogonia by preplating on peanut agglutinin and separating on a discontinuous Percoll gradient. By this procedure, purification of the suspension to 70-90% A spermatogonia was obtained. In the seminiferous tubules of the VAD rats, only Sertoli cells, A spermatogonia, and some preleptotene spermatocytes are present. In our rats, the A spermatogonia are almost all arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle before the S phase of A1 spermatogonia, and presumably before their differentiation into A1 spermatogonia. After administration of vitamin A, spermatogenesis starts synchronously from these A spermatogonia. The isolation of these synchronized A spermatogonia opens ways to investigate the regulation of differentiation and proliferation of A spermatogonia and the biochemical characteristics of the subsequent types of A spermatogonia.

  2. Do we need to measure total serum IgA to exclude IgA deficiency in coeliac disease?

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D; Saas, M; Turk, A; Goble, M; Kerr, D

    2006-01-01

    Background Screening for IgA deficiency in patients with coeliac disease is essential because of the increased incidence of IgA deficiency associated with the disease, which usually relies on the estimation of IgA levels in each case. Aim To devise a method of excluding IgA deficiency without measuring total serum IgA in each case. Materials and methods The optical density readings on enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of 608 routine samples received for tissue transglutaminase (TTG) antibody testing for coeliac disease were compared with their total IgA concentrations. Dilution experiments were also carried out to ensure linear relationships between optical density on ELISA and IgA concentrations and to compare the sensitivities for TTG and endomysium antibodies in TTG‐positive samples. Results and discussion A clear relationship was shown between total IgA concentration and TTG optical density readings by ELISA. To ensure a positive TTG result if antibodies are present, it was possible to recommend an optical density level above which all samples have sufficient IgA. Samples with optical density <0.05 should be investigated further by estimating total IgA and, if low, samples should be subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy testing for IgA and IgG endomysium antibodies. Conclusions An easier, more cost‐effective and practical way of excluding IgA deficiency in the investigation on coeliac disease is reported. PMID:16489174

  3. Dictyostelium myosin I double mutants exhibit conditional defects in pinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Novak, K D; Peterson, M D; Reedy, M C; Titus, M A

    1995-12-01

    The functional relationship between three Dictyostelium myosin Is, myoA, myoB, and myoC, has been examined through the creation of double mutants. Two double mutants, myoA-/B- and myoB-/C-, exhibit similar conditional defects in fluid-phase pinocytosis. Double mutants grown in suspension culture are significantly impaired in their ability to take in nutrients from the medium, whereas they are almost indistinguishable from wild-type and single mutant strains when grown on a surface. The double mutants are also found to internalize gp126, a 116-kD membrane protein, at a slower rate than either the wild-type or single mutant cells. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that both double mutants possess numerous small vesicles, in contrast to the wild-type or myosin I single mutants that exhibit several large, clear vacuoles. The alterations in fluid and membrane internalization in the suspension-grown double mutants, coupled with the altered vesicular profile, suggest that these cells may be compromised during the early stages of pinocytosis, a process that has been proposed to occur via actin-based cytoskeletal rearrangements. Scanning electron microscopy and rhodamine-phalloidin staining indicates that the myosin I double mutants appear to extend a larger number of actin-filled structures, such as filopodia and crowns, than wild-type cells. Rhodamine-phalloidin staining of the F-actin cytoskeleton of these suspension-grown cells also reveals that the double mutant cells are delayed in the rearrangement of cortical actin-rich structures upon adhesion to a substrate. We propose that myoA, myoB, and myoC play roles in controlling F-actin filled membrane projections that are required for pinosome internalization in suspension.

  4. Applications of Protein Thermodynamic Database for Understanding Protein Mutant Stability and Designing Stable Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Anoosha, P; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Protein stability is the free energy difference between unfolded and folded states of a protein, which lies in the range of 5-25 kcal/mol. Experimentally, protein stability is measured with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy using thermal and denaturant denaturation methods. These experimental data have been accumulated in the form of a database, ProTherm, thermodynamic database for proteins and mutants. It also contains sequence and structure information of a protein, experimental methods and conditions, and literature information. Different features such as search, display, and sorting options and visualization tools have been incorporated in the database. ProTherm is a valuable resource for understanding/predicting the stability of proteins and it can be accessed at http://www.abren.net/protherm/ . ProTherm has been effectively used to examine the relationship among thermodynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We describe the recent progress on the development of methods for understanding/predicting protein stability, such as (1) general trends on mutational effects on stability, (2) relationship between the stability of protein mutants and amino acid properties, (3) applications of protein three-dimensional structures for predicting their stability upon point mutations, (4) prediction of protein stability upon single mutations from amino acid sequence, and (5) prediction methods for addressing double mutants. A list of online resources for predicting has also been provided.

  5. Le don après un décès d'origine cardiocirculatoire au Canada

    PubMed Central

    Shemie, Sam D.; Baker, Andrew J.; Knoll, Greg; Wall, William; Rocker, Graeme; Howes, Daniel; Davidson, Janet; Pagliarello, Joe; Chambers-Evans, Jane; Cockfield, Sandra; Farrell, Catherine; Glannon, Walter; Gourlay, William; Grant, David; Langevin, Stéphan; Wheelock, Brian; Young, Kimberly; Dossetor, John

    2006-01-01

    Résumé Ces recommandations sont le fruit d'un processus multidisciplinaire national ayant duré un an et visant à déterminer si et comment l'on pourrait procéder au don d'organes après un décès d'origine cardiocirculatoire («don après le décès cardiocirculatoire», ou DDC) au Canada. Le forum national organisé en février 2005 a permis aux participants de discuter et d'élaborer des recommandations sur les principes, interventions et pratiques se rapportant au DDC. Les aspects éthiques et juridiques ont été abordés dans les discussions. À la fin du Forum, la majorité des participants ont été favorables à l'implantation de programmes de DDC au Canada. Les participants du Forum ont également convenu qu'il fallait formuler et prôner des valeurs fondamentales pour orienter l'élaboration de programmes et de protocoles basés sur le cadre médical, éthique et juridique établi lors de cette réunion. Même si la possibilité d'un don d'organes et de tissus doit faire partie intégrante des soins de fin de vie, il faut insister sur le fait que le devoir de diligence envers les patients mourants et leurs familles doit demeurer la priorité des équipes soignantes. La complexité et les répercussions profondes du décès sont reconnues et doivent être respectées, de même que les différences personnelles, ethnoculturelles et religieuses face à la mort et au don d'organes. Les décisions d'arrêter le traitement de maintien des fonctions vitales, la prise en charge des derniers moments de la vie et le diagnostic de décès selon des critères cardiocirculatoires doivent être distincts et indépendants des processus de don et transplantation. Ce rapport contient des recommandations destinées aux gestionnaires de program, aux autorités sanitaires régionales et aux instances appelés à élaborer les protocoles de DDC. Les programmes doivent être conçus en fonction des éléments suivants : direction et planification locales, éducation et

  6. A Deficiency in Arabinogalactan Biosynthesis Affects Corynebacterium glutamicum Mycolate Outer Membrane Stability▿

    PubMed Central

    Bou Raad, Roland; Méniche, Xavier; de Sousa-d'Auria, Celia; Chami, Mohamed; Salmeron, Christophe; Tropis, Marielle; Labarre, Cecile; Daffé, Mamadou; Houssin, Christine; Bayan, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Corynebacterineae is a specific suborder of Gram-positive bacteria that includes Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum. The ultrastructure of the cell envelope is very atypical. It is composed of a heteropolymer of peptidoglycan and arabinogalactan (AG) covalently associated to an outer membrane. Five arabinosyltransferases are involved in the biosynthesis of AG in C. glutamicum. AftB catalyzes the transfer of Araf (arabinofuranosyl) onto the arabinan domain of the arabinogalactan to form terminal β(1 → 2)-linked Araf residues. Here we show that ΔaftB cells lack half of the arabinogalactan mycoloylation sites but are still able to assemble an outer membrane. In addition, we show that a ΔaftB mutant grown on a rich medium has a perturbed cell envelope and sheds a significant amount of membrane fragments in the external culture medium. These fragments contain mono- and dimycolate of trehalose and PorA/H, the major porin of C. glutamicum, but lack conventional phospholipids that typify the plasma membrane, suggesting that they are derived from the atypical mycolate outer membrane of the cell envelope. This is the first report of outer membrane destabilization in the Corynebacterineae, and it suggests that a strong interaction between the mycolate outer membrane and the underlying polymer is essential for cell envelope integrity. The presence of outer membrane-derived fragments (OMFs) in the external medium of the ΔaftB mutant is also a very promising tool for outer membrane characterization. Indeed, fingerprint analysis of major OMF-associated proteins has already led to the identification of 3 associated mycoloyltransferases and an unknown protein with a C-terminal hydrophobic anchoring domain reminiscent of that found for the S-layer protein PS2 of C. glutamicum. PMID:20363942

  7. Vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Palafox, Neal A; Gamble, Mary V; Dancheck, Barbara; Ricks, Michelle O; Briand, Kennar; Semba, Richard D

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the co-occurrence of vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and anemia among young children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Hemoglobin, serum retinol, and serum ferritin were assessed in the Republic of the Marshall Islands Vitamin A Deficiency Study, a community-based survey that involved 919 children ages 1 to 5 y. The proportion of children with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol concentrations < 0.70 microM/L) was 59.9%. The prevalences of anemia (hemoglobin < 110 g/L), iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 12 microg/L), and iron deficiency anemia (iron deficiency and anemia) were 36.4%, 53.5%, and 23.8%, respectively. The proportion of children who had co-occurrence of vitamin A and iron deficiencies was 33.2%. The mean ages of children with and without vitamin A deficiency were 3.2 +/- 1.4 and 2.9 +/- 1.5 y, respectively (P = 0.01), and the mean ages of those with and without iron deficiency were 2.7 +/- 1.3 and 3.5 +/- 1.4 y, respectively (P < 0.0001). Children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, ages 1 to 5 y, are at high risk of anemia, vitamin A deficiency, and iron deficiency, and one-third of these children had the co-occurrence of vitamin A and iron deficiencies. Further investigation is needed to identify risk factors and evaluate interventions to address vitamin A and iron deficiencies among children.

  8. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  9. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  10. Dictyostelium discoideum mutants with conditional defects in phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized Dictyostelium discoideum mutants with conditional defects in phagocytosis. Under suspension conditions, the mutants exhibited dramatic reductions in the uptake of bacteria and polystyrene latex beads. The initial binding of these ligands was unaffected, however, indicating that the defect was not in a plasma membrane receptor: Because of the phagocytosis defect, the mutants were unable to grow when cultured in suspensions of heat-killed bacteria. The mutants exhibited normal capacities for fluid phase endocytosis and grew as rapidly as parental (AX4) cells in axenic medium. Both the defects in phagocytosis and growth on bacteria were corrected when the mutant Dictyostelium cells were cultured on solid substrates. Reversion and genetic complementation analysis suggested that the mutant phenotypes were caused by single gene defects. While the precise site of action of the mutations was not established, the mutations are likely to affect an early signaling event because the binding of bacteria to mutant cells in suspension was unable to trigger the localized polymerization of actin filaments required for ingestion; other aspects of actin function appeared normal. This class of conditional phagocytosis mutant should prove to be useful for the expression cloning of the affected gene(s). PMID:7519624

  11. A Mutant Hunt Using the C-Fern (Ceratopteris Richardii)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calie, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    A modification of the popular C-Fern system, the tropical fern Ceratopteris richardii is developed in which students plate out a genetically mixed set of fern spores and then select for specific mutants. This exercise can provide students with an experience in plant mutant selection and can be used as a platform to expose students to a diverse…

  12. Gravitropism in roots of intermediate-starch mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Wright, J. B.; Caspar, T.

    1996-01-01

    Gravitropism was studied in roots of wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (strain Wassilewskija) and three starch-deficient mutants that were generated by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis. One of these mutants was starchless while the other two were intermediate mutants, which had 51% and 60%, respectively, of the WT amount of starch as determined by light and electron microscopy. The four parameters used to assay gravitropism were: orientation during vertical growth, time course of curvature, induction, and intermittent stimulation experiments. WT roots were much more responsive to gravity than were roots of the starchless mutant, and the intermediate starch mutants exhibited an intermediate graviresponse. Our data suggest that lowered starch content in the mutants primarily affects gravitropism rather than differential growth because both phototropic curvature and growth rates were approximately equal among all four genotypes. Since responses of intermediate-starch mutants were closer to the WT response than to the starchless mutant, it appears that 51-60% of the WT level of starch is near the threshold amount needed for full gravitropic sensitivity. While other interpretations are possible, the data are consistent with the starch statolith hypothesis for gravity perception in that the degree of graviresponsiveness is proportional to the total mass of plastids per cell.

  13. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  14. Chaperone-mediated autophagy degrades mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Kim, Minsu; Xia, Hong-guang; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Pan, Lifeng; Ince, Tan A.; Kroemer, Guido; Brugge, Joan S.; Yuan, Junying

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations in the gene TP53, which encodes p53, one of the most important tumor suppressors, are common in human cancers. Accumulated mutant p53 proteins are known to actively contribute to tumor development and metastasis. Thus, promoting the removal of mutant p53 proteins in cancer cells may have therapeutic significance. Here we investigated the mechanisms that govern the turnover of mutant p53 in nonproliferating tumor cells using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches. We show that suppression of macroautophagy by multiple means promotes the degradation of mutant p53 through chaperone-mediated autophagy in a lysosome-dependent fashion. In addition, depletion of mutant p53 expression due to macroautophagy inhibition sensitizes the death of dormant cancer cells under nonproliferating conditions. Taken together, our results delineate a novel strategy for killing tumor cells that depend on mutant p53 expression by the activation of chaperone-mediated autophagy and potential pharmacological means to reduce the levels of accumulated mutant p53 without the restriction of mutant p53 conformation in quiescent tumor cells. PMID:23913924

  15. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  16. Characterization of amylolytic enzyme overproducing mutant of Aspergillus luchuensis obtained by ion beam mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Toshihiro; Kadooka, Chihiro; Komohara, Marisa; Onitsuka, Shiori; Tanimura, Miya; Muroi, Yukiko; Kurazono, Shugo; Shiraishi, Yohei; Oda, Ken; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Onoue, Masahira; Okutsu, Kayu; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Takamine, Kazunori; Futagami, Taiki; Mori, Kazuki; Tamaki, Hisanori

    2018-01-15

    Aspergillus luchuensis is a kuro (black) koji fungus that has been used as a starch degrader for the awamori- and shochu-making industries in Japan. In this study, we investigated the effect of ion beam irradiation on A. luchuensis RIB2601 and obtained a high starch-degrading mutant strain U1. Strain U1 showed reduced growth rate, whereas it showed higher α-amylase, glucoamylase, and α-glucosidase activities on a mycelial mass basis than the wild type (wt) strain both on agar plates and in rice koji. In addition, strain U1 showed higher N-acetylglucosamine content in the cell wall and higher sensitivity to calcofluor white, suggesting a deficiency in cell wall composition. Interestingly, produced protein showed higher expression of acid-labile α-amylase (AmyA) and glucoamylase (GlaA) in strain U1, although real-time RT-PCR indicated no significant change in the transcription of the amyA or glaA gene. These results suggested that the high amylolytic activity of strain U1 is attributable to a high AmyA and GlaA production level, but the elevated production is not due to transcriptional regulation of the corresponding genes. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis indicated that strain U1 shows transcriptional changes in at least 604 genes related to oxidation-reduction, transport, and glucosamine-containing compound metabolic processes, which may be involved in the deficient cell wall composition of strain U1.

  17. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  18. Misfolded opsin mutants display elevated β -sheet structure

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Lisa M.; Gragg, Megan; Kim, Tae Gyun; ...

    2015-09-07

    Mutations in rhodopsin can cause misfolding and aggregation of the receptor, which leads to retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degenerative disease. The structure adopted by misfolded opsin mutants and the associated cell toxicity is poorly understood. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy were utilized to probe within cells the structures formed by G188R and P23H opsins, which are misfolding mutants that cause autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Also, both mutants formed aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum and exhibited altered secondary structure with elevated β-sheet and reduced α-helical content. The newly formed β-sheet structure may facilitate themore » aggregation of misfolded opsin mutants. In conclusion, the effects observed for the mutants were unrelated to retention of opsin molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum itself.« less

  19. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  20. [Prevalence of vitamin a deficiency and anemia in children under five years of age in Peru].

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, Jaime; Miranda, Marianella; Zamora, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and nutritional anemia (NA) in children under five in Peru. Cross-sectional study with a stratified and multi-staged probabilistic sample conducted between November 2007 and April 2010.2,736 children were included for NA and 1,465 children for VAD. NA was defined as Hb<11 g/dL.VAD was identified by serum retinol levels <20 µg/dL. Sociodemographic variables related to the child and the mother were studied in addition to their participation in growth control and development programs, integrated nutrition program and supplementation with iron and vitamin A. Analysis of complex samples was performed, descriptive statistics and logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals and a significance level of p<0.05 were calculated. The prevalence of VAD was 11.7% (95% CI: 9.4 to 14.4). The highest prevalences were in children under five months (44.6%) and those living in rural areas (19.5%). The prevalence of NA was 33% (95% CI: 29.9 to 36.1) and was higher in children under 11 months (68.2%) and children of mothers aged 13-19 years old (55.4 %). VAD is a public health problem that remains, with the most affected children living in rural areas and in the jungle. The prevalence of NA shows a slight improvement. It is necessary to improve the efficiency and impact of programs that include supplementation of vitamin A and iron.

  1. Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency in South Asia: Causes, Outcomes, and Possible Remedies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Anwaar; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Atukorala, Sunethra; Arlappa, Nimmathota; Ismail, Tariq; Ali, Zulfiqar

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) has been recognized as a public-health issue in developing countries. Economic constraints, sociocultural limitations, insufficient dietary intake, and poor absorption leading to depleted vitamin A stores in the body have been regarded as potential determinants of the prevalence of VAD in South Asian developing countries. VAD is exacerbated by lack of education, poor sanitation, absence of new legislation and enforcement of existing food laws, and week monitoring and surveillance system. Several recent estimates confirmed higher morbidly and mortality rate among children and pregnant and non-pregnant women of childbearing age. Xerophthalmia is the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness with its earliest manifestations as night blindness and Bitot's spots, followed by blinding keratomalacia, all of which are the ocular manifestations of VAD. Children need additional vitamin A because they do not consume enough in their normal diet. There are three general ways for improving vitamin A status: supplementation, fortification, and dietary diversification. These approaches have not solved the problem in South Asian countries to the desired extent because of poor governmental support and supervision of vitamin A supplementation twice a year. An extensive review of the extant literature was carried out, and the data under various sections were identified by using a computerized bibliographic search via PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. All abstracts and full-text articles were examined, and the most relevant articles were selected for screening and inclusion in this review. Conclusively, high prevalence of VAD in South Asian developing countries leads to increased morbidity and mortality among infants, children, and pregnant women. Therefore, stern efforts are needed to address this issue of public-health significance at local and international level in lower- and middle-income countries of South Asia. PMID:24592582

  2. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A deficiency exacerbates acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahendra Pratap; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2017-02-26

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose induces acute liver injury via enhanced oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) depletion. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) acts as a reactive oxygen species scavenger by catalyzing the cyclic reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide. Herein, we investigated the protective role of MsrA against APAP-induced liver damage using MsrA gene-deleted mice (MsrA -/- ). We found that MsrA -/- mice were more susceptible to APAP-induced acute liver injury than wild-type mice (MsrA +/+ ). The central lobule area of the MsrA -/- liver was more impaired with necrotic lesions. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels were significantly higher in MsrA -/- than in MsrA +/+ mice after APAP challenge. Deletion of MsrA enhanced APAP-induced hepatic GSH depletion and oxidative stress, leading to increased susceptibility to APAP-induced liver injury in MsrA-deficient mice. APAP challenge increased Nrf2 activation more profoundly in MsrA -/- than in MsrA +/+ livers. Expression and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and its target gene expression were significantly elevated in MsrA -/- than in MsrA +/+ livers after APAP challenge. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MsrA protects the liver from APAP-induced toxicity. The data provided herein constitute the first in vivo evidence of the involvement of MsrA in hepatic function under APAP challenge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vitamin A deficiency among children--Federated States of Micronesia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-06-22

    Vitamin A, a fat-soluble, heat-stable nutrient (retinol) derived from animal sources and certain fruits and vegetables, forms the basic component of retinal pigments and plays a vital role in optimal health, growth, and development. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) (serum retinol < or = 20 microg/dL [< or = 0.7 micromol/L] for subclinical VAD) can substantially increase the risk for childhood mortality from infectious and noninfectious causes. VAD impairs the mobilization and transport of iron and is usually associated with anemia and reduced growth. VAD is a major public health problem in parts of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Western Pacific. In Chuuk and Pohnpei, two of the four Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) (2000 population: 107,008), nutrition surveys during the early 1990s documented VAD prevalences among the highest in the world (CDC, unpublished data, 1991; U.S. Public Health Service, unpublished data, 1994). In response to these findings, FSM health authorities, with support of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), began distributing vitamin A supplements in 1993 and 1998 in Chuuk and Pohnpei, respectively. In November 1999, FSM requested assistance from CDC in VAD assessment surveys of children in Kosrae and Yap, the other two FSM states. This report summarizes levels of serum retinol and prevalence of VAD and other indicators of nutritional status among children aged 24-59 months in Kosrae and Yap. The findings indicated low serum retinol levels and high VAD prevalences but no substantial stunting or wasting. A comprehensive, long-term national strategy is needed in FSM to promote sustained improvement in vitamin A status.

  4. Serotonin Receptor 6 Mediates Defective Brain Development in Monoamine Oxidase A-deficient Mouse Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi Chiu; Man, Gene Chi Wai; Chu, Ching Yan; Borchert, Astrid; Ugun-Klusek, Aslihan; Billett, E. Ellen; Kühn, Hartmut; Ufer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO-A and MAO-B) are enzymes of the outer mitochondrial membrane that metabolize biogenic amines. In the adult central nervous system, MAOs have important functions for neurotransmitter homeostasis. Expression of MAO isoforms has been detected in the developing embryo. However, suppression of MAO-B does not induce developmental alterations. In contrast, targeted inhibition and knockdown of MAO-A expression (E7.5–E10.5) caused structural abnormalities in the brain. Here we explored the molecular mechanisms underlying defective brain development induced by MAO-A knockdown during in vitro embryogenesis. The developmental alterations were paralleled by diminished apoptotic activity in the affected neuronal structures. Moreover, dysfunctional MAO-A expression led to elevated levels of embryonic serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)), and we found that knockdown of serotonin receptor-6 (5-Htr6) expression or pharmacologic inhibition of 5-Htr6 activity rescued the MAO-A knockdown phenotype and restored apoptotic activity in the developing brain. Our data suggest that excessive 5-Htr6 activation reduces activation of caspase-3 and -9 of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and enhances expression of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Moreover, we found that elevated 5-HT levels in MAO-A knockdown embryos coincided with an enhanced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and a reduction of proliferating cell numbers. In summary, our findings suggest that excessive 5-HT in MAO-A-deficient mouse embryos triggers cellular signaling cascades via 5-Htr6, which suppresses developmental apoptosis in the brain and thus induces developmental retardations. PMID:24497636

  5. Cardiac-Targeted Transgenic Mutant Mitochondrial Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, James J.; Hosseini, Seyed H.; Green, Elgin; Hoying-Brandt, Amy; Cucoranu, Ioan; Haase, Chad P.; Russ, Rodney; Srivastava, Jaya; Ivey, Kristopher; Ludaway, Tomika; Kapoor, Victor; Abuin, Allison; Shapoval, Alexsey; Santoianni, Robert; Saada, Ann; Elpeleg, Orly; Lewis, William

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA biogenesis is critical to cardiac contractility. DNA polymerase gamma (pol γ) replicates mtDNA, whereas thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) monophosphorylates pyrimidines intramitochondrially. Point mutations in POLG and TK2 result in clinical diseases associated with mtDNA depletion and organ dysfunction. Pyrimidine analogs (NRTIs) inhibit Pol γ and mtDNA replication. Cardiac “dominant negative” murine transgenes (TGs; Pol γ Y955G, and TK2 H121N or I212N) defined the role of each in the heart. mtDNA abundance, histopathological features, histochemistry, mitochondrial protein abundance, morphometry, and echocardiography were determined for TGs in “2 × 2” studies with or without pyrimidine analogs. Cardiac mtDNA abundance decreased in Y955C TGs (∼50%) but increased in H121N and I212N TGs (20-70%). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) increased in hearts of all mutants. Ultrastructural changes occurred in Y955C and H121N TGs. Histopathology demonstrated hypertrophy in H121N, LV dilation in I212N, and both hypertrophy and dilation in Y955C TGs. Antiretrovirals increased LV mass (≈50%) for all three TGs which combined with dilation indicates cardiomyopathy. Taken together, these studies demonstrate three manifestations of cardiac dysfunction that depend on the nature of the specific mutation and antiretroviral treatment. Mutations in genes for mtDNA biogenesis increase risk for defective mtDNA replication, leading to LV hypertrophy. PMID:18446447

  6. Membrane cytochromes of Escherichia coli chl mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, N R; Bragg, P D

    1983-01-01

    The cytochromes present in the membranes of Escherichia coli cells having defects in the formate dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase system have been analyzed by spectroscopic, redox titration, and enzyme fractionation techniques. Four phenotypic classes differing in cytochrome composition were recognized. Class I is represented by strains with defects in the synthesis or insertion of molybdenum cofactor. Cytochromes of the formate dehydrogenase-nitrate reductase pathway are present. Class II strains map in the chlC-chlI region. The cytochrome associated with nitrate reductase (cytochrome bnr) is absent in these strains, whereas that associated with formate dehydrogenase (cytochrome bfdh) is the major cytochrome in the membranes. Class III strains lack both cytochromes bfdh and bnr but overproduce cytochrome d of the aerobic pathway even under anaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. Class III strains have defects in the regulation of cytochrome synthesis. An fdhA mutant produced cytochrome bnr but lacked cytochrome bfdh. These results support the view that chlI (narI) is the structural gene for cytochrome bnr and that chlC (narG) and chlI(narI) are in the same operon, and they provide evidence of the complexity of the regulation of cytochrome synthesis. PMID:6302081

  7. Mutants of Cre recombinase with improved accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Church, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in genome engineering technologies, inserting genes into precise locations in the human genome remains an outstanding problem. It has been suggested that site-specific recombinases can be adapted towards use as transgene delivery vectors. The specificity of recombinases can be altered either with directed evolution or via fusions to modular DNA-binding domains. Unfortunately, both wildtype and altered variants often have detectable activities at off-target sites. Here we use bacterial selections to identify mutations in the dimerization surface of Cre recombinase (R32V, R32M, and 303GVSdup) that improve the accuracy of recombination. The mutants are functional in bacteria, in human cells, and in vitro (except for 303GVSdup, which we did not purify), and have improved selectivity against both model off-target sites and the entire E. coli genome. We propose that destabilizing binding cooperativity may be a general strategy for improving the accuracy of dimeric DNA-binding proteins. PMID:24056590

  8. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Vitamin A-Deficient Diet Accelerated Atherogenesis in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice and Dietary β-Carotene Prevents This Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Relevy, Noa Zolberg; Harats, Dror; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Bitzur, Rafael; Rühl, Ralph; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A is involved in regulation of glucose concentrations, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, which are major risk factors for atherogenesis. However, the effect of vitamin A deficiency on atherogenesis has not been investigated. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine whether vitamin A deficiency accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice (apoE−/−). ApoE−/− mice were allocated into the following groups: control, fed vitamin A-containing chow diet; BC, fed chow diet fortified with Dunaliella powder containing βc isomers; VAD, fed vitamin A-deficient diet; and VAD-BC group, fed vitamin A-deficient diet fortified with a Dunaliella powder. Following 15 weeks of treatment, liver retinol concentration had decreased significantly in the VAD group to about 30% that of control group. Vitamin A-deficient diet significantly increased both plasma cholesterol concentrations and the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus (+61%) compared to the control group. Dietary βc fortification inhibited the elevation in plasma cholesterol and retarded atherogenesis in mice fed the vitamin A-deficient diet. The results imply that dietary vitamin A deficiency should be examined as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and that dietary βc, as a sole source of retinoids, can compensate for vitamin A deficiency. PMID:25802864

  10. Experimental and code simulation of a station blackout scenario for APR1400 with test facility ATLAS and MARS code

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, X. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Choi, K. Y.

    2012-07-01

    A SBO (station blackout) experiment named SBO-01 was performed at full-pressure IET (Integral Effect Test) facility ATLAS (Advanced Test Loop for Accident Simulation) which is scaled down from the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In this study, the transient of SBO-01 is discussed and is subdivided into three phases: the SG fluid loss phase, the RCS fluid loss phase, and the core coolant depletion and core heatup phase. In addition, the typical phenomena in SBO-01 test - SG dryout, natural circulation, core coolant boiling, the PRZ full, core heat-up - are identified. Furthermore, the SBO-01 test is reproduced bymore » the MARS code calculation with the ATLAS model which represents the ATLAS test facility. The experimental and calculated transients are then compared and discussed. The comparison reveals there was malfunction of equipments: the SG leakage through SG MSSV and the measurement error of loop flow meter. As the ATLAS model is validated against the experimental results, it can be further employed to investigate the other possible SBO scenarios and to study the scaling distortions in the ATLAS. (authors)« less

  11. A Deficiency in Aspartate Biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 Causes Slow Milk Coagulation†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Yu, Weizhu; Coolbear, Tim; O’Sullivan, Dan; McKay, Larry L.

    1998-01-01

    A mutant of fast milk-coagulating (Fmc+) Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2, designated L. lactis KB4, was identified. Although possessing the known components essential for utilizing casein as a nitrogen source, which include functional proteinase (PrtP) activity and oligopeptide, di- and tripeptide, and amino acid transport systems, KB4 exhibited a slow milk coagulation (Fmc−) phenotype. When the amino acid requirements of L. lactis C2 were compared with those of KB4 by use of a chemically defined medium, it was found that KB4 was unable to grow in the absence of aspartic acid. This aspartic acid requirement could also be met by aspartate-containing peptides. The addition of aspartic acid to milk restored the Fmc+ phenotype of KB4. KB4 was found to be defective in pyruvate carboxylase and thus was deficient in the ability to form oxaloacetate and hence aspartic acid from pyruvate and carbon dioxide. The results suggest that when lactococci are propagated in milk, aspartate derived from casein is unable to meet fully the nutritional demands of the lactococci, and they become dependent upon aspartate biosynthesis. PMID:9572935

  12. Genetics of Ustilago violacea. I. Carotenoid mutants and carotenogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, E.D.; Baird, M.L.; Chapman, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Wild-type strains of Ustilago violacea produce pink colonies on laboratory medium and yield white, orange, pumpkin, and yellow colonies after uv mutagenesis. The wild-type strains contain neurosporene and lycopene; one orange mutant, $gamma$-carotene; and one yellow mutant, $beta$-carotene. One white mutant had no detectable carotenoids. Diploid colonies heterozygous for wild type and orange, pumpkin, yellow, or white are phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for yellow and orange are also phenotypically wild type. Diploid colonies heterozygous for white and orange; white and yellow; and white, yellow, and orange are phenotypically light orange, light yellow, and orange- yellow, respectively. The whitemore » mutants give a circular complementation map; the color mutants fit a linear complementation map. We propose a multienzyme of four identical dehydrogenases and one or two identical cyclases for carotenogenesis in this species. The white and color mutants represent structural mutations altering the conformation of the dehydrogenase or cyclase, respectively. Furthermore, cyclases may or may not aggregate in association with the dehydrogenase aggregate to form the multienzyme aggregate responsible for the color mutants. (auth)« less

  13. NRAS-mutant melanoma: current challenges and future prospect

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Adelantado, Ester Zamora; Ortiz, Carolina; García, Jesús Soberino; Perez-Garcia, José

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most common cutaneous cancers worldwide. Activating mutations in RAS oncogenes are found in a third of all human cancers and NRAS mutations are found in 15%–20% of melanomas. The NRAS-mutant subset of melanoma is more aggressive and associated with poorer outcomes, compared to non-NRAS-mutant melanoma. Although immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapies for BRAF-mutant melanoma are transforming the treatment of metastatic melanoma, the ideal treatment for NRAS-mutant melanoma remains unknown. Despite promising preclinical data, current therapies for NRAS-mutant melanoma remain limited, showing a modest increase in progression-free survival but without any benefit in overall survival. Combining MEK inhibitors with agents inhibiting cell cycling and the PI3K–AKT pathway appears to provide additional benefit; in particular, a strategy of MEK inhibition and CDK4/6 inhibition is likely to be a viable treatment option in the future. Patients whose tumors had NRAS mutations had better response to immunotherapy and better outcomes than patients whose tumors had other genetic subtypes, suggesting that immune therapies – especially immune checkpoint inhibitors – may be particularly effective as treatment options for NRAS-mutant melanoma. Improved understanding of NRAS-mutant melanoma will be essential to develop new treatment strategies for this subset of patients with melanoma. PMID:28860801

  14. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of “Golden Mustard” for Treating Vitamin A Deficiency in India

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jeffrey; Klein, Eili Y.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2010-01-01

    Background Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is an important nutritional problem in India, resulting in an increased risk of severe morbidity and mortality. Periodic, high-dose vitamin A supplementation is the WHO-recommended method to prevent VAD, since a single dose can compensate for reduced dietary intake or increased need over a period of several months. However, in India only 34 percent of targeted children currently receive the two doses per year, and new strategies are urgently needed. Methodology Recent advancements in biotechnology permit alternative strategies for increasing the vitamin A content of common foods. Mustard (Brassica juncea), which is consumed widely in the form of oil by VAD populations, can be genetically modified to express high levels of beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A. Using estimates for consumption, we compare predicted costs and benefits of genetically modified (GM) fortification of mustard seed with high-dose vitamin A supplementation and industrial fortification of mustard oil during processing to alleviate VAD by calculating the avertable health burden in terms of disability-adjusted life years (DALY). Principal Findings We found that all three interventions potentially avert significant numbers of DALYs and deaths. Expanding vitamin A supplementation to all areas was the least costly intervention, at $23–$50 per DALY averted and $1,000–$6,100 per death averted, though cost-effectiveness varied with prevailing health subcenter coverage. GM fortification could avert 5 million–6 million more DALYs and 8,000–46,000 more deaths, mainly because it would benefit the entire population and not just children. However, the costs associated with GM fortification were nearly five times those of supplementation. Industrial fortification was dominated by both GM fortification and supplementation. The cost-effectiveness ratio of each intervention decreased with the prevalence of VAD and was sensitive to the efficacy rate of averted

  16. Experimental Demyelination and Axonal Loss Are Reduced in MicroRNA-146a Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nellie A; Molnar, Viktor; Szilagyi, Gabor T; Elkjaer, Maria L; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Okarmus, Justyna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Thygesen, Eva K; Palkovits, Miklos; Gallyas, Ferenc; Larsen, Martin R; Lassmann, Hans; Benedikz, Eirikur; Owens, Trevor; Svenningsen, Asa F; Illes, Zsolt

    2018-01-01

    The cuprizone (CPZ) model of multiple sclerosis (MS) was used to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) related to in vivo de- and remyelination. We further investigated the role of miR-146a in miR-146a-deficient (KO) mice: this miRNA is differentially expressed in MS lesions and promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) during remyelination, but its role has not been examined during demyelination. MicroRNAs were examined by Agilent Mouse miRNA Microarray in the corpus callosum during CPZ-induced demyelination and remyelination. Demyelination, axonal loss, changes in number of oligodendrocytes, OPCs, and macrophages/microglia was compared by histology/immunohistochemistry between KO and WT mice. Differential expression of target genes and proteins of miR-146a was analyzed in the transcriptome (4 × 44K Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Microarray) and proteome (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) of CPZ-induced de- and remyelination in WT mice. Levels of proinflammatory molecules in the corpus callosum were compared in WT versus KO mice by Meso Scale Discovery multiplex protein analysis. miR-146a was increasingly upregulated during CPZ-induced de- and remyelination. The absence of miR-146a in KO mice protected against demyelination, axonal loss, body weight loss, and atrophy of thymus and spleen. The number of CNP + oligodendrocytes was increased during demyelination in the miR-146a KO mice, while there was a trend of increased number of NG2 + OPCs in the WT mice. miR-146a target genes, SNAP25 and SMAD4, were downregulated in the proteome of demyelinating corpus callosum in WT mice. Higher levels of SNAP25 were measured by ELISA in the corpus callosum of miR-146a KO mice, but there was no difference between KO and WT mice during demyelination. Multiplex protein analysis of the corpus callosum lysate revealed upregulated TNF-RI, TNF-RII, and CCL2 in the WT mice in contrast to KO mice. The number of Mac3 + and Iba1 + macrophages/microglia was

  17. Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers suppress mutant huntingtin expression and attenuate neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Marque, Leonard O.; Cordner, Zachary; Pruitt, Jennifer L.; Bhat, Manik; Li, Pan P.; Kannan, Geetha; Ladenheim, Ellen E.; Moran, Timothy H.; Margolis, Russell L.; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Disease pathogenesis derives, at least in part, from the long polyglutamine tract encoded by mutant HTT. Therefore, considerable effort has been dedicated to the development of therapeutic strategies that significantly reduce the expression of the mutant HTT protein. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the CAG repeat region of HTT transcripts have been of particular interest due to their potential capacity to discriminate between normal and mutant HTT transcripts. Here, we focus on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs), ASOs that are especially stable, highly soluble and non-toxic. We designed three PMOs to selectively target expanded CAG repeat tracts (CTG22, CTG25 and CTG28), and two PMOs to selectively target sequences flanking the HTT CAG repeat (HTTex1a and HTTex1b). In HD patient–derived fibroblasts with expanded alleles containing 44, 77 or 109 CAG repeats, HTTex1a and HTTex1b were effective in suppressing the expression of mutant and non-mutant transcripts. CTGn PMOs also suppressed HTT expression, with the extent of suppression and the specificity for mutant transcripts dependent on the length of the targeted CAG repeat and on the CTG repeat length and concentration of the PMO. PMO CTG25 reduced HTT-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and suppressed mutant HTT expression in vivo in the N171-82Q transgenic mouse model. Finally, CTG28 reduced mutant HTT expression and improved the phenotype of HdhQ7/Q150 knock-in HD mice. These data demonstrate the potential of PMOs as an approach to suppressing the expression of mutant HTT. PMID:25035419

  18. Prevalence and demographic factors associated with vitamin A deficiency in Colombian children aged 12-59 months.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Torres, Javier; Meneses-Echavéz, José F; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2014-11-01

    To examine the sociodemographic factors associated with subclinical vitamin A deficiency in a representative sample of Colombian children. Subjects and methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted of data from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey of Colombia (ENSIN 2010) on 4,279 children aged 12 to 59 months. Plasma vitamin A levels were measured using high resolution liquid chromatography (HRLC), and sociodemographic factors (sex, age, ethnicity, SISBEN score, and geographic region) were collected using a structured survey. Prevalence rates and associations were established using a multivariate regression model. Vitamin A levels ranged from 7.5-93.7 μg/dL (mean=26.2; 95% CI, 25.9 to 26.5μg/dL). Vitamin A levels less than 20 μg/dL (subclinical deficiency) were found in 24.3% of children. Children belonging to ethnic groups of African ascent, those living in the Orinoquia and Amazonia regions, and those aged 12-23 months had the greatest subclinical vitamin A deficiencies (29.5%, 31.1%, and 27.6% respectively. Regression models showed that age ranging from 12 and 23 months (OR 1.32; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.73), a SISBEN score 1 (OR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.34), an African ascent (OR 1.35; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.74), and living in the Orinoquia and Amazonia regions (OR 2.38; 95% CI, 1.62 to 3.51) were factors associated to subclinical vitamin A deficiency. The study population shows a high prevalence of subclinical vitamin A deficiency, and comprehensive interventions involving nutritional and educational components are therefore recommended. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF LIPOPEROXIDATION AND ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES ARE MODIFIED IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF VITAMIN A-DEFICIENT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Navigatore Fonzo, Lorena S.; Golini, Rebeca S.; Delgado, Silvia M.; Ponce, Ivana T.; Bonomi, Myrta R.; Rezza, Irma G.; Gimenez, María S.; Anzulovich, Ana C.

    2011-01-01

    Animals can adapt their behavior to predictable temporal fluctuations in the environment through both, memory-and-learning processes and an endogenous time-keeping mechanism. Hippocampus plays a key role in memory and learning and is especially susceptible to oxidative stress. In compensation, antioxidant enzymes activity, such as Catalase (CAT) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), has been detected in this brain region. Daily rhythms of antioxidant enzymes activitiy, as well as of glutathione and lipid peroxides levels, have been described in brain. Here, we investigate day/night variations in lipoperoxidation, CAT and GPx expression and activity, as well as the temporal fluctuations of two key components of the endogenous clock, BMAL1 and PER1, in the rat hippocampus and evaluate to which extent vitamin A deficiency may affect their amplitude or phase. Holtzman male rats from control, vitamin A-deficient and vitamin A-refed groups were sacrificed throughout a 24-h period. Daily levels of clock proteins, lipoperoxidation, CAT and GPx mRNA, protein, and activity, were determined in the rat hippocampus obtained every 4 or 5 h. Gene expression of RARα and RXRβ was also quantified in the hippocampus of the three groups of rats. Our results show significant daily variations of BMAL1 and PER1 protein expression. Rhythmic lipoperoxidation, CAT, and GPx, expression and activity, were also observed in the rat hippocampus. Vitamin A deficiency reduced RXRβ mRNA level, as well as the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 daily oscillation, phase-shifted the daily peak of lipoperoxidation, and had a differential effect on the oscillating CAT and GPx mRNA, protein, and activity. Learning how vitamin A deficiency affects the circadian gene expression in the hippocampus may have an impact on the neurobiology, nutritional and chronobiology fields, emphasizing for the first time the importance of nutritional factors, such as dietary micronutrients, in the regulation of circadian parameters

  20. A dinoflagellate mutant with higher frequency of multiple fission.

    PubMed

    Lam, C M; Chong, C; Wong, J T

    2001-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Biecheler propagates by both binary and multiple fission. By a newly developed mutagenesis protocol based on using ethyl methanesulfonate and a cell size screening method, a cell cycle mutant, mf2, was isolated with giant cells which predominantly divide by multiple fission. The average cell size of the mutant mf2 is larger than the control C. cohnii. Cell cycle synchronization experiments suggest that mutant mf2, when compared with the control strain, has a prolonged G1 phase with a corresponding delay of the G2 + M phase.

  1. Complex regulation of AprA metalloprotease in Pseudomonas fluorescens M114: evidence for the involvement of iron, the ECF sigma factor, PbrA and pseudobactin M114 siderophore.

    PubMed

    Maunsell, Bláithín; Adams, Claire; O'Gara, Fergal

    2006-01-01

    In the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens M114, extracellular proteolytic activity and fluorescent siderophore (pseudobactin M114) production were previously shown to be co-ordinately negatively regulated in response to environmental iron levels. An iron-starvation extracytoplasmic function sigma factor, PbrA, required for the transcription of siderophore biosynthetic genes, was also implicated in M114 protease regulation. The current study centred on the characterization and genetic regulation of the gene(s) responsible for protease production in M114. A serralysin-type metalloprotease gene, aprA, was identified and found to encode the major, if not only, extracellular protease produced by this strain. The expression of aprA and its protein product were found to be subject to complex regulation. Transcription analysis confirmed that PbrA was required for full aprA transcription under low iron conditions, while the ferric uptake regulator, Fur, was implicated in aprA repression under high iron conditions. Interestingly, the iron regulation of AprA was dependent on culture conditions, with PbrA-independent AprA-mediated proteolytic activity observed on skim milk agar supplemented with yeast extract, when supplied with iron or purified pseudobactin M114. These effects were not observed on skim milk agar without yeast extract. PbrA-independent aprA expression was also observed from a truncated transcriptional fusion when grown in sucrose asparagine tryptone broth supplied with iron or purified pseudobactin M114. Thus, experimental evidence suggested that iron mediated its effects via transcriptional activation by PbrA under low iron conditions, while an as-yet-unidentified sigma factor(s) may be required for the PbrA-independent aprA expression and AprA proteolytic activity induced by siderophore and iron.

  2. Decreasing stunting, anemia, and vitamin A deficiency in Peru: results of the Good Start in Life Program.

    PubMed

    Lechtig, Aarón; Cornale, Guido; Ugaz, María Elena; Arias, Lena

    2009-03-01

    The rates of stunting, iron-deficiency anemia, and vitamin A deficiency in Peru are among the highest in South America. There is little scaled-up experience on how to solve these problems countrywide. To evaluate the Good Start in Life Program during the period from 2000 to 2004. Data on weight, height, hemoglobin, serum retinol, urinary iodine, and age were obtained from children under 3 years of age during two transverse surveys in 2000 and 2004. In 2004, the program covered 75,000 children, 35,000 mothers, and 1 million inhabitants from 223 poor communities. The rate of stunting decreased from 54.1% to 36.9%, the rate of iron-deficiency anemia decreased from 76.0% to 52.3%, and the rate of vitamin A deficiency decreased from 30.4% to 5.3% (p < .01). The annual cost per child was US$116.50. Adaptations of this participative program could contribute to decreased stunting, iron-deficiency anemia, and vitamin A deficiency at the national scale in Peru and many other countries.

  3. The national Vitamin A Supplementation Program and subclinical vitamin A deficiency among preschool children in the philippines.

    PubMed

    Pedro, M R A; Madriaga, J R; Barba, C V C; Habito, R C F; Gana, A E; Deitchler, M; Mason, J B

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol [SR] < 20 microg/dl) in children from one to five years of age in the Philippines rose from 35.8% to 38% between 1993 and 1998, despite a twice-yearly universal vitamin A capsule distribution program. The Philippines 1998 National Nutrition Survey, with one-time SR measurements from 11,620 children from one to four years of age, collected over an eight-month period from one month to more than six months after distribution of vitamin A capsules, was an opportunity to examine the impact of the program on the children's vitamin A status, using post hoc analysis. Overall, a detectable impact of vitamin A capsules on SR was limited to groups with the highest prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and lasted up to four months after dose administration. In highly urban cities in Visayas, where very high prevalences of deficient SR (SR < 10 microg/dl) were found, the prevalence of deficient SR was reduced from 27% to 9% one to two months after distribution of vitamin A capsules, and to 16% at three to four months. In Mindanao, a statistically significant reduction from 38% to 32% was seen in the prevalence of deficient to low SR (SR < 20 microg/dl) one to four months after distribution of vitamin A capsules. There was no overall reduction in the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency or deficient and low SR (SR < 20 microg/dl) in Luzon, but a significant interaction with stunting was observed in Luzon non-highly urbanized cities. Two aspects are of concern. First, the magnitude of the effect of high-dose vitamin A capsules on SR, and hence on the extent of reduction in deficiency, is limited. Second, the effect does not persist for six months, which is the interval between doses. Thus there is no decrease in the prevalence of deficiency over time. With more frequent dosing (especially to those most deficient in SR), a progressive reduction in vitamin A deficiency could, however, be expected; this hypothesis could be tested. The

  4. Mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, disrupts the recruitment of SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy protein to nuclear Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Shingo; Re, Diane B; Jacquier, Arnaud; Nelson, Katelyn; Przedborski, Serge; Monani, Umrao R

    2012-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are among the most common motor neuron diseases to afflict the human population. A deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein causes SMA and is also reported to be an exacerbating factor in the development of ALS. However, pathways linking the two diseases have yet to be defined and it is not clear precisely how the pathology of ALS is aggravated by reduced SMN or whether mutant proteins underlying familial forms of ALS interfere with SMN-related biochemical pathways to exacerbate the neurodegenerative process. In this study, we show that mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), a cause of familial ALS, profoundly alters the sub-cellular localization of the SMN protein, preventing the formation of nuclear 'gems' by disrupting the recruitment of the protein to Cajal bodies. Overexpressing the SMN protein in mutant SOD1 mice, a model of familial ALS, alleviates this phenomenon, most likely in a cell-autonomous manner, and significantly mitigates the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and in culture dishes. In the mice, the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype is delayed and motor function enhanced, suggestive of a therapeutic benefit for ALS patients treated with agents that augment the SMN protein. Nevertheless, this finding is tempered by an inability to prolong survival, a limitation most likely imposed by the inexorable denervation that characterizes ALS and eventually disrupts the neuromuscular synapses even in the presence of increased SMN.

  5. Minos-insertion mutant of the Drosophila GBA gene homologue showed abnormal phenotypes of climbing ability, sleep and life span with accumulation of hydroxy-glucocerebroside.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ito, Kumpei; Takahara, Tsubasa; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sakata, Kazuki; Ishida, Norio

    2017-05-30

    Gaucher's disease in humans is considered a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase) that result in the accumulation of its substrate, glucocerebroside (GlcCer). Although mouse models of Gaucher's disease have been reported from several laboratories, these models are limited due to the perinatal lethality of GlcCerase gene. Here, we examined phenotypes of Drosophila melanogaster homologues genes of the human Gaucher's disease gene by using Minos insertion. One of two Minos insertion mutants to unknown function gene (CG31414) accumulates the hydroxy-GlcCer in whole body of Drosophila melanogaster. This mutant showed abnormal phenotypes of climbing ability and sleep, and short lifespan. These abnormal phenotypes are very similar to that of Gaucher's disease in human. In contrast, another Minos insertion mutant (CG31148) and its RNAi line did not show such severe phenotype as observed in CG31414 gene mutation. The data suggests that Drosophila CG31414 gene mutation might be useful for unraveling the molecular mechanism of Gaucher's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide and Aldoheptose Biosynthesis in Transketolase Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Eidels, L.; Osborn, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence that sedoheptulose-7-phosphate is an obligatory precursor of the L-glycero-D-mannoheptose residues of the lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella was obtained by isolation and characterization of transketolase-negative mutants of Salmonella typhimurium. These mutants, which are defective in synthesis of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate, were found to produce an incomplete heptose-deficient lipopolysaccharide, and were also sensitive to bile salts, a characteristic property of heptose-deficient mutants. Phenotypic repair of the defect in lipopolysaccharide synthesis was obtained by addition of exogenous sedoheptulose-7-phosphate to growing cultures of the mutant strains. Characterization of revertants isolated either as transketolase-positive or heptose-positive provided further evidence that the heptose deficiency resulted from mutation at the transketolase locus. On the basis of these findings a possible pathway for conversion of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate to L-glycero-D-mannoheptose is proposed. PMID:4942911

  7. [Biosorption ability of mutants of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776].

    PubMed

    Mamieieva, O H; Kasatkina, T P; Lavrinchuk, V Ia

    2007-01-01

    Twenty stable mutants with various coloration intensity have been allocated in carotene-synthesizing natural strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776 (wild type) after nitrosoguanidine action. Two brightly orange mutants 4L and 11 and one non-pigmented mutant 2 were chosen for the further researches. The ultraviolet was inefficient as a mutagen. Resistance to high concentration of copper ions (up to 200 mg/g), high sorption ability (Qmax = 9.1 mmol/g) was characteristic of R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776. Concentration of copper ions 50 mg/l was toxic for mutants 4L, 11 and 2, which sorption ability was lower in comparison with carotene pigmented R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776. It was shown, for the first time that there was a direct dependence between the presence of carotenoid pigments, resistance to high concentration of copper ions and sorption ability for yeast R. mucilaginosa UCM Y-1776.

  8. Altered sexual and social behaviors in trp2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Leypold, Bradley G.; Yu, C. Ron; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Kim, Michelle M.; Zufall, Frank; Axel, Richard

    2002-01-01

    We have used gene targeting to generate mice with a homozygous deficiency in trp2, a cation channel expressed in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Trp2 mutant animals reveal a striking reduction in the electrophysiological response to pheromones in the VNO, suggesting that trp2 plays a central role in mediating the pheromone response. These mutants therefore afford the opportunity to examine the role of the VNO in the generation of innate sexual and social behaviors in mice. Trp2 mutant males and nursing females are docile and fail to initiate aggressive attacks on intruder males. Male–female sexual behavior appears normal, but trp2 mutant males also vigorously mount other males. These results suggest that the cation channel trp2 is required in the VNO to detect male-specific pheromones that elicit aggressive behaviors and dictate the choice of sexual partners. PMID:11972034

  9. Cortex content of asporogenous mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Imae, Y; Strominger, J L

    1976-01-01

    A method for the measurement of muramic lactam, which is specifically located in the cortical peptidoglycan of bacterial spores, was developed as a quantitative assay method for spore cortex content. During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168, muramic lactam (i.e., spore cortex) began to appear at state IV of sporulation and continued to increase over most of the late stages of sporulation. Spore cortex contents of various spo mutants of B. subitils were surveyed. Cortex was not detected in mutants in which sporulation was blocked earlier than stage II sporulation. Spores of spo IV mutant had about 40% of the cortex content of the wild-type spores. One spo III mutant had a low amount of cortex, but four others had none. PMID:1262319

  10. Mutant Kras copy number defines metabolic reprogramming and therapeutic susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Emma; Gaude, Edoardo; Turrell, Frances; Frezza, Christian; Martins, Carla P

    2016-01-01

    Summary The RAS/MAPK-signalling pathway is frequently deregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), often through KRAS activating mutations1-3. A single endogenous mutant Kras allele is sufficient to promote lung tumour formation in mice but malignant progression requires additional genetic alterations4-7. We recently showed that advanced lung tumours from KrasG12D/+;p53-null mice frequently exhibit KrasG12D allelic enrichment (KrasG12D/Kraswild-type>1)7, implying that mutant Kras copy gains are positively selected during progression. Through a comprehensive analysis of mutant Kras homozygous and heterozygous MEFs and lung cancer cells we now show that these genotypes are phenotypically distinct. In particular, KrasG12D/G12D cells exhibit a glycolytic switch coupled to increased channelling of glucose-derived metabolites into the TCA cycle and glutathione biosynthesis, resulting in enhanced glutathione-mediated detoxification. This metabolic rewiring is recapitulated in mutant KRAS homozygous NSCLC cells and in vivo, in spontaneous advanced murine lung tumours (which display a high frequency of KrasG12D copy gain), but not in the corresponding early tumours (KrasG12D heterozygous). Finally, we demonstrate that mutant Kras copy gain creates unique metabolic dependences that can be exploited to selectively target these aggressive mutant Kras tumours. Our data demonstrate that mutant Kras lung tumours are not a single disease but rather a heterogeneous group comprised of two classes of tumours with distinct metabolic profiles, prognosis and therapeutic susceptibility, which can be discriminated based on their relative mutant allelic content. We also provide the first in vivo evidence of metabolic rewiring during lung cancer malignant progression. PMID:26909577

  11. Mapping Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation in BRCA1 Mutant Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Transformation in BRCA1 Mutant Mice PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerburg M. Wulf CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical...REPORT NUMBER Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston, MA 02215 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...and whether it allowed us to analyze the early steps of tumor formation. For this purpose transgenic and conditional knock-out mice (mutant p53 or

  12. Mutant Enrichment in the Colonial Alga, EUDORINA ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Toby, A. L.; Kemp, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    An enrichment procedure has been developed that results in at least a 200x increase in mutation frequency in the colonial alga, Eudorina elegans. A period of nitrogen starvation followed by treatment with 8-azaguanine results in the death of wild-type cells and the maintenance of mutants. N'-nitro-N-nitro-soguanidine-induced acetate, p-aminobenzoic acid and reduced nitrogen requiring mutants have been isolated by this procedure. PMID:1205128

  13. Circulation of Pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase mutants in France.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Damiani, Céline; Perrot, Maëla; Rouillé, Amélie; Virmaux, Michèle; Quinio, Dorothée; Moalic, Elodie; Saliou, Philippe; Berthou, Christian; Le Meur, Yann; Totet, Anne; Nevez, Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Data on the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutants in France are still limited. In this study, mutant prevalence in the Brest region (western France) was determined. Archival pulmonary specimens from 85 patients infected with P. jirovecii and admitted to our institution (University Hospital, Brest) from October 2007 to February 2010 were retrospectively typed at the DHPS locus using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Type identification was successful in 66 of 85 patients. Sixty-four patients were infected with a wild type, whereas mutants were found in 2 patients (2/66, 3%). Medical chart analysis revealed that these 2 patients usually lived in Paris. Another patient usually lived on the French Riviera, whereas 63 patients were from the city of Brest. Thus, the corrected prevalence of mutants in patients who effectively lived in our geographic area was 0% (0/63). Taking into account that i) Paris is characterized by a high prevalence of mutants from 18.5% to 40%, ii) infection diagnoses were performed in the 2 Parisians during their vacation <30 days, iii) infection incubation is assumed to last about 2 months, the results provide evidence of mutant circulation from Paris to Brest through infected vacationers. The study shows that the usual city of patient residence, rather than the city of infection diagnosis, is a predictor of mutants and that P. jirovecii infections involving mutants do not represent a public health issue in western France. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction of protein mutant stability using classification and regression tool.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang-Tsung; Saraboji, K; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hwang, Shiow-Fen; Ponnuswamy, M N; Gromiha, M Michael

    2007-02-01

    Prediction of protein stability upon amino acid substitutions is an important problem in molecular biology and the solving of which would help for designing stable mutants. In this work, we have analyzed the stability of protein mutants using two different datasets of 1396 and 2204 mutants obtained from ProTherm database, respectively for free energy change due to thermal (DeltaDeltaG) and denaturant denaturations (DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O)). We have used a set of 48 physical, chemical energetic and conformational properties of amino acid residues and computed the difference of amino acid properties for each mutant in both sets of data. These differences in amino acid properties have been related to protein stability (DeltaDeltaG and DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O)) and are used to train with classification and regression tool for predicting the stability of protein mutants. Further, we have tested the method with 4 fold, 5 fold and 10 fold cross validation procedures. We found that the physical properties, shape and flexibility are important determinants of protein stability. The classification of mutants based on secondary structure (helix, strand, turn and coil) and solvent accessibility (buried, partially buried, partially exposed and exposed) distinguished the stabilizing/destabilizing mutants at an average accuracy of 81% and 80%, respectively for DeltaDeltaG and DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O). The correlation between the experimental and predicted stability change is 0.61 for DeltaDeltaG and 0.44 for DeltaDeltaG(H(2)O). Further, the free energy change due to the replacement of amino acid residue has been predicted within an average error of 1.08 kcal/mol and 1.37 kcal/mol for thermal and chemical denaturation, respectively. The relative importance of secondary structure and solvent accessibility, and the influence of the dataset on prediction of protein mutant stability have been discussed.

  15. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    mutant NSCLC , a challenge we must meet to make progress in this clinically challenging NSCLC subset. Mutant KRAS, like ALK or EGFR, is a bone fide NSCLC ...required for KRAS G12D-driven NSCLC . Specific Aim 1. To identify gene products specifically essential for KRAS-driven NSCLC , we will perform a shRNA...screen of thousands of mouse genes, looking for essentiality in multiple independent cell lines derived from two NSCLC GEMMs: one RAF- dependent and

  16. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 ( eal1 ) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene ( enhancer of eal1 ) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis .

  17. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis. PMID:27746791

  18. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ozone-Sensitive Arabidopsis Mutants with Deficiencies in Photorespiratory Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Saji, Shoko; Bathula, Srinivas; Kubo, Akihiro; Tamaoki, Masanori; Aono, Mitsuko; Sano, Tomoharu; Tobe, Kazuo; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Saji, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    An ozone-sensitive mutant was isolated from T-DNA-tagged lines of Arabidopsis thaliana. The T-DNA was inserted at a locus on chromosome 3, where two genes encoding glycolate oxidases, GOX1 and GOX2, peroxisomal enzymes involved in photorespiration, reside contiguously. The amounts of the mutant's foliar transcripts for these genes were reduced, and glycolate oxidase activity was approximately 60% of that of the wild-type plants. No difference in growth and appearance was observed between the mutant and the wild-type plants under normal conditions with ambient air under a light intensity of 100 µmol photons m-2 s-1. However, signs of severe damage, such as chlorosis and ion leakage from the tissue, rapidly appeared in mutant leaves in response to ozone treatment at a concentration of 0.2 µl l-1 under a higher light intensity of 350 µmol photons m-2 s-1 that caused no such symptoms in the wild-type plant. The mutant also exhibited sensitivity to sulfur dioxide and long-term high-intensity light. Arabidopsis mutants with deficiencies in other photorespiratory enzymes such as glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase and hydroxypyruvate reductase also exhibited ozone sensitivities. Therefore, photorespiration appears to be involved in protection against photooxidative stress caused by ozone and other abiotic factors under high-intensity light. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Leptin gene promoter DNA methylation in WNIN obese mutant rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity has become an epidemic in worldwide population. Leptin gene defect could be one of the causes for obesity. Two mutant obese rats WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb, isolated at National Centre for Laboratory Animal Sciences (NCLAS), Hyderabad, India, were found to be leptin resistant. The present study aims to understand the regulatory mechanisms underlying the resistance by promoter DNA methylation of leptin gene in these mutant obese rats. Methods Male obese mutant homozygous, carrier and heterozygous rats of WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb strain of 6 months old were studied to check the leptin gene expression (RT-PCR) and promoter DNA methylation (MassARRAY Compact system, SEQUENOM) of leptin gene by invivo and insilico approach. Results Homozygous WNIN/Ob and WNIN/GROb showed significantly higher leptin gene expression compared to carrier and lean counterparts. Leptin gene promoter DNA sequence region was analyzed ranging from transcription start site (TSS) to-550 bp length and found four CpGs in this sequence among them only three CpG loci (-309, -481, -502) were methylated in these WNIN mutant rat phenotypes. Conclusion The increased percentage of methylation in WNIN mutant lean and carrier phenotypes is positively correlated with transcription levels. Thus genetic variation may have effect on methylation percentages and subsequently on the regulation of leptin gene expression which may lead to obesity in these obese mutant rat strains. PMID:24495350

  1. CHO-cell mutant with a defect in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Lindl, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    In a selection procedure designed to enrich for temperature-sensitive mutant cells blocked in mitosis a CHO-cell mutant was isolated which has a defect in cytokinesis as the basis of its temperature-sensitive phenotype. Cultures of the mutant had an abnormally high percentage (ie, 34 percent) of polyploid cells at the permissive temperature of 34/sup 0/C and showed further increased frequencies of polyploidy as well as many multinucleated cells at 38.5/sup 0/ and 39.5/sup 0/. When the mutant cells were synchronized in metaphase by Colcemid arrest and then placed into fresh medium at nonpermissive temperature, they did not divide although the completionmore » of mitosis appeared cytologically normal. Ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy of such synchronized cells at telophase revealed no specific defects in cellular components other than failure of development of a normal midbody. The sensitivity of the mutant to cytochalasin B and to Colcemid was the same as for wild-type cells. This mutation behaved as recessive in tetraploid cell hybrids constructed by fusing the mutant with a CHO strain which was wild-type with respect to temperature sensitivity.« less

  2. Revisiting PC1/3 Mutants: Dominant-Negative Effect of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Retained Mutants.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elias H; Ramos-Molina, Bruno; Lindberg, Iris

    2015-10-01

    Prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), encoded by the gene PCSK1, is critical for peptide hormone synthesis. An increasing number of studies have shown that inactivating mutations in PCSK1 are correlated with endocrine pathologies ranging from intestinal dysfunction to morbid obesity, whereas the common nonsynonymous polymorphisms rs6232 (N221D) and rs6234-rs6235 (Q665E-S690T) are highly associated with obesity risk. In this report, we revisited the biochemical and cellular properties of PC1/3 variants in the context of a wild-type PC1/3 background instead of the S357G hypermorph background used for all previous studies. In the wild-type background the PC1/3 N221D variant exhibited 30% lower enzymatic activity in a fluorogenic assay than wild-type PC1/3; this inhibition was greater than that detected in an equivalent experiment using the PC1/3 S357G background. A PC1/3 variant with the linked carboxyl-terminal polymorphisms Q665E-S690T did not show this difference. We also analyzed the biochemical properties of 2 PC1/3 mutants, G209R and G593R, which are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and studied their effects on wild-type PC1/3. The expression of ER-retained mutants induced ER stress markers and also resulted in dominant-negative blockade of wild-type PC1/3 prodomain cleavage and decreased expression of wild-type PC1/3, suggesting facilitation of the entry of wild-type protein to a degradative proteasomal pathway. Dominant-negative effects of PC1/3 mutations on the expression and maturation of wild-type protein, with consequential effects on PC1/3 availability, add a new element which must be considered in population and clinical studies of this gene.

  3. Mutant α-galactosidase A enzymes identified in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity: biochemical characterization and restoration of normal intracellular processing by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Chang, Hui-Hwa; Kawasaki, Kunito; Yasuda, Kayo; Wu, Hui-Li; Garman, Scott C.; Fan, Jian-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of α-Gal A (α-galactosidase A) activity. In order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying α-Gal A deficiency in Fabry disease patients with residual enzyme activity, enzymes with different missense mutations were purified from transfected COS-7 cells and the biochemical properties were characterized. The mutant enzymes detected in variant patients (A20P, E66Q, M72V, I91T, R112H, F113L, N215S, Q279E, M296I, M296V and R301Q), and those found mostly in mild classic patients (A97V, A156V, L166V and R356W) appeared to have normal Km and Vmax values. The degradation of all mutants (except E59K) was partially inhibited by treatment with kifunensine, a selective inhibitor of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) α-mannosidase I. Metabolic labelling and subcellular fractionation studies in COS-7 cells expressing the L166V and R301Q α-Gal A mutants indicated that the mutant protein was retained in the ER and degraded without processing. Addition of DGJ (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin) to the culture medium of COS-7 cells transfected with a large set of missense mutant α-Gal A cDNAs effectively increased both enzyme activity and protein yield. DGJ was capable of normalizing intracellular processing of mutant α-Gal A found in both classic (L166V) and variant (R301Q) Fabry disease patients. In addition, the residual enzyme activity in fibroblasts or lymphoblasts from both classic and variant hemizygous Fabry disease patients carrying a variety of missense mutations could be substantially increased by cultivation of the cells with DGJ. These results indicate that a large proportion of mutant enzymes in patients with residual enzyme activity are kinetically active. Excessive degradation in the ER could be responsible for the deficiency of enzyme activity in vivo, and the DGJ approach may be broadly applicable to Fabry disease patients with missense mutations. PMID:17555407

  4. Development and characterisation of highly antibiotic resistant Bartonella bacilliformis mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J.; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to develop and characterise in vitro Bartonella bacilliformis antibiotic resistant mutants. Three B. bacilliformis strains were plated 35 or 40 times with azithromycin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin or rifampicin discs. Resistance-stability was assessed performing 5 serial passages without antibiotic pressure. MICs were determined with/without Phe-Arg-β-Napthylamide and artesunate. Target alterations were screened in the 23S rRNA, rplD, rplV, gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE and rpoB genes. Chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin resistance were the most difficult and easiest (>37.3 and 10.6 passages) to be selected, respectively. All mutants but one selected with chloramphenicol achieved high resistance levels. All rifampicin, one azithromycin and one ciprofloxacin mutants did not totally revert when cultured without antibiotic pressure. Azithromycin resistance was related to L4 substitutions Gln-66 → Lys or Gly-70 → Arg; L4 deletion Δ62–65 (Lys-Met-Tyr-Lys) or L22 insertion 83::Val-Ser-Glu-Ala-His-Val-Gly-Lys-Ser; in two chloramphenicol-resistant mutants the 23S rRNA mutation G2372A was detected. GyrA Ala-91 → Val and Asp-95 → Gly and GyrB Glu474 → Lys were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. RpoB substitutions Gln-527 → Arg, His-540 → Tyr and Ser-545 → Phe plus Ser-588 → Tyr were detected in rifampicin-resistant mutants. In 5 mutants the effect of efflux pumps on resistance was observed. Antibiotic resistance was mainly related to target mutations and overexpression of efflux pumps, which might underlie microbiological failures during treatments. PMID:27667026

  5. Brassinosteroid-Insensitive Dwarf Mutants of Arabidopsis Accumulate Brassinosteroids1

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Shozo; Choe, Sunghwa; Takatsuto, Suguru; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yuan, Heng; Feldmann, Kenneth A.; Tax, Frans E.

    1999-01-01

    Seven dwarf mutants resembling brassinosteroid (BR)-biosynthetic dwarfs were isolated that did not respond significantly to the application of exogenous BRs. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that these were novel alleles of BRI1 (Brassinosteroid-Insensitive 1), which encodes a receptor kinase that may act as a receptor for BRs or be involved in downstream signaling. The results of morphological and molecular analyses indicated that these represent a range of alleles from weak to null. The endogenous BRs were examined from 5-week-old plants of a null allele (bri1-4) and two weak alleles (bri1-5 and bri1-6). Previous analysis of endogenous BRs in several BR-biosynthetic dwarf mutants revealed that active BRs are deficient in these mutants. However, bri1-4 plants accumulated very high levels of brassinolide, castasterone, and typhasterol (57-, 128-, and 33-fold higher, respectively, than those of wild-type plants). Weaker alleles (bri1-5 and bri1-6) also accumulated considerable levels of brassinolide, castasterone, and typhasterol, but less than the null allele (bri1-4). The levels of 6-deoxoBRs in bri1 mutants were comparable to that of wild type. The accumulation of biologically active BRs may result from the inability to utilize these active BRs, the inability to regulate BR biosynthesis in bri1 mutants, or both. Therefore, BRI1 is required for the homeostasis of endogenous BR levels. PMID:10557222

  6. Corticostriatal circuit defects in Hoxb8 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Naveen; Jones, Bryan W.; West, Peter J.; Marc, Robert; Capecchi, Mario R.

    2018-01-01

    Hoxb8 mutant mice exhibit compulsive grooming and hair removal dysfunction similar to humans with the OCD-spectrum disorder, trichotillomania. Since, in the mouse brain, the only detectable cells that label with Hoxb8 cell lineage appear to be microglia, we suggested that defective microglia cause the neuropsychiatric disorder. Does the Hoxb8 mutation in microglia lead to neural circuit dysfunctions? We demonstrate that Hoxb8 mutants contain corticostriatal circuit defects. Golgi staining, ultra-structural, and electrophysiological studies of mutants reveal excess dendritic spines, pre- and post-synaptic structural defects, long-term potentiation and miniature postsynaptic current defects. Hoxb8 mutants also exhibit hyperanxiety and social behavioral deficits similar to mice with neuronal mutations in Sapap3, Slitrk5 and Shank3, reported models of OCD and autism spectrum disorders (ASD’s). Long-term treatment of Hoxb8 mutants with fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), reduces excessive grooming, hyperanxiety and social behavioral impairments. These studies provide linkage between the neuronal defects induced by defective Hoxb8-microglia, and neuronal dysfunctions directly generated by mutations in synaptic components that result in mice that display similar pathological grooming, hyperanxiety and social impairment deficits. Our results shed light on Hoxb8 microglia driven circuit-specific defects and therapeutic approaches that will become essential to developing novel therapies for neuropsychiatric diseases such as OCD and ASD’s with Hoxb8-microglia being the central target. PMID:28948967

  7. Regulatory Mutants at the his1 Locus of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Carol; Fogel, Seymour; Cramer, Carole

    1979-01-01

    The his1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for phosphoribosyl transferase, an allosteric enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in histidine biosynthesis. Mutants that specifically alter the feedback regulatory function were isolated by selecting his1 prototrophic revertants that overproduce and excrete histidine. The prototrophs were obtained from diploids homoallelic for his1–7 and heterozygous for the flanking markers thr3 and arg6. Among six independently derived mutant isolates, three distinct levels of histidine excretion were detected. The mutants were shown to be second-site alterations mapping at the his1 locus by recovery of the original auoxtrophic parental alleles. The double mutants, HIS1–7e, are dominant with respect to catalytic function but recessive in regulatory function. When removed from this his1–7 background, the mutant regulatory site (HIS1–e) still confers prototrophy but not histidine excretion. To yield the excretion phenotype, the primary and altered secondary sites are required in cis array. Differences in histidine excretion levels correlate with resistance to the histidine analogue, triazoalanine. PMID:385447

  8. Analysis of AtCry1 and Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Derek; Purvis, Adam; Ahmad, Margaret; Link, Justin J.; Engle, Dorothy

    Cryptochrome is an incredibly versatile protein that influences numerous biological processes such as plant growth, bird migration, and sleep cycles. Due to the versatility of this protein, understanding the mechanism would allow for advances in numerous fields such as crop growth, animal behavior, and sleep disorders. It is known that cryptochrome requires blue light to function, but the exact processes in the regulation of biological activity are still not fully understood. It is believed that the c-terminal domain of the protein undergoes a conformational change when exposed to blue light which allows for biological function. Three different non-functioning mutants were tested during this study to gain insight on the mechanism of cryptochrome. Absorbance spectra showed a difference between two of the mutants and the wild type with one mutant showing little difference. Immunoprecipitation experiments were also conducted to identify the different c-terminal responses of the mutants. By studying non functioning mutants of this protein, the mechanism of the protein can be further characterized. This two-month research experience in Paris allowed us to experience international and interdisciplinary collaborations in science and immerse in a different culture. The Borcer Fund for Student Research, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, and John Hauck Foundation.

  9. A combinatorial strategy for treating KRAS mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manchado, Eusebio; Weissmueller, Susann; Morris, John P.; Chen, Chi-Chao; Wullenkord, Ramona; Lujambio, Amaia; de Stanchina, Elisa; Poirier, John T.; Gainor, Justin F.; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Rudin, Charles M.; Rosen, Neal; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma represents a major goal of clinical oncology. KRAS itself has proven difficult to inhibit, and the effectiveness of agents that target key KRAS effectors has been thwarted by activation of compensatory or parallel pathways that limit their efficacy as single agents. Here we take a systematic approach towards identifying combination targets for trametinib, an FDA-approved MEK inhibitor that acts downstream of KRAS to suppress signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Informed by a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen, we show that trametinib provokes a compensatory response involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that leads to signaling rebound and adaptive drug resistance. As a consequence, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of FGFR1 in combination with trametinib enhances tumor cell death in vitro and in vivo. This compensatory response shows distinct specificities – it is dominated by FGFR1 in KRAS mutant lung and pancreatic cancer cells, but is not activated or involves other mechanisms in KRAS wild-type lung and KRAS-mutant colon cancer cells. Importantly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer cells and patient tumors treated with trametinib show an increase in FRS2 phosphorylation, a biomarker of FGFR activation; this increase is abolished by FGFR1 inhibition and correlates with sensitivity to trametinib and FGFR inhibitor combinations. These results demonstrate that FGFR1 can mediate adaptive resistance to trametinib and validate a combinatorial approach for treating KRAS-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27338794

  10. EMMA—mouse mutant resources for the international scientific community

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Phil; Sengerova, Jitka; Matteoni, Raffaele; Chen, Chao-Kung; Soulat, Gaetan; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Fessele, Sabine; Hagn, Michael; Massimi, Marzia; Pickford, Karen; Butler, Richard H.; Marschall, Susan; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Pickard, Amanda; Raspa, Marcello; Scavizzi, Ferdinando; Fray, Martin; Larrigaldie, Vanessa; Leyritz, Johan; Birney, Ewan; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Brown, Steve; Herault, Yann; Montoliu, Lluis; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Smedley, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human disease and thousands of mutants have been identified or produced, most recently through gene-specific mutagenesis approaches. High throughput strategies by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) are producing mutants for all protein coding genes. Generating a knock-out line involves huge monetary and time costs so capture of both the data describing each mutant alongside archiving of the line for distribution to future researchers is critical. The European Mouse Mutant Archive (EMMA) is a leading international network infrastructure for archiving and worldwide provision of mouse mutant strains. It operates in collaboration with the other members of the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRe), EMMA being the European component. Additionally EMMA is one of four repositories involved in the IKMC, and therefore the current figure of 1700 archived lines will rise markedly. The EMMA database gathers and curates extensive data on each line and presents it through a user-friendly website. A BioMart interface allows advanced searching including integrated querying with other resources e.g. Ensembl. Other resources are able to display EMMA data by accessing our Distributed Annotation System server. EMMA database access is publicly available at http://www.emmanet.org. PMID:19783817

  11. Mutant number distribution in an exponentially growing population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Peter; Antal, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    We present an explicit solution to a classic model of cell-population growth introduced by Luria and Delbrück (1943 Genetics 28 491-511) 70 years ago to study the emergence of mutations in bacterial populations. In this model a wild-type population is assumed to grow exponentially in a deterministic fashion. Proportional to the wild-type population size, mutants arrive randomly and initiate new sub-populations of mutants that grow stochastically according to a supercritical birth and death process. We give an exact expression for the generating function of the total number of mutants at a given wild-type population size. We present a simple expression for the probability of finding no mutants, and a recursion formula for the probability of finding a given number of mutants. In the ‘large population-small mutation’ limit we recover recent results of Kessler and Levine (2014 J. Stat. Phys. doi:10.1007/s10955-014-1143-3) for a fully stochastic version of the process.

  12. The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium: Identification of ocular mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Monica M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Lu, Lu

    2005-06-01

    The Tennessee Mouse Genome Consortium (TMGC) is in its fifth year of a ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-based mutagenesis screen to detect recessive mutations that affect the eye and brain. Each pedigree is tested by various phenotyping domains including the eye, neurohistology, behavior, aging, ethanol, drug, social behavior, auditory, and epilepsy domains. The utilization of a highly efficient breeding protocol and coordination of various universities across Tennessee makes it possible for mice with ENU-induced mutations to be evaluated by nine distinct phenotyping domains within this large-scale project known as the TMGC. Our goal is to create mutant lines that model human diseases andmore » disease syndromes and to make the mutant mice available to the scientific research community. Within the eye domain, mice are screened for anterior and posterior segment abnormalities using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, eye weight, histology, and immunohistochemistry. As of January 2005, we have screened 958 pedigrees and 4800 mice, excluding those used in mapping studies. We have thus far identified seven pedigrees with primary ocular abnormalities. Six of the mutant pedigrees have retinal or subretinal aberrations, while the remaining pedigree presents with an abnormal eye size. Continued characterization of these mutant mice should in most cases lead to the identification of the mutated gene, as well as provide insight into the function of each gene. Mice from each of these pedigrees of mutant mice are available for distribution to researchers for independent study.« less

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration in mahogunin (Mgrn1) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaihua; Johnson, Brian S.; Gunn, Teresa M.

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress, ubiquitination defects and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly associated with neurodegeneration. Mice lacking mahogunin ring finger-1 (MGRN1) or attractin (ATRN) develop age-dependent spongiform neurodegeneration through an unknown mechanism. It has been suggested that they act in a common pathway. As MGRN1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, proteomic analysis of Mgrn1 mutant and control brains was performed to explore the hypothesis that loss of MGRN1 causes neurodegeneration via accumulation of its substrates. Many mitochondrial proteins were reduced in Mgrn1 mutants. Subsequent assays confirmed significantly reduced mitochondrial complex IV expression and activity as well as increased oxidative stress in mutant brains. Mitochondrial dysfunction was obvious many months before onset of vacuolation, implicating this as a causative factor. Compatible with the hypothesis that ATRN and MGRN1 act in the same pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress were also observed in the brains of Atrn mutants. Our results suggest that the study of Mgrn1 and Atrn mutant mice will provide insight into a causative molecular mechanism common to many neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17720281

  14. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  15. Production and characterization of streptomycin dependent mutants of Pasteurella multocida from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    de Alwis, M C; Carter, G R; Chengappa, M M

    1980-01-01

    A large number of streptomycin dependent mutants were produced from bovine haemorrhagic septicaemia strains of Pasteurella multocida. The mutants required a minimum concentration of 25-50 microgram/mL streptomycin for growth and tolerated a concentration of 200 mg/mL. These mutants were avirulent to mice, when inoculated alone, but some mutants killed mice when inoculated with streptomycin. Biochemically all mutants were uniform and similar to the wild type. Most mutants were stable, but a few produced streptomycin independent revertants. The rate of reversion varied with each mutant. Most revertants were highly virulent for mice, some totally avirulant and a few relatively avirulent. PMID:6778598

  16. A Comparison of Retinyl Palmitate and Red Palm Oil β-Carotene as Strategies to Address Vitamin A Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Souganidis, Ellie; Laillou, Arnaud; Leyvraz, Magali; Moench-Pfanner, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency continues to be an international public health problem with several important health consequences including blindness and overall increased rates of morbidity and mortality. To address this widespread issue, a series of strategies have been put into place from dietary diversification to supplementation and fortification programs. Retinyl palmitate has been used successfully for decades as a supplement as well as a way to fortify numerous foods, including vegetable oil, rice, monosodium glutamate, cereal flours and sugar. Recently, there has been rising interest in using a natural source of carotenoids, β-carotene from red palm oil (RPO), for fortification. Although RPO interventions have also been shown to effectively prevent Vitamin A deficiency, there are numerous challenges in using beta-carotene from RPO as a fortification technique. β-Carotene can induce significant changes in appearance and taste of the fortified product. Moreover, costs of fortifying with beta-carotene are higher than with retinyl palmitate. Therefore, RPO should only be used as a source of Vitamin A if it is produced and used in its crude form and regularly consumed without frying. Furthermore, refined RPO should be fortified with retinyl palmitate, not β-carotene, to ensure that there is adequate Vitamin A content. PMID:23955382

  17. Carotenoids and β-carotene in orange fleshed sweet potato: A possible solution to vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Nusrat, Tania; Begum, Parveen; Ahsan, Monira

    2016-05-15

    The present study, in line with a plant-food-based approach to address vitamin A deficiency, reports the analysis of total carotenoids, and trans- and cis-β-carotenes, in different varieties of raw and boiled orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP). Carotenoids were isolated using acetone-petroleum ether extraction followed by spectrophotometric determination. trans- and cis-β-Carotenes were analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC method using a mobile phase containing acetonitrile:methanol:2-propanol in the ratio of 85:15:33 with 0.01% ammonium acetate. Intra-varietal difference in carotenoids as well as trans- and cis-β-carotenes were noted in both the raw and boiled potatoes. Carotenoid content was found to be higher in the raw potatoes compared to the boiled samples from the same variety. Amongst the OFSP varieties, Kamalasundari (BARI SP-2) was found to contain the most carotenoids in both the raw and boiled samples. β-Carotene was significantly higher in the Kamalsundari and BARI SP-5 varieties. trans-β-Carotene was found to be the major carotenoid in all of the raw potatoes, but boiling was associated with an increase in cis-β-carotene and a decrease in the trans isomer. Kamalsundari and BARI SP-5 orange-fleshed sweet potatoes have the potential to be used as food-based supplements to reduce vitamin A deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Retinal dehydrogenase gene expression in stomach and small intestine of rats during postnatal development and in vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P V

    1998-04-17

    Retinal dehydrogenase (RALDH) catalyzes the oxidation of retinal to all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid, which function as ligands controlling RAR and RXR nuclear receptor-signaling pathways. We have recently shown the expression of RALDH transcript in the stomach and small intestine by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [Bhat, P.V., Labrecque J., Dumas, F., Lacroix, A. and Yoshida, A. (1995) Gene 166, 303-306]. We have examined RALDH expression in the stomach and small intestine before and during postnatal development and in vitamin A deficiency by assaying for mRNA levels and protein as well as for enzyme activity. In -2 day fetuses, RALDH expression was high in the small intestine, whereas RALDH protein was not detectable in the stomach. However, expression of RALDH was seen in the stomach after birth, and gradually increased with age and reached the highest level at postnatal day 42. In the intestine, RALDH expression decreased postnatally. Vitamin A deficiency up-regulated RALDH expression in the stomach and small intestine, and administration of retinoids down-regulated the RALDH expression in these tissues. These results show the differential expression of RALDH in the stomach and small intestine during postnatal development, and that vitamin A status regulates the expression of RALDH gene in these tissues.

  19. Spatial constraints govern competition of mutant clones in human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lynch, M D; Lynch, C N S; Craythorne, E; Liakath-Ali, K; Mallipeddi, R; Barker, J N; Watt, F M

    2017-10-24

    Deep sequencing can detect somatic DNA mutations in tissues permitting inference of clonal relationships. This has been applied to human epidermis, where sun exposure leads to the accumulation of mutations and an increased risk of skin cancer. However, previous studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the relative importance of positive selection and neutral drift in clonal evolution. Here, we sequenced larger areas of skin than previously, focusing on cancer-prone skin spanning five decades of life. The mutant clones identified were too large to be accounted for solely by neutral drift. Rather, using mathematical modelling and computational lattice-based simulations, we show that observed clone size distributions can be explained by a combination of neutral drift and stochastic nucleation of mutations at the boundary of expanding mutant clones that have a competitive advantage. These findings demonstrate that spatial context and cell competition cooperate to determine the fate of a mutant stem cell.

  20. Isolation of peroxisome-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, R; Veenhuis, M; Mertens, D; Kunau, W H

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affected in peroxisomal assembly (pas mutants) have been isolated and characterized. Each strain contains a single mutation that results in (i) the inability to grow on oleic acid, (ii) accumulation of peroxisomal matrix enzymes in the cytosol, and (iii) absence of detectable peroxisomes at the ultrastructural level. These lesions (pas1-1 and pas2) are shown to be nonallelic and recessive. Crossing of pas1-1 and pas2 strains resulted in diploid cells that had regained the ability to grow on oleic acid as sole carbon source and to form peroxisomes. These pas mutants may provide useful tools for future studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in peroxisomal assembly. Images PMID:2568633

  1. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John [Shoreham, NY; Whittle, Edward J [Greenport, NY

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  2. How Life History Can Sway the Fixation Probability of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Yi; Kurokawa, Shun; Giaimo, Stefano; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of demographic structure on evolutionary dynamics when selection acts on reproduction, survival, or both. In contrast to the previously discovered pattern that the fixation probability of a neutral mutant decreases while the population becomes younger, we show that a mutant with a constant selective advantage may have a maximum or a minimum of the fixation probability in populations with an intermediate fraction of young individuals. This highlights the importance of life history and demographic structure in studying evolutionary dynamics. We also illustrate the fundamental differences between selection on reproduction and selection on survival when age structure is present. In addition, we evaluate the relative importance of size and structure of the population in determining the fixation probability of the mutant. Our work lays the foundation for also studying density- and frequency-dependent effects in populations when demographic structures cannot be neglected. PMID:27129737

  3. Phenotypic analysis of a novel chordin mutant in medaka.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Shimada, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yokoi, Hayato; Narita, Takanori; Jindo, Tomoko; Kage, Takahiro; Kitagawa, Tadao; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Sekimizu, Koshin; Miyake, Akimitsu; Setiamarga, Davin H E; Murakami, Ryohei; Tsuda, Sachiko; Ooki, Shinya; Kakihara, Ken; Hojo, Motoki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Yuji; Araki, Kazuo; Saga, Yumiko; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2007-08-01

    We have isolated and characterized a ventralized mutant in medaka (the Japanese killifish; Oryzias latipes), which turned out to have a mutation in the chordin gene. The mutant exhibits ventralization of the body axis, malformation of axial bones, over-bifurcation of yolk sac blood vessels, and laterality defects in internal organs. The mutant exhibits variability of phenotypes, depending on the culture temperature, from embryos with a slightly ventralized phenotype to those without any head and trunk structures. Taking advantages of these variable and severe phenotypes, we analyzed the role of Chordin-dependent tissues such as the notochord and Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in the establishment of left-right axis in fish. The results demonstrate that, in the absence of the notochord and KV, the medaka lateral plate mesoderm autonomously and bilaterally expresses spaw gene in a default state. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Human mutant huntingtin disrupts vocal learning in transgenic songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Kohn, Jessica; Szwed, Sarah K; Pariser, Eben; Sepe, Sharon; Haripal, Bhagwattie; Oshimori, Naoki; Marsala, Martin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Lee, Ramee

    2015-11-01

    Speech and vocal impairments characterize many neurological disorders. However, the neurogenetic mechanisms of these disorders are not well understood, and current animal models do not have the necessary circuitry to recapitulate vocal learning deficits. We developed germline transgenic songbirds, zebra finches (Taneiopygia guttata) expressing human mutant huntingtin (mHTT), a protein responsible for the progressive deterioration of motor and cognitive function in Huntington's disease (HD). Although generally healthy, the mutant songbirds had severe vocal disorders, including poor vocal imitation, stuttering, and progressive syntax and syllable degradation. Their song abnormalities were associated with HD-related neuropathology and dysfunction of the cortical-basal ganglia (CBG) song circuit. These transgenics are, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimentally created, functional mutant songbirds. Their progressive and quantifiable vocal disorder, combined with circuit dysfunction in the CBG song system, offers a model for genetic manipulation and the development of therapeutic strategies for CBG-related vocal and motor disorders.

  5. Elevated Cell Wall Serine in Pleiotropic Staphylococcal Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Ruth Z.

    1966-01-01

    Korman, Ruth Z. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.). Elevated cell wall serine in pleiotropic staphylococcal mutants. J. Bacteriol. 92:762–768. 1966.—Physically purified cell walls were prepared from two staphylococcal strains and from pleiotropic variants derived from them. The quantitative amino acid and amino sugar content of these walls is reported. The pleiotypes, which are identified culturally by their failure to elaborate coagulase, their resistance to bacteriophage, and their sensitivity to mannitol, have altered molar ratios of amino acids and amino sugars in their cell walls. In comparison with lysine content, the serine content of the mutant wall is elevated and the glycine content is reduced. The glucosamine content is reduced also. It is postulated that the pleiotropic mutants possess an altered cell wall biosynthetic pathway. Images PMID:5922547

  6. Bending patterns of chlamydomonas flagella: III. A radial spoke head deficient mutant and a central pair deficient mutant.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, C J; Luck, D J

    1985-01-01

    Flash photomicrography at frequencies up to 300 Hz and computer-assisted image analysis have been used to obtain parameters describing the flagellar bending patterns of mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. All strains contained the uni1 mutation, to facilitate photography. The radial spoke head deficient mutant pf17, and the central pair deficient mutant, pf15, in combination with suppressor mutations that restore motility without restoring the ultrastructural or biochemical deficiencies, both generate forward mode bending patterns with increased shear amplitude and decreased asymmetry relative to the "wild-type" uni1 flagella described previously. In the reverse beating mode, the suppressed pf17 mutants generate reverse bending patterns with large shear amplitudes. Reverse beating of the suppressed pf15 mutants is rare. There is a reciprocal relationship between increased shear amplitude and decreased beat frequency, so that the velocity of sliding between flagellar microtubules is not increased by an increase in shear amplitude. The suppressor mutations alone cause decreased frequency and sliding velocity in both forward and reverse mode beating, with little change in shear amplitude or symmetry.

  7. Biochemical Analysis of Two Single Mutants that Give Rise to a Polymorphic G6PD A-Double Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Nava, Edson Jiovany; González-Valdez, Abigail; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Hernández-Pineda, Jessica; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Marcial-Quino, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a key regulatory enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular energy and redox balance. Mutations in the gene encoding G6PD cause the most common enzymopathy that drives hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. To gain insights into the effects of mutations in G6PD enzyme efficiency, we have investigated the biochemical, kinetic, and structural changes of three clinical G6PD variants, the single mutations G6PD A+ (Asn126AspD) and G6PD Nefza (Leu323Pro), and the double mutant G6PD A− (Asn126Asp + Leu323Pro). The mutants showed lower residual activity (≤50% of WT G6PD) and displayed important kinetic changes. Although all Class III mutants were located in different regions of the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme and were not close to the active site, these mutants had a deleterious effect over catalytic activity and structural stability. The results indicated that the G6PD Nefza mutation was mainly responsible for the functional and structural alterations observed in the double mutant G6PD A−. Moreover, our study suggests that the G6PD Nefza and G6PD A− mutations affect enzyme functions in a similar fashion to those reported for Class I mutations. PMID:29072585

  8. Validation of the All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group (APR-DRG) Risk of Mortality and Severity of Illness Modifiers as a Measure of Perioperative Risk.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Patrick J; Lin, Hung-Mo; Deiner, Stacie G; Levin, Matthew A

    2018-03-22

    The All Patient Refined Diagnosis Related Group (APR-DRG) is an inpatient visit classification system that assigns a diagnostic related group, a Risk of Mortality (ROM) subclass and a Severity of Illness (SOI) subclass. While extensively used for cost adjustment, no study has compared the APR-DRG subclass modifiers to the popular Charlson Comorbidity Index as a measure of comorbidity severity in models for perioperative in-hospital mortality. In this study we attempt to validate the use of these subclasses to predict mortality in a cohort of surgical patients. We analyzed all adult (age over 18 years) inpatient non-cardiac surgery at our institution between December 2005 and July 2013. After exclusions, we split the cohort into training and validation sets. We created prediction models of inpatient mortality using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, ROM only, SOI only, and ROM with SOI. Models were compared by receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve, area under the ROC curve (AUC), and Brier score. After exclusions, we analyzed 63,681 patient-visits. Overall in-hospital mortality was 1.3%. The median number of ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes was 6 (Q1-Q3 4-10). The median Charlson Comorbidity Index was 0 (Q1-Q3 0-2). When the model was applied to the validation set, the c-statistic for Charlson was 0.865, c-statistic for ROM was 0.975, and for ROM and SOI combined the c-statistic was 0.977. The scaled Brier score for Charlson was 0.044, Brier for ROM only was 0.230, and Brier for ROM and SOI was 0.257. The APR-DRG ROM or SOI subclasses are better predictors than the Charlson Comorbidity Index of in-hospital mortality among surgical patients.

  9. Quinolone-resistant gyrase mutants demonstrate decreased susceptibility to triclosan.

    PubMed

    Webber, Mark A; Buckner, Michelle M C; Redgrave, Liam S; Ifill, Gyles; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Webb, Carly; Iddles, Robyn; Maxwell, Anthony; Piddock, Laura J V

    2017-10-01

    Cross-resistance between antibiotics and biocides is a potentially important driver of MDR. A relationship between susceptibility of Salmonella to quinolones and triclosan has been observed. This study aimed to: (i) investigate the mechanism underpinning this; (ii) determine whether the phenotype is conserved in Escherichia coli; and (iii) evaluate the potential for triclosan to select for quinolone resistance. WT E. coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and gyrA mutants were used. These were characterized by determining antimicrobial susceptibility, DNA gyrase activity and sensitivity to inhibition. Expression of stress response pathways (SOS, RpoS, RpoN and RpoH) was measured, as was the fitness of mutants. The potential for triclosan to select for quinolone resistance was determined. All gyrase mutants showed increased triclosan MICs and altered supercoiling activity. There was no evidence for direct interaction between triclosan and gyrase. Identical substitutions in GyrA had different impacts on supercoiling in the two species. For both, there was a correlation between altered supercoiling and expression of stress responses. This was more marked in E. coli, where an Asp87Gly GyrA mutant demonstrated greatly increased fitness in the presence of triclosan. Exposure of parental strains to low concentrations of triclosan did not select for quinolone resistance. Our data suggest gyrA mutants are less susceptible to triclosan due to up-regulation of stress responses. The impact of gyrA mutation differs between E. coli and Salmonella. The impacts of gyrA mutation beyond quinolone resistance have implications for the fitness and selection of gyrA mutants in the presence of non-quinolone antimicrobials. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants affected in attachment to plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, C J; Halperin, W; Nester, E W

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed that the chromosome of A. tumefaciens codes for a specific ability of this bacterium to attach to plant cells. This ability is associated with tumorigenesis by A. tumefaciens, the ability of avirulent A. tumefaciens to inhibit tumorigenesis, and the ability to adsorb certain phages. A second class of chromosomal mutations affects tumorigenesis without altering the ability to attach to plant cells. The attachment of A. tumefaciens to plant cells was assayed by mixing radiolabeled bacteria with suspensions of tobacco tissue culture cells or freshly isolated Zinnia leaf mesophyll cells. Under the conditions of this assay, an avirulent Ti plasmid-cured strain attached to the same extent as the same strain containing pTiB6806. Six of eight avirulent mutants with Tn5 insertions in chromosomal DNA showed defective attachment, whereas two retained wild-type attachment ability. In contrast to the strains showing wild-type attachment, the attachment-defective mutants failed to inhibit tumorigenesis when inoculated onto Jerusalem artichoke slices before inoculation of a virulent strain and also showed a loss of sensitivity to two Agrobacterium phages. The loss of phage sensitivity appeared to be due to a loss of ability to adsorb the phages. Staining with Calcofluor indicated that the mutants retained the ability to synthesize cellulose fibrils, which have been implicated in the attachment process. Southern filter hybridizations demonstrated that each mutant contained a single Tn5 insertion, and genetic linkage between the Tn5 insertion in one mutant and the attachment phenotype has also been demonstrated. Images PMID:6292165

  11. Interaction of metronidazole with DNA repair mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yeung, T C; Beaulieu, B B; McLafferty, M A; Goldman, P

    1984-01-01

    It has been proposed that one of metronidazole's partially reduced intermediates interacts either with DNA to exert a bactericidal effect or with water to form acetamide. To test this hypothesis we have examined the effect of metronidazole on several mutants of Escherichia coli that are defective in DNA repair. UV-susceptible RecA- and UvrB- point mutants have an increased susceptibility to metronidazole as manifested by both a decreased minimal inhibitory concentration and a greater bactericidal response to metronidazole in resting cultures. By these criteria, however, we find that UvrB- deletion mutants, which lack the ability to reduce nitrate and chlorate, are no more susceptible to metronidazole than is the wild type. We find, however, that these deletion mutants also lack the ability to reduce metronidazole and thus possibly to form its reactive species. When metronidazole's bactericidal effect is expressed in terms of the concurrent accumulation of acetamide derived from metronidazole, then all RecA- and UvrB- mutants are killed more efficiently than their wild types. The data are consistent, therefore, with metronidazole's lethal effect being mediated by a partially reduced intermediate on the metabolic pathway between metronidazole and acetamide. Defects in other aspects of the DNA repair system do not confer this increased susceptibility to the proposed intermediate. A Tag- mutant, for example, which is defective in 3-methyl-adenine-DNA glycosylase, does not have this increased susceptibility to the presumed precursor of acetamide. Thus, these results provide further support for the hypothesis that the bactericidal effect of metronidazole is mediated by a partially reduced intermediate in the metabolic conversion of metronidazole to acetamide and suggest that this intermediate interacts with DNA to produce a lesion similar to that caused by UV light.

  12. Interaction of metronidazole with DNA repair mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, T C; Beaulieu, B B; McLafferty, M A; Goldman, P

    1984-01-01

    It has been proposed that one of metronidazole's partially reduced intermediates interacts either with DNA to exert a bactericidal effect or with water to form acetamide. To test this hypothesis we have examined the effect of metronidazole on several mutants of Escherichia coli that are defective in DNA repair. UV-susceptible RecA- and UvrB- point mutants have an increased susceptibility to metronidazole as manifested by both a decreased minimal inhibitory concentration and a greater bactericidal response to metronidazole in resting cultures. By these criteria, however, we find that UvrB- deletion mutants, which lack the ability to reduce nitrate and chlorate, are no more susceptible to metronidazole than is the wild type. We find, however, that these deletion mutants also lack the ability to reduce metronidazole and thus possibly to form its reactive species. When metronidazole's bactericidal effect is expressed in terms of the concurrent accumulation of acetamide derived from metronidazole, then all RecA- and UvrB- mutants are killed more efficiently than their wild types. The data are consistent, therefore, with metronidazole's lethal effect being mediated by a partially reduced intermediate on the metabolic pathway between metronidazole and acetamide. Defects in other aspects of the DNA repair system do not confer this increased susceptibility to the proposed intermediate. A Tag- mutant, for example, which is defective in 3-methyl-adenine-DNA glycosylase, does not have this increased susceptibility to the presumed precursor of acetamide. Thus, these results provide further support for the hypothesis that the bactericidal effect of metronidazole is mediated by a partially reduced intermediate in the metabolic conversion of metronidazole to acetamide and suggest that this intermediate interacts with DNA to produce a lesion similar to that caused by UV light. PMID:6367636

  13. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Susan I.

    Despite the fact that soluble sugar levels have been postulated to play an important role in the control of a wide variety of plant metabolic and developmental pathways, the mechanisms by which plants respond to soluble sugar levels remain poorly understood. Plant responses to soluble sugar levels are also important in bioenergy production, as plant sugar responses are believed to help regulate both carbon fixation and carbon partitioning. For example, accumulation of soluble sugars, such as sucrose and glucose, in source tissues leads to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing rates of carbon fixation. Soluble sugar levels can also affectmore » sink strengths, affecting the rates of accumulation of carbon-based compounds into both particular molecular forms (e.g. carbohydrates versus lipids versus proteins) and particular plant organs and tissues. Mutants of Arabidopsis that are defective in the ability to respond to soluble sugar levels were isolated and used as tools to identify some of the factors involved in plant sugar response. These sugar insensitive (sis) mutants were isolated by screening mutagenized seeds for those that were able to germinate and develop relatively normal shoot systems on media containing 0.3 M glucose or 0.3 M sucrose. At these sugar concentrations, wild-type Arabidopsis germinate and produce substantial root systems, but show little to no shoot development. Twenty-eight sis mutants were isolated during the course of four independent mutant screens. Based on a preliminary characterization of all of these mutants, sis3 and sis6 were chosen for further study. Both of these mutations appear to lie in previously uncharacterized loci. Unlike many other sugar-response mutants, sis3 mutants exhibit a wild-type or near wild-type response in all phytohormone-response assays conducted to date. The sis6-1 mutation is unusual in that it appears to be due to overexpression of a gene, rather than representing a loss of function

  14. User Guide for the LORE1 Insertion Mutant Resource.

    PubMed

    Mun, Terry; Małolepszy, Anna; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2017-01-01

    Lotus japonicus is a model legume used in the study of plant-microbe interactions, especially in the field of biological nitrogen fixation due to its ability to enter into a symbiotic relationship with a soil bacterium, Mesorhizobium loti. The LORE1 mutant population is a valuable resource for reverse genetics in L. japonicus due to its non-transgenic nature, high tagging efficiency, and low copy count. Here, we outline a workflow for identifying, ordering, and establishing homozygous LORE1 mutant lines for a gene of interest, LjFls2, including protocols for growth and genotyping of a segregating LORE1 population.

  15. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  16. Analysis of isoniazid-resistant transposon mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Billman-Jacobe, H; Sloan, J; Coppel, R L

    1996-10-15

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has renewed interest in the study of drug resistance in mycobacteria with the objective of improved chemotherapy. The genetic basis of isoniazid resistance in a model mycobacterium was studied. Eleven isoniazid-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis were created using transposon mutagenesis. Genetic and enzymatic characterisation of the mutants showed that katG, encoding T-catalase, was inactivated. The nucleotide sequence of M. smegmatis katG was determined and the mutation sites mapped demonstrating that both the amino and carboxyl halves of T-catalase are important for enzymatic activity.

  17. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  18. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  19. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  20. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  1. Mutant Profilin Suppresses Mutant Actin-dependent Mitochondrial Phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuo-Kuang; McKane, Melissa; Stokasimov, Ema; Rubenstein, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-profilin interface, Ala167 of the actin barbed end W-loop and His372 near the C terminus form a clamp around a profilin segment containing residue Arg81 and Tyr79. Modeling suggests that altering steric packing in this interface regulates actin activity. An actin A167E mutation could increase interface crowding and alter actin regulation, and A167E does cause growth defects and mitochondrial dysfunction. We assessed whether a profilin Y79S mutation with its decreased mass could compensate for actin A167E crowding and rescue the mutant phenotype. Y79S profilin alone caused no growth defect in WT actin cells under standard conditions in rich medium and rescued the mitochondrial phenotype resulting from both the A167E and H372R actin mutations in vivo consistent with our model. Rescue did not result from effects of profilin on actin nucleotide exchange or direct effects of profilin on actin polymerization. Polymerization of A167E actin was less stimulated by formin Bni1 FH1-FH2 fragment than was WT actin. Addition of WT profilin to mixtures of A167E actin and formin fragment significantly altered polymerization kinetics from hyperbolic to a decidedly more sigmoidal behavior. Substitution of Y79S profilin in this system produced A167E behavior nearly identical to that of WT actin. A167E actin caused more dynamic actin cable behavior in vivo than observed with WT actin. Introduction of Y79S restored cable movement to a more normal phenotype. Our studies implicate the importance of the actin-profilin interface for formin-dependent actin and point to the involvement of formin and profilin in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:21956104

  2. Interleukin-17A-Deficient Mice Are Highly Susceptible to Toxoplasma gondii Infection Due to Excessively Induced T. gondii HSP70 and Interferon Gamma Production.

    PubMed

    Moroda, Masataka; Takamoto, Masaya; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nakayama, Jun; Aosai, Fumie

    2017-12-01

    Interleukin17A (IL-17A) is known to be involved in the host defense against pathogens and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Previously, we showed that excessive amounts of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play an important role in the pathogenesis of the lethal effects of Toxoplasma gondii by inducing anaphylactic responses. In the study described in this report, we examined the effects of IL-17A deficiency on murine host defense against oral T. gondii infection. IL-17A-deficient C57BL/6 (B6) mice exhibited higher rates of mortality than wild-type (WT) mice during the acute phase of T. gondii infection. CD4 + T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) and ileum of T. gondii -infected IL-17A-deficient mice produced higher levels of IFN-γ than did those of WT mice. In addition, the level of T. gondii HSP70 ( T.g HSP70) expression was also significantly increased in the ileum, mLNs, liver, and spleen of infected IL-17A-deficient mice compared with that in WT mice. These elevated levels of expression of T.g HSP70 and IFN-γ in infected IL-17A-deficient mice were presumably linked to the IL-17A defect since they decreased to WT levels after treatment with recombinant IL-17A. Furthermore, IL-17A-deficient mice were highly susceptible to the anaphylactic effect of T.g HSP70, and the survival of IL-17A-deficient mice during the acute phase was improved by treatment with an anti- T.g HSP70 monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that IL-17A plays an important role in host survival against T. gondii infection by protecting the host from an anaphylactic reaction via the downregulation of T.g HSP70 and IFN-γ production. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Binding of Single Walled Carbon Nanotube to WT and Mutant HIV-1 Proteases: Analysis of Flap Dynamics and Binding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-01-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50VPR, V82APR and I84VPR) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3–5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1 kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  4. Proteostasis and ageing: insights from long-lived mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; Page, Melissa M; Selman, Colin

    2017-10-15

    The global increase in life expectancy is creating significant medical, social and economic challenges to current and future generations. Consequently, there is a need to identify the fundamental mechanisms underlying the ageing process. This knowledge should help develop realistic interventions capable of combatting age-related disease, and thus improving late-life health and vitality. While several mechanisms have been proposed as conserved lifespan determinants, the loss of proteostasis - where proteostasis is defined here as the maintenance of the proteome - appears highly relevant to both ageing and disease. Several studies have shown that multiple proteostatic mechanisms, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, appear indispensable for longevity in many long-lived invertebrate mutants. Similarly, interspecific comparisons suggest that proteostasis may be an important lifespan determinant in vertebrates. Over the last 20 years a number of long-lived mouse mutants have been described, many of which carry single-gene mutations within the growth-hormone, insulin/IGF-1 or mTOR signalling pathways. However, we still do not know how these mutations act mechanistically to increase lifespan and healthspan, and accordingly whether mechanistic commonality occurs between different mutants. Recent evidence supports the premise that the successful maintenance of the proteome during ageing may be linked to the increased lifespan and healthspan of long-lived mouse mutants. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  5. Mutations and Misconceptions: The Isolation and Study of Mutant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes simple, inexpensive activities for teaching students about mutants and mutations in bacteria. Explains how to isolate bacteria from soil and leaves and how to grow bacteria on agar or in broth. Describes how to construct a gradient plate for finding the minimum inhibitory concentration of a substance and how to use this set up to find…

  6. Modeling dynamics of mutants in heterogeneous stem cell niche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriyari, L.; Mahdipour-Shirayeh, A.

    2017-02-01

    Studying the stem cell (SC) niche architecture is a crucial step for investigating the process of oncogenesis and obtaining an effective stem cell therapy for various cancers. Recently, it has been observed that there are two groups of SCs in the SC niche collaborating with each other to maintain tissue homeostasis: border stem cells (BSCs), which are responsible in controlling the number of non-stem cells as well as stem cells, and central stem cells (CeSCs), which regulate the SC niche. Here, we develop a bi-compartmental stochastic model for the SC niche to study the spread of mutants within the niche. The analytic calculations and numeric simulations, which are in perfect agreement, reveal that in order to delay the spread of mutants in the SC niche, a small but non-zero number of SC proliferations must occur in the CeSC compartment. Moreover, the migration of BSCs to CeSCs delays the spread of mutants. Furthermore, the fixation probability of mutants in the SC niche is independent of types of SC division as long as all SCs do not divide fully asymmetrically. Additionally, the progeny of CeSCs have a much higher chance than the progeny of BSCs to take over the entire niche.

  7. Genetic characterization of glossy-leafed mutant broccoli lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glossy mutants of Brassica oleracea L. have reduced or altered epicuticular wax on the surface of their leaves as compared to wild-type plants, conveying a shiny green appearance. Mutations conferring glossiness are common and have been found in most B. oleracea crop varieties, including cauliflower...

  8. Disturbed secretion of mutant adiponectin associated with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Nagaretani, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hidehiko; Kobayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiyo; Maeda, Norikazu; Nagasawa, Azumi; Hibuse, Toshiyuki; Ohashi, Koji; Kumada, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Yoshihisa; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2003-06-20

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein, consists of collagen-like fibrous and complement C1q-like globular domains, and circulates in human plasma in a multimeric form. The protein exhibits anti-diabetic and anti-atherogenic activities. However, adiponectin plasma concentrations are low in obese subjects, and hypoadiponectinemia is associated with the metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. We have recently reported a missense mutation in the adiponectin gene, in which isoleucine at position 164 in the globular domain is substituted with threonine (I164T). Subjects with this mutation showed markedly low level of plasma adiponectin and clinical features of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we examined the molecular characteristics of the mutant protein associated with a genetic cause of hypoadiponectinemia. The current study revealed (1) the mutant protein showed an oligomerization state similar to the wild-type as determined by gel filtration chromatography and, (2) the mutant protein exhibited normal insulin-sensitizing activity, but (3) pulse-chase study showed abnormal secretion of the mutant protein from adipose tissues. Our results suggest that I164T mutation is associated with hypoadiponectinemia through disturbed secretion into plasma, which may contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Modelling the Evolution and Spread of HIV Immune Escape Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Helen R.; Frater, John; Duda, Anna; Roberts, Mick G.; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.

    2010-01-01

    During infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immune pressure from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) selects for viral mutants that confer escape from CTL recognition. These escape variants can be transmitted between individuals where, depending upon their cost to viral fitness and the CTL responses made by the recipient, they may revert. The rates of within-host evolution and their concordant impact upon the rate of spread of escape mutants at the population level are uncertain. Here we present a mathematical model of within-host evolution of escape mutants, transmission of these variants between hosts and subsequent reversion in new hosts. The model is an extension of the well-known SI model of disease transmission and includes three further parameters that describe host immunogenetic heterogeneity and rates of within host viral evolution. We use the model to explain why some escape mutants appear to have stable prevalence whilst others are spreading through the population. Further, we use it to compare diverse datasets on CTL escape, highlighting where different sources agree or disagree on within-host evolutionary rates. The several dozen CTL epitopes we survey from HIV-1 gag, RT and nef reveal a relatively sedate rate of evolution with average rates of escape measured in years and reversion in decades. For many epitopes in HIV, occasional rapid within-host evolution is not reflected in fast evolution at the population level. PMID:21124991

  10. Let-7 Sensitizes KRAS Mutant Tumor Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tan, Chalet

    2015-01-01

    KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis and drug resistance. Let-7 is a family of tumor suppressor microRNAs that are frequently suppressed in solid tumors, where KRAS mutations are highly prevalent. In this study, we investigated the potential use of let-7 as a chemosensitizer. We found that let-7b repletion selectively sensitized KRAS mutant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and gemcitabine. Transfection of let-7b mimic downregulated the expression of mutant but not wild-type KRAS. Combination of let-7b mimic with paclitaxel or gemcitabine diminished MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling concurrently, triggered the onset of apoptosis, and reverted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in KRAS mutant tumor cells. In addition, let-7b repletion downregulated the expression of β-tubulin III and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2, two proteins known to mediate tumor resistance to paclitaxel and gemcitabine, respectively. Let-7 may represent a new class of chemosensitizer for the treatment of KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25946136

  11. Searching and Mining Visually Observed Phenotypes of Maize Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are thousands of maize mutants, which are invaluable resources for plant research. Geneticists use them to study underlying mechanisms of biochemistry, cell biology, cell development, and cell physiology. To streamline the understanding of such complex processes, researchers need the most curr...

  12. Some Experiments with Respiratory Deficient Mutants of Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are described for the induction and identification of respiratory deficient mutants in yeast. Practical schemes are given to enable students to obtain dose-response information for physical and chemical mutagens such as heat, ultraviolet light, or acriflavine. A simple test for environmental mutagens is described. (Author/MA)

  13. Active site-directed double mutants of dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ercikan-Abali, E A; Mineishi, S; Tong, Y; Nakahara, S; Waltham, M C; Banerjee, D; Chen, W; Sadelain, M; Bertino, J R

    1996-09-15

    Variants of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), which confer resistance to antifolates, are used as dominant selectable markers in vitro and in vivo and may be useful in the context of gene therapy. To identify improved mutant human DHFRs with increased catalytic efficiency and decreased binding to methotrexate, we constructed by site-directed mutagenesis four variants with substitutions at both Leu22 and Phe31 (i.e., Phe22-Ser31, Tyr22-Ser31, Phe22-Gly31, and Tyr22-Gly31). Antifolate resistance has been observed previously when individual changes are made at these active-site residues. Substrate and antifolate binding properties of these "double" mutants revealed that each have greatly diminished affinity for antifolates (> 10,000-fold) yet only slightly reduced substrate affinity. Comparison of in vitro measured properties with those of single-residue variants indicates that double mutants are indeed significantly superior. This was verified for one of the double mutants that provided high-level methotrexate resistance following retrovirus-mediated gene transfer in NIH3T3 cells.

  14. Study the Expression of ompf Gene in Esherichia coli Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jaktaji, R Pourahmad; Heidari, F

    2013-09-01

    The outer membrane porin proteins are the major factors in controlling the permeability of cell membrane. OmpF is an example of porin proteins in Esherichia coli. In normal growth condition a large amount of this protein is synthesised, but under stress condition, such as the presence of antibiotics in environment its expression is decreased inhibiting the entrance of antibiotics into cell. The expression of ompF is inhibited by antisense RNA transcribed from micF. In normal condition the expression of micF is low, but in the presence of antibiotics its expression is increased and causes multiple resistances to irrelevant antibiotics. The aims of this research were to study first, the intactness of micF and then quantify the expression of ompF in ciprofloxacin and tetracycline resistant mutants of E. coli. For this purpose the 5' end of micF was amplified and then sequenced. None of these mutants except one and its clone has a mutation in this gene. Then the relative expression of ompF in these mutants was quantified by real time PCR. There was no significant difference between ompF transcription of mutants and wild type strain. Based on this study and previous study it is concluded that low to intermediate levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline does not decrease ompF transcription.

  15. Study the Expression of ompf Gene in Esherichia coli Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Jaktaji, R. Pourahmad; Heidari, F.

    2013-01-01

    The outer membrane porin proteins are the major factors in controlling the permeability of cell membrane. OmpF is an example of porin proteins in Esherichia coli. In normal growth condition a large amount of this protein is synthesised, but under stress condition, such as the presence of antibiotics in environment its expression is decreased inhibiting the entrance of antibiotics into cell. The expression of ompF is inhibited by antisense RNA transcribed from micF. In normal condition the expression of micF is low, but in the presence of antibiotics its expression is increased and causes multiple resistances to irrelevant antibiotics. The aims of this research were to study first, the intactness of micF and then quantify the expression of ompF in ciprofloxacin and tetracycline resistant mutants of E. coli. For this purpose the 5’ end of micF was amplified and then sequenced. None of these mutants except one and its clone has a mutation in this gene. Then the relative expression of ompF in these mutants was quantified by real time PCR. There was no significant difference between ompF transcription of mutants and wild type strain. Based on this study and previous study it is concluded that low to intermediate levels of resistance to ciprofloxacin and tetracycline does not decrease ompF transcription. PMID:24403654

  16. Potential of multiseeded mutant (msd) to boost sorghum grain yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seed number per plant is an important determinant of the grain yield in cereal and other crops. We have isolated a class of multiseeded (msd) sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) mutants that are capable of producing three times the seed number and twice the seed weight per panicle as compared with t...

  17. Wheat ABA-insensitive mutants result in reduced grain dormancy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper describes the isolation of wheat mutants in the hard red spring Scarlet resulting in reduced sensitivity to the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination. ABA induces seed dormancy during embryo maturation and inhibits the germination of mature seeds. Wheat sensitivity t...

  18. Enhanced cellulase producing mutants developed from heterokaryotic Aspergillus strain.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljit; Oberoi, H S; Chadha, B S

    2014-03-01

    A heterokaryon 28, derived through protoplast fusion between Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus tubingensis (Dal8), was subjected cyclic mutagenesis followed by selection on increasing levels of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) as selection marker. The derived deregulated cellulase hyper producing mutant '64', when compared to fusant 28, produced 9.83, 7.8, 3.2, 4.2 and 19.74 folds higher endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, FPase and xylanase, respectively, under shake cultures. The sequence analysis of PCR amplified β-glucosidase gene from wild and mutant showed nucleotide deletion/substitution. The mutants showed highly catalytic efficient β-glucosidase as evident from low Km and high Vmax values. The expression profiling through zymogram analysis also indicated towards over-expression of cellulases. The up/down regulated expressed proteins observed through SDS-PAGE were identified by Peptide mass fingerprinting The cellulase produced by mutants in conjunction with cellulase free xylanase derived from Thermomyces lanuginosus was used for efficient utilization of alkali treated rice straw for obtaining xylo-oligosaccharides and ethanol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Paradigms for pharmacological characterization of C. elegans synaptic transmission mutants.

    PubMed

    Locke, Cody; Berry, Kalen; Kautu, Bwarenaba; Lee, Kyle; Caldwell, Kim; Caldwell, Guy

    2008-08-18

    The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, has become an expedient model for studying neurotransmission. C. elegans is unique among animal models, as the anatomy and connectivity of its nervous system has been determined from electron micrographs and refined by pharmacological assays. In this video, we describe how two complementary neural stimulants, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, called aldicarb, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonist, called pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), may be employed to specifically characterize signaling at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and facilitate our understanding of antagonistic neural circuits. Of 302 C. elegans neurons, nineteen GABAergic D-type motor neurons innervate body wall muscles (BWMs), while four GABAergic neurons, called RMEs, innervate head muscles. Conversely, thirty-nine motor neurons express the excitatory neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), and antagonize GABA transmission at BWMs to coordinate locomotion. The antagonistic nature of GABAergic and cholinergic motor neurons at body wall NMJs was initially determined by laser ablation and later buttressed by aldicarb exposure. Acute aldicarb exposure results in a time-course or dose-responsive paralysis in wild-type worms. Yet, loss of excitatory ACh transmission confers resistance to aldicarb, as less ACh accumulates at worm NMJs, leading to less stimulation of BWMs. Resistance to aldicarb may be observed with ACh-specific or general synaptic function mutants. Consistent with antagonistic GABA and ACh transmission, loss of GABA transmission, or a failure to negatively regulate ACh release, confers hypersensitivity to aldicarb. Although aldicarb exposure has led to the isolation of numerous worm homologs of neurotransmission genes, aldicarb exposure alone cannot efficiently determine prevailing roles for genes and pathways in specific C. elegans motor neurons. For this purpose, we have introduced a complementary experimental approach, which

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Mms-Sensitive Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    1977-01-01

    We have isolated mutants sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Alleles of rad1, rad4, rad6, rad52, rad55 and rad57 were found among these mms mutants. Twenty-nine of the mms mutants which complement the existing radiation-sensitive (rad and rev ) mutants belong to 22 new complementation groups. Mutants from five complementation groups are sensitive only to MMS. Mutants of 11 complementation groups are sensitive to UV or X rays in addition to MMS, mutants of six complementation groups are sensitive to all three agents. The cross-sensitivities of these mms mutants to UV and X rays are discussed in terms of their possible involvement in DNA repair. Sporulation is reduced or absent in homozygous diploids of mms mutants from nine complementation groups. PMID:195865

  1. Alkaptonuria in a boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo, autoimmune thyroiditis and immunoglobulin A deficiency - a case report.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Anna; Pietrzak, Iwona; Antosik, Karolina; Borowiec, Maciej; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We present a 15-year-old Caucasian boy with an exceptional coincidence of a rare monogenic metabolic disease - alkaptonuria (AKU) and a cluster of autoimmune disorders: type 1 diabetes (T1DM), autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), vitiligo, insulin infusion induced lipoatrophy and immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) Alkaptonuria and type 1 diabetes in a child, especially in such an interesting coincidence with other autoimmune conditions, has not been reported so far. Our investigation, including comprehensive genetic evaluation using next generation sequencing technology, shows that alkaptonuria and T1DM were independently inherited. We also show that alkaptonuria in its pre-ochronotic phase seems to have no effect on the course of diabetes. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  2. Mutant matrix metalloproteinase-9 reduces postoperative peritoneal adhesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Atta, Hussein; El-Rehany, Mahmoud; Roeb, Elke; Abdel-Ghany, Hend; Ramzy, Maggie; Gaber, Shereen

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative peritoneal adhesions continue to be a major source of morbidity and occasional mortality. Studies have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels are decreased postoperatively which may limits matrix degradation and participate in the development of peritoneal adhesions. In this proof-of-principle study, we evaluated the effect of gene therapy with catalytically inactive mutant MMP-9 on postoperative peritoneal adhesions in rats. Adenovirus encoding mutant MMP-9 (Ad-mMMP-9) or saline was instilled in the peritoneal cavity after cecal and parietal peritoneal injury in rats. Expression of mutant MMP-9 transcript was verified by sequencing. Adenovirus E4 gene expression, adhesion scores, MMP-9, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression were evaluated at sacrifice one week after treatment. Both mutant MMP-9 transcripts and adenovirus E4 gene were expressed in Ad-mMMP-9 treated adhesions. Adhesions severity decreased significantly (p = 0.036) in the Ad-mMMP-9-treated compared with saline-treated adhesions. Expression of MMP-9 mRNA and protein were elevated (p = 0.001 and p = 0.029, respectively) in the Ad-mMMP-9-treated adhesions compared with saline-treated adhesions. While tPA levels were increased (p = 0.02) in Ad-mMMP-9 treated adhesions compared with saline-treated adhesions, TGF-β1 and PAI-1 levels were decreased (p = 0.017 and p = 0.042, respectively). No difference in mortality were found between groups (p = 0.64). Mutant MMP-9 gene therapy effectively transduced peritoneal adhesions resulting in reduction of severity of primary peritoneal adhesions. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two-Pore Channels: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in two-pore channels (TPCs) has resulted in a variety of studies dealing with the functional role and mechanism of action of these endo-lysosomal proteins in diverse physiological processes. With the availability of mouse lines harbouring mutant alleles for Tpcnl and/or Tpcn2 genes, several studies have made use of them to validate, consolidate and discover new roles for these channels not only at the cellular level but, importantly, also at the level of the whole organism. The different mutant mouse lines that have been used were derived from distinct genetic manipulation strategies, with the aim of knocking out expression of TPC proteins. However, the expression of different residual TPC sequences predicted to occur in these mutant mouse lines, together with the varied degree to which the effects on Tpcn expression have been studied, makes it important to assess the true knockout status of some of the lines. In this review we summarize these Tpcn mutant mouse lines with regard to their predicted effect on Tpcn expression and the extent to which they have been characterized. Additionally, we discuss how results derived from studies using these Tpcn mutant mouse lines have consolidated previously proposed roles for TPCs, such as mediators of NAADP signalling, endo-lysosomal functions, and pancreatic β cell physiology. We will also review how they have been instrumental in the assignment of new physiological roles for these cation channels in processes such as membrane electrical excitability, neoangiogenesis, viral infection and brown adipose tissue and heart function, revealing, in some cases, a specific contribution of a particular TPC isoform. PMID:27330869

  4. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGES

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore » Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  5. Targeting Autophagy Sensitizes BRAF-Mutant Thyroid Cancer to Vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibin; Kang, Helen; Zhao, Yinu; Min, Irene; Wyrwas, Brian; Moore, Maureen; Teng, Lisong; Zarnegar, Rasa; Jiang, Xuejun

    2017-01-01

    Context: The RAF inhibitor vemurafenib has provided a major advance for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. However, BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer is relatively resistant to vemurafenib, and the reason for this disparity remains unclear. Anticancer therapy–induced autophagy can trigger adaptive drug resistance in a variety of cancer types and treatments. To date, role of autophagy during BRAF inhibition in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Objective: In this study, we investigate if autophagy is activated in vemurafenib-treated BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells, and whether autophagy inhibition improves or impairs the treatment efficacy of vemurafenib. Design: Autophagy level was determined by western blot assay and transmission electron microscopy. The combined effects of autophagy inhibitor and vemurafenib were assessed in terms of cell viability in vitro and tumor growth rate in vivo. Whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was in response to vemurafenib-induced autophagy was also analyzed. Results: Vemurafenib induced a high level of autophagy in BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either a pharmacological inhibitor or interfering RNA knockdown of essential autophagy genes augmented vemurafenib-induced cell death. Vemurafenib-induced autophagy was independent of MAPK signaling pathway and was mediated through the ER stress response. Finally, administration of vemurafenib with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine promoted more pronounced tumor suppression in vivo. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that vemurafenib induces ER stress response–mediated autophagy in thyroid cancer and autophagy inhibition may be a beneficial strategy to sensitize BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer to vemurafenib. PMID:27754804

  6. Targeting Autophagy Sensitizes BRAF-Mutant Thyroid Cancer to Vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Kang, Helen; Zhao, Yinu; Min, Irene; Wyrwas, Brian; Moore, Maureen; Teng, Lisong; Zarnegar, Rasa; Jiang, Xuejun; Fahey, Thomas J

    2017-02-01

    The RAF inhibitor vemurafenib has provided a major advance for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. However, BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer is relatively resistant to vemurafenib, and the reason for this disparity remains unclear. Anticancer therapy-induced autophagy can trigger adaptive drug resistance in a variety of cancer types and treatments. To date, role of autophagy during BRAF inhibition in thyroid cancer remains unknown. In this study, we investigate if autophagy is activated in vemurafenib-treated BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells, and whether autophagy inhibition improves or impairs the treatment efficacy of vemurafenib. Autophagy level was determined by western blot assay and transmission electron microscopy. The combined effects of autophagy inhibitor and vemurafenib were assessed in terms of cell viability in vitro and tumor growth rate in vivo. Whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was in response to vemurafenib-induced autophagy was also analyzed. Vemurafenib induced a high level of autophagy in BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by either a pharmacological inhibitor or interfering RNA knockdown of essential autophagy genes augmented vemurafenib-induced cell death. Vemurafenib-induced autophagy was independent of MAPK signaling pathway and was mediated through the ER stress response. Finally, administration of vemurafenib with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine promoted more pronounced tumor suppression in vivo. Our data demonstrate that vemurafenib induces ER stress response-mediated autophagy in thyroid cancer and autophagy inhibition may be a beneficial strategy to sensitize BRAF-mutant thyroid cancer to vemurafenib. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  7. DAILY PATTERNS OF CLOCK AND COGNITION-RELATED FACTORS ARE MODIFIED IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF VITAMIN A-DEFICIENT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Golini, Rebeca S.; Delgado, Silvia M.; Navigatore Fonzo, Lorena S.; Ponce, Ivana T.; Lacoste, María G.; Anzulovich, Ana C.

    2012-01-01

    The circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled cognition-related genes in the hippocampus would be essential to achieve an optimal daily cognitive performance. There is some evidence that retinoid nuclear receptors (RARs and RXRs) can regulate circadian gene expression in different tissues. In this study, Holtzman male rats from control and vitamin A-deficient groups were sacrificed throughout a 24-h period and hippocampus samples were isolated every 4 or 5 h. RARα and RXRβ expression level was quantified and daily expression patterns of clock BMAL1, PER1, RORα and REVERB genes, RORα and REVERB proteins, as well as temporal expression of cognition-related RC3 and BDNF genes were determined in the hippocampus of the two groups of rats. Our results show significant daily variations of BMAL1, PER1, RORα and REVERB genes, RORα and REVERB proteins and, consequently, daily oscillating expression of RC3 and BDNF genes in the rat hippocampus. Vitamin A deficiency reduced RXRβ mRNA level as well as the amplitude of PER1, REVERB gene and REVERB protein rhythms, and phase-shifted the daily peaks of BMAL1 and RORα mRNA, RORα protein and RC3 and BDNF mRNA levels. Thus, nutritional factors, such as vitamin A and its derivatives the retinoids, might modulate daily patterns of BDNF and RC3 expression in the hippocampus and they could be essential to maintain an optimal daily performance at molecular level in this learning-and-memory-related brain area. PMID:22434687

  8. Breast-feeding, dietary intakes and their associations with subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children in Anhui Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yewu; Tao, Fangbiao; Yin, Huiping; Zhu, Xiaoming; Ji, Guoping; Kong, Shenghua; Song, Qinhua; Chen, Jianhua; Chu, Chengzhi; Li, Zhu

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations between breast-feeding, dietary intakes and other related factors and subclinical vitamin A deficiency (SVAD) in children aged 0-5 years in an area in China where mild vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is found. Data were from a population-based cross-sectional study with 1052 children aged 0-5 years. SVAD cases were identified by the indicator of serum retinol

  9. Aberrant T-cell function in vitro and impaired T-cell dependent antibody response in vivo in vitamin A-deficient rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, U; Hanson, L A; Kahu, H; Dahlgren, U I

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that vitamin A deficiency resulted in a reduced IgA antibody response to cholera toxin (CT) after per-oral immunization. In the present investigation we have studied the in vivo and in vitro immune response in vitamin A-deficient rats to two parenterally applied antigens, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and picrylsulphonic acid (TNP)-Ficoll. The serum IgG and IgM antibody responses to the T-cell dependent antigen beta-LG were significantly lower in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the pair-fed control rats. No such differences were seen with the IgG and IgM responses to the T-cell independent antigen TNP-Ficoll. However, the biliary IgA and the serum IgE antibodies against both antigens were decreased in the vitamin A-deficient rats. In vitro lymphocyte stimulation with concanavalin A (Con A) or beta-LG gave higher T-cell proliferation rates in the vitamin A-deficient than in the control rats. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) levels in supernatants from Con A-stimulated mesenteric lymph node cells were also higher in the vitamin A-deficient rats, while IL-6 levels were decreased, which is consistent with an up-regulated Th1 activity. Proliferation studies on purified accessory cells and T cells from the deficient and the control rats, mixed in different combinations, showed that the T cells, but not the accessory cells, were disturbed in the vitamin A-deficient rats. Despite the increased T-cell activity in vitro the vitamin A-deficient rats had a lower delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction than the pair-fed control rats. In conclusion, the increased IL-2 and IFN-gamma levels may reflect an up-regulation of Th1 cell function, while the decreased IgA, IgE and IL-6 levels indicate a suppression of Th2 cells. The disturbed T-lymphocyte function is manifested in vivo as a decreased DTH reaction and suppressed antibody production, the latter possibly due to a lack of B-cell switching and proliferation factors in

  10. Mutations in new cell cycle genes that fail to complement a multiply mutant third chromosome of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    White-Cooper, H; Carmena, M; Gonzalez, C; Glover, D M

    1996-11-01

    We have simultaneously screened for new alleles and second site mutations that fail to complement five cell cycle mutations of Drosphila carried on a single third chromosome (gnu, polo, mgr, asp, stg). Females that are either transheterozygous for scott of the antartic (scant) and polo, or homozygous for scant produce embryos that show mitotic defects. A maternal effect upon embryonic mitoses is also seen in embryos derived from females transheterozygous with helter skelter (hsk) and either mgr or asp. cleopatra (cleo), fails to complement asp but is not uncovered by a deficiency for asp. The mitotic phenotype of larvae heterozygous for cleo and the multiple mutant chromosome is similar to weak alleles of asp, but there are no defects in male meiosis. Mutations that failed to complement stg fell into two complementation groups corresponding to stg and a new gene noose. Three of the new stg alleles are early zygotic lethals, whereas the fourth is a pharate adult lethal allele that affects both mitosis and meiosis. Mutations in noose fully complement a small deficiency that removes stg, but when placed in trans to certain stg alleles, result in late lethality and mitotic abnormalities in larval brains.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Sex-Linked Female-Sterile Mutants in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER with Special Attention to Eggshell Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Komitopoulou, Katia; Gans, Madeleine; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Masson, Michele

    1983-01-01

    To study genes that function mainly or exclusively during oogenesis, we have isolated and analyzed female-sterile mutations, with special emphasis on those that affect eggshell formation. Following treatment that induced 61 to 66% lethals, 8.1% of the 1071 X chromosomes tested carried recessive female sterility mutations (87 isolates), and 8.0% carried partial female-sterile mutations (86 isolates), respectively. In addition, three dominant female steriles were recovered. Some of the mutants had very low fecundity, and others laid morphologically normal eggs that failed to develop. A third category included 29 mutants that laid eggs with morphological abnormalities: 26 were female steriles, two were partial female steriles and one was fertile. Mutants of this third category were characterized in some detail and compared with 40 previously isolated mutants that laid similarly abnormal eggs. Approximately 28–31 complementation groups with morphological abnormalities were detected, some of which were large allelic series (11, 9, 7, 6 and 5 alleles). Twenty-four groups were mapped genetically or cytogenetically, and 21 were partially characterized by ultrastructural and biochemical procedures. Of the latter, one group showed clear deficiency of yolk proteins, and nine showed prominent ultrastructural defects in the chorion (at least eight accompanied by deficiencies in characterized chorion proteins). At least six groups with clear-cut effects were found at loci not previously identified with known chorion structural genes. PMID:17246182

  12. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  13. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Govinda; Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium's efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  14. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kamila B.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings. PMID:28275610

  15. A sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with altered carbon isotope ratio

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Shanta; Thakur, Vivek; Wanchana, Samart; Alonso-Cantabrana, Hugo; Dionora, Jacque; Sheehy, John E.; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Quick, William Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts to engineer C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 plants such as rice demand an understanding of the genetic elements that enable C4 plants to outperform C3 plants. As a part of the C4 Rice Consortium’s efforts to identify genes needed to support C4 photosynthesis, EMS mutagenized sorghum populations were generated and screened to identify genes that cause a loss of C4 function. Stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of leaf dry matter has been used to distinguishspecies with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the identification of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mutant with a low δ13C characteristic. A mutant (named Mut33) with a pale phenotype and stunted growth was identified from an EMS treated sorghum M2 population. The stable carbon isotope analysis of the mutants showed a decrease of 13C uptake capacity. The noise of random mutation was reduced by crossing the mutant and its wildtype (WT). The back-cross (BC1F1) progenies were like the WT parent in terms of 13C values and plant phenotypes. All the BC1F2 plants with low δ13C died before they produced their 6th leaf. Gas exchange measurements of the low δ13C sorghum mutants showed a higher CO2 compensation point (25.24 μmol CO2.mol-1air) and the maximum rate of photosynthesis was less than 5μmol.m-2.s-1. To identify the genetic determinant of this trait, four DNA pools were isolated; two each from normal and low δ13C BC1F2 mutant plants. These were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Comparison of allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the pools with contrasting phenotype showed that a locus in Chromosome 10 between 57,941,104 and 59,985,708 bps had an allele frequency of 1. There were 211 mutations and 37 genes in the locus, out of which mutations in 9 genes showed non-synonymous changes. This finding is expected to contribute to future research on the identification of the causal factor differentiating C4 from C3 species that can be used in the

  16. Relationship of vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and inflammation to anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Gamble, M V; Palafox, N A; Dancheck, B; Ricks, M O; Briand, K; Semba, R D

    2004-10-01

    Although vitamin A deficiency, iron deficiency, and inflammation may contribute to anemia, their relative contribution to anemia has not been well characterized in preschool children in developing countries. To characterize the contributions of vitamin A and iron deficiencies and inflammation to anemia among preschool children in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. A community-based survey, the Republic of the Marshall Islands Vitamin A Deficiency Study, was conducted among 919 preschool children. The relationship of vitamin A and iron status and markers of inflammation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, alpha1-acid glycoprotein, and interleukin-10, to anemia were studied in a subsample of 367 children. Among the 367 children, the prevalence of anemia was 42.5%. The prevalence of severe vitamin A deficiency (serum vitamin A < 0.35 micromol/l) and iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 12 microg/dl) were 10.9 and 51.7%, respectively. The respective prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (hemoglobin < 110 g/l and iron deficiency), anemia with inflammation (anemia with TNF-alpha > 2 pg/ml and/or AGP > 1000 mg/l), and severe vitamin A deficiency combined with anemia was 26.7, 35.6, and 7.6%. In multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, sex, and inflammation, both iron deficiency (odds ratio (OR) 1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.83, P = 0.023) and severe vitamin A deficiency (OR 4.85, 95% CI 2.14-10.9, P < 0.0001) were significantly associated with anemia. Both iron and vitamin A deficiencies were independent risk factors for anemia, but inflammation was not a significant risk factor for anemia among these preschool children.

  17. Allergic transfusion reactions from blood components donated by IgA-deficient donors with and without anti-IgA: a comparative retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, N; Delage, G; Long, A; Thibault, L; Robillard, P

    2010-08-01

    IgA deficiency is common (1/500) and up to 40% of affected individuals will develop anti-IgA. A few studies suggested that passive transfusion of anti-IgA was not associated with an increased risk of allergic reactions. This study was designed to assess the safety of transfusing blood components containing anti-IgA. IgA-deficient blood donors with and without anti-IgA were identified from Héma-Québec's (HQ) computerized database. IgA deficiency was confirmed by an ELISA method and the presence of anti-IgA by a passive hemagglutination assay. Blood donations from IgA-deficient donors issued to hospitals between March 1999 and December 2004 were retrieved. Medical charts of recipients were reviewed for the occurrence of a suspected transfusion reaction. Presence and nature of transfusion reactions were assessed blindly by an adjudicating committee. A total of 323 IgA-deficient blood products were issued by HQ to 55 hospitals. Of these, 48 agreed to participate [315 blood products (97.5%)]. A total of 272 products were transfused: 174 contained anti-IgA, and 98 did not. Only two minor allergic reactions occurred in each group. Incidence of allergic reactions was 1.15% in the anti-IgA group and 2.04% in the group without anti-IgA (P = 0.91). There was no anaphylactic reaction in either group. This study indicates that the proportion of allergic reactions does not appear to be greater in recipients of blood components containing anti-IgA compared to recipients of non-anti-IgA-containing components. Allowing donations from IgA-deficient donors with anti-IgA may therefore be contemplated.

  18. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, Nicholas C.; McCann, Maureen C.

    2015-04-06

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with ‘invisible’ phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basismore » of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.« less

  19. Selection of Streptococcus lactis Mutants Defective in Malolactic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Pierre P.; Heslot, Henri

    1987-01-01

    An enrichment medium and a new sensitive medium were developed to detect malolactic variants in different strains of lactic bacteria. Factors such as the concentration of glucose and l-malate, pH level, and the type of indicator dye used are discussed with regard to the kinetics of malic acid conversion to lactic acid. Use of these media allowed a rapid and easier screening of mutagenized streptococcal cells unable to ferment l-malate. A collection of malolactic-negative mutants of Streptococcus lactis induced by UV, nitrosoguanidine, or transposonal mutagenesis were characterized. The results showed that several mutants were apparently defective in the structural gene of malolactic enzyme, whereas others contained mutations which may either inactivate a putative permease or affect a regulatory sequence. PMID:16347282

  20. Ultradian rhythm unmasked in the Pdf clock mutant of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yuuichi; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2014-09-01

    A diverse range of organisms shows physiological and behavioural rhythms with various periods. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms with an approximately 24 h period in both Drosophila and mammals, while less attention has been paid to ultradian rhythms with shorter periods. We used a video-tracking method to monitor the movement of single flies, and clear ultradian rhythms were detected in the locomotor behaviour of wild type and clock mutant flies kept under constant dark conditions. In particular, the Pigment-dispersing factor mutant (Pdf 01) demonstrated a precise and robust ultradian rhythmicity, which was not temperature compensated. Our results suggest that Drosophila has an endogenous ultradian oscillator that is masked by circadian rhythmic behaviours.

  1. Implications of long tails in the distribution of mutant effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, D.; Feng, J.

    2005-07-01

    Long-tailed distributions possess an infinite variance, yet a finite sample that is drawn from such a distribution has a finite variance. In this work we consider a model of a population subject to mutation, selection and drift. We investigate the implications of a long-tailed distribution of mutant allelic effects on the distribution of genotypic effects in a model with a continuum of allelic effects. While the analysis is confined to asexual populations, it does also have implications for sexual populations. We obtain analytical results for a selectively neutral population as well as one subject to selection. We supplement these analytical results with numerical simulations, to take into account genetic drift. We find that a long-tailed distribution of mutant effects may affect both the equilibrium and the evolutionary adaptive behaviour of a population.

  2. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Confer Cross-Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heithoff, Douglas M.; Enioutina, Elena Y.; Daynes, Raymond A.; Sinsheimer, Robert L.; Low, David A.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella isolates that lack or overproduce DNA adenine methylase (Dam) elicited a cross-protective immune response to different Salmonella serovars. The protection afforded by the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam vaccine was greater than that elicited in mice that survived a virulent infection. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam mutant strains exhibited enhanced sensitivity to mediators of innate immunity such as antimicrobial peptides, bile salts, and hydrogen peroxide. Also, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccines were not immunosuppressive; unlike wild-type vaccines, they failed to induce increased nitric oxide levels and permitted a subsequent robust humoral response to diptheria toxoid antigen in infected mice. Dam mutant strains exhibited a low-grade persistence which, coupled with the nonimmunosuppression and the ectopic protein expression caused by altered levels of Dam, may provide an expanded source of potential antigens in vaccinated hosts. PMID:11598044

  3. Alteration of the proteostasis network of plant cells promotes the post-endoplasmic reticulum trafficking of recombinant mutant (L444P) human β-glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Babajani, Gholamreza; Kermode, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency in the activity of lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45). One of the most prevalent disease-causing mutations in humans is a L444P missense mutation in the GCase protein, which results in its disrupted folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and impaired post-ER trafficking. To determine whether the post-ER trafficking of this severely malfolded protein can be restored, we expressed the mutant L444P GCase as a recombinant protein in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow 2 [BY2]) cells, in which the GCase variant was equipped with a plant signal peptide to allow for secretion upon rescued trafficking out of the ER. The recombinant L444P mutant GCase was retained in the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Kifunensine and Eeyarestatin I, both inhibitors of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), and the proteostasis regulators, celastrol and MG-132, increased the steady-state levels of the mutant protein inside the plant cells and further promoted the post-ER trafficking of L444P GCase, as indicated by endoglycosidase-H sensitivity- and secretion- analyses. Transcript profiling of genes encoding ER-molecular chaperones, ER stress responsive proteins, and cytoplasmic heat shock response proteins, revealed insignificant or only very modest changes in response to the ERAD inhibitors and proteostasis regulators. An exception was the marked response to celastrol which reduced the steady-state levels of cytoplasmic HSP90 transcripts and protein. As HSP90 participates in the targeting of misfolded proteins to the proteasome pathway, its down-modulation in response to celastrol may partly account for the mechanism of improved homeostasis of L444P GCase mediated by this triterpene. PMID:24713615

  4. Dictyostelium discoideum mutants with temperature-sensitive defects in endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized temperature-sensitive endocytosis mutants in Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium is an attractive model for genetic studies of endocytosis because of its high rates of endocytosis, its reliance on endocytosis for nutrient uptake, and tractable molecular genetics. Endocytosis-defective mutants were isolated by a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) as cells unable to take up a fluorescent marker. One temperature-sensitive mutant (indy1) was characterized in detail and found to exhibit a complete block in fluid phase endocytosis at the restrictive temperature, but normal rates of endocytosis at the permissive temperature. Likewise, a potential cell surface receptor that was rapidly internalized in wild-type cells and indy1 cells at the permissive temperature was poorly internalized in indy1 under restrictive conditions. Growth was also completely arrested at the restrictive temperature. The endocytosis block was rapidly induced upon shift to the restrictive temperature and reversed upon return to normal conditions. Inhibition of endocytosis was also specific, as other membrane-trafficking events such as phagocytosis, secretion of lysosomal enzymes, and contractile vacuole function were unaffected at the restrictive temperature. Because recycling and transport to late endocytic compartments were not affected, the site of the defect's action is probably at an early step in the endocytic pathway. Additionally, indy1 cells were unable to proceed through the normal development program at the restrictive temperature. Given the tight functional and growth phenotypes, the indy1 mutant provides an opportunity to isolate genes responsible for endocytosis in Dictyostelium by complementation cloning. PMID:7929583

  5. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC. In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production. PMID:22455837

  6. Targeting Palmitoyl Acyltransferases in Mutant NRAS-Driven Melanoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    activation in melanoma cells using chemical biology and functional genomic approaches. In the first year of the study, we have developed more potent...post-translational modification by adding a 16-carbon palmitate) is required for N-RAS proper membrane localization and its oncogenic activities ...RAS regulation could be a novel strategy to treat N-RAS mutant melanoma. We have developed chemical probes that covalently label the active sites of

  7. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection.

  8. Xylitol production by a Pichia stipitis D-xylulokinase mutant

    Treesearch

    Yong-Su Jin; Jose Cruz; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2005-01-01

    Xylitol production by Pichia stipitis FPL-YS30, a xyl3-Ä1 mutant that metabolizes xylose using an alternative metabolic pathway, was investigated under aerobic and oxygen-limited culture conditions. Under both culture conditions, FPL-YS30 (xyl3-Ä1) produced a negligible amount of ethanol and converted xylose mainly into xylitol with comparable yields (0.30 and 0.27 g...

  9. Poring over two-pore channel pore mutants

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore channels are members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily. They localise to the endolysosomal system and are likely targets for the Ca2+ mobilising messenger NAADP. In this brief review, we relate mutagenesis of the TPC pore to a recently published homology model and discuss how pore mutants are informing us of TPC function. Molecular physiology of these ubiquitous proteins is thus emerging. PMID:27226934

  10. Phenotypic Characterization of pncA Mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Morlock, Glenn P.; Crawford, Jack T.; Butler, W. Ray; Brim, Suzanne E.; Sikes, David; Mazurek, Gerald H.; Woodley, Charles L.; Cooksey, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the correlation of mutations in the pyrazinamidase (PZase) gene (pncA) with the pyrazinamide (PZA) resistance phenotype with 60 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. PZase activity was determined by the method of Wayne (L. G. Wayne, Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 109:147–151, 1974), and the entire pncA nucleotide sequence, including the 74 bp upstream of the start codon, was determined. PZA susceptibility testing was performed by the method of proportions on modified Middlebrook and Cohn 7H10 medium. The PZA MICs were ≥100 μg/ml for 37 isolates, 34 of which had alterations in the pncA gene. These mutations included missense substitutions for 24 isolates, nonsense substitutions for 3 isolates, frameshifts by deletion for 4 isolates, a three-codon insertion for 1 isolate, and putative regulatory mutations for 2 isolates. Among 21 isolates for which PZA MICs were <100 μg/ml, 3 had the same mutation (Thr47→Ala) and 18 had the wild-type sequence. For the three Thr47→Ala mutants PZA MICs were 12.5 μg/ml by the method of proportions on 7H10 agar; two of these were resistant to 100 μg of PZA per ml and the third was resistant to 800 μg of PZA per ml by the BACTEC method. In all, 30 different pncA mutations were found among the 37 pncA mutants. No PZase activity was detected in 35 of 37 strains that were resistant to ≥100 μg of PZA per ml or in 34 of 37 pncA mutants. Reduced PZase activity was found in the three mutants with the Thr47→Ala mutation. This study demonstrates that mutations in the pncA gene may serve as a reliable indicator of resistance to ≥100 μg of PZA per ml. PMID:10952570

  11. GPNMB ameliorates mutant TDP-43-induced motor neuron cell death.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Yuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ohuchi, Kazuki; Ito, Junko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-08-01

    Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (GPNMB) aggregates are observed in the spinal cord of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, but the detailed localization is still unclear. Mutations of transactive response DNA binding protein 43kDa (TDP-43) are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including ALS. In this study, we evaluated the localization of GPNMB aggregates in the spinal cord of ALS patients and the effect of GPNMB against mutant TDP-43 induced motor neuron cell death. GPNMB aggregates were not localized in the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocyte and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1)-positive microglia. GPNMB aggregates were localized in the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2)-positive neuron and neurofilament H non-phosphorylated (SMI-32)-positive neuron, and these were co-localized with TDP-43 aggregates in the spinal cord of ALS patients. Mock or TDP-43 (WT, M337V, and A315T) plasmids were transfected into mouse motor neuron cells (NSC34). The expression level of GPNMB was increased by transfection of mutant TDP-43 plasmids. Recombinant GPNMB ameliorated motor neuron cell death induced by transfection of mutant TDP-43 plasmids and serum-free stress. Furthermore, the expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and phosphorylated Akt were decreased by this stress, and these expressions were increased by recombinant GPNMB. These results indicate that GPNMB has protective effects against mutant TDP-43 stress via activating the ERK1/2 and Akt pathways, and GPNMB may be a therapeutic target for TDP-43 proteinopathy in familial and sporadic ALS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CT features of HER2-mutant lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sawan, Peter; Plodkowski, Andrew J; Li, Angela E; Li, Bob T; Drilon, Alexander; Capanu, Marinela; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2018-06-07

    To describe the radiological phenotype of HER2-mutant lung cancers on CT at presentation. Eligible patients with lung adenocarcinomas with HER2 mutations were stage-matched with two control groups (EGFR- and KRAS-mutant groups). Evaluated CT features of the primary tumor included size, location, consistency, contour, presence of pleural tags and pleural retractions. Presence of pleural effusions, lung metastases, adenopathy, chest wall invasion, and were also recorded. Wilcoxon rank-sum and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare continuous and categorical features, respectively. One hundred and fifty-four patients were identified: 50 (33%) harbored HER2 mutations, 56 (36%) harbored KRAS mutations, and 48 (31%) harbored EGFR mutations. Compared with KRAS, HER2 tumors presented as smaller lesions (2.3 cm versus 2.9 cm, p = 0.005 for length; 1.6 cm versus 2.1 cm, p = 0.002 for width) with the presence of pleural tags (74% vs. 52%, p = 0.03), pleural retractions (58% vs. 39%, p = 0.006), ipsilateral hilar (36% vs. 16%, p = 0.03) and scalene/supraclavicular N3 adenopathy (24% vs. 7%, p = 0.03). Compared with EGFR, pleural retractions were more prevalent among the HER2 tumors (58% vs. 37%, p = 0.05). Lung adenocarcinomas with HER2 gene mutation exhibit an aggressive behavior manifesting by higher incidence of local invasion, compared to KRAS and EGFR mutant controls, and a nodal metastatic spread compared to KRAS-mutant control. This is the first radiogenomics study of HER2 mutations in lung cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reversible biofunctionalization of surfaces with a switchable mutant of avidin.

    PubMed

    Pollheimer, Philipp; Taskinen, Barbara; Scherfler, Andreas; Gusenkov, Sergey; Creus, Marc; Wiesauer, Philipp; Zauner, Dominik; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Schwarzinger, Clemens; Ebner, Andreas; Tampé, Robert; Stutz, Hanno; Hytönen, Vesa P; Gruber, Hermann J

    2013-10-16

    Label-free biosensors detect binding of prey molecules (″analytes″) to immobile bait molecules on the sensing surface. Numerous methods are available for immobilization of bait molecules. A convenient option is binding of biotinylated bait molecules to streptavidin-functionalized surfaces, or to biotinylated surfaces via biotin-avidin-biotin bridges. The goal of this study was to find a rapid method for reversible immobilization of biotinylated bait molecules on biotinylated sensor chips. The task was to establish a biotin-avidin-biotin bridge which was easily cleaved when desired, yet perfectly stable under a wide range of measurement conditions. The problem was solved with the avidin mutant M96H which contains extra histidine residues at the subunit-subunit interfaces. This mutant was bound to a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) containing biotin residues on 20% of the oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated SAM components. Various biotinylated bait molecules were bound on top of the immobilized avidin mutant. The biotin-avidin-biotin bridge was stable at pH ≥3, and it was insensitive to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at neutral pH. Only the combination of citric acid (2.5%, pH 2) and SDS (0.25%) caused instantaneous cleavage of the biotin-avidin-biotin bridge. As a consequence, the biotinylated bait molecules could be immobilized and removed as often as desired, the only limit being the time span for reproducible chip function when kept in buffer (2-3 weeks at 25 °C). As expected, the high isolectric pH (pI) of the avidin mutant caused nonspecific adsorption of proteins. This problem was solved by acetylation of avidin (to pI < 5), or by optimization of SAM formation and passivation with biotin-BSA and BSA.

  14. Molecular Determinants of Mutant Phenotypes, Inferred from Saturation Mutagenesis Data.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Arti; Gupta, Kritika; Khare, Shruti; Jain, Pankaj C; Patel, Siddharth; Kumar, Prasanth; Pulianmackal, Ajai J; Aghera, Nilesh; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-11-01

    Understanding how mutations affect protein activity and organismal fitness is a major challenge. We used saturation mutagenesis combined with deep sequencing to determine mutational sensitivity scores for 1,664 single-site mutants of the 101 residue Escherichia coli cytotoxin, CcdB at seven different expression levels. Active-site residues could be distinguished from buried ones, based on their differential tolerance to aliphatic and charged amino acid substitutions. At nonactive-site positions, the average mutational tolerance correlated better with depth from the protein surface than with accessibility. Remarkably, similar results were observed for two other small proteins, PDZ domain (PSD95 pdz3 ) and IgG-binding domain of protein G (GB1). Mutational sensitivity data obtained with CcdB were used to derive a procedure for predicting functional effects of mutations. Results compared favorably with those of two widely used computational predictors. In vitro characterization of 80 single, nonactive-site mutants of CcdB showed that activity in vivo correlates moderately with thermal stability and solubility. The inability to refold reversibly, as well as a decreased folding rate in vitro, is associated with decreased activity in vivo. Upon probing the effect of modulating expression of various proteases and chaperones on mutant phenotypes, most deleterious mutants showed an increased in vivo activity and solubility only upon over-expression of either Trigger factor or SecB ATP-independent chaperones. Collectively, these data suggest that folding kinetics rather than protein stability is the primary determinant of activity in vivo This study enhances our understanding of how mutations affect phenotype, as well as the ability to predict fitness effects of point mutations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Inositol Depletion Restores Vesicle Transport in Yeast Phospholipid Flippase Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases. PMID:25781026

  16. Functional verification of a porcine myostatin propeptide mutant.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dezun; Jiang, Shengwang; Gao, Pengfei; Qian, Lili; Wang, Qingqing; Cai, Chunbo; Xiao, Gaojun; Yang, Jinzeng; Cui, Wentao

    2015-10-01

    Myostatin is a member of TGF-β superfamily that acts as a key negative regulator in development and growth of embryonic and postnatal muscles. In this study, the inhibitory activities of recombinant porcine myostatin propeptide and its mutated form (at the cleavage site of metalloproteinases of BMP-1/TLD family) against murine myostatin was evaluated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection into mice. Results showed that both wild type and mutated form of porcine propeptide significantly inhibited myostatin activity in vivo. The average body weight of mice receiving wild type propeptide or its mutated form increased by 12.5 % and 24.14%, respectively, compared to mice injected with PBS, implying that the in vivo efficacy of porcine propeptide mutant is greater than its wild type propeptide. Transgenic mice expressing porcine myostatin propeptide mutant were generated to further verify the results obtained from mice injected with recombinant porcine propeptide mutant. Compared with wild type (non-transgenic) mice, relative weight of gastrocnemius, rectusfemoris, and tibialis anterior increased by 22.14 %, 34.13 %, 25.37%, respectively, in transgenic male mice, and by 19.90 %, 42.47 %, 45.61%, respectively, in transgenic female mice. Our data also demonstrated that the mechanism by which muscle growth enhancement is achieved by these propeptides is due to an increase in fiber sizes, not by an increase in number of fiber cells.

  17. An Arabidopsis mutant showing reduced feedback inhibition of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Van Oosten, J J; Gerbaud, A; Huijser, C; Dijkwel, P P; Chua, N H; Smeekens, S C

    1997-11-01

    Many plant genes are responsive to sugars but the mechanisms used by plants to sense sugars are unknown. A genetic approach has been used in Arabidopsis to identify genes involved in perception and transduction of sugar signals. For this purpose, an in vivo reporter system was established consisting of the light- and sugar-regulated plastocyanin promoter, fused to the luciferase coding sequence (PC-LUC construct). At the seedling stage, expression of the PC-LUC gene is repressed by sucrose, and a number of sucrose-uncoupled (sun) mutants were selected in which sucrose is unable to repress the activity of the PC promoter. Three mutants have been characterized in more detail. The sugar analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) was used to repress whole plant photosynthesis, PC-LUC gene expression and total ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate activity. It was found that the sun6 mutation makes plants unresponsive to these 2DG-induced effects. Moreover, unlike wild-type plants, sun6 mutants are insensitive to elevated levels of glucose in the growth medium. These findings suggest that the SUN6 gene is active in a hexose-activated signal transduction pathway.

  18. Virulence of Burkholderia mallei Quorum-Sensing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Kinman, Loren; Han, Tony; Bunt, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Many Proteobacteria use acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) to activate specific sets of genes as a function of cell density. QS often controls the virulence of pathogenic species, and in fact a previous study indicated that QS was important for Burkholderia mallei mouse lung infections. To gain in-depth information on the role of QS in B. mallei virulence, we constructed and characterized a mutant of B. mallei strain GB8 that was unable to make acyl-homoserine lactones. The QS mutant showed virulence equal to that of its wild-type parent in an aerosol mouse infection model, and growth in macrophages was indistinguishable from that of the parent strain. Furthermore, we assessed the role of QS in B. mallei ATCC 23344 by constructing and characterizing a mutant strain producing AiiA, a lactonase enzyme that degrades acyl-homoserine lactones. Although acyl-homoserine lactone levels in cultures of this strain are very low, it showed full virulence. Contrary to the previous report, we conclude that QS is not required for acute B. mallei infections of mice. QS may be involved in some stage of chronic infections in the natural host of horses, or the QS genes may be remnants of the QS network in B. pseudomallei from which this host-adapted pathogen evolved. PMID:23429539

  19. Drosophila melanogaster White Mutant w1118 Undergo Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreiro, María José; Pérez, Coralia; Marchesano, Mariana; Ruiz, Santiago; Caputi, Angel; Aguilera, Pedro; Barrio, Rosa; Cantera, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Key scientific discoveries have resulted from genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster, using a multitude of transgenic fly strains, the majority of which are constructed in a genetic background containing mutations in the white gene. Here we report that white mutant flies from w1118 strain undergo retinal degeneration. We observed also that w1118 mutants have progressive loss of climbing ability, shortened life span, as well as impaired resistance to various forms of stress. Retinal degeneration was abolished by transgenic expression of mini-white+ in the white null background w1118. We conclude that beyond the classical eye-color phenotype, mutations in Drosophila white gene could impair several biological functions affecting parameters like mobility, life span and stress tolerance. Consequently, we suggest caution and attentiveness during the interpretation of old experiments employing white mutant flies and when planning new ones, especially within the research field of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. We also encourage that the use of w1118 strain as a wild-type control should be avoided. PMID:29354028

  20. Mutant phenotypes for thousands of bacterial genes of unknown function

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Waters, R. Jordan; ...

    2018-05-16

    One-third of all protein-coding genes from bacterial genomes cannot be annotated with a function. Here, to investigate the functions of these genes, we present genome-wide mutant fitness data from 32 diverse bacteria across dozens of growth conditions. We identified mutant phenotypes for 11,779 protein-coding genes that had not been annotated with a specific function. Many genes could be associated with a specific condition because the gene affected fitness only in that condition, or with another gene in the same bacterium because they had similar mutant phenotypes. Of the poorly annotated genes, 2,316 had associations that have high confidence because theymore » are conserved in other bacteria. By combining these conserved associations with comparative genomics, we identified putative DNA repair proteins; in addition, we propose specific functions for poorly annotated enzymes and transporters and for uncharacterized protein families. Lastly, our study demonstrates the scalability of microbial genetics and its utility for improving gene annotations.« less

  1. Mutant phenotypes for thousands of bacterial genes of unknown function

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Waters, R. Jordan

    One-third of all protein-coding genes from bacterial genomes cannot be annotated with a function. Here, to investigate the functions of these genes, we present genome-wide mutant fitness data from 32 diverse bacteria across dozens of growth conditions. We identified mutant phenotypes for 11,779 protein-coding genes that had not been annotated with a specific function. Many genes could be associated with a specific condition because the gene affected fitness only in that condition, or with another gene in the same bacterium because they had similar mutant phenotypes. Of the poorly annotated genes, 2,316 had associations that have high confidence because theymore » are conserved in other bacteria. By combining these conserved associations with comparative genomics, we identified putative DNA repair proteins; in addition, we propose specific functions for poorly annotated enzymes and transporters and for uncharacterized protein families. Lastly, our study demonstrates the scalability of microbial genetics and its utility for improving gene annotations.« less

  2. A mutant of barley lacking NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lea, P.

    1989-04-01

    A mutant of barley, LaPr 88/29, deficient in peroxisomal NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been identified. Compared to the wild type the activities of NADH-HPR and NADPH-HPR were severely reduced but the mutant was still capable of fixing CO{sub 2} at rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type in air. Although lacking an enzyme in the main photorespiratory pathway, there appeared to be little disruption to photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C) serine were similar in both mutant and wild type. LaPr 88/29 has been used tomore » show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase (GR) and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-HPR activity is due to the NADH-HPR enzyme. Immunological studies, using antibodies raised against spinach HPR, have shown that the NADH-dependent enzyme protein is absent in LaPr 88/29 but there appears to be enhanced synthesis of the NADPH-dependent enzyme protein.« less

  3. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2006-04-01

    Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  4. Genes and Alcohol Consumption: Studies with Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jody; Arends, Michael A.; Harris, R. Adron; Blednov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the effects of global null mutant and overexpressing transgenic mouse lines on voluntary self-administration of alcohol. We examine approximately 200 publications pertaining to the effects of 155 mouse genes on alcohol consumption in different drinking models. The targeted genes vary in function and include neurotransmitter, ion channel, neuroimmune, and neuropeptide signaling systems. The alcohol self-administration models include operant conditioning, two- and four-bottle choice continuous and intermittent access, drinking in the dark limited access, chronic intermittent ethanol, and scheduled high alcohol consumption tests. Comparisons of different drinking models using the same mutant mice are potentially the most informative, and we will highlight those examples. More mutants have been tested for continuous two-bottle choice consumption than any other test; of the 137 mouse genes examined using this model, 97 (72%) altered drinking in at least one sex. Overall, the effects of genetic manipulations on alcohol drinking often depend on the sex of the mice, alcohol concentration and time of access, genetic background, as well as the drinking test. PMID:27055617

  5. Pollen embryogenesis to induce, detect, and analyze mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, M.J.

    The development of fully differentiated plants from individual pollen grains through a series of developmental phases that resemble embryogenesis beginning with the zygote was demonstrated during the mid-1960's. This technology opened the door to the use of haploid plants (sporophytes with the gametic number of chromosomes) for plant breeding and genetic studies, biochemical and metabolic studies, and the selection of mutations. Although pollen embryogenesis has been demonstrated successfully in numerous plant genera, the procedure cannot as yet be used routinely to generate large populations of plants for experiments. Practical results from use of the technology in genetic toxicology research tomore » detect mutations have failed to fully realize the theoretical potential; further developments of the technology could overcome the limitations. Pollen embryogenesis could be used to develop plants from mutant pollen grains to verify that genetic changes are involved. Through either spontaneous or induced chromosome doubling, these plants can be made homozygous and used to analyze genetically the mutants involved. The success of this approach will depend on the mutant frequency relative to the fraction of pollen grains that undergo embryogenesis; these two factors will dictate population size needed for success. Research effort is needed to further develop pollen embryogenesis for use in the detection of genotoxins under both laboratory and in situ conditions.« less

  6. Search for methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms in mutant figs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Bertoni, B W; Figueira, A; Giuliatti, S

    2013-07-08

    Fig (Ficus carica) breeding programs that use conventional approaches to develop new cultivars are rare, owing to limited genetic variability and the difficulty in obtaining plants via gamete fusion. Cytosine methylation in plants leads to gene repression, thereby affecting transcription without changing the DNA sequence. Previous studies using random amplification of polymorphic DNA and amplified fragment length polymorphism markers revealed no polymorphisms among select fig mutants that originated from gamma-irradiated buds. Therefore, we conducted methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism analysis to verify the existence of variability due to epigenetic DNA methylation among these mutant selections compared to the main cultivar 'Roxo-de-Valinhos'. Samples of genomic DNA were double-digested with either HpaII (methylation sensitive) or MspI (methylation insensitive) and with EcoRI. Fourteen primer combinations were tested, and on an average, non-methylated CCGG, symmetrically methylated CmCGG, and hemimethylated hmCCGG sites accounted for 87.9, 10.1, and 2.0%, respectively. MSAP analysis was effective in detecting differentially methylated sites in the genomic DNA of fig mutants, and methylation may be responsible for the phenotypic variation between treatments. Further analyses such as polymorphic DNA sequencing are necessary to validate these differences, standardize the regions of methylation, and analyze reads using bioinformatic tools.

  7. Oncogenic Signaling by Leukemia-Associated Mutant Cbl Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, Scott; An, Wei; Palermo, Nick; Feng, Dan; Ahmad, Gulzar; Dong, Lin; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Natarajan, Amarnath; Naramura, Mayumi; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Cbl protein family (Cbl, Cbl-b, and Cbl-c) are E3 ubiquitin ligases that have emerged as critical negative regulators of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) signaling. This function reflects their ability to directly interact with activated PTKs and to target them as well as their associated signaling components for ubiquitination. Given the critical roles of PTK signaling in driving oncogenesis, recent studies in animal models and genetic analyses in human cancer have firmly established that Cbl proteins function as tumor suppressors. Missense mutations or small in-frame deletions within the regions of Cbl protein that are essential for its E3 activity have been identified in nearly 5% of leukemia patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorders. Based on evidence from cell culture studies, in vivo models and clinical data, we discuss the potential signaling mechanisms of mutant Cbl-driven oncogenesis. Mechanistic insights into oncogenic Cbl mutants and associated animal models are likely to enhance our understanding of normal hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and provide avenues for targeted therapy of mutant Cbl-driven cancers. PMID:23997989

  8. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  9. Molecular Genetic Analysis of an Endotoxin Nonresponder Mutant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schromm, Andra B.; Lien, Egil; Henneke, Philipp; Chow, Jesse C.; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Heine, Holger; Latz, Eicke; Monks, Brian G.; Schwartz, David A.; Miyake, Kensuke; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2001-01-01

    Somatic cell mutagenesis is a powerful tool for characterizing receptor systems. We reported previously two complementation groups of mutant cell lines derived from CD14-transfected Chinese hamster ovary–K1 fibroblasts defective in responses to bacterial endotoxin. Both classes of mutants expressed a normal gene product for Toll-like receptor (TLR)4, and fully responded to stimulation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or interleukin (IL)-1β. We identified the lesion in one of the complementation groups in the gene for MD-2, a putative TLR4 coreceptor. The nonresponder phenotype of this mutant was reversed by transfection with MD-2. Cloning of MD-2 from the nonresponder cell line revealed a point mutation in a highly conserved region resulting in a C95Y amino acid exchange. Both forms of MD-2 colocalized with TLR4 on the cell surface after transfection, but only the wild-type cDNA reverted the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) nonresponder phenotype. Furthermore, soluble MD-2, but not soluble MD-2C95Y, functioned to enable LPS responses in cells that expressed TLR4. Thus, MD-2 is a required component of the LPS signaling complex and can function as a soluble receptor for cells that do not otherwise express it. We hypothesize that MD-2 conformationally affects the extracellular domain of TLR4, perhaps resulting in a change in affinity for LPS or functioning as a portion of the true ligand for TLR4. PMID:11435474

  10. Mouse mutants from chemically mutagenized embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Robert J.; Bergstrom, Rebecca A.; Zheng, Qing Yin; Libby, Brian; Smith, Richard; John, Simon W.M.; Schimenti, Kerry J.; Browning, Victoria L.; Schimenti, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The drive to characterize functions of human genes on a global scale has stimulated interest in large-scale generation of mouse mutants. Conventional germ-cell mutagenesis with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) is compromised by an inability to monitor mutation efficiency, strain1 and interlocus2 variation in mutation induction, and extensive husbandry requirements. To overcome these obstacles and develop new methods for generating mouse mutants, we devised protocols to generate germline chi-maeric mice from embryonic stem (ES) cells heavily mutagenized with ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS). Germline chimaeras were derived from cultures that underwent a mutation rate of up to 1 in 1,200 at the Hprt locus (encoding hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase). The spectrum of mutations induced by EMS and the frameshift mutagen ICR191 was consistent with that observed in other mammalian cells. Chimaeras derived from ES cells treated with EMS transmitted mutations affecting several processes, including limb development, hair growth, hearing and gametogenesis. This technology affords several advantages over traditional mutagenesis, including the ability to conduct shortened breeding schemes and to screen for mutant phenotypes directly in ES cells or their differentiated derivatives. PMID:10700192

  11. Drosophila melanogaster White Mutant w 1118 Undergo Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, María José; Pérez, Coralia; Marchesano, Mariana; Ruiz, Santiago; Caputi, Angel; Aguilera, Pedro; Barrio, Rosa; Cantera, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Key scientific discoveries have resulted from genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster , using a multitude of transgenic fly strains, the majority of which are constructed in a genetic background containing mutations in the white gene. Here we report that white mutant flies from w 1118 strain undergo retinal degeneration. We observed also that w 1118 mutants have progressive loss of climbing ability, shortened life span, as well as impaired resistance to various forms of stress. Retinal degeneration was abolished by transgenic expression of mini-white + in the white null background w 1118 . We conclude that beyond the classical eye-color phenotype, mutations in Drosophila white gene could impair several biological functions affecting parameters like mobility, life span and stress tolerance. Consequently, we suggest caution and attentiveness during the interpretation of old experiments employing white mutant flies and when planning new ones, especially within the research field of neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. We also encourage that the use of w 1118 strain as a wild-type control should be avoided.

  12. Intragenic Mapping of Chemically Induced ad-7 Mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Loprieno, Nicola

    1967-01-01

    Thirty adenine-requiring ad-7 mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, induced by ethylmethanesulfonate, methyl-methanesulfonate, and hydroxylamine and exhibiting low spontaneous reversion frequencies, were located by intragenic recombination analysis. Their identification as ad-7 mutants was assessed in relation to two previously mapped ad-7 mutants. Each mutant was found to occupy a distinct mutational site; the smallest recombination fraction observed between the two closest mutational sites was of the order of 0.5 × 10−6. PMID:6051345

  13. Evaluation of natural regulatory T cells in subjects with selective IgA deficiency: from senior idea to novel opportunities.

    PubMed

    Soheili, Habib; Abolhassani, Hassan; Arandi, Narges; Khazaei, Hossein Ali; Shahinpour, Shervin; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency disorder, which is characterized by significantly decreased serum levels of IgA. Abnormalities of CD4+CD25(high)forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ regulatory T cells (T(reg)) have been shown in association with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. In order to evaluate the relationship between autoimmunity and T(reg) in SIgAD, we studied 26 IgA-deficient patients (aged 4-17 years) with serum IgA levels <7 mg/dl, 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls and 26 age- and sex matched idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura cases with normal immune system. T(reg) were determined by flow cytometry using T(reg) markers, including CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. The mean percentage of CD4, CD25+FoxP3+ T(reg) from all CD4+ cells was 4.08 ± 0.86 in healthy controls, which was significantly higher than in SIgAD patients (2.93 ± 1.3; p = 0.003). We set a cutoff point (2.36%) for T(reg), which was two standard deviations lower than the mean of normal controls. According to this cutoff point and in order to assess the role of T(reg) in clinical SIgAD manifestation, we classified patients into two groups: 16 patients in G1 with T(reg) <2.36% and 10 patients in G2 with T(reg) >2.36%. Autoimmunity was recorded in 9 patients (53.3%) of G1 and only 1 patient of G2, respectively (p = 0.034). Although a defect in class switching recombination was observed in 40% of the patients in G1, none of the G2 patients had such a defect (p = 0.028). This study showed decreased proportions of T(reg) in SIgAD patients, particularly in those with signs of chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Isolation, characterization, and expression analyses of tryptophan aminotransferase genes in a maize dek18 mutant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dek18 mutant of maize has decreased auxin content in kernels. Molecular and functional characterization of this mutant line offers the possibility to better understand auxin biology in maize seed development. Seeds of the dek18 mutants are smaller compared to wild type seeds and the vegetative d...

  15. Identification of a novel Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus mutant that exhibits abnormal polyhedron formation and virion occlusion

    Treesearch

    James M. Slavicek; Melissa J. Mercer; Dana Pohlman; Mary Ellen Kelly; David S. Bischoff

    1998-01-01

    In previous studies on the formation of Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus (LdMNPV) few polyhedra (FP) mutants, several polyhedron formation mutants (PFM) were identified that appeared to be unique. These viral mutants are being characterized to investigate the processes of polyhedron formation and virion occlusion. Ld

  16. 2-deoxyglucose as a selective agent for derepressed mutants of Pichia stipitis

    Treesearch

    Hassan K. Sreenath; Thomas W. Jeffries

    1998-01-01

    The glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) has been used to obtain mutants derepressed for pentose metabolism. Some researchers have used 2-DOG alone whereas others have used it in the presence of a glucoserepressible carbon source. We examined both methods and screened mutant strains for improved use of xylose in the presence of glucose. Pichia stipitis mutants...

  17. A new fuzzless seed locus in an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Various fiber mutants of cotton have been reported since 1920. Two of the best characterized mutants are the naked seed loci, N1N1 and n2n2. Recently, a naked-tufted mutant called 9023n4t was developed from the cultivar SC 9023 through chemical mutagenesis. The objective of this research was to dete...

  18. Determination of the Mutant Prevention Concentration and the Mutant Selection Window of Topical Antimicrobial Agents against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Keisuke; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Toda, Yuta; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2017-01-01

    Determination of the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and the mutant selection window (MSW) of antimicrobial agents used to treat pathogenic bacteria is important in order to apply effective antimicrobial therapies. Here, we determined the MPCs of the major topical antimicrobial agents against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus which cause skin infections and compared their MSWs. Among the MPCs of nadifloxacin and clindamycin, the clindamycin MPC was determined to be the lowest against P. acnes. In contrast, the nadifloxacin MPC was the lowest against S. aureus. Calculations based on the minimum inhibitory concentrations and MPCs showed that clindamycin has the lowest MSW against both P. acnes and S. aureus. Nadifloxacin MSWs were 4-fold higher against P. acnes than against S. aureus. It is more likely for P. acnes to acquire resistance to fluoroquinolones than S. aureus. Therefore, topical application of clindamycin contributes very little to the emergence of resistant P. acnes and S. aureus strains. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Mutant prevention concentrations of antibacterial agents to ocular pathogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qun; Li, Ran; Luo, Shi-Yun; Deng, Shi-Jing; Sun, Xu-Guang

    2009-01-01

    To establish a method to measure mutant prevention concentration (MPC) in vitro, and to measure MPC of antibacterial agents for ocular bacteria caused keratitis. It was an experimental study. Forty strains of ocular bacteria were separated from cornea in Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, which included 8 strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the levofloxacin (LVF), ofloxacin (OFL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NFL), tobramycin (TOB) and chloromycetin (CHL) were determined by agar dilution method from National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standard (NCCLS). The MPC were measured by accumulate-bacterial methods with bacterial population inoculated more than 1.2 x 10(10) colony forming units per milliliter with Mueller-Hinton broth and tryptic soy agar plate. With the software of SPSS 11.0, the datum such as the range of MIC, MPC, MIC90 and MPC90 were calculated, and the selection index (MPC90/ MI90) and mutant selection window (MSW) were obtained. The MI90 of LVF and TOB (4 mg/L) to Staphylococcus aureus strains were the lowest. CIP showed the lowest MIC90 (0.25 mg/L) to Pseudomonas aeruginosa among six kinds of antibacterial agents. The MIC90 of LVF to Staphylococcus epidermidis (256 mg/L), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 mg/L) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (0.25 mg/L) were lower than other antibacterial agents. The MPC90, MSW and the MPC90/MIC90 of levofloxacin showed lower values compared with other antibacterial medicines. From all the datum, the MIC90 of CHL was the highest and the activity was the weakest. Although the activity of LVF was higher to every kind of bacteria, CIP had the highest activity antibacterial to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The capacity of CHL and TOB was weaker than Quinolones for restricting resistant mutants on ocular bacteria. LVF had the strongest capacity for restricting resistant

  20. A Deficiency of Credulousness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Asks the question: how does society assist citizens to stop deluding themselves with ESP, UFOs, astrology, polygraphy, water dowsing, channeling, and all manner of New Age gimcrackery? Supplies an answer: educators should emphasize instruction in probability models and scientific inference, while imparting an appropriate, scientific skepticism to…

  1. The higher frequency of IgA deficiency among Swedish twins is not explained by HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Frankowiack, M; Kovanen, R-M; Repasky, G A; Lim, C K; Song, C; Pedersen, N L; Hammarström, L

    2015-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) concentrations were determined in 12 600 adult Swedish twins, applying a high-throughput reverse-phase protein microarray technique. The prevalence of IgA deficiency (IgAD) was found to be 1:241 in monozygotic (MZ) twins and 1:198 in dizygotic (DZ) twins. Hence, the prevalence in twins is markedly elevated as compared with the normal Swedish adult population (1:600). The twins did not show a difference in the frequency of HLA haplotypes in comparison with almost 40 000 healthy Swedish controls. As expected, the risk-conveying HLA alleles A*01, B*08 and DRB1*01 were overrepresented among the IgAD twins and were also associated with significantly lower mean serum IgA concentrations in the twin cohort. In contrast, significantly higher mean IgA concentrations were found among individuals carrying the protective HLA alleles B*07 and DRB1*15. Exome sequencing data from two MZ twin pairs discordant for the deficiency showed no differences between the siblings. Model fitting analyses derived a heritability of 35% and indicate that genetic influences are modestly important for IgAD. The probandwise concordance rates for IgAD were found to be 31% for MZ and 13% for DZ twins.

  2. Are MAO-A deficiency states in the general population and in putative high-risk populations highly uncommon?

    PubMed

    Murphy, D L; Sims, K; Eisenhofer, G; Greenberg, B D; George, T; Berlin, F; Zametkin, A; Ernst, M; Breakefield, X O

    1998-01-01

    Lack of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) due to either Xp chromosomal deletions or alterations in the coding sequence of the gene for this enzyme are associated with marked changes in monoamine metabolism and appear to be associated with variable cognitive deficits and behavioral changes in humans and in transgenic mice. In mice, some of the most marked behavioral changes are ameliorated by pharmacologically-induced reductions in serotonin synthesis during early development, raising the question of possible therapeutic interventions in humans with MAO deficiency states. At the present time, only one multi-generational family and a few other individuals with marked MAO-A deficiency states have been identified and studied in detail. Although MAO deficiency states associated with Xp chromosomal deletions were identified by distinct symptoms (including blindness in infancy) produced by the contiguous Norrie disease gene, the primarily behavioral phenotype of individuals with the MAO mutation is less obvious. This paper reports a sequential research design and preliminary results from screening several hundred volunteers in the general population and from putative high-risk groups for possible MAO deficiency states. These preliminary results suggest that marked MAO deficiency states are very rare.

  3. The Effect of Red Palm Oil on Vitamin A Deficiency: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shunan; Xia, Hui; Wang, Feng; Sun, Guiju

    2017-11-24

    Red palm oil (RPO) has been investigated for preventing or alleviating vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Previous data has offered inconclusive and inconsistent results about the effects of RPO in patients with VAD. Our objective was to undertake a meta-analysis to assess the effects of RPO in preventing VAD in the population. After conducting a comprehensive literature search, nine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Overall, when trial results were pooled, the results indicated that RPO reduced the risk of VAD (relative risk (RR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) = 0.55 (0.37, 0.82), p = 0.003), increasedserum retinol levels in both children ( p < 0.00001) and adults ( p = 0.002), and increased β-carotene levels ( p = 0.01). However, RPO supplementation did not have a significant overall effect on serum α-carotene levels ( p = 0.06), body weight ( p = 0.45), and haemoglobin levels ( p = 0.72). The results also showed that low level of PRO intake (≤8 g RPO) could increase serum retinol concentrations whereas PRO intake above 8 g did not lead to further increase of serum retinol concentrations. This meta-analysis demonstrated that RPO might be effective for preventing or alleviating VAD.

  4. Vitamin A Deficiency Due to Selective Eating as a Cause of Blindness in a High-Income Setting.

    PubMed

    Martini, Silvia; Rizzello, Angela; Corsini, Ilaria; Romanin, Benedetta; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Grandi, Sara; Bergamaschi, Rosalba

    2018-04-01

    Vitamin A is a fat-soluble micronutrient involved in the regulation of several physiologic functions, such as visual acuity, epithelial tissue integrity, immune response, and gene expression, thus playing a crucial role in childhood growth and development. Although vitamin A deficiency (VAD) in resource-limited settings is still an actual issue and represents the leading cause of preventable childhood blindness, its occurrence in high-income countries is rare, although possibly underdiagnosed because of its nonspecific early manifestations. A good awareness of VAD symptoms and risk factors could aid its early diagnosis, which is fundamental to undertake a prompt treatment and to prevent ocular complications. Nevertheless, the role of restrictive dietary habits, increasingly common in developed countries, is often overlooked in infants and children. We present a case of VAD with permanent ocular sequelae in a 5-year-old girl from a high-income country. In the case described, VAD ensued from a highly restricted diet, mainly limited to oat milk, which had been followed for more than 2 years. This child presented with ocular symptoms, opportunistic infection, anemia, poor growth, and a diffuse squamous metaplasia of the bladder; after commencing retinol supplementation, a gradual healing of clinical VAD manifestations occurred, with the exception of the ocular sequelae, which resulted in irreversible visual loss. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. [Graves disease and IgA deficiency as manifestations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Silva, João Miguel de Almeida; Silva, Cecília Pereira; Melo, Flavio Fernando Nogueira de; Silva, Luis Alberto A; Utagawa, Claudia Yamada

    2010-08-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is related to a high phenotypic variability including the velocardiofacial/DiGeorge spectrum. Autoimmune, endocrine and immunodeficiency manifestations have been reportedly associated with the syndrome. The objective of this study was to report a case of 22q11.2DS associated with IgA deficiency and Graves disease and review literature in order to verify the frequency of syndrome alterations. Autoimmune disorders have been increasingly related to 22q11.2DS, and new phenotypes are being incorporated in the clinical spectrum of this syndrome. In our study we found that Graves disease in association with 22q11.2DS was reported in only sixteen patients, and fifteen cases were described in the last 13 years. Based on the incidence and on the amplitude of this recognized spectrum, we reinforce the findings of literature that Graves disease should be included on the 22q11.2DS manifestations, which would lead us to seek it with 22q11.2 deletion patients.

  6. Vitamin A-Deficiency Eye Disease Among Soldiers in the U.S. Civil War: Spectrum of Clinical Disease.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2015-07-01

    During the U.S. Civil War, nutritional night blindness was a common problem among soldiers forced to subsist of nutritionally inadequate diets, but medical officers typically attributed this complaint to malingering and did not suspect or appreciate a dietary basis. More than 8,000 cases of night blindness were recorded among Union troops, but many cases were not tabulated because of incomplete data for black soldiers and prisoners of war. From 1864 to 1865, during which comparable data were available for both whites and blacks, the average annual cumulative incidence of night blindness was 4.3 per 1,000 troops for whites, compared with 11.0 per 1,000 troops for blacks. Affected patients had dilated pupils that were poorly responsive to candle light. Approximately 30 cases of keratomalacia were also reported among severely malnourished and emaciated soldiers with chronic diarrhea, generally within 2 weeks before death. The reported clinical manifestations are characteristic of the full range of vitamin A deficiency eye disease from night blindness to corneal ulceration and perforation. Although medical officers typically accused affected soldiers of malingering, malingering cannot account for either the observed abnormalities of pupillary reflexes, or the corneal epithelial pathology and mortality recorded in severe cases. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Dark adaptation in vitamin A-deficient adults awaiting liver transplantation: improvement with intramuscular vitamin A treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbott-Johnson, Winsome J; Kerlin, Paul; Abiad, Ghassan; Clague, Alan E; Cuneo, Ross C

    2011-04-01

    Although vitamin A deficiency is common in chronic liver disease, limited data exist on impairment of dark adaptation and response to therapy. The aims were (1) to assess dark adaptation in patients, (2) to assess the relationship between dark adaptation and vitamin A status, zinc and Child-Pugh score, (3) to compare perceived and measured dark adaptation and (4) to assess the dark adaptation response to intramuscular vitamin A. This was a prospective study of 20 patients (alcoholic liver disease 10, other parenchymal diseases six, cholestatic diseases four) awaiting liver transplantation. Selection was based on low serum retinol. There were 15 age-matched controls. Dark adaptation was measured with a SST-1 dark adaptometer and perception by questionnaire. Eight patients received 50, 000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and dark adaptation was repeated at 1 month. Forty per cent of patients had impaired dark adaptation. Patients with alcoholic liver disease were more impaired than those with other parenchymal diseases (p=0.015). No relationship was found between dark adaptation and the biochemical indicators or Child-Pugh score. Seventy-five per cent of patients with impairment did not perceive a problem. After intervention, light of half the previous intensity could be seen (p=0.05). Dark-adaptation impairment was common, was worse in alcoholic liver disease, was largely not appreciated by the patients and improved with vitamin A treatment.

  8. The current impact and potential of biotechnology to improve the capacity of orange-fleshed sweet potato to prevent vitamin A deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world and an important cause of premature death in young children and pregnant women. Billions of people get most of their vitamin A from plants that are rich in pro-vitamin A carotenoids such as beta-carotene. Orange-fleshe...

  9. 23 CFR 661.59 - What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support the project? 661.59 Section 661.59 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.59 What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not...

  10. 23 CFR 661.59 - What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bridge if the Indian Tribe does not support the project? 661.59 Section 661.59 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.59 What should be done with a deficient BIA owned IRR bridge if the Indian Tribe does not...

  11. UV-induced lethal sectoring and pure mutant clones in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hannan, M A; Duck, P; Nasim, A

    1976-08-01

    The induction of lethal sectoring and pure mutant clones by ultraviolet light has been studied in a homogeneous G1 population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a normal growth medium. At the lowest UV dose of 250 ergs, which corresponds to a shoulder in the survival curve, all mutants appeared as pure clones. At higher doses the frequency of mosaic mutants progressively increased. These results indicate a relationship between the highest frequency of complete mutants and the maximum repair activity. In addition, the frequency of lethal sectoring at all doses tested was too low to account for the origin of pure mutant clones.

  12. Changes on metabolic parameters induced by acute cannabinoid administration (CBD, THC) in a rat experimental model of nutritional vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Loubna; Porres, Jesús M; Merzouki, Abderrahmane; Louktibi, Abdelaziz; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Urbano, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency can result from malnutrition, malabsorption of vitamin A, impaired vitamin metabolism associated with liver disease, or chronic debilitating diseases like HIV infection or cancer. Cannabis administration has been described as a palliative symptom management therapy in such pathological stages. Therefore, this research aimed to study the effects of acute administration of cannabidiol (CBD) or thetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the levels of retinol in plasma and in the liver, and biochemical parameters related to lipid and glucose metabolism (cholesterolaemia, triglyceridemia and glycemia) in a rat experimental model of vitamin A deficiency. The experimental animal model of Vitamin A deficiency was developed during a 50-day experimental period in which rats consumed a vitamin A-free diet. Cannabidiol (10 mg/kg body weight) or thetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg body weight) were administered intraperitoneally 2 hours prior to sacrifice of the animals. The nutritional deficiency caused a significant decrease in plasmatic and liver contents of retinol and biochemical parameters of glycemic, lipidic, and mineral metabolism. Acute intraperitoneal administration of Cannabidiol and thetrahydrocannabinol did not improve the indices of vitamin A status in either control or vitamin A-deficient rats. However, it had a significant effect on specific biochemical parameters such as glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Under our experimental conditions, the reported effects of cannabinoid administration on certain signs of nutritional vitamin A deficiency appeared to be mediated through mechanisms other than changes in retinol metabolism or its mobilization after the acute administration of such compounds. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. A CsrA/RsmA translational regulator gene encoded in the replication region of a Sinorhizobium meliloti cryptic plasmid complements Pseudomonas fluorescens rsmA/E mutants.

    PubMed

    Agaras, Betina; Sobrero, Patricio; Valverde, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    Members of the CsrA/RsmA family are global regulatory proteins that bind to mRNAs, usually at the ribosome-binding site, to control mRNA translation and stability. Their activity is counteracted by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), which offer several binding sites to compete with mRNA binding. The csrA/rsmA genes are widespread in prokaryotic chromosomes, although certain phylogenetic groups such as Alphaproteobacteria lack this type of global regulator. Interestingly, a csrA/rsmA-like sequence was identified in the replication region of plasmid pMBA19a from the alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. This rsmA-like allele (rsmA(Sm)) is 58 % identical to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri chromosomal rsmA and bears an unusual C-terminal extension that may fold into an extra α-helix. Homology-based modelling of RsmA(Sm) suggests that all key mRNA-binding residues are conserved and correctly positioned in the RNA-binding pocket. In fact, a 1.6 kb fragment from pMBA19a encompassing the rsmA(Sm) locus restored rsmA/E-dependent phenotypes of rsmA/E gacS Pseudomonas fluorescens mutants. The functionality of RsmA(Sm) was confirmed by the gain of control over target aprA'-'lacZ and hcnA'-'lacZ translational fusions in the same mutant background. The RsmA(Sm) activity correlated with Western blot detection of the polypeptide. Phenotype and translational fusion data from rsmA/E P. fluorescens mutants expressing RsmX/Y/Z RNAs indicated that RsmA(Sm) is able to bind these antagonistic sRNAs. In agreement with the latter observation, it was also found that the sRNA RsmY was stabilized by RsmA(Sm). Deletion of the C-terminal extra α-helix of RsmA(Sm) affected its cellular concentration, but increased its relative RNA-binding activity. This is believed to be the first report of the presence and characterization of a functional csrA/rsmA homologue in a mobile genetic element.

  14. Polysaccharide production by a reduced pigmentation mutant of Aureobasidium pullulans NYS-1.

    PubMed

    West, T P; Strohfus, B

    2001-08-01

    To isolate a reduced pigmentation mutant of Aureobasidium pullulans NYS-1 and characterize its cellular pigmentation plus its polysaccharide and biomass production relative to carbon source. Cellular pigmentation, polysaccharide levels and biomass production by the isolated mutant NYSRP-1 were analysed relative to carbon source. Cellular pigmentation of the mutant was lower than its parent strain using either carbon source. The mutant elaborated higher polysaccharide levels on sucrose than on corn syrup. The pullulan content of the polysaccharide synthesized and biomass production by the mutant rose as the carbon source concentration was increased. It is feasible to isolate a reduced pigmentation mutant from strain NYS-1 that exhibits elevated polysaccharide production using corn syrup as a carbon source. The mutant provides an advantage for commercial pullulan production because of its reduced pigmentation and enhanced polysaccharide synthesis.

  15. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  16. Rubisco mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Pinto, T S; Malcata, F X; Arrabaça, J D; Silva, J M; Spreitzer, R J; Esquível, M G

    2013-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an ideal fuel characterized by high enthalpy change and lack of greenhouse effects. This biofuel can be released by microalgae via reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen catalyzed by hydrogenases. The main competitor for the reducing power required by the hydrogenases is the Calvin cycle, and rubisco plays a key role therein. Engineered Chlamydomonas with reduced rubisco levels, activity and stability was used as the basis of this research effort aimed at increasing hydrogen production. Biochemical monitoring in such metabolically engineered mutant cells proceeded in Tris/acetate/phosphate culture medium with S-depletion or repletion, both under hypoxia. Photosynthetic activity, maximum photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll and protein levels were all measured. In addition, expression of rubisco, hydrogenase, D1 and Lhcb were investigated, and H2 was quantified. At the beginning of the experiments, rubisco increased followed by intense degradation. Lhcb proteins exhibited monomeric isoforms during the first 24 to 48 h, and D1 displayed sensitivity under S-depletion. Rubisco mutants exhibited a significant decrease in O2 evolution compared with the control. Although the S-depleted medium was much more suitable than its complete counterpart for H2 production, hydrogen release was observed also in sealed S-repleted cultures of rubisco mutated cells under low-moderate light conditions. In particular, the rubisco mutant Y67A accounted for 10-15-fold higher hydrogen production than the wild type under the same conditions and also displayed divergent metabolic parameters. These results indicate that rubisco is a promising target for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered microalgae.

  17. Masking responses to light in period mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, Julie S; Yamazaki, Shin

    2011-10-01

    Masking is an acute effect of an external signal on an overt rhythm and is distinct from the process of entrainment. In the current study, we investigated the phase dependence and molecular mechanisms regulating masking effects of light pulses on spontaneous locomotor activity in mice. The circadian genes, Period1 (Per1) and Per2, are necessary components of the timekeeping machinery and entrainment by light appears to involve the induction of the expression of Per1 and Per2 mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). We assessed the roles of the Per genes in regulating masking by assessing the effects of light pulses on nocturnal locomotor activity in C57BL/6J Per mutant mice. We found that Per1(-/-) and Per2(-/-) mice had robust negative masking responses to light. In addition, the locomotor activity of Per1(-/-)/Per2(-/-) mice appeared to be rhythmic in the light-dark (LD) cycle, and the phase of activity onset was advanced (but varied among individual mice) relative to lights off. This rhythm persisted for 1 to 2 days in constant darkness in some Per1(-/-)/Per2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, Per1(-/-)/Per2(-/-) mice exhibited robust negative masking responses to light. Negative masking was phase dependent in wild-type mice such that maximal suppression was induced by light pulses at zeitgeber time 14 (ZT14) and gradually weaker suppression occurred during light pulses at ZT16 and ZT18. By measuring the phase shifts induced by the masking protocol (light pulses were administered to mice maintained in the LD cycle), we found that the phase responsiveness of Per mutant mice was altered compared to wild-types. Together, our data suggest that negative masking responses to light are robust in Per mutant mice and that the Per1(-/-)/Per2(-/-) SCN may be a light-driven, weak/damping oscillator.

  18. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance tomore » oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.« less

  19. Resveratrol Antagonizes Antimicrobial Lethality and Stimulates Recovery of Bacterial Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli; Zhou, Jinan; Qu, Yilin; Yang, Xinguang; Shi, Guojing; Wang, Xiuhong; Hong, Yuzhi; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, peroxide, and hydroxyl radical) are thought to contribute to the rapid bactericidal activity of diverse antimicrobial agents. The possibility has been raised that consumption of antioxidants in food may interfere with the lethal action of antimicrobials. Whether nutritional supplements containing antioxidant activity are also likely to interfere with antimicrobial lethality is unknown. To examine this possibility, resveratrol, a popular antioxidant dietary supplement, was added to cultures of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus that were then treated with antimicrobial and assayed for bacterial survival and the recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Resveratrol, at concentrations likely to be present during human consumption, caused a 2- to 3-fold reduction in killing during a 2-hr treatment with moxifloxacin or kanamycin. At higher, but still subinhibitory concentrations, resveratrol reduced antimicrobial lethality by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Resveratrol also reduced the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) characteristic of treatment with quinolone (oxolinic acid). These data support the general idea that the lethal activity of some antimicrobials involves ROS. Surprisingly, subinhibitory concentrations of resveratrol promoted (2- to 6-fold) the recovery of rifampicin-resistant mutants arising from the action of ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, or daptomycin. This result is consistent with resveratrol reducing ROS to sublethal levels that are still mutagenic, while the absence of resveratrol allows ROS levels to high enough to kill mutagenized cells. Suppression of antimicrobial lethality and promotion of mutant recovery by resveratrol suggests that the antioxidant may contribute to the emergence of resistance to several antimicrobials, especially if new derivatives and/or formulations of resveratrol markedly increase bioavailability. PMID:27045517

  20. Eicosapentaenoic acid prevents arterial calcification in klotho mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazufumi; Miura, Daiji; Saito, Yukihiro; Yunoki, Kei; Koyama, Yasushi; Satoh, Minoru; Kondo, Megumi; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Hatipoglu, Omer F; Miyoshi, Toru; Yoshida, Masashi; Morita, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The klotho gene was identified as an "aging-suppressor" gene that accelerates arterial calcification when disrupted. Serum and vascular klotho levels are reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease, and the reduced levels are associated with arterial calcification. Intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an n-3 fatty acid, reduces the risk of fatal coronary artery disease. However, the effects of EPA on arterial calcification have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of EPA on arterial calcification in klotho mutant mice. Four-week-old klotho mutant mice and wild-type (WT) mice were given a diet containing 5% EPA (EPA food, klotho and WT: n = 12, each) or not containing EPA (control food, klotho and WT: n = 12, each) for 4 weeks. Calcium volume scores of thoracic and abdominal aortas assessed by computed tomography were significantly elevated in klotho mice after 4 weeks of control food, but they were not elevated in klotho mice after EPA food or in WT mice. Serum levels of EPA and resolvin E1, an active metabolite of EPA, in EPA food-fed mice were significantly increased compared to those in control food-fed mice. An oxidative stress PCR array followed by quantitative PCR revealed that NADPH oxidase-4 (NOX4), an enzyme that generates superoxide, gene expression was up-regulated in arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of klotho mice. Activity of NOX was also significantly higher in SMCs of klotho mice than in those of WT mice. EPA decreased expression levels of the NOX4 gene and NOX activity. GPR120, a receptor of n-3 fatty acids, gene knockdown by siRNA canceled effects of EPA on NOX4 gene expression and NOX activity in arterial SMCs of klotho mice. EPA prevents arterial calcification together with reduction of NOX gene expression and activity via GPR120 in klotho mutant mice.

  1. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-01-01

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild-type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild-type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:21386657

  2. Using PATIMDB to Create Bacterial Transposon Insertion Mutant Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Urbach, Jonathan M.; Wei, Tao; Liberati, Nicole; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Villanueva, Jacinto; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    PATIMDB is a software package for facilitating the generation of transposon mutant insertion libraries. The software has two main functions: process tracking and automated sequence analysis. The process tracking function specifically includes recording the status and fates of multiwell plates and samples in various stages of library construction. Automated sequence analysis refers specifically to the pipeline of sequence analysis starting with ABI files from a sequencing facility and ending with insertion location identifications. The protocols in this unit describe installation and use of PATIMDB software. PMID:19343706

  3. Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy Targets Tumour-Specific Mutant Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gubin, Matthew M.; Zhang, Xiuli; Schuster, Heiko; Caron, Etienne; Ward, Jeffrey P.; Noguchi, Takuro; Ivanova, Yulia; Hundal, Jasreet; Arthur, Cora D.; Krebber, Willem-Jan; Mulder, Gwenn E.; Toebes, Mireille; Vesely, Matthew D.; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Korman, Alan J.; Allison, James P.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Pearce, Erika L.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillanders, William E.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays key roles in determining the fate of developing cancers by not only functioning as a tumour promoter facilitating cellular transformation, promoting tumour growth and sculpting tumour cell immunogenicity1–6, but also as an extrinsic tumour suppressor that either destroys developing tumours or restrains their expansion1,2,7. Yet clinically apparent cancers still arise in immunocompetent individuals in part as a consequence of cancer induced immunosuppression. In many individuals, immunosuppression is mediated by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), two immunomodulatory receptors expressed on T cells8,9. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based therapies targeting CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 (checkpoint blockade) have yielded significant clinical benefits—including durable responses—to patients with different malignancies10–13. However, little is known about the identity of the tumour antigens that function as the targets of T cells activated by checkpoint blockade immunotherapy and whether these antigens can be used to generate vaccines that are highly tumour-specific. Herein, we use genomics and bioinformatics approaches to identify tumour-specific mutant proteins as a major class of T cell rejection antigens following αPD-1 and/or αCTLA-4 therapy of mice bearing progressively growing sarcomas and show that therapeutic synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines incorporating these mutant epitopes induce tumour rejection comparably to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Whereas, mutant tumour antigen-specific T cells are present in progressively growing tumours, they are reactivated following treatment with αPD-1- and/or αCTLA-4 and display some overlapping but mostly treatment-specific transcriptional profiles rendering them capable of mediating tumour rejection. These results reveal that tumour-specific mutant antigens (TSMA) are not only important targets of checkpoint blockade therapy but also can be

  4. Pattern-formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Starruß, Jörn; Peruani, Fernando; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of the rod-shaped cells of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus depends on two motility machineries, type IV pili (giving rise to S-motility) and the gliding motility apparatus (giving rise to A-motility). Cell motility is regulated by occasional reversals. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies, depending on their nutritional status. To ultimately understand these two pattern-formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as the cell reversal machinery, we analyse spatial self-organization in three M. xanthus strains: (i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, (ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and (iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, occasionally reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by means of the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria owing to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemical signal regulation. The two-engine strain mutant reveals that the same phenomenon emerges when both motility systems are present, and as long as cells exhibit unidirectional motion only. From the study of these two strains, we conclude that unidirectional cell motion induces the formation of large moving clusters at low and intermediate densities, while it results in vortex formation at very high densities. These findings are consistent with what is known from self-propelled rod models, which strongly suggests that the combined effect of self-propulsion and volume exclusion interactions is the pattern-formation mechanism leading to the observed phenomena. On the other hand, we learn that when cells occasionally reverse

  5. Isolation of Phaffia rhodozyma Mutants with Increased Astaxanthin Content

    PubMed Central

    An, Gil-Hwan; Schuman, Donald B.; Johnson, Eric A.

    1989-01-01

    Plating of the astaxanthin-producing yeast Phaffia rhodozyma onto yeast-malt agar containing 50 μM antimycin A gave rise to colonies of unusual morphology, characterized by a nonpigmented lower smooth surface that developed highly pigmented vertical papillae after 1 to 2 months. Isolation and purification of the pigmented papillae, followed by testing for pigment production in shake flasks, demonstrated that several antimycin isolates were increased two- to fivefold in astaxanthin content compared with the parental natural isolate (UCD-FST 67-385). One of the antimycin strains (ant-1) and a nitrosoguanidine derivative of ant-1 (ant-1-4) produced considerably more astaxanthin than the parent (ant-1 had 800 to 900 μg/g; ant-1-4 had 900 to 1,300 μg/g; and 67-385 had 300 to 450 μg/g). The mutant strains were compared physiologically with the parent. The antimycin mutants grew slower on ammonia, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen sources compared with the natural isolate and also had lower cell yields on several carbon sources. Although isolated on antimycin plates, they were found to be more susceptible to antimycin A, apparently owing to the spatial separation of the papillae from the agar. They were also more susceptible than the parent to the respiratory inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone and were slightly more susceptible to cyanide, but did not differ from the natural isolate in susceptibility to azide. The antimycin-derived strains were also killed faster than the parent by hydrogen peroxide. The carotenoid compositions of the parent and the antimycin-derived strains were similar to those previously determined in the type strain (UCD-FST 67-210) except that two carotenoids not previously found in the type strain were present in increased quantities in the antimycin mutants and phoenicoxanthin was a minor component. The chemical properties of the unknown carotenoids suggested that the strains isolated on antimycin agar tended to oxygenate and desaturate

  6. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  7. Probing the mechanism of insulin fibril formation with insulin mutants.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L; Frokjaer, S; Brange, J; Uversky, V N; Fink, A L

    2001-07-27

    The molecular basis of insulin fibril formation was investigated by studying the structural properties and kinetics of fibril formation of 20 different human insulin mutants at both low pH (conditions favoring monomer/dimer) and at pH 7.4 (conditions favoring tetramer/hexamer). Small-angle X-ray scattering showed insulin to be monomeric in 20% acetic acid, 0.1 M NaCl, pH 2. The secondary structure of the mutants was assessed using far-UV circular dichroism, and the tertiary structure was determined using near-UV circular dichroism, quenching of intrinsic fluorescence by acrylamide and interactions with the hydrophobic probe 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS). The kinetics of fibril formation were monitored with the fluorescent dye, Thioflavin T. The results indicate that the monomer is the state from which fibrils arise, thus under some conditions dissociation of hexamers may be rate limiting or partially rate limiting. The insulin mutants were found to retain substantial nativelike secondary and tertiary structure under all conditions studied. The results suggest that fibril formation of the insulin mutants is controlled by specific molecular interactions that are sensitive to variations in the primary structure. The observed effects of several mutations on the rate of fibril formation are inconsistent with a previously suggested model for fibrillation [Brange, J., Whittingham, J., Edwards, D., Youshang, Z., Wollmer, A., Brandenburg, D., Dodson, G., and Finch, J. (1997) Curr. Sci. 72, 470-476]. Two surfaces on the insulin monomer are identified as potential interacting sites in insulin fibrils, one consisting of the residues B10, B16, and B17 and the other consisting of at least the residues A8 and B25. The marked increase in the lag time for fibril formation with mutations to more polar residues, as well as mutations to charged residues, demonstrates the importance of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions in the initial stages of fibrillation

  8. Electrical phenotypes of calcium transport mutant strains of a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Hamam, Ahmed; Lew, Roger R

    2012-05-01

    We characterized the electrical phenotypes of mutants with mutations in genes encoding calcium transporters-a mechanosensitive channel homolog (MscS), a Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange protein (cax), and Ca(2+)-ATPases (nca-1, nca-2, nca-3)-as well as those of double mutants (the nca-2 cax, nca-2 nca-3, and nca-3 cax mutants). The electrical characterization used dual impalements to obtain cable-corrected current-voltage measurements. Only two types of mutants (the MscS mutant; the nca-2 mutant and nca-2-containing double mutants) exhibited lower resting potentials. For the nca-2 mutant, on the basis of unchanged conductance and cyanide-induced depolarization of the potential, the cause is attenuated H(+)-ATPase activity. The growth of the nca-2 mutant-containing strains was inhibited by elevated extracellular Ca(2+) levels, indicative of lesions in Ca(2+) homeostasis. However, the net Ca(2+) effluxes of the nca-2 mutant, measured noninvasively with a self-referencing Ca(2+)-selective microelectrode, were similar to those of the wild type. All of the mutants exhibited osmosensitivity similar to that of the wild type (the turgor of the nca-2 mutant was also similar to that of the wild type), suggesting that Ca(2+) signaling does not play a role in osmoregulation. The hyphal tip morphology and tip-localized mitochondria of the nca-2 mutant were similar to those of the wild type, even when the external [Ca(2+)] was elevated. Thus, although Ca(2+) homeostasis is perturbed in the nca-2 mutant (B. J. Bowman et al., Eukaryot. Cell 10:654-661, 2011), the phenotype does not extend to tip growth or to osmoregulation but is revealed by lower H(+)-ATPase activity.

  9. Electrical Phenotypes of Calcium Transport Mutant Strains of a Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the electrical phenotypes of mutants with mutations in genes encoding calcium transporters—a mechanosensitive channel homolog (MscS), a Ca2+/H+ exchange protein (cax), and Ca2+-ATPases (nca-1, nca-2, nca-3)—as well as those of double mutants (the nca-2 cax, nca-2 nca-3, and nca-3 cax mutants). The electrical characterization used dual impalements to obtain cable-corrected current-voltage measurements. Only two types of mutants (the MscS mutant; the nca-2 mutant and nca-2-containing double mutants) exhibited lower resting potentials. For the nca-2 mutant, on the basis of unchanged conductance and cyanide-induced depolarization of the potential, the cause is attenuated H+-ATPase activity. The growth of the nca-2 mutant-containing strains was inhibited by elevated extracellular Ca2+ levels, indicative of lesions in Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the net Ca2+ effluxes of the nca-2 mutant, measured noninvasively with a self-referencing Ca2+-selective microelectrode, were similar to those of the wild type. All of the mutants exhibited osmosensitivity similar to that of the wild type (the turgor of the nca-2 mutant was also similar to that of the wild type), suggesting that Ca2+ signaling does not play a role in osmoregulation. The hyphal tip morphology and tip-localized mitochondria of the nca-2 mutant were similar to those of the wild type, even when the external [Ca2+] was elevated. Thus, although Ca2+ homeostasis is perturbed in the nca-2 mutant (B. J. Bowman et al., Eukaryot. Cell 10:654–661, 2011), the phenotype does not extend to tip growth or to osmoregulation but is revealed by lower H+-ATPase activity. PMID:22408225

  10. Characterization of three Agrobacterium tumefaciens avirulent mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect induction of vir genes.

    PubMed

    Metts, J; West, J; Doares, S H; Matthysse, A G

    1991-02-01

    Three Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutants with chromosomal mutations that affect bacterial virulence were isolated by transposon mutagenesis. Two of the mutants were avirulent on all hosts tested. The third mutant, Ivr-211, was a host range mutant which was avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana, Nicotiana tabacum, N. debneyi, N. glauca, and Daucus carota but was virulent on Zinnia elegans and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). That the mutant phenotype was due to the transposon insertion was determined by cloning the DNA containing the transposon insertion and using the cloned DNA to replace the wild-type DNA in the parent bacterial strain by marker exchange. The transposon insertions in the three mutants mapped at three widely separated locations on the bacterial chromosome. The effects of the mutations on various steps in tumor formation were examined. All three mutants showed no alteration in binding to carrot cells. However, none of the mutants showed any induction of vir genes by acetosyringone under conditions in which the parent strain showed vir gene induction. When the mutant bacteria were examined for changes in surface components, it was found that all three of the mutants showed a similar alteration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS from the mutants was larger in size and more heavily saccharide substituted than LPS from the parent strain. Two of the mutants showed no detectable alteration in outer membrane and periplasmic space proteins. The third mutant, Ivr-225, was missing a 79-kDa surface peptide. The reason(s) for the failure of vir gene induction in these mutants and its relationship, if any, to the observed alteration in LPS are unknown.

  11. A quadruple mutant of Arabidopsis reveals a β-carotene hydroxylation activity for LUT1/CYP97C1 and a regulatory role of xanthophylls on determination of the PSI/PSII ratio

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids playing an essential role as structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. Xanthophylls contribute to the assembly and stability of light-harvesting complex, to light absorbance and to photoprotection. The first step in xanthophyll biosynthesis from α- and β-carotene is the hydroxylation of ε- and β-rings, performed by both non-heme iron oxygenases (CHY1, CHY2) and P450 cytochromes (LUT1/CYP97C1, LUT5/CYP97A3). The Arabidopsis triple chy1chy2lut5 mutant is almost completely depleted in β-xanthophylls. Results Here we report on the quadruple chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant, additionally carrying the lut2 mutation (affecting lycopene ε-cyclase). This genotype lacks lutein and yet it shows a compensatory increase in β-xanthophylls with respect to chy1chy2lut5 mutant. Mutant plants show an even stronger photosensitivity than chy1chy2lut5, a complete lack of qE, the rapidly reversible component of non-photochemical quenching, and a peculiar organization of the pigment binding complexes into thylakoids. Biochemical analysis reveals that the chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant is depleted in Lhcb subunits and is specifically affected in Photosystem I function, showing a deficiency in PSI-LHCI supercomplexes. Moreover, by analyzing a series of single, double, triple and quadruple Arabidopsis mutants in xanthophyll biosynthesis, we show a hitherto undescribed correlation between xanthophyll levels and the PSI-PSII ratio. The decrease in the xanthophyll/carotenoid ratio causes a proportional decrease in the LHCII and PSI core levels with respect to PSII. Conclusions The physiological and biochemical phenotype of the chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant shows that (i) LUT1/CYP97C1 protein reveals a major β-carotene hydroxylase activity in vivo when depleted in its preferred substrate α-carotene; (ii) xanthophylls are needed for normal level of Photosystem I and LHCII accumulation. PMID:22513258

  12. miR-146a deficiency in hematopoietic cells is not involved in the development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Monte, Alberto; Arroyo, Ana B; Andrés-Manzano, María J; García-Barberá, Nuria; Caleprico, María S; Vicente, Vicente; Roldán, Vanessa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Martínez, Constantino; Andrés, Vicente

    2018-01-01

    Atherosclerosis involves activation of the IRAK1/TRAF6/NF-κB inflammatory cascade, which is negatively regulated by miR146a. Previous studies showed that the TT genotype of rs2431697, located near the miR-146a gene, drives lower miR-146a transcription and predicts adverse cardiovascular events in anticoagulated atrial fibrillation patients. Moreover, systemic miR-146a administration protects mice from atherosclerosis. Here we evaluated the ability of miR-146a expression in the hematopoietic component to regulate atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice (Ldlr-/-). Lethally-irradiated Ldlr-/- mice transplanted with bone marrow from wild-type or miR-146a-null mice were fed an atherogenic diet for 8 and 20 weeks. Irak1, Traf6 and MIR146A expression were quantified in thoracic aorta by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Aortic plaque size and composition were characterized by Oil-Red staining and immunohistochemistry and leukocyte recruitment by intravital microscopy. Blood cell counts were similar in fat-fed Ldlr-/-mice with or without hematopoietic miR-146a expression. However, plasma cholesterol decreased in fat-fed Ldlr-/-mice transplanted with bone marrow deficient for miR-146a. Finally, aortic atherosclerosis burden and recruitment of leukocytes into the vessel wall were undistinguishable between the two groups, despite higher levels of Irak1 and Traf6 mRNA and protein in the aorta of fat-fed mice lacking hematopoietic miR-146a expression. miR-146a deficiency exclusively in hematopoietic cells modulates cholesterol levels in plasma and the expression of its targets in the artery wall of fat-fed Ldlr-/- mice, but does not accelerate atherosclerosis. Atheroprotection upon systemic miR-146a administration may therefore be caused by specific effects on vascular cells.

  13. p16INK4a deficiency promotes IL-4-induced polarization and inhibits proinflammatory signaling in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cudejko, Céline; Wouters, Kristiaan; Fuentes, Lucía; Hannou, Sarah Anissa; Paquet, Charlotte; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Fleury, Sébastien; Remy, Patrick; Tailleux, Anne; Chinetti, Giulia; Dombrowicz, David; Staels, Bart; Paumelle, Réjane

    2011-01-01

    The CDKN2A locus, which contains the tumor suppressor gene p16INK4a, is associated with an increased risk of age-related inflammatory diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, in which macrophages play a crucial role. Monocytes can polarize towards classically (CAMφ) or alternatively (AAMφ) activated macrophages. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition of these phenotypes are not well defined. Here, we show that p16INK4a-deficiency (p16−/−) modulates the macrophage phenotype. Transcriptome analysis revealed that p16−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) exhibit a phenotype resembling interleukin (IL)-4-induced macrophage polarization. In line with this observation, p16−/− BMDM displayed a decreased response to classically polarizing IFNγ and LPS and an increased sensitivity to alternative polarization by IL-4. Furthermore, mice transplanted with p16−/− bone marrow displayed higher hepatic AAMφ marker expression levels upon Schistosoma mansoni infection, an in vivo model of AAMφ phenotype-skewing. Surprisingly, p16−/− BMDM did not display increased IL-4-induced STAT6 signaling, but decreased IFNγ-induced STAT1 and LPS-induced IKKα,β phosphorylation. This decrease correlated with decreased JAK2 phosphorylation and with higher levels of inhibitory acetylation of STAT1 and IKKα,β. These findings identify p16INK4a as a modulator of macrophage activation and polarization via the JAK2-STAT1 pathway with possible roles in inflammatory diseases. PMID:21636855

  14. Retinoic acid reverses the airway hyperresponsiveness but not the parenchymal defect that is associated with vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Stephen E; Holmes, Amey Jo; Smith, Jennifer

    2004-02-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is influenced by structural components of the bronchial wall, including the smooth muscle and connective tissue elements and the neuromuscular function. AHR is also influenced by parenchymally derived tethering forces on the bronchial wall, which maintain airway caliber by producing outward radial traction. Our previous work has shown that vitamin A-deficient (VAD) rats exhibit cholinergic hyperresponsiveness and a decrease in the expression and function of the muscarinic-2 receptors (M2R). We hypothesized that if decreases in radial traction from airway or parenchymal structures contributed to the VAD-related increase in AHR, then the radial traction would normalize more slowly than VAD-related alterations in neurotransmitter signaling. Rats remained vitamin A sufficient (VAS) or were rendered VAD and then maintained on the VAD diet in the presence or absence of supplementation with all-trans retinoic acid (RA). VAD was associated with an approximately twofold increase in respiratory resistance and elastance compared with VAS rats. Exposure to RA for 12 days but not 4 days restored resistance and elastance to control (VAS) levels. In VAD rats, AHR was accompanied by decreases in bronchial M2R gene expression and function, which were restored after 12 days of RA supplementation. Subepithelial bronchial elastic fibers were decreased by approximately 50% in VAD rats and were significantly restored by RA. The increase in AHR that is associated with VAD is accompanied by decreases in M2R expression and function that can be restored by RA and a reduction in airway elastic fibers that can be partially restored by RA.

  15. High risk of severe anaemia after chlorproguanil-dapsone+artesunate antimalarial treatment in patients with G6PD (A-) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fanello, Caterina I; Karema, Corine; Avellino, Pamela; Bancone, Germana; Uwimana, Aline; Lee, Sue J; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Modiano, David

    2008-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common inherited human enzyme defect. This deficiency provides some protection from clinical malaria, but it can also cause haemolysis after administration of drugs with oxidant properties. The safety of chlorproguanil-dapsone+artesunate (CD+A) and amodiaquine+sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ+SP) for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria was evaluated according to G6PD deficiency in a secondary analysis of an open-label, randomized clinical trial. 702 children, treated with CD+A or AQ+SP and followed for 28 days after treatment were genotyped for G6PD A- deficiency. In the first 4 days following CD+A treatment, mean haematocrit declined on average 1.94% (95% CI 1.54 to 2.33) and 1.05% per day (95% CI 0.95 to 1.15) respectively in patients with G6PD deficiency and normal patients; a mean reduction of 1.3% per day was observed among patients who received AQ+SP regardless of G6PD status (95% CI 1.25 to 1.45). Patients with G6PD deficiency recipients of CD+A had significantly lower haematocrit than the other groups until day 7 (p = 0.04). In total, 10 patients had severe post-treatment haemolysis requiring blood transfusion. Patients with G6PD deficiency showed a higher risk of severe anaemia following treatment with CD+A (RR = 10.2; 95% CI 1.8 to 59.3) or AQ+SP (RR = 5.6; 95% CI 1.0 to 32.7). CD+A showed a poor safety profile in individuals with G6PD deficiency most likely as a result of dapsone induced haemolysis. Screening for G6PD deficiency before drug administration of potentially pro-oxidants drugs, like dapsone-containing combinations, although seldom available, is necessary.

  16. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  17. Analyses of tomato fruit brightness mutants uncover both cutin-deficient and cutin-abundant mutants and a new hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase.

    PubMed

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants.

  18. Analyses of Tomato Fruit Brightness Mutants Uncover Both Cutin-Deficient and Cutin-Abundant Mutants and a New Hypomorphic Allele of GDSL Lipase[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants. PMID:24357602

  19. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C

    2015-07-01

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with 'invisible' phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant glioma: Evolving clinical and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie J; Shih, Helen A; Andronesi, Ovidiu C; Cahill, Daniel P

    2017-12-01

    The metabolic genes isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are commonly mutated in low-grade glioma and in a subset of glioblastoma. These mutations co-occur with other recurrent molecular alterations, including 1p/19q codeletions and tumor suppressor protein 53 (TP53) and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation (ATRX) mutations, which together help to define a molecular signature that aids in the classification of gliomas and helps to better predict clinical behavior. A confluence of research suggests that glioma development in IDH-mutant and IDH wild-type tumors is driven by different oncogenic processes and responds differently to current treatment paradigms. Herein, the authors discuss the discovery of IDH mutations and associated molecular alterations in glioma, review clinical features common to patients with IDH-mutant glioma, and highlight current understanding of IDH mutation-driven gliomagenesis with implications for emerging treatment strategies. Cancer 2017;123:4535-4546. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  1. Lipid profiling of parkin-mutant human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lobasso, Simona; Tanzarella, Paola; Vergara, Daniele; Maffia, Michele; Cocco, Tiziana; Corcelli, Angela

    2017-12-01

    Parkin mutations are a major cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). The impairment of protein quality control system together with defects in mitochondria and autophagy process are consequences of the lack of parkin, which leads to neurodegeneration. Little is known about the role of lipids in these alterations of cell functions. In the present study, parkin-mutant human skin primary fibroblasts have been considered as cellular model of PD to investigate on possible lipid alterations associated with the lack of parkin protein. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained from two unrelated PD patients with different parkin mutations and their lipid compositions were compared with that of two control fibroblasts. The lipid extracts of fibroblasts have been analyzed by combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). In parallel, we have performed direct MALDI-TOF/MS lipid analyses of intact fibroblasts by skipping lipid extraction steps. Results show that the proportions of some phospholipids and glycosphingolipids were altered in the lipid profiles of parkin-mutant fibroblasts. The detected higher level of gangliosides, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylserine could be linked to dysfunction of autophagy and mitochondrial turnover; in addition, the lysophosphatidylcholine increase could represent the marker of neuroinflammatory state, a well-known component of PD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Computational and Experimental Study of Neuroglobin and Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Lauren; Cho, Samuel; Kim-Shaprio, Daniel

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a hexacoordinated heme protein that is closely related to hemoglobin and myoglobin and normally found in the brain and nervous systems. It is involved in cellular oxygen homeostasis and reversibly binds to oxygen with a higher binding affinity than hemoglobin. To protect the brain tissue from hypoxic or ischemic conditions, Ngb increases oxygen availability. We have previously shown that a mutant form of Ngb reduces nitrite to nitric oxide 50x faster than myoglobin and 500x faster than hemoglobin. It also tightly binds to carbon monoxide (CO) with an association rate that is 500x faster than hemoglobin. To analyze the structure of neuroglobin and the characteristics causing these phenomena, we performed 3 sets of 1 microsecond molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of wild-type oxidized and reduced human Ngb and their C46A, C55A, H64L, and H64Q mutants. We also directly compare our MD simulations with time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. These studies will help identify treatments for diseases involving low nitric oxide availability and carbon monoxide poisoning. This research was supported by an NIH NSRA predoctoral fellowship in the Structural and Computational Biophysics Program training Grant (T32GM095440-05).

  3. Phenotype detection in morphological mutant mice using deformation features.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Liang, Xi; Kitamoto, Asanobu; Tamura, Masaru; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Brown, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale global efforts are underway to knockout each of the approximately 25,000 mouse genes and interpret their roles in shaping the mammalian embryo. Given the tremendous amount of data generated by imaging mutated prenatal mice, high-throughput image analysis systems are inevitable to characterize mammalian development and diseases. Current state-of-the-art computational systems offer only differential volumetric analysis of pre-defined anatomical structures between various gene-knockout mice strains. For subtle anatomical phenotypes, embryo phenotyping still relies on the laborious histological techniques that are clearly unsuitable in such big data environment. This paper presents a system that automatically detects known phenotypes and assists in discovering novel phenotypes in muCT images of mutant mice. Deformation features obtained from non-linear registration of mutant embryo to a normal consensus average image are extracted and analyzed to compute phenotypic and candidate phenotypic areas. The presented system is evaluated using C57BL/10 embryo images. All cases of ventricular septum defect and polydactyly, well-known to be present in this strain, are successfully detected. The system predicts potential phenotypic areas in the liver that are under active histological evaluation for possible phenotype of this mouse line.

  4. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve.

  5. Overexpression of mutant HSP27 causes axonal neuropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinho; Jung, Sung-Chul; Joo, Jaesoon; Choi, Yu-Ri; Moon, Hyo Won; Kwak, Geon; Yeo, Ha Kyung; Lee, Ji-Su; Ahn, Hye-Jee; Jung, Namhee; Hwang, Sunhee; Rheey, Jingeun; Woo, So-Youn; Kim, Ji Yon; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2015-06-19

    Mutations in heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSP27 or HSPB1) cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 F (CMT2F) according to unknown factors. Mutant HSP27 proteins affect axonal transport by reducing acetylated tubulin. We generated a transgenic mouse model overexpressing HSP27-S135F mutant protein driven by Cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early promoter. The mouse phenotype was similar to dHMN patients in that they exhibit motor neuropathy. To determine the phenotypic aberration of transgenic mice, behavior test, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electrophysiological study, and pathology were performed. Rotarod test showed that founder mice exhibited lowered motor performance. MRI also revealed marked fatty infiltration in the anterior and posterior compartments at calf level. Electrophysiologically, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) but not motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was reduced in the transgenic mice. Toluidine staining with semi-thin section of sciatic nerve showed the ratio of large myelinated axon fiber was reduced, which might cause reduced locomotion in the transgenic mice. Electron microscopy also revealed abundant aberrant myelination. Immunohistochemically, neuronal dysfunctions included elevated level of phosphorylated neurofilament and reduced level of acetylated tubulin in the sural nerve of transgenic mice. There was no additional phenotype besides motor neuronal defects. Overexpression of HSP27-S135F protein causes peripheral neuropathy. The mouse model can be applied to future development of therapeutic strategies for dHMN or CMT2F.

  6. Root-Growth Behavior of the Arabidopsis Mutant rgr11

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Jack L.; Turk, Ed; Johnson, Karin; Wolverton, Chris; Ishikawa, Hideo; Simmons, Carl; Söll, Deiter; Evans, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigated the kinetics of the gravitropic response of the Arabidopsis mutant rgr1 (reduced root gravitropism). Although the rate of curvature in rgr1, which is allelic to axr4, was smaller than in the wild type (ecotype Wassilewskija), curvature was initiated in the same region of the root, the distal elongation zone. The time lag for the response was unaffected in the mutant; however, the gravitropic response of rgr1 contained a feature not found in the wild type: when roots growing along the surface of an agar plate were gravistimulated, there was often an upward curvature that initiated in the central elongation zone. Because this response was dependent on the tactile environment of the root, it most likely resulted from the superposition of the waving/coiling phenomenon onto the gravitropic response. We found that the frequency of the waving pattern and circumnutation, a cyclic endogenous pattern of root growth, was the same in rgr1 and in the wild type, so the waving/coiling phenomenon is likely governed by circumnutation patterns. The amplitudes of these oscillations may then be selectively amplified by tactile stimulation to provide a directional preference to the slanting. PMID:9847088

  7. Craniofacial skeletal defects of adult zebrafish glypican 4 (knypek) mutants

    PubMed Central

    LeClair, Elizabeth E.; Mui, Stephanie R.; Huang, Angela; Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Topczewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan Glypican 4 (Gpc4) is part of the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, which is required for convergence and extension during zebrafish gastrulation. To observe Glypican 4-deficient phenotypes at later stages, we rescued gpc4−/− (knypek) homozygotes and raised them for more than one year. Adult mutants showed diverse cranial malformations of both dermal and endochondral bones, ranging from shortening of the rostral-most skull to loss of the symplectic. Additionally, the adult palatoquadrate cartilage was disorganized, with abnormal chondrocyte orientation. To understand how the palatoquadrate cartilage normally develops, we examined a juvenile series of wild type and mutant specimens. This identified two novel domains of elongated chondrocytes in the larval palatoquadrate, which normally form prior to endochondral ossification. In contrast, gpc4−/− larvae never form these domains, suggesting a failure of chondrocyte orientation, though not differentiation. Our findings implicate Gpc4 in the regulation of zebrafish cartilage and bone morphogenesis. PMID:19777561

  8. Treatment of MDR1 Mutant Dogs with Macrocyclic Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Joachim; Janko, Christina

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance gene MDR1, is an ATP-driven drug efflux pump which is highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier of vertebrates. Drug efflux of macrocyclic lactones by P-glycoprotein is highly relevant for the therapeutic safety of macrocyclic lactones, as thereby GABA-gated chloride channels, which are confined to the central nervous system in vertebrates, are protected from high drug concentrations that otherwise would induce neurological toxicity. A 4-bp deletion mutation exists in the MDR1 gene of many dog breeds such as the Collie and the Australian Shepherd, which results in the expression of a non-functional P-glycoprotein and is associated with multiple drug sensitivity. Accordingly, dogs with homozygous MDR1 mutation are in general prone to neurotoxicity by macrocyclic lactones due to their increased brain penetration. Nevertheless, treatment of these dogs with macrocyclic lactones does not inevitably result in neurological symptoms, since, the safety of treatment highly depends on the treatment indication, dosage, route of application, and the individual compound used as outlined in this review. Whereas all available macrocyclic lactones can safely be administered to MDR1 mutant dogs at doses usually used for heartworm prevention, these dogs will experience neurological toxicity following a high dose regimen which is common for mange treatment in dogs. Here, we review and discuss the neurotoxicological potential of different macrocyclic lactones as well as their treatment options in MDR1 mutant dogs. PMID:22039792

  9. The emergence of cooperation from a single cooperative mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Jonas; Melbinger, Anna; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Population structure is one central condition which promotes the stability of cooperation: If cooperators more likely interact with other cooperators (positive assortment), they keep most of their benefit for themselves and are less exploited by non-cooperators. However, positive assortment can only act successfully if cooperation is already well established in the population such that cooperative individuals can successfully assort. But how can cooperation emerge when starting with a single cooperative mutant? Here we study this issue for a generic situation of microbial systems where microbes regularly form new colonies and show strong population growth. We show how and when the dynamical interplay between colony formation, population growth and evolution within colonies can provoke the emergence of cooperation. In particular, the probability for a single cooperative mutant to succeed is robustly large when colony-formation is fast or comparable to the time-scale of growth within colonies; growth supports cooperation.[4pt] [1] A. Melbinger, J. Cremer, and E. Frey, Evolutionary game theory in growing populations, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 178101 (2010)[0pt] [2] J. Cremer, A. Melbinger, and E. Frey, Evolutionary and population dynamics: a coupled approach, arXiv:1108.2604

  10. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  11. Flavonoid accumulation patterns of transparent testa mutants of arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peer, W. A.; Brown, D. E.; Tague, B. W.; Muday, G. K.; Taiz, L.; Murphy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells.

  12. Flavonoid Accumulation Patterns of Transparent Testa Mutants of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Wendy Ann; Brown, Dana E.; Tague, Brian W.; Muday, Gloria K.; Taiz, Lincoln; Murphy, Angus S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells. PMID:11402185

  13. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOEpatents

    Kastner, Daniel L [Bethesda, MD; Aksentijevichh, Ivona [Bethesda, MD; Centola, Michael [Tacoma Park, MD; Deng, Zuoming [Gaithersburg, MD; Sood, Ramen [Rockville, MD; Collins, Francis S [Rockville, MD; Blake, Trevor [Laytonsville, MD; Liu, P Paul [Ellicott City, MD; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan [Los Angeles, CA; Gumucio, Deborah L [Ann Arbor, MI; Richards, Robert I [North Adelaide, AU; Ricke, Darrell O [San Diego, CA; Doggett, Norman A [Santa Cruz, NM; Pras, Mordechai [Tel-Hashomer, IL

    2003-09-30

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  14. Overexpression of SOS genes in ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad Jaktaji, Razieh; Pasand, Shirin

    2016-01-15

    Fluoroquinolones are important antibiotics for the treatment of urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli. Mutational studies have shown that ciprofloxacin, a member of fluoroquinolones induces SOS response and mutagenesis in pathogenic bacteria which in turn develop antibiotic resistance. However, inhibition of SOS response can increase recombination activity which in turn leads to genetic variation. The aim of this study was to measure 5 SOS genes expressions in nine E. coli mutants with different MICs for ciprofloxacin following exposure to ciprofloxacin. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative real time PCR. Gene alteration assessment was conducted by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Results showed that the expression of recA was increased in 5 mutants. This overexpression is not related to gene alteration, and enhances the expression of polB and umuCD genes encoding nonmutagenic and mutagenic polymerases, respectively. The direct relationship between the level of SOS expression and the level of resistance to ciprofloxacin was also indicated. It was concluded that novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits RecA activity would enhance the efficiency of common antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy Homeostasis Control in Drosophila Adipokinetic Hormone Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gáliková, Martina; Diesner, Max; Klepsatel, Peter; Hehlert, Philip; Xu, Yanjun; Bickmeyer, Iris; Predel, Reinhard; Kühnlein, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of biological functions under negative energy balance depends on mobilization of storage lipids and carbohydrates in animals. In mammals, glucagon and glucocorticoid signaling mobilizes energy reserves, whereas adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) play a homologous role in insects. Numerous studies based on AKH injections and correlative studies in a broad range of insect species established the view that AKH acts as master regulator of energy mobilization during development, reproduction, and stress. In contrast to AKH, the second peptide, which is processed from the Akh encoded prohormone [termed “adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptide” (APRP)] is functionally orphan. APRP is discussed as ecdysiotropic hormone or as scaffold peptide during AKH prohormone processing. However, as in the case of AKH, final evidence for APRP functions requires genetic mutant analysis. Here we employed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering to create AKH and AKH plus APRP-specific mutants in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Lack of APRP did not affect any of the tested steroid-dependent processes. Similarly, Drosophila AKH signaling is dispensable for ontogenesis, locomotion, oogenesis, and homeostasis of lipid or carbohydrate storage until up to the end of metamorphosis. During adulthood, however, AKH regulates body fat content and the hemolymph sugar level as well as nutritional and oxidative stress responses. Finally, we provide evidence for a negative autoregulatory loop in Akh gene regulation. PMID:26275422

  16. Cell-to-cell stimulation of movement in nonmotile mutants of Myxococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Kaiser, Dale

    1977-01-01

    A large number of nonmotile mutants of the gliding bacterium Myxococcus xanthus have been isolated and partly characterized. About [unk] of these mutants are conditional mutants of a novel kind: mutant cells become transiently motile after contact with nonmutant cells or with cells of a different mutant type. These “stimulatable” mutants fall into five phenotypic classes (types B, C, D, E, and F). Most mutants are nonstimulatable (type A) and never become motile, but type A cells (and wild-type cells) can stimulate cells of any of the other five types. Stimulatable mutants of different types are capable of stimulating each other. For example, in a mixture of B and C cells, both become motile. Linkage analysis using a generalized transducing phage has shown that each of types B, C, D, E, and F corresponds to a single distinct genetic locus. Type A mutants, by contrast, belong to at least 17 different loci. Stimulation depends on close apposition of interacting cells, because stimulation does not occur when contact between cells is prevented. It is possible that the stimulatable mutants are defective in components of the gliding mechanism that can be exchanged between cells. Alternatively, they may be defective in a system of cell communication controlling the coordinated cell movements observed in Myxococcus. Images PMID:16592422

  17. Defining the requirements for the pathogenic interaction between mutant calreticulin and MPL in MPN

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Baral, April J.; Beeson, Danielle; Rivera, Jeanne F.; Ko, Amy; Florescu, Natalie; Birrane, Gabriel; Chen, Edwin

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are phenotypic drivers in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated that mutant CALR binds to the thrombopoietin receptor MPL, and that the positive electrostatic charge of the mutant CALR C terminus is required for mutant CALR-mediated activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate that although binding between mutant CALR and MPL is required for mutant CALR to transform hematopoietic cells; binding alone is insufficient for cytokine independent growth. We further show that the threshold of positive charge in the mutant CALR C terminus influences both binding of mutant CALR to MPL and activation of MPL signaling. We find that mutant CALR binds to the extracellular domain of MPL and that 3 tyrosine residues within the intracellular domain of MPL are required to activate signaling. With respect to mutant CALR function, we show that its lectin-dependent function is required for binding to MPL and for cytokine independent growth, whereas its chaperone and polypeptide-binding functionalities are dispensable. Together, our findings provide additional insights into the mechanism of the pathogenic mutant CALR-MPL interaction in myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:29288169

  18. Defining the requirements for the pathogenic interaction between mutant calreticulin and MPL in MPN.

    PubMed

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S; Baral, April J; Beeson, Danielle; Rivera, Jeanne F; Ko, Amy; Florescu, Natalie; Birrane, Gabriel; Chen, Edwin; Mullally, Ann

    2018-02-15

    Mutations in calreticulin ( CALR ) are phenotypic drivers in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated that mutant CALR binds to the thrombopoietin receptor MPL, and that the positive electrostatic charge of the mutant CALR C terminus is required for mutant CALR-mediated activation of JAK-STAT signaling. Here we demonstrate that although binding between mutant CALR and MPL is required for mutant CALR to transform hematopoietic cells; binding alone is insufficient for cytokine independent growth. We further show that the threshold of positive charge in the mutant CALR C terminus influences both binding of mutant CALR to MPL and activation of MPL signaling. We find that mutant CALR binds to the extracellular domain of MPL and that 3 tyrosine residues within the intracellular domain of MPL are required to activate signaling. With respect to mutant CALR function, we show that its lectin-dependent function is required for binding to MPL and for cytokine independent growth, whereas its chaperone and polypeptide-binding functionalities are dispensable. Together, our findings provide additional insights into the mechanism of the pathogenic mutant CALR-MPL interaction in myeloproliferative neoplasms. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Exploring the regulatory role of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant protein on glioma stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lu, H-C; Ma, J; Zhuang, Z; Qiu, F; Cheng, H-L; Shi, J-X

    2016-08-01

    Glioma is the most lethal form of cancer that originates mostly from the brain and less frequently from the spine. Glioma is characterized by abnormal regulation of glial cell differentiation. The severity of the glioma was found to be relaxed in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutant. The present study focused on histological discrimination and regulation of cancer stem cell between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. Histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting techniques are used to analyze the glioma nature and variation in glioma stem cells that differ between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. The aggressive form of non-IDH1 mutant glioma shows abnormal cellular histological variation with prominent larger nucleus along with abnormal clustering of cells. The longer survival form of IDH1 mutant glioma has a control over glioma stem cell proliferation. Immunohistochemistry with stem cell markers, CD133 and EGFRvIII are used to demonstrate that the IDH1 mutant glioma shows limited dependence on cancer stem cells and it shows marked apoptotic signals in TUNEL assay to regulate abnormal cells. The non-IDH1 mutant glioma failed to regulate misbehaving cells and it promotes cancer stem cell proliferation. Our finding supports that the IDH1 mutant glioma has a regulatory role in glioma stem cells and their survival.

  20. Defined single-gene and multi-gene deletion mutant collections in Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Porwollik, Steffen; Santiviago, Carlos A; Cheng, Pui; Long, Fred; Desai, Prerak; Fredlund, Jennifer; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Silva, Cecilia A; Chu, Weiping; Chen, Xin; Canals, Rocío; Reynolds, M Megan; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Shields, Christine; Cui, Ping; Guo, Jinbai; Zheng, Yi; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Maple, Aimee; Ragoza, Yury; Blondel, Carlos J; Valenzuela, Camila; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We constructed two collections of targeted single gene deletion (SGD) mutants and two collections of targeted multi-gene deletion (MGD) mutants in Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium 14028s. The SGD mutant collections contain (1), 3517 mutants in which a single gene is replaced by a cassette containing a kanamycin resistance (KanR) gene oriented in the sense direction (SGD-K), and (2), 3376 mutants with a chloramphenicol resistance gene (CamR) oriented in the antisense direction (SGD-C). A combined total of 3773 individual genes were deleted across these SGD collections. The MGD collections contain mutants bearing deletions of contiguous regions of three or more genes and include (3), 198 mutants spanning 2543 genes replaced by a KanR cassette (MGD-K), and (4), 251 mutants spanning 2799 genes replaced by a CamR cassette (MGD-C). Overall, 3476 genes were deleted in at least one MGD collection. The collections with different antibiotic markers permit construction of all viable combinations of mutants in the same background. Together, the libraries allow hierarchical screening of MGDs for different phenotypic followed by screening of SGDs within the target MGD regions. The mutants of these collections are stored at BEI Resources (www.beiresources.org) and publicly available.

  1. Value of bilirubin oxidase and its mutants in the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao; Luo, Zhi-Ying

    2005-11-01

    To elucidate the significance of the coordination amino acid residues in bilirubin oxidase (BO) and their kinetic characteristics, and evaluate whether BO mutants may serve as better diagnostic agent for hyperbilirubinemia. The BO mutants I402G and C457S were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed by amino acid sequence analysis. Ru-incorporated C457S mutant was obtained by direct incubation of ruthenium compounds with the mutant. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the recombinant BO and the mutants were investigated, and the enzyme kinetics of the recombinant BO and I402G mutant were measured with bilirubin as the substrate at 25 degrees C. The BO mutants were expressed and purified successfully. The mutant I402G showed low enzyme activity, and had C457S virtually no enzyme activity. Nevertheless Ru-incorporation conferred higher enzyme activity to C457S mutant. The enzyme kinetic investigations revealed that the kinetic parameter k(cat) of the recombinant BO and I402G mutant was 235.8 min(-1) and 6.9 min(-1), respectively, suggesting higher enzyme activity of the recombinant BO. The coordinating amino acids have important significance in maintaining the integrity of active centers and enzyme activities of recombinant BO and its mutants. The enzyme activities of the mutants I402G and C457S are much lower than those of recombinant BO, therefore they are not appropriate for diagnostic purpose. Ru-incorporation facilitates the formation of a new intact active center in C457S mutant, which therefore acquires enzyme activity.

  2. Selective chaperone effect of aminocyclitol derivatives on G202R and other mutant glucocerebrosidases causing Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Vinardell, Jenny; Díaz, Lucía; Gutiérrez-de Terán, Hugo; Sánchez-Ollé, Gessamí; Bujons, Jordi; Michelakakis, Helen; Mavridou, Irene; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Delgado, Antonio; Grinberg, Daniel; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Casas, Josefina

    2014-09-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder characterized by the accumulation of glucosylceramide as a result of a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Several competitive glucocerebrosidase inhibitors are able to act as pharmacological chaperones for an efficient rescue of the mutated, misfolded forms of the enzyme. Along this line, we report in this work on the ability of several aminocyclitols to increase the residual glucocerebrosidase activity in patient fibroblasts with different genotypes. Some of the compounds were slightly active on fibroblasts bearing some mutations, including the highly prevalent N370S mutation. All compounds were highly active as enzyme activity enhancers on fibroblasts from Gaucher disease patients containing the G202R mutation. Moreover, using the novel tagged sphingolipid ω-azidosphingosine, a reduction in the tagged glucosylceramide accumulation was also observed for selected aminocyclitols. Attempts to explain the activity impairment observed in glucocerebrosidase bearing the G202R mutation by comparative molecular dynamic studies on wild type and the G202R mutated proteins (free and isofagomine-bound, in both cases) were unsuccessful. Under the simulation conditions used, no clear effect of the G202R mutation neither over the global structure of the protein nor on the loops that constitute the glucocerebrosidase active site was observed. Since the G202R residue is located on the protein surface, altered protein-membrane or protein-protein interactions could account for the observed differences. In conclusion, we have tested novel compounds that have shown some chaperone effect on particular glucocerebrosidase mutant enzymes, supporting the enhancement therapy as an alternative approach for Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymatic characterization of novel arylsulfatase A variants using human arylsulfatase A-deficient immortalized mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Böhringer, Judith; Santer, René; Schumacher, Neele; Gieseke, Friederike; Cornils, Kerstin; Pechan, Maria; Kustermann-Kuhn, Birgit; Handgretinger, Rupert; Schöls, Ludger; Harzer, Klaus; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Müller, Ingo

    2017-11-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the ARSA gene leading to arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency and causing sulfatide accumulation. Main symptoms of the disease are progressive demyelination, neurological dysfunction, and reduced life expectancy. To date, more than 200 different ARSA variants have been reported in MLD patients. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of seven novel pathogenic variants (c.98T > C, c.195delC, c.229G > C, c.545C > G, c.674A > G, c.852T > A, and c.1274A > G), which were found when sequencing a cohort of 31 German MLD families. For that purpose, the ARSA cDNAs carrying the respective mutations inserted by site-directed mutagenesis were cloned into a MigR1 (MSCV, IRES, GFP, retrovirus-1) vector. The constructs were overexpressed using retroviral gene transfer in immortalized, human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells prepared from a patient deficient in ARSA activity (late infantile MLD). In this novel ARSA -/- cell system, the seven ARSA mutants showed ARSA activity of less than 10% when compared with wild type, which is evidence for the pathogenicity of all seven variants. In conclusion, the system of ARSA -/- -immortalized MSC turned out to be a helpful novel tool for the biochemical characterization of ARSA variants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Alcohol-tolerant mutants of cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 obtained by single-cell mutant screening system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Sayuri; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Kanamoto, Yuki; Shimizu, Kazunori; Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Hanai, Taizo; Murakami, Akio; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    Enhancement of alcohol tolerance in microorganisms is an important strategy for improving bioalcohol productivity. Although cyanobacteria can be used as a promising biocatalyst to produce various alcohols directly from CO 2 , low productivity, and low tolerance against alcohols are the main issues to be resolved. Nevertheless, to date, a mutant with increasing alcohol tolerance has rarely been reported. In this study, we attempted to select isopropanol (IPA)-tolerant mutants of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 using UV-C-induced random mutagenesis, followed by enrichment of the tolerant candidates in medium containing 10 g/L IPA and screening of the cells with a high growth rate in the single cell culture system in liquid medium containing 10 g/L IPA. We successfully acquired the most tolerant strain, SY1043, which maintains the ability to grow in medium containing 30 g/L IPA. The photosynthetic oxygen-evolving activities of SY1043 were almost same in cells after 72 h incubation under light with or without 10 g/L IPA, while the activity of the wild-type was remarkably decreased after the incubation with IPA. SY1043 also showed higher tolerance to ethanol, 1-butanol, isobutanol, and 1-pentanol than the wild type. These results suggest that SY1043 would be a promising candidate to improve alcohol production using cyanobacteria. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1771-1778. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A rare case of Addison's disease, hepatitis, thyreoiditis, positive IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and partial IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baleva, Marta P; Mihaylova, Snejina; Yankova, Petja; Atanasova, Iliana; Nikolova-Vlahova, Milena; Naumova, Elissaveta

    2016-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (IgAD) is the most prevalent type of primary immune deficiencies, but partial IgA deficiency is even more common. Addison's disease is a rare condition associated with primary adrenal insufficiency due to infection or autoimmune destruction of the adrenals. The association between IgA deficiency and Addison's disease is very rare. We observed a 22-year-old male patient with marked darkening of the skin, especially on the palms and areolae, jaundice on the skin and sclera, astheno-adynamia, hypotension (80/50 mm Hg), and pain in the right hypochondrium. The laboratory investigations revealed increased serum levels of total and indirect bilirubin, AST, ALT, GGT and LDH, negative HBsAg, anti-HBc IgM, anti-HCV and anti-HAV IgM, very low serum IgA levels (0.16 g/l) with normal IgG and IgM, negative ANA, ANCA, AMA, LKM-1, anti-GAD-60, anti-IA-2, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, a mild increase in anti-TPO antibodies titer, a marked increase in IgG anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, with no typical changes in cellular immunity, negative T-SPOT-TB test, HLA - A*01; B*08; DRB1*03; DQB1*02, karyotype - 46, XY. We present a rare case of partial IgA deficiency with Addison's disease, hepatitis, thyroiditis and positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. IgAD and some autoimmune disorders share several predisposing HLA genes, thus explaining the increased prevalence of IgAD in certain patient groups.

  6. Cadmium-sensitive, cad1 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana are phytochelatin deficient.

    PubMed Central

    Howden, R; Goldsbrough, P B; Andersen, C R; Cobbett, C S

    1995-01-01

    An allelic series of cad1, cadmium-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, was isolated. These mutants were sensitive to cadmium to different extents and were deficient in their ability to form cadmium-peptide complexes as detected by gel-filtration chromatography. Each mutant was deficient in its ability to accumulate phytochelatins (PCs) as detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and the amount of PCs accumulated by each mutant correlated with its degree of sensitivity to cadmium. The mutants had wild-type levels of glutathione, the substrate for PC biosynthesis, and in vitro assays demonstrated that each of the mutants was deficient in PC synthase activity. These results demonstrate conclusively the importance of PCs for cadmium tolerance in plants. PMID:7770517

  7. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  8. Repair of Ultraviolet Radiation Damage in Sensitive Mutants of Micrococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, B. E. B.

    1969-01-01

    Various aspects of the repair of ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced damage were compared in wild-type Micrococcus radiodurans and two UV-sensitive mutants. Unlike the wild type, the mutants are more sensitive to radiation at 265 nm than at 280 nm. The delay in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis following exposure to UV is about seven times as long in the mutants as in the wild type. All three strains excise UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from their DNA, although the rate at which cytosine-thymine dimers are excised is slower in the mutants. The three strains also mend the single-strand breaks that appear in the irradiated DNA as a result of dimer excision, although the process is less efficient in the mutants. It is suggested that the increased sensitivity of the mutants to UV radiation may be caused by a partial defect in the second step of dimer excision. PMID:5773016

  9. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A., E-mail: jab@ysbl.york.ac.uk; Prabhune, Asmita

    The production, crystallization and characterization of three inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase from B. sphaericus in their respective precursor and processed forms are reported. The space groups are different for the native enzyme and the mutants. The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants willmore » provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme.« less

  10. Complete Protection against Influenza Virus H1N1 Strain A/PR/8/34 Challenge in Mice Immunized with Non-Adjuvanted Novirhabdovirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Ronan N.; Mérour, Emilie; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Brémont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Novirhabdoviruses like Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) are fish-infecting Rhabdoviruses belonging to the Mononegavirales order. By reverse genetics, we previously showed that a recombinant VHSV expressing the West Nile Virus (WNV) E glycoprotein could serve as a vaccine platform against WNV. In the current study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of the Novirhabdovirus platform as a vaccine against influenza virus. Recombinant Novirhabdoviruses, rVHSV-HA and rIHNV-HA, expressing at the viral surface the hemagglutinin HA ectodomain were generated and used to immunized mice. We showed that mice immunized with either, rVHSV-HA or rIHNV-HA, elicited a strong neutralizing antibody response against influenza virus. A complete protection was conferred to the immunized mice when challenged with a lethal dose of influenza H1N1 A/PR/8/34 virus. Furthermore we showed that although acting as inert antigen in mice, since naturally inactivated over 20°C, mice immunized with rVHSV-HA or rIHNV-HA in the absence of adjuvant were also completely protected from a lethal challenge. Novirhabdoviruses platform are of particular interest as vaccines for mammals since they are cost effective to produce, relatively easy to generate and very effective to protect immunized animals. PMID:27711176

  11. Urinary bisphenol A is associated with dysregulation of HPA-axis function in pregnant women: Findings from the APrON cohort study.

    PubMed

    Giesbrecht, Gerald F; Liu, Jiaying; Ejaredar, Maede; Dewey, Deborah; Letourneau, Nicole; Campbell, Tavis; Martin, Jonathan W

    2016-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is associated with dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in rodents, but evidence in humans is lacking. To determine whether BPA exposure during pregnancy is associated with dysregulation of the HPA-axis, we examined the association between urinary BPA concentrations and diurnal salivary cortisol in pregnant women. Secondary analyses investigated whether the association between BPA and cortisol was dependent on fetal sex. Diurnal salivary cortisol and urinary BPA were collected during pregnancy from 174 women in a longitudinal cohort study, the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study. Associations between BPA and daytime cortisol and the cortisol awakening response (CAR) were estimated using mixed models after adjusting for covariates. Higher concentrations of total BPA uncorrected for urinary creatinine were associated with dysregulation of the daytime cortisol pattern, including reduced cortisol at waking, β=-.055, 95% CI (-.100, -.010) and a flatter daytime pattern, β=.014, 95% CI (.006, .022) and β=-.0007 95% CI (-.001, -.0002) for the linear and quadratic slopes, respectively. Effect sizes in creatinine corrected BPA models were slightly smaller. None of the interactions between fetal sex and BPA were significant (all 95% CI's include zero). These findings provide the first human evidence suggesting that BPA exposure is associated with dysregulation of HPA-axis function during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. L'endométriose pariétale cicatricielle après césarienne: une entité rare

    PubMed Central

    El Fahssi, Mohammed; Lomdo, Massama; Bounaim, Ahmed; Ali, Abdelmounaim Ait; Sair, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    L'endométriose de la paroi est une entité clinique rare, dont la physiopathologie demeure imprécise. Elle survient le plus souvent après une intervention chirurgicale gynécologique ou obstétricale. Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente présentant une douleur cyclique, au niveau de la cicatrice de césarienne, Avec à l'examen clinique une masse de 5cm localisée au niveau de la fosse iliaque droite. la tomodensitométrie montre une masse de densité tissulaire de 45mm de grand axe. D'où la décision d'excision large de la lésion dont l’étude anatomopathologique confirme le diagnostic d'endométriose pariétale. Les suites postopératoires étaient simples avec un recul de 20 mois sans récidive de la masse ni de la douleur. A travers notre cas, nous insisterons sur les caractéristiques de cette pathologie, ce qui permettra au praticien de comprendre l'intérêt du diagnostic et de la prise en charge précoce de cette affection ainsi que la possibilité de sa prévention au cours de chaque chirurgie gynécologique ou obstétricale. PMID:27642418

  13. Selective targeting of KRAS-Mutant cells by miR-126 through repression of multiple genes essential for the survival of KRAS-Mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Toshifumi; Jones, Matthew F.; Subramanian, Murugan; Li, Xiao Ling; Ou, Oliver; Zhu, Yuelin; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M.; Hussain, S. Perwez; Gaedcke, Jochen; Ried, Thomas; Luo, Ji; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lal, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of hundreds of genes. However, identifying the critical targets within a miRNA-regulated gene network is challenging. One approach is to identify miRNAs that exert a context-dependent effect, followed by expression profiling to determine how specific targets contribute to this selective effect. In this study, we performed miRNA mimic screens in isogenic KRAS-Wild-type (WT) and KRAS-Mutant colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines to identify miRNAs selectively targeting KRAS-Mutant cells. One of the miRNAs we identified as a selective inhibitor of the survival of multiple KRAS-Mutant CRC lines was miR-126. In KRAS-Mutant cells, miR-126 over-expression increased the G1 compartment, inhibited clonogenicity and tumorigenicity, while exerting no effect on KRAS-WT cells. Unexpectedly, the miR-126-regulated transcriptome of KRAS-WT and KRAS-Mutant cells showed no significant differences. However, by analyzing the overlap between miR-126 targets with the synthetic lethal genes identified by RNAi in KRAS-Mutant cells, we identified and validated a subset of miR-126-regulated genes selectively required for the survival and clonogenicity of KRAS-Mutant cells. Our strategy therefore identified critical target genes within the miR-126-regulated gene network. We propose that the selective effect of miR-126 on KRAS-Mutant cells could be utilized for the development of targeted therapy for KRAS mutant tumors. PMID:25245095

  14. The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency in 1994 on an atoll of the Marshall Islands and its relationship to locally grown food.

    PubMed

    Dickson, J; Hunt, D D

    2001-03-01

    In an area of the world not previously studied for the presence of nutritional deficiencies, this study conducted in 1994, examined the prevalence of Vitamin A deficiency on a representative atoll of the Marshall Islands. All children ages three through ten living on Mili atoll were surveyed. The study was conducted house-to-house with all 38 subjects on the atoll voluntarily enrolling in the study. Vitamin A status was assessed by conjunctival impression cytology with transfer ([CT), clinical ophthalmic signs, and nutritional survey in all children ages three through ten living on Mili atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Forty-seven percent had xerophthannia (5% with XN, 39% with XN + XIA, and 3% with XN + XIB). More than three-quarters (78%) were ICT abnormal, indicating 31% of the population had mild sub-clinical vitamin A deficiency. Eighty-six percent of the children had not received the U.S. recommended daily allowance of vitamin A in the previous week. Oiven the World Health Organization's published guidelines that anything greater than a 1% prevalence, Vitamin A deficiency on Mili atoll may be classified as a significant public health problem.

  15. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age. PMID:27626474

  16. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  17. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Sordaria macrospora Mutants Identifies Developmental Genes.

    PubMed

    Nowrousian, Minou; Teichert, Ines; Masloff, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    The study of mutants to elucidate gene functions has a long and successful history; however, to discover causative mutations in mutants that were generated by random mutagenesis often takes years of laboratory work and requires previously generated genetic and/or physical markers, or resources like DNA libraries for complementation. Here, we present an alternative method to identify defective genes in developmental mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora through Illumina/Solexa whole-genome sequencing. We sequenced pooled DNA from progeny of crosses of three mutants and the wild type and were able to pinpoint the causative mutations in the mutant strains through bioinformatics analysis. One mutant is a spore color mutant, and the mutated gene encodes a melanin biosynthesis enzyme. The causative mutation is a G to A change in the first base of an intron, leading to a splice defect. The second mutant carries an allelic mutation in the pro41 gene encoding a protein essential for sexual development. In the mutant, we detected a complex pattern of deletion/rearrangements at the pro41 locus. In the third mutant, a point mutation in the stop codon of a transcription factor-encoding gene leads to the production of immature fruiting bodies. For all mutants, transformation with a wild type-copy of the affected gene restored the wild-type phenotype. Our data demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing of mutant strains is a rapid method to identify developmental genes in an organism that can be genetically crossed and where a reference genome sequence is available, even without prior mapping information.

  18. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Sordaria macrospora Mutants Identifies Developmental Genes

    PubMed Central

    Nowrousian, Minou; Teichert, Ines; Masloff, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The study of mutants to elucidate gene functions has a long and successful history; however, to discover causative mutations in mutants that were generated by random mutagenesis often takes years of laboratory work and requires previously generated genetic and/or physical markers, or resources like DNA libraries for complementation. Here, we present an alternative method to identify defective genes in developmental mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora through Illumina/Solexa whole-genome sequencing. We sequenced pooled DNA from progeny of crosses of three mutants and the wild type and were able to pinpoint the causative mutations in the mutant strains through bioinformatics analysis. One mutant is a spore color mutant, and the mutated gene encodes a melanin biosynthesis enzyme. The causative mutation is a G to A change in the first base of an intron, leading to a splice defect. The second mutant carries an allelic mutation in the pro41 gene encoding a protein essential for sexual development. In the mutant, we detected a complex pattern of deletion/rearrangements at the pro41 locus. In the third mutant, a point mutation in the stop codon of a transcription factor-encoding gene leads to the production of immature fruiting bodies. For all mutants, transformation with a wild type-copy of the affected gene restored the wild-type phenotype. Our data demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing of mutant strains is a rapid method to identify developmental genes in an organism that can be genetically crossed and where a reference genome sequence is available, even without prior mapping information. PMID:22384404

  19. Benomyl-resistant mutant strain of Trichoderma sp. with increased mycoparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Olejníková, P; Ondrusová, Z; Krystofová, S; Hudecová, D

    2010-01-01

    Application of UV radiation to the strain Trichoderma sp. T-bt (isolated from lignite) resulted in the T-brm mutant which was resistant to the systemic fungicide benomyl. The tub2 gene sequence in the T-brm mutant differed from the parent as well as the collection strain (replacing tyrosine with histidine in the TUB2 protein). Under in vitro conditions this mutant exhibited a higher mycoparasitic activity toward phytopathogenic fungi.

  20. Immunological Study of the O-Antigens of Streptomycin-Dependent Mutants of Salmonella

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-23

    AD/A-O00 361 IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE O-ANTIGENS OF STREPTOMYCIN-DEPENDENT MUTANTS OF SALMONELLA L. S. Edvabnaya, et al Foreign Technology Division...U. S. Air Force SREPORT TITLE IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE 0-ANTIGENS OF STREPTOMYCIN-DEPENDENT MUTANTS OF SALMONELLA 4 DCESCRIPTIVIE NOTES (?T’pe of...THE O-ANTIGENS OF STREPTOMYCIN-DEPENDENT MUTANTS OF SALMONELLA By: L. S. Yedvabnaya, Ye. S. Stanislavskiy, and V. V. Sergeyev Englihs pages: 10 Source

  1. Mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} identified in MODY3 and MODY5 downregulate DPP-IV gene expression in Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Ning; Laboratory of Neurochemistry, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto; Adachi, Tetsuya

    2006-08-04

    Dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a well-documented drug target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1{alpha} and HNF-1{beta}, known as the causal genes of MODY3 and MODY5, respectively, have been reported to be involved in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression. But, it is not completely clear (i) that they play roles in regulation of DPP-IV gene expression, and (ii) whether DPP-IV gene activity is changed by mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} in MODY3 and MODY5. To explore these questions, we investigated transactivation effects of wild HNF-1{alpha} and 13 mutant HNF-1{alpha}, as well as wild HNF-1{beta} and 2more » mutant HNF-1{beta}, on DPP-IV promoter luciferase gene in Caco-2 cells by means of a transient experiment. Both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} significantly transactivated DPP-IV promoter, but mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} exhibited low transactivation activity. Moreover, to study whether mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} change endogenous DPP-IV enzyme activity, we produced four stable cell lines from Caco-2 cells, in which wild HNF-1{alpha} or wild HNF-1{beta}, or else respective dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC or dominant-negative mutant HNF-1{beta}R177X, was stably expressed. We found that DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity were significantly increased in wild HNF-1{alpha} cells and wild HNF-1{beta} cells, whereas they decreased in HNF-1{alpha}T539fsdelC cells and HNF-1{beta}R177X cells, compared with DPP-IV gene expression and enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that both wild HNF-1{alpha} and wild HNF-1{beta} have a stimulatory effect on DPP-IV gene expression, but that mutant HNF-1{alpha} and mutant HNF-1{beta} attenuate the stimulatory effect.« less

  2. Validating regulatory predictions from diverse bacteria with mutant fitness data

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, Shiori; Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.

    Although transcriptional regulation is fundamental to understanding bacterial physiology, the targets of most bacterial transcription factors are not known. Comparative genomics has been used to identify likely targets of some of these transcription factors, but these predictions typically lack experimental support. Here, we used mutant fitness data, which measures the importance of each gene for a bacterium's growth across many conditions, to test regulatory predictions from RegPrecise, a curated collection of comparative genomics predictions. Because characterized transcription factors often have correlated fitness with one of their targets (either positively or negatively), correlated fitness patterns provide support for the comparative genomicsmore » predictions. At a false discovery rate of 3%, we identified significant cofitness for at least one target of 158 TFs in 107 ortholog groups and from 24 bacteria. Thus, high-throughput genetics can be used to identify a high-confidence subset of the sequence-based regulatory predictions.« less

  3. Validating regulatory predictions from diverse bacteria with mutant fitness data

    DOE PAGES

    Sagawa, Shiori; Price, Morgan N.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; ...

    2017-05-24

    Although transcriptional regulation is fundamental to understanding bacterial physiology, the targets of most bacterial transcription factors are not known. Comparative genomics has been used to identify likely targets of some of these transcription factors, but these predictions typically lack experimental support. Here, we used mutant fitness data, which measures the importance of each gene for a bacterium's growth across many conditions, to test regulatory predictions from RegPrecise, a curated collection of comparative genomics predictions. Because characterized transcription factors often have correlated fitness with one of their targets (either positively or negatively), correlated fitness patterns provide support for the comparative genomicsmore » predictions. At a false discovery rate of 3%, we identified significant cofitness for at least one target of 158 TFs in 107 ortholog groups and from 24 bacteria. Thus, high-throughput genetics can be used to identify a high-confidence subset of the sequence-based regulatory predictions.« less

  4. Characterization of Cytokinetic Mutants Using Small Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Smertenko, Andrei; Moschou, Panagiotis; Zhang, Laining; Fahy, Deirdre; Bozhkov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis is a powerful paradigm for addressing fundamental questions of plant biology including molecular mechanisms of development, cell division, cell signaling, membrane trafficking, cell wall synthesis, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Genetics was instrumental in identification of proteins regulating cytokinesis. Characterization of mutant lines generated using forward or reverse genetics includes microscopic analysis for defects in cell division. Typically, failure of cytokinesis results in appearance of multinucleate cells, formation of cell wall stubs, and isotropic cell expansion in the root elongation zone. Small fluorescent probes served as a very effective tool for the detection of cytokinetic defects. Such probes stain living or formaldehyde-fixed specimens avoiding complex preparatory steps. Although resolution of the fluorescence probes is inferior to electron microscopy, the procedure is fast, easy, and does not require expensive materials or equipment. This chapter describes techniques for staining DNA with the probes DAPI and SYTO82, for staining membranes with FM4-64, and for staining cell wall with propidium iodide.

  5. Microscale insights into pneumococcal antibiotic mutant selection windows

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Robin A.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae shows alarming rates of antibiotic resistance emergence. The basic requirements for de novo resistance emergence are poorly understood in the pneumococcus. Here we systematically analyse the impact of antibiotics on S. pneumoniae at concentrations that inhibit wild type cells, that is, within the mutant selection window. We identify discrete growth-inhibition profiles for bacteriostatic and bactericidal compounds, providing a predictive framework for distinction between the two classifications. Cells treated with bacteriostatic agents show continued gene expression activity, and real-time mutation assays link this activity to the development of genotypic resistance. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that antibiotic-susceptible pneumococci display remarkable growth and death bistability patterns in response to many antibiotics. We furthermore capture the rise of subpopulations with decreased susceptibility towards cell wall synthesis inhibitors (heteroresisters). We show that this phenomenon is epigenetically inherited, and that heteroresistance potentiates the accumulation of genotypic resistance. PMID:26514094

  6. The Phenotype performance of M3 red rice mutant (Oryza sativa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, N.; Sjahril, R.; Riadi, M.; Arbie, F.

    2018-05-01

    Local rice genotype generally has colour, flavour and scent more preferred by consumers, yet unfortunately it has long-lived planting period and low production. Therefore, the plant breeding practices in rice needs to be implemented for better rice varieties which are superior in terms of both quality and quantity. Our findings describe the growth character performance and the production of red rice mutant from M3 generation. This study was conducted in the Agriculture Faculty wetlands, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, by using ANOVA test with some red rice mutant genotypes i.e. 7 genotypes mutants (G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6 and G7) and controls/parent-plants (not the mutant). Results show that there were difference in growth performance and production of red rice mutant. Each parameter observed on each genotype had different results. Mutants produced best response in tillers production were G4 mutant with the tillers grain weight at 99.2 g, whereas by the results of the analysis of rank, mutants showed the best overall response were found in G6 mutants.

  7. Tissue-Specific Profiling Reveals Transcriptome Alterations in Arabidopsis Mutants Lacking Morphological Phenotypes[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marissa; Bruex, Angela; Kainkaryam, Raghunandan M.; Zheng, Xiaohua; Huang, Ling; Woolf, Peter J.; Schiefelbein, John

    2013-01-01

    Traditional genetic analysis relies on mutants with observable phenotypes. Mutants lacking visible abnormalities may nevertheless exhibit molecular differences useful for defining gene function. To examine this, we analyzed tissue-specific transcript profiles from Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor gene mutants with known roles in root epidermis development, but lacking a single-gene mutant phenotype due to genetic redundancy. We discovered substantial transcriptional changes in each mutant, preferentially affecting root epidermal genes in a manner consistent with the known double mutant effects. Furthermore, comparing transcript profiles of single and double mutants, we observed remarkable variation in the sensitivity of target genes to the loss of one or both paralogous genes, including preferential effects on specific branches of the epidermal gene network, likely reflecting the pathways of paralog subfunctionalization during evolution. In addition, we analyzed the root epidermal transcriptome of the transparent testa glabra2 mutant to clarify its role in the network. These findings provide insight into the molecular basis of genetic redundancy and duplicate gene diversification at the level of a specific gene regulatory network, and they demonstrate the usefulness of tissue-specific transcript profiling to define gene function in mutants lacking informative visible changes in phenotype. PMID:24014549

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Sex-Linked Female-Sterile Mutants in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Gans, Madeleine; Audit, Claudie; Masson, Michele

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments described was to identify X chromosome genes functioning mainly or exclusively during oogenesis. Two mutagenesis experiments were carried out with ethyl methane sulfonate. Following treatment inducing 60% lethals, 9% of the treated X chromosomes carried a female sterility mutation which did not otherwise seriously affect viability. Among —95 isolated mutants, 19 were heat-sensitive and 5 cold-sensitive. The mutants have been classified as follows: I (16 mutants; 12 complementation groups): the females laid few or no eggs; the defect concerned either ovulation or oogenesis. II (37 mutants; 18 complementation groups): the female laid morphologically abnormal eggs, often with increased membrane permeability. III A (13 mutants; at least 8 complementation groups): the homozygous females were sterile if mated to mutant males; their progeny (homo- and hemizygous) died at a late embryonic stage (11 mutants), at the larval stage (1 mutant) or at the pupal stage (1 mutant). However fertility was partly restored by breeding to wild-type males as shown by survival of some heterozygous descendants. III B (29 mutants; 22 complementation groups): the fertility of the females was not restored by breeding to a wild-type male. Most of the eggs of 13 of the mutants died at a late stage of embryogenesis. The eggs of the others ceased development earlier or, perhaps, remained unfertilized. The distribution of the number of mutants per complementation group led to an estimation of a total of about 150 X-linked genes involved in female fertility. The females of three mutants, heat-sensitive and totally sterile at 29°, produced at a lower temperature descendants morphologically abnormal or deprived of germ cells. Three other mutants not described in detail showed a reduction in female fertility with many descendants lacking germ cells. A desirable mutant which was not recovered was one with normal fertile females producing descendants which, regardless of

  9. Growth and sporulation of a pyrimidine spore color mutant of Sordaria fimicola.

    PubMed

    el-Ani, A S

    1967-04-07

    A nonautonomous spore color mutant of Sordaria fimicola is a pyrimidine auxotroph that produces hyaline nonviable ascospores. Uracil, uridine, and cytidine are more effective growth factors than cytosine and thymine and, in high concentrations, render the mutant self-fertile by inducing the ascospores to resume development and maturation. Crosses with the unlinked arginine non-autonomus spore color mutant st-59 yielded the double mutant st-59 pyr that requires both arginine and a pyrimidine for growth, which indicates a lack of suppression of the pyrimidine requirement by the arginine locus.

  10. Isolation and preliminary characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants of influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, A; Tobita, K; Kilbourne, E D

    1972-10-01

    Isolation of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants was attempted from the WSN strain of influenza A virus which was grown and assayed in MDBK cells. After growth of wild-type virus in the presence of 5-fluorouracil, 15 ts mutants were selected for which the ratio of plaquing efficiency at 39.5 C to that at 33 C was 10(-3) or less. In pairwise crosses of ts mutants, recombination and complementation were either very efficient or undetectable. It is suggested, therefore, that the viral genome consists of physically discrete units and recombination occurs as an exchange of these units. All 15 mutants have been assigned with certainty into five recombination groups. Three mutants are suspected to be double mutants. Any two complementing mutants always recombined with each other, and noncomplementing mutants did not recombine. In physiological tests, mutants showed diverse patterns of functional defects at the nonpermissive temperature. However, it was not always possible to correlate these physiological defects with the results of genetic characterization.

  11. Aggressive behavior of the white-eye mutant crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Sakura, Midori; Watanabe, T; Aonuma, H

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior of white-eye mutant crickets was investigated and compared with that of wild-type crickets. In the dark, wild-type pairs performed long-lasting fights with significantly higher aggressive levels compared to those in the light. In contrast, fights between two white-eye mutants were not significantly different with those between two wild-type crickets both in duration and the aggressive levels. Ethograms of aggressive behavior showed that the mutants could show typical sequentially escalating fight with the same behavioral categories as the wild-type crickets. These results indicate that the white-eye mutants are able to express normal aggressive behavior.

  12. Cloning, preparation and preliminary crystallographic studies of penicillin V acylase autoproteolytic processing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, P. Manish; Brannigan, James A.; Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, G. Guy; Suresh, C. G.

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization of three catalytically inactive mutants of penicillin V acylase (PVA) from Bacillus sphaericus in precursor and processed forms is reported. The mutant proteins crystallize in different primitive monoclinic space groups that are distinct from the crystal forms for the native enzyme. Directed mutants and clone constructs were designed to study the post-translational autoproteolytic processing of PVA. The catalytically inactive mutants will provide three-dimensional structures of precursor PVA forms, plus open a route to the study of enzyme–substrate complexes for this industrially important enzyme. PMID:16508111

  13. The pathogenicity of thymidine kinase-deficient mutants of herpes simplex virus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Field, H. J.; Wildy, P.

    1978-01-01

    The pathogenicity for mice of two mutants of herpes simplex virus (type 1 and type 2), which fail to induce thymidine kinase, were compared with their respective parent strains. The mutants were much less virulent than the parents following either intracerebral or peripheral inoculation. The replication of the virus at the site of inoculation and its progression into the nervous system were studied. Following a very large inoculum in the ear, the type 1 mutant was found to establish a latent infection in the cervical dorsal root ganglia. Mice inoculated intracerebrally with small doses of the mutant viruses were solidly immune to challenge with lethal doses of the parent strain. PMID:212476

  14. The pathogenicity of thymidine kinase-deficient mutants of herpes simplex virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Field, H J; Wildy, P

    1978-10-01

    The pathogenicity for mice of two mutants of herpes simplex virus (type 1 and type 2), which fail to induce thymidine kinase, were compared with their respective parent strains. The mutants were much less virulent than the parents following either intracerebral or peripheral inoculation. The replication of the virus at the site of inoculation and its progression into the nervous system were studied. Following a very large inoculum in the ear, the type 1 mutant was found to establish a latent infection in the cervical dorsal root ganglia. Mice inoculated intracerebrally with small doses of the mutant viruses were solidly immune to challenge with lethal doses of the parent strain.

  15. Neutral lipid accumulation at elevated temperature in conditional mutants of two microalgae species.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shuo; Brandt, Anders; Egsgaard, Helge; Gjermansen, Claes

    2012-12-01

    Triacylglycerols, an energy storage compound in microalgae, are known to be accumulated after nitrogen starvation of microalgae cells. Microalgae could be of importance for future biodiesel production due to their fast growth rate and high oil content. In collections of temperature sensitive mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris, nine out of fourty-one mutants in C. reinhardtii and eleven out of fifty-three mutants in C. vulgaris contained increased amounts of neutral lipids, predominantly as triacylglycerols. Upon temperature induced cell-cycle arrest, these mutants showed enlarged cellular volume compared with the wild type. The C. reinhardtii mutants were analyzed further and one type of mutants displayed a shift in lipid composition from polar membrane lipids to neutral lipids after a temperature up-shift, while the second type of mutants accumulated more total lipid per cell, predominantly as neutral lipids as compared with the wild type. Three C. reinhardtii mutants were analyzed further and found to be arrested after DNA synthesis but prior to cell division in the cell cycle. These mutants will be useful in order to further understand neutral lipid accumulation in microalgae and suggest possibilities for biodiesel production by specific induction of lipid accumulation in miroalgal cultures by cell-cycle inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumours with class 3 BRAF mutants are sensitive to the inhibition of activated RAS.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhan; Yaeger, Rona; Rodrik-Outmezguine, Vanessa S; Tao, Anthony; Torres, Neilawattie M; Chang, Matthew T; Drosten, Matthias; Zhao, Huiyong; Cecchi, Fabiola; Hembrough, Todd; Michels, Judith; Baumert, Hervé; Miles, Linde; Campbell, Naomi M; de Stanchina, Elisa; Solit, David B; Barbacid, Mariano; Taylor, Barry S; Rosen, Neal

    2017-08-10

    Approximately 200 BRAF mutant alleles have been identified in human tumours. Activating BRAF mutants cause feedback inhibition of GTP-bound RAS, are RAS-independent and signal either as active monomers (class 1) or constitutively active dimers (class 2). Here we characterize a third class of BRAF mutants-those that have impaired kinase activity or are kinase-dead. These mutants are sensitive to ERK-mediated feedback and their activation of signalling is RAS-dependent. The mutants bind more tightly than wild-type BRAF to RAS-GTP, and their binding to and activation of wild-type CRAF is enhanced, leading to increased ERK signalling. The model suggests that dysregulation of signalling by these mutants in tumours requires coexistent mechanisms for maintaining RAS activation despite ERK-dependent feedback. Consistent with this hypothesis, melanomas with these class 3 BRAF mutations also harbour RAS mutations or NF1 deletions. By contrast, in lung and colorectal cancers with class 3 BRAF mutants, RAS is typically activated by receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. These tumours are sensitive to the inhibition of RAS activation by inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases. We have thus defined three distinct functional classes of BRAF mutants in human tumours. The mutants activate ERK signalling by different mechanisms that dictate their sensitivity to therapeutic inhibitors of the pathway.

  17. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus mutants expressing reduced susceptibility to common house-cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.O.; O’Leary, J.O.; Muthaiyan, A.; Langevin, M.J.; Delgado, A.; Abalos, A.T.; Fajardo, A.R.; Marek, J.; Wilkinson, B.J.; Gustafson, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize mutants of Staphylococcus aureus expressing reduced susceptibility to house cleaners (HC), assess the impact of the alternative sigma factor SigB on HC susceptibility, and determine the MIC of clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) to a HC. Methods and Results Susceptibility to HC, HC components, H2O2, vancomycin and oxacillin and physiological parameters were determined for HC-reduced susceptibility (HCRS) mutants, parent strain COL and COLsigB::kan. HCRS mutants selected with three HC expressed reduced susceptibility to multiple HC, HC components, H2O2 and vancomycin. Two unique HCRS mutants also lost the methicillin resistance determinant. In addition, all HCRS mutants exhibited better growth at two temperatures, and one HCRS mutant expressed reduced carotenoid production. COLsigB::kan demonstrated increased susceptibility to all HC and many HC components. sigB operon mutations were not detected in one HCRS mutant background. Of 76 clinical MRSA, 20 exhibited reduced susceptibility to a HC. Conclusions HCRS mutants demonstrate altered susceptibility to multiple antimicrobials. While sigB is required for full HC resistance, one HCRS mechanism does not involve sigB operon mutations. Clinical MRSA expressing reduced susceptibility to a common HC were detected. Significance and Impact of the Study This study suggests that HCRS mutants are not protected against, nor selected by, practical HC concentrations. PMID:15659191

  18. Isolation and characterization of acid-sensitive mutants of Pediococcus acidilactici.

    PubMed

    Kurdi, Peter; Smitinont, Thitapha; Valyasevi, Ruud

    2009-02-01

    Acid-sensitive mutants of Pediococcus acidilactici BCC 9545, a starter culture of the Thai fermented pork sausage nham, were isolated as spontaneous neomycin resistant mutants. The mutants generally produced less acid and acidified the culture media less than the parent strain in a 72 h culturing period. Interestingly, the ATPase activities of the mutants did not differ considerably from that of the parent strain in acidic conditions. It was also found that the internal pH values of the mutant strains were somewhat lower in neutral environment, while at pH 5.0 their internal pHs were significantly lower compared to the parent's. Inhibiting the H(+)-ATPase activities in energized cells by N,N'-dicyclohexyl carbodiimide also revealed that protons were leaking from the mutants at neutral pH, which increased under acidic conditions. In contrast, the parent strain exhibited a smaller proton leak and only under acidic conditions. The membrane fatty acid analysis of the mutants indicated that under acidic conditions the mutants had a significantly smaller major unsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio ((C(18:1)+C(18:3n6))/(C(16:0)+C(18:0))) compared to the parent strain's membrane. Taken together, these observations suggest there is a reasonable possibility that the membrane fatty acid profile differences in the mutants resulted in their acid-sensitivity.

  19. The Kinase Activity of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated Interferes with Adenovirus E4 Mutant DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Dipendra

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) mutants that lack early region 4 (E4) are unable to produce the early regulatory proteins that normally inactivate the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) sensor complex, which is a critical component for the ability of cells to respond to DNA damage. E4 mutant infection therefore activates a DNA damage response, which in turn interferes with a productive viral infection. MRN complex proteins localize to viral DNA replication centers in E4 mutant-infected cells, and this complex is critical for activating the kinases ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), which phosphorylate numerous substrates important for DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint activation, and apoptosis. E4 mutant growth defects are substantially rescued in cells lacking an intact MRN complex. We have assessed the role of the downstream ATM and ATR kinases in several MRN-dependent E4 mutant phenotypes. We did not identify a role for either ATM or ATR in “repair” of E4 mutant genomes to form concatemers. ATR was also not observed to contribute to E4 mutant defects in late protein production. In contrast, the kinase activity of ATM was important for preventing efficient E4 mutant DNA replication and late gene expression. Our results suggest that the MRN complex interferes with E4 mutant DNA replication at least in part through its ability to activate ATM. PMID:23740981

  20. Creation, characterization and utilization of Cryptococcus neoformans mutants sensitive to micafungin.

    PubMed

    Toh-E, Akio; Ohkusu, Misako; Shimizu, Kiminori; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2017-12-01

    We constructed deletion mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans var neoformans (serotype D) genes encoding late ergosterol biosynthetic pathway enzymes and found that the mutations enhanced susceptibility to various drugs including micafungin, one of the echinocandins, to which wild-type Cryptococcus strains show no susceptibility. Furthermore, through isolation of a mutant resistant to micafungin from a micafungin-sensitive erg mutant and genetic analysis of it, we found that the responsible mutation occurred in the hotspot 2 of FKS1 encoding β-1, 3-glucan synthase, indicating that micafungin inhibited the growth of the erg mutant via inhibiting Fk