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Sample records for a-dna

  1. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  2. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  3. Recognition Imaging with a DNA Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liyun; Wang, Hongda; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao; Lindsay, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    We have used a DNA-aptamer tethered to an atomic force microscope probe to carry out recognition imaging of IgE molecules attached to a mica substrate. The recognition was efficient (∼90%) and specific, being blocked by injection of IgE molecules in solution, and not being interfered with by high concentrations of a second protein. The signal/noise ratio of the recognition signal was better than that obtained with antibodies, despite the fact that the average force required to break the aptamer-protein bonds was somewhat smaller. PMID:16513776

  4. Energy required to pinch a DNA plectoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barde, Céline; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2018-03-01

    DNA supercoiling plays an important role from a biological point of view. One of its consequences at the supramolecular level is the formation of DNA superhelices named plectonemes. Normally separated by a distance on the order of 10 nm, the two opposite double strands of a DNA plectoneme must be brought closer if a protein or protein complex implicated in genetic regulation is to be bound simultaneously to both strands, as if the plectoneme was locally pinched. We propose an analytic calculation of the energetic barrier, of elastic nature, required to bring closer the two loci situated on the opposed double strands. We examine how this energy barrier scales with the DNA supercoiling. For physically relevant values of elastic parameters and of supercoiling density, we show that the energy barrier is in the kBT range under physiological conditions, thus demonstrating that the limiting step to loci encounter is more likely the preceding plectoneme slithering bringing the two loci side by side.

  5. A DNA enzyme that cleaves RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Hoyce, G. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several types of RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been identified in biological systems and generated in the laboratory. Considering the variety of known RNA enzymes and the similarity of DNA and RNA, it is reasonable to imagine that DNA might be able to function as an enzyme as well. No such DNA enzyme has been found in nature, however. We set out to identify a metal-dependent DNA enzyme using in vitro selection methodology. RESULTS: Beginning with a population of 10(14) DNAs containing 50 random nucleotides, we carried out five successive rounds of selective amplification, enriching for individuals that best promote the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of a target ribonucleoside 3'-O-P bond embedded within an otherwise all-DNA sequence. By the fifth round, the population as a whole carried out this reaction at a rate of 0.2 min-1. Based on the sequence of 20 individuals isolated from this population, we designed a simplified version of the catalytic domain that operates in an intermolecular context with a turnover rate of 1 min-1. This rate is about 10(5)-fold increased compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Using in vitro selection techniques, we obtained a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester in a reaction that proceeds with rapid turnover. The catalytic rate compares favorably to that of known RNA enzymes. We expect that other examples of DNA enzymes will soon be forthcoming.

  6. Protein synthesis editing by a DNA aptamer.

    PubMed Central

    Hale, S P; Schimmel, P

    1996-01-01

    Potential errors in decoding genetic information are corrected by tRNA-dependent amino acid recognition processes manifested through editing reactions. One example is the rejection of difficult-to-discriminate misactivated amino acids by tRNA synthetases through hydrolytic reactions. Although several crystal structures of tRNA synthetases and synthetase-tRNA complexes exist, none of them have provided insight into the editing reactions. Other work suggested that editing required active amino acid acceptor hydroxyl groups at the 3' end of a tRNA effector. We describe here the isolation of a DNA aptamer that specifically induced hydrolysis of a misactivated amino acid bound to a tRNA synthetase. The aptamer had no effect on the stability of the correctly activated amino acid and was almost as efficient as the tRNA for inducing editing activity. The aptamer has no sequence similarity to that of the tRNA effector and cannot be folded into a tRNA-like structure. These and additional data show that active acceptor hydroxyl groups in a tRNA effector and a tRNA-like structure are not essential for editing. Thus, specific bases in a nucleic acid effector trigger the editing response. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610114

  7. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  8. Towards a DNA Nanoprocessor: Reusable Tile-Integrated DNA Circuits.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2016-08-22

    Modern electronic microprocessors use semiconductor logic gates organized on a silicon chip to enable efficient inter-gate communication. Here, arrays of communicating DNA logic gates integrated on a single DNA tile were designed and used to process nucleic acid inputs in a reusable format. Our results lay the foundation for the development of a DNA nanoprocessor, a small and biocompatible device capable of performing complex analyses of DNA and RNA inputs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Controlling charge current through a DNA based molecular transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, S.; Fathizadeh, S.; Ziaei, J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular electronics is complementary to silicon-based electronics and may induce electronic functions which are difficult to obtain with conventional technology. We have considered a DNA based molecular transistor and study its transport properties. The appropriate DNA sequence as a central chain in molecular transistor and the functional interval for applied voltages is obtained. I-V characteristic diagram shows the rectifier behavior as well as the negative differential resistance phenomenon of DNA transistor. We have observed the nearly periodic behavior in the current flowing through DNA. It is reported that there is a critical gate voltage for each applied bias which above it, the electrical current is always positive.

  10. Stereochemical model for proflavin intercalation in A-DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Alden, C J; Arnott, S

    1977-01-01

    Linked-atom molecular modelling was employed to determine the steric and torsional requirements for intercalation of proflavine into a double-stranded region of DNA compatible with adjacent regions of cohelical A-DNA. The optimum intercalation conformation is characterized by the dihedral angles xi and psi becoming trans, with all sugars retaining the characteristics C3'-endo pucker. This extended conformation results in virtually no helical unwinding, suggesting it may be an appropriate model for an intercalative intermediary in mutagenesis by virtue of its similarity to standard helical DNA. PMID:593890

  11. Recognition Imaging of Acetylated Chromatin Using a DNA Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liyun; Fu, Qiang; Williams, Berea A.R.; Azzaz, Abdelhamid M.; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A.; Chaput, John C.; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. A DNA aptamer generated by in vitro selection to be highly specific for histone H4 protein acetylated at lysine 16 was used as a recognition element for atomic force microscopy-based recognition imaging of synthetic nucleosomal arrays with precisely controlled acetylation. The aptamer proved to be reasonably specific at recognizing acetylated histones, with recognition efficiencies of 60% on-target and 12% off-target. Though this selectivity is much poorer than the >2000:1 equilibrium specificity of the aptamer, it is a large improvement on the performance of a ChIP-quality antibody, which is not selective at all in this application, and it should permit high-fidelity recognition with repeated imaging. The ability to image the precise location of posttranslational modifications may permit nanometer-scale investigation of their effect on chromatin structure. PMID:19751687

  12. Structure of fluorescent metal clusters on a DNA template.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichev, A. A.; Sych, T. S.; Reveguk, Z. V.; Smirnova, A. A.; Maksimov, D. A.; Ramazanov, R. R.; Kononov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    Luminescent metal clusters are a subject of growing interest in recent years due to their bright emission from visible to near infrared range. Detailed structure of the fluorescent complexes of Ag and other metal clusters with ligands still remains a challenging task. In this joint experimental and theoretical study we synthesized Ag-DNA complexes on a DNA oligonucleotide emitting in violet- green spectral range. The structure of DNA template was determined by means of various spectral measurements (CD, MS, XPS). Comparison of the experimental fluorescent excitation spectra and calculated absorption spectra for different QM/MM optimized structures allowed us to determine the detailed structure of the green cluster containing three silver atoms in the stem of the DNA hairpin structure stabilized by cytosine-Ag+-cytosine bonds.

  13. A DNA enzyme with N-glycosylase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, T. L.; Ordoukhanian, P.; Joyce, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    In vitro evolution was used to develop a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the site-specific depurination of DNA with a catalytic rate enhancement of about 10(6)-fold. The reaction involves hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of a particular deoxyguanosine residue, leading to DNA strand scission at the apurinic site. The DNA enzyme contains 93 nucleotides and is structurally complex. It has an absolute requirement for a divalent metal cation and exhibits optimal activity at about pH 5. The mechanism of the reaction was confirmed by analysis of the cleavage products by using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The isolation and characterization of an N-glycosylase DNA enzyme demonstrates that single-stranded DNA, like RNA and proteins, can form a complex tertiary structure and catalyze a difficult biochemical transformation. This DNA enzyme provides a new approach for the site-specific cleavage of DNA molecules.

  14. A DNA aptamer recognising a malaria protein biomarker can function as part of a DNA origami assembly

    PubMed Central

    Godonoga, Maia; Lin, Ting-Yu; Oshima, Azusa; Sumitomo, Koji; Tang, Marco S. L.; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Kinghorn, Andrew B.; Dirkzwager, Roderick M.; Zhou, Cunshan; Kuzuya, Akinori; Tanner, Julian A.; Heddle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA aptamers have potential for disease diagnosis and as therapeutics, particularly when interfaced with programmable molecular technology. Here we have combined DNA aptamers specific for the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) with a DNA origami scaffold. Twelve aptamers that recognise PfLDH were integrated into a rectangular DNA origami and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the incorporated aptamers preserve their ability to specifically bind target protein. Captured PfLDH retained enzymatic activity and protein-aptamer binding was observed dynamically using high-speed AFM. This work demonstrates the ability of DNA aptamers to recognise a malaria biomarker whilst being integrated within a supramolecular DNA scaffold, opening new possibilities for malaria diagnostic approaches based on DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26891622

  15. Selection and characterization of a DNA aptamer to crystal violet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Yajie; Xu, Lijun; Gao, Tian; Wang, Bing; Pei, Renjun

    2018-06-13

    Aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA, which can be selected in vitro by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). In order to develop novel light-up probes to substitute G-quadruplex (G4), we selected a DNA aptamer for crystal violet (CV), a triphenylmethane light-up dye, by a modified affinity chromatography-based SELEX. The ssDNA pool was first coupled on streptavidin-coated agarose beads through a biotin labeled complementary oligonucleotide, and then the aptamer sequences would be released from agarose beads by CV affinity. This method is simple, straightforward and effective. The aptamer sequence with a low micromolar dissociation constant (Kd) and good specificity was achieved after 11 rounds of selection. The light-up properties of the CV-aptamer were also investigated, and the CV showed dramatic fluorescence enhancement. The CV-aptamer pair could be further used as a novel light-up fluorescent probe to design biosensors.

  16. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Active, motor-driven mechanics in a DNA gel.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Olivier J N; Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir; Saleh, Omar A

    2012-10-23

    Cells are capable of a variety of dramatic stimuli-responsive mechanical behaviors. These capabilities are enabled by the pervading cytoskeletal network, an active gel composed of structural filaments (e.g., actin) that are acted upon by motor proteins (e.g., myosin). Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of an active gel using noncytoskeletal components. We use methods of base-pair-templated DNA self assembly to create a hybrid DNA gel containing stiff tubes and flexible linkers. We then activate the gel by adding the motor FtsK50C, a construct derived from the bacterial protein FtsK that, in vitro, has a strong and processive DNA contraction activity. The motors stiffen the gel and create stochastic contractile events that affect the positions of attached beads. We quantify the fluctuations of the beads and show that they are comparable both to measurements of cytoskeletal systems and to theoretical predictions for active gels. Thus, we present a DNA-based active gel whose behavior highlights the universal aspects of nonequilibrium, motor-driven networks.

  18. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  19. Electronic Activation of a DNA Nanodevice Using a Multilayer Nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyejoong; Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Heo, Jiwoong; Shin, Jooseok; Park, Kwangyong; Ricci, Francesco; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-10-01

    A method to control activation of a DNA nanodevice by supplying a complementary DNA (cDNA) strand from an electro-responsive nanoplatform is reported. To develop functional nanoplatform, hexalayer nanofilm is precisely designed by layer-by-layer assembly technique based on electrostatic interaction with four kinds of materials: Hydrolyzed poly(β-amino ester) can help cDNA release from the film. A cDNA is used as a key building block to activate DNA nanodevice. Reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and the conductive polymer provide conductivity. In particular, rGOs efficiently incorporate a cDNA in the film via several interactions and act as a barrier. Depending on the types of applied electronic stimuli (reductive and oxidative potentials), a cDNA released from the electrode can quantitatively control the activation of DNA nanodevice. From this report, a new system is successfully demonstrated to precisely control DNA release on demand. By applying more advanced form of DNA-based nanodevices into multilayer system, the electro-responsive nanoplatform will expand the availability of DNA nanotechnology allowing its improved application in areas such as diagnosis, biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Does a DNA-less cellular organism exist on Earth?

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Akira; Miyahara, Kohji; Kato, Chiaki; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2011-12-01

    All the self-reproducing cellular organisms so far examined have DNA as the genome. However, a DNA-less organism carrying an RNA genome is suggested by the fact that many RNA viruses exist and the widespread view that an RNA world existed before the present DNA world. Such a possibility is most plausible in the microbial world where biological diversity is enormous and most organisms have not been identified. We have developed experimental methodology to search DNA-less microorganisms, which is based on cultivation with drugs that inhibit replication or expression of DNA, detection of DNA in colonies with a fluorescent dye and double staining for DNA and RNA at a cellular level. These methods have been applied for about 100 microbial samples from various waters including hot springs, soils including deep sea sediments, and organisms. We found many colonies and cells which apparently looked DNA-less and examined them further. So far, all such colonies that reformed colonies on isolation were identified to be DNA-positive. However, considering the difficulty in cultivation, we think it possible for DNA-less microorganisms to live around us. We believe that our ideas and results will be of interest and useful to discover one in the future. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A DNA Barcoding Approach to Characterize Pollen Collected by Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Ilaria; Scaccabarozzi, Daniela; Sandionigi, Anna; Barbuto, Michela; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Labra, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated DNA barcoding effectiveness to characterize honeybee pollen pellets, a food supplement largely used for human nutrition due to its therapeutic properties. We collected pollen pellets using modified beehives placed in three zones within an alpine protected area (Grigna Settentrionale Regional Park, Italy). A DNA barcoding reference database, including rbcL and trnH-psbA sequences from 693 plant species (104 sequenced in this study) was assembled. The database was used to identify pollen collected from the hives. Fifty-two plant species were identified at the molecular level. Results suggested rbcL alone could not distinguish among congeneric plants; however, psbA-trnH identified most of the pollen samples at the species level. Substantial variability in pollen composition was observed between the highest elevation locality (Alpe Moconodeno), characterized by arid grasslands and a rocky substrate, and the other two sites (Cornisella and Ortanella) at lower altitudes. Pollen from Ortanella and Cornisella showed the presence of typical deciduous forest species; however in samples collected at Ortanella, pollen of the invasive Lonicera japonica, and the ornamental Pelargonium x hortorum were observed. Our results indicated pollen composition was largely influenced by floristic local biodiversity, plant phenology, and the presence of alien flowering species. Therefore, pollen molecular characterization based on DNA barcoding might serve useful to beekeepers in obtaining honeybee products with specific nutritional or therapeutic characteristics desired by food market demands. PMID:25296114

  2. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-07-08

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg(2+) concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerich, Felix E.; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg2+ concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. PMID:27016742

  4. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  5. Untangling taxonomy: a DNA barcode reference library for Canadian spiders.

    PubMed

    Blagoev, Gergin A; deWaard, Jeremy R; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; deWaard, Stephanie L; Lu, Liuqiong; Robertson, James; Telfer, Angela C; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1460 species of spiders have been reported from Canada, 3% of the global fauna. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for 1018 of these species based upon the analysis of more than 30,000 specimens. The sequence results show a clear barcode gap in most cases with a mean intraspecific divergence of 0.78% vs. a minimum nearest-neighbour (NN) distance averaging 7.85%. The sequences were assigned to 1359 Barcode index numbers (BINs) with 1344 of these BINs composed of specimens belonging to a single currently recognized species. There was a perfect correspondence between BIN membership and a known species in 795 cases, while another 197 species were assigned to two or more BINs (556 in total). A few other species (26) were involved in BIN merges or in a combination of merges and splits. There was only a weak relationship between the number of specimens analysed for a species and its BIN count. However, three species were clear outliers with their specimens being placed in 11-22 BINs. Although all BIN splits need further study to clarify the taxonomic status of the entities involved, DNA barcodes discriminated 98% of the 1018 species. The present survey conservatively revealed 16 species new to science, 52 species new to Canada and major range extensions for 426 species. However, if most BIN splits detected in this study reflect cryptic taxa, the true species count for Canadian spiders could be 30-50% higher than currently recognized. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Probing the structure of RecA-DNA filaments. Advantages of a fluorescent guanine analog.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Scott F; Roca, Alberto I; Lee, Andrew M; Xiao, Jie

    2007-04-23

    The RecA protein of Escherichia coli plays a crucial roles in DNA recombination and repair, as well as various aspects of bacterial pathogenicity. The formation of a RecA-ATP-ssDNA complex initiates all RecA activities and yet a complete structural and mechanistic description of this filament has remained elusive. An analysis of RecA-DNA interactions was performed using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides. A direct comparison was made between fluorescein and several fluorescent nucleosides. The fluorescent guanine analog 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI) demonstrated significant advantages over the other fluorophores and represents an important new tool for characterizing RecA-DNA interactions.

  7. A novel quantitative electrochemical method to monitor DNA double-strand breaks caused by a DNA cleavage agent at a DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Banasiak, Anna; Cassidy, John; Colleran, John

    2018-06-01

    To date, DNA cleavage, caused by cleavage agents, has been monitored mainly by gel and capillary electrophoresis. However, these techniques are time-consuming, non-quantitative and require gel stains. In this work, a novel, simple and, importantly, a quantitative method for monitoring the DNA nuclease activity of potential anti-cancer drugs, at a DNA electrochemical sensor, is presented. The DNA sensors were prepared using thiol-modified oligonucleotides that self-assembled to create a DNA monolayer at gold electrode surfaces. The quantification of DNA double-strand breaks is based on calculating the DNA surface coverage, before and after exposure to a DNA cleavage agent. The nuclease properties of a model DNA cleavage agent, copper bis-phenanthroline ([Cu II (phen) 2 ] 2+ ), that can cleave DNA in a Fenton-type reaction, were quantified electrochemically. The DNA surface coverage decreased on average by 21% after subjecting the DNA sensor to a nuclease assay containing [Cu II (phen) 2 ] 2+ , a reductant and an oxidant. This percentage indicates that 6 base pairs were cleaved in the nuclease assay from the immobilised 30 base pair strands. The DNA cleavage can be also induced electrochemically in the absence of a chemical reductant. [Cu II (phen) 2 ] 2+ intercalates between DNA base pairs and, on application of a suitable potential, can be reduced to [Cu I (phen) 2 ] + , with dissolved oxygen acting as the required oxidant. This reduction process is facilitated through DNA strands via long-range electron transfer, resulting in DNA cleavage of 23%. The control measurements for both chemically and electrochemically induced cleavage revealed that DNA strand breaks did not occur under experimental conditions in the absence of [Cu II (phen) 2 ] 2+ . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct AFM observation of an opening event of a DNA cuboid constructed via a prism structure.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2011-04-07

    A cuboid structure was constructed using a DNA origami design based on a square prism structure. The structure was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering. The real-time opening event of the cuboid was directly observed by high-speed AFM.

  9. A-DNA and B-DNA: Comparing Their Historical X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Amand A.

    2008-01-01

    A-DNA and B-DNA are two secondary molecular conformations (among other allomorphs) that double-stranded DNA drawn into a fiber can assume, depending on the relative water content and other chemical parameters of the fiber. They were the first two forms to be observed by X-ray fiber diffraction in the early 1950s, respectively by Wilkins and…

  10. Use PCR and a Single Hair To Produce a "DNA Fingerprint."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents a laboratory procedure that involves students extracting their own DNA from a single hair follicle, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify a polymorphic locus, performing electrophoresis on the PCR products on an agarose gel, and visualizing the alleles to generate a "DNA fingerprint." Discusses theoretical background,…

  11. Ancient pathogens in museal dry bone specimens: analysis of paleocytology and aDNA.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Johanna Sophia; Winter, Eduard; Grossschmidt, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Bone samples investigated in this study derive from the pathologic-anatomical collection of the Natural History Museum of Vienna. In order to explore the survival of treponemes and treponemal ancient DNA in museal dry bone specimens, we analyzed three individuals known to have been infected with Treponema pallidum pallidum. No reproducible evidence of surviving pathogen's ancient DNA (aDNA) was obtained, despite the highly sensitive extraction and amplification techniques (TPP15 and arp). Additionally, decalcification fluid of bone sections was smear stained with May-Gruenwald-Giemsa. The slides were examined using direct light microscope and dark field illumination. Remnants of spirochetal structures were detectable in every smear. Our results demonstrate that aDNA is unlikely to survive, but spirochetal remains are stainable and thus detectable.

  12. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    and Classificalion I 2 . TheCellWall 4 3. Intracellular Molecules 7 4. Genetics _ _ _ _ _.. 8 a. DNA COntent. 8 b. Chromosomes 8 c. Plasmids 10 d...Summary 11 B. DNA Damaging Agenls 12 I. Visible Light and Low-Frequency UV Radiation 12 2 . High-frequency UV Radiation 13 a. Pyrimidine DiIners 13 b. The...23 a. Photoreactivation Repair 23 b. Repair of Spore Pholoproducts 27 2 . Repair by Methods Involving Single Proteins 27 a. Repair of

  13. A DNA Crystal Designed to Contain Two Molecules per Asymmetric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    T Wang; R Sha; J Birktoft

    2011-12-31

    We describe the self-assembly of a DNA crystal that contains two tensegrity triangle molecules per asymmetric unit. We have used X-ray crystallography to determine its crystal structure. In addition, we have demonstrated control over the colors of the crystals by attaching either Cy3 dye (pink) or Cy5 dye (blue-green) to the components of the crystal, yielding crystals of corresponding colors. Attaching the pair of dyes to the pair of molecules yields a purple crystal.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance at the picomole level of a DNA adduct.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Roger; Wang, Poguang; Giese, Roger W

    2013-10-21

    We investigate the limit of detection for obtaining NMR data of a DNA adduct using modern microscale NMR instrumentation, once the adduct has been isolated at the picomole level. Eighty nanograms (130 pmol) of a DNA adduct standard, N-(2'-deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene 5'-monophosphate (AAF-dGMP), in 1.5 μL of D₂O with 10% methanol-d₄, in a vial, was completely picked up as a droplet suspended in a fluorocarbon liquid and loaded efficiently into a microcoil probe. This work demonstrates a practical manual method of droplet microfluidic sample loading, previously demonstrated using automated equipment, which provides a severalfold advantage over conventional flow injection. Eliminating dilution during injection and confining the sample to the observed volume produce the full theoretical mass sensitivity of a microcoil, comparable to that of a microcryo probe. With 80 ng, an NMR spectrum acquired over 40 h showed all of the resonances seen in a standard spectrum of AAF-dGMP, with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 10, despite broadening due to previously noted effects of conformational exchange. Even with this broadening to 5 Hz, a two-dimensional total correlation spectroscopy spectrum was acquired on 1.6 μg in 18 h. This work helps to define the utility of NMR in combination with other analytical methods for the structural characterization of a small amount of a DNA adduct.

  15. From a structural average to the conformational ensemble of a DNA bulge

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuesong; Beauchamp, Kyle A.; Harbury, Pehr B.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Direct experimental measurements of conformational ensembles are critical for understanding macromolecular function, but traditional biophysical methods do not directly report the solution ensemble of a macromolecule. Small-angle X-ray scattering interferometry has the potential to overcome this limitation by providing the instantaneous distance distribution between pairs of gold-nanocrystal probes conjugated to a macromolecule in solution. Our X-ray interferometry experiments reveal an increasing bend angle of DNA duplexes with bulges of one, three, and five adenosine residues, consistent with previous FRET measurements, and further reveal an increasingly broad conformational ensemble with increasing bulge length. The distance distributions for the AAA bulge duplex (3A-DNA) with six different Au-Au pairs provide strong evidence against a simple elastic model in which fluctuations occur about a single conformational state. Instead, the measured distance distributions suggest a 3A-DNA ensemble with multiple conformational states predominantly across a region of conformational space with bend angles between 24 and 85 degrees and characteristic bend directions and helical twists and displacements. Additional X-ray interferometry experiments revealed perturbations to the ensemble from changes in ionic conditions and the bulge sequence, effects that can be understood in terms of electrostatic and stacking contributions to the ensemble and that demonstrate the sensitivity of X-ray interferometry. Combining X-ray interferometry ensemble data with molecular dynamics simulations gave atomic-level models of representative conformational states and of the molecular interactions that may shape the ensemble, and fluorescence measurements with 2-aminopurine-substituted 3A-DNA provided initial tests of these atomistic models. More generally, X-ray interferometry will provide powerful benchmarks for testing and developing computational methods. PMID:24706812

  16. [RTEL1 (regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1), a DNA helicase essential for genome stability].

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Tangui; Jullien, Laurent; Schertzer, Mike; Lefebvre, Axelle; Kermasson, Laetitia; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Revy, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    RTEL1 (regulator of telomere length helicase 1) is a DNA helicase that has been identified more than 10 years ago. Many works since, mainly in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the mouse, have highlighted its role in chromosomal stability, maintenance of telomere length, and DNA repair. Recently, four laboratories have characterized RTEL1 mutations in patients with dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome, a rare and severe variant of DC. We here summarize the current knowledge on RTEL1 and discuss the possible other functions that RTEL1 could play. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  17. Building a DNA barcode library of Alaska's non-marine arthropods.

    PubMed

    Sikes, Derek S; Bowser, Matthew; Morton, John M; Bickford, Casey; Meierotto, Sarah; Hildebrandt, Kyndall

    2017-03-01

    Climate change may result in ecological futures with novel species assemblages, trophic mismatch, and mass extinction. Alaska has a limited taxonomic workforce to address these changes. We are building a DNA barcode library to facilitate a metabarcoding approach to monitoring non-marine arthropods. Working with the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, we obtained DNA barcodes from recently collected and authoritatively identified specimens in the University of Alaska Museum (UAM) Insect Collection and the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge collection. We submitted tissues from 4776 specimens, of which 81% yielded DNA barcodes representing 1662 species and 1788 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs), of primarily terrestrial, large-bodied arthropods. This represents 84% of the species available for DNA barcoding in the UAM Insect Collection. There are now 4020 Alaskan arthropod species represented by DNA barcodes, after including all records in Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) of species that occur in Alaska - i.e., 48.5% of the 8277 Alaskan, non-marine-arthropod, named species have associated DNA barcodes. An assessment of the identification power of the library in its current state yielded fewer species-level identifications than expected, but the results were not discouraging. We believe we are the first to deliberately begin development of a DNA barcode library of the entire arthropod fauna for a North American state or province. Although far from complete, this library will become increasingly valuable as more species are added and costs to obtain DNA sequences fall.

  18. A DNA vaccine against dolphin morbillivirus is immunogenic in bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Del Crew, Jason; Hermanson, Gary; Wloch, Mary K; Riffenburgh, Robert H; Smith, Cynthia R; Van Bonn, William G

    2007-12-15

    The immunization of exotic species presents considerable challenges. Nevertheless, for facilities like zoos, animal parks, government facilities and non-profit conservation groups, the protection of valuable and endangered species from infectious disease is a growing concern. The rationale for immunization in these species parallels that for human and companion animals; to decrease the incidence of disease. The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program, in collaboration with industry and academic partners, has developed and evaluated a DNA vaccine targeting a marine viral pathogen - dolphin morbillivirus (DMV). The DMV vaccine consists of the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) genes of DMV. Vaccine constructs (pVR-DMV-F and pVR-DMV-H) were evaluated for expression in vitro and then for immunogenicity in mice. Injection protocols were designed for application in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to balance vaccine effectiveness with clinical utility. Six dolphins were inoculated, four animals received both pDMV-F and pDMV-H and two animals received a mock vaccine (vector alone). All animals received an inoculation week 0, followed by two booster injections weeks 8 and 14. Vaccine-specific immune responses were documented in all four vaccinated animals. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pathogen-specific immunogenicity to a DNA vaccine in an aquatic mammal species.

  19. A DNA-scaffold platform enhances a multi-enzymatic cycling reaction.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Yasumasa; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2018-04-01

    We explored the co-localization of multiple enzymes on a DNA backbone via a DNA-binding protein, Gene-A* (A*-tag) to increase the efficiency of cascade enzymatic reactions. Firefly luciferase (FLuc) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) were genetically fused with A*-tag and modified with single-stranded (ss) DNA via A*-tag. The components were assembled on ssDNA by hybridization, thereby enhancing the efficiency of the cascading bioluminescent reaction producing light emission from pyrophosphate. The activity of A*-tag in each enzyme was investigated with dye-labeled DNA. Co-localization of the enzymes via hybridization was examined using a gel shift assay. The multi-enzyme complex showed significant improvement in the overall efficiency of the cascading reaction in comparison to a mixture of free enzymes. A*-tag is highly convenient for ssDNA modification of versatile enzymes, and it can be used for construction of functional DNA-enzyme complexes.

  20. Spectroscopic study of a DNA brush synthesized in situ by surface initiated enzymatic polymerization.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nuruzzaman; Tjong, Vinalia; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Zharnikov, Michael

    2013-08-29

    We used a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to study the chemical integrity, purity, and possible internal alignment of single-strand (ss) adenine deoxynucleotide (poly(A)) DNA brushes. The brushes were synthesized by surface-initiated enzymatic polymerization (SIEP) on a 25-mer of adenine self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold (A25-SH), wherein the terminal 3'-OH of the A25-SH serve as the initiation sites for SIEP of poly(A). XPS and NEXAFS spectra of poly(A) brushes were found to be almost identical to those of A25-SH initiator, with no unambiguous traces of contamination. Apart from the well-defined chemical integrity and contamination-free character, the brushes were found to have a high degree of orientational order, with an upright orientation of individual strands, despite their large thickness up to ~55 nm, that corresponds to a chain length of at least several hundred nucleotides for individual ssDNA molecules. The orientational order exhibited by these poly(A) DNA brushes, mediated presumably by base stacking, was found to be independent of the brush thickness as long as the packing density was high enough. The well-defined character and orientational ordering of the ssDNA brushes make them a potentially promising system for different applications.

  1. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  2. Evaluation of the skin irritation using a DNA microarray on a reconstructed human epidermal model.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Makoto; Nagai, Kanji; Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko

    2009-02-01

    To avoid the need to use animals to test the skin irritancy potential of chemicals and cosmetics, it is important to establish an in vitro method based on the reconstructed human epidermal model. To evaluate skin irritancy efficiently and sensitively, we determined the gene expression induced by a topically-applied mild irritant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a reconstructed human epidermal model LabCyte EPI-MODEL (LabCyte) using a DNA microarray carrying genes that were related to inflammation, immunity, stress and housekeeping. The expression and secretion of IL-1alpha in reconstructed human epidermal culture is known to be induced by irritation. We detected the induction of IL-1alpha expression and its secretion into the cell culture medium by treatment with 0.075% SDS for 18 h in LabCyte culture using DNA microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and ELISA. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the expression of 10 of the 205 genes carried on the DNA microarray was significantly induced in a LabCyte culture by 0.05% or 0.075% SDS irritation for 18 h. RT-PCR analysis confirmed that SDS treatment significantly induced the expressions of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN), FOS-like antigen 1 (FOSL1), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A (HSPA1) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MYD88), as well as the known marker genes for irritation IL-1beta and IL-8 in a LabCyte culture. Our results showed that a DNA microarray is a useful tool for efficiently evaluating mild skin irritation using a reconstructed human epidermal model.

  3. Accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of vaginitis compared with a DNA probe laboratory standard.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Nancy K; Neal, Jeremy L; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2009-01-01

    To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared with a DNA probe laboratory standard. This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active-duty United States military women presenting with vulvovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis, 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis, 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis, and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared with the DNA probe standard. Compared with a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70-99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, Candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and, therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. II.

  4. The mechanisms of Ag85A DNA vaccine activates RNA sensors through new signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingbo; Wang, Qiubo; Gao, Yunfeng; Zhang, Ran; Li, Shengjun; Wei, Bing; You, Yong; Sun, Xun; Lu, Changlong

    2018-06-01

    Low immunogenicity is one of the major problems limiting the clinical use for DNA vaccines, which makes it impossible to obtain a strong protective immune response after vaccination. In order to explore whether Ag85A DNA vaccine could mount more efficiently protective immune response through new RNA sensor and its signal transduction pathway of antigen presentation we designed and synthesized Ag85A gene fragment containing multiple points mutations and transfected the gene fragment into the dendritic cell line (DC2.4) by CRISPR/Cas9. Subsequently, we focused on the changes of RNA sensors RIG-I, Mda-5, and the downstream adaptors MAVS, IRF3, IRF7 and IFN-β. The results indicated the significant increases in the mRNA and protein expression of RNA sensors RIG-I, Mda-5 and related adaptors MAVS, IRF3, IRF7, and IFN-β in the mutant DC 2.4 cells. The flow cytometry results demonstrated that the expression of MHC II on the surface of DC 2.4 significantly increased when compared with that in control. Therefore, it is suggested that Ag85A mutant DNA could release immunogenic message through RNA sensors and related adaptors via non protein pathway. There is at least one RNA signal transduction pathway of Ag85A DNA in DC2.4 cell. The work provides a new mode of action for nucleic acid vaccine to improve immunogenicity and meaningful data for the better understanding of the mechanisms of DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Identification of a DNA restriction-modification system in Pectobacterium carotovorum strains isolated from Poland.

    PubMed

    Waleron, K; Waleron, M; Osipiuk, J; Podhajska, A J; Lojkowska, E

    2006-02-01

    Polish isolates of pectinolytic bacteria from the species Pectobacterium carotovorum were screened for the presence of a DNA restriction-modification (R-M) system. Eighty-nine strains of P. carotovorum were isolated from infected potato plants. Sixty-six strains belonged to P. carotovorum ssp. atrosepticum and 23 to P. carotovorum ssp. carotovorum. The presence of restriction enzyme Pca17AI, which is an isoschizomer of EcoRII endonuclease, was observed in all isolates of P. c. atrosepticum but not in P. c. carotovorum. The biochemical properties, PCR amplification, and sequences of the Pca17AI restriction endonuclease and methyltransferase genes were compared with the prototype EcoRII R-M system genes. Only when DNA isolated from cells of P. c. atrosepticum was used as a template, amplification of a 680 bp homologous to the gene coding EcoRII endonuclease. Endonuclease Pca17AI, having a relatively low temperature optimum, was identified. PCR amplification revealed that the nucleotide sequence of genes for EcoRII and Pca17AI R-M are different. Dcm methylation was observed in all strains of Pectobacterium and other Erwinia species tested. The sequence of a DNA fragment coding Dcm methylase in P. carotovorum was different from that of Escherichia coli. Pca17AI is the first psychrophilic isoschizomer of EcoRII endonuclease. The presence of specific Dcm methylation in chromosomal DNA isolated from P. carotovorum is described for the first time. A 680 bp PCR product, unique for P. c. atrosepticum strains, could serve as a molecular marker for detection of these bacteria in environmental samples.

  6. Cloning and characterization of a DNA polymerase beta gene from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Juan A; Aslund, Lena; Solari, Aldo

    2009-06-01

    A gene coding for a DNA polymerase beta from the Trypanosoma cruzi Miranda clone, belonging to the TcI lineage, was cloned (Miranda Tcpol beta), using the information from eight peptides of the T. cruzi beta-like DNA polymerase purified previously. The gene encodes for a protein of 403 amino acids which is very similar to the two T. cruzi CL Brener (TcIIe lineage) sequences published, but has three different residues in highly conserved segments. At the amino acid level, the identity of TcI-pol beta with mitochondrial pol beta and pol beta-PAK from other trypanosomatids was between 68-80% and 22-30%, respectively. Miranda Tc-pol beta protein has an N-terminal sequence similar to that described in the mitochondrial Crithidia fasciculata pol beta, which suggests that the TcI-pol beta plays a role in the organelle. Northern and Western analyses showed that this T. cruzi gene is highly expressed both in proliferative and non-proliferative developmental forms. These results suggest that, in addition to replication of kDNA in proliferative cells, this enzyme may have another function in non-proliferative cells, such as DNA repair role similar to that which has extensively been described in a vast spectrum of eukaryotic cells.

  7. The Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ExoIII homologue Mth212 is a DNA uridine endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Jens; Schomacher, Lars; Chong, James P. J.; Majerník, Alan I.; Raabe, Monika; Urlaub, Henning; Müller, Sabine; Ciirdaeva, Elena; Kramer, Wilfried; Fritz, Hans-Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The genome of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, as a hitherto unique case, is apparently devoid of genes coding for general uracil DNA glycosylases, the universal mediators of base excision repair following hydrolytic deamination of DNA cytosine residues. We have now identified protein Mth212, a member of the ExoIII family of nucleases, as a possible initiator of DNA uracil repair in this organism. This enzyme, in addition to bearing all the enzymological hallmarks of an ExoIII homologue, is a DNA uridine endonuclease (U-endo) that nicks double-stranded DNA at the 5′-side of a 2′-d-uridine residue, irrespective of the nature of the opposing nucleotide. This type of activity has not been described before; it is absent from the ExoIII homologues of Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Methanosarcina mazei, all of which are equipped with uracil DNA repair glycosylases. The U-endo activity of Mth212 is served by the same catalytic center as its AP-endo activity. PMID:17012282

  8. A DNA Mini-Barcoding System for Authentication of Processed Fish Products.

    PubMed

    Shokralla, Shadi; Hellberg, Rosalee S; Handy, Sara M; King, Ian; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad

    2015-10-30

    Species substitution is a form of seafood fraud for the purpose of economic gain. DNA barcoding utilizes species-specific DNA sequence information for specimen identification. Previous work has established the usability of short DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-for identification of specimens harboring degraded DNA. This study aims at establishing a DNA mini-barcoding system for all fish species commonly used in processed fish products in North America. Six mini-barcode primer pairs targeting short (127-314 bp) fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase I (CO1) DNA barcode region were developed by examining over 8,000 DNA barcodes from species in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Seafood List. The mini-barcode primer pairs were then tested against 44 processed fish products representing a range of species and product types. Of the 44 products, 41 (93.2%) could be identified at the species or genus level. The greatest mini-barcoding success rate found with an individual primer pair was 88.6% compared to 20.5% success rate achieved by the full-length DNA barcode primers. Overall, this study presents a mini-barcoding system that can be used to identify a wide range of fish species in commercial products and may be utilized in high throughput DNA sequencing for authentication of heavily processed fish products.

  9. A DNA-Inspired Encryption Methodology for Secure, Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Users are pushing for greater physical mobility with their network and Internet access. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) can provide an efficient mobile network architecture, but security is a key concern. A figure summarizes differences in the state of network security for MANET and fixed networks. MANETs require the ability to distinguish trusted peers, and tolerate the ingress/egress of nodes on an unscheduled basis. Because the networks by their very nature are mobile and self-organizing, use of a Public Key Infra structure (PKI), X.509 certificates, RSA, and nonce ex changes becomes problematic if the ideal of MANET is to be achieved. Molecular biology models such as DNA evolution can provide a basis for a proprietary security architecture that achieves high degrees of diffusion and confusion, and resistance to cryptanalysis. A proprietary encryption mechanism was developed that uses the principles of DNA replication and steganography (hidden word cryptography) for confidentiality and authentication. The foundation of the approach includes organization of coded words and messages using base pairs organized into genes, an expandable genome consisting of DNA-based chromosome keys, and a DNA-based message encoding, replication, and evolution and fitness. In evolutionary computing, a fitness algorithm determines whether candidate solutions, in this case encrypted messages, are sufficiently encrypted to be transmitted. The technology provides a mechanism for confidential electronic traffic over a MANET without a PKI for authenticating users.

  10. Priming of microglia in a DNA-repair deficient model of accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Raj, Divya D A; Jaarsma, Dick; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Ferreira, Filipa M; Schaafsma, Wandert; Brouwer, Nieske; Meijer, Michel M; de Waard, Monique C; van der Pluijm, Ingrid; Brandt, Renata; Kreft, Karim L; Laman, Jon D; de Haan, Gerald; Biber, Knut P H; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Eggen, Bart J L; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with reduced function, degenerative changes, and increased neuroinflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence suggests that changes in microglia cells contribute to the age-related deterioration of the CNS. The most prominent age-related change of microglia is enhanced sensitivity to inflammatory stimuli, referred to as priming. It is unclear if priming is due to intrinsic microglia ageing or induced by the ageing neural environment. We have studied this in Ercc1 mutant mice, a DNA repair-deficient mouse model that displays features of accelerated aging in multiple tissues including the CNS. In Ercc1 mutant mice, microglia showed hallmark features of priming such as an exaggerated response to peripheral lipopolysaccharide exposure in terms of cytokine expression and phagocytosis. Specific targeting of the Ercc1 deletion to forebrain neurons resulted in a progressive priming response in microglia exemplified by phenotypic alterations. Summarizing, these data show that neuronal genotoxic stress is sufficient to switch microglia from a resting to a primed state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-time study of a DNA strand displacement reaction using dual polarization interferometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2013-03-15

    A DNA strand displacement reaction on a solid-liquid interface was investigated using dual polarization interferometry. This effective analytical technique allows the real-time, simultaneous determination of the thickness, density, and mass of a biological layer. The displacement process was examined, and the changes in thickness, density, and mass were determined. Injection of the displacement DNA resulted in an increase in density and a decrease in mass and thickness, which indicated that a portion of the target DNA was displaced from the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The effects of the displacement DNA concentration and toehold length on the displacement efficiency were also examined. Increasing the displacement DNA concentration and the toehold length increased the changes in mass and the displacement efficiency. At the concentration of 0.2 μM, the toeholds with 4, 5, 6, and 7 bases had displacement percentages of 24.54%, 25.99%, 30.16%, and 70.41%, respectively. At displacement DNA concentrations exceeding that of the dsDNA, the displacement percentage was not concentration-dependent. Above a certain concentration, the percentage remained stable with increasing concentration. Comparison using different toehold sequences showed that the displacement efficiency increases with increasing bonding force between the base pairs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Mitotic UV Irradiation Induces a DNA Replication-Licensing Defect that Potentiates G1 Arrest Response

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Masayuki; Nukina, Kohei; Sakaguchi, Hiroki; Maeda, Takeshi; Takahara, Michiyo; Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Cdt1 begins to accumulate in M phase and has a key role in establishing replication licensing at the end of mitosis or in early G1 phase. Treatments that damage the DNA of cells, such as UV irradiation, induce Cdt1 degradation through PCNA-dependent CRL4-Cdt2 ubiquitin ligase. How Cdt1 degradation is linked to cell cycle progression, however, remains unclear. In G1 phase, when licensing is established, UV irradiation leads to Cdt1 degradation, but has little effect on the licensing state. In M phase, however, UV irradiation does not induce Cdt1 degradation. When mitotic UV-irradiated cells were released into G1 phase, Cdt1 was degraded before licensing was established. Thus, these cells exhibited both defective licensing and G1 cell cycle arrest. The frequency of G1 arrest increased in cells expressing extra copies of Cdt2, and thus in cells in which Cdt1 degradation was enhanced, whereas the frequency of G1 arrest was reduced in cell expressing an extra copy of Cdt1. The G1 arrest response of cells irradiated in mitosis was important for cell survival by preventing the induction of apoptosis. Based on these observations, we propose that mammalian cells have a DNA replication-licensing checkpoint response to DNA damage induced during mitosis. PMID:25798850

  13. Average probability that a "cold hit" in a DNA database search results in an erroneous attribution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun S; Patil, Anand; Murphy, Erin E; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2009-01-01

    We consider a hypothetical series of cases in which the DNA profile of a crime-scene sample is found to match a known profile in a DNA database (i.e., a "cold hit"), resulting in the identification of a suspect based only on genetic evidence. We show that the average probability that there is another person in the population whose profile matches the crime-scene sample but who is not in the database is approximately 2(N - d)p(A), where N is the number of individuals in the population, d is the number of profiles in the database, and p(A) is the average match probability (AMP) for the population. The AMP is estimated by computing the average of the probabilities that two individuals in the population have the same profile. We show further that if a priori each individual in the population is equally likely to have left the crime-scene sample, then the average probability that the database search attributes the crime-scene sample to a wrong person is (N - d)p(A).

  14. Helminth Coinfection Does Not Affect Therapeutic Effect of a DNA Vaccine in Mice Harboring Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, Fabiani G.; Rosada, Rogério S.; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Perusso, Franciele R. T.; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Ramos, Simone G.; Kunkel, Steven L.; Silva, Célio L.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Helminthiasis and tuberculosis (TB) coincide geographically and there is much interest in exploring how concurrent worm infections might alter immune responses against bacilli and might necessitate altered therapeutic approaches. A DNA vaccine that codifies heat shock protein Hsp65 from M. leprae (DNAhsp65) has been used in therapy during experimental tuberculosis. This study focused on the impact of the co-existence of worms and TB on the therapeutic effects of DNAhsp65. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were infected with Toxocara canis or with Schistosoma mansoni, followed by coinfection with M. tuberculosis and treatment with DNAhsp65. While T. canis infection did not increase vulnerability to pulmonary TB, S. mansoni enhanced susceptibility to TB as shown by higher numbers of bacteria in the lungs and spleen, which was associated with an increase in Th2 and regulatory cytokines. However, in coinfected mice, the therapeutic effect of DNAhsp65 was not abrogated, as indicated by colony forming units and analysis of histopathological changes. In vitro studies indicated that Hsp65-specific IFN-γ production was correlated with vaccine-induced protection in coinfected mice. Moreover, in S. mansoni-coinfected mice, DNA treatment inhibited in vivo TGF-β and IL-10 production, which could be associated with long-term protection. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that the therapeutic effects of DNAhsp65 in experimental TB infection are persistent in the presence of an unrelated Th2 immune response induced by helminth infections. PMID:20544012

  15. A Method for Preparing DNA Sequencing Templates Using a DNA-Binding Microplate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Hebron, Haroun R.; Hang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    A DNA-binding matrix was immobilized on the surface of a 96-well microplate and used for plasmid DNA preparation for DNA sequencing. The same DNA-binding plate was used for bacterial growth, cell lysis, DNA purification, and storage. In a single step using one buffer, bacterial cells were lysed by enzymes, and released DNA was captured on the plate simultaneously. After two wash steps, DNA was eluted and stored in the same plate. Inclusion of phosphates in the culture medium was found to enhance the yield of plasmid significantly. Purified DNA samples were used successfully in DNA sequencing with high consistency and reproducibility. Eleven vectors and nine libraries were tested using this method. In 10 μl sequencing reactions using 3 μl sample and 0.25 μl BigDye Terminator v3.1, the results from a 3730xl sequencer gave a success rate of 90–95% and read-lengths of 700 bases or more. The method is fully automatable and convenient for manual operation as well. It enables reproducible, high-throughput, rapid production of DNA with purity and yields sufficient for high-quality DNA sequencing at a substantially reduced cost. PMID:19568455

  16. A DNA Aptamer Recognizes the Asp f 1 Allergen of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Low, Swee Yang; Hill, Jane E.; Peccia, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Allergies are caused by the binding of IgE antibodies onto specific sites on allergens. However, in the assessment of exposure to airborne allergens, current techniques such as whole spore counts fail to account for the presence of these allergenic epitopes that trigger allergic reactions. The objective of the research is to develop a DNA aptamer for the Asp f 1 allergen of the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, using an IgE-binding epitope of the allergen as the target for aptamer selection. Through in vitro SELEX, an aptamer has been produced that binds with nanomolar affinity to the Asp f 1 IgE-epitope. The aptamer is also able to recognize the native Asp f 1 allergen, and does not bind to allergenic proteins from non-target mold species such as Alternaria alternata. Production of this aptamer provides proof-of-principle that allergen measurement methods can be developed to indicate the potent fraction, or allergenicity, of allergens. PMID:19545545

  17. Mechanism of Facilitated Diffusion during a DNA Search in Crowded Environments.

    PubMed

    Krepel, Dana; Gomez, David; Klumpp, Stefan; Levy, Yaakov

    2016-11-03

    The key feature explaining the rapid recognition of a DNA target site by its protein lies in the combination of one- and three-dimensional (1D and 3D) diffusion, which allows efficient scanning of the many alternative sites. This facilitated diffusion mechanism is expected to be affected by cellular conditions, particularly crowding, given that up to 40% of the total cellular volume may by occupied by macromolecules. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the crowding particles can enhance facilitated diffusion and accelerate search kinetics. This effect originates from a trade-off between 3D and 1D diffusion. The 3D diffusion coefficient is lower under crowded conditions, but it has little influence because the excluded volume effect of molecular crowding restricts its use. Largely prevented from using 3D diffusion, the searching protein dramatically increases its use of the hopping search mode, which results in a higher linear diffusion coefficient. The coefficient of linear diffusion also increases under crowded conditions as a result of increased collisions between the crowding particles and the searching protein. Overall, less 3D diffusion coupled with an increase in the use of the hopping and speed of 1D diffusion results in faster search kinetics under crowded conditions. Our study shows that the search kinetics and mechanism are modulated not only by the crowding occupancy but also by the properties of the crowding particles and the salt concentration.

  18. A DNA Barcode Library for North American Pyraustinae (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaofu; Landry, Jean-François; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    Although members of the crambid subfamily Pyraustinae are frequently important crop pests, their identification is often difficult because many species lack conspicuous diagnostic morphological characters. DNA barcoding employs sequence diversity in a short standardized gene region to facilitate specimen identifications and species discovery. This study provides a DNA barcode reference library for North American pyraustines based upon the analysis of 1589 sequences recovered from 137 nominal species, 87% of the fauna. Data from 125 species were barcode compliant (>500bp, <1% n), and 99 of these taxa formed a distinct cluster that was assigned to a single BIN. The other 26 species were assigned to 56 BINs, reflecting frequent cases of deep intraspecific sequence divergence and a few instances of barcode sharing, creating a total of 155 BINs. Two systems for OTU designation, ABGD and BIN, were examined to check the correspondence between current taxonomy and sequence clusters. The BIN system performed better than ABGD in delimiting closely related species, while OTU counts with ABGD were influenced by the value employed for relative gap width. Different species with low or no interspecific divergence may represent cases of unrecognized synonymy, whereas those with high intraspecific divergence require further taxonomic scrutiny as they may involve cryptic diversity. The barcode library developed in this study will also help to advance understanding of relationships among species of Pyraustinae.

  19. Development of a DNA microarray for species identification of quarantine aphids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Sun; Choi, Hwalran; Kang, Jinseok; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Lee, Seunghwan; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-12-01

    Aphid pests are being brought into Korea as a result of increased crop trading. Aphids exist on growth areas of plants, and thus plant growth is seriously affected by aphid pests. However, aphids are very small and have several sexual morphs and life stages, so it is difficult to identify species on the basis of morphological features. This problem was approached using DNA microarray technology. DNA targets of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene were generated with a fluorescent dye-labelled primer and were hybridised onto a DNA microarray consisting of specific probes. After analysing the signal intensity of the specific probes, the unique patterns from the DNA microarray, consisting of 47 species-specific probes, were obtained to identify 23 aphid species. To confirm the accuracy of the developed DNA microarray, ten individual blind samples were used in blind trials, and the identifications were completely consistent with the sequencing data of all individual blind samples. A microarray has been developed to distinguish aphid species. DNA microarray technology provides a rapid, easy, cost-effective and accurate method for identifying aphid species for pest control management. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. A DNA Origami Mechanical Device for the Regulation of Microcosmic Structural Rigidity.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Hong, Zhouping; Wang, Huading; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ziyue; Li, Chao; Xia, Han; Fang, Yan; Li, Maoteng; Zhan, Yi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2017-11-01

    DNA origami makes it feasible to fabricate a tremendous number of DNA nanostructures with various geometries, dimensions, and functionalities. Moreover, an increasing amount of research on DNA nanostructures is focused on biological and biomedical applications. Here, the reversible regulation of microcosmic structural rigidity is accomplished using a DNA origami device in vitro. The designed DNA origami monomer is composed of an internal central axis and an external sliding tube. Due to the external tube sliding, the device transforms between flexible and rigid states. By transporting the device into the liposome, the conformational change of the origami device induces a structural change in the liposome. The results obtained demonstrate that the programmed DNA origami device can be applied to regulate the microcosmic structural rigidity of liposomes. Because microcosmic structural rigidity is important to cell proliferation and function, the results obtained potentially provide a foundation for the regulation of cell microcosmic structural rigidity using DNA nanostructures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Direct analysis of Holliday junction resolving enzyme in a DNA origami nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Cañas, Cristina; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-06-01

    Holliday junction (HJ) resolution is a fundamental step for completion of homologous recombination. HJ resolving enzymes (resolvases) distort the junction structure upon binding and prior cleavage, raising the possibility that the reactivity of the enzyme can be affected by a particular geometry and topology at the junction. Here, we employed a DNA origami nano-scaffold in which each arm of a HJ was tethered through the base-pair hybridization, allowing us to make the junction core either flexible or inflexible by adjusting the length of the DNA arms. Both flexible and inflexible junctions bound to Bacillus subtilis RecU HJ resolvase, while only the flexible junction was efficiently resolved into two duplexes by this enzyme. This result indicates the importance of the structural malleability of the junction core for the reaction to proceed. Moreover, cleavage preferences of RecU-mediated reaction were addressed by analyzing morphology of the reaction products. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  3. Engineering RENTA, a DNA prime-MVA boost HIV vaccine tailored for Eastern and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Nkolola, J P; Wee, E G-T; Im, E-J; Jewell, C P; Chen, N; Xu, X-N; McMichael, A J; Hanke, T

    2004-07-01

    For the development of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines, traditional approaches inducing virus-neutralizing antibodies have so far failed. Thus the effort is now focused on elicitation of cellular immunity. We are currently testing in clinical trials in the United Kingdom and East Africa a T-cell vaccine consisting of HIV-1 clade A Gag-derived immunogen HIVA delivered in a prime-boost regimen by a DNA plasmid and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Here, we describe engineering and preclinical development of a second immunogen RENTA, which will be used in combination with the present vaccine in a four-component DNA/HIVA-RENTA prime-MVA/HIVA-RENTA boost formulation. RENTA is a fusion protein derived from consensus HIV clade A sequences of Tat, reverse transcriptase, Nef and gp41. We inactivated the natural biological activities of the HIV components and confirmed immunogenicities of the pTHr.RENTA and MVA.RENTA vaccines in mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated in mice and rhesus monkeys broadening of HIVA-elicited T-cell responses by a parallel induction of HIVA- and RENTA-specific responses recognizing multiple HIV epitopes.

  4. Inviability of a DNA2 deletion mutant is due to the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Budd, Martin E; Antoshechkin, Igor A; Reis, Clara; Wold, Barbara J; Campbell, Judith L

    2011-05-15

    Dna2 is a dual polarity exo/endonuclease, and 5' to 3' DNA helicase involved in Okazaki Fragment Processing (OFP) and Double-Strand Break (DSB) Repair. In yeast, DNA2 is an essential gene, as expected for a DNA replication protein. Suppression of the lethality of dna2Δ mutants has been found to occur by two mechanisms: overexpression of RAD27 (scFEN1) , encoding a 5' to 3' exo/endo nuclease that processes Okazaki fragments (OFs) for ligation, or deletion of PIF1, a 5' to 3' helicase involved in mitochondrial recombination, telomerase inhibition and OFP. Mapping of a novel, spontaneously arising suppressor of dna2Δ now reveals that mutation of rad9 and double mutation of rad9 mrc1 can also suppress the lethality of dna2Δ mutants. Interaction of dna2Δ and DNA damage checkpoint mutations provides insight as to why dna2Δ is lethal but rad27Δ is not, even though evidence shows that Rad27 (ScFEN1) processes most of the Okazaki fragments, while Dna2 processes only a subset.

  5. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA–protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host–guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA–protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host–guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging. PMID:28205515

  6. BOKP: A DNA Barcode Reference Library for Monitoring Herbal Drugs in the Korean Pharmacopeia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Shi, Linchun; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Wei; Han, Jianping; Liu, Xia; Hou, Dianyun; Yao, Hui; Li, Mingyue; Chen, Shilin

    2017-01-01

    Herbal drug authentication is an important task in traditional medicine; however, it is challenged by the limitations of traditional authentication methods and the lack of trained experts. DNA barcoding is conspicuous in almost all areas of the biological sciences and has already been added to the British pharmacopeia and Chinese pharmacopeia for routine herbal drug authentication. However, DNA barcoding for the Korean pharmacopeia still requires significant improvements. Here, we present a DNA barcode reference library for herbal drugs in the Korean pharmacopeia and developed a species identification engine named KP-IDE to facilitate the adoption of this DNA reference library for the herbal drug authentication. Using taxonomy records, specimen records, sequence records, and reference records, KP-IDE can identify an unknown specimen. Currently, there are 6,777 taxonomy records, 1,054 specimen records, 30,744 sequence records (ITS2 and psbA-trnH) and 285 reference records. Moreover, 27 herbal drug materials were collected from the Seoul Yangnyeongsi herbal medicine market to give an example for real herbal drugs authentications. Our study demonstrates the prospects of the DNA barcode reference library for the Korean pharmacopeia and provides future directions for the use of DNA barcoding for authenticating herbal drugs listed in other modern pharmacopeias. PMID:29326593

  7. Horses for courses: a DNA-based test for race distance aptitude in thoroughbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Hill, Emmeline W; Ryan, Donal P; MacHugh, David E

    2012-12-01

    Variation at the myostatin (MSTN) gene locus has been shown to influence racing phenotypes in Thoroughbred horses, and in particular, early skeletal muscle development and the aptitude for racing at short distances. Specifically, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the first intron of MSTN (g.66493737C/T) is highly predictive of best race distance among Flat racing Thoroughbreds: homozygous C/C horses are best suited to short distance races, heterozygous C/T horses are best suited to middle distance races, and homozygous T/T horses are best suited to longer distance races. Patent applications for this gene marker association, and other linked markers, have been filed. The information contained within the patent applications is exclusively licensed to the commercial biotechnology company Equinome Ltd, which provides a DNA-based test to the international Thoroughbred horse racing and breeding industry. The application of this information in the industry enables informed decision making in breeding and racing and can be used to assist selection to accelerate the rate of change of genetic types among distinct populations (Case Study 1) and within individual breeding operations (Case Study 2).

  8. Methods for transforming and expression screening of filamentous fungal cells with a DNA library

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Lamsa, Michael; Cherry, Joel; Ward, Connie

    2015-06-02

    The present invention relates to methods for expression screening of filamentous fungal transformants, comprising: (a) isolating single colony transformants of a DNA library introduced into E. coli; (b) preparing DNA from each of the single colony E. coli transformants; (c) introducing a sample of each of the DNA preparations of step (b) into separate suspensions of protoplasts of a filamentous fungus to obtain transformants thereof, wherein each transformant contains one or more copies of an individual polynucleotide from the DNA library; (d) growing the individual filamentous fungal transformants of step (c) on selective growth medium, thereby permitting growth of the filamentous fungal transformants, while suppressing growth of untransformed filamentous fungi; and (e) measuring activity or a property of each polypeptide encoded by the individual polynucleotides. The present invention also relates to isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides of interest obtained by such methods, to nucleic acid constructs, expression vectors, and recombinant host cells comprising the isolated polynucleotides, and to methods of producing the polypeptides encoded by the isolated polynucleotides.

  9. A fluorescent aptasensor based on a DNA pyramid nanostructure for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Nameghi, Morteza Alinezhad; Danesh, Noor Mohammad; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hassani, Faezeh Vahdati; Abnous, Khalil; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Analytical techniques for detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) in food products and blood serum are of great significance. In this study, a fluorescent aptasensor was developed for sensitive and specific detection of OTA, based on a DNA pyramid nanostructure (DPN) and PicoGreen (PG) dye. The designed aptasensor inherits characteristics of DPN, such as high stability and capacity for PG loading. PG, as a fluorescent dye, could bind to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). In the absence of OTA, the pyramid structure of DPN remains intact, leading to a very strong fluorescence emission. Because of higher affinity of aptamer for its target relative to its complementary strand, upon addition of target, the pyramid structure of DPN is disassembled, leading to a weak fluorescence emission. The presented aptasensor showed high specificity toward OTA with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.135 nM. Besides, the designed sensing strategy was successfully utilized to recognize OTA in serum and grape juice with LODs of 0.184 and 0.149 nM, respectively.

  10. One-by-one single-molecule detection of mutated nucleobases by monitoring tunneling current using a DNA tip.

    PubMed

    Bui, Phuc Tan; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-31

    A DNA molecule was utilized as a probe tip to achieve single-molecule genetic diagnoses. Hybridization of the probe and target DNAs resulted in electron tunneling along the emergent double-stranded DNA. Simple stationary monitoring of the tunneling current leads to single-molecule DNA detection and discovery of base mismatches and methylation.

  11. Traditional Mold Analysis Compared to a DNA-based Method of Mold Analysis with Applications in Asthmatics' Homes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional environmental mold analysis is based-on microscopic observations and counting of mold structures collected from the air on a sticky surface or culturing of molds on growth media for identification and quantification. A DNA-based method of mold analysis called mol...

  12. Carbinolamine Formation and Dehydration in a DNA Repair Enzyme Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, M. L.; Walker, Ross C.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In order to suggest detailed mechanistic hypotheses for the formation and dehydration of a key carbinolamine intermediate in the T4 pyrimidine dimer glycosylase (T4PDG) reaction, we have investigated these reactions using steered molecular dynamics with a coupled quantum mechanics–molecular mechanics potential (QM/MM). We carried out simulations of DNA abasic site carbinolamine formation with and without a water molecule restrained to remain within the active site quantum region. We recovered potentials of mean force (PMF) from thirty replicate reaction trajectories using Jarzynski averaging. We demonstrated feasible pathways involving water, as well as those independent of water participation. The water–independent enzyme–catalyzed reaction had a bias–corrected Jarzynski–average barrier height of approximately for the carbinolamine formation reaction and ) for the reverse reaction at this level of representation. When the proton transfer was facilitated with an intrinsic quantum water, the barrier height was approximately in the forward (formation) reaction and for the reverse. In addition, two modes of unsteered (free dynamics) carbinolamine dehydration were observed: in one, the quantum water participated as an intermediate proton transfer species, and in the other, the active site protonated glutamate hydrogen was directly transferred to the carbinolamine oxygen. Water–independent unforced proton transfer from the protonated active site glutamate carboxyl to the unprotonated N–terminal amine was also observed. In summary, complex proton transfer events, some involving water intermediates, were studied in QM/MM simulations of T4PDG bound to a DNA abasic site. Imine carbinolamine formation was characterized using steered QM/MM molecular dynamics. Dehydration of the carbinolamine intermediate to form the final imine product was observed in free, unsteered, QM/MM dynamics simulations, as was unforced acid-base transfer between the active site

  13. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Lukashevich, Igor S; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Franco, David

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime-boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. © 2015.

  14. Efficacy of a DNA vaccine carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 antigen gene against coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan; Tao, Jianping

    2013-04-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (P<0.05) at day 7 and 14 after the first immunization. The level of lymphocyte proliferation started to decrease on day 21 after the first immunization. A similar trend was seen in specific antibody levels. Among the 3 pcDNA-Gam56 immunized groups, the median dosage group displayed the highest lymphocyte proliferation and antibody levels (P<0.05). The median dosage group had the greatest relative body weight gain (89.7%), and the greatest oocyst shedding reduction (53.7%). These results indicate that median dosage of DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and immune protection effects, and may be used in field applications for coccidiosis control.

  15. Molecular and immunological characterization of a DNA-launched yellow fever virus 17D infectious clone

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Bredenbeek, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV)-17D is an empirically developed, highly effective live-attenuated vaccine that has been administered to human beings for almost a century. YFV-17D has stood as a paradigm for a successful viral vaccine, and has been exploited as a potential virus vector for the development of recombinant vaccines against other diseases. In this study, a DNA-launched YFV-17D construct (pBeloBAC-FLYF) was explored as a new modality to the standard vaccine to combine the commendable features of both DNA vaccine and live-attenuated viral vaccine. The DNA-launched YFV-17D construct was characterized extensively both in cell culture and in mice. High titres of YFV-17D were generated upon transfection of the DNA into cells, whereas a mutant with deletion in the capsid-coding region (pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC) was restricted to a single round of infection, with no release of progeny virus. Homologous prime–boost immunization of AAD mice with both pBeloBAC-FLYF and pBeloBAC-YF/ΔC elicited specific dose-dependent cellular immune response against YFV-17D. Vaccination of A129 mice with pBeloBAC-FLYF resulted in the induction of YFV-specific neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinated subjects. These promising results underlined the potential of the DNA-launched YFV both as an alternative to standard YFV-17D vaccination and as a vaccine platform for the development of DNA-based recombinant YFV vaccines. PMID:25516543

  16. Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus Encodes a DNA-Binding Protein Capable of Destabilizing Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailov, Victor S.; Mikhailova, Alla L.; Iwanaga, Masashi; Gomi, Sumiko; Maeda, Susumu

    1998-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (designated DBP) with an apparent molecular mass of 38 kDa was purified to homogeneity from BmN cells (derived from Bombyx mori) infected with the B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). Six peptides obtained after digestion of the isolated protein with Achromobacter protease I were partially or completely sequenced. The determined amino acid sequences indicated that DBP was encoded by an open reading frame (ORF16) located at nucleotides (nt) 16189 to 17139 in the BmNPV genome (GenBank accession no. L33180). This ORF (designated dbp) is a homolog of Autographa californica multicapsid NPV ORF25, whose product has not been identified. BmNPV DBP is predicted to contain 317 amino acids (calculated molecular mass of 36.7 kDa) and to have an isoelectric point of 7.8. DBP showed a tendency to multimerization in the course of purification and was found to bind preferentially to single-stranded DNA. When bound to oligonucleotides, DBP protected them from hydrolysis by phage T4 DNA polymerase-associated 3′→5′ exonuclease. The sizes of the protected fragments indicated that a binding site size for DBP is about 30 nt per protein monomer. DBP, but not BmNPV LEF-3, was capable of unwinding partial DNA duplexes in an in vitro system. This helix-destabilizing ability is consistent with the prediction that DBP functions as a single-stranded DNA binding protein in virus replication. PMID:9525636

  17. A DNA barcode library for Germany's mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera).

    PubMed

    Morinière, Jérôme; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael; Beermann, Arne J; König, Tobias; Hess, Monika; Koch, Stefan; Müller, Reinhard; Leese, Florian; Hebert, Paul D N; Hausmann, Axel; Schubart, Christoph D; Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2017-11-01

    Mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera) are prominent representatives of aquatic macroinvertebrates, commonly used as indicator organisms for water quality and ecosystem assessments. However, unambiguous morphological identification of EPT species, especially their immature life stages, is a challenging, yet fundamental task. A comprehensive DNA barcode library based upon taxonomically well-curated specimens is needed to overcome the problematic identification. Once available, this library will support the implementation of fast, cost-efficient and reliable DNA-based identifications and assessments of ecological status. This study represents a major step towards a DNA barcode reference library as it covers for two-thirds of Germany's EPT species including 2,613 individuals belonging to 363 identified species. As such, it provides coverage for 38 of 44 families (86%) and practically all major bioindicator species. DNA barcode compliant sequences (≥500 bp) were recovered from 98.74% of the analysed specimens. Whereas most species (325, i.e., 89.53%) were unambiguously assigned to a single Barcode Index Number (BIN) by its COI sequence, 38 species (18 Ephemeroptera, nine Plecoptera and 11 Trichoptera) were assigned to a total of 89 BINs. Most of these additional BINs formed nearest neighbour clusters, reflecting the discrimination of geographical subclades of a currently recognized species. BIN sharing was uncommon, involving only two species pairs of Ephemeroptera. Interestingly, both maximum pairwise and nearest neighbour distances were substantially higher for Ephemeroptera compared to Plecoptera and Trichoptera, possibly indicating older speciation events, stronger positive selection or faster rate of molecular evolution. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. ITS1: a DNA barcode better than ITS2 in eukaryotes?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Cun; Liu, Chang; Huang, Liang; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Chen, Haimei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Cai, Dayong; Li, Jian-Qin

    2015-05-01

    A DNA barcode is a short piece of DNA sequence used for species determination and discovery. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS/ITS2) region has been proposed as the standard DNA barcode for fungi and seed plants and has been widely used in DNA barcoding analyses for other biological groups, for example algae, protists and animals. The ITS region consists of both ITS1 and ITS2 regions. Here, a large-scale meta-analysis was carried out to compare ITS1 and ITS2 from three aspects: PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and species discrimination, in terms of the presence of DNA barcoding gaps, species discrimination efficiency, sequence length distribution, GC content distribution and primer universality. In total, 85 345 sequence pairs in 10 major groups of eukaryotes, including ascomycetes, basidiomycetes, liverworts, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, monocotyledons, eudicotyledons, insects and fishes, covering 611 families, 3694 genera, and 19 060 species, were analysed. Using similarity-based methods, we calculated species discrimination efficiencies for ITS1 and ITS2 in all major groups, families and genera. Using Fisher's exact test, we found that ITS1 has significantly higher efficiencies than ITS2 in 17 of the 47 families and 20 of the 49 genera, which are sample-rich. By in silico PCR amplification evaluation, primer universality of the extensively applied ITS1 primers was found superior to that of ITS2 primers. Additionally, shorter length of amplification product and lower GC content was discovered to be two other advantages of ITS1 for sequencing. In summary, ITS1 represents a better DNA barcode than ITS2 for eukaryotic species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Selection of a DNA barcode for Nectriaceae from fungal whole-genomes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhaoqing; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Jing; Zhuang, Wenying; Yu, Zhihe

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a short segment of sequence that is able to distinguish species. A barcode must ideally contain enough variation to distinguish every individual species and be easily obtained. Fungi of Nectriaceae are economically important and show high species diversity. To establish a standard DNA barcode for this group of fungi, the genomes of Neurospora crassa and 30 other filamentous fungi were compared. The expect value was treated as a criterion to recognize homologous sequences. Four candidate markers, Hsp90, AAC, CDC48, and EF3, were tested for their feasibility as barcodes in the identification of 34 well-established species belonging to 13 genera of Nectriaceae. Two hundred and fifteen sequences were analyzed. Intra- and inter-specific variations and the success rate of PCR amplification and sequencing were considered as important criteria for estimation of the candidate markers. Ultimately, the partial EF3 gene met the requirements for a good DNA barcode: No overlap was found between the intra- and inter-specific pairwise distances. The smallest inter-specific distance of EF3 gene was 3.19%, while the largest intra-specific distance was 1.79%. In addition, there was a high success rate in PCR and sequencing for this gene (96.3%). CDC48 showed sufficiently high sequence variation among species, but the PCR and sequencing success rate was 84% using a single pair of primers. Although the Hsp90 and AAC genes had higher PCR and sequencing success rates (96.3% and 97.5%, respectively), overlapping occurred between the intra- and inter-specific variations, which could lead to misidentification. Therefore, we propose the EF3 gene as a possible DNA barcode for the nectriaceous fungi.

  20. Targeting with bovine CD154 enhances humoral immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Manoj, Sharmila; Griebel, Philip J; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2003-01-15

    CD40-CD154 interactions play an important role in regulating humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, these interactions have been exploited for the development of therapeutic and preventive treatments. The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine CD154 to target a plasmid-encoded Ag to CD40-expressing APCs. To achieve this, a plasmid coding for bovine CD154 fused to a truncated secreted form of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D (tgD), pSLIAtgD-CD154, was constructed. The chimeric tgD-CD154 was expressed in vitro in COS-7 cells and reacted with both glycoprotein D- and CD154-specific Abs. Both tgD and tgD-CD154 were capable of binding to epithelial cells, whereas only tgD-CD154 bound to B cells. Furthermore, dual-labeling of ovine PBMCs revealed that tgD-CD154 was bound by primarily B cells. The functional integrity of the tgD-CD154 chimera was confirmed by the induction of both IL-4-dependent B cell proliferation and tgD-specific lymphoproliferative responses in vitro. Finally, sheep immunized with pSLIAtgD-CD154 developed a more rapid primary tgD-specific Ab response and a significantly stronger tgD-specific secondary response when compared with animals immunized with pSLIAtgD and control animals. Similarly, virus-neutralizing Ab titers were significantly higher after secondary immunization with pSLIAtgD-CD154. These results demonstrate that using CD154 to target plasmid-expressed Ag can significantly enhance immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine.

  1. Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine Carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 Antigen Gene against Coccidiosis in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×104 sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (P<0.05) at day 7 and 14 after the first immunization. The level of lymphocyte proliferation started to decrease on day 21 after the first immunization. A similar trend was seen in specific antibody levels. Among the 3 pcDNA-Gam56 immunized groups, the median dosage group displayed the highest lymphocyte proliferation and antibody levels (P<0.05). The median dosage group had the greatest relative body weight gain (89.7%), and the greatest oocyst shedding reduction (53.7%). These results indicate that median dosage of DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and immune protection effects, and may be used in field applications for coccidiosis control. PMID:23710081

  2. Development of a DNA Barcoding System for Seagrasses: Successful but Not Simple

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Christina; Thangaradjou, Thirunavakkarasu; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Seagrasses, a unique group of submerged flowering plants, profoundly influence the physical, chemical and biological environments of coastal waters through their high primary productivity and nutrient recycling ability. They provide habitat for aquatic life, alter water flow, stabilize the ground and mitigate the impact of nutrient pollution. at the coast region. Although on a global scale seagrasses represent less than 0.1% of the angiosperm taxa, the taxonomical ambiguity in delineating seagrass species is high. Thus, the taxonomy of several genera is unsolved. While seagrasses are capable of performing both, sexual and asexual reproduction, vegetative reproduction is common and sexual progenies are always short lived and epimeral in nature. This makes species differentiation often difficult, especially for non-taxonomists since the flower as a distinct morphological trait is missing. Our goal is to develop a DNA barcoding system assisting also non-taxonomists to identify regional seagrass species. The results will be corroborated by publicly available sequence data. The main focus is on the 14 described seagrass species of India, supplemented with seagrasses from temperate regions. According to the recommendations of the Consortium for the Barcoding of Life (CBOL) rbcL and matK were used in this study. After optimization of the DNA extraction method from preserved seagrass material, the respective sequences were amplified from all species analyzed. Tree- and character-based approaches demonstrate that the rbcL sequence fragment is capable of resolving up to family and genus level. Only matK sequences were reliable in resolving species and partially the ecotype level. Additionally, a plastidic gene spacer was included in the analysis to confirm the identification level. Although the analysis of these three loci solved several nodes, a few complexes remained unsolved, even when constructing a combined tree for all three loci. Our approaches contribute to the

  3. Development of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer can be Predicted by a DNA Hypermethylation Profile.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier C; Andrés, Guillermo; Ashour, Nadia; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; López, Jose I; Ropero, Santiago

    2016-03-01

    Detection of DNA hypermethylation has emerged as a novel molecular biomarker for prostate cancer diagnosis and evaluation of prognosis. We sought to define whether a hypermethylation profile of patients with prostate cancer on androgen deprivation would predict castrate resistant prostate cancer. Genome-wide methylation analysis was performed using a methylation cancer panel in 10 normal prostates and 45 tumor samples from patients placed on androgen deprivation who were followed until castrate resistant disease developed. Castrate resistant disease was defined according to EAU (European Association of Urology) guideline criteria. Two pathologists reviewed the Gleason score, Ki-67 index and neuroendocrine differentiation. Hierarchical clustering analysis was performed and relationships with outcome were investigated by Cox regression and log rank analysis. We found 61 genes that were significantly hypermethylated in greater than 20% of tumors analyzed. Three clusters of patients were characterized by a DNA methylation profile, including 1 at risk for earlier castrate resistant disease (log rank p = 0.019) and specific mortality (log rank p = 0.002). Hypermethylation of ETV1 (HR 3.75) and ZNF215 (HR 2.89) predicted disease progression despite androgen deprivation. Hypermethylation of IRAK3 (HR 13.72), ZNF215 (HR 4.81) and SEPT9 (HR 7.64) were independent markers of prognosis. Prostate specific antigen greater than 25 ng/ml, Gleason pattern 5, Ki-67 index greater than 12% and metastasis at diagnosis also predicted a negative response to androgen deprivation. Study limitations included the retrospective design and limited number of cases. Epigenetic silencing of the mentioned genes could be novel molecular markers for the prognosis of advanced prostate cancer. It might predict castrate resistance during hormone deprivation and, thus, disease specific mortality. Gene hypermethylation is associated with disease progression in patients who receive hormone therapy. It

  4. Particle integrity, sampling, and application of a DNA-tagged tracer for aerosol transport studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeser, Cynthia Jeanne

    Aerosols are an ever-present part of our daily environment and have extensive effects on both human and environmental health. Particles in the inhalable range (1-10 μm diameter) are of particular concern because their deposition in the lung can lead to a variety of illnesses including allergic reactions, viral or bacterial infections, and cancer. Understanding the transport of inhalable aerosols across both short and long distances is necessary to predict human exposures to aerosols. To assess the transport of hazardous aerosols, surrogate tracer particles are required to measure their transport through occupied spaces. These tracer particles must not only possess similarmore » transport characteristics to those of interest but also be easily distinguished from the background at low levels and survive the environmental conditions of the testing environment. A previously-developed DNA-tagged particle (DNATrax), composed of food-grade sugar and a DNA oligonucleotide as a “barcode” label, shows promise as a new aerosol tracer. Herein, the use of DNATrax material is validated for use in both indoor and outdoor environments. Utilizing passive samplers made of materials commonly found in indoor environments followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for endpoint particle detection, particles detection was achieved up to 90 m from the aerosolization location and across shorter distances with high spatial resolution. The unique DNA label and PCR assay specificity were leveraged to perform multiple simultaneous experiments. This allowed the assessment of experimental reproducibility, a rare occurrence among aerosol field tests. To transition to outdoor testing, the solid material provides some protection of the DNA label when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with 60% of the DNA remaining intact after 60 minutes under a germicidal lamp and the rate of degradation declining with irradiation time. Additionally, exposure of the DNATrax material

  5. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production

    PubMed Central

    Wallenhammar, Ann-Charlotte; Gunnarson, Albin; Hansson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil−1) in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g−1 soil) in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20%) showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g−1 soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g−1 soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of prevention of

  6. Quantification of Plasmodiophora brassicae Using a DNA-Based Soil Test Facilitates Sustainable Oilseed Rape Production.

    PubMed

    Wallenhammar, Ann-Charlotte; Gunnarson, Albin; Hansson, Fredrik; Jonsson, Anders

    2016-04-22

    Outbreaks of clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne obligate parasite Plasmodiophora brassicae are common in oilseed rape (OSR) in Sweden. A DNA-based soil testing service that identifies fields where P. brassicae poses a significant risk of clubroot infection is now commercially available. It was applied here in field surveys to monitor the prevalence of P. brassicae DNA in field soils intended for winter OSR production and winter OSR field experiments. In 2013 in Scania, prior to planting, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 60% of 45 fields on 10 of 18 farms. In 2014, P. brassicae DNA was detected in 44% of 59 fields in 14 of 36 farms, in the main winter OSR producing region in southern Sweden. P. brassicae was present indicative of a risk for >10% yield loss with susceptible cultivars (>1300 DNA copies g soil(-1)) in 47% and 44% of fields in 2013 and 2014 respectively. Furthermore, P. brassicae DNA was indicative of sites at risk of complete crop failure if susceptible cultivars were grown (>50 000 copies g(-1) soil) in 14% and 8% of fields in 2013 and 2014, respectively. A survey of all fields at Lanna research station in western Sweden showed that P. brassicae was spread throughout the farm, as only three of the fields (20%) showed infection levels below the detection limit for P.brassicae DNA, while the level was >50,000 DNA copies g(-1) soil in 20% of the fields. Soil-borne spread is of critical importance and soil scraped off footwear showed levels of up to 682 million spores g(-1) soil. Soil testing is an important tool for determining the presence of P. brassicae and providing an indication of potential yield loss, e.g., in advisory work on planning for a sustainable OSR crop rotation. This soil test is gaining acceptance as a tool that increases the likelihood of success in precision agriculture and in applied research conducted in commercial oilseed fields and at research stations. The present application highlights the importance of prevention of

  7. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle.

  8. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-07-29

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world's attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg(2+) ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species.

  9. Integrating a DNA Strand Displacement Reaction with a Whispering Gallery Mode Sensor for Label-Free Mercury (II) Ion Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengchi; Wu, Yuqiang; Niu, Zhongwei; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is an extremely toxic chemical pollutant of our environment. It has attracted the world’s attention due to its high mobility and the ease with which it accumulates in organisms. Sensitive devices and methods specific for detecting mercury ions are, hence, in great need. Here, we have integrated a DNA strand displacement reaction with a whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensor for demonstrating the detection of Hg2+ ions. Our approach relies on the displacement of a DNA hairpin structure, which forms after the binding of mercury ions to an aptamer DNA sequence. The strand displacement reaction of the DNA aptamer provides highly specific and quantitative means for determining the mercury ion concentration on a label-free WGM sensor platform. Our approach also shows the possibility for manipulating the kinetics of a strand displacement reaction with specific ionic species. PMID:27483277

  10. A smart magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent responsive to adenosine based on a DNA aptamer-conjugated gadolinium complex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weichen; Lu, Yi

    2011-05-07

    We report a general strategy for developing a smart MRI contrast agent for the sensing of small molecules such as adenosine based on a DNA aptamer that is conjugated to a Gd compound and a protein streptavidin. The binding of adenosine to its aptamer results in the dissociation of the Gd compound from the large protein, leading to decreases in the rotational correlation time and thus change of MRI contrast. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  11. A Phase-1 Clinical Trial of a DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Delivered by Intramuscular or Intradermal Electroporation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-25

    A Phase 1 clinical trial of a DNA vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis delivered by intramuscular or intradermal electroporation Drew... vaccines against VEEV available in the United States. We developed a candidate DNA vaccine expressing the E3-E2-6K-E1 genes of VEEV (pWRG/VEEV) and...groups and were vaccinated with high and low doses of pWRG/VEE or a saline placebo by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) electroporation (EP

  12. Simultaneous binding to the tracking strand, displaced strand and the duplex of a DNA fork enhances unwinding by Dda helicase

    PubMed Central

    Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Byrd, Alicia K.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between helicases and the tracking strand of a DNA substrate are well-characterized; however, the role of the displaced strand is a less understood characteristic of DNA unwinding. Dda helicase exhibited greater processivity when unwinding a DNA fork compared to a ss/ds DNA junction substrate. The lag phase in the unwinding progress curve was reduced for the forked DNA compared to the ss/ds junction. Fewer kinetic steps were required to unwind the fork compared to the ss/ds junction, suggesting that binding to the fork leads to disruption of the duplex. DNA footprinting confirmed that interaction of Dda with a fork leads to two base pairs being disrupted whereas no disruption of base pairing was observed with the ss/ds junction. Neutralization of the phosphodiester backbone resulted in a DNA-footprinting pattern similar to that observed with the ss/ds junction, consistent with disruption of the interaction between Dda and the displaced strand. Several basic residues in the 1A domain which were previously proposed to bind to the incoming duplex DNA were replaced with alanines, resulting in apparent loss of interaction with the duplex. Taken together, these results suggest that Dda interaction with the tracking strand, displaced strand and duplex coordinates DNA unwinding. PMID:25249618

  13. Examining the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop on science teachers' professional development and student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonmez, Duygu

    behavior. The goal is to understand what factors affect teachers' decision making to implement the new knowledge and skills in their classrooms. For this purpose, the study focuses on the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop, which has been developed and is regularly offered by a large Midwestern university in the United States for secondary science teachers and their students through cooperation between the university and a large Midwestern public school district. The workshop focuses on the biotechnology applications of genetics---specifically, use of DNA fingerprinting technology in different areas of social life---while forensic science is emphasized. Results indicate that the teachers' motivation to attend the DNA Fingerprinting professional development workshop was mainly influenced by two variables: (1) the need to improve content knowledge and skills, and (2) requirements associated with current educational policies. Level of content knowledge was also found to be a factor contributing to teachers' motivation to implement the workshop. Concerns related to student maturity and classroom management were also identified as factors influencing teachers' implementation behavior. Evidence that the DNA Fingerprinting workshop can be successfully implemented by classroom teachers was obtained. The DNA fingerprinting workshop was found to be a successful model for packaging professional development experiences for content intensive areas.

  14. Probing the recognition surface of a DNA triplex: binding studies with intercalator-neomycin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Xi, Hongjuan; Kumar, Sunil; Gray, David; Davis, Erik; Hamilton, Paris; Skriba, Michael; Arya, Dev P

    2010-07-06

    Thermodynamic studies on the interactions between intercalator-neomycin conjugates and a DNA polynucleotide triplex [poly(dA).2poly(dT)] were conducted. To draw a complete picture of such interactions, naphthalene diimide-neomycin (3) and anthraquinone-neomycin (4) conjugates were synthesized and used together with two other analogues, previously synthesized pyrene-neomycin (1) and BQQ-neomycin (2) conjugates, in our investigations. A combination of experiments, including UV denaturation, circular dichroism (CD) titration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), revealed that all four conjugates (1-4) stabilized poly(dA).2poly(dT) much more than its parent compound, neomycin. UV melting experiments clearly showed that the temperature (T(m3-->2)) at which poly(dA).2poly(dT) dissociated into poly(dA).poly(dT) and poly(dT) increased dramatically (>12 degrees C) in the presence of intercalator-neomycin conjugates (1-4) even at a very low concentration (2 muM). In contrast to intercalator-neomycin conjugates, the increment of T(m3-->2) of poly(dA).2poly(dT) induced by neomycin was negligible under the same conditions. The binding preference of intercalator-neomycin conjugates (1-4) to poly(dA).2poly(dT) was also confirmed by competition dialysis and a fluorescent intercalator displacement assay. Circular dichroism titration studies revealed that compounds 1-4 had slightly larger binding site size ( approximately 7-7.5) with poly(dA).2poly(dT) as compared to neomycin ( approximately 6.5). The thermodynamic parameters of these intercalator-neomycin conjugates with poly(dA).2poly(dT) were derived from an integrated van't Hoff equation using the T(m3-->2) values, the binding site size numbers, and other parameters obtained from DSC and ITC. The binding affinity of all tested ligands with poly(dA).2poly(dT) increased in the following order: neomycin < 1 < 3 < 4 < 2. Among them, the binding constant [(2.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(8) M(-1)] of

  15. Entrapping of fullerenes, nanotubes, and inorganic nanoparticles by a DNA-chitosan complex: a method for nanomaterials removal.

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, Anatoly A; Maeda, Noriko; Pu, Shengyan; Murata, Shizuaki

    2013-05-07

    We report a protocol for entrapping of various water-dispersed nanomaterials: fullerenes, multiwall carbon nanotubes, quantum dots (semiconductor nanoparticles), and gold nanorods, into a DNA-chitosan complex. In contrast to small-size nanomaterial particles, the bulky DNA-chitosan interpolyelectrolyte complex incorporating the dispersed nanomaterials can be easily separated from aqueous media by centrifugation, filtration, or decantation. While the removal of nanoparticles by centrifugation is equally efficient for every type of nanoparticles and reaches 100%, the higher efficiency of the nanomaterials removal by other two methods is favored by larger size of nanoparticles. The application of this entrapping protocol for removal of nanomaterials from water is discussed.

  16. Integrating a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey: a case study on temperate intertidal polychaete communities in Qingdao, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhinan; Chen, Haiyan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hui; Guo, Lei; Pan, Haijian

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we integrated a DNA barcoding project with an ecological survey on intertidal polychaete communities and investigated the utility of CO1 gene sequence as a DNA barcode for the classification of the intertidal polychaetes. Using 16S rDNA as a complementary marker and combining morphological and ecological characterization, some of dominant and common polychaete species from Chinese coasts were assessed for their taxonomic status. We obtained 22 haplotype gene sequences of 13 taxa, including 10 CO1 sequences and 12 16S rDNA sequences. Based on intra- and inter-specific distances, we built phylogenetic trees using the neighbor-joining method. Our study suggested that the mitochondrial CO1 gene was a valid DNA barcoding marker for species identification in polychaetes, but other genes, such as 16S rDNA, could be used as a complementary genetic marker. For more accurate species identification and effective testing of species hypothesis, DNA barcoding should be incorporated with morphological, ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic information. The application of DNA barcoding and molecular identification in the ecological survey on the intertidal polychaete communities demonstrated the feasibility of integrating DNA taxonomy and ecology.

  17. A microfluidic chip containing a molecularly imprinted polymer and a DNA aptamer for voltammetric determination of carbofuran.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhuai; Li, Jianping; Luo, Jinhui; Xu, Zhi; Ma, Xionghui

    2018-05-11

    An electrochemical microfluidic chip is described for the determination of the insecticide carbofuran. It is making use of a molecularly imprinted film (MIP) and a DNA aptamer as dual recognition units. The analyte (carbofuran) is transported to the MIP and captured at the identification site in the channel. Then, carbofuran is eluted with carbinol-acetic acid and transported to the DNA aptamer on the testing position of the chip. It is captured again, this time by the aptamer, and detected by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The dual recognition (by aptamer and MIP) results in outstanding selectivity. Additionally, graphene oxide-supported gold nanoparticles (GO-AuNPs) were used to improve the sensitivity of electrochemical detector. DPV response is linear in the 0.2 to 50 nM carbofuran concentration range at a potential of -1.2 V, with a 67 pM detection limit. The method has attractive features such as its potential for high throughput, high degree of automation, and high integration. Conceivably, the method may be extended to other analytes for which appropriate MIPs and aptamers are available. Graphical abstract Schematic of an electrochemical microfluidic chip for carbofuran detection based on a molecularly imprinted film (MIP) and a DNA aptamer as dual recognition units. In the chip, targets were recognized by MIP and aptamer, respectively. It shows promising potential for the design of electrochemical devices with high throughput, high automation, and high integration.

  18. Toehold-Mediated Displacement of an Adenosine-Binding Aptamer from a DNA Duplex by its Ligand.

    PubMed

    Monserud, Jon H; Macri, Katherine M; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2016-10-24

    DNA is increasingly used to engineer dynamic nanoscale circuits, structures, and motors, many of which rely on DNA strand-displacement reactions. The use of functional DNA sequences (e.g., aptamers, which bind to a wide range of ligands) in these reactions would potentially confer responsiveness on such devices, and integrate DNA computation with highly varied molecular stimuli. By using high-throughput single-molecule FRET methods, we compared the kinetics of a putative aptamer-ligand and aptamer-complement strand-displacement reaction. We found that the ligands actively disrupted the DNA duplex in the presence of a DNA toehold in a similar manner to complementary DNA, with kinetic details specific to the aptamer structure, thus suggesting that the DNA strand-displacement concept can be extended to functional DNA-ligand systems. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-10-04

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases.

  20. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan. PMID:18834537

  1. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, S.; Brody, T.; Linn, S.

    1994-04-26

    Cells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells is caused by a defect in DDB activity. Injected DDB protein stimulated DNA repair to normal levels in those strains that lack the DDB activity but did not stimulate repair in cells from other xeroderma pigmentosum groups or in XP-E cells that contain the activity. These results provide direct evidence that defective DDB activity causes the repairmore » defect in a subset of XP-E patients, which in turn establishes a role for this activity in nucleotide-excision repair in vivo.« less

  2. Preparation of a DNA matrix via an electrochemically directed copolymerization of pyrrole and oligonucleotides bearing a pyrrole group.

    PubMed Central

    Livache, T; Roget, A; Dejean, E; Barthet, C; Bidan, G; Téoule, R

    1994-01-01

    A new methodology for the preparation of addressed DNA matrices is described. The process includes an electrochemically directed copolymerization of pyrrole and oligonucleotides bearing on their 5' end a pyrrole moiety introduced by phosphoramidite chemistry. The electro-controlled synthesis of the copolymer (poly-pyrrole) gives, in one step, a solid conducting film deposited on the surface of an electrode. The resulting polymer consists of pyrrole chains bearing covalently linked oligonucleotide. The polymer growth is limited to the electrode surface, so that it is possible to prepare a DNA matrix on a multiple electrode device by successive copolymerizations. A support bearing four oligonucleotides was used to detect three ras mutations on a synthetic DNA fragment. PMID:8065902

  3. Patient identification error among prostate needle core biopsy specimens--are we ready for a DNA time-out?

    PubMed

    Suba, Eric J; Pfeifer, John D; Raab, Stephen S

    2007-10-01

    Patient identification errors in surgical pathology often involve switches of prostate or breast needle core biopsy specimens among patients. We assessed strategies for decreasing the occurrence of these uncommon and yet potentially catastrophic events. Root cause analyses were performed following 3 cases of patient identification error involving prostate needle core biopsy specimens. Patient identification errors in surgical pathology result from slips and lapses of automatic human action that may occur at numerous steps during pre-laboratory, laboratory and post-laboratory work flow processes. Patient identification errors among prostate needle biopsies may be difficult to entirely prevent through the optimization of work flow processes. A DNA time-out, whereby DNA polymorphic microsatellite analysis is used to confirm patient identification before radiation therapy or radical surgery, may eliminate patient identification errors among needle biopsies.

  4. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  5. A DNA vaccine for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever protects against disease and death in two lethal mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Collin J.; Suschak, John J.; Richards, Michelle J.; Badger, Catherine V.; Six, Carolyn M.; Martin, Jacqueline D.; Hannaman, Drew; Zivcec, Marko; Bergeron, Eric; Koehler, Jeffrey W.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2017-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus capable of causing a severe hemorrhagic fever disease in humans. There are currently no licensed vaccines to prevent CCHFV-associated disease. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the M-segment glycoprotein precursor gene of CCHFV and assessed its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in two lethal mouse models of disease: type I interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR-/-) mice; and a novel transiently immune suppressed (IS) mouse model. Vaccination of mice by muscle electroporation of the M-segment DNA vaccine elicited strong antigen-specific humoral immune responses with neutralizing titers after three vaccinations in both IFNAR-/- and IS mouse models. To compare the protective efficacy of the vaccine in the two models, groups of vaccinated mice (7–10 per group) were intraperitoneally (IP) challenged with a lethal dose of CCHFV strain IbAr 10200. Weight loss was markedly reduced in CCHFV DNA-vaccinated mice as compared to controls. Furthermore, whereas all vector-control vaccinated mice succumbed to disease by day 5, the DNA vaccine protected >60% of the animals from lethal disease. Mice from both models developed comparable levels of antibodies, but the IS mice had a more balanced Th1/Th2 response to vaccination. There were no statistical differences in the protective efficacies of the vaccine in the two models. Our results provide the first comparison of these two mouse models for assessing a vaccine against CCHFV and offer supportive data indicating that a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein genes of CCHFV elicits protective immunity against CCHFV. PMID:28922426

  6. A DNA vaccine for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever protects against disease and death in two lethal mouse models.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Aura R; Shoemaker, Charles J; Golden, Joseph W; Fitzpatrick, Collin J; Suschak, John J; Richards, Michelle J; Badger, Catherine V; Six, Carolyn M; Martin, Jacqueline D; Hannaman, Drew; Zivcec, Marko; Bergeron, Eric; Koehler, Jeffrey W; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne virus capable of causing a severe hemorrhagic fever disease in humans. There are currently no licensed vaccines to prevent CCHFV-associated disease. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the M-segment glycoprotein precursor gene of CCHFV and assessed its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in two lethal mouse models of disease: type I interferon receptor knockout (IFNAR-/-) mice; and a novel transiently immune suppressed (IS) mouse model. Vaccination of mice by muscle electroporation of the M-segment DNA vaccine elicited strong antigen-specific humoral immune responses with neutralizing titers after three vaccinations in both IFNAR-/- and IS mouse models. To compare the protective efficacy of the vaccine in the two models, groups of vaccinated mice (7-10 per group) were intraperitoneally (IP) challenged with a lethal dose of CCHFV strain IbAr 10200. Weight loss was markedly reduced in CCHFV DNA-vaccinated mice as compared to controls. Furthermore, whereas all vector-control vaccinated mice succumbed to disease by day 5, the DNA vaccine protected >60% of the animals from lethal disease. Mice from both models developed comparable levels of antibodies, but the IS mice had a more balanced Th1/Th2 response to vaccination. There were no statistical differences in the protective efficacies of the vaccine in the two models. Our results provide the first comparison of these two mouse models for assessing a vaccine against CCHFV and offer supportive data indicating that a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein genes of CCHFV elicits protective immunity against CCHFV.

  7. Sensitive electrochemical detection of dopamine with a DNA/graphene bi-layer modified carbon ionic liquid electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; You, Zheng; Sha, Hailiang; Cheng, Yong; Zhu, Huanhuan; Sun, Wei

    2014-10-01

    A DNA and graphene (GR) bi-layer modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) was fabricated by an electrodeposition method. GR nanosheets were electrodeposited on the surface of CILE at the potential of -1.3 V and then DNA was further deposited at the potential of +0.5 V on GR modified CILE. Electrochemical performances of the fabricated DNA/GR/CILE were carefully investigated. Then electrochemical behaviors of dopamine (DA) on the modified electrode were studied with the calculated electrochemical parameters. Under the optimized conditions, a linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration of DA was obtained in the range from 0.1 μmol/L to 1.0 mmol/L with a detection limit of 0.027 μmol/L (3σ). The modified electrode exhibited excellent reproducibility, repeatability, stability, validation and robustness for the electrochemical detection of DA. The proposed method was further applied to the DA injection solution and human urine samples determination with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Portal protein functions akin to a DNA-sensor that couples genome-packaging to icosahedral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Lokareddy, Ravi K.; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S.; Roy, Ankoor

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses assemble infectious particles via an empty precursor capsid (or ‘procapsid’) built by multiple copies of coat and scaffolding protein and by one dodecameric portal protein. Genome packaging triggers rearrangement of the coat protein and release of scaffolding protein, resulting in dramatic procapsid lattice expansion. Here, we provide structural evidence that the portal protein of the bacteriophage P22 exists in two distinct dodecameric conformations: an asymmetric assembly in the procapsid (PC-portal) that is competent for high affinity binding to the large terminase packaging protein, and a symmetric ring in the mature virion (MV-portal) that has negligible affinitymore » for the packaging motor. Modelling studies indicate the structure of PC-portal is incompatible with DNA coaxially spooled around the portal vertex, suggesting that newly packaged DNA triggers the switch from PC- to MV-conformation. Thus, we propose the signal for termination of ‘Headful Packaging’ is a DNA-dependent symmetrization of portal protein.« less

  9. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  10. ARG1 (altered response to gravity) encodes a DnaJ-like protein that potentially interacts with the cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J. C.; Chen, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1999-01-01

    Gravitropism allows plant organs to direct their growth at a specific angle from the gravity vector, promoting upward growth for shoots and downward growth for roots. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying gravitropic signal transduction. We found that mutations in the ARG1 locus of Arabidopsis thaliana alter root and hypocotyl gravitropism without affecting phototropism, root growth responses to phytohormones or inhibitors of auxin transport, or starch accumulation. The positional cloning of ARG1 revealed a DnaJ-like protein containing a coiled-coil region homologous to coiled coils found in cytoskeleton-interacting proteins. These data suggest that ARG1 participates in a gravity-signaling process involving the cytoskeleton. A combination of Northern blot studies and analysis of ARG1-GUS fusion-reporter expression in transgenic plants demonstrated that ARG1 is expressed in all organs. Ubiquitous ARG1 expression in Arabidopsis and the identification of an ortholog in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that ARG1 is involved in other essential processes.

  11. Building a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: what about the subspecies?

    PubMed

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity.

  12. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-dependent bioactivation of clofibric acid to a DNA-damaging intermediate in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ghaoui, Roula; Sallustio, Benedetta C; Burcham, Philip C; Fontaine, Frank R

    2003-05-06

    Glucuronidation of a number of carboxyl-containing drugs generates reactive acyl glucuronide metabolites. These electrophilic species alkylate cell proteins and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of toxic syndromes seen in patients receiving the parent aglycones. Whether acyl glucuronides also attack nuclear DNA is unknown, although the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid was recently found to decrease the transfection efficiency of phage DNA and generate strand breaks in plasmid DNA in vitro. To determine if such a DNA damage occurs within a cellular environment, the comet assay (i.e. single-cell gel electrophoresis) was used to detect DNA lesions in the nuclear genome of isolated mouse hepatocytes cultured with clofibric acid. Overnight exposure to 50 microM and higher concentrations of clofibric acid produced concentration-dependent increases in the comet areas of hepatocyte nuclei, with 1 mM clofibrate producing a 3.6-fold elevation over controls. These effects closely coincided with culture medium concentrations of the glucuronide metabolite formed from clofibric acid, 1-O-beta-clofibryl glucuronide. Consistent with a role for glucuronidation in the DNA damage observed, the glucuronidation inhibitor borneol diminished glucuronide formation from 100 microM clofibrate by 98% and returned comet areas to baseline levels. Collectively, these results suggest that the acyl glucuronide formed from clofibric acid is capable of migrating from its site of formation within the endoplasmic reticulum to generate strand nicks in nuclear DNA.

  13. Controlling the stoichiometry and strand polarity of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex structure by using a DNA origami frame

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Lan Thao Tran, Phong; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Guanine-rich oligonucleotides often show a strong tendency to form supramolecular architecture, the so-called G-quadruplex structure. Because of the biological significance, it is now considered to be one of the most important conformations of DNA. Here, we describe the direct visualization and single-molecule analysis of the formation of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex in KCl solution. The conformational changes were carried out by incorporating two duplex DNAs, with G–G mismatch repeats in the middle, inside a DNA origami frame and monitoring the topology change of the strands. In the absence of KCl, incorporated duplexes had no interaction and laid parallel to each other. Addition of KCl induced the formation of a G-quadruplex structure by stably binding the duplexes to each other in the middle. Such a quadruplex formation allowed the DNA synapsis without disturbing the duplex regions of the participating sequences, and resulted in an X-shaped structure that was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Further, the G-quadruplex formation in KCl solution and its disruption in KCl-free buffer were analyzed in real-time. The orientation of the G-quadruplex is often difficult to control and investigate using traditional biochemical methods. However, our method using DNA origami could successfully control the strand orientations, topology and stoichiometry of the G-quadruplex. PMID:23863846

  14. Design and construction of a DNA origami drug delivery system based on MPT64 antibody aptamer for tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Hafezi-Moghadam, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-02-01

    With all of the developments on infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains a cause of death among people. One of the most promising assembly techniques in nano-technology is "scaffolded DNA origami" to design and construct a nano-scale drug delivery system. Because of the global health problems of tuberculosis, the development of potent new anti-tuberculosis drug delivery system without cross-resistance with known anti-mycobacterial agents is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to design a nano-scale drug delivery system for TB treatment using the DNA origami method. In this study, we presented an experimental research on a DNA drug delivery system for treating Tuberculosis. TEM images were visualized with an FEI Tecnai T12 BioTWIN at 120 kV. The model was designed by caDNAno software and computational prediction of the 3D solution shape and its flexibility was calculated with a CanDo server. Synthesizing the product was imaged using transmission electron microscopy after negative-staining by uranyl formate. We constructed a multilayer 3D DNA nanostructure system by designing square lattice geometry with the scaffolded-DNA-origami method. With changes in the lock and key sequences, we recommend that this system be used for other infectious diseases to target the pathogenic bacteria.

  15. A DNA microarray-based methylation-sensitive (MS)-AFLP hybridization method for genetic and epigenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, F; Yamamoto, M

    2004-07-01

    We previously developed a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting technique named the Methylation Sensitive (MS)-AFLP method, which permits comparative genome-wide scanning of methylation status with a manageable number of fingerprinting experiments. The technique uses the methylation sensitive restriction enzyme NotI in the context of the existing Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) method. Here we report the successful conversion of this gel electrophoresis-based DNA fingerprinting technique into a DNA microarray hybridization technique (DNA Microarray MS-AFLP). By performing a total of 30 (15 x 2 reciprocal labeling) DNA Microarray MS-AFLP hybridization experiments on genomic DNA from two breast and three prostate cancer cell lines in all pairwise combinations, and Southern hybridization experiments using more than 100 different probes, we have demonstrated that the DNA Microarray MS-AFLP is a reliable method for genetic and epigenetic analyses. No statistically significant differences were observed in the number of differences between the breast-prostate hybridization experiments and the breast-breast or prostate-prostate comparisons.

  16. Building a DNA Barcode Reference Library for the True Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: What about the Subspecies?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John-James; Sing, Kong-Wah; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and subspecies. Analyses confirmed the capacity of the new DNA barcode reference library to distinguish the vast majority of species (92%) and revealed that most subspecies possessed unique DNA barcodes (84%). In some cases conspecific subspecies exhibited genetic distances between their DNA barcodes that are typically seen between species, and these were often taxa that have previously been regarded as full species. Subspecies designations as shorthand for geographically and morphologically differentiated groups provide a useful heuristic for assessing how such groups correlate with clustering patterns of DNA barcodes, especially as the number of DNA barcodes per species in reference libraries increases. Our study demonstrates the value in attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records as they can reveal a history of taxonomic concepts and expose important units of biodiversity. PMID:24282514

  17. The Species and Origin of Shark Fins in Taiwan's Fishing Ports, Markets, and Customs Detention: A DNA Barcoding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Po-Shun; Hung, Tzu-Chiao; Chang, Hung-An; Huang, Chien-Kang; Shiao, Jen-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    The increasing consumption of shark products, along with the shark's fishing vulnerabilities, has led to the decrease in certain shark populations. In this study we used a DNA barcoding method to identify the species of shark landings at fishing ports, shark fin products in retail stores, and shark fins detained by Taiwan customs. In total we identified 23, 24, and 14 species from 231 fishing landings, 316 fin products, and 113 detained shark fins, respectively. All the three sample sources were dominated by Prionace glauca, which accounted for more than 30% of the collected samples. Over 60% of the species identified in the fin products also appeared in the port landings, suggesting the domestic-dominance of shark fin products in Taiwan. However, international trade also contributes a certain proportion of the fin product markets, as four species identified from the shark fin products are not found in Taiwan's waters, and some domestic-available species were also found in the customs-detained sample. In addition to the species identification, we also found geographical differentiation in the cox1 gene of the common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus), the pelagic thresher shark (A. pelagicus), the smooth hammerhead shark (Sphyrna zygaena), and the scalloped hammerhead shark (S. lewini). This result might allow fishing authorities to more effectively trace the origins as well as enforce the management and conservation of these sharks.

  18. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masateru; Takahashi, Etsuko; Joudeh, Luay I; Marini, Monica; Das, Gobind; Elshenawy, Mohamed M; Akal, Anastassja; Sakashita, Kosuke; Alam, Intikhab; Tehseen, Muhammad; Sobhy, Mohamed A; Stingl, Ulrich; Merzaban, Jasmeen S; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Hamdan, Samir M

    2018-01-24

    The deep-sea brines of the Red Sea are remote and unexplored environments characterized by high temperatures, anoxic water, and elevated concentrations of salt and heavy metals. This environment provides a rare system to study the interplay between halophilic and thermophilic adaptation in biologic macromolecules. The present article reports the first DNA polymerase with halophilic and thermophilic features. Biochemical and structural analysis by Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the charge distribution on the protein's surface mediates the structural balance between stability for thermal adaptation and flexibility for counteracting the salt-induced rigid and nonfunctional hydrophobic packing. Salt bridge interactions via increased negative and positive charges contribute to structural stability. Salt tolerance, conversely, is mediated by a dynamic structure that becomes more fixed and functional with increasing salt concentration. We propose that repulsive forces among excess negative charges, in addition to a high percentage of negatively charged random coils, mediate this structural dynamism. This knowledge enabled us to engineer a halophilic version of KOD DNA polymerase.-Takahashi, M., Takahashi, E., Joudeh, L. I., Marini, M., Das, G., Elshenawy, M. M., Akal, A., Sakashita, K., Alam, I., Tehseen, M., Sobhy, M. A., Stingl, U., Merzaban, J. S., Di Fabrizio, E., Hamdan, S. M. Dynamic structure mediates halophilic adaptation of a DNA polymerase from the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea.

  19. A DNA microarray for identification of selected Korean birds based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Chung, In-Hyuk; Yoo, Hye Sook; Eah, Jae-Yong; Yoon, Hyun-Kyu; Jung, Jin-Wook; Hwang, Seung Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2010-10-01

    DNA barcoding with the gene encoding cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) in the mitochondrial genome has been proposed as a standard marker to identify and discover animal species. Some migratory wild birds are suspected of transmitting avian influenza and pose a threat to aircraft safety because of bird strikes. We have previously reported the COI gene sequences of 92 Korean bird species. In the present study, we developed a DNA microarray to identify 17 selected bird species on the basis of nucleotide diversity. We designed and synthesized 19 specific oligonucleotide probes; these probes were arrayed on a silylated glass slide. The length of the probes was 19-24 bps. The COI sequences amplified from the tissues of the selected birds were labeled with a fluorescent probe for microarray hybridization, and unique hybridization patterns were detected for each selected species. These patterns may be considered diagnostic patterns for species identification. This microarray system will provide a sensitive and a high-throughput method for identification of Korean birds.

  20. A new assay format for NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Altevogt, Dominik; Hrenn, Andrea; Kern, Claudia; Clima, Lilia; Bannwarth, Willi; Merfort, Irmgard

    2009-10-07

    Herein we report a feasibility study for a new concept to detect DNA binding protein NF-kappaB based on a DNA triple helix formation in combination with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The new principle avoids expensive antibodies and radioactivity and might have implications for assays of other DNA binding proteins.

  1. Individualization of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients: possible usefulness of a DNA damage assay to measure normal cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano; Guirado, Damian; Isabel Núñez, María; López, Escarlata; Guerrero, Rosario; Valenzuela, María Teresa; Villalobos, Mercedes; del Moral, Rosario

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the distribution of sensitivities in breast cancer patients, measured using a DNA damage assay on lymphocytes, is likely to provide sufficient discrimination to enable the reliable identification of patients with abnormal sensitivities. Radiosensitivity (x) was assessed in 226 samples of lymphocytes from unselected women with breast cancer and was quantified as the initial number of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) induced per Gy and per DNA unit (200 Mbp). The existence of an inter-individual variation in the parameter (x) is described through the range (0.40-4.72 dsb/Gy/DNA unit) of values found, which have been fitted to the mathematical model defined by the log-normal distribution (mu = 0.42+/-0.03; sigma = 0.52+/-0.03; R(2)=0.9475). A total of 189 patients received radiotherapy after surgical treatment. Among them, we have detected 15 patients who developed severe skin reactions and we have compared their radiosensitivity values with the rest of patients treated. Our results suggest that DNA initial damage measured on lymphocytes offers an approach to predict the acute response of human normal tissues prior to radiotherapy. Values of x higher than 3.20 dsb/Gy/DNA unit theoretically should correspond to the highly radio-sensitive patients. Using the experimental results, we have calculated the strength of the test by means of the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (A(Z)) to determine whether the radiosensitivity assay can discriminate between patients according to their radiation response. The value found (A(Z)=0.675+/-0.072) is indicative of a fair-poor discriminating capacity of the test to identify the patients with higher risk of developing a severe acute reaction during the radiotherapy treatment.

  2. ThrR, a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in controlling threonine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Müller, Peter; Lentes, Sabine; Thiele, Martin J; Zeigler, Daniel R; Tödter, Dominik; Paulus, Henry; Brantl, Sabine; Stülke, Jörg; Commichau, Fabian M

    2016-09-01

    The threonine dehydratase IlvA is part of the isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, deletion of ilvA causes isoleucine auxotrophy. It has been reported that ilvA pseudo-revertants having a derepressed hom-thrCB operon appear in the presence of threonine. Here we have characterized two classes of ilvA pseudo-revertants. In the first class the hom-thrCB operon was derepressed unmasking the threonine dehydratase activity of the threonine synthase ThrC. In the second class of mutants, threonine biosynthesis was more broadly affected. The first class of ilvA pseudo-revertants had a mutation in the Phom promoter (P*hom ), resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. In the second class of ilvA pseudo-revertants, the thrR gene encoding a putative DNA-binding protein was inactivated, also resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. Here we demonstrate that ThrR is indeed a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the hom-thrCB operon and the thrD aspartokinase gene. DNA binding assays uncovered the DNA-binding site of ThrR and revealed that the repressor competes with the RNA polymerase for DNA binding. This study also revealed that ThrR orthologs are ubiquitous in genomes from the Gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and in some Gram-negative bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine in ram lambs.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanguo; Liu, Guiqiong; Jiang, Xunping; Ijaz, Nabeel; Tesema, Birhanu; Xie, Guangyue

    2015-02-04

    KISS1 gene-encoding kisspeptins are critical for the onset of puberty and control of adult fertility. This study investigated whether KISS1 can be used as a novel target for immunocastration. Human KISS1 was fused with the HBsAg-S gene for constructing an antibiotic-free recombinant plasmid pKS-asd that coded for 31.168 kDa target fusion protein. Six male Hu sheep lambs were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (1mg/ram lamb) prepared in saline solution was injected into lambs at weeks 0, 3 and 6 of the experiment, respectively. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in terms of KISS1-specific IgG antibody response, serum testosterone levels, scrotal circumference, testicular weight, length and breadth, extent of testicular tissue damage, and sexual behaviour changes. The specific anti-KISS1 antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than that in controls (p<0.05). In addition, vaccinated animals showed lower serum testosterone level, testicular weight and length and smaller scrotal circumference than those in controls (p<0.05). Spermatogenesis of seminiferous tubules in vaccinated animals was suppressed; sexual behaviours in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (p<0.05) than those in controls. In conclusion, the immunization against KISS1 in this DNA vaccine induced a strong antibody response and resulted in the suppression of gonadal function and sexual behaviour in animals, demonstrating that KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of protective and therapeutic antitumor immunity by a DNA vaccine with C3d as a molecular adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-lian; Zhang, Ke-qin; Guo, Bo; Zhao, Ting-ting; Yang, Fei; Jiang, Man; Wang, Qing-hong; Shang, Yu-hang; Wu, Yu-zhang

    2010-10-18

    Although the critical role of complement component C3d as a molecular adjuvant in preventing virus infection is well established, its role in cancer therapies is unclear. In this study, we have engineered a DNA vaccine that expresses extracellular region of murine VEGFR-2 (FLK1(265-2493)) and 3 copies of C3d (C3d3), a component of complement as a molecular adjuvant, designed to increase antitumor immunity. VEGFR-2 has a more restricted expression on endothelial cells and is upregulated once these cells proliferate during angiogenesis in the tumor vasculature. Immunization of mice with vector encoding FLK1(265-2493) alone generated only background levels of anti-VEGFR-2 antibodies and slight inhibitory effect on tumor growth. However, the addition of C3d3 to the vaccine construct significantly augmented the anti-VEGFR-2 humoral immune response and inhibited the tumor growth. The antitumor activity induced by vaccination with vector encoding FLK1(265-2493)-C3d3 fusion protein was also demonstrated via growth inhibition of established tumors following passive transfer of immune serum from vaccinated mice. Our results suggest that vaccination with vector encoding FLK1(265-2493) with C3d3 as a molecular adjuvant induces adaptive humoral activity, which is directed against the murine VEGFR-2 and can significantly inhibit tumor growth, and that administration of C3d as a molecular adjuvant to increase antibodies levels to VEGFR-2 may provide an alternative treatment modality for cancer therapies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adenovirus Core Protein VII Protects the Viral Genome from a DNA Damage Response at Early Times after Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Karen, Kasey A.; Hearing, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus has a linear, double-stranded DNA genome that is perceived by the cellular Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) DNA repair complex as a double-strand break. If unabated, MRN elicits a double-strand break repair response that blocks viral DNA replication and ligates the viral genomes into concatemers. There are two sets of early viral proteins that inhibit the MRN complex. The E1B-55K/E4-ORF6 complex recruits an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targets MRN proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation. The E4-ORF3 protein inhibits MRN through sequestration. The mechanism that prevents MRN recognition of the viral genome prior to the expression of these early proteins was previously unknown. Here we show a temporal correlation between the loss of viral core protein VII from the adenovirus genome and a gain of checkpoint signaling due to the double-strand break repair response. While checkpoint signaling corresponds to the recognition of the viral genome, core protein VII binding to and checkpoint signaling at viral genomes are largely mutually exclusive. Transcription is known to release protein VII from the genome, and the inhibition of transcription shows a decrease in checkpoint signaling. Finally, we show that the nuclease activity of Mre11 is dispensable for the inhibition of viral DNA replication during a DNA damage response. These results support a model involving the protection of the incoming viral genome from checkpoint signaling by core protein VII and suggest that the induction of an MRN-dependent DNA damage response may inhibit adenovirus replication by physically masking the origins of DNA replication rather than altering their integrity. PMID:21345950

  6. Cooperative DNA binding and protein/DNA fiber formation increases the activity of the Dnmt3a DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Emperle, Max; Rajavelu, Arumugam; Reinhardt, Richard; Jurkowska, Renata Z; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-10-24

    The Dnmt3a DNA methyltransferase has been shown to bind cooperatively to DNA and to form large multimeric protein/DNA fibers. However, it has also been reported to methylate DNA in a processive manner, a property that is incompatible with protein/DNA fiber formation. We show here that the DNA methylation rate of Dnmt3a increases more than linearly with increasing enzyme concentration on a long DNA substrate, but not on a short 30-mer oligonucleotide substrate. We also show that addition of a catalytically inactive Dnmt3a mutant, which carries an amino acid exchange in the catalytic center, increases the DNA methylation rate by wild type Dnmt3a on the long substrate but not on the short one. In agreement with this finding, preincubation experiments indicate that stable protein/DNA fibers are formed on the long, but not on the short substrate. In addition, methylation experiments with substrates containing one or two CpG sites did not provide evidence for a processive mechanism over a wide range of enzyme concentrations. These data clearly indicate that Dnmt3a binds to DNA in a cooperative reaction and that the formation of stable protein/DNA fibers increases the DNA methylation rate. Fiber formation occurs at low μm concentrations of Dnmt3a, which are in the range of Dnmt3a concentrations in the nucleus of embryonic stem cells. Understanding the mechanism of Dnmt3a is of vital importance because Dnmt3a is a hotspot of somatic cancer mutations one of which has been implicated in changing Dnmt3a processivity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Specific amino acid residues in the beta sliding clamp establish a DNA polymerase usage hierarchy in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark D; Duzen, Jill M

    2006-03-07

    Escherichia coli dnaN159 strains encode a mutant form of the beta sliding clamp (beta159), causing them to display altered DNA polymerase (pol) usage. In order to better understand mechanisms of pol selection/switching in E. coli, we have further characterized pol usage in the dnaN159 strain. The dnaN159 allele contains two amino acid substitutions: G66E (glycine-66 to glutamic acid) and G174A (glycine-174 to alanine). Our results indicated that the G174A substitution impaired interaction of the beta clamp with the alpha catalytic subunit of pol III. In light of this finding, we designed two additional dnaN alleles. One of these dnaN alleles contained a G174A substitution (beta-G174A), while the other contained D173A, G174A and H175A substitutions (beta-173-175). Examination of strains bearing these different dnaN alleles indicated that each conferred a distinct UV sensitive phenotype that was dependent upon a unique combination of Delta polB (pol II), Delta dinB (pol IV) and/or Delta umuDC (pol V) alleles. Taken together, these findings indicate that mutations in the beta clamp differentially affect the functions of these three pols, and suggest that pol II, pol IV and pol V are capable of influencing each others' abilities to gain access to the replication fork. These findings are discussed in terms of a model whereby amino acid residues in the vicinity of those mutated in beta159 (G66 and G174) help to define a DNA polymerase usage hierarchy in E. coli following UV irradiation.

  8. Mate-Pair Sequencing as a Powerful Clinical Tool for the Characterization of Cancers with a DNA Viral Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses are known to be associated with a variety of different cancers. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a family of viruses and several of its sub-types are classified as high-risk HPVs as they are found to be associated with the development of a number of different cancers. Almost all cervical cancers appear to be driven by HPV infection and HPV is also found in most cancers of the anus and at least half the cancers of the vulva, penis and vagina, and increasingly found in one sub-type of head and neck cancers namely oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Our understanding of HPVs role in cancer development comes from extensive studies done on cervical cancer and it has just been assumed that HPV plays an identical role in the development of all other cancers arising in the presence of HPV sequences, although this has not been proven. Most invasive cervical cancers have the HPV genome integrated into one or more sites within the human genome. One powerful tool to examine all the sites of HPV integration in a cancer but that also provides a comprehensive view of genomic alterations in that cancer is the use of next generation sequencing of mate-pair libraries produced from the DNA isolated. We will describe how this powerful technology can provide important information about the genomic organization within an individual cancer genome, and how this has demonstrated that HPVs role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is distinct from that in cervical cancer. We will also describe why the sequencing of mate-pair libraries could be a powerful clinical tool for the management of patients with a DNA viral etiology and how this could quickly transform the care of these patients. PMID:26262638

  9. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J.

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean ormore » terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.« less

  10. TH-CD-201-11: Optimizing the Response and Cost of a DNA Double-Strand Break Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S

    Purpose: A DNA double-strand break (DSB) dosimeter was developed to measure the biological effect of radiation. The goal here is to refine the fabrication method of this dosimeter to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation (CoV) and reduce the cost for the dosimeter. Methods: Our dosimeter consists of 4 kilo-base pair DNA strands (labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein) attached to streptavidin magnetic beads. The final step of the DNA dosimeter fabrication is to suspend these attached beads in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The amount of PBS used to suspend the attached beads andmore » the relative volume of the DNA strands to the beads both affect the CoV and dosimeter cost. We diluted the beads attached with DNA in different volumes of PBS (100, 200, and 400 µL) to create different concentrations of the DNA dosimeter. Then we irradiated these dosimeters (50 µL samples) in a water-equivalent plastic phantom at 25 and 50 Gy (three samples per dose) and calculated the CoV for each dosimeter concentration. Also, we used different masses of DNA strands (1, 2, 8, 16, 24, and 32 µg) to attach to the same volume of magnetic beads (100 µL) to explore how this affects the cost of the dosimeter. Results: The lowest CoV was produced for the highest concentration of dosimeter (100 µL of PBS), which created CoV of 2.0 and 1.0% for 25 and 50 Gy, respectively. We found that the lowest production cost for the dosimeter occurs by attaching 16 µg of DNA strands with 100 µL of beads. Conclusion: : We optimized the fabrication of the DNA dosimeter to produce low CoV and cost, but we still need to explore ways to further improve the dosimeter for use at lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)« less

  11. A DNA Vaccine That Targets Hemagglutinin to Antigen-Presenting Cells Protects Mice against H7 Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Tor Kristian; Zhou, Fan; Cox, Rebecca; Bogen, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zoonotic influenza H7 viral infections have a case fatality rate of about 40%. Currently, no or limited human to human spread has occurred, but we may be facing a severe pandemic threat if the virus acquires the ability to transmit between humans. Novel vaccines that can be rapidly produced for global distribution are urgently needed, and DNA vaccines may be the only type of vaccine that allows for the speed necessary to quench an emerging pandemic. Here, we constructed DNA vaccines encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A/chicken/Italy/13474/99 (H7N1). In order to increase the efficacy of DNA vaccination, HA was targeted to either major histocompatibility complex class II molecules or chemokine receptors 1, 3, and 5 (CCR1/3/5) that are expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APC). A single DNA vaccination with APC-targeted HA significantly increased antibody levels in sera compared to nontargeted control vaccines. The antibodies were confirmed neutralizing in an H7 pseudotype-based neutralization assay. Furthermore, the APC-targeted vaccines increased the levels of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and a single DNA vaccination could confer protection against a lethal challenge with influenza A/turkey/Italy/3889/1999 (H7N1) in mice. In conclusion, we have developed a vaccine that rapidly could contribute protection against a pandemic threat from avian influenza. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic avian influenza H7 constitute a pandemic threat that can cause severe illness and death in infected individuals. Vaccination is the main method of prophylaxis against influenza, but current vaccine strategies fall short in a pandemic situation due to a prolonged production time and insufficient production capabilities. In contrast, a DNA vaccine can be rapidly produced and deployed to prevent the potential escalation of a highly pathogenic influenza pandemic. We here demonstrate that a single DNA delivery of hemagglutinin from an H7 influenza could mediate full

  12. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on public attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Satoh, Nobunori

    2009-11-01

    To assess the attitudes of the Japanese general public towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a national survey for 1,103 Japanese adults from the general public, not a patient population. The response rate was 36.8%. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (81.0%) and a DNA bank (70.4%). Considering fictitious clinical situations such as taking medications and experiencing ADRs, the willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing ADRs (61.7%) was higher than when taking medications (45.3%). Older generations were significantly associated with a decreased willingness to donate (OR = 0.45, CI 0.28-0.72 in 50s. OR = 0.49, CI: 0.31-0.77 in 60s). Positive attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research, a DNA bank, blood/bone marrow/organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness. However, the respondents had the following concerns regarding a DNA bank: the confidentiality of their personal information, the manner by which research results were utilized and simply the use of their own DNA for research. In order to attain public understanding to overcome these concerns, a process of public awareness should be put into place to emphasize the beneficial aspects of identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and to address these concerns raised in our study. Further study is needed to assess the willingness of actual patients taking medications in real situations, since the respondents in our study were from the general public, not a patient population, and their willingness was assessed on the condition of assuming that they were patients taking medications.

  13. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Ping; Kang, Hye Na; Babiuk, Lorne A; Liu, Qiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models. METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation, ELISPOT for the number of interferon-γ secreting cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays. RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and shifted the immune response towards Th2-like ones in piglets. CONCLUSION: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein elicited E2-specific immune responses in mice and piglets. Recombinant E2 protein vaccination following DNA immunization significantly increased the antibody response in piglets. These HCV E2 vaccines may represent promising hepatitis C vaccine candidates for further investigations. PMID:17131474

  14. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on patients' attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Sakurada, Tomoya; Ueda, Shiro; Satoh, Nobunori

    2011-05-01

    To assess the attitude of Japanese patients towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a survey of 550 male and female patients. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (87.6%) and a DNA bank (75.1%). The willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing severe ADRs (55.8%) was higher than when taking medications (40.4%). Positive attitudes towards a DNA bank and organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness to donate. Though the level of positive attitude in the patient population was higher than that in the general public in our former study (81.0 and 70.4%, respectively), the level of the willingness of patients to donate was 40.4% when taking medications and 55.8% when experiencing severe ADRs which was lower than that of the general public in our former study (45.3 and 61.7%). The results suggested that the level of true willingness in the patient population was lower than that of the general public considering the fictitious situation presented to the public (to suppose that they were patients receiving medication). It is important to assess the willingness of patients who are true potential donors, not the general public.

  15. Neisseria conserved protein DMP19 is a DNA mimic protein that prevents DNA binding to a hypothetical nitrogen-response transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Mao-Lun; Ku, Shan-Chi; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    DNA mimic proteins occupy the DNA binding sites of DNA-binding proteins, and prevent these sites from being accessed by DNA. We show here that the Neisseria conserved hypothetical protein DMP19 acts as a DNA mimic. The crystal structure of DMP19 shows a dsDNA-like negative charge distribution on the surface, suggesting that this protein should be added to the short list of known DNA mimic proteins. The crystal structure of another related protein, NHTF (Neisseria hypothetical transcription factor), provides evidence that it is a member of the xenobiotic-response element (XRE) family of transcriptional factors. NHTF binds to a palindromic DNA sequence containing a 5′-TGTNAN11TNACA-3′ recognition box that controls the expression of an NHTF-related operon in which the conserved nitrogen-response protein [i.e. (Protein-PII) uridylyltransferase] is encoded. The complementary surface charges between DMP19 and NHTF suggest specific charge–charge interaction. In a DNA-binding assay, we found that DMP19 can prevent NHTF from binding to its DNA-binding sites. Finally, we used an in situ gene regulation assay to provide evidence that NHTF is a repressor of its down-stream genes and that DMP19 can neutralize this effect. We therefore conclude that the interaction of DMP19 and NHTF provides a novel gene regulation mechanism in Neisseria spps. PMID:22373915

  16. HIV-1 gp120 and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) gp140 Boost Immunogens Increase Immunogenicity of a DNA/MVA HIV-1 Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoying; Basu, Rahul; Sawant, Sheetal; Beaumont, David; Kwa, Sue Fen; LaBranche, Celia; Seaton, Kelly E; Yates, Nicole L; Montefiori, David C; Ferrari, Guido; Wyatt, Linda S; Moss, Bernard; Alam, S Munir; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D; Robinson, Harriet L

    2017-12-15

    An important goal of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine design is identification of strategies that elicit effective antiviral humoral immunity. One novel approach comprises priming with DNA and boosting with modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env on virus-like particles. In this study, we evaluated whether the addition of a gp120 protein in alum or MVA-expressed secreted gp140 (MVAgp140) could improve immunogenicity of a DNA prime-MVA boost vaccine. Five rhesus macaques per group received two DNA primes at weeks 0 and 8 followed by three MVA boosts (with or without additional protein or MVAgp140) at weeks 18, 26, and 40. Both boost immunogens enhanced the breadth of HIV-1 gp120 and V1V2 responses, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and low-titer tier 1B and tier 2 neutralizing antibody responses. However, there were differences in antibody kinetics, linear epitope specificity, and CD4 T cell responses between the groups. The gp120 protein boost elicited earlier and higher peak responses, whereas the MVAgp140 boost resulted in improved antibody durability and comparable peak responses after the final immunization. Linear V3 specific IgG responses were particularly enhanced by the gp120 boost, whereas the MVAgp140 boost also enhanced responses to linear C5 and C2.2 epitopes. Interestingly, gp120, but not the MVAgp140 boost, increased peak CD4 + T cell responses. Thus, both gp120 and MVAgp140 can augment potential protection of a DNA/MVA vaccine by enhancing gp120 and V1/V2 antibody responses, whereas potential protection by gp120, but not MVAgp140 boosts, may be further impacted by increased CD4 + T cell responses. IMPORTANCE Prior immune correlate analyses with humans and nonhuman primates revealed the importance of antibody responses in preventing HIV-1 infection. A DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine has proven to be potent in eliciting antibody responses. Here we explore the ability of boosts with

  17. Measurement of changes in impedance of DNA nanowires due to radiation induced structural damage. A novel approach for a DNA-based radiosensitive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, Florian; Arndt, Alexander; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Langner, Frank; Giesen, Ulrich; Rabus, Hans; Sellner, Stefan; Toppari, Jussi; Shen, Boxuan; Baek, Woon Yong

    2017-08-01

    The ability of DNA to conduct electric current has been the topic of numerous investigations over the past few decades. Those investigations indicate that this ability is dependent on the molecular structure of the DNA. Radiation-induced damages, which lead to an alteration of the molecular structure, should therefore change the electrical impedance of a DNA molecule. In this paper, the damage due to ionising radiation is shown to have a direct effect on the electrical transport properties of DNA. Impedance measurements of DNA samples were carried out by an AC impedance spectrometer before, during and after irradiation. The samples comprised of DNA segments, which were immobilized between gold electrodes with a gap of 12 μm. The impedance of all DNA samples exhibited rising capacitive behaviour with increasing absorbed dose.

  18. Tyramine Hydrochloride Based Label-Free System for Operating Various DNA Logic Gates and a DNA Caliper for Base Number Measurements.

    PubMed

    Fan, Daoqing; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2017-07-05

    DNA is believed to be a promising candidate for molecular logic computation, and the fluorogenic/colorimetric substrates of G-quadruplex DNAzyme (G4zyme) are broadly used as label-free output reporters of DNA logic circuits. Herein, for the first time, tyramine-HCl (a fluorogenic substrate of G4zyme) is applied to DNA logic computation and a series of label-free DNA-input logic gates, including elementary AND, OR, and INHIBIT logic gates, as well as a two to one encoder, are constructed. Furthermore, a DNA caliper that can measure the base number of target DNA as low as three bases is also fabricated. This DNA caliper can also perform concatenated AND-AND logic computation to fulfil the requirements of sophisticated logic computing. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Unique parasite aDNA in moa coprolites from New Zealand suggests mass parasite extinctions followed human-induced megafauna extinctions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Hopkins, Skylar R.

    2018-01-01

    Having split early from Gondwana, Zealandia (now modern New Zealand) escaped discovery until the late 13th century, and therefore remains an important glimpse into a human-free world. Without humans or other land mammals, diverse and peculiar birds evolved in isolation, including several flightless moa species, the giant pouakai eagle (Harpagornis moorei), the kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), and the kakapo parrot (Strigops habroptila). This unique community has fascinated paleoecologists, who have spent almost two centuries devising new ways to glean information from ancient bird remains. In PNAS, Boast et al. (1) apply one recent technological advance, ancient DNA (aDNA) metabarcoding, to confirm previous discoveries and report new details about moa and kakapo diets, parasites, and niches. Their efforts confirm Zealandia was a lot different before humans arrived.

  20. Enzymatic Reaction with Unnatural Substrates: DNA Photolyase (Escherichia coli) Recognizes and Reverses Thymine [2+2] Dimers in the DNA Strand of a DNA/PNA Hybrid Duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaiah, Danaboyina; Kan, Yongzhi; Koch, Troels; Orum, Henrik; Schuster, Gary B.

    1998-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are mimics with normal bases connected to a pseudopeptide chain that obey Watson--Crick rules to form stable duplexes with itself and natural nucleic acids. This has focused attention on PNA as therapeutic or diagnostic reagents. Duplexes formed with PNA mirror some but not all properties of DNA. One fascinating aspect of PNA biochemistry is their reaction with enzymes. Here we show an enzyme reaction that operates effectively on a PNA/DNA hybrid duplex. A DNA oligonucleotide containing a cis, syn-thymine [2+2] dimer forms a stable duplex with PNA. The hybrid duplex is recognized by photolyase, and irradiation of the complex leads to the repair of the thymine dimer. This finding provides insight into the enzyme mechanism and provides a means for the selective repair of thymine photodimers.

  1. Immunotherapy of tuberculosis with Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine triggers cross-reactive antibodies against mammalian Hsp60 but not pathological autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Doimo, Nayara T S; Zárate-Bladés, Carlos R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo F; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Trotte, Marcele N S; Souza, Patrícia R M; Soares, Luana S; Rios, Wendy M; Floriano, Elaine M; Brandão, Izaira T; Masson, Ana P; Coelho, Verônica; Ramos, Simone G; Silva, Celio L

    2014-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts in recent years toward the development of new vaccines and drugs against tuberculosis (TB), success has remained elusive. Immunotherapy of TB with mycobacterial Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine (DNA-hsp65) results in a reduction of systemic bacterial loads and lung tissue damage, but the high homology of Hsp65 with the mammalian protein raises concern that pathological autoimmune responses may also be triggered. We searched for autoimmune responses elicited by DNA-hsp65 immunotherapy in mice chronically infected with TB by evaluating the humoral immune response and comprehensive histopathology using stereology. Cross-reactive antibodies between mycobacterial and mammalian Hsp60/65 were detected; however, no signs of pathological autoimmunity were found up to 60 days after the end of the therapy.

  2. Immunotherapy of tuberculosis with Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine triggers cross-reactive antibodies against mammalian Hsp60 but not pathological autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Doimo, Nayara TS; Zárate-Bladés, Carlos R; Rodrigues, Rodrigo F; Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Trotte, Marcele NS; Souza, Patrícia RM; Soares, Luana S; Rios, Wendy M; Floriano, Elaine M; Brandão, Izaira T; Masson, Ana P; Coelho, Verônica; Ramos, Simone G; Silva, Celio L

    2014-01-01

    Despite substantial efforts in recent years toward the development of new vaccines and drugs against tuberculosis (TB), success has remained elusive. Immunotherapy of TB with mycobacterial Hsp65 as a DNA vaccine (DNA-hsp65) results in a reduction of systemic bacterial loads and lung tissue damage, but the high homology of Hsp65 with the mammalian protein raises concern that pathological autoimmune responses may also be triggered. We searched for autoimmune responses elicited by DNA-hsp65 immunotherapy in mice chronically infected with TB by evaluating the humoral immune response and comprehensive histopathology using stereology. Cross-reactive antibodies between mycobacterial and mammalian Hsp60/65 were detected; however, no signs of pathological autoimmunity were found up to 60 days after the end of the therapy. PMID:24607935

  3. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown butmore » our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.« less

  4. Construction and immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine coexpressing GP3 and GP5 of genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The European (EU) genotype of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (Genotype-I PRRSV) has recently emerged in China. The coexistence of Genotype-I and -II PRRSV strains could cause seriously affect PRRSV diagnosis and management. Current vaccines are not able to protect against PRRSV infection completely and have inherent drawbacks. Thus, genetically engineered vaccines, including DNA vaccine and live vector engineered vaccines, have been developed. This study aimed to determine the enhanced immune responses of mice inoculated with a DNA vaccine coexpressing GP3 and GP5 of a Genotype-I PRRSV. Results To evaluate the immunogenicity of GP3 and GP5 proteins from European-type PRRSV, three DNA vaccines, pVAX1-EU-ORF3-ORF5, pVAX1-EU-ORF3 and pVAX1-EU-ORF5, were constructed, which were based on a Genotype-I LV strain (GenBank ID: M96262). BALB/c mice were immunized with the DNA vaccines; delivered in the form of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles. To increase the efficiency of the vaccine, Quil A (Quillaja) was used as an adjuvant. GP3 and GP5-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies and cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN gamma) from the immunized mice sera, and other immune parameters, were examined, including T-cell proliferation responses and subgroups of spleen T-lymphocytes. The results showed that ORF3 and ORF5 proteins of Genotype-I PRRSV induced GP3 and GP5-specific antibodies that could neutralize the virus. The levels of Cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN–γ of the experimental groups were significantly higher than those of control groups after booster vaccination (P < 0.05). The production of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T lymphocyte was also induced. T lymphocyte proliferation assays showed that the PRRSV LV strain virus could stimulate the proliferation of T lymphocytes in mice in the experimental group. Conclusions Using Quil A as adjuvant, Genotype-I PRRSV GP3 and GP5 proteins produced good immunogenicity and reactivity. More

  5. Dynamics of a DNA Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Dogariu, Aristide

    We study in silico the properties of a gel consisting of DNA strands (modeled as semi-flexible chains) and linkers of varying flexibility, length, and topology. These linkers are envisioned and modeled as active components with additional attributes so as to mimic properties of a synthetic DNA gel containing motor proteins. We use Brownian dynamics to directly obtain frequency dependent complex shear moduli of the gel. We further carry out force spectroscopy on these computer generated gels and study the relaxation properties as a function of the important parameters of the model, e.g., densities and relative ratios of the DNAs and the linkers, the average life time of a link, etc. Our studies are relevant for designing synthetic bio-materials for both materials and medical applications.

  6. Fanconi Anemia: A DNA repair disorder characterized by accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and other features of aging.

    PubMed

    Brosh, Robert M; Bellani, Marina; Liu, Yie; Seidman, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), endocrine dysfunction, cancer, and other clinical features commonly associated with normal aging. The anemia stems directly from an accelerated decline of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although FA is a complex heterogeneous disease linked to mutations in 19 currently identified genes, there has been much progress in understanding the molecular pathology involved. FA is broadly considered a DNA repair disorder and the FA gene products, together with other DNA repair factors, have been implicated in interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. However, in addition to the defective DNA damage response, altered epigenetic regulation, and telomere defects, FA is also marked by elevated levels of inflammatory mediators in circulation, a hallmark of faster decline in not only other hereditary aging disorders but also normal aging. In this review, we offer a perspective of FA as a monogenic accelerated aging disorder, citing the latest evidence for its multi-factorial deficiencies underlying its unique clinical and cellular features. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A DNA-binding protein from Candida albicans that binds to the RPG box of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the telomeric repeat sequence of C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Yamamoto, M; Lahm, H W; Iizumi, S; Yoshihara, F; Nakayama, H; Arisawa, M; Aoki, Y

    1997-02-01

    Electromobility shift assays with a DNA probe containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ENO1 RPG box identified a specific DNA-binding protein in total protein extracts of Candida albicans. The protein, named Rbf1p (RPG-box-binding protein 1), bound to other S. cerevisiae RPG boxes, although the nucleotide recognition profile was not completely the same as that of S. cerevisiae Rap 1p (repressor-activator protein 1), an RPG-box-binding protein. The repetitive sequence of the C. albicans chromosomal telomere also competed with RPG-box binding to Rbf1p. For further analysis, we purified Rbf1p 57,600-fold from C. albicans total protein extracts, raised mAbs against the purified protein and immunologically cloned the gene, whose ORF specified a protein of 527 aa. The bacterially expressed protein showed RPG-box-binding activity with the same profile as that of the purified one. The Rbf1p, containing two glutamine-rich regions that are found in many transcription factors, showed transcriptional activation capability in S. cerevisiae and was predominantly observed in nuclei. These results suggest that Rbf1p is a transcription factor with telomere-binding activity in C. albicans.

  8. Characterization of the paclitaxel loaded chitosan graft Pluronic F127 copolymer micelles conjugate with a DNA aptamer targeting HER-2 overexpressing breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thach Nguyen, Kim; Nguyen, Thu Ha; Do, Dinh Ho; Huan Le, Quang

    2017-03-01

    In this work we report the isolation of DNA aptamer that is specifically bound to a HER-2 overexpressing SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cell line, using SELEX strategy. Paclitaxel (PTX) loaded chitosan graft Pluronic F127 copolymer micelles conjugate with a DNA aptamer was synthesized and its structure was confirmed by TEM image. This binary mixed system consisting of DNA aptamer modified Pluronic F127 and chitosan could enhance PTX loading capacity and increase micelle stability. Morphology images confirmed the existence of PTX micelles, with an average size of approximately 86.22 ± 1.45 nm diameters. Drug release profile showed that the PTX conjugate maintained a sustained PTX release. From in vitro cell experiment it was shown that 89%-93%, 50%-58%, 55%-62%, 24%-28% and 2%-7% of the SK-BR-3, NS-VN-67, LH-VN-48, HT-VN-26 and NV-VN-31, respectively, were dead after 6-48 h. These results demonstrated a novel DNA aptamer-micelle assembly for efficient detection and a system for the delivery of PTX targeting specific HER-2 overexpressing. We have also successfully cultivated cancer tissues of explants from Vietnamese patients on a type I collagen substrate. The NS-VN-67, LH-VN-48, HT-VN-26 and NV-VN-31cell lines were used as cellular model sources for the study of chemotherapy drug in cancer.

  9. Cholera toxin B-subunit gene enhances mucosal immunoglobulin A, Th1-type, and CD8+ cytotoxic responses when coadministered intradermally with a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Alba E; Aquino, Guillermo; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Laclette, Juan P; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia

    2004-07-01

    A plasmid vector encoding the cholera toxin B subunit (pCtB) was evaluated as an intradermal genetic adjuvant for a model DNA vaccine expressing the human papillomavirus type 16 L1 capsid gene (p16L1) in mice. p16L1 was coadministered with plasmid pCtB or commercial polypeptide CtB as a positive control. Coadministration of pCtB induced a significant increment of specific anti-L1 immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in cervical secretions (P < 0.05) and fecal extracts (P < 0.005). Additionally, coadministration of pCtB enhanced the production of interleukin-2 and gamma interferon by spleen cells but did not affect the production of interleukin-4, suggesting a Th1-type helper response. Furthermore, improved CD8+ T-cell-mediated cytotoxic activity was observed in mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine with pCtB as an adjuvant. This adjuvant effect was comparable to that induced by the CtB polypeptide. These results indicate that intradermal coadministration of pCtB is an adequate means to enhance the mucosa-, Th1-, and CD8(+)-mediated cytotoxic responses induced by a DNA vaccine.

  10. Gene Gun Bombardment with DNA-Coated Golden Particles Enhanced the Protective Effect of a DNA Vaccine Based on Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan; Zhao, Bin; Han, Yanhui; Zhang, Juan; Li, Xuezhen; Qiu, Chunhui; Wu, Xiujuan; Hong, Yang; Ai, Dezhou; Lin, Jiaojiao; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma species, remains an important parasitic zoonosis. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjTGR) plays an important role in the development of the parasite and for its survival. Here we present a recombinant plasmid DNA vaccine, pVAX1/SjTGR, to estimate its protection against S. japonicum in BALB/c mice. The DNA vaccine administrated by particle bombardment induced higher protection than by intramuscular injection. All animals vaccinated with pVAX1/SjTGR developed significant specific anti-SjTGR antibodies than control groups. Moreover, animals immunized by gene gun exhibited a splenocyte proliferative response, with an increase in IFN-γ and IL-4. The recombinant plasmid administrated by gene gun achieved a medium protective efficacy of 27.83–38.83% (P < 0.01) of worm reduction and 40.38–44.51% (P < 0.01) of liver egg count reduction. It suggests that different modes of administering a DNA vaccine can influence the protective efficacy induced by the vaccine. Interestingly, from the enzymatic activity results, we found that worms obtained from pVAX1/SjTGR-vaccinated animals expressed lower enzymatic activity than the control group and the antibodies weakened the enzymatic activity of SjTGR in vitro, too. It implies that the high-level antibodies may contribute to the protective effects. PMID:23509820

  11. Use of KW-2189, a DNA minor groove-binding agent, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: a north central cancer treatment group (NCCTG) phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Steven R; Suman, Vera J; Pitot, Henry C; Camoriano, John K; Rubin, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer in certain portions of the world. Currently no effective therapies exist for patients with advanced or metastatic HCC. KW-2189, a DNA minor groove-binding agent, has shown promising activity against HCC in preclinical evaluations. A phase II study was conducted to evaluate the activity of KW-2189 in patients with histologic or cytologic confirmed advanced or metastatic HCC who had no prior systemic therapy. Patients received KW-2189 at a dose of 0.5 mg/m2 administered on day 1 of a 6-week cycle. The primary endpoint of the trial was objective regression. Other endpoints included toxicity, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Due to hematologic toxicity the dose of KW-2189 was reduced to 0.375 mg/m2 after 11 patients had been enrolled into the trial. Due to continued significant hematologic toxicity in the next five patients enrolled at the lower dose the trial was closed to accrual. Two responses were seen in patients enrolled at the higher dose, including one sustained CR. KW-2189 showed evidence of anti-tumor activity in HCC. However, because of significant and prolonged hematologic toxicity, when given as a single dose every 6 weeks, further development of this drug in HCC is not possible. Further exploration of DNA minor groove-binding agents in the treatment of HCC appears warranted.

  12. Which one among the Pt-containing anticancer drugs more easily forms monoadducts with G and A DNA bases? A comparative study among oxaliplatin, nedaplatin, and carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Alberto, Marta E; Butera, Valeria; Russo, Nino

    2011-08-01

    The platination processes of DNA bases with second- and third-generation Pt(II) anticancer drugs have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) combined with the conductor-like dielectric continuum model (CPCM) approach, in order to describe their binding mechanisms and to obtain detailed data on the reaction energy profiles. Although there is no doubt that a Pt-N7 bond forms during initial attack, the energetic profiles for the formation of the monofunctional adducts are not known. Herein, a direct comparison between the rate of formation of the monofunctional adducts of the second- and third-generation anticancer drugs with guanine (G) and adenine (A) DNA bases has been made in order to spotlight possible common or different behavior. The guanine as target for platination process is confirmed to be preferred over adenine for all the investigated compounds and for both the hydrolyzed forms considered in our investigation. The preference for G purine base is dominated by electronic factors and promoted by a more favorable hydrogen-bonds pattern, confirming the important role played by H-bonds in determining both structural and kinetic control on the purine platination process. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  13. A DNA vaccine targeting p42.3 induces protective antitumor immunity via eliciting cytotoxic CD8+T lymphocytes in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Geng, Shuang; Feng, Congcong; Xie, Xiaoping; Wu, Bing; Chen, Xuan; Zou, Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Cui, Jiantao; Xing, Rui; Li, Wenmei; Lu, Youyong; Wang, Bin

    2013-10-01

    The p42.3 gene was recently identified and characterized as having tumor-specific and mitosis phase-dependent expression in many types of cancer. This suggested that p42.3 antigen could be used as a target for vaccines against cancers. In this study, we immunized C57BL/6 mice with a DNA vaccine encoding p42.3. We used intramuscular injection with electroporation, either before or after challenge with tumor B16F10 cells. Vaccination with pcDNA3-p42.3 induced some degree of antitumor effect both therapeutically and prophylactically, as evaluated by the inhibition of tumor growth and decrease in tumor weight. Immunized mice showed a high level of specific cytotoxic activity against the p42.3 protein in vivo and had activated CD8 T cells that secreted IFN-γ, perforin, and granzyme B in response to stimulation with the antigen in vitro. Thus, this study presents the DNA vaccination against novel tumor target p42.3 as a promising antitumor modality.

  14. A Turn-on Fluorescence Sensor for Heparin Detection Based on a Release of Taiwan Cobra Cardiotoxin from a DNA Aptamer or Adenosine-Based Molecular Beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-Jun; Wang, Liang-Jun; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Huang, Chia-Hui; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2018-02-19

    This study presents two sensitive fluorescent assays for sensing heparin on the basis of the electrostatic interaction between heparin and Naja naja atra cardiotoxin 3 (CTX3). Owing to CTX3-induced folded structure of an adenosine-based molecular beacon (MB) or a DNA aptamer against CTX3, a reduction in the fluorescent signal of the aptamer or MB 5'-end labeled with carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and 3'-end labeled with 4-([4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo)-benzoic acid (DABCYL) was observed upon the addition of CTX3. The presence of heparin and formation of the CTX3-heparin complex caused CTX3 detachment from the MB or aptamer, and restoration of FAM fluorescence of the 5'-FAM-and-3'-DABCYL-labeled MB and aptamer was subsequently noted. Moreover, the detection of heparin with these CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB sensors showed high sensitivity and selectivity toward heparin over chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid regardless of the presence of plasma. The limit of detection for heparin in plasma was determined to be 16 ng/mL and 15 ng/mL, respectively, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This study validates the practical utility of the CTX3-aptamer and CTX3-MB systems for determining the concentration of heparin in a biological matrix.

  15. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics dynamics simulation of A-DNA double strands irradiated by ultra-low-energy carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngaojampa, C.; Nimmanpipug, P.; Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Lee, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    In order to promote understanding of the fundamentals of ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA, molecular dynamics simulations using combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics of poly-AT and poly-GC A-DNA double strands irradiated by <200 eV carbon ions were performed to investigate the molecular implications of mutation bias. The simulations were focused on the responses of the DNA backbones and nitrogenous bases to irradiation. Analyses of the root mean square displacements of the backbones and non-hydrogen atoms of base rings of the simulated DNA structure after irradiation revealed a potential preference of DNA double strand separation, dependent on the irradiating energy. The results show that for the backbones, the large difference in the displacement between poly-GC and poly-AT in the initial time period could be the reason for the backbone breakage; for the nitrogenous base pairs, A-T is 30% more sensitive or vulnerable to ion irradiation than G-C, demonstrating a preferential, instead of random, effect of irradiation-induced mutation.

  16. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Adriana S; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M B

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  17. A new fluorescence turn-on nanobiosensor for the detection of micro-RNA-21 based on a DNA-gold nanocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Morteza; Ahmadi, Elnaz; Borghei, Yasaman-Sadat; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2017-03-01

    In this study, DNA/gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were used to develop an AuNC-based turn-on fluorescence probe for the analysis of mi-RNA-21, which is a potential screening biomarker for cancer detection. AuNCs on a DNA scaffold were prepared through a one-pot wet-chemical route and evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Experiments revealed that the fluorescence intensity of the DNA-AuNCs showed a gradual increase with the addition of the target species in a concentration range from 1pM to 10 nM. The method had a detection limit of 0.7 pM and was able to discriminate the target species from mismatched mi-RNAs very efficiently. The method was used for the determination of mi-RNA spiked human plasma samples, and was evaluated as a promising nanobiosensor for application in the selective detection of mi-RNA in various biomedical and clinical tests.

  18. A DNA-Encoded Library of Chemical Compounds Based on Common Scaffolding Structures Reveals the Impact of Ligand Geometry on Protein Recognition.

    PubMed

    Favalli, Nicholas; Biendl, Stefan; Hartmann, Marco; Piazzi, Jacopo; Sladojevich, Filippo; Gräslund, Susanne; Brown, Peter J; Näreoja, Katja; Schüler, Herwig; Scheuermann, Jörg; Franzini, Raphael; Neri, Dario

    2018-06-01

    A DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) with 1.2 million compounds was synthesized by combinatorial reaction of seven central scaffolds with two sets of 343×492 building blocks. Library screening by affinity capture revealed that for some target proteins, the chemical nature of building blocks dominated the selection results, whereas for other proteins, the central scaffold also crucially contributed to ligand affinity. Molecules based on a 3,5-bis(aminomethyl)benzoic acid core structure were found to bind human serum albumin with a K d value of 6 nm, while compounds with the same substituents on an equidistant but flexible l-lysine scaffold showed 140-fold lower affinity. A 18 nm tankyrase-1 binder featured l-lysine as linking moiety, while molecules based on d-Lysine or (2S,4S)-amino-l-proline showed no detectable binding to the target. This work suggests that central scaffolds which predispose the orientation of chemical building blocks toward the protein target may enhance the screening productivity of encoded libraries. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A conserved region of leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A and B proteins as a DNA vaccine elicits a prophylactic immune response against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Forster, Karine M; Hartwig, Daiane D; Seixas, Fabiana K; Bacelo, Kátia L; Amaral, Marta; Hartleben, Cláudia P; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2013-05-01

    The leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins LigA and LigB possess immunoglobulin-like domains with 90-amino-acid repeats and are adhesion molecules involved in pathogenicity. They are conserved in pathogenic Leptospira spp. and thus are of interest for use as serodiagnostic antigens and in recombinant vaccine formulations. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the LigA and LigB proteins are identical, but the C-terminal sequences vary. In this study, we evaluated the protective potential of five truncated forms of LigA and LigB proteins from Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola as DNA vaccines using the pTARGET mammalian expression vector. Hamsters immunized with the DNA vaccines were subjected to a heterologous challenge with L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Spool via the intraperitoneal route. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding LigBrep resulted in the survival of 5/8 (62.5%) hamsters against lethal infection (P < 0.05). None of the control hamsters or animals immunized with the other vaccine preparations survived. The vaccine induced an IgG antibody response and, additionally, conferred sterilizing immunity in 80% of the surviving animals. Our results indicate that the LigBrep DNA vaccine is a promising candidate for inclusion in a protective leptospiral vaccine.

  20. A Conserved Region of Leptospiral Immunoglobulin-Like A and B Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Elicits a Prophylactic Immune Response against Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Karine M.; Hartwig, Daiane D.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Bacelo, Kátia L.; Amaral, Marta; Hartleben, Cláudia P.

    2013-01-01

    The leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins LigA and LigB possess immunoglobulin-like domains with 90-amino-acid repeats and are adhesion molecules involved in pathogenicity. They are conserved in pathogenic Leptospira spp. and thus are of interest for use as serodiagnostic antigens and in recombinant vaccine formulations. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the LigA and LigB proteins are identical, but the C-terminal sequences vary. In this study, we evaluated the protective potential of five truncated forms of LigA and LigB proteins from Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola as DNA vaccines using the pTARGET mammalian expression vector. Hamsters immunized with the DNA vaccines were subjected to a heterologous challenge with L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Spool via the intraperitoneal route. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding LigBrep resulted in the survival of 5/8 (62.5%) hamsters against lethal infection (P < 0.05). None of the control hamsters or animals immunized with the other vaccine preparations survived. The vaccine induced an IgG antibody response and, additionally, conferred sterilizing immunity in 80% of the surviving animals. Our results indicate that the LigBrep DNA vaccine is a promising candidate for inclusion in a protective leptospiral vaccine. PMID:23486420

  1. Maternal immunization with a DNA vaccine candidate elicits specific passive protection against post-natal Zika virus infection in immunocompetent BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Liao, Xianzheng; Fan, Dongying; Wang, Lei; Song, Ji; Feng, Kaihao; Li, Mingyuan; Wang, Peigang; Chen, Hui; An, Jing

    2018-06-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is closely associated in the fetus with microcephaly and in the adults with Guillain-Barré syndrome and even male infertility. It is an urgent international priority to develop a safe and effective vaccine that offers protection to both women of childbearing age and their children. In this study, female immunocompetent BALB/c mice were immunized with a DNA-based vaccine candidate, pVAX1-ZME, expressing the prM/E protein of ZIKV, and the immunogenicity for maternal mice and the post-natal protection for suckling mice were evaluated. It was found that administration with three doses of 50 μg pVAX1-ZME via in vivo electroporation induced robust ZIKV-specific cellular and long-term humoral immune responses with high and sustained neutralizing activity in adult mice. Moreover, using a maternal immunization protocol, neutralizing antibodies provided specific passive protection against ZIKV infection in neonatal mice and effectively inhibited the growth delay. This vaccine candidate is expected to be further evaluated in higher animals, and maternal vaccination shows great promise for protecting both women of childbearing age and their offspring against post-natal ZIKV infection. The vaccinated mothers and ZIKV-challenged pups provide key insight into Zika vaccine evaluation in an available fully immunocompetent animal model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative analysis and molecular characterization of a gene BANF1 encoded a DNA-binding protein during mitosis from the Giant Panda and Black Bear.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yichun; Hou, Yi-Ling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wan-Ru; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Barrier to autointegration factor 1 (BANF1) is a DNA-binding protein found in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells that functions to establish nuclear architecture during mitosis. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of BANF1 were cloned from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus mupinensis) using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. The cDNA of the BANF1 cloned from Giant Panda and Black Bear is 297 bp in size, containing an open reading frame of 270 bp encoding 89 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence from Giant Panda is 521 bp, from Black Bear is 536 bp, which were found both to possess 2 exons. Alignment analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence are highly conserved to some mammalian species studied. Topology prediction showed there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Casein kinase II phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Giant Panda, and there is one Protein kinase C phosphorylation site, one Tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site, one N-myristoylation site, and one Amidation site in the BANF1 protein of the Black Bear. The BANF1 gene can be readily expressed in E. coli. Results showed that the protein BANF1 fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form gave rise to the accumulation of an expected 14 kD polypeptide that formed inclusion bodies. The expression products obtained could be used to purify the proteins and study their function further.

  3. A DNA vaccine co-expressing Trichinella spiralis MIF and MCD-1 with murine ubiquitin induces partial protective immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2013-03-01

    Co-expression of Trichinella spiralis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TsMIF) with T. spiralis cystatin-like domain protein (TsMCD-1) in a DNA vaccine induces a Th1 immune response and partial protection against T. spiralis infection. The present study evaluated whether co-expression of mouse ubiquitin (Ub) with TsMIF and TsMCD-1 might improve the immune response against T. spiralis infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of plasmid DNA encoding either a TsMIF-TsMCD-1 fusion protein (pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1) or an Ub-co-expressing triple fusion protein Ub-TsMIF-TsMCD-1 (pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1). Control animals were immunized with pVAX1-Ub or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17), CD4+/CD8+ T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks after the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Antibody responses induced by pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 were significantly lower than for TsMIF-TsMCD-1, but the vaccine induced increased levels of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and increased T-cell cytotoxicity. The reduction of worm burden (37.95%) following immunization with pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 was significantly greater than that induced by the pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 vaccine (23.17%; P< 0.05).

  4. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    PubMed Central

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  5. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  6. Islands of non-essential genes, including a DNA translocation operon, in the genome of bacteriophage 0305ϕ8-36

    PubMed Central

    Pathria, Saurav; Rolando, Mandy; Lieman, Karen; Hayes, Shirley; Hardies, Stephen; Serwer, Philip

    2012-01-01

    We investigate genes of lytic, Bacillus thuringiensis bacteriophage 0305ϕ8-36 that are non-essential for laboratory propagation, but might have a function in the wild. We isolate deletion mutants to identify these genes. The non-permutation of the genome (218.948 Kb, with a 6.479 Kb terminal repeat and 247 identified orfs) simplifies isolation of deletion mutants. We find two islands of non-essential genes. The first island (3.01% of the genomic DNA) has an informatically identified DNA translocation operon. Deletion causes no detectable growth defect during propagation in a dilute agarose overlay. Identification of the DNA translocation operon begins with a DNA relaxase and continues with a translocase and membrane-binding anchor proteins. The relaxase is in a family, first identified here, with homologs in other bacteriophages. The second deleted island (3.71% of the genome) has genes for two metallo-protein chaperonins and two tRNAs. Deletion causes a significant growth defect. In addition, (1) we find by “in situ” (in-plaque) single-particle fluorescence microscopy that adsorption to the host occurs at the tip of the 486 nm long tail, (2) we develop a procedure of 0305ϕ8-36 purification that does not cause tail contraction, and (3) we then find by electron microscopy that 0305ϕ8-36 undergoes tail tip-tail tip dimerization that potentially blocks adsorption to host cells, presumably with effectiveness that increases as the bacteriophage particle concentration increases. These observations provide an explanation of the previous observation that 0305ϕ8-36 does not lyse liquid cultures, even though 0305ϕ8-36 is genomically lytic. PMID:22666654

  7. Determination of the Optimal Chromosomal Location(s) for a DNA Element in Escherichia coli Using a Novel Transposon-mediated Approach.

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2017-09-11

    The optimal chromosomal position(s) of a given DNA element was/were determined by transposon-mediated random insertion followed by fitness selection. In bacteria, the impact of the genetic context on the function of a genetic element can be difficult to assess. Several mechanisms, including topological effects, transcriptional interference from neighboring genes, and/or replication-associated gene dosage, may affect the function of a given genetic element. Here, we describe a method that permits the random integration of a DNA element into the chromosome of Escherichia coli and select the most favorable locations using a simple growth competition experiment. The method takes advantage of a well-described transposon-based system of random insertion, coupled with a selection of the fittest clone(s) by growth advantage, a procedure that is easily adjustable to experimental needs. The nature of the fittest clone(s) can be determined by whole-genome sequencing on a complex multi-clonal population or by easy gene walking for the rapid identification of selected clones. Here, the non-coding DNA region DARS2, which controls the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli, was used as an example. The function of DARS2 is known to be affected by replication-associated gene dosage; the closer DARS2 gets to the origin of DNA replication, the more active it becomes. DARS2 was randomly inserted into the chromosome of a DARS2-deleted strain. The resultant clones containing individual insertions were pooled and competed against one another for hundreds of generations. Finally, the fittest clones were characterized and found to contain DARS2 inserted in close proximity to the original DARS2 location.

  8. A quantum dot-aptamer beacon using a DNA intercalating dye as the FRET reporter: application to label-free thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chun-Wei; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Li, Yi-Shan; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-03-15

    A new quantum dot (QD)-aptamer (apt) beacon that acts by folding-induced dissociation of a DNA intercalating dye, BOBO-3(B), is demonstrated with label-free thrombin detection. The beacon, denoted as QD-apt:B, is constructed by (1) coupling of a single-stranded thrombin aptamer to Qdot 565 via EDC/Sulfo-NHS chemistry and (2) staining the duplex regions of the aptamer on QD with excess BOBO-3 before thrombin binding. When mixing a thrombin sample with QD-apt:B, BOBO-3 is competed away from the beacon due to target-induced aptamer folding, which then causes a decrease in QD fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-mediated BOBO-3 emission and achieves thrombin quantitation. In this work, the effects of Mg(2+), coupling time, and aptamer type on the beacon's performances are investigated and discussed thoroughly with various methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and two-color differential gel electrophoresis. Using the best aptamer beacon (HTQ37), we attain highly specific and wide-range detection (from nM to μM) of thrombin in buffer, and the beacon can sense nM-range thrombin in 15% diluted serum. Compared to the reported QD aptamer assays, our method is advantageous from the aspect of using a simple sensory unit design without losing the detection sensitivity. Therefore, we consider the QD-apt:B beacon a potential alternative to immuno-reagents and an effective tool to study nucleic acid folding on QD as well. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Broad and Cross-Clade CD4+ T-Cell Responses Elicited by a DNA Vaccine Encoding Highly Conserved and Promiscuous HIV-1 M-Group Consensus Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rafael Ribeiro; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Santana, Vinicius Canato; Kallás, Esper Georges; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2012-01-01

    T-cell based vaccine approaches have emerged to counteract HIV-1/AIDS. Broad, polyfunctional and cytotoxic CD4+ T-cell responses have been associated with control of HIV-1 replication, which supports the inclusion of CD4+ T-cell epitopes in vaccines. A successful HIV-1 vaccine should also be designed to overcome viral genetic diversity and be able to confer immunity in a high proportion of immunized individuals from a diverse HLA-bearing population. In this study, we rationally designed a multiepitopic DNA vaccine in order to elicit broad and cross-clade CD4+ T-cell responses against highly conserved and promiscuous peptides from the HIV-1 M-group consensus sequence. We identified 27 conserved, multiple HLA-DR-binding peptides in the HIV-1 M-group consensus sequences of Gag, Pol, Nef, Vif, Vpr, Rev and Vpu using the TEPITOPE algorithm. The peptides bound in vitro to an average of 12 out of the 17 tested HLA-DR molecules and also to several molecules such as HLA-DP, -DQ and murine IAb and IAd. Sixteen out of the 27 peptides were recognized by PBMC from patients infected with different HIV-1 variants and 72% of such patients recognized at least 1 peptide. Immunization with a DNA vaccine (HIVBr27) encoding the identified peptides elicited IFN-γ secretion against 11 out of the 27 peptides in BALB/c mice; CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferation was observed against 8 and 6 peptides, respectively. HIVBr27 immunization elicited cross-clade T-cell responses against several HIV-1 peptide variants. Polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, able to simultaneously proliferate and produce IFN-γ and TNF-α, were also observed. This vaccine concept may cope with HIV-1 genetic diversity as well as provide increased population coverage, which are desirable features for an efficacious strategy against HIV-1/AIDS. PMID:23028895

  10. Enhanced synergistic anti-Lewis lung carcinoma effect of a DNA vaccine harboring a MUC1-VEGFR2 fusion gene used with GM-CSF as an adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Junzhong; Duan, Yong; Li, Fugen; Wang, Zitong

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve a synergistic effect on anti-tumour and anti-angiogenesis activity, we designed and constructed a DNA vaccine that expresses MUC1and VEGFR2 in the same reading frame. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumour activity of this DNA vaccine. Furthermore, we also investigated the enhanced synergistic anti-Lewis lung carcinoma effect of this DNA vaccine by using GM-CSF as an adjuvant. A series of DNA plasmids encoding MUC1, VEGFR2, GM-CSF, and their conjugates were constructed and injected into mice intramuscularly (i.m.) followed by an electric pulse. The humoral and cellular immune responses after immunization were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the anti-tumour efficacy of these plasmids, murine models with MUC1-expressing tumours were generated. After injection into the tumour-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the fusion gene of MUC1 and VEGFR2 showed stronger inhibition of tumour growth than the plasmid expressing MUC1 or VEGFR2 alone, which indicated that MUC1 and VEGFR2 could exert a synergistic anti-tumour effect. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with the combination of the GM-CSF expressing plasmid and the plasmid carrying the fusion gene of MUC1 and VEGFR2 showed an increased inhibition in the growth of MUC1-expressing tumours and prolonged mouse survival. These observations emphasize the potential of the synergistic anti-tumour and anti-angiogenesis strategy used in DNA vaccines, and the potential of the GM-CSF gene as an adjuvant for DNA vaccines, which could represent a promising approach for tumour immunotherapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) induces partial immune protection against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Cao, Aiping; Li, Yawen; Li, Xun; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2017-06-07

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals including humans and causes toxoplasmosis. An effective vaccine could be an ideal choice for preventing and controlling toxoplasmosis. T. gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) might participate in affecting the intracellular growth of both bradyzoite and tachyzoite forms. In the present study, the TgSOD gene was used to construct a DNA vaccine (pEGFP-SOD). TgSOD gene was amplified and inserted into eukaryotic vector pEGFP-C1 and formed the DNA vaccine pEGFP-SOD. Then the BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine and those injected with pEGFP-C1, PBS or nothing were treated as controls. Four weeks after the last immunization, all mouse groups followed by challenging intraperitoneally with tachyzoites of T. gondii ME49 strain. Results showed higher levels of total IgG, IgG2α in the sera and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the splenocytes from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice than those unvaccinated, or inoculated with either empty plasmid vector or PBS. The proportions of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in the spleen from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice were significantly (p < 0.05) increased compared to control groups. In addition, the survival time of mice immunized with pEGFP-SOD was significantly prolonged as compared to the controls (p < 0.05) although all the mice died. The present study revealed that the DNA vaccine triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses, and aroused partial protective immunity against acute T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. The collective data suggests the SOD may be a potential vaccine candidate for further development.

  12. Concurrent, but not sequential, PD-1 blockade with a DNA vaccine elicits anti-tumor responses in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Douglas G; Eickhoff, Jens C; Wargowski, Ellen; Zahm, Christopher; Staab, Mary Jane; Straus, Jane; Liu, Glenn

    2018-05-22

    T-cell checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated dramatic clinical activity against multiple cancer types, however little activity in patients with prostate cancer. Conversely, an anti-tumor vaccine was approved for the treatment of prostate cancer, having demonstrated an improvement in overall survival, despite few objective disease responses. In murine studies, we found that PD-1 expression on CD8+ T cells increased following anti-tumor vaccination, and that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade at the time of immunization elicited greater anti-tumor responses. Based on these data we initiated a pilot trial evaluating the immunological and clinical efficacy of a DNA encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) when delivered in combination with pembrolizumab. 26 patients were treated for 12 weeks with vaccine and received pembrolizumab either during this time or during the subsequent 12 weeks. Adverse events included grade 2 and 3 fatigue, diarrhea, thyroid dysfunction, and hepatitis. Median time to radiographic progression was not different between study arms. 8/13 (62%) of patients treated concurrently, and 1/12 (8%, p=0.01) of patients treated sequentially, experienced PSA declines from baseline. Of these, two were over 50% and one was a complete PSA response. No confirmed CR or PR were observed, however 4/5 patients treated concurrently had measurable decreases in tumor volume at 12 weeks. PSA declines were associated with the development of PAP-specific Th1-biased T cell immunity and CD8+ T cell infiltration in metastatic tumor biopsy specimens. These data are the first report of a clinical trial demonstrating that the efficacy of an anti-tumor vaccine can be augmented by concurrent PD-1 blockade.

  13. A DNA Barcoding Method to Discriminate between the Model Plant Brachypodium distachyon and Its Close Relatives B. stacei and B. hybridum (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    López-Alvarez, Diana; López-Herranz, Maria Luisa; Betekhtin, Alexander; Catalán, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Background Brachypodium distachyon s. l. has been widely investigated across the world as a model plant for temperate cereals and biofuel grasses. However, this annual plant shows three cytotypes that have been recently recognized as three independent species, the diploids B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20) and their derived allotetraploid B. hybridum (2n = 30). Methodology/Principal Findings We propose a DNA barcoding approach that consists of a rapid, accurate and automatable species identification method using the standard DNA sequences of complementary plastid (trnLF) and nuclear (ITS, GI) loci. The highly homogenous but largely divergent B. distachyon and B. stacei diploids could be easily distinguished (100% identification success) using direct trnLF (2.4%), ITS (5.5%) or GI (3.8%) sequence divergence. By contrast, B. hybridum could only be unambiguously identified through the use of combined trnLF+ITS sequences (90% of identification success) or by cloned GI sequences (96.7%) that showed 5.4% (ITS) and 4% (GI) rate divergence between the two parental sequences found in the allopolyploid. Conclusion/Significance Our data provide an unbiased and effective barcode to differentiate these three closely-related species from one another. This procedure overcomes the taxonomic uncertainty generated from methods based on morphology or flow cytometry identifications that have resulted in some misclassifications of the model plant and its allies. Our study also demonstrates that the allotetraploid B. hybridum has resulted from bi-directional crosses of B. distachyon and B. stacei plants acting either as maternal or paternal parents. PMID:23240000

  14. Short ORF-Dependent Ribosome Shunting Operates in an RNA Picorna-Like Virus and a DNA Pararetrovirus that Cause Rice Tungro Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail V.; Ryabova, Lyubov A.

    2012-01-01

    Rice tungro disease is caused by synergistic interaction of an RNA picorna-like virus Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) and a DNA pararetrovirus Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV). It is spread by insects owing to an RTSV-encoded transmission factor. RTBV has evolved a ribosome shunt mechanism to initiate translation of its pregenomic RNA having a long and highly structured leader. We found that a long leader of RTSV genomic RNA remarkably resembles the RTBV leader: both contain several short ORFs (sORFs) and potentially fold into a large stem-loop structure with the first sORF terminating in front of the stem basal helix. Using translation assays in rice protoplasts and wheat germ extracts, we show that, like in RTBV, both initiation and proper termination of the first sORF translation in front of the stem are required for shunt-mediated translation of a reporter ORF placed downstream of the RTSV leader. The base pairing that forms the basal helix is required for shunting, but its sequence can be varied. Shunt efficiency in RTSV is lower than in RTBV. But in addition to shunting the RTSV leader sequence allows relatively efficient linear ribosome migration, which also contributes to translation initiation downstream of the leader. We conclude that RTSV and RTBV have developed a similar, sORF-dependent shunt mechanism possibly to adapt to the host translation system and/or coordinate their life cycles. Given that sORF-dependent shunting also operates in a pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus and likely in other pararetroviruses that possess a conserved shunt configuration in their leaders it is tempting to propose that RTSV may have acquired shunt cis-elements from RTBV during their co-existence. PMID:22396650

  15. A DNA-based pattern classifier with in vitro learning and associative recall for genomic characterization and biosensing without explicit sequence knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Seok; Chen, Junghuei; Deaton, Russell; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic material extracted from in situ microbial communities has high promise as an indicator of biological system status. However, the challenge is to access genomic information from all organisms at the population or community scale to monitor the biosystem's state. Hence, there is a need for a better diagnostic tool that provides a holistic view of a biosystem's genomic status. Here, we introduce an in vitro methodology for genomic pattern classification of biological samples that taps large amounts of genetic information from all genes present and uses that information to detect changes in genomic patterns and classify them. We developed a biosensing protocol, termed Biological Memory, that has in vitro computational capabilities to "learn" and "store" genomic sequence information directly from genomic samples without knowledge of their explicit sequences, and that discovers differences in vitro between previously unknown inputs and learned memory molecules. The Memory protocol was designed and optimized based upon (1) common in vitro recombinant DNA operations using 20-base random probes, including polymerization, nuclease digestion, and magnetic bead separation, to capture a snapshot of the genomic state of a biological sample as a DNA memory and (2) the thermal stability of DNA duplexes between new input and the memory to detect similarities and differences. For efficient read out, a microarray was used as an output method. When the microarray-based Memory protocol was implemented to test its capability and sensitivity using genomic DNA from two model bacterial strains, i.e., Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis, results indicate that the Memory protocol can "learn" input DNA, "recall" similar DNA, differentiate between dissimilar DNA, and detect relatively small concentration differences in samples. This study demonstrated not only the in vitro information processing capabilities of DNA, but also its promise as a genomic pattern classifier that could

  16. High Levels of mecA DNA Detected by a Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay Are Associated with Mortality in Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ya-Chi; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Lin, Su-Ru; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2009-01-01

    Persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor. While several PCR assays for the detection of MRSA in various clinical samples were recently reported, the possibility that a quantitative PCR assay could be used to quantify and monitor MRSA bacteremia has not been explored. In this study, we established a quantitative real-time PCR assay for the mecA gene using known copy numbers of a plasmid containing mecA DNA as a standard and the previously described mecA-specific primers and probe (P. Francois et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:254-260, 2003). We employed this assay to examine 250 sequential whole-blood samples from 20 adult patients, including 13 survivors and 7 nonsurvivors, with culture-proven MRSA bacteremia at the intensive care units of National Taiwan University Hospital between 1 July 2006 and 31 January 2007. The levels of mecA DNA in the nonsurvivors were significantly higher than those in the survivors during the three periods of bacteremia examined (days 0 to 2, 3 to 5, and 6 to 8) (P = 0.003 by two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test). Moreover, the nonsurvivors had higher mecA DNA levels than the survivors after 3 days and 7 days of anti-MRSA therapy (medians for nonsurvivors and survivors at 3 days, 5.86 and 4.30 log copies/ml, respectively; medians for nonsurvivors and survivors at 7 days, 5.21 and 4.36 log copies/ml, respectively; P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively, by two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test). Together, these findings suggest that the level of mecA DNA in blood could potentially be used to monitor MRSA bacteremia and evaluate responses to therapy. PMID:19279177

  17. Interaction of Zn(II)bleomycin-A2 and Zn(II)peplomycin with a DNA hairpin containing the 5'-GT-3' binding site in comparison with the 5'-GC-3' binding site studied by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Follett, Shelby E; Ingersoll, Azure D; Murray, Sally A; Reilly, Teresa M; Lehmann, Teresa E

    2017-10-01

    Bleomycins are a group of glycopeptide antibiotics synthesized by Streptomyces verticillus that are widely used for the treatment of various neoplastic diseases. These antibiotics have the ability to chelate a metal center, mainly Fe(II), and cause site-specific DNA cleavage. Bleomycins are differentiated by their C-terminal regions. Although this antibiotic family is a successful course of treatment for some types of cancers, it is known to cause pulmonary fibrosis. Previous studies have identified that bleomycin-related pulmonary toxicity is linked to the C-terminal region of these drugs. This region has been shown to closely interact with DNA. We examined the binding of Zn(II)peplomycin and Zn(II)bleomycin-A 2 to a DNA hairpin of sequence 5'-CCAGTATTTTTACTGG-3', containing the binding site 5'-GT-3', and compared the results with those obtained from our studies of the same MBLMs bound to a DNA hairpin containing the binding site 5'-GC-3'. We provide evidence that the DNA base sequence has a strong impact in the final structure of the drug-target complex.

  18. Signal replication in a DNA nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Houmadi, Said; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reaction are the basic building blocks of future nanorobotic systems. The circuits tethered to DNA origami platforms present several advantages over solution-phase versions where couplings are always diffusion-limited. Here we consider a possible implementation of one of the basic operations needed in the design of these circuits, namely, signal replication. We show that with an appropriate preparation of the initial state, signal replication performs in a reproducible way. We also show the existence of side effects concomitant to the high effective concentrations in tethered circuits, such as slow leaky reactions and cross-activation.

  19. Brain Connectivity as a DNA Sequencing Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zador, Anthony

    The mammalian cortex consists of millions or billions of neurons, each connected to thousands of other neurons. Traditional methods for determining the brain connectivity rely on microscopy to visualize neuronal connections, but such methods are slow, labor-intensive and often lack single neuron resolution. We have recently developed a new method, MAPseq, to recast the determination of brain wiring into a form that can exploit the tremendous recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing. DNA sequencing technology has outpaced even Moore's law, so that the cost of sequencing the human genome has dropped from a billion dollars in 2001 to below a thousand dollars today. MAPseq works by introducing random sequences of DNA-``barcodes''-to tag neurons uniquely. With MAPseq, we can determine the connectivity of over 50K single neurons in a single mouse cortex in about a week, an unprecedented throughput, ushering in the era of ``big data'' for brain wiring. We are now developing analytical tools and algorithms to make sense of these novel data sets.

  20. A DNA barcode for land plants.

    PubMed

    2009-08-04

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF-atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK-psbI spacer, and trnH-psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants.

  1. A DNA barcode for land plants

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Forrest, Laura L.; Spouge, John L.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; van der Bank, Michelle; Chase, Mark W.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Erickson, David L.; Fazekas, Aron J.; Graham, Sean W.; James, Karen E.; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kress, W. John; Schneider, Harald; van AlphenStahl, Jonathan; Barrett, Spencer C.H.; van den Berg, Cassio; Bogarin, Diego; Burgess, Kevin S.; Cameron, Kenneth M.; Carine, Mark; Chacón, Juliana; Clark, Alexandra; Clarkson, James J.; Conrad, Ferozah; Devey, Dion S.; Ford, Caroline S.; Hedderson, Terry A.J.; Hollingsworth, Michelle L.; Husband, Brian C.; Kelly, Laura J.; Kesanakurti, Prasad R.; Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Young-Dong; Lahaye, Renaud; Lee, Hae-Lim; Long, David G.; Madriñán, Santiago; Maurin, Olivier; Meusnier, Isabelle; Newmaster, Steven G.; Park, Chong-Wook; Percy, Diana M.; Petersen, Gitte; Richardson, James E.; Salazar, Gerardo A.; Savolainen, Vincent; Seberg, Ole; Wilkinson, Michael J.; Yi, Dong-Keun; Little, Damon P.

    2009-01-01

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF–atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK–psbI spacer, and trnH–psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants. PMID:19666622

  2. A DNA Fingerprint Simulation: Different, Simple, Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Eileen

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the impact of biotechnology (i.e., the use of DNA profiling in the courtroom) on today's society. Presents a hands-on activity for DNA profiling simulation that actively involves students. (YDS)

  3. Paternity testing that involves a DNA mixture.

    PubMed

    Mortera, Julia; Vecchiotti, Carla; Zoppis, Silvia; Merigioli, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Here we analyse a complex disputed paternity case, where the DNA of the putative father was extracted from his corpse that had been inhumed for over 20 years. This DNA was contaminated and appears to be a mixture of at least two individuals. Furthermore, the mother's DNA was not available. The DNA mixture was analysed so as to predict the most probable genotypes of each contributor. The major contributor's profile was then used to compute the likelihood ratio for paternity. We also show how to take into account a dropout allele and the possibility of mutation in paternity testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Suppression of dexamethasone-stimulated DNA synthesis in an oncogene construct containing rat cell line by a DNA site-oriented ligand of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase: 6-amino-1,2-benzopyrone

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsten, E.; Bauer, P.I.; Kun, E.

    1991-03-01

    The cellular inhibitory effects of 6-amino-1,2-benzopyrone (6-ABP), a DNA site-specific ligand of adenosine diphosphoribosyl transferase (ADPRT), were determined in a dexamethasone-sensitive EJ-ras gene construct containing cell line (14C cells). Dexamethansone in vitro transforms these cells to a tumorigenic phenotype and also stimulates cell replication. AT a nontoxic concentration 6-ABP treatment of intact cells for 4 days inhibits the dexamethasone-stimulated increment of cellular DNA content, depresses replicative DNA synthesis as assayed by thymidine incorporation to the level of cells that were not exposed to dexamethasone, and in permeabilized cells reduces the dexamethasone-stimulated increase of deoxyribonucleotide incorporation into DNA to the levelmore » of untreated cells. In situ pulse labeling of cells pretreated with 6-ABP indicated an inhibition of DNA synthesis at a stage prior to the formation of the 10-kb intermediate species. Neither dexamethasone nor the drug influenced the cellular quantity of ADPRT molecules, tested immunochemically.« less

  5. Comparative assessment of a DNA and protein Leishmania donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase vaccine to cross-protect against murine cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major or L. mexicana infection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S A; Alawa, J; Doro, B; Henriquez, F L; Roberts, C W; Nok, A; Alawa, C B I; Alsaadi, M; Mullen, A B; Carter, K C

    2012-02-08

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem and it is estimated that 12 million people are currently infected. A vaccine which could cross-protect people against different Leishmania spp. would facilitate control of this disease as more than one species of Leishmania may be present. In this study the ability of a DNA vaccine, using the full gene sequence for L. donovani gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γGCS) incorporated in the pVAX vector (pVAXγGCS), and a protein vaccine, using the corresponding recombinant L. donovani γGCS protein (LdγGCS), to protect against L. major or L. mexicana infection was evaluated. DNA vaccination gave transient protection against L. major and no protection against L. mexicana despite significantly enhancing specific antibody titres in vaccinated infected mice compared to infected controls. Vaccination with the LdγGCS protected against both species but only if the protein was incorporated into non-ionic surfactant vesicles for L. mexicana. The results of this study indicate that a L. donovani γGCS vaccine could be used to vaccinate against more than one Leishmania species but only if the recombinant protein is used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaccination of calves using the BRSV nucleocapsid protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects the lungs against BRSV replication and pathology.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Carine; Boxus, Mathieu; Rosar, Laurent; Toussaint, Jean-François; Walravens, Karl; Roels, Stefan; Meyer, Gilles; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Kerkhofs, Pierre

    2008-09-02

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in both cattle and young children. Despite the development of vaccines against bovine (B)RSV, incomplete protection and exacerbation of subsequent RSV disease have occurred. In order to circumvent these problems, calves were vaccinated with the nucleocapsid protein, known to be a major target of CD8(+) T cells in cattle. This was performed according to a DNA prime-protein boost strategy. The results showed that DNA vaccination primed a specific T-cell-mediated response, as indicated by both a lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma production. These responses were enhanced after protein boost. After challenge, mock-vaccinated calves displayed gross pneumonic lesions and viral replication in the lungs. In contrast, calves vaccinated by successive administrations of plasmid DNA and protein exhibited protection against the development of pneumonic lesions and the viral replication in the BAL fluids and the lungs. The protection correlated to the cell-mediated immunity and not to the antibody response.

  7. A DNA prime-oral Listeria boost vaccine in rhesus macaques induces a SIV-specific CD8 T cell mucosal response characterized by high levels of α4β7 integrin and an effector memory phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Neeson, Paul; Boyer, Jean; Kumar, Sanjeev; Lewis, Mark G.; Veazey, Lennox MattiasRon; Weiner, David; Paterson, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    In this study in Rhesus macaques, we tested whether IL-12 or IL-15 in a DNA prime-oral Listeria boost amplifies the SIV-Gag specific CD8 mucosal response. SIV-specific CD8 T cells were demonstrated in the peripheral blood (PB) in all test vaccine groups, but not the control group. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells in the PB expressed α4β7 integrin, the gut-homing receptor; a minor subset co-express αEβ7 integrin. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells were also detected in the gut tissue, intraepithelial (IEL) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) of the duodenum and ileum. These cells were characterized by high levels of β7 integrin expression and a predominance of the effector memory phenotype. Neither Il-12 nor IL-15 amplified the frequency of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the gut. Thus, the DNA prime oral Listeria boost strategy induced a mucosal SIV-Gag specific CD8 T cell response characterized by expression of the α4β7 integrin gut-homing receptor. PMID:16904153

  8. Expression of ZmMET1, a gene encoding a DNA methyltransferase from maize, is associated not only with DNA replication in actively proliferating cells, but also with altered DNA methylation status in cold-stressed quiescent cells.

    PubMed

    Steward, N; Kusano, T; Sano, H

    2000-09-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding part of a DNA methyltransferase was isolated from maize. The putative amino acid sequence identically matched that deduced from a genomic sequence in the database (accession no. AF063403), and the corresponding gene was designated as ZmMET1. Bacterially expressed ZmMET1 actively methylated DNA in vitro. Transcripts of ZmMET1 could be shown to exclusively accumulate in actively proliferating cells of the meristems of mesocotyls and root apices, suggesting ZmMET1 expression to be associated with DNA replication. This was confirmed by simultaneous decrease of transcripts of ZmMET1 and histone H3, a marker for DNA replication, in seedlings exposed to wounding, desiccation and salinity, all of which suppress cell division. Cold stress also depressed both transcripts in root tissues. In contrast, however, accumulation of ZmMET1 transcripts in shoot mesocotyls was not affected by cold stress, whereas those for H3 sharply decreased. Such a differential accumulation of ZmMET1 transcripts was consistent with ZmMET1 protein levels as revealed by western blotting. Expression of ZmMET1 is thus coexistent, but not completely dependent on DNA replication. Southern hybridization analysis with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme revealed that cold treatment induced demethylation of DNA in the Ac/Ds transposon region, but not in other genes, and that such demethylation primarily occurred in roots. These results suggested that the methylation level was decreased selectively by cold treatment, and that ZmMET1 may, at least partly, prevent such demethylation.

  9. A randomized, phase 2 study of ASP0113, a DNA-based vaccine, for the prevention of CMV in CMV-seronegative kidney transplant recipients receiving a kidney from a CMV-seropositive donor.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Flavio; Budde, Klemens; Merville, Pierre; Shihab, Fuad; Peddi, V Ram; Shah, Malay; Wyburn, Kate; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Weidemann, Alexander; Lee, Misun; Flegel, Teresa; Erdman, Jay; Wang, Xuegong; Lademacher, Christopher

    2018-05-09

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a latent infection in most infected individuals, but can be pathogenic in immunocompromised kidney transplant recipients. ASP0113 is a DNA-based vaccine for the prevention of CMV-related mortality and end-organ disease in transplant recipients. The efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity of ASP0113 was assessed in a phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in CMV-seronegative kidney transplant recipients receiving a kidney from a CMV-seropositive donor. Transplant recipients were randomized (1:1) to receive five doses of ASP0113 (5 mg; n=75) or placebo (n=74) on Days 30/60/90/120/180 post transplant, and received prophylactic valganciclovir/ganciclovir 10-100 days post transplant. The primary endpoint was the proportion of transplant recipients with CMV viremia ≥1000 IU/mL from Day 100 through to 1 year after first study vaccine injection. There was no statistically significant difference in the primary endpoint between the ASP0113 and placebo groups (odds ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.43-1.47; p=0.307). There were similar numbers of transplant recipients with treatment-emergent adverse events between groups; however, more transplant recipients reported injection site pain in the ASP0113 group compared with placebo. ASP0113 did not demonstrate efficacy in the prevention of CMV viremia in this CMV-seronegative kidney transplant population, but demonstrated a safety profile similar to placebo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and antitumor activity evaluation of a novel combi-nitrosourea prodrug: Designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohui; Zhang, Na; Zhao, Lijiao; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhang, Shufen; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-05-01

    The drug resistance of CENUs induced by O(6)-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT), which repairs the O(6)-alkylated guanine and subsequently inhibits the formation of dG-dC cross-links, hinders the application of CENU chemotherapies. Therefore, the discovery of CENU analogs with AGT inhibiting activity is a promising approach leading to novel CENU chemotherapies with high therapeutic index. In this study, a new combi-nitrosourea prodrug 3-(3-(((2-amino-9H-purin-6-yl)oxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (6), designed to release a DNA cross-linking agent and an inhibitor of AGT, was synthesized and evaluated for its antitumor activity and ability to induce DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). The results indicated that 6 exhibited higher cytotoxicity against mer(+) glioma cells compared with ACNU, BCNU, and their respective combinations with O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BG). Quantifications of dG-dC cross-links induced by 6 were performed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Higher levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated human glioma SF763 cells (mer(+)), whereas lower levels of dG-dC cross-link were observed in 6-treated calf thymus DNA, when compared with the groups treated with BCNU and ACNU. The results suggested that the superiority of 6 might result from the AGT inhibitory moiety, which specifically functions in cells with AGT activity. Molecular docking studies indicated that five hydrogen bonds were formed between the O(6)-BG analogs released from 6 and the five residues in the active pocket of AGT, which provided a reasonable explanation for the higher AGT-inhibitory activity of 6 than O(6)-BG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced Control of Pathogenic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 Replication in Macaques Immunized with an Interleukin-12 Plasmid and a DNA Prime-Viral Vector Boost Vaccine Regimen ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Winstone, Nicola; Wilson, Aaron J.; Morrow, Gavin; Boggiano, Cesar; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Lopez, Mary; Kemelman, Marina; Ginsberg, Arielle A.; Mullen, Karl; Coleman, John W.; Wu, Chih-Da; Narpala, Sandeep; Ouellette, Ian; Dean, Hansi J.; Lin, Feng; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Cassamasa, Holly; McBride, Dawn; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Schultz, Alan; Hudgens, Michael G.; King, C. Richter; Zamb, Timothy J.; Parks, Christopher L.; McDermott, Adrian B.

    2011-01-01

    DNA priming has previously been shown to elicit augmented immune responses when administered by electroporation (EP) or codelivered with a plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (pIL-12). We hypothesized that the efficacy of a DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination regimen (DNA/rAd5) would be improved when incorporating these vaccination strategies into the DNA priming phase, as determined by pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 challenge outcome. The whole SIVmac239 proteome was delivered in 5 separate DNA plasmids (pDNA-SIV) by EP with or without pIL-12, followed by boosting 4 months later with corresponding rAd5-SIV vaccine vectors. Remarkably, after repeated low-dose SIVmac239 mucosal challenge, we demonstrate 2.6 and 4.4 log reductions of the median SIV peak and set point viral loads in rhesus macaques (RMs) that received pDNA-SIV by EP with pIL-12 compared to the median peak and set point viral loads in mock-immunized controls (P < 0.01). In 5 out of 6 infected RMs, strong suppression of viremia was observed, with intermittent “blips” in virus replication. In 2 RMs, we could not detect the presence of SIV RNA in tissue and lymph nodes, even after 13 viral challenges. RMs immunized without pIL-12 demonstrated a typical maximum of 1.5 log reduction in virus load. There was no significant difference in the overall magnitude of SIV-specific antibodies or CD8 T-cell responses between groups; however, pDNA delivery by EP with pIL-12 induced a greater magnitude of SIV-specific CD4 T cells that produced multiple cytokines. This vaccine strategy is relevant for existing vaccine candidates entering clinical evaluation, and this model may provide insights into control of retrovirus replication. PMID:21734035

  12. Evaluation of a DNA Aβ42 vaccine in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): antibody kinetics and immune profile after intradermal immunization with full-length DNA Aβ42 trimer.

    PubMed

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Fu, Min; Frost, Pat; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2017-04-26

    Aggregated amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ42), derived from the cellular amyloid precursor protein, is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although active immunization against Aβ42 peptide was successful in AD mouse models and led to removal of plaques and improved memory, a similar clinical trial in humans (Aβ42 peptide immunization with QS-21 adjuvant) was stopped in phase II, when 6% of the treated patients developed encephalitis. Currently ongoing passive immunizations with the injection of preformed monoclonal antibodies against different epitopes within the Aβ 1-42 peptide, which do not lead to activation of the immune system, have shown some effects in slowing AD pathology. Active DNA Aβ42 immunizations administered with the gene gun into the skin are noninflammatory because they activate a different T-cell population (Th2) with different cytokine responses eliciting a different humoral immune response. We present our findings in rhesus macaques that underwent the DNA Aβ42 immunization via gene gun delivery into the skin. Six rhesus monkeys received two different doses of a DNA Aβ42 trimer vaccine. The humoral immune response was analyzed from blood throughout the study, and cellular immune responses were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after three and six immunizations. DNA Aβ42 trimer immunization led to high titer antibody responses in the nonhuman primate (NHP) model. Antibodies generated in the rhesus monkeys following DNA Aβ42 immunization detected amyloid plaques consisting of human Aβ42 peptide in the brain of the triple-transgenic AD mouse model. T-cell responses showed no interferon (IFN)-γ- and interleukin (IL)-17-producing cells from PBMCs in Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assays after three immunization time points. At six immunization time points, IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing cells were found in immunized animals as well as in control animals and were thus considered nonspecific and not due to

  13. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. IMPORTANCE There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1

  14. Collective helicity switching of a DNA-coat assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongju; Li, Huichang; He, Ying; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xiaoteng; Lee, Myongsoo

    2017-07-01

    Hierarchical assemblies of biomolecular subunits can carry out versatile tasks at the cellular level with remarkable spatial and temporal precision. As an example, the collective motion and mutual cooperation between complex protein machines mediate essential functions for life, such as replication, synthesis, degradation, repair and transport. Nucleic acid molecules are far less dynamic than proteins and need to bind to specific proteins to form hierarchical structures. The simplest example of these nucleic acid-based structures is provided by a rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, which consists of genetic material surrounded by coat proteins. Inspired by the complexity and hierarchical assembly of viruses, a great deal of effort has been devoted to design similarly constructed artificial viruses. However, such a wrapping approach makes nucleic acid dynamics insensitive to environmental changes. This limitation generally restricts, for example, the amplification of the conformational dynamics between the right-handed B form to the left-handed Z form of double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Here we report a virus-like hierarchical assembly in which the native DNA and a synthetic coat undergo repeated collective helicity switching triggered by pH change under physiological conditions. We also show that this collective helicity inversion occurs during translocation of the DNA-coat assembly into intracellular compartments. Translating DNA conformational dynamics into a higher level of hierarchical dynamics may provide an approach to create DNA-based nanomachines.

  15. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  16. Capturing a DNA duplex under near-physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Wei; Liu, Xiaogang; Stellacci, Francesco; Thong, John T. L.

    2010-10-01

    We report in situ trapping of a thiolated DNA duplex with eight base pairs into a polymer-protected gold nanogap device under near-physiological conditions. The double-stranded DNA was captured by electrophoresis and covalently attached to the nanogap electrodes through sulfur-gold bonding interaction. The immobilization of the DNA duplex was confirmed by direct electrical measurements under near-physiological conditions. The conductance of the DNA duplex was estimated to be 0.09 μS. We also demonstrate the control of DNA dehybridization by heating the device to temperatures above the melting point of the DNA.

  17. A DNA Melting Exercise for a Large Laboratory Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Lauren A.; Junker, Matthew; Stark, Myranda; Greenleaf, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    A simple and economical experimental setup is described that enables multiple individuals or groups within a laboratory class to measure the thermal melting of double stranded DNA simultaneously. The setup utilizes a basic spectrophotometer capable of measuring absorbance at 260 nm, UV plastic cuvettes, and a stirring hot plate. Students measure…

  18. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  19. Isolation of a DNA Probe for Lactobacillus curvatus

    PubMed Central

    Petrick, Hendrik A. R.; Ambrosio, Riccardo E.; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Lactobacillus curvatus DSM 20019 was constructed in bacteriophage λ gt11. A 1.2-kilobase DNA probe specific for L. curvatus was isolated from this library. When this probe was hybridized to DNA from Lactobacillus isolates from different sources classified by conventional techniques, differing degrees of hybridization were obtained. This could imply that these isolates may have been incorrectly classified. Images PMID:16347554

  20. A DNA network as an information processing system.

    PubMed

    Santini, Cristina Costa; Bath, Jonathan; Turberfield, Andrew J; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular systems that can process information are sought for computational applications, because of their potential for parallelism and miniaturization and because their biocompatibility also makes them suitable for future biomedical applications. DNA has been used to design machines, motors, finite automata, logic gates, reaction networks and logic programs, amongst many other structures and dynamic behaviours. Here we design and program a synthetic DNA network to implement computational paradigms abstracted from cellular regulatory networks. These show information processing properties that are desirable in artificial, engineered molecular systems, including robustness of the output in relation to different sources of variation. We show the results of numerical simulations of the dynamic behaviour of the network and preliminary experimental analysis of its main components.

  1. A DNA mini-barcode for land plants.

    PubMed

    Little, Damon P

    2014-05-01

    Small portions of the barcode region - mini-barcodes - may be used in place of full-length barcodes to overcome DNA degradation for samples with poor DNA preservation. 591,491,286 rbcL mini-barcode primer combinations were electronically evaluated for PCR universality, and two novel highly universal sets of priming sites were identified. Novel and published rbcL mini-barcode primers were evaluated for PCR amplification [determined with a validated electronic simulation (n = 2765) and empirically (n = 188)], Sanger sequence quality [determined empirically (n = 188)], and taxonomic discrimination [determined empirically (n = 30,472)]. PCR amplification for all mini-barcodes, as estimated by validated electronic simulation, was successful for 90.2-99.8% of species. Overall Sanger sequence quality for mini-barcodes was very low - the best mini-barcode tested produced sequences of adequate quality (B20 ≥ 0.5) for 74.5% of samples. The majority of mini-barcodes provide correct identifications of families in excess of 70.1% of the time. Discriminatory power noticeably decreased at lower taxonomic levels. At the species level, the discriminatory power of the best mini-barcode was less than 38.2%. For samples believed to contain DNA from only one species, an investigator should attempt to sequence, in decreasing order of utility and probability of success, mini-barcodes F (rbcL1/rbcLB), D (F52/R193) and K (F517/R604). For samples believed to contain DNA from more than one species, an investigator should amplify and sequence mini-barcode D (F52/R193). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Efficient Quenching of Oligomeric Fluorophores on a DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, James N.; Teo, Yin Nah; Kool, Eric T.

    2008-01-01

    The quenching properties of a series of oligodeoxyribosides bearing fluorophore ‘bases’ is described. Sequences of adjacent, π-stacked pyrenes exhibit stronger electronic interactions visible in both absorbance and emission spectra than pyrenes that are insulated by intervening adenines. Quenching by N, N′-dimethyl-4,4′-bipyridinium dichloride is efficient for excimer-and exciplex-forming oligomers, with Stern-Volmer constants comparable to conjugated polymer “superquenching” schemes. PMID:18027944

  3. Dissolving Hydroxyolite: A DNA Molecule into Its Hydroxyapatite Mold.

    PubMed

    Bertran, Oscar; Revilla-López, Guillermo; Casanovas, Jordi; Del Valle, Luis J; Turon, Pau; Puiggalí, Jordi; Alemán, Carlos

    2016-05-04

    In spite of the clinical importance of hydroxyapatite (HAp), the mechanism that controls its dissolution in acidic environments remains unclear. Knowledge of such a process is highly desirable to provide better understanding of different pathologies, as for example osteoporosis, and of the HAp potential as vehicle for gene delivery to replace damaged DNA. In this work, the mechanism of dissolution in acid conditions of HAp nanoparticles encapsulating double-stranded DNA has been investigated at the atomistic level using computer simulations. For this purpose, four consecutive (multi-step) molecular dynamics simulations, involving different temperatures and proton transfer processes, have been carried out. Results are consistent with a polynuclear decalcification mechanism in which proton transfer processes, from the surface to the internal regions of the particle, play a crucial role. In addition, the DNA remains protected by the mineral mold and transferred proton from both temperature and chemicals. These results, which indicate that biomineralization imparts very effective protection to DNA, also have important implications in other biomedical fields, as for example in the design of artificial bones or in the fight against osteoporosis by promoting the fixation of Ca(2+) ions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2008-11-11

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy intermediate or even a floppy end state. We describe a system in which three different structurally robust end states can be obtained, all resulting from the addition of different set strands to a single floppy intermediate. This system is an extension of the PX-JX(2) DNA device. The three states are related to each other by three different motions, a twofold rotation, a translation of approximately 2.1-2.5 nm, and a twofold screw rotation, which combines these two motions. We demonstrate the transitions by gel electrophoresis, by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and by atomic force microscopy. The control of this system by DNA strands opens the door to trinary logic and to systems containing N devices that are able to attain 3(N) structural states.

  5. A DNA-based nanomechanical device with three robust states

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Banani; Sha, Ruojie; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2008-01-01

    DNA has been used to build a variety of devices, ranging from those that are controlled by DNA structural transitions to those that are controlled by the addition of specific DNA strands. These sequence-dependent devices fulfill the promise of DNA in nanotechnology because a variety of devices in the same physical environment can be controlled individually. Many such devices have been reported, but most of them contain one or two structurally robust end states, in addition to a floppy intermediate or even a floppy end state. We describe a system in which three different structurally robust end states can be obtained, all resulting from the addition of different set strands to a single floppy intermediate. This system is an extension of the PX-JX2 DNA device. The three states are related to each other by three different motions, a twofold rotation, a translation of ≈2.1–2.5 nm, and a twofold screw rotation, which combines these two motions. We demonstrate the transitions by gel electrophoresis, by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and by atomic force microscopy. The control of this system by DNA strands opens the door to trinary logic and to systems containing N devices that are able to attain 3N structural states. PMID:18474862

  6. Identifying single bases in a DNA oligomer with electron tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuo; He, Jin; Chang, Shuai; Zhang, Peiming; Liang, Feng; Li, Shengqin; Tuchband, Michael; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Ros, Robert; Lindsay, Stuart

    2010-12-01

    It has been proposed that single molecules of DNA could be sequenced by measuring the physical properties of the bases as they pass through a nanopore. Theoretical calculations suggest that electron tunnelling can identify bases in single-stranded DNA without enzymatic processing, and it was recently experimentally shown that tunnelling can sense individual nucleotides and nucleosides. Here, we report that tunnelling electrodes functionalized with recognition reagents can identify a single base flanked by other bases in short DNA oligomers. The residence time of a single base in a recognition junction is on the order of a second, but pulling the DNA through the junction with a force of tens of piconewtons would yield reading speeds of tens of bases per second.

  7. Scaffolded DNA origami of a DNA tetrahedron molecular container.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yonggang; Sharma, Jaswinder; Liu, Minghui; Jahn, Kasper; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2009-06-01

    We describe a strategy of scaffolded DNA origami to design and construct 3D molecular cages of tetrahedron geometry with inside volume closed by triangular faces. Each edge of the triangular face is approximately 54 nm in dimension. The estimated total external volume and the internal cavity of the triangular pyramid are about 1.8 x 10(-23) and 1.5 x 10(-23) m(3), respectively. Correct formation of the tetrahedron DNA cage was verified by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering techniques.

  8. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P). OriP replicates once and only once per cell cycle in synchrony with the cellular genome, and is...modifications, and to investigate its function at OriP in DNA replication and plasmid maintenance. We propose that these studies will provide valuable...information concerning the function of OriP at replication origins and in the control of DNA replication initiation and genome stability.

  9. Analysis of a DNA simulation model through hairpin melting experiments.

    PubMed

    Linak, Margaret C; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2010-09-28

    We compare the predictions of a two-bead Brownian dynamics simulation model to melting experiments of DNA hairpins with complementary AT or GC stems and noninteracting loops in buffer A. This system emphasizes the role of stacking and hydrogen bonding energies, which are characteristics of DNA, rather than backbone bending, stiffness, and excluded volume interactions, which are generic characteristics of semiflexible polymers. By comparing high throughput data on the open-close transition of various DNA hairpins to the corresponding simulation data, we (1) establish a suitable metric to compare the simulations to experiments, (2) find a conversion between the simulation and experimental temperatures, and (3) point out several limitations of the model, including the lack of G-quartets and cross stacking effects. Our approach and experimental data can be used to validate similar coarse-grained simulation models.

  10. A DNA Vaccine against Yellow Fever Virus: Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  11. A DNA Tracer System for Hydrological Environment Investigations.

    PubMed

    Liao, Renkuan; Yang, Peiling; Wu, Wenyong; Luo, Dan; Yang, Dayong

    2018-02-20

    To monitor and manage hydrological pollution effectively, tracing sources of pollutants is of great importance and also is in urgent need. A variety of tracers have been developed such as isotopes, silica, bromide, and dyes; however, practical limitations of these traditional tracers still exist such as lack of multiplexed, multipoint tracing and interference of background noise. To overcome these limitations, a new tracing system based on DNA nanomaterials, namely DNA tracer, has already been developed. DNA tracers possess remarkable advantages including sufficient species, specificity, environmental friendly, stable migration, and high sensitivity as well as allowing for multipoints tracing. In this review article, we introduce the molecular design, synthesis, protection and signal readout strategies of DNA tracers, compare the advantages and disadvantages of DNA tracer with traditional tracers, and summarize the-state-of-art applications in hydrological environment investigations. In the end, we provide our perspective on the future development of DNA tracers.

  12. The (6-4) Dimeric Lesion as a DNA Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; Rodríguez-Muñiz, Gemma M; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-07-04

    Based on our previous investigations into the photophysical properties of the 5-methyl-2-pyrimidone (Pyo) chromophore, we now extend our studies to the photobehavior of the dimeric (6-4) thymine photoproducts (6-4 PP) to evaluate their capability to act as instrinsic DNA photosensitizers. The lesion presents significant absorption in the UVB/UVA region, weak fluorescence emission, a singlet-excited-state energy of approximately 351 kJ mol(-1) , and a triplet-excited-state energy of 297 kJ mol(-1) . Its triplet transient absorption has a maximum at 420-440 nm, a lifetime of around 7 μs, and a high formation quantum yield, ΦISC =0.86. This species is efficiently quenched by thymidine. Its DNA photosensitizing properties are demonstrated by a series of experiments run on a pBR322 plasmid. The lesion photoinduces both single-strand breaks and the formation of cyclobutane thymine dimers. Altogether, these results show that, the substitution of the pyrimidone ring at C4 by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine does not cancel out the photosensitization properties of the chromophore. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Escape of a knot from a DNA molecule in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Macroscale knots are an everyday occurrence when trying to unravel an unorganized flexible string (e.g. an iPhone cord taken out of your pocket). In nature, knots are found in proteins and viral capsid DNA, and the properties imbued by their topologies are thought to have biological significance. Unlike their macroscale counterparts, thermal fluctuations greatly influence the dynamics of polymer knots. Here, we use Brownian Dynamics simulations to study knot diffusion along a linear polymer chain. The model is parameterized to dsDNA, a model polymer used in previous simulation and experimental studies of knot dynamics. We have used this model to study the process of knot escape and transport along a dsDNA strand extended by an elongational flow. For a range of knot topologies and flow strengths, we show scalings that result in collapse of the data onto a master curve. We show a topologically mediated mode of transport coincides with observed differences in rates of knot transport, and we provide a simple mechanistic explanation for its effect. We anticipate these results will build on the growing body of fundamental studies of knotted polymers and inform future experimental study. This work is supported by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant CBET-0852235.

  14. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Sonia; Nguyen, Joseph H C; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Caldecott, Keith W; Semler, Bert L

    2015-12-29

    Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5' tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2). TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg) and the 5' end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis) in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections. Picornaviruses are one of the most prevalent groups of viruses that infect humans and livestock worldwide. These viruses include the human pathogens belonging to the Enterovirus genus, such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus. Diseases caused by enteroviruses pose a major problem for public health and have significant economic impact. Poliovirus can cause paralytic poliomyelitis. CVB3 can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease and myocarditis. Human rhinovirus is the causative agent of the common cold, which has a severe economic impact due to lost productivity and severe health consequences in individuals with respiratory dysfunction, such as asthma. By gaining a better understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle, antiviral drugs against enteroviruses may be developed. Here, we report that the absence of the cellular enzyme TDP2 can significantly decrease viral yields of poliovirus, CVB3, and human rhinovirus, making TDP2 a potential target for an antiviral against enterovirus infections. Copyright © 2016 Maciejewski et al.

  15. Divergent Requirement for a DNA Repair Enzyme during Enterovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Maciejewski, Sonia; Nguyen, Joseph H. C.; Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses of the Enterovirus genus of picornaviruses, including poliovirus, coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), and human rhinovirus, commandeer the functions of host cell proteins to aid in the replication of their small viral genomic RNAs during infection. One of these host proteins is a cellular DNA repair enzyme known as 5′ tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2). TDP2 was previously demonstrated to mediate the cleavage of a unique covalent linkage between a viral protein (VPg) and the 5′ end of picornavirus RNAs. Although VPg is absent from actively translating poliovirus mRNAs, the removal of VPg is not required for the in vitro translation and replication of the RNA. However, TDP2 appears to be excluded from replication and encapsidation sites during peak times of poliovirus infection of HeLa cells, suggesting a role for TDP2 during the viral replication cycle. Using a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line lacking TDP2, we found that TDP2 is differentially required among enteroviruses. Our single-cycle viral growth analysis shows that CVB3 replication has a greater dependency on TDP2 than does poliovirus or human rhinovirus replication. During infection, CVB3 protein accumulation is undetectable (by Western blot analysis) in the absence of TDP2, whereas poliovirus protein accumulation is reduced but still detectable. Using an infectious CVB3 RNA with a reporter, CVB3 RNA could still be replicated in the absence of TDP2 following transfection, albeit at reduced levels. Overall, these results indicate that TDP2 potentiates viral replication during enterovirus infections of cultured cells, making TDP2 a potential target for antiviral development for picornavirus infections. PMID:26715620

  16. Identifying aggressive prostate cancer foci using a DNA methylation classifier.

    PubMed

    Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Chopra, Sameer; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duymich, Christopher; Lakshminarasimhan, Ranjani; Nichols, Peter W; Aron, Manju; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Ukimura, Osamu; Aron, Monish; Stern, Mariana; Gill, Parkash; Carpten, John D; Ørntoft, Torben F; Sørensen, Karina D; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A; Duddalwar, Vinay; Gill, Inderbir; Liang, Gangning

    2017-01-12

    Slow-growing prostate cancer (PC) can be aggressive in a subset of cases. Therefore, prognostic tools to guide clinical decision-making and avoid overtreatment of indolent PC and undertreatment of aggressive disease are urgently needed. PC has a propensity to be multifocal with several different cancerous foci per gland. Here, we have taken advantage of the multifocal propensity of PC and categorized aggressiveness of individual PC foci based on DNA methylation patterns in primary PC foci and matched lymph node metastases. In a set of 14 patients, we demonstrate that over half of the cases have multiple epigenetically distinct subclones and determine the primary subclone from which the metastatic lesion(s) originated. Furthermore, we develop an aggressiveness classifier consisting of 25 DNA methylation probes to determine aggressive and non-aggressive subclones. Upon validation of the classifier in an independent cohort, the predicted aggressive tumors are significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases and invasive tumor stages. Overall, this study provides molecular-based support for determining PC aggressiveness with the potential to impact clinical decision-making, such as targeted biopsy approaches for early diagnosis and active surveillance, in addition to focal therapy.

  17. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Panicucci, R.; Heal, R.; Laderoute, K.

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl)-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 ismore » reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells.« less

  18. A DNA sequence analysis package for the IBM personal computer.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L M; Brentano, S T; Donelson, J E

    1984-01-01

    We present here a collection of DNA sequence analysis programs, called "PC Sequence" (PCS), which are designed to run on the IBM Personal Computer (PC). These programs are written in IBM PC compiled BASIC and take full advantage of the IBM PC's speed, error handling, and graphics capabilities. For a modest initial expense in hardware any laboratory can use these programs to quickly perform computer analysis on DNA sequences. They are written with the novice user in mind and require very little training or previous experience with computers. Also provided are a text editing program for creating and modifying DNA sequence files and a communications program which enables the PC to communicate with and collect information from mainframe computers and DNA sequence databases. PMID:6546433

  19. A DNA vaccine for the prevention of Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dery, Markalain; Bausch, Daniel G

    2008-06-01

    The NIH and Vical Inc are developing an intramuscular needle-free DNA vaccine containing plasmids encoding the envelope glycoprotein of Ebola virus (EBOV) from the Sudan and Zaire strains, and the nucleoprotein of EBOV Zaire strain. A phase I clinical trial demonstrated a good safety profile, with most adverse events limited to the site of injection and largely attributable to the delivery.

  20. 78 FR 58514 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing of a DNA Immunostimulant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service [Docket No. APHIS-2013-0077... field testing this product could have on the quality of the human environment. Based on the risk... testing this product will not have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment, and that...

  1. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    PubMed

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A DNA-based semantic fusion model for remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Heng; Weng, Jian; Yu, Guangchuang; Massawe, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology.

  3. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of a DNA Hydrogel in Three Phases Based on ATP Aptamer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hengyuan; Cao, Tianyang; Xu, Yun; Dong, Yuanchen; Liu, Dongsheng

    2018-05-31

    By integrating ATP aptamer into the linker DNA, a novel DNA hydrogel was designed, with mechanical properties that could be tuned into three phases. Based on the unique interaction between ATP and its aptamer, the mechanical strength of the hydrogel increased from 204 Pa to 380 Pa after adding ATP. Furthermore, with the addition of the complementary sequence to the ATP aptamer, the mechanical strength could be increased to 570 Pa.

  4. Selection and characterization, application of a DNA aptamer targeted to Streptococcus pyogenes in cooked chicken.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yukun; Wang, Xin; Duan, Nuo; Xia, Yu; Wang, Zhouping; Che, Zhenming; Wang, Lijun; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Xianggui

    2018-06-15

    An aptamer against Streptococcus pyogenes was selected and identified, and a fluorescent method based on the reported aptamer was established to detect S. pyogenes in the cooked chicken. Through a twelve rounds of whole-bacterium SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) selection in vitro, a set of aptamers binding to the whole cell of S. pyogenes were generated, harvesting a low-level dissociation constant (K d ) value of 44 ± 5 nmol L -1 of aptamer S-12. Aptamer-based quantification of S. pyogenes in the cooked chicken sample was implemented in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay by using graphene oxide, resulting in a limit of detection of 70 cfu mL -1 . The selected aptamer showed affinity and selectivity recognizing S. pyogenes; besides, more biosensors based on the selected aptamer as a molecular recognition element could be developed in the innovative determinations of S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of species diversity and distribution of an ancient diatom lineage using a DNA metabarcoding approach.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Deepak; Audic, Stephane; Romac, Sarah; Kooistra, Wiebe H C F; Zingone, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Continuous efforts to estimate actual diversity and to trace the species distribution and ranges in the natural environments have gone in equal pace with advancements of the technologies in the study of microbial species diversity from microscopic observations to DNA-based barcoding. DNA metabarcoding based on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) constitutes the latest advancement in these efforts. Here we use NGS data from different sites to investigate the geographic range of six species of the diatom family Leptocylindraceae and to identify possible new taxa within the family. We analysed the V4 and V9 regions of the nuclear-encoded SSU rDNA gene region in the NGS database of the European ERA-Biodiversa project BioMarKs, collected in plankton and sediments at six coastal sites in European coastal waters, as well as environmental sequences from the NCBI database. All species known in the family Leptocylindraceae were detected in both datasets, but the much larger Illumina V9 dataset showed a higher species coverage at the various sites than the 454 V4 dataset. Sequences identical or similar to the references of Leptocylindrus aporus, L. convexus, L. danicus/hargravesii and Tenuicylindrus belgicus were found in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Black Sea as well as at locations outside Europe. Instead, sequences identical or close to that of L. minimus were found in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea but not in the Mediterranean Sea, while sequences belonging to a yet undescribed taxon were encountered only in Oslo Fjord and Baffin Bay. Identification of Leptocylindraceae species in NGS datasets has expanded our knowledge of the species biogeographic distribution and of the overall diversity of this diatom family. Individual species appear to be widespread, but not all of them are found everywhere. Despite the sequencing depth allowed by NGS and the wide geographic area covered by this study, the diversity of this ancient diatom family appears to be low, at least at the level of the marker used in this study.

  6. Assessment of Species Diversity and Distribution of an Ancient Diatom Lineage Using a DNA Metabarcoding Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, Deepak; Audic, Stephane; Romac, Sarah; Kooistra, Wiebe H. C. F.; Zingone, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous efforts to estimate actual diversity and to trace the species distribution and ranges in the natural environments have gone in equal pace with advancements of the technologies in the study of microbial species diversity from microscopic observations to DNA-based barcoding. DNA metabarcoding based on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) constitutes the latest advancement in these efforts. Here we use NGS data from different sites to investigate the geographic range of six species of the diatom family Leptocylindraceae and to identify possible new taxa within the family. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed the V4 and V9 regions of the nuclear-encoded SSU rDNA gene region in the NGS database of the European ERA-Biodiversa project BioMarKs, collected in plankton and sediments at six coastal sites in European coastal waters, as well as environmental sequences from the NCBI database. All species known in the family Leptocylindraceae were detected in both datasets, but the much larger Illumina V9 dataset showed a higher species coverage at the various sites than the 454 V4 dataset. Sequences identical or similar to the references of Leptocylindrus aporus, L. convexus, L. danicus/hargravesii and Tenuicylindrus belgicus were found in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Black Sea as well as at locations outside Europe. Instead, sequences identical or close to that of L. minimus were found in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea but not in the Mediterranean Sea, while sequences belonging to a yet undescribed taxon were encountered only in Oslo Fjord and Baffin Bay. Conclusions/Significance Identification of Leptocylindraceae species in NGS datasets has expanded our knowledge of the species biogeographic distribution and of the overall diversity of this diatom family. Individual species appear to be widespread, but not all of them are found everywhere. Despite the sequencing depth allowed by NGS and the wide geographic area covered by this study, the diversity of this ancient diatom family appears to be low, at least at the level of the marker used in this study. PMID:25133638

  7. Interactions of RadB, a DNA repair protein in archaea, with DNA and ATP.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Haldenby, Sam; Brindley, Amanda; Walsh, David A; Briggs, Geoffrey S; Warren, Martin J; Allers, Thorsten; Bolt, Edward L

    2006-04-21

    The RecA family of recombinases (RecA, Rad51, RadA and UvsX) catalyse strand-exchange between homologous DNA molecules by utilising conserved DNA-binding modules and a common core ATPase domain. RadB was identified in archaea as a Rad51-like protein on the basis of conserved ATPase sequences. However, RadB does not catalyse strand exchange and does not turn over ATP efficiently. RadB does bind DNA, and here we report a triplet of residues (Lys-His-Arg) that is highly conserved at the RadB C terminus, and is crucial for DNA binding. This is consistent with the motif forming a "basic patch" of highly conserved residues identified in an atomic structure of RadB from Thermococcus kodakaraensis. As the triplet motif is conserved at the C terminus of XRCC2 also, a mammalian Rad51-paralogue, we present a phylogenetic analysis that clarifies the relationship between RadB, Rad51-paralogues and recombinases. We investigate interactions between RadB and ATP using genetics and biochemistry; ATP binding by RadB is needed to promote survival of Haloferax volcanii after UV irradiation, and ATP, but not other NTPs, induces pronounced conformational change in RadB. This is the first genetic analysis of radB, and establishes its importance for maintaining genome stability in archaea. ATP-induced conformational change in RadB may explain previous reports that RadB controls Holliday junction resolution by Hjc, depending on the presence or the absence of ATP.

  8. Development and application of a DNA microarray-based yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Yildirimman, Reha; Raskó, Tamás; Schaefer, Martin H.; Rasche, Axel; Porras, Pablo; Vázquez-Álvarez, Blanca M.; Russ, Jenny; Rau, Kirstin; Foulle, Raphaele; Zenkner, Martina; Saar, Kathrin; Herwig, Ralf; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Wanker, Erich E.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system is the most widely applied methodology for systematic protein–protein interaction (PPI) screening and the generation of comprehensive interaction networks. We developed a novel Y2H interaction screening procedure using DNA microarrays for high-throughput quantitative PPI detection. Applying a global pooling and selection scheme to a large collection of human open reading frames, proof-of-principle Y2H interaction screens were performed for the human neurodegenerative disease proteins huntingtin and ataxin-1. Using systematic controls for unspecific Y2H results and quantitative benchmarking, we identified and scored a large number of known and novel partner proteins for both huntingtin and ataxin-1. Moreover, we show that this parallelized screening procedure and the global inspection of Y2H interaction data are uniquely suited to define specific PPI patterns and their alteration by disease-causing mutations in huntingtin and ataxin-1. This approach takes advantage of the specificity and flexibility of DNA microarrays and of the existence of solid-related statistical methods for the analysis of DNA microarray data, and allows a quantitative approach toward interaction screens in human and in model organisms. PMID:23275563

  9. Colorimetric determination of DNase I activity with a DNA-methyl green substrate.

    PubMed

    Sinicropi, D; Baker, D L; Prince, W S; Shiffer, K; Shak, S

    1994-11-01

    A simple, high throughput, and precise assay was developed for quantification of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase; IUB 3.1.21.1) activity. The method was adapted from the procedure devised by Kurnick which employs a substrate comprised of highly polymerized native DNA complexed with methyl green. Hydrolysis of the DNA produced unbound methyl green and a decrease in the absorbance of the solution at 620 nm. By adjusting the time and temperature of the reaction, the assay permits quantification of DNase activity over a wide concentration range (0.4 to 8900 ng/ml). Samples and standards were added to the substrate in microtiter plates and were incubated for 1-24 h at 25-37 degrees C to achieve the desired assay range. The DNase activity of the samples was interpolated from a standard curve generated with Pulmozyme recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I (rhDNase). Interassay precision was less than 12% CV and recovery was within 100 +/- 11%. Activity determination by the DNA-methyl green method correlated well with that determined by the widely used "hyperchromicity" method originated by Kunitz, which is based on the increase in absorbance at 260 nm upon hydrolysis of DNA. The DNA-methyl green assay was simpler and more versatile than the hyperchromicity method and was used to characterize the activity of rhDNase and DNase isolated from human urine.

  10. Immobilization of proteins onto microbeads using a DNA binding tag for enzymatic assays.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takaaki; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Ota, Eri; Hata, Jumpei; Homma, Keisuke; Zhu, Bo; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    A novel DNA-binding protein tag, scCro-tag, which is a single-chain derivative of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor, has been developed to immobilize proteins of interest (POI) on a solid support through binding OR consensus DNA (ORC) that is tightly bound by the scCro protein. The scCro-tag successfully bound a transglutaminase 2 (TGase 2) substrate and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to microbeads via scaffolding DNA. The resulting protein-coated microbeads can be utilized for functional analysis of the enzymatic activity using flow cytometry. The quantity of bead-bound proteins can be enhanced by increasing the number of ORCs. In addition, proteins with the scCro-tag that were synthesized using a cell-free protein synthesis system were also immobilized onto the beads, thus indicating that this bead-based system would be applicable to high-throughput analysis of various enzymatic activities. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A DNA Logic Gate Automaton for Detection of Rabies and Other Lyssaviruses.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Pavithra; Macdonald, Joanne

    2017-07-05

    Immediate activation of biosensors is not always desirable, particularly if activation is due to non-specific interactions. Here we demonstrate the use of deoxyribozyme-based logic gate networks arranged into visual displays to precisely control activation of biosensors, and demonstrate a prototype molecular automaton able to discriminate between seven different genotypes of Lyssaviruses, including Rabies virus. The device uses novel mixed-base logic gates to enable detection of the large diversity of Lyssavirus sequence populations, while an ANDNOT logic gate prevents non-specific activation across genotypes. The resultant device provides a user-friendly digital-like, but molecule-powered, dot-matrix text output for unequivocal results read-out that is highly relevant for point of care applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Compartment-specific control of signaling from a DNA-sensing immune receptor.

    PubMed

    Engel, Alex; Barton, Gregory M

    2010-11-30

    Many cell signaling events are spatially organized, enabling control of specificity, amplitude, and duration. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) binds to nucleic acid sequences present in bacteria or DNA viruses and initiates a signaling pathway that culminates in the transcriptional induction of genes important for host defense, such as those encoding proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferon. A specialized membrane trafficking pathway has been described that is required for a specific branch of TLR9 signaling: the production of type I interferon. Cells deficient for the clathrin adaptor complex AP-3 failed to traffic TLR9 to a specific endosomal compartment and were unable to produce type I interferon despite normal increases in the abundance of interleukin-12p40, a proinflammatory cytokine. These findings support a model in which the targets of TLR9 engagement are controlled by the compartment in which TLR9 is activated.

  13. Overexpression of DEMETER, a DNA demethylase, promotes early apical bud maturation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Conde, Daniel; Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Dervinis, Christopher; Ramos-Sánchez, José M; Kirst, Matias; Perales, Mariano; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-11-01

    The transition from active growth to dormancy is critical for the survival of perennial plants. We identified a DEMETER-like (CsDML) cDNA from a winter-enriched cDNA subtractive library in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.), an economically and ecologically important species. Next, we characterized this DNA demethylase and its putative ortholog in the more experimentally tractable hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × alba), under the signals that trigger bud dormancy in trees. We performed phylogenetic and protein sequence analysis, gene expression profiling, and 5-methyl-cytosine methylation immunodetection studies to evaluate the role of CsDML and its homolog in poplar, PtaDML6. Transgenic hybrid poplars overexpressing CsDML were produced and analysed. Short days and cold temperatures induced CsDML and PtaDML6. Overexpression of CsDML accelerated short-day-induced bud formation, specifically from Stages 1 to 0. Buds acquired a red-brown coloration earlier than wild-type plants, alongside with the up-regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis enzymes and accumulation of flavonoids in the shoot apical meristem and bud scales. Our data show that the CsDML gene induces bud formation needed for the survival of the apical meristem under the harsh conditions of winter. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A DNA vaccine targeting angiomotin inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Lars; Ambrosino, Elena; Birot, Olivier; Tullus, Carl; Veitonmäki, Niina; Levchenko, Tetyana; Carlson, Lena-Maria; Musiani, Piero; Iezzi, Manuela; Curcio, Claudia; Forni, Guido; Cavallo, Federica; Kiessling, Rolf

    2006-06-01

    Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have shown promise in preclinical trials, but clinical use has been hindered by low half-life in circulation and high production costs. Here, we describe a strategy that targets the angiostatin receptor angiomotin (Amot) by DNA vaccination. The vaccination procedure generated antibodies that detected Amot on the endothelial cell surface. Purified Ig bound to the endothelial cell membrane and inhibited endothelial cell migration. In vivo, DNA vaccination blocked angiogenesis in the matrigel plug assay and prevented growth of transplanted tumors for up to 150 days. We further demonstrate that a combination of DNA vaccines encoding Amot and the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human EGF receptor 2 (Her-2)/neu oncogene inhibited breast cancer progression and impaired tumor vascularization in Her-2/neu transgenic mice. No toxicity or impairment of normal blood vessels could be detected. This work shows that DNA vaccination targeting Amot may be used to mimic the effect of angiostatin. cancer vaccines | neoplasia | neovascularization | breast cancer | angiostatin

  15. A DNA-Based Semantic Fusion Model for Remote Sensing Data

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Heng; Weng, Jian; Yu, Guangchuang; Massawe, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Semantic technology plays a key role in various domains, from conversation understanding to algorithm analysis. As the most efficient semantic tool, ontology can represent, process and manage the widespread knowledge. Nowadays, many researchers use ontology to collect and organize data's semantic information in order to maximize research productivity. In this paper, we firstly describe our work on the development of a remote sensing data ontology, with a primary focus on semantic fusion-driven research for big data. Our ontology is made up of 1,264 concepts and 2,030 semantic relationships. However, the growth of big data is straining the capacities of current semantic fusion and reasoning practices. Considering the massive parallelism of DNA strands, we propose a novel DNA-based semantic fusion model. In this model, a parallel strategy is developed to encode the semantic information in DNA for a large volume of remote sensing data. The semantic information is read in a parallel and bit-wise manner and an individual bit is converted to a base. By doing so, a considerable amount of conversion time can be saved, i.e., the cluster-based multi-processes program can reduce the conversion time from 81,536 seconds to 4,937 seconds for 4.34 GB source data files. Moreover, the size of result file recording DNA sequences is 54.51 GB for parallel C program compared with 57.89 GB for sequential Perl. This shows that our parallel method can also reduce the DNA synthesis cost. In addition, data types are encoded in our model, which is a basis for building type system in our future DNA computer. Finally, we describe theoretically an algorithm for DNA-based semantic fusion. This algorithm enables the process of integration of the knowledge from disparate remote sensing data sources into a consistent, accurate, and complete representation. This process depends solely on ligation reaction and screening operations instead of the ontology. PMID:24116207

  16. Oral Vaccination with a DNA Vaccine Encoding Capsid Protein of Duck Tembusu Virus Induces Protection Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haoyue; Jia, Renyong; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Liu, Yunya; Zhang, Ling; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jing, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), a new member of the Flavivirus genus, has caused great economical loss in the poultry industry in China. Since the outbreak and spread of DTMUV is hard to control in a clinical setting, an efficient and low-cost oral delivery DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C) based on the capsid protein of DTMUV was developed and evaluated in this study. The antigen capsid protein was expressed from the DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C), both in vitro and in vivo. The humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo were observed after oral immunization with the SL7207 (pVAX1-C) DNA vaccine. High titers of the specific antibody against the capsid protein and the neutralizing antibody against the DTMUV virus were both detected after inoculation. The ducks were efficiently protected from lethal DTMUV exposure by the SL7207 (pVAX1-C) vaccine in this experiment. Taken together, we demonstrated that the capsid protein of DTMUV possesses a strong immunogenicity against the DTMUV infection. Moreover, an oral delivery of the DNA vaccine SL7207 (pVAX1-C) utilizing Salmonella SL7207 was an efficient way to protect the ducks against DTMUV infection and provides an economic and fast vaccine delivery strategy for a large scale clinical use. PMID:29642401

  17. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M.; Hashsham, Syed A.

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131). PMID:28555058

  18. Identification and functional characterization of BTas transactivator as a DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Juan; Hao, Peng; Jia, Rui; Yang, Wei; Liu, Ruichang; Wang, Jinzhong; Xi, Zhen; Geng, Yunqi; Qiao, Wentao

    2010-09-30

    The genome of bovine foamy virus (BFV) encodes a transcriptional transactivator, namely BTas, that remarkably enhances gene expression by binding to the viral long-terminal repeat promoter (LTR) and internal promoter (IP). In this report, we characterized the functional domains of BFV BTas. BTas contains two major functional domains: the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (residues 1-133) and the C-terminal activation domain (residues 198-249). The complete BTas responsive regions were mapped to the positions -380/-140 of LTR and 9205/9276 of IP. Four BTas responsive elements were identified at the positions -368/-346, -327/-307, -306/-285 and -186/-165 of the BFV LTR, and one element was identified at the position 9243/9264 of the BFV IP. Unlike other foamy viruses, the five BTas responsive elements in BFV shared obvious sequence homology. These data suggest that among the complex retroviruses, BFV appears to have a unique transactivation mechanism. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    SciTech Connect

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenicmore » DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.« less

  20. Preparation and characterization of chemically functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a DNA separator.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kiho; Choi, Jinsub; Nam, Joong Hee; Lee, Sang Cheon; Kim, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang-Won; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2009-01-15

    The work describes a simple and convenient process for highly efficient and direct DNA separation with functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles and silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared uniformly, and the silica coating thickness could be easily controlled in a range from 10 to 50 nm by changing the concentration of silica precursor (TEOS) including controlled magnetic strength and particle size. A change in the surface modification on the nanoparticles was introduced by aminosilanization to enhance the selective DNA separation resulting from electrostatic interaction. The efficiency of the DNA separation was explored via the function of the amino-group numbers, particle size, the amount of the nanoparticles used, and the concentration of NaCl salt. The DNA adsorption yields were high in terms of the amount of triamino-functionalized nanoparticles used, and the average particle size was 25 nm. The adsorption efficiency of aminofunctionalized nanoparticles was the 4-5 times (80-100%) higher compared to silica-coated nanoparticles only (10-20%). DNA desorption efficiency showed an optimum level of over 0.7 M of the NaCl concentration. To elucidate the agglomeration of nanoparticles after electrostatic DNA binding, the Guinier plots were calculated from small-angle X-ray diffractions in a comparison of the results of energy diffraction TEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the direct separation of human genomic DNA was achieved from human saliva and whole blood with high efficiency.

  1. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  2. Molecular screening of walnut backcross populations for a DNA marker linked to cherry leafroll virus resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blackline disease, a graft union disorder caused by infection of English walnut (Juglans regia) trees by Cherry leafroll virus (CLRV) is a major problem for walnut production in Northern California where scions are grafted onto virus resistant black walnut (J. hindsii) or ‘Paradox’ (J. hindsii × J. ...

  3. Switching bonds in a DNA gel: an all-DNA vitrimer.

    PubMed

    Romano, Flavio; Sciortino, Francesco

    2015-02-20

    We design an all-DNA system that behaves like vitrimers, innovative plastics with self-healing and stress-releasing properties. The DNA sequences are engineered to self-assemble first into tetra- and bifunctional units which, upon further cooling, bind to each other forming a fully bonded network gel. An innovative design of the binding regions of the DNA sequences, exploiting a double toehold-mediated strand displacement, generates a network gel which is able to reshuffle its bonds, retaining at all times full bonding. As in vitrimers, the rate of bond switching can be controlled via a thermally activated catalyst, which in the present design is very short DNA strands.

  4. A detailed experimental study of a DNA computer with two endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakowski, Sebastian; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Sarnik, Joanna; Blasiak, Janusz; Waldmajer, Jacek; Poplawski, Tomasz

    2017-07-14

    Great advances in biotechnology have allowed the construction of a computer from DNA. One of the proposed solutions is a biomolecular finite automaton, a simple two-state DNA computer without memory, which was presented by Ehud Shapiro's group at the Weizmann Institute of Science. The main problem with this computer, in which biomolecules carry out logical operations, is its complexity - increasing the number of states of biomolecular automata. In this study, we constructed (in laboratory conditions) a six-state DNA computer that uses two endonucleases (e.g. AcuI and BbvI) and a ligase. We have presented a detailed experimental verification of its feasibility. We described the effect of the number of states, the length of input data, and the nondeterminism on the computing process. We also tested different automata (with three, four, and six states) running on various accepted input words of different lengths such as ab, aab, aaab, ababa, and of an unaccepted word ba. Moreover, this article presents the reaction optimization and the methods of eliminating certain biochemical problems occurring in the implementation of a biomolecular DNA automaton based on two endonucleases.

  5. Speeding up the self-assembly of a DNA nanodevice using a variety of polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Di; Duan, Ruixue; Tan, Yerpeng; Hong, Fan; Wang, Boya; Chen, Zhifei; Xu, Shaofang; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Wei; Yurke, Bernard; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-01

    The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors.The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol-1) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol-1), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures and analytical data are provided. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02257b

  6. Speeding up the self-assembly of a DNA nanodevice using a variety of polar solvents.

    PubMed

    kang, Di; Duan, Ruixue; Tan, Yerpeng; Hong, Fan; Wang, Boya; Chen, Zhifei; Xu, Shaofang; Lou, Xiaoding; Wei, Wei; Yurke, Bernard; Xia, Fan

    2014-11-06

    The specific recognition and programmable assembly properties make DNA a potential material for nanodevices. However, the more intelligent the nanodevice is, the more complicated the structure of the nanodevice is, which limits the speed of DNA assembly. Herein, to address this problem, we investigate the performance of DNA Strand Displacement Reaction (DSDR) in a mixture of polar organic solvents and aqueous buffer and demonstrate that the organic polar solvent can speed up DNA self-assembly efficiently. Taking DSDR in 20% ethanol as an example, first we have demonstrated that the DSDR is highly accelerated in the beginning of the reaction and it can complete 60% of replacement reactions (160% enhancement compared with aqueous buffer) in the first 300 seconds. Secondly, we calculated that the ΔΔG of the DSDR in 20% ethanol (-18.2 kcal mol(-1)) is lower than that in pure aqueous buffer (-32.6 kcal mol(-1)), while the activation energy is lowered by introducing ethanol. Finally, we proved that the DSDR on the electrode surface can also be accelerated using this simple strategy. More importantly, to test the efficacy of this approach in nanodevices with a complicated and slow DNA self-assembly process, we apply this strategy in the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and prove the acceleration is fairly obvious in 20% ethanol, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed strategy in DNA nanotechnology and DNA-based biosensors.

  7. A DNA Sequence Element That Advances Replication Origin Activation Time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Thomas J.; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time. PMID:24022751

  8. A DNA sequence element that advances replication origin activation time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Thomas J; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2013-11-06

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time.

  9. Improvement in the amine glass platform by bubbling method for a DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Young Soo

    2015-01-01

    A glass platform with high sensitivity for sexually transmitted diseases microarray is described here. An amino-silane-based self-assembled monolayer was coated on the surface of a glass platform using a novel bubbling method. The optimized surface of the glass platform had highly uniform surface modifications using this method, as well as improved hybridization properties with capture probes in the DNA microarray. On the basis of these results, the improved glass platform serves as a highly reliable and optimal material for the DNA microarray. Moreover, in this study, we demonstrated that our glass platform, manufactured by utilizing the bubbling method, had higher uniformity, shorter processing time, lower background signal, and higher spot signal than the platforms manufactured by the general dipping method. The DNA microarray manufactured with a glass platform prepared using bubbling method can be used as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:26468293

  10. Improvement in the amine glass platform by bubbling method for a DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Jee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Ji Hyeong; Yoon, Young Soo

    2015-01-01

    A glass platform with high sensitivity for sexually transmitted diseases microarray is described here. An amino-silane-based self-assembled monolayer was coated on the surface of a glass platform using a novel bubbling method. The optimized surface of the glass platform had highly uniform surface modifications using this method, as well as improved hybridization properties with capture probes in the DNA microarray. On the basis of these results, the improved glass platform serves as a highly reliable and optimal material for the DNA microarray. Moreover, in this study, we demonstrated that our glass platform, manufactured by utilizing the bubbling method, had higher uniformity, shorter processing time, lower background signal, and higher spot signal than the platforms manufactured by the general dipping method. The DNA microarray manufactured with a glass platform prepared using bubbling method can be used as a clinical diagnostic tool.

  11. Novobiocin: redesigning a DNA gyrase inhibitor for selective inhibition of hsp90.

    PubMed

    Burlison, Joseph A; Neckers, Len; Smith, Andrew B; Maxwell, Anthony; Blagg, Brian S J

    2006-12-06

    Novobiocin is a member of the coumermycin family of antibiotics and is a well-established inhibitor of DNA gyrase. Recent studies have shown that novobiocin binds to a previously unrecognized ATP-binding site at the C-terminus of Hsp90 and induces degradation of Hsp90-dependent client proteins at approximately 700 microM. In an effort to develop more efficacious inhibitors of the C-terminal binding site, a library of novobiocin analogues was prepared and initial structure-activity relationships revealed. These data suggested that the 4-hydroxy moiety of the coumarin ring and the 3'-carbamate of the noviose appendage were detrimental to Hsp90 inhibitory activity. In an effort to confirm these findings, 4-deshydroxy novobiocin (DHN1) and 3'-descarbamoyl-4-deshydroxynovobiocin (DHN2) were prepared and evaluated against Hsp90. Both compounds were significantly more potent than the natural product, and DHN2 proved to be more active than DHN1. In an effort to determine whether these moieties are important for DNA gyrase inhibition, these compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit DNA gyrase and found to exhibit significant reduction in gyrase activity. Thus, we have established the first set of compounds that clearly differentiate between the C-terminus of Hsp90 and DNA gyrase, converted a well-established gyrase inhibitor into a selective Hsp90 inhibitor, and confirmed essential structure-activity relationships for the coumermycin family of antibiotics.

  12. Feasibility of a DNA-Based Combinatorial Array Recognition Surface (CARS) in a Polyacrylamide Gel Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-12

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE o:~r’Jo , , , , ’!’" ’ "~’’;;;, .-’ ’"",: I ~~--’ h.~ ng t I :;"O(’:,~s ) (From ~ To) . I "NO ’."" "elE I ~~A...1612 temperature (Rn with gentle shaki ng and were then scanned as described below prior to addition ofanalytes. All DNA oligonu- cleotides were added...scans. One parameter which we have recently found to be of great val ue in reduci ng baseline variations in the CARS array (Fig. 6) is purificalion

  13. Effect of genome sequence on the force-induced unzipping of a DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Singh, Y

    2006-02-01

    We considered a dsDNA polymer in which distribution of bases are random at the base pair level but ordered at a length of 18 base pairs and calculated its force elongation behaviour in the constant extension ensemble. The unzipping force F(y) vs. extension y is found to have a series of maxima and minima. By changing base pairs at selected places in the molecule we calculated the change in F(y) curve and found that the change in the value of force is of the order of few pN and the range of the effect depending on the temperature, can spread over several base pairs. We have also discussed briefly how to calculate in the constant force ensemble a pause or a jump in the extension-time curve from the knowledge of F(y).

  14. Force-Induced Rupture of a DNA Duplex: From Fundamentals to Force Sensors.

    PubMed

    Mosayebi, Majid; Louis, Ard A; Doye, Jonathan P K; Ouldridge, Thomas E

    2015-12-22

    The rupture of double-stranded DNA under stress is a key process in biophysics and nanotechnology. In this article, we consider the shear-induced rupture of short DNA duplexes, a system that has been given new importance by recently designed force sensors and nanotechnological devices. We argue that rupture must be understood as an activated process, where the duplex state is metastable and the strands will separate in a finite time that depends on the duplex length and the force applied. Thus, the critical shearing force required to rupture a duplex depends strongly on the time scale of observation. We use simple models of DNA to show that this approach naturally captures the observed dependence of the force required to rupture a duplex within a given time on duplex length. In particular, this critical force is zero for the shortest duplexes, before rising sharply and then plateauing in the long length limit. The prevailing approach, based on identifying when the presence of each additional base pair within the duplex is thermodynamically unfavorable rather than allowing for metastability, does not predict a time-scale-dependent critical force and does not naturally incorporate a critical force of zero for the shortest duplexes. We demonstrate that our findings have important consequences for the behavior of a new force-sensing nanodevice, which operates in a mixed mode that interpolates between shearing and unzipping. At a fixed time scale and duplex length, the critical force exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on the fraction of the duplex that is subject to shearing.

  15. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5’-end including the 5’-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer. PMID:26221730

  16. Development of a DNA Aptamer for Screening Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B by Cell SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakhani, Kimia; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rasooli, Iraj; Rasoulinejad, Samaneh

    2018-01-01

    Background: Artificial oligonucleotides like DNA or RNA aptamers can be used as biodiagnostic alternatives for antibodies to detect pathogens. Comparing to antibodies, artificial oligonucleotides are produced easily at lower costs and are more stable. Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of meningitis, is responsible for about 1% of infections in an epidemic period. Specific DNA aptamers that bind to N. meningitidis serogroup B were identified by whole-cell Systemic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential Enrichment (SELEX). Methods: The SELEX begins with a library of labeled ssDNA molecules. After six rounds of selection and two rounds of counter-selection, 60 clones were obtained, of which the binding efficiency of 21 aptamers to the aforementioned bacterium was tested by flow cytometry. Results: The aptamers K3 and K4 showed the highest affinity to N. meningitidis serogroup B and no affinity to N. meningitidis serogroups Y, A, and C, or to other meningitis causing bacteria. The dissociation constant (Kd value) for K3 and K4 were calculated as 28.3 ± 8.9 pM and 39.1 ± 8.6 pM, respectively. K3 aptamer with the lowest Kd was chosen as the main aptamer. K3 could detect N. meningitidis in patients’ cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and in CSF from healthy volunteers inoculated with N. meningitidis serogroup B (ATCC 13090) at 200 and 100 CFU ml-1, respectively. Conclusion: The findings suggest the application of the developed aptamer in specific detection of N. meningitidis serogroup B amongst a group of meningitis causing bacteria.

  17. Selection, Characterization and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer for the Detection of Bifidobacterium bifidum

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lujun; Wang, Linlin; Lu, Wenwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    A whole-bacterium-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) procedure was adopted in this study for the selection of an ssDNA aptamer that binds to Bifidobacterium bifidum. After 12 rounds of selection targeted against B. bifidum, 30 sequences were obtained and divided into seven families according to primary sequence homology and similarity of secondary structure. Four FAM (fluorescein amidite) labeled aptamer sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by flow cytometric analysis. The results reveal that the aptamer sequence CCFM641-5 demonstrated high-affinity and specificity for B. bifidum compared with the other sequences tested, and the estimated Kd value was 10.69 ± 0.89 nM. Additionally, sequence truncation experiments of the aptamer CCFM641-5 led to the conclusion that the 5′-primer and 3′-primer binding sites were essential for aptamer-target binding. In addition, the possible component of the target B. bifidum, bound by the aptamer CCFM641-5, was identified as a membrane protein by treatment with proteinase. Furthermore, to prove the potential application of the aptamer CCFM641-5, a colorimetric bioassay of the sandwich-type structure was used to detect B. bifidum. The assay had a linear range of 104 to 107 cfu/mL (R2 = 0.9834). Therefore, the colorimetric bioassay appears to be a promising method for the detection of B. bifidum based on the aptamer CCFM641-5. PMID:28441340

  18. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    PubMed

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  19. Selection and identification of a DNA aptamer targeted to Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun; Wang, Zhouping

    2012-04-25

    A whole-bacterium systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA molecules to identify DNA aptamers demonstrating specific binding to Vibrio parahemolyticus . FAM-labeled aptamer sequences with high binding affinity to V. parahemolyticus were identified by flow cytometric analysis. Aptamer A3P, which showed a particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterization. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 16.88 ± 1.92 nM. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer A3P showed a high binding affinity (76%) for V. parahemolyticus and a low apparent binding affinity (4%) for other bacteria. Whole-bacterium SELEX is a promising technique for the design of aptamer-based molecular probes for microbial pathogens that does not require the labor-intensive steps of isolating and purifying complex markers or targets.

  20. Subunit Conformations and Assembly States of a DNA Translocating Motor: The Terminase of Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Němeček, Daniel; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Kang, Sebyung; Prevelige, Peter E.; Casjens, Sherwood; Thomas, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22, a podovirus infecting strains of Salmonella typhimurium, packages a 42 kbp genome using a headful mechanism. DNA translocation is accomplished by the phage terminase, a powerful molecular motor consisting of large and small subunits. Although many of the structural proteins of the P22 virion have been well characterized, little is known about the terminase subunits and their molecular mechanism of DNA translocation. We report here structural and assembly properties of ectopically expressed and highly purified terminase large and small subunits. The large subunit (gp2), which contains the nuclease and ATPase activities of terminase, exists as a stable monomer with an α/β fold. The small subunit (gp3), which recognizes DNA for packaging and may regulate gp2 activity, exhibits a highly α-helical secondary structure and self-associates to form a stable oligomeric ring in solution. For wildtype gp3, the ring contains nine subunits, as demonstrated by hydrodynamic measurements, electron microscopy and native mass spectrometry. We have also characterized a gp3 mutant (Ala 112 → Thr) that forms a ten subunit ring, despite a subunit fold indistinguishable from wildtype. Both the nonameric and decameric gp3 rings exhibit nonspecific DNA binding activity, and gp2 is able to bind strongly to the DNA/gp3 complex but not to DNA alone. We propose a scheme for the roles of P22 terminase large and small subunits in the recruitment and packaging of viral DNA and discuss the model in relation to proposals for terminase-driven DNA translocation in other phages. PMID:17945256

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 Does Not Encode a DNA Gyrase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Breuer, Christian; Wall, Melisa K.; Sugimoto-Shirasu, Keiko; Maxwell, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3. Methodology/Principal Findings We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer. Conclusions/Significance These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen. PMID:20360860

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana GYRB3 does not encode a DNA gyrase subunit.

    PubMed

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M; Breuer, Christian; Wall, Melisa K; Sugimoto-Shirasu, Keiko; Maxwell, Anthony

    2010-03-26

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in all cells. DNA gyrase is unique among the topoisomerases in that it is the only enzyme that can actively supercoil DNA using the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. Until recently gyrase was thought to be unique to bacteria, but has now been discovered in plants. The genome of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, is predicted to encode four gyrase subunits: AtGyrA, AtGyrB1, AtGyrB2 and AtGyrB3. We found, contrary to previous data, that AtGyrB3 is not essential to the survival of A. thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis suggests AtGyrB3 is considerably shorter than other gyrase B subunits, lacking part of the ATPase domain and other key motifs found in all type II topoisomerases; but it does contain a putative DNA-binding domain. Partially purified AtGyrB3 cannot bind E. coli GyrA or support supercoiling. AtGyrB3 cannot complement an E. coli gyrB temperature-sensitive strain, whereas AtGyrB2 can. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that AtGyrB3 cannot bind to AtGyrA or form a dimer. These data strongly suggest that AtGyrB3 is not a gyrase subunit but has another unknown function. One possibility is that it is a nuclear protein with a role in meiosis in pollen.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits a DNA damage response by mislocalizing checkpoint proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Miguel; Shenk, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint pathway responds to DNA damage and induces a cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. Several viruses are known to activate or modulate this cellular response. Here we show that the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated checkpoint pathway, which responds to double-strand breaks in DNA, is activated in response to human cytomegalovirus DNA replication. However, this activation does not propagate through the pathway; it is blocked at the level of the effector kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2). Late after infection, several checkpoint proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Chk2, are mislocalized to a cytoplasmic virus assembly zone, where they are colocalized with virion structural proteins. This colocalization was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of virion proteins with an antibody that recognizes Chk2. Virus replication was resistant to ionizing radiation, which causes double-strand breaks in DNA. We propose that human CMV DNA replication activates the checkpoint response to DNA double-strand breaks, and the virus responds by altering the localization of checkpoint proteins to the cytoplasm and thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway. ionizing radiation | ataxia-telangiectasia mutated pathway

  4. Determining Plant – Leaf Miner – Parasitoid Interactions: A DNA Barcoding Approach

    PubMed Central

    Derocles, Stéphane A. P.; Evans, Darren M.; Nichols, Paul C.; Evans, S. Aifionn; Lunt, David H.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a) morphological identification of adult specimens; b) identification based on the shape of the mines; c) the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp) and d) the COI full barcode (658 bp) fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant – leaf miner – parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria. PMID:25710377

  5. Tuberculosis outbreaks predicted by characteristics of first patients in a DNA fingerprint cluster.

    PubMed

    Kik, Sandra V; Verver, Suzanne; van Soolingen, Dick; de Haas, Petra E W; Cobelens, Frank G; Kremer, Kristin; van Deutekom, Henk; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2008-07-01

    Some clusters of patients who have Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical DNA fingerprint patterns grow faster than others. It is unclear what predictors determine cluster growth. To assess whether the development of a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak can be predicted by the characteristics of its first two patients. Demographic and clinical data of all culture-confirmed patients with TB in the Netherlands from 1993 through 2004 were combined with DNA fingerprint data. Clusters were restricted to cluster episodes of 2 years to only detect newly arising clusters. Characteristics of the first two patients were compared between small (2-4 cases) and large (5 or more cases) cluster episodes. Of 5,454 clustered cases, 1,756 (32%) were part of a cluster episode of 2 years. Of 622 cluster episodes, 54 (9%) were large and 568 (91%) were small episodes. Independent predictors for large cluster episodes were as follows: less than 3 months' time between the diagnosis of the first two patients, one or both patients were young (<35 yr), both patients lived in an urban area, and both patients came from sub-Saharan Africa. In the Netherlands, patients in new cluster episodes should be screened for these risk factors. When the risk pattern applies, targeted interventions (e.g., intensified contact investigation) should be considered to prevent further cluster expansion.

  6. Association of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression with a DNA Methylation Signature in Adult Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Vitaro, Frank; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic physical aggression (CPA) is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity. Aims To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood. Methods We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays. Results In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome. Conclusions This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression. PMID:24691403

  7. Unfolding and Targeting Thermodynamics of a DNA Intramolecular Complex with Joined Triplex-Duplex Domains.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah E; Reiling-Steffensmeier, Calliste; Lee, Hui-Ting; Marky, Luis A

    2018-01-25

    Our laboratory is interested in developing methods that can be used for the control of gene expression. In this work, we are investigating the reaction of an intramolecular complex containing a triplex-duplex junction with partially complementary strands. We used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectroscopy techniques to determine standard thermodynamic profiles for these targeting reactions. Specifically, we have designed single strands to target one loop (CTTTC) or two loops (CTTTC and GCAA) of this complex. Both reactions yielded exothermic enthalpies of -66.3 and -82.8 kcal/mol by ITC, in excellent agreement with the reaction enthalpies of -72.7 and -88.7 kcal/mol, respectively, obtained from DSC Hess cycles. The favorable heat contributions result from the formation of base-pair stacks involving mainly the unpaired bases of the loops. This shows that each complementary strand is able to invade and disrupt the secondary structure. The simultaneous targeting of two loops yielded a more favorable reaction free energy, by approximately -8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to the formation of roughly four base-pair stacks involving the unpaired bases of the 5'-GCAA loop. The main conclusion is that the targeting of loops with a large number of unpaired bases results in a more favorable reaction free energy.

  8. A DNA vaccine delivered by dermal electroporation fully protects cynomolgus macaques against Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Facemire, Paul R; Bell, Todd M; Bearss, Jeremy J; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-12-02

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an ambisense RNA virus in the Arenaviridae family and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe hemorrhagic disease endemic to West and Central Africa. 1,2 There are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines available to prevent Lassa fever. 1,2 in our previous studies, we developed a gene-optimized DNA vaccine that encodes the glycoprotein precursor gene of LASV (Josiah strain) and demonstrated that 3 vaccinations accompanied by dermal electroporation protected guinea pigs from LASV-associated illness and death. Here, we describe an initial efficacy experiment in cynomolgus macaque nonhuman primates (NHPs) in which we followed an identical 3-dose vaccine schedule that was successful in guinea pigs, and a follow-on experiment in which we used an accelerated vaccination strategy consisting of 2 administrations, spaced 4 weeks apart. In both studies, all of the LASV DNA-vaccinated NHPs survived challenge and none of them had measureable, sustained viremia or displayed weight loss or other disease signs post-exposure. Three of 10 mock-vaccinates survived exposure to LASV, but all of them became acutely ill post-exposure and remained chronically ill to the study end point (45 d post-exposure). Two of the 3 survivors experienced sensorineural hearing loss (described elsewhere). These results clearly demonstrate that the LASV DNA vaccine combined with dermal electroporation is a highly effective candidate for eventual use in humans.

  9. A DNA microarray-based assay to detect dual infection with two dengue virus serotypes.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Muñoz, María de Lourdes; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-04-25

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples.

  10. A DNA Microarray-Based Assay to Detect Dual Infection with Two Dengue Virus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Badillo, Alvaro; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Altuzar, Victor; Burgueño, Juan; Mendoza-Alvarez, Julio G.; Martínez-Muñoz, Jorge P.; Cisneros, Alejandro; Navarrete-Espinosa, Joel; Sanchez-Sinencio, Feliciano

    2014-01-01

    Here; we have described and tested a microarray based-method for the screening of dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. This DNA microarray assay is specific and sensitive and can detect dual infections with two dengue virus serotypes and single-serotype infections. Other methodologies may underestimate samples containing more than one serotype. This technology can be used to discriminate between the four DENV serotypes. Single-stranded DNA targets were covalently attached to glass slides and hybridised with specific labelled probes. DENV isolates and dengue samples were used to evaluate microarray performance. Our results demonstrate that the probes hybridized specifically to DENV serotypes; with no detection of unspecific signals. This finding provides evidence that specific probes can effectively identify single and double infections in DENV samples. PMID:24776933

  11. Synthetic polymers as substrates for a DNA-sliding clamp protein.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, S F M; Clerx, J; van den Boomen, O I; Pervaiz, M; Trakselis, M A; Ritschel, T; Schoonen, L; Schoenmakers, D C; Nolte, R J M

    2018-04-26

    The clamp protein (gp45) of the DNA polymerase III of the bacteriophage T4 is known to bind to DNA and stay attached to it in order to facilitate the process of DNA copying by the polymerase. As part of a project aimed at developing new biomimetic data-encoding systems we have investigated the binding of gp45 to synthetic polymers, that is, rigid, helical polyisocyanopeptides. Molecular modelling studies suggest that the clamp protein may interact with the latter polymers. Experiments aimed at verifying these interactions are presented and discussed. © 2018 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Good Manufacturing Practices production and analysis of a DNA vaccine against dental caries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-ping; Li, Yu-hong; Zhang, Ai-hua; Bi, Lan; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-11-01

    To prepare a clinical-grade anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX and explore its immune effect and protective efficacy against a cariogenic bacterial challenge. A large-scale industrial production process was developed under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) by combining and optimizing common unit operations such as alkaline lysis, precipitation, endotoxin removal and column chromatography. Quality controls of the purified bulk and final lyophilized vaccine were conducted according to authoritative guidelines. Mice and gnotobiotic rats were intranasally immunized with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with chitosan. Antibody levels of serum IgG and salivary SIgA were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and caries activity was evaluated by the Keyes method. pGJA-P/VAX and pVAX1 prepared by a laboratory-scale commercial kit were used as controls. The production process proved to be scalable and reproducible. Impurities including host protein, residual RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxin in the purified plasmid were all under the limits of set specifications. Intranasal vaccination with clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX induced higher serum IgG and salivary SIgA in both mice and gnotobiotic rats. While in the experimental caries model, the enamel (E), dentinal slight (Ds), and dentinal moderate (Dm) caries lesions were reduced by 21.1%, 33.0%, and 40.9%, respectively. The production process under GMP was efficient in preparing clinical-grade pGJA-P/VAX with high purity and intended effectiveness, thus facilitating future clinical trials for the anti-caries DNA vaccine.

  13. Early development and characterization of a DNA-based radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avarmaa, Kirsten A.

    It is the priority of first responders to minimize damage to persons and infrastructure in the case of a nuclear emergency due to an accident or deliberate terrorist attack -- if this emergency includes a radioactive hazard, first responders require a simple-to-use, accurate and complete dosimeter for radiation protection purposes in order to minimize the health risk to these individuals and the general population at large. This work consists of the early evaluation of the design and performance of a biologically relevant dosimeter which uses DNA material that can respond to the radiation of any particle type. The construct consists of fluorescently tagged strands of DNA. The signalling components of this dosimeter are also investigated for their sensitivity to radiation damage and light exposure. The dual-labelled dosimeter that is evaluated in this work gave a measurable response to gamma radiation at dose levels of 10 Gy for the given detector design and experimental setup. Further testing outside of this work confirmed this finding and indicated a working range of 100 mGy to 10 Gy using a custom-built fluorimeter as part of a larger CRTI initiative. Characterization of the chromatic components of the dosimeter showed that photobleaching is not expected to have an effect on dosimeter performance, but that radiation can damage the non-DNA signalling components at higher dose levels, although this damage is minimal at lower doses over the expected operating ranges. This work therefore describes the early steps in the quantification of the behaviour of the DNA dosimeter as a potential biologically-based device to measure radiation dose.

  14. Identification of a DNA sequence motif required for expression of iron-regulated genes in pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Rombel, I T; McMorran, B J; Lamont, I L

    1995-02-20

    Many bacteria respond to a lack of iron in the environment by synthesizing siderophores, which act as iron-scavenging compounds. Fluorescent pseudomonads synthesize strain-specific but chemically related siderophores called pyoverdines or pseudobactins. We have investigated the mechanisms by which iron controls expression of genes involved in pyoverdine metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transcription of these genes is repressed by the presence of iron in the growth medium. Three promoters from these genes were cloned and the activities of the promoters were dependent on the amounts of iron in the growth media. Two of the promoters were sequenced and the transcriptional start site were identified by S1 nuclease analysis. Sequences similar to the consensus binding site for the Fur repressor protein, which controls expression of iron-repressible genes in several gram-negative species, were not present in the promoters, suggesting that they are unlikely to have a high affinity for Fur. However, comparison of the promoter sequences with those of iron-regulated genes from other Pseudomonas species and also the iron-regulated exotoxin gene of P. aeruginosa allowed identification of a shared sequence element, with the consensus sequence (G/C)CTAAAT-CCC, which is likely to act as a binding site for a transcriptional activator protein. Mutations in this sequence greatly reduced the activities of the promoters characterized here as well as those of other iron-regulated promoters. The requirement for this motif in the promoters of iron-regulated genes of different Pseudomonas species indicates that similar mechanisms are likely to be involved in controlling expression of a range of iron-regulated genes in pseudomonads.

  15. Development of a DNA Sensor Based on Nanoporous Pt-Rich Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hao, Pham; Thanh, Pham Duc; Xuan, Chu Thi; Hai, Nguyen Hoang; Tuan, Mai Anh

    2017-06-01

    Nanoporous Pt-rich electrodes with 72 at.% Pt composition were fabricated by sputtering a Pt-Ag alloy, followed by an electrochemical dealloying process to selectively etch away Ag atoms. The surface properties of nanoporous membranes were investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), a documentation system, and a gel image system (Gel Doc Imager). A single strand of probe deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was immobilized onto the electrode surface by physical adsorption. The DNA probe and target hybridization were measured using a lock-in amplifier and an electrochemical impedance spectroscope (EIS). The nanoporous Pt-rich electrode-based DNA sensor offers a fast response time of 3.7 s, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.35 × 10-10 M of DNA target.

  16. A DNA fragment of Leptospira interrogans encodes a protein which shares epitopes with equine cornea.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, P M; Parma, A E

    1999-11-30

    Horses infected with Leptospira interrogans present several clinical disorders, one of them being recurrent uveitis. An antigenic relationship between this bacterium and equine cornea has been described in previous studies. With the aim to make progress on defining the molecular basis and pathogenesis of equine recurrent uveitis, here we describe the cloning of one DNA fragment from a Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona genomic lambda gt11 library. Although there are references of transcription of leptospiral genes in E. coli from their own leptospiral promoters, in this recombinant construction the leptospiral DNA was located under the control of lacZ promoter since no expression could be detected in the absence of IPTG. This clone, isolated by expression screening with polyclonal serum raised against equine corneal proteins, encodes a 90 kDa protein of L. interrogans which crossreacts with equine cornea as proved Western-blotting. Antibodies directed against this leptospiral protein strongly recognised a 66 kDa equine corneal protein, one of those recognised by an anti-equine cornea serum. Our findings suggest that an immune response to 90 kDa protein participates in pathogenesis of equine uveitis.

  17. Serovar distribution of a DNA sequence involved in the antigenic relationship between Leptospira and equine cornea

    PubMed Central

    Lucchesi, Paula MA; Parma, Alberto E; Arroyo, Guillermo H

    2002-01-01

    Background Horses infected with Leptospira present several clinical disorders, one of them being recurrent uveitis. A common endpoint of equine recurrent uveitis is blindness. Serovar pomona has often been incriminated, although others have also been reported. An antigenic relationship between this bacterium and equine cornea has been described in previous studies. A leptospiral DNA fragment that encodes cross-reacting epitopes was previously cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Results A region of that DNA fragment was subcloned and sequenced. Samples of leptospiral DNA from several sources were analysed by PCR with two primer pairs designed to amplify that region. Reference strains from serovars canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae, pomona, pyrogenes, wolffi, bataviae, sentot, hebdomadis and hardjo rendered products of the expected sizes with both pairs of primers. The specific DNA region was also amplified from isolates from Argentina belonging to serogroups Canicola and Pomona. Both L. biflexa serovar patoc and L. borgpetersenii serovar tarassovi rendered a negative result. Conclusions The DNA sequence related to the antigen mimicry with equine cornea was not exclusively found in serovar pomona as it was also detected in several strains of Leptospira belonging to different serovars. The results obtained with L. biflexa serovar patoc strain Patoc I and L. borgpetersenii serovar tarassovi strain Perepelicin suggest that this sequence is not present in these strains, which belong to different genomospecies than those which gave positive results. This is an interesting finding since L. biflexa comprises nonpathogenic strains and serovar tarassovi has not been associated clinically with equine uveitis. PMID:11869455

  18. Serovar distribution of a DNA sequence involved in the antigenic relationship between Leptospira and equine cornea.

    PubMed

    Lucchesi, Paula M A; Parma, Alberto E; Arroyo, Guillermo H

    2002-01-01

    Horses infected with Leptospira present several clinical disorders, one of them being recurrent uveitis. A common endpoint of equine recurrent uveitis is blindness. Serovar pomona has often been incriminated, although others have also been reported. An antigenic relationship between this bacterium and equine cornea has been described in previous studies. A leptospiral DNA fragment that encodes cross-reacting epitopes was previously cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. A region of that DNA fragment was subcloned and sequenced. Samples of leptospiral DNA from several sources were analysed by PCR with two primer pairs designed to amplify that region. Reference strains from serovars canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae, pomona, pyrogenes, wolffi, bataviae, sentot, hebdomadis and hardjo rendered products of the expected sizes with both pairs of primers. The specific DNA region was also amplified from isolates from Argentina belonging to serogroups Canicola and Pomona. Both L. biflexa serovar patoc and L. borgpetersenii serovar tarassovi rendered a negative result. The DNA sequence related to the antigen mimicry with equine cornea was not exclusively found in serovar pomona as it was also detected in several strains of Leptospira belonging to different serovars. The results obtained with L. biflexa serovar patoc strain Patoc I and L. borgpetersenii serovar tarassovi strain Perepelicin suggest that this sequence is not present in these strains, which belong to different genomospecies than those which gave positive results. This is an interesting finding since L. biflexa comprises nonpathogenic strains and serovar tarassovi has not been associated clinically with equine uveitis.

  19. Identification of an Unfolding Intermediate for a DNA Lesion Bypass Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Sherrer, Shanen M.; Maxwell, Brian A.; Pack, Lindsey R.; Fiala, Kevin A.; Fowler, Jason D.; Zhang, Jun; Suo, Zucai

    2012-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricusDNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4), a prototype Y-family DNA polymerase, has been well characterized biochemically and biophysically at 37 °C or lower temperatures. However, the physiological temperature of the hyperthermophile S. solfataricus is approximately 80 °C. With such a large discrepancy in temperature, the in vivo relevance of these in vitro studies of Dpo4 has been questioned. Here, we employed circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence-based thermal scanning to investigate the secondary structural changes of Dpo4 over a temperature range from 26 to 119 °C. Dpo4 was shown to display a high melting temperature characteristic of hyperthermophiles. Unexpectedly, the Little Finger domain of Dpo4, which is only found in the Y-family DNA polymerases, was shown to be more thermostable than the polymerase core. More interestingly, Dpo4 exhibited a three-state cooperative unfolding profile with an unfolding intermediate. The linker region between the Little Finger and Thumb domains of Dpo4 was found to be a source of structural instability. Through site-directed mutagenesis, the interactions between the residues in the linker region and the Palm domain were identified to play a critical role in the formation of the unfolding intermediate. Notably, the secondary structure of Dpo4 was not altered when the temperature was increased from 26 to 87.5 °C. Thus, in addition to providing structural insights into the thermal stability and an unfolding intermediate of Dpo4, our work also validated the relevance of the in vitro studies of Dpo4 performed at temperatures significantly lower than 80 °C. PMID:22667759

  20. Structure of a DNA glycosylase that unhooks interstrand cross-links

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, Elwood A.; Warren, Garrett M.; Bradley, Noah P.

    DNA glycosylases are important editing enzymes that protect genomic stability by excising chemically modified nucleobases that alter normal DNA metabolism. These enzymes have been known only to initiate base excision repair of small adducts by extrusion from the DNA helix. However, recent reports have described both vertebrate and microbial DNA glycosylases capable of unhooking highly toxic interstrand cross-links (ICLs) and bulky minor groove adducts normally recognized by Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair machinery, although the mechanisms of these activities are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of Streptomyces sahachiroi AlkZ (previously Orf1), a bacterial DNA glycosylase that protectsmore » its host by excising ICLs derived from azinomycin B (AZB), a potent antimicrobial and antitumor genotoxin. AlkZ adopts a unique fold in which three tandem winged helix-turn-helix motifs scaffold a positively charged concave surface perfectly shaped for duplex DNA. Through mutational analysis, we identified two glutamine residues and a β-hairpin within this putative DNA-binding cleft that are essential for catalytic activity. Additionally, we present a molecular docking model for how this active site can unhook either or both sides of an AZB ICL, providing a basis for understanding the mechanisms of base excision repair of ICLs. Given the prevalence of this protein fold in pathogenic bacteria, this work also lays the foundation for an emerging role of DNA repair in bacteria-host pathogenesis.« less

  1. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA–DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an ‘inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA–DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition. PMID:26725969

  2. Manipulation of a DNA aptamer-protein binding site through arylation of internal guanine residues.

    PubMed

    Van Riesen, Abigail J; Fadock, Kaila L; Deore, Prashant S; Desoky, Ahmed; Manderville, Richard A; Sowlati-Hashjin, Shahin; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2018-05-23

    Chemically modified aptamers have the opportunity to increase aptamer target binding affinity and provide structure-activity relationships to enhance our understanding of molecular target recognition by the aptamer fold. In the current study, 8-aryl-2'-deoxyguanosine nucleobases have been inserted into the G-tetrad and central TGT loop of the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) to determine their impact on antiparallel G-quadruplex (GQ) folding and thrombin binding affinity. The aryl groups attached to the dG nucleobase vary greatly in aryl ring size and impact on GQ stability (∼20 °C change in GQ thermal melting (Tm) values) and thrombin binding affinity (17-fold variation in dissociation constant (Kd)). At G8 of the central TGT loop that is distal from the aptamer recognition site, the probes producing the most stable GQ structure exhibited the strongest thrombin binding affinity. However, within the G-tetrad, changes to the electron density of the dG component within the modified nucleobase can diminish thrombin binding affinity. Detailed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the modified TBA (mTBA) and mTBA-protein complexes demonstrate how the internal 8-aryl-dG modification can manipulate the interactions between the DNA nucleobases and the amino acid residues of thrombin. These results highlight the potential of internal fluorescent nuclobase analogs (FBAs) to broaden design options for aptasensor development.

  3. Direct growth of aligned graphitic nanoribbons from a DNA template by chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Yap, Fung Ling; Liu, Nan; Kim, Kwanpyo; Ci, Lijie; Johnson, Olasupo B; Wang, Huiliang; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Koh, Ai Leen; Chen, Jihua; Park, Jinseong; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-01-01

    Graphene, laterally confined within narrow ribbons, exhibits a bandgap and is envisioned as a next-generation material for high-performance electronics. To take advantage of this phenomenon, there is a critical need to develop methodologies that result in graphene ribbons <10 nm in width. Here we report the use of metal salts infused within stretched DNA as catalysts to grow nanoscopic graphitic nanoribbons. The nanoribbons are termed graphitic as they have been determined to consist of regions of sp(2) and sp(3) character. The nanoscopic graphitic nanoribbons are micrometres in length, <10 nm in width, and take on the shape of the DNA template. The DNA strand is converted to a graphitic nanoribbon by utilizing chemical vapour deposition conditions. Depending on the growth conditions, metallic or semiconducting graphitic nanoribbons are formed. Improvements in the growth method have potential to lead to bottom-up synthesis of pristine single-layer graphene nanoribbons.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Repetitive Element from the Mouse Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Adriana; Cossio, Gabriela; Wettstein, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 3-week laboratory activity for an undergraduate molecular biology course. This activity introduces students to the practice of basic molecular techniques such as restriction enzyme digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, cloning, plasmid DNA purification, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Students learn how to carry…

  5. Neoplastic MiR-17~92 deregulation at a DNA fragility motif (SIDD).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Björn; Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corinna; Geffers, Robert; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F

    2012-03-01

    Chromosomal or mutational activation of BCL6 (at 3q27) typifies diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which in the germinal center subtype may be accompanied by focal amplification of chromosome band 13q31 effecting upregulation of miR-17~92. Using long distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction, we mapped and sequenced six breakpoints of a complex BCL6 rearrangement t(3;13)(q27;q31)t(12;13)(p11;q31) in DLBCL cells, which places miR-17~92 antisense within the resulting ITPR2-BCL6 chimeric fusion gene rearrangement. MiR-17~92 members were upregulated ~15-fold over controls in a copy number independent manner consistent with structural deregulation. MIR17HG and ITPR2-BCL6 were, despite their close configuration, independently expressed, discounting antisense regulation. MIR17HG in t(3;13)t(12;13) cells proved highly responsive to treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors implicating epigenetic deregulation, consistent with which increased histone-H3 acetylation was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation near the upstream MIR17HG breakpoint. Remarkably, 5/6 DNA breaks in the t(3;13)t(12;13) precisely cut at stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD) peaks reminiscent of chromosomal fragile sites, while the sixth lay 150 bp distant. Extended SIDD profiling showed that additional oncomiRs also map to SIDD peaks. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that 11 of 52 (21%) leukemia-lymphoma (L-L) cell lines with 13q31 involvement bore structural rearrangements at/near MIR17HG associated with upregulation. As well as fueling genome instability, SIDD peaks mark regulatory nuclear-scaffold matrix attachment regions open to nucleosomal acetylation. Collectively, our data indict a specific DNA instability motif (SIDD) in chromosome rearrangement, specifically alterations activating miR-17~92 epigenetically via promoter hyperacetylation, and supply a model for the clustering of oncomiRs near cancer breakpoints. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. A DNA 'barcode blitz': rapid digitization and sequencing of a natural history collection.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Paul D N; Dewaard, Jeremy R; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Prosser, Sean W J; Sones, Jayme E; McKeown, Jaclyn T A; Mantle, Beth; La Salle, John

    2013-01-01

    DNA barcoding protocols require the linkage of each sequence record to a voucher specimen that has, whenever possible, been authoritatively identified. Natural history collections would seem an ideal resource for barcode library construction, but they have never seen large-scale analysis because of concerns linked to DNA degradation. The present study examines the strength of this barrier, carrying out a comprehensive analysis of moth and butterfly (Lepidoptera) species in the Australian National Insect Collection. Protocols were developed that enabled tissue samples, specimen data, and images to be assembled rapidly. Using these methods, a five-person team processed 41,650 specimens representing 12,699 species in 14 weeks. Subsequent molecular analysis took about six months, reflecting the need for multiple rounds of PCR as sequence recovery was impacted by age, body size, and collection protocols. Despite these variables and the fact that specimens averaged 30.4 years old, barcode records were obtained from 86% of the species. In fact, one or more barcode compliant sequences (>487 bp) were recovered from virtually all species represented by five or more individuals, even when the youngest was 50 years old. By assembling specimen images, distributional data, and DNA barcode sequences on a web-accessible informatics platform, this study has greatly advanced accessibility to information on thousands of species. Moreover, much of the specimen data became publically accessible within days of its acquisition, while most sequence results saw release within three months. As such, this study reveals the speed with which DNA barcode workflows can mobilize biodiversity data, often providing the first web-accessible information for a species. These results further suggest that existing collections can enable the rapid development of a comprehensive DNA barcode library for the most diverse compartment of terrestrial biodiversity - insects.

  7. A checklist of the bats of Peninsular Malaysia and progress towards a DNA barcode reference library.

    PubMed

    Lim, Voon-Ching; Ramli, Rosli; Bhassu, Subha; Wilson, John-James

    2017-01-01

    Several published checklists of bat species have covered Peninsular Malaysia as part of a broader region and/or in combination with other mammal groups. Other researchers have produced comprehensive checklists for specific localities within the peninsula. To our knowledge, a comprehensive checklist of bats specifically for the entire geopolitical region of Peninsular Malaysia has never been published, yet knowing which species are present in Peninsular Malaysia and their distributions across the region are crucial in developing suitable conservation plans. Our literature search revealed that 110 bat species have been documented in Peninsular Malaysia; 105 species have precise locality records while five species lack recent and/or precise locality records. We retrieved 18 species from records dated before the year 2000 and seven species have only ever been recorded once. Our search of Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD) found that 86 (of the 110) species have public records of which 48 species have public DNA barcodes available from bats sampled in Peninsular Malaysia. Based on Neighbour-Joining tree analyses and the allocation of DNA barcodes to Barcode Index Number system (BINs) by BOLD, several DNA barcodes recorded under the same species name are likely to represent distinct taxa. We discuss these cases in detail and highlight the importance of further surveys to determine the occurences and resolve the taxonomy of particular bat species in Peninsular Malaysia, with implications for conservation priorities.

  8. Starting a DNA barcode reference library for shallow water polychaetes from the southern European Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Jorge; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Borges, Luisa M S; Ferreira, Maria S G; Hollatz, Claudia; Gomes, Pedro T; Sousa, Ronaldo; Ravara, Ascensão; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2016-01-01

    Annelid polychaetes have been seldom the focus of dedicated DNA barcoding studies, despite their ecological relevance and often dominance, particularly in soft-bottom estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we report the first assessment of the performance of DNA barcodes in the discrimination of shallow water polychaete species from the southern European Atlantic coast, focusing on specimens collected in estuaries and coastal ecosystems of Portugal. We analysed cytochrome oxidase I DNA barcodes (COI-5P) from 164 specimens, which were assigned to 51 morphospecies. To our data set from Portugal, we added available published sequences selected from the same species, genus or family, to inspect for taxonomic congruence among studies and collection location. The final data set comprised 290 specimens and 79 morphospecies, which generated 99 Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) within Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD). Among these, 22 BINs were singletons, 47 other BINs were concordant, confirming the initial identification based on morphological characters, and 30 were discordant, most of which consisted on multiple BINs found for the same morphospecies. Some of the most prominent cases in the latter category include Hediste diversicolor (O.F. Müller, 1776) (7), Eulalia viridis (Linnaeus, 1767) (2) and Owenia fusiformis (delle Chiaje, 1844) (5), all of them reported from Portugal and frequently used in ecological studies as environmental quality indicators. Our results for these species showed discordance between molecular lineages and morphospecies, or added additional relatively divergent lineages. The potential inaccuracies in environmental assessments, where underpinning polychaete species diversity is poorly resolved or clarified, demand additional and extensive investigation of the DNA barcode diversity in this group, in parallel with alpha taxonomy efforts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Interaction of the Sliding Clamp β-Subunit and Hda, a DnaA-Related Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the β subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and β proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with β in vitro. A new β-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified β-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind β. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda β-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to β in an Hda-β interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with β is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication. PMID:15150238

  10. Interaction of the sliding clamp beta-subunit and Hda, a DnaA-related protein.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and beta proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with beta in vitro. A new beta-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified beta-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind beta. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda beta-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to beta in an Hda-beta interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with beta is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication.

  11. A single thiazole orange molecule forms an exciplex in a DNA i-motif.

    PubMed

    Xu, Baochang; Wu, Xiangyang; Yeow, Edwin K L; Shao, Fangwei

    2014-06-18

    A fluorescent exciplex of thiazole orange (TO) is formed in a single-dye conjugated DNA i-motif. The exciplex fluorescence exhibits a large Stokes shift, high quantum yield, robust response to pH oscillation and little structural disturbance to the DNA quadruplex, which can be used to monitor the folding of high-order DNA structures.

  12. A DNA-based molecular motor that can navigate a network of tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Shelley F. J.; Bath, Jonathan; Katsuda, Yousuke; Endo, Masayuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic molecular motors can be fuelled by the hydrolysis or hybridization of DNA. Such motors can move autonomously and programmably, and long-range transport has been observed on linear tracks. It has also been shown that DNA systems can compute. Here, we report a synthetic DNA-based system that integrates long-range transport and information processing. We show that the path of a motor through a network of tracks containing four possible routes can be programmed using instructions that are added externally or carried by the motor itself. When external control is used we find that 87% of the motors follow the correct path, and when internal control is used 71% of the motors follow the correct path. Programmable motion will allow the development of computing networks, molecular systems that can sort and process cargoes according to instructions that they carry, and assembly lines that can be reconfigured dynamically in response to changing demands.

  13. Engineering of a DNA Polymerase for Direct m6 A Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Joos; Werner, Stephan; Marchand, Virginie; Adam, Martina; Motorin, Yuri; Helm, Mark; Marx, Andreas

    2018-01-08

    Methods for the detection of RNA modifications are of fundamental importance for advancing epitranscriptomics. N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) is the most abundant RNA modification in mammalian mRNA and is involved in the regulation of gene expression. Current detection techniques are laborious and rely on antibody-based enrichment of m 6 A-containing RNA prior to sequencing, since m 6 A modifications are generally "erased" during reverse transcription (RT). To overcome the drawbacks associated with indirect detection, we aimed to generate novel DNA polymerase variants for direct m 6 A sequencing. Therefore, we developed a screen to evolve an RT-active KlenTaq DNA polymerase variant that sets a mark for N 6 -methylation. We identified a mutant that exhibits increased misincorporation opposite m 6 A compared to unmodified A. Application of the generated DNA polymerase in next-generation sequencing allowed the identification of m 6 A sites directly from the sequencing data of untreated RNA samples. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. A checklist of the bats of Peninsular Malaysia and progress towards a DNA barcode reference library

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Rosli; Bhassu, Subha

    2017-01-01

    Several published checklists of bat species have covered Peninsular Malaysia as part of a broader region and/or in combination with other mammal groups. Other researchers have produced comprehensive checklists for specific localities within the peninsula. To our knowledge, a comprehensive checklist of bats specifically for the entire geopolitical region of Peninsular Malaysia has never been published, yet knowing which species are present in Peninsular Malaysia and their distributions across the region are crucial in developing suitable conservation plans. Our literature search revealed that 110 bat species have been documented in Peninsular Malaysia; 105 species have precise locality records while five species lack recent and/or precise locality records. We retrieved 18 species from records dated before the year 2000 and seven species have only ever been recorded once. Our search of Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD) found that 86 (of the 110) species have public records of which 48 species have public DNA barcodes available from bats sampled in Peninsular Malaysia. Based on Neighbour-Joining tree analyses and the allocation of DNA barcodes to Barcode Index Number system (BINs) by BOLD, several DNA barcodes recorded under the same species name are likely to represent distinct taxa. We discuss these cases in detail and highlight the importance of further surveys to determine the occurences and resolve the taxonomy of particular bat species in Peninsular Malaysia, with implications for conservation priorities. PMID:28742835

  15. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids released via lipolysis of white adipose tissue. PMID:27187182

  16. Attenuated Shigella as a DNA Delivery Vehicle for DNA-Mediated Immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Donata R.; Branstrom, Arthur A.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1995-10-01

    Direct inoculation of DNA, in the form of purified bacterial plasmids that are unable to replicate in mammalian cells but are able to direct cell synthesis of foreign proteins, is being explored as an approach to vaccine development. Here, a highly attenuated Shigella vector invaded mammalian cells and delivered such plasmids into the cytoplasm of cells, and subsequent production of functional foreign protein was measured. Because this Shigella vector was designed to deliver DNA to colonic mucosa, the method is a potential basis for oral and other mucosal DNA immunization and gene therapy strategies.

  17. A DNA fingerprinting procedure for ultra high-throughput genetic analysis of insects.

    PubMed

    Schlipalius, D I; Waldron, J; Carroll, B J; Collins, P J; Ebert, P R

    2001-12-01

    Existing procedures for the generation of polymorphic DNA markers are not optimal for insect studies in which the organisms are often tiny and background molecular information is often non-existent. We have used a new high throughput DNA marker generation protocol called randomly amplified DNA fingerprints (RAF) to analyse the genetic variability in three separate strains of the stored grain pest, Rhyzopertha dominica. This protocol is quick, robust and reliable even though it requires minimal sample preparation, minute amounts of DNA and no prior molecular analysis of the organism. Arbitrarily selected oligonucleotide primers routinely produced approximately 50 scoreable polymorphic DNA markers, between individuals of three independent field isolates of R. dominica. Multivariate cluster analysis using forty-nine arbitrarily selected polymorphisms generated from a single primer reliably separated individuals into three clades corresponding to their geographical origin. The resulting clades were quite distinct, with an average genetic difference of 37.5 +/- 6.0% between clades and of 21.0 +/- 7.1% between individuals within clades. As a prelude to future gene mapping efforts, we have also assessed the performance of RAF under conditions commonly used in gene mapping. In this analysis, fingerprints from pooled DNA samples accurately and reproducibly reflected RAF profiles obtained from individual DNA samples that had been combined to create the bulked samples.

  18. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effectmore » of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.« less

  19. MO-AB-BRA-04: Radiation Measurements with a DNA Double-Strand-Break Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Obeidat, M; Cline, K; Stathakis, S

    Purpose: Many types of dosimeters are used to measure radiation, but none of them directly measures the biological effect of this dose. The purpose here is to create a dosimeter that can measure the probability of double-strand breaks (DSB) for DNA, which is directly related to the biological effect of radiation. Methods: The dosimeter has DNA strands, which are labeled on one end with biotin and on the other with fluorescein. The biotin attaches these strands to magnetic beads. We suspended the DNA dosimeter in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as it matches the internal environment of the body. We placed smallmore » volumes (50µL) of the DNA dosimeter into tubes and irradiated these samples in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with several doses (three samples per dose). After irradiating the samples, a magnet was placed against the tubes. The fluorescein attached to broken DNA strands was extracted (called the supernatant) and placed into a different tube. The fluorescein on the unbroken strands remained attached to the beads in the tube and was re-suspended with 50µL of PBS. A fluorescence reader was used to measure the fluorescence for both the re-suspended beads and supernatant. To prove that we are measuring DSB, we tested dosimeter response with two different lengths of attached DNA strands (1 and 4 kilo-base pair). Results: The probability of DSB at the dose levels of 5, 10, 25, and 50 Gy were 0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.19, respectively, while the coefficients of variation were 0.14, 0.07, 0.02, and 0.01, respectively. The 4 kilo-base-pair dosimeter produced 5.3 times the response of the 1 kilo-base-pair dosimeter. Conclusion: The DNA dosimeter yields a measurable response to dose that scales with the DNA strand length. The goal now is to refine the dosimeter fabrication to reproducibly create a low coefficient of variation for the lower doses. This work was supported in part by Yarmouk University (Irbid, Jordan) and CPRIT (RP140105)« less

  20. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing, E-mail: jqqi@uw.edu; Anantram, M. P., E-mail: anantmp@uw.edu; Govind, Niranjan, E-mail: niri.govind@pnnl.gov

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance throughmore » the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.« less

  1. Effect of Moderate Hypothermia on Gene Expression by THP-1 Cells: A DNA Microarray Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    h was found to improve both survival and neurological outcomes in newborn infants suffering from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (17). Al- though the...from adults and newborns . J Interferon Cytokine Res 20: 1049–1055, 2000. 7. Farrell RE Jr. Determination of nucleic acid concentration and purity. In...hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy . N Engl J Med 353: 1574–1584, 2005. 18. Sonna LA, Cullivan ML, Sheldon HK, Pratt RE, and Lilly CM. Effect of hypoxia

  2. A DNA sequence obtained by replacement of the dopamine RNA aptamer bases is not an aptamer.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-08-05

    A unique specificity of the aptamer-ligand biorecognition and binding facilitates bioanalysis and biosensor development, contributing to discrimination of structurally related molecules, such as dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. The aptamer sequence capable of specific binding of dopamine is a 57 nucleotides long RNA sequence reported in 1997 (Biochemistry, 1997, 36, 9726). Later, it was suggested that the DNA homologue of the RNA aptamer retains the specificity of dopamine binding (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 2009, 388, 732). Here, we show that the DNA sequence obtained by the replacement of the RNA aptamer bases for their DNA analogues is not able of specific biorecognition of dopamine, in contrast to the original RNA aptamer sequence. This DNA sequence binds dopamine and structurally related catecholamine neurotransmitters non-specifically, as any DNA sequence, and, thus, is not an aptamer and cannot be used neither for in vivo nor in situ analysis of dopamine in the presence of structurally related neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterisation of a DNA sequence element that directs Dictyostelium stalk cell-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, A; Zhukovskaya, N; Kawata, T; Bozzaro, S; Williams, J

    2000-12-01

    The ecmB gene of Dictyostelium is expressed at culmination both in the prestalk cells that enter the stalk tube and in ancillary stalk cell structures such as the basal disc. Stalk tube-specific expression is regulated by sequence elements within the cap-site proximal part of the promoter, the stalk tube (ST) promoter region. Dd-STATa, a member of the STAT transcription factor family, binds to elements present in the ST promoter-region and represses transcription prior to entry into the stalk tube. We have characterised an activatory DNA sequence element, that lies distal to the repressor elements and that is both necessary and sufficient for expression within the stalk tube. We have mapped this activator to a 28 nucleotide region (the 28-mer) within which we have identified a GA-containing sequence element that is required for efficient gene transcription. The Dd-STATa protein binds to the 28-mer in an in vitro binding assay, and binding is dependent upon the GA-containing sequence. However, the ecmB gene is expressed in a Dd-STATa null mutant, therefore Dd-STATa cannot be responsible for activating the 28-mer in vivo. Instead, we identified a distinct 28-mer binding activity in nuclear extracts from the Dd-STATa null mutant, the activity of this GA binding activity being largely masked in wild type extracts by the high affinity binding of the Dd-STATa protein. We suggest, that in addition to the long range repression exerted by binding to the two known repressor sites, Dd-STATa inhibits transcription by direct competition with this putative activator for binding to the GA sequence.

  4. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-04

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an 'inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  5. Identification of a DNA Segment Exhibiting Rearrangement Modifying Effects upon Transgenic δ-deleting Elements

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Karen M.; Ledbetter, Stephanie; Mayo, Matthew S.; Hockett, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    Control of the rearrangement and expression of the T cell receptor α and δ chains is critical for determining T cell type. The process of δ deletion is a candidate mechanism for maintaining separation of the α and δ loci. Mice harboring a transgenic reporter δ deletion construct show α/β T cell lineage–specific use of the transgenic elements. A 48-basepair segment of DNA, termed HPS1A, when deleted from this reporter construct, loses tight lineage-specific rearrangement control of transgenic elements, with abundant rearrangements of transgenic δ-deleting elements now in γ/δ T cells. Furthermore, HPS1A augments recombination frequency of extrachromosomal substrates in an in vitro recombination assay. DNA binding proteins recognizing HPS1A have been identified and are restricted to early B and T cells, during the time of active rearrangement of endogenous TCR and immunoglobulin loci. These data are consistent with δ deletion playing an important role in maintaining separate TCR α and δ loci. PMID:9207011

  6. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an `inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  7. Prevention and synergistic control of Ph(+) ALL by a DNA vaccine and 6-mercaptopurine.

    PubMed

    Köchling, Joachim; Rott, Yvonne; Arndt, Stefanie; Marschke, Christina; Schmidt, Manuel; Wittig, Burghardt; Kalies, Katrin; Westermann, Jürgen; Henze, Günter

    2012-09-07

    Although the outcome of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been improved continuously by chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph(+)) ALL still remains poor. Since further intensification of chemotherapy is limited by toxic side effects and patients with high risk of transplant-related mortality are not eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation new treatment strategies are urgently needed for the prevention of Ph(+) ALL relapse. There is increasing evidence that the immune system plays an essential role for the eradication or immunologic control of remaining leukemia cells. We developed several DNA-based vaccines encoding a BCR-ABL(p185) specific peptide and GM-CSF, and CD40-L, IL-27 or IL-12 and evaluated the preventive and therapeutic efficacy against a lethal challenge of syngeneic Ph(+) ALL in Balb/c mice. In vivo cell depletion assays and cytokine expression studies were performed and the efficacy of the DNA vaccine was compared with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) alone and the combination of the DNA vaccine and 6-MP. Preventive immunization with the vaccine BCR-ABL/GM-CSF/IL-12 and the TLR-9 agonist dSLIM induced an innate and adaptive immune response mediated by NK-cells, CD4(+) T-cells and CD8(+) T-cells leading to a survival rate of 80%. Therapeutic vaccination resulted in a significantly longer leukemia-free survival (40.7 days vs. 20.4 days) and a higher survival rate (56% vs. 10%) compared to chemotherapy with 6-MP. Remarkably, in combination with the vaccine 6-MP acted synergistically and led to 100% survival. These results demonstrate that minimal residual disease of Ph(+) ALL can be significantly better controlled by a combined treatment approach of immunotherapy and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for improving maintenance therapy in order to reduce the relapse rate in patients with Ph(+) ALL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A DNA-Based Procedure for In Planta Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Alves-Santos, Fernando M; Ramos, Brisa; García-Sánchez, M Asunción; Eslava, Arturo P; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    2002-03-01

    ABSTRACT We have characterized strains of Fusarium oxysporum from common bean fields in Spain that were nonpathogenic on common bean, as well as F. oxysporum strains (F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli) pathogenic to common bean by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. We identified a RAPD marker (RAPD 4.12) specific for the highly virulent pathogenic strains of the seven races of F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli. Sequence analysis of RAPD 4.12 allowed the design of oligonucleotides that amplify a 609-bp sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker (SCAR-B310A280). Under controlled environmental and greenhouse conditions, detection of the pathogen by polymerase chain reaction was 100% successful in root samples of infected but still symptomless plants and in stem samples of plants with disease severity of >/=4 in the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT; Cali, Colombia) scale. The diagnostic procedure can be completed in 5 h and allows the detection of all known races of the pathogen in plant samples at early stages of the disease with no visible symptoms.

  9. Identification of the vascular plants of Churchill, Manitoba, using a DNA barcode library

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because arctic plant communities are highly vulnerable to climate change, shifts in their composition require rapid, accurate identifications, often for specimens that lack diagnostic floral characters. The present study examines the role that DNA barcoding can play in aiding floristic evaluations in the arctic by testing the effectiveness of the core plant barcode regions (rbcL, matK) and a supplemental ribosomal DNA (ITS2) marker for a well-studied flora near Churchill, Manitoba. Results This investigation examined 900 specimens representing 312 of the 354 species of vascular plants known from Churchill. Sequencing success was high for rbcL: 95% for fresh specimens and 85% for herbarium samples (mean age 20 years). ITS2 worked equally well for the fresh and herbarium material (89% and 88%). However, sequencing success was lower for matK, despite two rounds of PCR amplification, which reflected less effective primer binding and sensitivity to the DNA degradation (76% of fresh, 45% of herbaria samples). A species was considered as taxonomically resolved if its members showed at least one diagnostic difference from any other taxon in the study and formed a monophyletic clade. The highest species resolution (69%) was obtained by combining information from all three genes. The joint sequence information for rbcL and matK distinguished 54% of 286 species, while rbcL and ITS2 distinguished 63% of 285 species. Discrimination of species within Salix, which constituted 8% of the flora, was particularly problematic. Despite incomplete resolution, the barcode results revealed 22 misidentified herbarium specimens, and enabled the identification of field specimens which were otherwise too immature to identify. Although seven cases of ITS2 paralogy were noted in the families Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Juncaginaceae, this intergenic spacer played an important role in resolving congeneric plant species at Churchill. Conclusions Our results provided fast and cost-effective solution to create a comprehensive, effective DNA barcode reference library for a local flora. PMID:23190419

  10. Identification of the vascular plants of Churchill, Manitoba, using a DNA barcode library.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Maria L; Johnson, Karen L; Barron, Hannah R; Hebert, Paul Dn

    2012-11-28

    Because arctic plant communities are highly vulnerable to climate change, shifts in their composition require rapid, accurate identifications, often for specimens that lack diagnostic floral characters. The present study examines the role that DNA barcoding can play in aiding floristic evaluations in the arctic by testing the effectiveness of the core plant barcode regions (rbcL, matK) and a supplemental ribosomal DNA (ITS2) marker for a well-studied flora near Churchill, Manitoba. This investigation examined 900 specimens representing 312 of the 354 species of vascular plants known from Churchill. Sequencing success was high for rbcL: 95% for fresh specimens and 85% for herbarium samples (mean age 20 years). ITS2 worked equally well for the fresh and herbarium material (89% and 88%). However, sequencing success was lower for matK, despite two rounds of PCR amplification, which reflected less effective primer binding and sensitivity to the DNA degradation (76% of fresh, 45% of herbaria samples). A species was considered as taxonomically resolved if its members showed at least one diagnostic difference from any other taxon in the study and formed a monophyletic clade. The highest species resolution (69%) was obtained by combining information from all three genes. The joint sequence information for rbcL and matK distinguished 54% of 286 species, while rbcL and ITS2 distinguished 63% of 285 species. Discrimination of species within Salix, which constituted 8% of the flora, was particularly problematic. Despite incomplete resolution, the barcode results revealed 22 misidentified herbarium specimens, and enabled the identification of field specimens which were otherwise too immature to identify. Although seven cases of ITS2 paralogy were noted in the families Cyperaceae, Juncaceae and Juncaginaceae, this intergenic spacer played an important role in resolving congeneric plant species at Churchill. Our results provided fast and cost-effective solution to create a comprehensive, effective DNA barcode reference library for a local flora.

  11. The chemical end-ligation of homopyrimidine oligodeoxyribonucleotides within a DNA triple helix.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Weinstein, D S; Nicolaou, K

    1997-03-01

    Triple-helical nucleic acids, first reported in the late 1950s, are receiving attention for their possible involvement in controlling gene expression. Certain sequences of DNA are believed to form local triple-helical structures (H-form DNA), although this has not been directly observed in vivo. Studies carried out in our laboratories have suggested that self-replicating oligonucleotides could have been involved in chemical evolution via triple-helical intermediates. In addition to self-replication mechanisms, elucidating processes for the nonenzymatic elongation of biologically relevant polymers remains an important challenge in understanding the origin of life. To this end, we have studied a novel ligation of oligodeoxyribonucleotides that lie within a triple helix. The chemical end-ligation of homopyrimidine oligodeoxyribonucleotides on a triple helix is reported. This selective process, induced by cyanoimidazole, is facilitated by a template effect of the DNA aggregate and occurs between the 3' end (hydroxyl) of the third minor-groove-bound strand and the 5' end (phosphate) of the antiparallel oligopyrimidine strand. Double-helical homopurine/homopyrimidine DNA can serve as a template for the elongation of oligonucleotides in a manner that has not been described previously. The end-ligation of homopyrimidine oligomers, a nonenzymatic process, proceeds via a requisite triple-helical intermediate and constitutes an efficient and selective method for the template-directed elongation of nucleic acids. Such a process could conceivably have been involved in the elongation of primordial information-bearing biopolymers.

  12. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Waseem, Hassan; Williams, Maggie R; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2017-05-29

    Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics) to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs). Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R² = 0.8131).

  13. Identification and characterization of a DnaJ gene from red alga Pyropia yezoensis (Bangiales, Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiao; Li, Xianchao; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Members of the DnaJ family are proteins that play a pivotal role in various cellular processes, such as protein folding, protein transport and cellular responses to stress. In the present study, we identified and characterized the full-length DnaJ cDNA sequence from expressed sequence tags of Pyropia yezoensis ( PyDnaJ) via rapid identification of cDNA ends. This cDNA encoded a protein of 429 amino acids, which shared high sequence similarity with other identified DnaJ proteins, such as a heat shock protein 40/DnaJ from Pyropia haitanensis. The relative mRNA expression level of PyDnaJ was investigated using real-time PCR to determine its specific expression during the algal life cycle and during desiccation. The relative mRNA expression level in sporophytes was higher than that in gametophytes and significantly increased during the whole desiccation process. These results indicate that PyDnaJ is an authentic member of the DnaJ family in plants and red algae and might play a pivotal role in mitigating damage to P. yezoensis during desiccation.

  14. Design of a DNA panel for genomic studies in Russian cattle breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A panel of 96 DNA samples (Russian Cattle Genomic Diversity Panel 1.0 or RCGDP 1.0) characterizing the breadth of genetic diversity in popular Russian cattle breeds was designed. The panel contains from four to eight animals from each of 11 dairy and six dairy-meat and meat breeds. The main criterio...

  15. Free-energy simulations reveal molecular mechanism for functional switch of a DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen; Whitley, Kevin D; Schulten, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    Helicases play key roles in genome maintenance, yet it remains elusive how these enzymes change conformations and how transitions between different conformational states regulate nucleic acid reshaping. Here, we developed a computational technique combining structural bioinformatics approaches and atomic-level free-energy simulations to characterize how the Escherichia coli DNA repair enzyme UvrD changes its conformation at the fork junction to switch its function from unwinding to rezipping DNA. The lowest free-energy path shows that UvrD opens the interface between two domains, allowing the bound ssDNA to escape. The simulation results predict a key metastable 'tilted' state during ssDNA strand switching. By simulating FRET distributions with fluorophores attached to UvrD, we show that the new state is supported quantitatively by single-molecule measurements. The present study deciphers key elements for the 'hyper-helicase' behavior of a mutant and provides an effective framework to characterize directly structure-function relationships in molecular machines. PMID:29664402

  16. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Modulate the B- to A-DNA Transition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study the conformational equilibrium between B-to-A forms of ds-DNA adsorbed onto a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) using free energy profile calculations based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) of the B-to-A transition of ds-DNA in the presence of an uncharged (10,0) carbon nanotube for two dodecamers with poly-AT or poly-GC sequences is calculated as a function of a root-mean-square-distance (ΔRMSD) difference metric for the B-to-A transition. The calculations reveal that in the presence of a SWNT DNA favors B-form DNA significantly in both poly-GC and poly-AT sequences. Furthermore, the poly-AT DNA:SWNT complex shows a higher energy penalty for adopting an A-like conformation than poly-GC DNA:SWNT by several kcal/mol. The presence of a SWNT on either poly-AT or poly-GC DNA affects the PMF of the transition such that the B form is favored by as much as 10 kcal/mol. In agreement with published data, we find a potential energy minimum between A and B-form DNA at ΔRMSD ≈ −1.5 Å and that the presence of the SWNT moves this minimum by as much as ΔRMSD = 3 Å. PMID:25553205

  17. Blocking Blood Supply to Breast Carcinoma With a DNA Vaccine Encoding VEGF Receptor-2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    recognize antigens in the form of 8 to 10 amino acid long peptides, presented to T- cell receptors (TCRs) on the cell surface as complexes with major... receptor , and providing tumor- associated antigens , our DNA vaccine can efficiently activate DCs, NK cells , and CTLs, presumably in Peyer’s patches. The... immunoreceptor in immune cell activation and natural killing. Immunity. 2002;17:19-29. (5) Snyder MR, Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ. The double life of NK receptors

  18. Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice Induces a DNA Damage Response That Facilitates Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemi, Richard O.; Landry, Sebastien; Davis, Meredith E.; Weitzman, Matthew D.; Pintel, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Infection by DNA viruses can elicit DNA damage responses (DDRs) in host cells. In some cases the DDR presents a block to viral replication that must be overcome, and in other cases the infecting agent exploits the DDR to facilitate replication. We find that low multiplicity infection with the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) results in the activation of a DDR, characterized by the phosphorylation of H2AX, Nbs1, RPA32, Chk2 and p53. These proteins are recruited to MVM replication centers, where they co-localize with the main viral replication protein, NS1. The response is seen in both human and murine cell lines following infection with either the MVMp or MVMi strains. Replication of the virus is required for DNA damage signaling. Damage response proteins, including the ATM kinase, accumulate in viral-induced replication centers. Using mutant cell lines and specific kinase inhibitors, we show that ATM is the main transducer of the signaling events in the normal murine host. ATM inhibitors restrict MVM replication and ameliorate virus-induced cell cycle arrest, suggesting that DNA damage signaling facilitates virus replication, perhaps in part by promoting cell cycle arrest. Thus it appears that MVM exploits the cellular DNA damage response machinery early in infection to enhance its replication in host cells. PMID:20949077

  19. Diversity of marine planktonic ostracods in South China Sea: a DNA taxonomy approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Lianggen; Ning, Jiajia; Li, Hong; Ji, Yingying; Du, Feiyan

    2018-04-19

    Ostracods (Crustacea, Ostracoda) are small bivalved crustaceans, contributing over 200 described species to the marine zooplankton community. They are widely distributed and are relatively abundant components of the mesozooplankton, playing an important role in the transport of organic matter to deep layers. However, identification of ostracods based on micro-morphological characters is extremely difficult and time-consuming. Previous fragmentary taxonomic studies of ostracods in the South China Sea (SCA), were based solely on morphology. Here, by analysing the mitochondrial COI gene, we explore the taxa across the SCA using molecular tools for the first time. Our results show that sequence divergence among species varies within a large range, from 12.93% to 35.82%. Sixteen of the taxonomic units recovered by DNA taxonomy agree well with morphology, but Paraconchoecia oblonga, Conchoecia magna and Halocypris brevirostris split into two clades each, each of which contains cryptic species.

  20. The role of Pif1p, a DNA helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in maintaining mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xin; Dunaway, Stephen; Ivessa, Andreas S

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is highly susceptible to oxidative and chemically induced damage, and these insults lead to a number of diseases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the DNA helicase Pif1p is localized to the nucleus and mitochondria. We show that pif1 mutant cells are sensitive to ethidium bromide-induced damage and this mtDNA is prone to fragmentation. We also show that Pif1p associates with mtDNA. In pif1 mutant cells, mtDNA breaks at specific sites that exhibit Pif1-dependent recombination. We conclude that Pif1p participates in the protection from double-stranded (ds) DNA breaks or alternatively in the repair process of dsDNA breaks in mtDNA.

  1. Structure and hydrodynamics of a DNA G-quadruplex with a cytosine bulge.

    PubMed

    Meier, Markus; Moya-Torres, Aniel; Krahn, Natalie J; McDougall, Matthew D; Orriss, George L; McRae, Ewan K S; Booy, Evan P; McEleney, Kevin; Patel, Trushar R; McKenna, Sean A; Stetefeld, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    The identification of four-stranded G-quadruplexes (G4s) has highlighted the fact that DNA has additional spatial organisations at its disposal other than double-stranded helices. Recently, it became clear that the formation of G4s is not limited to the traditional G3+NL1G3+NL2G3+NL3G3+ sequence motif. Instead, the G3 triplets can be interrupted by deoxythymidylate (DNA) or uridylate (RNA) where the base forms a bulge that loops out from the G-quadruplex core. Here, we report the first high-resolution X-ray structure of a unique unimolecular DNA G4 with a cytosine bulge. The G4 forms a dimer that is stacked via its 5'-tetrads. Analytical ultracentrifugation, static light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering confirmed that the G4 adapts a predominantly dimeric structure in solution. We provide a comprehensive comparison of previously published G4 structures containing bulges and report a special γ torsion angle range preferentially populated by the G4 core guanylates adjacent to bulges. Since the penalty for introducing bulges appears to be negligible, it should be possible to functionalize G4s by introducing artificial or modified nucleotides at such positions. The presence of the bulge alters the surface of the DNA, providing an opportunity to develop drugs that can specifically target individual G4s.

  2. Formation mechanism of glyoxal-DNA adduct, a DNA cross-link precursor.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, B; Fernández, D; Casasnovas, R; Pomar, A M; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R; Hernández-Haro, N; Grand, A; Adrover, M; Donoso, J; Frau, J; Muñoz, F; Ortega-Castro, J

    2017-05-01

    DNA nucleobases undergo non-enzymatic glycation to nucleobase adducts which can play important roles in vivo. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive experimental and theoretical kinetic study of the mechanisms of formation of glyoxal-guanine adducts over a wide pH range in order to elucidate the molecular basis for the glycation process. Also, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate how open or cyclic glyoxal-guanine adducts can cause structural changes in an oligonucleotide model. A thermodynamic study of other glycating agents including methylglyoxal, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-deoxyglucosone revealed that, at neutral pH, cyclic adducts were more stable than open adducts; at basic pH, however, the open adducts of 3-deoxyglucosone, methylglyoxal and glyoxal were more stable than their cyclic counterparts. This result can be ascribed to the ability of the adducts to cross-link DNA. The new insights may contribute to improve our understanding of the connection between glycation and DNA cross-linking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A DNA Barcode Library for Korean Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) and Indexes for Defining Barcode Gap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungmin; Song, Kyo-Hong; Ree, Han-Il; Kim, Won

    2012-01-01

    Non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) are a diverse population that commonly causes respiratory allergies in humans. Chironomid larvae can be used to indicate freshwater pollution, but accurate identification on the basis of morphological characteristics is difficult. In this study, we constructed a mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)-based DNA barcode library for Korean chironomids. This library consists of 211 specimens from 49 species, including adults and unidentified larvae. The interspecies and intraspecies COI sequence variations were analyzed. Sophisticated indexes were developed in order to properly evaluate indistinct barcode gaps that are created by insufficient sampling on both the interspecies and intraspecies levels and by variable mutation rates across taxa. In a variety of insect datasets, these indexes were useful for re-evaluating large barcode datasets and for defining COI barcode gaps. The COI-based DNA barcode library will provide a rapid and reliable tool for the molecular identification of Korean chironomid species. Furthermore, this reverse-taxonomic approach will be improved by the continuous addition of other speceis’ sequences to the library. PMID:22138764

  4. Positive association between a DNA sequence variant in the serotonin 2A receptor gene and schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Inayama, Y.; Yoneda, H.; Sakai, T.

    Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 96 normal controls were investigated for genetic association with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in the serotonin receptor genes. A positive association between the serotonin 2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and schizophrenia was found, but not between schizophrenia and the serotonin 1A receptor gene. The positive association we report here would suggest that the DNA region with susceptibility to schizophrenia lies in the HTR2A on the long arm of chromosome 13. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  6. THE FORK AND THE KINASE: A DNA REPLICATION TALE FROM A CHK1 PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    González Besteiro, Marina A.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. The checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged-DNA. Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Such findings unveil a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA-lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, the multifaceted and versatile functions of Chk1 at ongoing forks and replication origins determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. PMID:25795119

  7. EVALUATION OF A DNA PROBE TEST KIT FOR DETECTION OF SALMONELLAE IN BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Current United States regulations (40 CFR 503) for "Class A" biosolids requires use of multiple-tube fermentation techniques for fecal coliform or multiple tube enrichment techniques for Salmonella spp. followed by isolation and biochemical and serological confirmation. T...

  8. Genetically encoded multispectral labeling of proteins with polyfluorophores on a DNA backbone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Wang, Shenliang; Chan, Ke Min; Clark, Spencer A; Kool, Eric T

    2013-04-24

    Genetically encoded methods for protein conjugation are of high importance as biological tools. Here we describe the development of a new class of dyes for genetically encoded tagging that add new capabilities for protein reporting and detection via HaloTag methodology. Oligodeoxyfluorosides (ODFs) are short DNA-like oligomers in which the natural nucleic acid bases are replaced by interacting fluorescent chromophores, yielding a broad range of emission colors using a single excitation wavelength. We describe the development of an alkyl halide dehalogenase-compatible chloroalkane linker phosphoramidite derivative that enables the rapid automated synthesis of many possible dyes for protein conjugation. Experiments to test the enzymatic self-conjugation of nine different DNA-like dyes to proteins with HaloTag domains in vitro were performed, and the data confirmed the rapid and efficient covalent labeling of the proteins. Notably, a number of the ODF dyes were found to increase in brightness or change color upon protein conjugation. Tests in mammalian cellular settings revealed that the dyes are functional in multiple cellular contexts, both on the cell surface and within the cytoplasm, allowing protein localization to be imaged in live cells by epifluorescence and laser confocal microscopy.

  9. Development of a robust, versatile, and scalable inoculum train for the production of a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Okonkowski, J; Kizer-Bentley, L; Listner, K; Robinson, D; Chartrain, M

    2005-01-01

    For many microbial fermentation processes, the inoculum train can have a substantial impact on process performance in terms of productivity, profitability, and process control. In general, it is understood that a well-characterized and flexible inoculum train is essential for future scale-up and implementation of the process in a pilot plant or manufacturing setting. A fermentation process utilizing E. coli DH5 for the production of plasmid DNA carrying the HIV gag gene for use as a vaccine is currently under development in our laboratory. As part of the development effort, we evaluated inoculum train schemes that incorporate one, two, or three stages. In addition, we investigated the effect of inoculum viable-cell concentrations, either thawed or actively growing, over a wide range (from 2.5 x 10(4) to 1.0 x 10(8) viable cells/mL or approximately 0.001% to 4% of final working volume). The various inoculum trains were evaluated in terms of final plasmid yield, process time, reproducibility, robustness, and feasibility at large scale. The results of these studies show that final plasmid yield remained in the desired range, despite the number of stages or inoculation viable-cell concentrations comprising the inoculum train. On the basis of these observations and because it established a large database, the first part of these investigations supports an exceptional flexibility in the design of scalable inoculum trains for this DNA vaccine process. This work also highlighted that a slightly higher level of process reproducibility, as measured by the time for the culture to reach mid-exponential growth, was observed when using actively growing versus frozen cells. It also demonstrated the existence of a viable-cell concentration threshold for the one-stage process, since we observed that inoculation of the production stage with very low amounts of viable cells from a frozen source could lead to increased process sensitivity to external factors such as variation in the quality of the raw materials used in the medium formulation. However, our analysis indicates that, despite this slight disadvantage, a one-stage inoculum train was a viable option in many situations, especially if the inoculation viable-cell concentration was kept above 4.8 x 10(6) viable cells/mL. Because it leads to a reduction in process steps and eliminates some capital investments (i.e., inoculum fermenter), when feasible a one-stage process configuration will positively impact process economics.

  10. Development of a DNA-liposome complex for gene delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Rasoulianboroujeni, M; Kupgan, G; Moghadam, F; Tahriri, M; Boughdachi, A; Khoshkenar, P; Ambrose, J J; Kiaie, N; Vashaee, D; Ramsey, J D; Tayebi, L

    2017-06-01

    The association structures formed by cationic liposomes and DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid)-liposome have been effectively utilized as gene carriers in transfection assays. In this research study, cationic liposomes were prepared using a modified lipid film hydration method consisting of a lyophilization step for gene delivery applications. The obtained results demonstrated that the mean particle size had no significant change while the polydispersity (PDI) increased after lyophilization. The mean particle size slightly reduced after lyophilization (520±12nm to 464±25nm) while the PDI increased after lyophilization (0.094±0.017 to 0.220±0.004). In addition. The mean particle size of vesicles increases when DNA is incorporated to the liposomes (673±27nm). According to the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, the spherical shape of liposomes confirmed their successful preservation and reconstitution from the powder. It was found that liposomal formulation has enhanced transfection considerably compared to the naked DNA as negative control. Finally, liposomal formulation in this research had a better function than Lipofectamine® 2000 as a commercialized product because the cellular activity (cellular protein) was higher in the prepared lipoplex than Lipofectamine® 2000. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of a DNA chip for detection of unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Nesvold, Håvard; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Berdal, Knut G

    2005-05-01

    Unknown genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have not undergone a risk evaluation, and hence might pose a danger to health and environment. There are, today, no methods for detecting unknown GMOs. In this paper we propose a novel method intended as a first step in an approach for detecting unknown genetically modified (GM) material in a single plant. A model is designed where biological and combinatorial reduction rules are applied to a set of DNA chip probes containing all possible sequences of uniform length n, creating probes capable of detecting unknown GMOs. The model is theoretically tested for Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia, and the probabilities for detecting inserts and receiving false positives are assessed for various parameters for this organism. From a theoretical standpoint, the model looks very promising but should be tested further in the laboratory. The model and algorithms will be available upon request to the corresponding author.

  12. Free-energy simulations reveal molecular mechanism for functional switch of a DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen; Whitley, Kevin D; Chemla, Yann R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Schulten, Klaus

    2018-04-17

    Helicases play key roles in genome maintenance, yet it remains elusive how these enzymes change conformations and how transitions between different conformational states regulate nucleic acid reshaping. Here, we developed a computational technique combining structural bioinformatics approaches and atomic-level free-energy simulations to characterize how the Escherichia coli DNA repair enzyme UvrD changes its conformation at the fork junction to switch its function from unwinding to rezipping DNA. The lowest free-energy path shows that UvrD opens the interface between two domains, allowing the bound ssDNA to escape. The simulation results predict a key metastable 'tilted' state during ssDNA strand switching. By simulating FRET distributions with fluorophores attached to UvrD, we show that the new state is supported quantitatively by single-molecule measurements. The present study deciphers key elements for the 'hyper-helicase' behavior of a mutant and provides an effective framework to characterize directly structure-function relationships in molecular machines. © 2018, Ma et al.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A DNA ARCHIVE FOR GENETIC MONITORING OF FISH POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of intraspecific genetic diversity provides a potentially powerful tool to estimate the impacts of environmental stressors on populations. Genetic responses of populations to novel stressors include dramatic shifts in genotype frequencies at loci under selection (i.e. ad...

  14. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxycytidine: a DNA building block with a 'clickable' side chain.

    PubMed

    Seela, Frank; Mei, Hui; Xiong, Hai; Budow, Simone; Eickmeier, Henning; Reuter, Hans

    2012-10-01

    The title compound [systematic name: 4-amino-1-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-5-ethynylpyrimidin-2(1H)-one], C(11)H(13)N(3)O(4), shows two conformations in the crystalline state. The N-glycosylic bonds of both conformers adopt similar conformations, with χ = -149.2 (1)° for conformer (I-1) and -151.4 (1)° for conformer (I-2), both in the anti range. The sugar residue of (I-1) shows a C2'-endo envelope conformation ((2)E, S-type), with P = 164.7 (1)° and τ(m) = 36.9 (1)°, while (I-2) shows a major C3'-exo sugar pucker (C3'-exo-C2'-endo, (3)T(2), S-type), with P = 189.2 (1)° and τ(m) = 33.3 (1)°. Both conformers participate in the formation of a layered three-dimensional crystal structure with a chain-like arrangement of the conformers. The ethynyl groups do not participate in hydrogen bonding, but are arranged in proximal positions.

  15. Methylation-Sensitive Expression of a DNA Demethylase Gene Serves As an Epigenetic Rheostat

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ben P.; Pignatta, Daniela; Henikoff, Steven; Gehring, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Genomes must balance active suppression of transposable elements (TEs) with the need to maintain gene expression. In Arabidopsis, euchromatic TEs are targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Conversely, active DNA demethylation prevents accumulation of methylation at genes proximal to these TEs. It is unknown how a cellular balance between methylation and demethylation activities is achieved. Here we show that both RdDM and DNA demethylation are highly active at a TE proximal to the major DNA demethylase gene ROS1. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to most other genomic targets, expression of ROS1 is promoted by DNA methylation and antagonized by DNA demethylation. We demonstrate that inducing methylation in the ROS1 proximal region is sufficient to restore ROS1 expression in an RdDM mutant. Additionally, methylation-sensitive expression of ROS1 is conserved in other species, suggesting it is adaptive. We propose that the ROS1 locus functions as an epigenetic rheostat, tuning the level of demethylase activity in response to methylation alterations, thus ensuring epigenomic stability. PMID:25826366

  16. A DNA 3′-phosphatase functions in active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Qian, Weiqiang; Miki, Daisuke; Pontes, Olga; Liu, Yunhua; Tang, Kai; Liu, Renyi; Morales-Ruiz, Teresa; Ariza, Rafael R.; Roldán-Arjona, Teresa; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark established by the combined actions of methylation and demethylation reactions. Plants use a base excision repair pathway for active DNA demethylation. After 5-methylcytosine removal, the Arabidopsis DNA glycosylase/lyase ROS1 incises the DNA backbone and part of the product has a single-nucleotide gap flanked by 3′- and 5′-phosphate termini. Here we show that the DNA phosphatase ZDP removes the blocking 3′-phosphate, allowing subsequent DNA polymerization and ligation steps needed to complete the repair reactions. ZDP and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo in nucleoplasmic foci. Extracts from zdp mutant plants are unable to complete DNA demethylation in vitro, and the mutations cause DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing of a reporter gene. Genome-wide methylation analysis in zdp mutant plants identified hundreds of hypermethylated endogenous loci. Our results show that ZDP functions downstream of ROS1 in one branch of the active DNA demethylation pathway. PMID:22325353

  17. Electrochemical control of a DNA Holliday Junction nanoswitch by Mg2+ ions.

    PubMed

    Ferapontova, E E; Mountford, C P; Crain, J; Buck, A H; Dickinson, P; Beattie, J S; Ghazal, P; Terry, J G; Walton, A J; Mount, A R

    2008-11-15

    The molecular conformation of a synthetic branched, 4-way DNA Holliday junction (HJ) was electrochemically switched between the open and closed (stacked) conformers. Switching was achieved by electrochemically induced quantitative release of Mg(2+) ions from the oxidised poly(N-methylpyrrole) film (PPy), which contained polyacrylate as an immobile counter anion and Mg(2+) ions as charge compensating mobile cations. This increase in the Mg(2+) concentration screened the electrostatic repulsion between the widely separated arms in the open HJ configuration, inducing switching to the closed conformation. Upon electrochemical reduction of PPy, entrapment of Mg(2+) ions back into the PPy film induced the reverse HJ switching from the closed to open state. The conformational transition was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor dyes each located at the terminus of one of the arms. The demonstrated electrochemical control of the conformation of the used probe-target HJ complex, previously reported as a highly sequence specific nanodevice for detecting of unlabelled target [Buck, A.H., Campbell, C.J., Dickinson, P., Mountford, C.P., Stoquert, H.C., Terry, J.G., Evans, S.A.G., Keane, L., Su, T.J., Mount, A.R., Walton, A.J., Beattie, J.S., Crain, J., Ghazal, P., 2007. Anal. Chem., 79, 4724-4728], allows the development of electronically addressable DNA nanodevices and label-free gene detection assays.

  18. Role of UME6 in transcriptional regulation of a DNA repair gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sweet, D H; Jang, Y K; Sancar, G B

    1997-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae UV radiation and a variety of chemical DNA-damaging agents induce the transcription of specific genes, including several involved in DNA repair. One of the best characterized of these genes is PHR1, which encodes the apoenzyme for DNA photolyase. Basal-level and damage-induced expression of PHR1 require an upstream activation sequence, UAS(PHR1), which has homology with DRC elements found upstream of at least 19 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes in yeast. Here we report the identification of the UME6 gene of S. cerevisiae as a regulator of UAS(PHR1) activity. Multiple copies of UME6 stimulate expression from UAS(PHR1) and the intact PHR1 gene. Surprisingly, the effect of deletion of UME6 is growth phase dependent. In wild-type cells PHR1 is induced in late exponential phase, concomitant with the initiation of glycogen accumulation that precedes the diauxic shift. Deletion of UME6 abolishes this induction, decreases the steady-state concentration of photolyase molecules and PHR1 mRNA, and increases the UV sensitivity of a rad2 mutant. Despite the fact that UAS(PHR1) does not contain the URS1 sequence, which has been previously implicated in UME6-mediated transcriptional regulation, we find that Ume6p binds to UAS(PHR1) with an affinity and a specificity similar to those seen for a URS1 site. Similar binding is also seen for DRC elements from RAD2, RAD7, and RAD53, suggesting that UME6 contributes to the regulated expression of a subset of damage-responsive genes in yeast.

  19. Multifunctional energy landscape for a DNA G-quadruplex: An evolved molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cragnolini, Tristan; Chakraborty, Debayan; Šponer, Jiří; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela; Wales, David J.

    2017-10-01

    We explore the energy landscape for a four-fold telomere repeat, obtaining interconversion pathways between six experimentally characterised G-quadruplex topologies. The results reveal a multi-funnel system, with a variety of intermediate configurations and misfolded states. This organisation is identified with the intrinsically multi-functional nature of the system, suggesting a new paradigm for the classification of such biomolecules and clarifying issues regarding apparently conflicting experimental results.

  20. A DNA Aptamer Against Influenza A Virus: An Effective Inhibitor to the Hemagglutinin-Glycan Interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkai; Feng, Xinru; Yan, Xing; Liu, Keyi; Deng, Le

    2016-06-01

    Most therapeutical nucleic acid aptamers tend to inhibit protein-protein interactions and thereby function as antagonists. Attachment of the influenza virus surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) to sialic acid-containing host cell receptors (glycan) facilitates the initial stage of viral infection. Inhibition of the attachment may result in an antiviral effect on the proliferation of the influenza virus. To develop therapeutically interesting agents, we selected two single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers specific to the HA protein of H1N1 influenza virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934) through a procedure of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. As it showed a higher binding affinity for HA protein (Kd = 78 ± 1 nM), aptamer 1 was tested for its ability to interfere with HA-glycan interactions using chicken red blood cell hemagglutination and microneutralization assays, which demonstrated that it significantly suppressed the viral infection in host cells. These results indicate that the isolated ssDNA aptamer may be developed as an antiviral agent against influenza through appropriate therapeutic formulation.

  1. A DNA Barcode Library for North American Ephemeroptera: Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeffrey M.; Jacobus, Luke M.; Funk, David H.; Zhou, Xin; Kondratieff, Boris; Geraci, Christy J.; DeWalt, R. Edward; Baird, Donald J.; Richard, Barton; Phillips, Iain; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding of aquatic macroinvertebrates holds much promise as a tool for taxonomic research and for providing the reliable identifications needed for water quality assessment programs. A prerequisite for identification using barcodes is a reliable reference library. We gathered 4165 sequences from the barcode region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene representing 264 nominal and 90 provisional species of mayflies (Insecta: Ephemeroptera) from Canada, Mexico, and the United States. No species shared barcode sequences and all can be identified with barcodes with the possible exception of some Caenis. Minimum interspecific distances ranged from 0.3–24.7% (mean: 12.5%), while the average intraspecific divergence was 1.97%. The latter value was inflated by the presence of very high divergences in some taxa. In fact, nearly 20% of the species included two or three haplotype clusters showing greater than 5.0% sequence divergence and some values are as high as 26.7%. Many of the species with high divergences are polyphyletic and likely represent species complexes. Indeed, many of these polyphyletic species have numerous synonyms and individuals in some barcode clusters show morphological attributes characteristic of the synonymized species. In light of our findings, it is imperative that type or topotype specimens be sequenced to correctly associate barcode clusters with morphological species concepts and to determine the status of currently synonymized species. PMID:22666447

  2. A DNA methylation map of human cancer at single base-pair resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, E; Sayols, S; Moran, S; Guillaumet-Adkins, A; Schroeder, M P; Royo, R; Orozco, M; Gut, M; Gut, I; Lopez-Bigas, N; Heyn, H; Esteller, M

    2017-01-01

    Although single base-pair resolution DNA methylation landscapes for embryonic and different somatic cell types provided important insights into epigenetic dynamics and cell-type specificity, such comprehensive profiling is incomplete across human cancer types. This prompted us to perform genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of 22 samples derived from normal tissues and associated neoplasms, including primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Unlike their invariant normal counterparts, cancer samples exhibited highly variable CpG methylation levels in a large proportion of the genome, involving progressive changes during tumor evolution. The whole-genome sequencing results from selected samples were replicated in a large cohort of 1112 primary tumors of various cancer types using genome-scale DNA methylation analysis. Specifically, we determined DNA hypermethylation of promoters and enhancers regulating tumor-suppressor genes, with potential cancer-driving effects. DNA hypermethylation events showed evidence of positive selection, mutual exclusivity and tissue specificity, suggesting their active participation in neoplastic transformation. Our data highlight the extensive changes in DNA methylation that occur in cancer onset, progression and dissemination. PMID:28581523

  3. A DNA methylation map of human cancer at single base-pair resolution.

    PubMed

    Vidal, E; Sayols, S; Moran, S; Guillaumet-Adkins, A; Schroeder, M P; Royo, R; Orozco, M; Gut, M; Gut, I; Lopez-Bigas, N; Heyn, H; Esteller, M

    2017-10-05

    Although single base-pair resolution DNA methylation landscapes for embryonic and different somatic cell types provided important insights into epigenetic dynamics and cell-type specificity, such comprehensive profiling is incomplete across human cancer types. This prompted us to perform genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of 22 samples derived from normal tissues and associated neoplasms, including primary tumors and cancer cell lines. Unlike their invariant normal counterparts, cancer samples exhibited highly variable CpG methylation levels in a large proportion of the genome, involving progressive changes during tumor evolution. The whole-genome sequencing results from selected samples were replicated in a large cohort of 1112 primary tumors of various cancer types using genome-scale DNA methylation analysis. Specifically, we determined DNA hypermethylation of promoters and enhancers regulating tumor-suppressor genes, with potential cancer-driving effects. DNA hypermethylation events showed evidence of positive selection, mutual exclusivity and tissue specificity, suggesting their active participation in neoplastic transformation. Our data highlight the extensive changes in DNA methylation that occur in cancer onset, progression and dissemination.

  4. A DNA Barcoding Based Study to Identify Main Mosquito Species in Taiwan and its Difference from Those in Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Fang, Yiliang; Zhang, Jianqing; Wu, Rongquan; Xu, Baohai; Xie, Lianhui

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes can transmit many types of viruses such as West Nile virus and Zika virus and are responsible for a number of virus-causing diseases including malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, lymphatic filariasis, and Japanese B encephalitis. On January 19, 2016, the first case of Zika virus infection was identified in Taiwan, which presents the need for studying the mosquito species in the Taiwan Strait and evaluating the risk of the outbreak of this infection. In this study, we have collected 144 mosquito specimens from 42 species belonging to nine genera from both sides of the Taiwan Strait during 2013 and 2014. We then applied the COI DNA Barcoding technique to classify the specimens and performed a phylogenetic analysis to infer the evolutionary history of these mosquitoes. Based on the analyses, we found that though the mosquitoes from different sides of the Taiwan Strait share a lot of commonality, they have a few regional specificities. Our results also suggested a very small divergences (1%~9%) between specimens from the same mosquito species and relatively large divergences (8%~25%) between specimens from different mosquito species. Within the same species, the divergence of specimens from the same region is significantly smaller than that between two regions. A few highly divergent species between Fujian and Taiwan (e.g., An.maculatus and Ae.elsiae) might be formed due to the so-called "cryptic evolutionary events", in which the species has differentiation into cryptic species due to geographical differences without changing morphological characteristics. In conclusion, the phylogenetic analyses showed a very similar taxonomy to the historical one based on morphological characteristics, validating again the application of COI DNA Barcoding technique in classifying mosquito species. However, there are also some inconsistencies between COI DNA Barcoding and historical taxonomy, which points out the differences between mosquito DNA and morphological characteristics and suggests the possibility to improve mosquito taxonomy based on DNA techniques. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Madsen, Charlotte S; Petersen, Michael; Nielsen, Poul

    2013-06-17

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single-strand regions may be created during DNA replication or by single-strand exonuclease digestion of linear duplex DNA. Previously, in vitro studies reported that these recombinases promote the single-strand annealing of two complementary DNAs and also strand invasion of a single DNA strand into duplex DNA to create a three-stranded region. Here, in vivo experiments show that recombinase-mediated annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA is the predominant recombination pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Thomason et al.

  7. Exploring the Feasibility of a DNA Computer: Design of an ALU Using Sticker-Based DNA Model.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mayukh; Ghosal, Prasun; Mohanty, Saraju P

    2017-09-01

    Since its inception, DNA computing has advanced to offer an extremely powerful, energy-efficient emerging technology for solving hard computational problems with its inherent massive parallelism and extremely high data density. This would be much more powerful and general purpose when combined with other existing well-known algorithmic solutions that exist for conventional computing architectures using a suitable ALU. Thus, a specifically designed DNA Arithmetic and Logic Unit (ALU) that can address operations suitable for both domains can mitigate the gap between these two. An ALU must be able to perform all possible logic operations, including NOT, OR, AND, XOR, NOR, NAND, and XNOR; compare, shift etc., integer and floating point arithmetic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division). In this paper, design of an ALU has been proposed using sticker-based DNA model with experimental feasibility analysis. Novelties of this paper may be in manifold. First, the integer arithmetic operations performed here are 2s complement arithmetic, and the floating point operations follow the IEEE 754 floating point format, resembling closely to a conventional ALU. Also, the output of each operation can be reused for any next operation. So any algorithm or program logic that users can think of can be implemented directly on the DNA computer without any modification. Second, once the basic operations of sticker model can be automated, the implementations proposed in this paper become highly suitable to design a fully automated ALU. Third, proposed approaches are easy to implement. Finally, these approaches can work on sufficiently large binary numbers.

  8. Prevalence, identification by a DNA microarray-based assay of human and food isolates Listeria spp. from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hmaïed, F; Helel, S; Le Berre, V; François, J-M; Leclercq, A; Lecuit, M; Smaoui, H; Kechrid, A; Boudabous, A; Barkallah, I

    2014-02-01

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence of Listeria species isolated from food samples and characterizing food and human cases isolates. Between 2005 and 2007, one hundred food samples collected in the markets of Tunis were analysed in our study. Five strains of Listeria monocytogenes responsible for human listeriosis isolated in hospital of Tunis were included. Multiplex PCR serogrouping and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) applying the enzyme AscI and ApaI were used for the characterization of isolates of L. monocytogenes. We have developed a rapid microarray-based assay to a reliable discrimination of species within the Listeria genus. The prevalence of Listeria spp. in food samples was estimated at 14% by using classical biochemical identification. Two samples were assigned to L. monocytogenes and 12 to L. innocua. DNA microarray allowed unambiguous identification of Listeria species. Our results obtained by microarray-based assay were in accordance with the biochemical identification. The two food L. monocytogenes isolates were assigned to the PCR serogroup IIa (serovar 1/2a). Whereas human L. monocytogenes isolates were of PCR serogroup IVb, (serovars 4b). These isolates present a high similarity in PFGE. Food L. monocytogenes isolates were classified into two different pulsotypes. These pulsotypes were different from that of the five strains responsible for the human cases. We confirmed the presence of Listeria spp. in variety of food samples in Tunis. Increased food and clinical surveillance must be taken into consideration in Tunisia to identify putative infections sources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The MiAge Calculator: a DNA methylation-based mitotic age calculator of human tissue types.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ahrim; Wang, Shuang

    2018-01-01

    Cell division is important in human aging and cancer. The estimation of the number of cell divisions (mitotic age) of a given tissue type in individuals is of great interest as it allows not only the study of biological aging (using a new molecular aging target) but also the stratification of prospective cancer risk. Here, we introduce the MiAge Calculator, a mitotic age calculator based on a novel statistical framework, the MiAge model. MiAge is designed to quantitatively estimate mitotic age (total number of lifetime cell divisions) of a tissue using the stochastic replication errors accumulated in the epigenetic inheritance process during cell divisions. With the MiAge model, the MiAge Calculator was built using the training data of DNA methylation measures of 4,020 tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples from eight TCGA cancer types and was tested using the testing data of DNA methylation measures of 2,221 tumor and adjacent normal tissue samples of five other TCGA cancer types. We showed that within each of the thirteen cancer types studied, the estimated mitotic age is universally accelerated in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. Across the thirteen cancer types, we showed that worse cancer survivals are associated with more accelerated mitotic age in tumor tissues. Importantly, we demonstrated the utility of mitotic age by showing that the integration of mitotic age and clinical information leads to improved survival prediction in six out of the thirteen cancer types studied. The MiAge Calculator is available at http://www.columbia.edu/∼sw2206/softwares.htm .

  10. Identification of members of the genera Panaeolus and Psilocybe by a DNA test. A preliminary test for hallucinogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Lee, J C; Cole, M; Linacre, A

    2000-08-14

    Abuse of hallucinogens produced by the fungal genera Psilocybe and Panaeolus are a growing problem. Five species from each of the two genera were examined in this preliminary research and a method that will unambiguously identify fungal samples as being of one of these two genera has been developed. The method uses genus specific DNA sequences within the Internal Transcribed Spacer of the ribosomal gene complex. Amplification of a common DNA product and a genus specific product results in two identifiable products, which facilitates the unambiguous identification of material from these two fungi to generic level.

  11. Development of a DNA microarray to detect antimicrobial resistance genes identified in the national center for biotechnology information database

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High density genotyping techniques are needed for investigating antimicrobial resistance especially in the case of multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates. To achieve this all antimicrobial resistance genes in the NCBI Genbank database were identified by key word searches of sequence annotations and the...

  12. Generation of Marker-free Transgenic Plants Concurrently Resistant to a DNA Geminivirus and a RNA Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Cheng, Ying-Hui; Raja, Joseph A. J.; Huang, Ya-Ling; Chien, Wan-Chu; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Global threats of ssDNA geminivirus and ss(-)RNA tospovirus on crops necessitate the development of transgenic resistance. Here, we constructed a two-T DNA vector carrying a hairpin of the intergenic region (IGR) of Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV), residing in an intron inserted in an untranslatable nucleocapsid protein (NP) fragment of Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV). Transgenic tobacco lines highly resistant to AYVV and MYSV were generated. Accumulation of 24-nt siRNA, higher methylation levels on the IGR promoters of the transgene, and suppression of IGR promoter activity of invading AYVV indicate that AYVV resistance is mediated by transcriptional gene silencing. Lack of NP transcript and accumulation of corresponding siRNAs indicate that MYSV resistance is mediated through post-transcriptional gene silencing. Marker-free progenies with concurrent resistance to both AYVV and MYSV, stably inherited as dominant nuclear traits, were obtained. Hence, we provide a novel way for concurrent control of noxious DNA and RNA viruses with less biosafety concerns. PMID:25030413

  13. Safety and Immunological Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine Encoding the Androgen Receptor Ligand-Binding Domain (AR-LBD).

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; Bradley, Eric S; Sawicki, Thomas; Zhong, Weixiong; Ranheim, Erik A; Bloom, Jordan E; Colluru, Viswa T; Johnson, Laura E; Rekoske, Brian T; Eickhoff, Jens C; McNeel, Douglas G

    2017-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key oncogenic driver of prostate cancer, and has been the primary focus of prostate cancer treatment for several decades. We have previously demonstrated that the AR is also an immunological target antigen, recognized in patients with prostate cancer, and targetable by means of vaccines in rodent models with delays in prostate tumor growth. The current study was performed to determine the safety and immunological efficacy of a GMP-grade plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the AR, pTVG-AR. Groups of male mice (n = 6-10 per group) were evaluated after four or seven immunizations, using different schedules and inclusion of GM-CSF as a vaccine adjuvant. Animals were assessed for toxicity using gross observations, pathological analysis, and analysis of serum chemistries. Animals were analyzed for evidence of vaccine-augmented immunity by tetramer analysis. Survival studies using different immunization schedules and inclusion of GM-CSF were conducted in an autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model. No significant toxicities were observed in terms of animal weights, histopathology, hematological changes, or changes in serum chemistries, although there was a trend to lower serum glucose in animals treated with the vaccine. There was specifically no evidence of toxicity in other tissues that express AR, including liver, muscle, hematopoietic, and brain. Vaccination was found to elicit AR LBD-specific CD8+ T cells. In a subsequent study of tumor-bearing animals, animals treated with vaccine had prolonged survival compared with control-immunized mice. These studies demonstrate that, in immunocompetent mice expressing the target antigen, immunization with the pTVG-AR vaccine was both safe and effective in eliciting AR-specific cellular immune responses, and prolonged the survival of prostate tumor-bearing mice. These findings support the clinical evaluation of pTVG-AR in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Prostate 77:812-821, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A DNA replicon system for rapid high-level production of virus-like particles in plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhong; Chen, Qiang; Hjelm, Brooke; Arntzen, Charles; Mason, Hugh

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a safe and effective vaccine strategy. We previously described a stable transgenic plant system for inexpensive production and oral delivery of VLP vaccines. However, the relatively low-level antigen accumulation and long-time frame to produce transgenic plants are the two major roadblocks in the practical development of plant-based VLP production. In this article, we describe the optimization of geminivirus-derived DNA replicon vectors for rapid, high-yield plant-based production of VLPs. Co-delivery of bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV)-derived vector and Rep/RepA-supplying vector by agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in efficient replicon amplification and robust protein production within 5 days. Co-expression of the P19 protein of tomato bush stunt virus, a gene silencing inhibitor, further enhanced VLP accumulation by stabilizing the mRNA. With this system, hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) and Norwalk virus capsid protein (NVCP) were produced at 0.80 and 0.34 mg/g leaf fresh weight, respectively. Sedimentation analysis and electron microscopy of transiently expressed antigens verified the efficient assembly of VLPs. Furthermore, a single replicon vector containing a built-in Rep/RepA cassette without P19 drove protein expression at similar levels as the three-component system. These results demonstrate the advantages of fast and high-level production of VLP-based vaccines using the BeYDV-derived DNA replicon system for transient expression in plants. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A DNA replicon system for rapid high-level production of virus-like particles in plants

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhong; Chen, Qiang; Hjelm, Brooke; Arntzen, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a safe and effective vaccine strategy. We previously described a stable transgenic plant system for inexpensive production and oral delivery of VLP vaccines. However, the relatively low level antigen accumulation and long time frame to produce transgenic plants are the two major roadblocks in the practical development of plant-based VLP production. In this paper, we describe the optimization of geminivirus-derived DNA replicon vectors for rapid, high-yield plant-based production of VLPs. Co-delivery of bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV)-derived vector and Rep/RepA-supplying vector by agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in efficient replicon amplification and robust protein production within five days. Co-expression of the P19 protein of tomato bush stunt virus, a gene silencing inhibitor, further enhanced VLP accumulation by stabilizing the mRNA. With this system, hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) and Norwalk virus capsid protein (NVCP) were produced at 0.80 and 0.34 mg/g leaf fresh weight, respectively. Sedimentation analysis and electron microscopy of transiently expressed antigens verified the efficient assembly of VLPs. Furthermore, a single replicon vector containing a built-in Rep/RepA cassette without p19 drove protein expression at similar levels as the three-component system. These results demonstrate the advantages of fast and high-level production of VLP-based vaccines using the BeYDV-derived DNA replicon system for transient expression in plants. PMID:19309755

  16. Loss of long term protection with the inclusion of HIV pol to a DNA vaccine encoding gag.

    PubMed

    Garrod, Tamsin J; Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Major, Lee; Burrell, Christopher J; Wesselingh, Steven; Suhrbier, Andreas; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2014-11-04

    Traditional vaccine strategies that induce antibody responses have failed to protect against HIV infection in clinical trials, and thus cell-mediated immunity is now an additional criterion. Recent clinical trials that aimed to induce strong T cell responses failed to do so. Therefore, to enhance induction of protective T cell responses, it is crucial that the optimum antigen combination is chosen. Limited research has been performed into the number of antigens selected for an HIV vaccine. This study aimed to compare DNA vaccines encoding either a single HIV antigen or a combination of two antigens, using intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice. Immune assays were performed on splenocytes, and in vivo protection was examined by challenge with a chimeric virus, EcoHIV, able to infect mouse but not human leukocytes, at 10 days (short term) and 60 days (long term) post final vaccination. At 60 days there was significantly lower frequency of induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in the spleens of pCMVgag-pol-vaccinated mice compared with mice which received pCMVgag only. Most importantly, short term viral control of EcoHIV was similar for pCMVgag and pCMVgag-pol-vaccinated mice at day 10, but only the pCMVgag-vaccinated significantly controlled EcoHIV at day 60 compared with pCMV-vaccinated mice, showing that control was reduced with the inclusion of the HIV pol gene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v /F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  18. Spontaneous germline excision of Tol1, a DNA-based transposable element naturally occurring in the medaka fish genome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koga, Hajime; Nakamura, Kodai; Fujita, Akiko; Hattori, Akimasa; Matsuda, Masaru; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    DNA-based transposable elements are ubiquitous constituents of eukaryotic genomes. Vertebrates are, however, exceptional in that most of their DNA-based elements appear to be inactivated. The Tol1 element of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, is one of the few elements for which copies containing an undamaged gene have been found. Spontaneous transposition of this element in somatic cells has previously been demonstrated, but there is only indirect evidence for its germline transposition. Here, we show direct evidence of spontaneous excision in the germline. Tyrosinase is the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. In an albino laboratory strain of medaka fish, which is homozygous for a mutant tyrosinase gene in which a Tol1 copy is inserted, we identified de novo reversion mutations related to melanin pigmentation. The gamete-based reversion rate was as high as 0.4%. The revertant fish carried the tyrosinase gene from which the Tol1 copy had been excised. We previously reported the germline transposition of Tol2, another DNA-based element that is thought to be a recent invader of the medaka fish genome. Tol1 is an ancient resident of the genome. Our results indicate that even an old element can contribute to genetic variation in the host genome as a natural mutator.

  19. A DNA barcode library for ground beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Germany: The genus Bembidion Latreille, 1802 and allied taxa

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hannig, Karsten; Morinière, Jérome; Hendrich, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As molecular identification method, DNA barcoding based on partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) sequences has been proven to be a useful tool for species determination in many insect taxa including ground beetles. In this study we tested the effectiveness of DNA barcodes to discriminate species of the ground beetle genus Bembidion and some closely related taxa of Germany. DNA barcodes were obtained from 819 individuals and 78 species, including sequences from previous studies as well as more than 300 new generated DNA barcodes. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BIN and traditionally recognized species for 69 species (89%). Low interspecific distances with maximum pairwise K2P values below 2.2% were found for three species pairs, including two species pairs with haplotype sharing (Bembidion atrocaeruleum/Bembidion varicolor and Bembidion guttula/Bembidion mannerheimii). In contrast to this, deep intraspecific sequence divergences with distinct lineages were revealed for two species (Bembidion geniculatum/Ocys harpaloides). Our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of the analyzed ground beetles species and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for the Carabidae in Germany and Central Europe as well. PMID:27408547

  20. Quantifying Species Diversity with a DNA Barcoding-Based Method: Tibetan Moth Species (Noctuidae) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qian; Han, Huilin; Hu, XiMin; Li, XinHai; Zhu, ChaoDong; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Ward, Robert D.; Zhang, Ai-bing

    2013-01-01

    With the ongoing loss of biodiversity, there is a great need for fast and effective ways to assess species richness and diversity: DNA barcoding provides a powerful new tool for this. We investigated this approach by focusing on the Tibetan plateau, which is one of the world's top biodiversity hotspots. There have been few studies of its invertebrates, although they constitute the vast majority of the region's diversity. Here we investigated species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae, across different environmental gradients, using measurements based on traditional morphology as well as on DNA barcoding. The COI barcode showed an average interspecific K2P distance of , which is about four times larger than the mean intraspecific distance (). Using six diversity indices, we did not detect any significant differences in estimated species diversity between measurements based on traditional morphology and on DNA barcoding. Furthermore, we found strong positive correlations between them, indicating that barcode-based measures of species diversity can serve as a good surrogate for morphology-based measures in most situations tested. Eastern communities were found to have significantly higher diversity than Western ones. Among 22 environmental factors tested, we found that three (precipitation of driest month, precipitation of driest quarter, and precipitation of coldest quarter) were significantly correlated with species diversity. Our results indicate that these factors could be the key ecological factors influencing the species diversity of the lepidopteran family Noctuidae on the Tibetan plateau. PMID:23741330

  1. Interferon antagonist NSs of La Crosse virus triggers a DNA damage response-like degradation of transcribing RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Paul; Ruf, Marius; Blakqori, Gjon; Överby, Anna K; Heidemann, Martin; Eick, Dirk; Weber, Friedemann

    2011-02-04

    La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) is a mosquito-borne member of the negative-strand RNA virus family Bunyaviridae. We have previously shown that the virulence factor NSs of LACV is an efficient inhibitor of the antiviral type I interferon system. A recombinant virus unable to express NSs (rLACVdelNSs) strongly induced interferon transcription, whereas the corresponding wt virus (rLACV) suppressed it. Here, we show that interferon induction by rLACVdelNSs mainly occurs through the signaling pathway leading from the pattern recognition receptor RIG-I to the transcription factor IRF-3. NSs expressed by rLACV, however, acts downstream of IRF-3 by specifically blocking RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription. Further investigations revealed that NSs induces proteasomal degradation of the mammalian RNA polymerase II subunit RPB1. NSs thereby selectively targets RPB1 molecules of elongating RNA polymerase II complexes, the so-called IIo form. This phenotype has similarities to the cellular DNA damage response, and NSs was indeed found to transactivate the DNA damage response gene pak6. Moreover, NSs expressed by rLACV boosted serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, one of the earliest cellular reactions to damaged DNA. However, other DNA damage response markers such as up-regulation and serine 15 phosphorylation of p53 or serine 1524 phosphorylation of BRCA1 were not triggered by LACV infection. Collectively, our data indicate that the strong suppression of interferon induction by LACV NSs is based on a shutdown of RNA polymerase II transcription and that NSs achieves this by exploiting parts of the cellular DNA damage response pathway to degrade IIo-borne RPB1 subunits.

  2. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces.

    PubMed

    Beknazarova, Meruyert; Millsteed, Shelby; Robertson, Gemma; Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2017-06-09

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic) and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl) preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS) and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  3. Separase is recruited to mitotic chromosomes to dissolve sister chromatid cohesion in a DNA-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuxiao; Kucej, Martin; Fan, Heng-Yu; Yu, Hong; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Zou, Hui

    2009-04-03

    Sister chromatid separation is triggered by the separase-catalyzed cleavage of cohesin. This process is temporally controlled by cell-cycle-dependent factors, but its biochemical mechanism and spatial regulation remain poorly understood. We report that cohesin cleavage by human separase requires DNA in a sequence-nonspecific manner. Separase binds to DNA in vitro, but its proteolytic activity, measured by its autocleavage, is not stimulated by DNA. Instead, biochemical characterizations suggest that DNA mediates cohesin cleavage by bridging the interaction between separase and cohesin. In human cells, a fraction of separase localizes to the mitotic chromosome. The importance of the chromosomal DNA in cohesin cleavage is further demonstrated by the observation that the cleavage of the chromosome-associated cohesins is sensitive to nuclease treatment. Our observations explain why chromosome-associated cohesins are specifically cleaved by separase and the soluble cohesins are left intact in anaphase.

  4. Hindering the illegal trade in dog and cat furs through a DNA-based protocol for species identification.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Luisa; Mariacher, Alessia; Fanelli, Rita; Fico, Rosario; Lorenzini, Rita

    2018-01-01

    In Western countries dogs and cats are the most popular pets, and people are increasingly opposed to their rearing for the fur industry. In 2007, a Regulation of the European Union (EU) banned the use and trade of dog and cat furs, but an official analytical protocol to identify them as source species was not provided, and violations of law are still frequent in all Member States. In this paper we report on the development and validation of a simple and affordable DNA method for species detection in furs to use as an effective tool to combat illegal trade in fur products. A set of mitochondrial primers was designed for amplification of partial cytochrome b, control region and ND1 gene in highly degraded samples, like furs and pelts. Our amplification workflow involved the use of a non-specific primer pair to perform a first test to identify the species through sequencing, then the application of species-specific primer pairs to use in singleplex end-point PCRs as confirmation tests. The advantage of this two-step procedure is twofold: on the one hand it minimises the possibility of negative test results from degraded samples, since failure of amplification with a first set of primers can be offset by successful amplification of the second, and on the other it adds confidence and reliability to final authentication of species. All designed primers were validated on a reference collection of tissue samples, obtaining solid results in terms of specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and reproducibility. Application of the protocol on real caseworks from seized furs yielded successful results also from old and dyed furs, suggesting that age and chemical staining do not necessarily affect positive amplifications. Major pros of this approach are: (1) sensitive and informative primer sets for detection of species; (2) short PCR amplicons for the analysis of poor quality DNA; (3) binding primers that avoid contamination from human DNA; (4) user-friendly protocol for any laboratory equipped for analysis of low-copy-number DNA. Our molecular procedure proved to be a good starting point for enforcing the EU Regulation against dog and cat fur trade in forensic contexts where source attribution is essential to the assignment of responsibilities.

  5. Inhibition of aflatoxin metabolism and growth of Aspergillus flavus in liquid culture by a DNA methylation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kunlong; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Zhang, Feng; Song, Fengqin; Zhong, Hong; Ran, Fanlei; Yu, Song; Xu, Gaopo; Lan, Faxiu; Wang, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are a group of highly oxygenated polyketidese-derived toxins mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, whose biosynthesis mechanisms are extremely sophisticated. Methylation is known as the major form of epigenetic regulation, which is correlated with gene expression. As the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-AC) blocks AF production, we studied AFB1 metabolism and morphological changes of A. flavus by treatment with 5-AC in liquid culture. The results show that 5-AC caused a decrease in AF production and concurrent changes in morphology. In addition, we isolated a non-aflatoxigenic mutant of A. flavus, showing a significant reduction in pigment production, after 5-AC treatment. This mutant showed significant reduction in the expression of genes in the AF biosynthesis pathway, and conidia formation. Furthermore, as AF biosynthesis and oxidative stress are intimately related events, we assessed the viability of A. flavus to oxidative stress after treatment with 5-AC, which showed that the mutant was more sensitive to the strong oxidant hydrogen peroxide. We found that the non-aflatoxigenic mutant showed a decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metabolites indicative of oxidative stress, which may be caused by the disruption of the defence system against excessive ROS formation after 5-AC treatment. These data indicate that 5-AC, as an inactivator of DNA methyltransferase, plays a very important role in AFB1 metabolism and the development of A. flavus, which might provide an effective strategy to pre- or post-harvest control of AFs.

  6. Characterization of a DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Gene of Borrelia hermsii and Its Dispensability for Murine Infection and Persistence.

    PubMed

    James, Allison E; Rogovskyy, Artem S; Crowley, Michael A; Bankhead, Troy

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases have been implicated in the regulation of virulence genes in a number of pathogens. Relapsing fever Borrelia species harbor a conserved, putative DNA methyltransferase gene on their chromosome, while no such ortholog can be found in the annotated genome of the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi. In the relapsing fever species Borrelia hermsii, the locus bh0463A encodes this putative DNA adenine methyltransferase (dam). To verify the function of the BH0463A protein product as a Dam, the gene was cloned into a Dam-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Restriction fragment analysis subsequently demonstrated that complementation of this E. coli mutant with bh0463A restored adenine methylation, verifying bh0463A as a Dam. The requirement of bh0463A for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence was then investigated by genetically disrupting the gene. The dam- mutant was capable of infecting immunocompetent mice, and the mean level of spirochetemia in immunocompetent mice was not significantly different from wild type B. hermsii. Collectively, the data indicate that dam is dispensable for B. hermsii viability, infectivity, and persistence.

  7. Ebola Vaccination Using a DNA Vaccine Coated on PLGA-PLL/γPGA Nanoparticles Administered Using a Microneedle Patch.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Xin Dong; Yang, Chinglai; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Ebola DNA vaccine is incorporated into PLGA-PLL/γPGA nanoparticles and administered to skin using a microneedle (MN) patch. The nanoparticle delivery system increases vaccine thermostability and immunogenicity compared to free vaccine. Vaccination by MN patch produces stronger immune responses than intramuscular administration. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Probability of coding of a DNA sequence: an algorithm to predict translated reading frames from their thermodynamic characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Tramontano, A; Macchiato, M F

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm to determine the probability that a reading frame codifies for a protein is presented. It is based on the results of our previous studies on the thermodynamic characteristics of a translated reading frame. We also develop a prediction procedure to distinguish between coding and non-coding reading frames. The procedure is based on the characteristics of the putative product of the DNA sequence and not on periodicity characteristics of the sequence, so the prediction is not biased by the presence of overlapping translated reading frames or by the presence of translated reading frames on the complementary DNA strand. PMID:3753761

  9. Folding and Hydrodynamics of a DNA i-Motif from the c-MYC Promoter Determined by Fluorescent Cytidine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Samantha M.; Lyons, Daniel F.; Wingate, Sara E.; Wright, Robert T.; Correia, John J.; Jameson, David M.; Wadkins, Randy M.

    2014-01-01

    The four-stranded i-motif (iM) conformation of cytosine-rich DNA has importance to a wide variety of biochemical systems that range from their use in nanomaterials to potential roles in oncogene regulation. The iM structure is formed at slightly acidic pH, where hemiprotonation of cytosine results in a stable C-C+ basepair. Here, we performed fundamental studies to examine iM formation from a C-rich strand from the promoter of the human c-MYC gene. We used a number of biophysical techniques to characterize both the hydrodynamic properties and folding kinetics of a folded iM. Our hydrodynamic studies using fluorescence anisotropy decay and analytical ultracentrifugation show that the iM structure has a compact size in solution and displays the rigidity of a double strand. By studying the rates of circular dichroism spectral changes and quenching of fluorescent cytidine analogs, we also established a mechanism for the folding of a random coil oligo into the iM. In the course of determining this folding pathway, we established that the fluorescent dC analogs tC° and PdC can be used to monitor individual residues of an iM structure and to determine the pKa of an iM. We established that the C-C+ hydrogen bonding of certain bases initiates the folding of the iM structure. We also showed that substitutions in the loop regions of iMs give a distinctly different kinetic signature during folding compared with bases that are intercalated. Our data reveal that the iM passes through a distinct intermediate form between the unfolded and folded forms. Taken together, our results lay the foundation for using fluorescent dC analogs to follow structural changes during iM formation. Our technique may also be useful for examining folding and structural changes in more complex iMs. PMID:25296324

  10. Two Successive Reactions on a DNA Template: A Strategy for Improving Background and Specificity in Nucleic Acid Detection

    PubMed Central

    Franzini, Raphael M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for template-mediated fluorogenic chemistry that results in enhanced performance for the fluorescence detection of nucleic acids. In this approach, two successive templated reactions are required to induce a fluorescence signal, rather than only one. These novel fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probes, termed 2-STAR probes, contain two quencher groups tethered by separate reductively cleavable linkers. When a 2-STAR quenched probe binds adjacent to either two successive mono triphenyl-phosphine (TPP)-DNAs or a dual TPP-DNA, the two quenchers are released, resulting in a fluorescence signal. Because of the requirement for two consecutive reactions, 2-STAR probes display an unprecedented level of sequence-specificity for template-mediated probe designs. At the same time, background emission generated by off-template reactions or incomplete quenching is among the lowest of any fluorogenic reactive probes for the detection of DNA or RNA. PMID:21294182

  11. A DNA Vaccine for Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Protects Against Disease and Death in Two Lethal Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-18

    hemorrhage. 74 Humans appear to be uniquely affected by CCHFV as infection in other animals, including 75 agricultural animals, does not cause...infected 77 ticks, as well as from exposure to infected agricultural animals during butchering (5). 78 TR-17-120 Distribution Statement A: Approved

  12. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP. PMID:7574582

  13. In silico design of a DNA-based HIV-1 multi-epitope vaccine for Chinese populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Sun, Weilai; Guo, Jingjing; Zhao, Guangyu; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Li, Jungfeng; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The development of an HIV-1 vaccine that is capable of inducing effective and broadly cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses remains a challenging task because of the extensive diversity of HIV-1, the difference of virus subtypes (clades) in different geographical regions, and the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). We performed an in silico design of 3 DNA vaccines, designated pJW4303-MEG1, pJW4303-MEG2 and pJW4303-MEG3, encoding multi-epitopes that are highly conserved within the HIV-1 subtypes most prevalent in China and can be recognized through HLA alleles dominant in China. The pJW4303-MEG1-encoded protein consisted of one Th epitope in Env, and one, 2, and 6 epitopes in Pol, Env, and Gag proteins, respectively, with a GGGS linker sequence between epitopes. The pJW4303-MEG2-encoded protein contained similar epitopes in a different order, but with the same linker as pJW4303-MEG1. The pJW4303-MEG3-encoded protein contained the same epitopes in the same order as that of pJW4303-MEG2, but with a different linker sequence (AAY). To evaluate immunogenicity, mice were immunized intramuscularly with these DNA vaccines. Both pJW4303-MEG1 and pJW4303-MEG2 vaccines induced equally potent humoral and cellular immune responses in the vaccinated mice, while pJW4303-MEG3 did not induce immune responses. These results indicate that both epitope and linker sequences are important in designing effective epitope-based vaccines against HIV-1 and other viruses. PMID:25839222

  14. Solution structure of a DNA complex with the fluorescent bis-intercalator TOTO determined by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, H P; Wemmer, D E; Jacobsen, J P

    1995-07-11

    We have used two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy to determine the solution structure of the DNA oligonucleotide d(5'-CGCTAGCG-3')2 complexed with the bis-intercalating dye 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diazaundecamethylene)bis[4-(3-methyl -2,3- dihydrobenzo-1,3-thiazolyl-2-methylidene)qui nolinium] tetraiodide (TOTO). The determination of the structure was based on total relaxation matrix analysis of the NOESY cross-peak intensities using the program MARDIGRAS. Improved procedures to consider the experimental "noise" in NOESY spectra during these calculations have been employed. The NOE-derived distance restraints were applied in restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Twenty final structures each were generated for the TOTO complex from both A-form and B-form dsDNA starting structures. The root-mean-square (rms) deviation of the coordinates for the 40 structures of the complex was 1.45 A. The local DNA structure is distorted in the complex. The helix is unwound by 60 degrees and has an overall helical repeat of 12 base pairs, caused by bis-intercalation of TOTO. The poly(propylenamine) linker chain is located in the minor groove of dsDNA. Calculations indicate that the benzothiazole ring system is twisted relative to the quinoline in the uncomplexed TOTO molecule. The site selectivity of TOTO for the CTAG-CTAG site is explained by its ability to adapt to the base pair propeller twist of dsDNA to optimize stacking and the hydrophobic interaction between the thymidine methyl group and the benzothiazole ring. There is a 3000-fold fluorescence enhancement upon binding of TOTO to dsDNA. Rotation about the cyanine methine bonds is possible in free TOTO, allowing relaxation nonradiatively. When bound to dsDNA, the benzothiazole ring and the quinolinium ring are clamped by the nucleobases preventing this rotation, and the chromophore loses excitation energy by fluorescence instead.

  15. A DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates the division of dikaryotic cells in the ink cap mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea.

    PubMed

    de Sena-Tomás, Carmen; Navarro-González, Mónica; Kües, Ursula; Pérez-Martín, José

    2013-09-01

    The fungal fruiting body or mushroom is a multicellular structure essential for sexual reproduction. It is composed of dikaryotic cells that contain one haploid nucleus from each mating partner sharing the same cytoplasm without undergoing nuclear fusion. In the mushroom, the pileus bears the hymenium, a layer of cells that includes the specialized basidia in which nuclear fusion, meiosis, and sporulation occur. Coprinopsis cinerea is a well-known model fungus used to study developmental processes associated with the formation of the fruiting body. Here we describe that knocking down the expression of Atr1 and Chk1, two kinases shown to be involved in the response to DNA damage in a number of eukaryotic organisms, dramatically impairs the ability to develop fruiting bodies in C. cinerea, as well as other developmental decisions such as sclerotia formation. These developmental defects correlated with the impairment in silenced strains to sustain an appropriated dikaryotic cell cycle. Dikaryotic cells in which chk1 or atr1 genes were silenced displayed a higher level of asynchronous mitosis and as a consequence aberrant cells carrying an unbalanced dose of nuclei. Since fruiting body initiation is dependent on the balanced mating-type regulator doses present in the dikaryon, we believe that the observed developmental defects were a consequence of the impaired cell cycle in the dikaryon. Our results suggest a connection between the DNA damage response cascade, cell cycle regulation, and developmental processes in this fungus.

  16. A DNA Nanotube-Peptide biocomplex for mRNA Detection and Its Application in Cancer Diagnosis and Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoting; Lv, Haoyuan; Guo, Jiayi; Ding, Caifeng; Luo, Xiliang

    2018-04-25

    A biocomplex of DNA nanotube-peptide, consisting of six concatenated DNA strands, three lock DNA strands and a cell-penetrating peptide was developed herein. The barrel structured DNA nanotube-peptide was successfully applied as a co-drug delivery system for targeting cancer therapy. The mucin 1 proteins (MUC-1) aptamer which is part of DNA nanotube can specially recognize MUC-1 protein on the surface of MCF-7 cells. Cyclo (Arg-Gly-Asp-D-phe-Lys) (cRGD), as a cell-penetrating peptide, facilitates recruitment and uptake of targeting drugs by binding to integrin receptors (αvβ3) of cytomembrane surface. Anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) were loaded into the capsulated DNA nanotube-peptide (CDNP), which was used as co-drug cargo models. The as-prepared biocomplex can be utilized not only to deliver drug but also to achieve the anticancer effect in vivo. The experimental results suggested that the treatment efficacy of co-drug delivery platform (CDNP/DOX/PTX) was better than single-drug delivery platform (CDNP/DOX or CDNP/PTX). This system that was composed by DNA strands and peptide has good biocompatibility and biodegradability. Furthermore, the system can readily achieve detection of target mRNA of MCF-7 cell in vitro. The detection limits of mRNA are 9.7×10-8 M and 1.8×10-8 M by using CDNP/DOX and CDNP/PTX-FITC as a probe, respectively. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Potential use of glucuronylglucosyl-β-cyclodextrin/dendrimer conjugate (G2) as a DNA carrier in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anno, Takayuki; Higashi, Taishi; Motoyama, Keiichi; Hirayama, Fumitoshi; Uekama, Kaneto; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the polyamidoamine starburst dendrimer (dendrimer, generation 2: G2) conjugate with 6-O-α-(4-O-α-D-glucuronyl)-D-glucosyl-β-cyclodextrin (GUG-β-CDE (G2)) as a gene transfer carrier. The in vitro gene transfer activity of GUG-β-CDE (G2, degree of substitution (DS) of cyclodextrin (CyD) 1.8) was remarkably higher than that of dendrimer (G2) conjugate with α-CyD (α-CDE (G2, DS 1.2)) and that with β-CyD(β-CDE (G2, DS 1.3)) in A549 and RAW264.7 cells. The particle size, ζ-potential, DNase I-catalyzed degradation, and cellular association of plasmid DNA (pDNA) complex with GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8) were almost the same as those of the other CDEs. Fluorescent-labeled GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8) localized in the nucleus 6 h after transfection of its pDNA complex in A549 cells, suggesting that nuclear localization of pDNA complex with GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8), at least in part, contributes to its high gene transfer activity. GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8) provided higher gene transfer activity than α-CDE (G2, DS 1.2) and β-CDE (G2, DS 1.3) in kidney with negligible changes in blood chemistry values 12 h after intravenous injection of pDNA complexes with GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8) in mice. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that GUG-β-CDE (G2, DS 1.8) has the potential for a novel polymeric pDNA carrier in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Detecting single-abasic residues within a DNA strand immobilized in a biological nanopore using an integrated CMOS sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsuk; Maitra, Raj D; Pedrotti, Ken; Dunbar, William B

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a novel current-measuring sensor (CMS) customized for nanopore applications. The low-noise CMS is fabricated in a 0.35μm CMOS process and is implemented in experiments involving DNA captured in an α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore. Specifically, the CMS is used to build a current amplitude map as a function of varying positions of a single-abasic residue within a homopolymer cytosine single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that is captured and held in the pore. Each ssDNA is immobilized using a biotin-streptavidin linkage. Five different DNA templates are measured and compared: one all-cytosine ssDNA, and four with a single-abasic residue substitution that resides in or near the ~1.5nm aperture of the α-HL channel when the strand is immobilized. The CMOS CMS is shown to resolves the ~5Å displacements of the abasic residue within the varying templates. The demonstration represents an advance in application-specific circuitry that is optimized for small-footprint nanopore applications, including genomic sequencing.

  19. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Anton, Brian P; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R; Roberts, Richard J; Raleigh, Elisabeth A

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of ER2796, a DNA Methyltransferase-Deficient Strain of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Brian P.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Agrawal, Sonia; Fomenkov, Alexey; Byrd, Devon R.; Roberts, Richard J.; Raleigh, Elisabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete sequence of ER2796, a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli K-12 that is completely defective in DNA methylation. Because of its lack of any native methylation, it is extremely useful as a host into which heterologous DNA methyltransferase genes can be cloned and the recognition sequences of their products deduced by Pacific Biosciences Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing. The genome was itself sequenced from a long-insert library using the SMRT platform, resulting in a single closed contig devoid of methylated bases. Comparison with K-12 MG1655, the first E. coli K-12 strain to be sequenced, shows an essentially co-linear relationship with no major rearrangements despite many generations of laboratory manipulation. The comparison revealed a total of 41 insertions and deletions, and 228 single base pair substitutions. In addition, the long-read approach facilitated the surprising discovery of four gene conversion events, three involving rRNA operons and one between two cryptic prophages. Such events thus contribute both to genomic homogenization and to bacteriophage diversification. As one of relatively few laboratory strains of E. coli to be sequenced, the genome also reveals the sequence changes underlying a number of classical mutant alleles including those affecting the various native DNA methylation systems. PMID:26010885

  2. Development of a DNA Microarray-Based Assay for the Detection of Sugar Beet Root Rot Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Christ, Daniela S; Ehricht, Ralf; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet root rot diseases that occur during the cropping season or in storage are accompanied by high yield losses and a severe reduction of processing quality. The vast diversity of microorganism species involved in rot development requires molecular tools allowing simultaneous identification of many different targets. Therefore, a new microarray technology (ArrayTube) was applied in this study to improve diagnosis of sugar beet root rot diseases. Based on three marker genes (internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and 16S ribosomal DNA), 42 well-performing probes enabled the identification of prevalent field pathogens (e.g., Aphanomyces cochlioides), storage pathogens (e.g., Botrytis cinerea), and ubiquitous spoilage fungi (e.g., Penicillium expansum). All probes were proven for specificity with pure cultures from 73 microorganism species as well as for in planta detection of their target species using inoculated sugar beet tissue. Microarray-based identification of root rot pathogens in diseased field beets was successfully confirmed by classical detection methods. The high discriminatory potential was proven by Fusarium species differentiation based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. The results demonstrate that the ArrayTube constitute an innovative tool allowing a rapid and reliable detection of plant pathogens particularly when multiple microorganism species are present.

  3. A DNA-Encapsulated and Fluorescent Ag 10 6+ Cluster with a Distinct Metal-Like Core

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Jeffrey T.; Ganguly, Mainak; Rankine, Ian J.

    Silver cluster–DNA complexes are optical chromophores, and pairs of these conjugates can be toggled from fluorescently dim to bright states using DNA hybridization. This paper highlights spectral and structural differences for a specific cluster pair. We have previously characterized a cluster with low emission and violet absorption that forms a compact structure with single-stranded oligonucleotides. We now consider its counterpart with blue absorption and strong green emission. This cluster develops with a single-stranded/duplex DNA construct and is favored by low silver concentrations with ≲8 Ag+:DNA, an oxygen atmosphere, and neutral pH. The resulting cluster displays key signatures of a molecularmore » metal with well-defined absorption/emission bands at 490/550 nm, and with a fluorescence quantum yield of 15% and lifetime of 2.4 ns. The molecular cluster conjugates with the larger DNA host because it chromatographically elutes with the DNA and it exhibits circular dichroism. The silver cluster is identified as Ag106+ using two modes of mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. Our key finding is that it adopts a low-dimensional shape, as determined from a Ag K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The Ag0 in this oxidized cluster segregates from the Ag+ via a sparse number of metal-like bonds and a denser network of silver–DNA bonds. This structure contrasts with the compact, octahedral-like shape of the violet counterpart to the blue cluster, which is also a Ag106+ species. We consider that the blue- and violet-absorbing clusters may be isomers with shapes that are controlled by the secondary structures of their DNA templates.« less

  4. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  5. Identification of maca (Lepidium meyenii Walp.) and its adulterants by a DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Qing-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Lan; Zha, Sheng-Hua; Zhao, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii) is an herbaceous plant that grows in high plateaus and has been used as both food and folk medicine for centuries because of its benefits to human health. In the present study, ITS (internal transcribed spacer) sequences of forty-three maca samples, collected from different regions or vendors, were amplified and analyzed. The ITS sequences of nineteen potential adulterants of maca were also collected and analyzed. The results indicated that the ITS sequence of maca was consistent in all samples and unique when compared with its adulterants. Therefore, this DNA-barcoding approach based on the ITS sequence can be used for the molecular identification of maca and its adulterants. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Species identification of medicinal pteridophytes by a DNA barcode marker, the chloroplast psbA-trnH intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin-Ye; Xie, Cai-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Song, Jing-Yuan; Yao, Hui; Luo, Kun; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Gao, Ting; Pang, Xiao-Hui; Qian, Jun; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Medicinal pteridophytes are an important group used in traditional Chinese medicine; however, there is no simple and universal way to differentiate various species of this group by morphological traits. A novel technology termed "DNA barcoding" could discriminate species by a standard DNA sequence with universal primers and sufficient variation. To determine whether DNA barcoding would be effective for differentiating pteridophyte species, we first analyzed five DNA sequence markers (psbA-trnH intergenic region, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, and matK) using six chloroplast genomic sequences from GeneBank and found psbA-trnH intergenic region the best candidate for availability of universal primers. Next, we amplified the psbA-trnH region from 79 samples of medicinal pteridophyte plants. These samples represented 51 species from 24 families, including all the authentic pteridophyte species listed in the Chinese pharmacopoeia (2005 version) and some commonly used adulterants. We found that the sequence of the psbA-trnH intergenic region can be determined with both high polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification efficiency (94.1%) and high direct sequencing success rate (81.3%). Combined with GeneBank data (54 species cross 12 pteridophyte families), species discriminative power analysis showed that 90.2% of species could be separated/identified successfully by the TaxonGap method in conjunction with the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool 1 (BLAST1) method. The TaxonGap method results further showed that, for 37 out of 39 separable species with at least two samples each, between-species variation was higher than the relevant within-species variation. Thus, the psbA-trnH intergenic region is a suitable DNA marker for species identification in medicinal pteridophytes.

  7. A DNA barcode library for ground beetles of Germany: the genus Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Insecta, Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hannig, Karsten; Moriniére, Jérôme; Hendrich, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The genus Amara Bonelli, 1810 is a very speciose and taxonomically difficult genus of the Carabidae. The identification of many of the species is accomplished with considerable difficulty, in particular for females and immature stages. In this study the effectiveness of DNA barcoding, the most popular method for molecular species identification, was examined to discriminate various species of this genus from Central Europe. DNA barcodes from 690 individuals and 47 species were analysed, including sequences from previous studies and more than 350 newly generated DNA barcodes. Our analysis revealed unique BINs for 38 species (81%). Interspecific K2P distances below 2.2% were found for three species pairs and one species trio, including haplotype sharing between Amara alpina/Amara torrida and Amara communis/Amara convexior/Amara makolskii. This study represents another step in generating an extensive reference library of DNA barcodes for carabids, highly valuable bioindicators for characterizing disturbances in various habitats. PMID:29853775

  8. Developing a DNA barcode library for perciform fishes in the South China Sea: Species identification, accuracy and cryptic diversity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gang; Chen, Wei-Tao; Lu, Huo-Sheng; Cheng, Fei; Xie, Song-Guang

    2018-01-01

    DNA barcodes were studied for 1,353 specimens representing 272 morphological species belonging to 149 genera and 55 families of Perciformes from the South China Sea (SCS). The average Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) distances within species, genera and families were 0.31%, 8.71% and 14.52%, respectively. A neighbour-joining (NJ) tree, Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum-likelihood (ML) trees and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) revealed 260, 253 and 259 single-species-representing clusters, respectively. Barcoding gap analysis (BGA) demonstrated that barcode gaps were present for 178 of 187 species analysed with multiple specimens (95.2%), with the minimum interspecific distance to the nearest neighbour larger than the maximum intraspecific distance. A group of three Thunnus species (T. albacares, T. obesus and T. tonggol), a pair of Gerres species (G. oyena and G. japonicus), a pair of Istiblennius species (I. edentulous and I. lineatus) and a pair of Uranoscopus species (U. oligolepis and U. kaianus) were observed with low interspecific distances and overlaps between intra- and interspecific genetic distances. Three species (Apogon ellioti, Naucrates ductor and Psenopsis anomala) showed deep intraspecific divergences and generated two lineages each, suggesting the possibility of cryptic species. Our results demonstrated that DNA barcodes are highly reliable for delineating species of Perciformes in the SCS. The DNA barcode library established in this study will shed light on further research on the diversity of Perciformes in the SCS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Enhancing T cell activation and antiviral protection by introducing the HIV-1 protein transduction domain into a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Leifert, J A; Lindencrona, J A; Charo, J; Whitton, J L

    2001-10-10

    Protein transduction domains (PTD), which can transport proteins or peptides across biological membranes, have been identified in several proteins of viral, invertebrate, and vertebrate origin. Here, we evaluate the immunological and biological consequences of including PTD in synthetic peptides and in DNA vaccines that contain CD8(+) T cell epitopes from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Synthetic PTD-peptides did not induce detectable CD8(+) T cell responses. However, fusion of an open reading frame encoding a PTD to an epitope minigene caused transfected tissue culture cells to stimulate epitope-specific T cells much more effectively. Kinetic studies indicated that the epitope reached the surface of transfected cells more rapidly and that the number of transfected cells needed to stimulate T cell responses was reduced by 35- to 50-fold when compared to cells transfected with a standard minigene plasmid. The mechanism underlying the effect of PTD linkage is not clear, but transit of the PTD-attached epitope from transfected cells to nontransfected cells (cross presentation) seemed to play, at most, a minimal role. Mice immunized once with the plasmid encoding the PTD-linked epitope showed a markedly accelerated CD8(+) T cell response and, unlike mice immunized with a standard plasmid, were completely protected against a normally lethal LCMV challenge administered only 8 days post-immunization.

  10. CX-5461 is a DNA G-quadruplex stabilizer with selective lethality in BRCA1/2 deficient tumours

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Di Antonio, Marco; McKinney, Steven; Mathew, Veena; Ho, Brandon; O'Neil, Nigel J.; Santos, Nancy Dos; Silvester, Jennifer; Wei, Vivien; Garcia, Jessica; Kabeer, Farhia; Lai, Daniel; Soriano, Priscilla; Banáth, Judit; Chiu, Derek S.; Yap, Damian; Le, Daniel D.; Ye, Frank B.; Zhang, Anni; Thu, Kelsie; Soong, John; Lin, Shu-chuan; Tsai, Angela Hsin Chin; Osako, Tomo; Algara, Teresa; Saunders, Darren N.; Wong, Jason; Xian, Jian; Bally, Marcel B.; Brenton, James D.; Brown, Grant W.; Shah, Sohrab P.; Cescon, David; Mak, Tak W.; Caldas, Carlos; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Phil; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplex DNAs form four-stranded helical structures and are proposed to play key roles in different cellular processes. Targeting G-quadruplex DNAs for cancer treatment is a very promising prospect. Here, we show that CX-5461 is a G-quadruplex stabilizer, with specific toxicity against BRCA deficiencies in cancer cells and polyclonal patient-derived xenograft models, including tumours resistant to PARP inhibition. Exposure to CX-5461, and its related drug CX-3543, blocks replication forks and induces ssDNA gaps or breaks. The BRCA and NHEJ pathways are required for the repair of CX-5461 and CX-3543-induced DNA damage and failure to do so leads to lethality. These data strengthen the concept of G4 targeting as a therapeutic approach, specifically for targeting HR and NHEJ deficient cancers and other tumours deficient for DNA damage repair. CX-5461 is now in advanced phase I clinical trial for patients with BRCA1/2 deficient tumours (Canadian trial, NCT02719977, opened May 2016). PMID:28211448

  11. CX-5461 is a DNA G-quadruplex stabilizer with selective lethality in BRCA1/2 deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Di Antonio, Marco; McKinney, Steven; Mathew, Veena; Ho, Brandon; O'Neil, Nigel J; Santos, Nancy Dos; Silvester, Jennifer; Wei, Vivien; Garcia, Jessica; Kabeer, Farhia; Lai, Daniel; Soriano, Priscilla; Banáth, Judit; Chiu, Derek S; Yap, Damian; Le, Daniel D; Ye, Frank B; Zhang, Anni; Thu, Kelsie; Soong, John; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Tsai, Angela Hsin Chin; Osako, Tomo; Algara, Teresa; Saunders, Darren N; Wong, Jason; Xian, Jian; Bally, Marcel B; Brenton, James D; Brown, Grant W; Shah, Sohrab P; Cescon, David; Mak, Tak W; Caldas, Carlos; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Phil; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-02-17

    G-quadruplex DNAs form four-stranded helical structures and are proposed to play key roles in different cellular processes. Targeting G-quadruplex DNAs for cancer treatment is a very promising prospect. Here, we show that CX-5461 is a G-quadruplex stabilizer, with specific toxicity against BRCA deficiencies in cancer cells and polyclonal patient-derived xenograft models, including tumours resistant to PARP inhibition. Exposure to CX-5461, and its related drug CX-3543, blocks replication forks and induces ssDNA gaps or breaks. The BRCA and NHEJ pathways are required for the repair of CX-5461 and CX-3543-induced DNA damage and failure to do so leads to lethality. These data strengthen the concept of G4 targeting as a therapeutic approach, specifically for targeting HR and NHEJ deficient cancers and other tumours deficient for DNA damage repair. CX-5461 is now in advanced phase I clinical trial for patients with BRCA1/2 deficient tumours (Canadian trial, NCT02719977, opened May 2016).

  12. Detection of sequence variation in parasite ribosomal DNA by electrophoresis in agarose gels supplemented with a DNA-intercalating agent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Chilton, N B; Gasser, R B

    1998-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of a commercially available DNA intercalating agent (Resolver Gold) in agarose gels for the direct detection of sequence variation in ribosomal DNA (rDNA). This agent binds preferentially to AT sequence motifs in DNA. Regions of nuclear rDNA, known to provide genetic markers for the identification of species of parasitic ascarid nematodes (order Ascaridida), were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to electrophoresis in standard agarose gels versus gels supplemented with Resolver Gold. Individual taxa examined could not be distinguished reliably based on the size of their amplicons in standard agarose gels, whereas they could be readily delineated based on mobility using Resolver Gold-supplemented gels. The latter was achieved because of differences (approximately 0.1-8.2%) in the AT content of the fragments among different taxa, which were associated with significant interspecific differences (approximately 11-39%) in the rDNA sequences employed. There was a tendency for fragments with higher AT content to migrate slower in supplemented agarose gels compared with those of lower AT content. The results indicate the usefulness of this electrophoretic approach to rapidly screen for sequence variability within or among PCR-amplified rDNA fragments of similar sizes but differing AT contents. Although evaluated on rDNA of parasites, the approach has potential to be applied to a range of genes of different groups of infectious organisms.

  13. Development of a DNA-Based Method for Distinguishing the Malaria Vectors, Anopheles Gambiae from Anopheles Arabiensis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-15

    analysis. However, in our preliminary studies, hybridization with the DPro.5ohil actin probe required such low stringency conditions that the signal to...rDNA genes and could therefore contain seOuencec tjhich, under normal DNA hybridization conditions , behave in a species-specific mrnner. We theref’-e...pAGr23B) behave as species-specific probes under the conditions normally used for DNA hybridization. These sequences could be used to design specific

  14. Development of a DNA-Based Method for Distinguishing the Malaria Vectors, Anopheles gambiae From Anopheles arabiensis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    our preliminary studies hybridization with the Droso- phila actin probe required such low stringency conditions that the signal to noise ratio made...Balabacensis complex of Southeast Asia (Diptera: Culicidae). Genetica 57:81-86. (14) Mahon RJ and PM Miethke. 1982. Anopheles farauti No. 3, a hitherto un

  15. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Reveals Millisecond Transitions of a DNA Origami Switch.

    PubMed

    Bruetzel, Linda K; Walker, Philipp U; Gerling, Thomas; Dietz, Hendrik; Lipfert, Jan

    2018-04-11

    Self-assembled DNA structures enable creation of specific shapes at the nanometer-micrometer scale with molecular resolution. The construction of functional DNA assemblies will likely require dynamic structures that can undergo controllable conformational changes. DNA devices based on shape complementary stacking interactions have been demonstrated to undergo reversible conformational changes triggered by changes in ionic environment or temperature. An experimentally unexplored aspect is how quickly conformational transitions of large synthetic DNA origami structures can actually occur. Here, we use time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering to monitor large-scale conformational transitions of a two-state DNA origami switch in free solution. We show that the DNA device switches from its open to its closed conformation upon addition of MgCl 2 in milliseconds, which is close to the theoretical diffusive speed limit. In contrast, measurements of the dimerization of DNA origami bricks reveal much slower and concentration-dependent assembly kinetics. DNA brick dimerization occurs on a time scale of minutes to hours suggesting that the kinetics depend on local concentration and molecular alignment.

  16. Genetic variation in a DNA double strand break repair gene in saudi population: a comparative study with worldwide ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Areeshi, Mohammed Yahya

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair capacity is crucial in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. However, it can be altered based on DNA sequence variations in DNA repair genes and this may lead to the development of many diseases including malignancies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity is necessary for better prevention. Homologous recombination (HR), a major double strand break repair pathway, plays a critical role in maintaining the genome stability. The present study was performed to determine the frequency of the HR gene XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) polymorphisms in Saudi Arabian population in comparison with epidemiological studies by "MEDLINE" search to equate with global populations. The variant allelic (T) frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) was found to be 39%. Our results suggest that frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) DNA repair gene exhibits distinctive patterns compared with the Saudi Arabian population and this might be attributed to ethnic variation. The present findings may help in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  17. Genetic Variability of Beauveria bassiana and a DNA Marker for Environmental Monitoring of a Highly Virulent Isolate Against Cosmopolites sordidus.

    PubMed

    Ferri, D V; Munhoz, C F; Neves, P M O; Ferracin, L M; Sartori, D; Vieira, M L C; Fungaro, M H P

    2012-12-01

    The banana weevil Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) is one of a number of pests that attack banana crops. The use of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana as a biological control agent for this pest may contribute towards reducing the application of chemical insecticides on banana crops. In this study, the genetic variability of a collection of Brazilian isolates of B. bassiana was evaluated. Samples were obtained from various geographic regions of Brazil, and from different hosts of the Curculionidae family. Based on the DNA fingerprints generated by RAPD and AFLP, we found that 92 and 88 % of the loci were polymorphic, respectively. The B. bassiana isolates were attributed to two genotypic clusters based on the RAPD data, and to three genotypic clusters, when analyzed with AFLP. The nucleotide sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers confirmed that all isolates are in fact B. bassiana. Analysis of molecular variance showed that variability among the isolates was not correlated with geographic origin or hosts. A RAPD-specific marker for isolate CG 1024, which is highly virulent to C. sordidus, was cloned and sequenced. Based on the sequences obtained, specific PCR primers BbasCG1024F (5'-TGC GGC TGA GGA GGA CT-3') and BbasCG1024R (5'-TGC GGC TGA GTG TAG AAC-3') were designed for detecting and monitoring this isolate in the field.

  18. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum–acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent. PMID:24407462

  19. The human haptoglobin gene promoter: interleukin-6-responsive elements interact with a DNA-binding protein induced by interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Oliviero, S; Cortese, R

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the human haptoglobin (Hp) gene is induced by interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the human hepatoma cell line Hep3B. Cis-acting elements responsible for this response are localized within the first 186 bp of the 5'-flanking region. Site-specific mutants of the Hp promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene were analysed by transient transfection into uninduced and IL-6-treated Hep3B cells. We identified three regions, A, B and C, defined by mutation, which are important for the IL-6 response. Band shift experiments using nuclear extracts from untreated or IL-6-treated cells revealed the presence of IL-6-inducible DNA binding activities when DNA fragments containing the A or the C sequences were used. Competition experiments showed that both sequences bind to the same nuclear factors. Polymers of oligonucleotides containing either the A or the C regions confer IL-6 responsiveness to a truncated SV40 promoter. The B region forms several complexes with specific DNA-binding proteins different from those which bind to the A and C region. The B region complexes are identical in nuclear extracts from IL-6-treated and untreated cells. While important for IL-6 induction in the context of the haptoglobin promoter, the B site does not confer IL-6 inducibility to the SV40 promoter. Our results indicate that the IL-6 response of the haptoglobin promoter is dependent on the presence of multiple, partly redundant, cis-acting elements. Images PMID:2787245

  20. Solution structure of a DNA mimicking motif of an RNA aptamer against transcription factor AML1 Runt domain.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Fukunaga, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Chiba, Manabu; Iibuchi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Kozu, Tomoko; Sakamoto, Taiichi

    2013-12-01

    AML1/RUNX1 is an essential transcription factor involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. AML1 binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. In a previous study, we obtained RNA aptamers against the AML1 Runt domain by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and revealed that RNA aptamers exhibit higher affinity for the Runt domain than that for RDE and possess the 5'-GCGMGNN-3' and 5'-N'N'CCAC-3' conserved motif (M: A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs) that is important for Runt domain binding. In this study, to understand the structural basis of recognition of the Runt domain by the aptamer motif, the solution structure of a 22-mer RNA was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. The motif contains the AH(+)-C mismatch and base triple and adopts an unusual backbone structure. Structural analysis of the aptamer motif indicated that the aptamer binds to the Runt domain by mimicking the RDE sequence and structure. Our data should enhance the understanding of the structural basis of DNA mimicry by RNA molecules.

  1. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-07-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5'-NNCCAC-3' and 5'-GCGMGN'N'-3' (M:A or C; N and N' form Watson-Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences.

  2. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  3. Further characterization and independent validation of a DNA aptamer-quantum dot-based magnetic sandwich assay for Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John G; Sivils, Jeffrey C

    2017-11-01

    Previously reported DNA aptamers developed against surface proteins extracted from Campylobacter jejuni were further characterized by aptamer-based Western blotting and shown to bind epitopes on proteins weighing ~16 and 60 kD from reduced C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli lysates. Proteins of these approximate weights have also been identified in traditional antibody-based Western blots of Campylobacter spp. Specificity of the capture and reporter aptamers from the previous report was further validated by aptamer-based ELISA-like (ELASA) colorimetric microplate assay. Finally, the limit of detection of the previously reported plastic-adherent aptamer-magnetic bead and aptamer-quantum dot sandwich assay (PASA) was validated by an independent food safety testing laboratory to lie between 5 and 10 C. jejuni cells per milliliter in phosphate buffered saline and repeatedly frozen and thawed chicken rinsate. Such ultrasensitive and rapid (30 min) aptamer-based assays could provide alternative or additional screening tools to enhance food safety testing for Campylobacter and other foodborne pathogens.

  4. Expression of a DNA Replication Gene Cluster in Bacteriophage T4: Genetic Linkage and the Control of Gene Product Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, W. L.; Karam, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of this study bear on the relationship between genetic linkage and control of interactions between the protein products of different cistrons. In T4 bacteriophage, genes 45 and 44 encode essential components of the phage DNA replication multiprotein complex. T4 gene 45 maps directly upstream of gene 44 relative to the overall direction of reading of this region of the phage chromosome, but it is not known whether these two genes are cotranscribed. It has been shown that a nonsense lesion of T4 gene 45 exerts a cis-dominant inhibitory effect on growth of a missense mutant of gene 44 but not on growth of phage carrying the wild-type gene 44 allele. In previous work, we confirmed these observations on polarity of the gene 45 mutation but detected no polar effects by this lesion on synthesis of either mutant or wild-type gene 44 protein. In the present study, we demonstrate that mRNA for gene 44 protein is separable by gel electrophoresis from gene 45-protein-encoding mRNA. That is, the two proteins are not synthesized from one polycistronic message, and the cis-dominant inhibitory effect of the gene 45 mutation on gene 44 function is probably expressed at a posttranslational stage. We propose that close genetic linkage, whether or not it provides shared transcriptional and translational regulatory signals for certain clusters of functionally related cistrons, may determine the intracellular compartmentalization for synthesis of proteins encoded by these clusters. In prokaryotes, such linkage-dependent compartmentation may minimize the diffusion distances between gene products that are synthesized at low levels and are destined to interact. PMID:6745641

  5. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 0.63–5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  6. A DNA-Based Assessment of the Phylogenetic Position of a Morphologically Distinct, Anchialine-Lake-Restricted Seahorse.

    PubMed

    Rose, Emily; Masonjones, Heather D; Jones, Adam G

    2016-11-01

    Isolated populations provide special opportunities to study local adaptation and incipient speciation. In some cases, however, morphological evolution can obscure the taxonomic status of recently founded populations. Here, we use molecular markers to show that an anchialine-lake-restricted population of seahorses, originally identified as Hippocampus reidi, appears on the basis of DNA data to be Hippocampus erectus We collected seahorses from Sweetings Pond, on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, during the summer of 2014. We measured morphological traits and sequenced 2 genes, cytochrome b and ribosomal protein S7, from 19 seahorses in our sample. On the basis of morphology, Sweetings Pond seahorses could not be assigned definitively to either of the 2 species of seahorse, H. reidi and H. erectus, that occur in marine waters surrounding the Bahamas. However, our DNA-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sweetings Pond fish were firmly nested within the H. erectus clade with a Bayesian posterior probability greater than 0.99. Thus, Sweetings Pond seahorses most recently shared a common ancestor with H. erectus populations from the Western Atlantic. Interestingly, the seahorses from Sweetings Pond differ morphologically from other marine populations of H. erectus in having a more even torso to tail length ratio. The substantial habitat differences between Sweetings Pond and the surrounding coastal habitat make Sweetings Pond seahorses particularly interesting from the perspectives of conservation, local adaptation, and incipient speciation. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The influence of antigen targeting to sub-cellular compartments on the anti-allergic potential of a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Esther E; Isakovic, Almedina; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ramsauer, Christina; Reiter, Katrin; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-12-09

    Gene vaccines offer attractive rationales for prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments of type I allergies. DNA and mRNA vaccines have been shown to prevent from allergic sensitization and to counterbalance established allergic immune reactions. Recent advances in gene vaccine manipulation offer additional opportunities for modulation of T helper cell profiles by specific targeting of cellular compartments. DNA vaccines encoding the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 were equipped with different leader sequences to shuttle the antigen to lysosomes (LIMP-II), to trigger cellular secretion (hTPA), or to induce proteasomal degradation via forced ubiquitination (ubi). Mice were pre-vaccinated with these constructs and the protective efficacy was tested by subcutaneous Th2-promoting challenges, followed by allergen inhalation. IgG antibody subclass distribution and allergen-specific IgE as well as cytokine profiles from re-stimulated splenocytes and from BALFs were assessed. The cellular composition of BALFs, and lung resistance and compliance were determined. Immunization with all targeting variants protected from allergic sensitization, i.e. IgE induction, airway hyperresponsiveness, lung inflammation, and systemic and local Th2 cytokine expression. Surprisingly, protection did not clearly correlate with the induction of a systemic Th1 cytokine profile, but rather with proliferating CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells in splenocyte cultures. Targeting the allergen to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation severely down-regulated antibody induction after vaccination, while T cell responses remained unaffected. Although secretion of antigen promoted the highest numbers of Th1 cells, this vaccine type was the least efficient in suppressing the establishment of an allergic immune response. This comparative analysis highlights the modulatory effect of antigen targeting on the resulting immune response, with a special emphasis on prophylactic anti-allergy DNA vaccination. Targeting the antigen to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation reduces the availability of native allergen, thereby rendering the vaccine hypoallergenic without compromising efficacy, an important feature for a therapeutic setting. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii ROP54 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zou, Yang; Chen, Kai; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular protozoan, which infects most of the warm-blooded animals, causing serious public health problems and enormous economic losses worldwide. The rhoptry effector protein 54 (ROP54) has been indicated as a virulence factor that promotes Toxoplasma infection by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles, which can modulate some aspects of the host immune response. In order to evaluate the immuno-protective value of ROP54, we constructed a eukaryotic recombinant plasmid expressing T. gondii ROP54 and intramuscularly immunized Kunming mice with this recombinant plasmid against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. All mice immunized with pVAX-ROP54 elicited a high level of specific antibody responses, a significant increase of lymphocyte proliferation, and a significant level of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12p70), in addition to an increased production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). These results demonstrated that pVAX-ROP54 induced significant cellular and humoral (Th1/Th2) immune responses, which extended the survival time (13.0±1.15days for pVAX-ROP54 vs 6.7±0.48days for pVAX I, 6.8±0.42days for PBS and 6.5±0.53 for blank control) and significantly reduced cyst burden (35.9% for pVAX-ROP54, 1% for pVAX I and 2% for PBS, compared with blank control) of immunized mice. These results indicate that the recombinant ROP54 plasmid can provide partial protection and might be a potential vaccine candidate against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  11. Development of a DNA-Based Method for Distinguishing the Malaria Vectors, Anopheles gambiae from Anopheles arabiensis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Page Front Cover DD FPrm I󈨍 Title Page Su’imat v 1 , or e cr d 2 , i bhle of -)Tdprn’. 3 l’ t Cf ’at’e - 3r)C W I4 eS &,cj_’l, -:f Pep:-, *a< V’ d t...ed R Williamson), NY, Academic Press, pp. 1-48. (16) Avise J, RA Lansman, and RO Shade. 1979. Use of restriction endonucle- ases to measure mtDNA

  12. Crystal structure of a DNA/Ba2+ G-quadruplex containing a water-mediated C-tetrad.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diana; Huang, Terry; Lukeman, Philip S; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the 1.50 Å crystal structure of the DNA decamer, d(CCA(CNV)KGCGTGG) ((CNV)K, 3-cyanovinylcarbazole), which forms a G-quadruplex structure in the presence of Ba(2+). The structure contains several unique features including a bulged nucleotide and the first crystal structure observation of a C-tetrad. The structure reveals that water molecules mediate contacts between the divalent cations and the C-tetrad, allowing Ba(2+) ions to occupy adjacent steps in the central ion channel. One ordered Mg(2+) facilitates 3'-3' stacking of two quadruplexes in the asymmetric unit, while the bulged nucleotide mediates crystal contacts. Despite the high diffraction limit, the first four nucleotides including the (CNV)K nucleoside are disordered though they are still involved in crystal packing. This work suggests that the bulky hydrophobic groups may locally influence the formation of non-Watson-Crick structures from otherwise complementary sequences. These observations lead to the intriguing possibility that certain types of DNA damage may act as modulators of G-quadruplex formation. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Engineering a trifunctional proline utilization A chimaera by fusing a DNA-binding domain to a bifunctional PutA.

    PubMed

    Arentson, Benjamin W; Hayes, Erin L; Zhu, Weidong; Singh, Harkewal; Tanner, John J; Becker, Donald F

    2016-12-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a bifunctional flavoenzyme with proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ 1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains that catalyses the two-step oxidation of proline to glutamate. Trifunctional PutAs also have an N-terminal ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) DNA-binding domain and moonlight as autogenous transcriptional repressors of the put regulon. A unique property of trifunctional PutA is the ability to switch functions from DNA-bound repressor to membrane-associated enzyme in response to cellular nutritional needs and proline availability. In the present study, we attempt to construct a trifunctional PutA by fusing the RHH domain of Escherichia coli PutA (EcRHH) to the bifunctional Rhodobacter capsulatus PutA (RcPutA) in order to explore the modular design of functional switching in trifunctional PutAs. The EcRHH-RcPutA chimaera retains the catalytic properties of RcPutA while acquiring the oligomeric state, quaternary structure and DNA-binding properties of EcPutA. Furthermore, the EcRHH-RcPutA chimaera exhibits proline-induced lipid association, which is a fundamental characteristic of functional switching. Unexpectedly, RcPutA lipid binding is also activated by proline, which shows for the first time that bifunctional PutAs exhibit a limited form of functional switching. Altogether, these results suggest that the C-terminal domain (CTD), which is conserved by trifunctional PutAs and certain bifunctional PutAs, is essential for functional switching in trifunctional PutAs. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Engineering a trifunctional proline utilization A chimaera by fusing a DNA-binding domain to a bifunctional PutA

    PubMed Central

    Arentson, Benjamin W.; Hayes, Erin L.; Zhu, Weidong; Singh, Harkewal; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2016-01-01

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a bifunctional flavoenzyme with proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains that catalyses the two-step oxidation of proline to glutamate. Trifunctional PutAs also have an N-terminal ribbon–helix–helix (RHH) DNA-binding domain and moonlight as autogenous transcriptional repressors of the put regulon. A unique property of trifunctional PutA is the ability to switch functions from DNA-bound repressor to membrane-associated enzyme in response to cellular nutritional needs and proline availability. In the present study, we attempt to construct a trifunctional PutA by fusing the RHH domain of Escherichia coli PutA (EcRHH) to the bifunctional Rhodobacter capsulatus PutA (RcPutA) in order to explore the modular design of functional switching in trifunctional PutAs. The EcRHH–RcPutA chimaera retains the catalytic properties of RcPutA while acquiring the oligomeric state, quaternary structure and DNA-binding properties of EcPutA. Furthermore, the EcRHH–RcPutA chimaera exhibits proline-induced lipid association, which is a fundamental characteristic of functional switching. Unexpectedly, RcPutA lipid binding is also activated by proline, which shows for the first time that bifunctional PutAs exhibit a limited form of functional switching. Altogether, these results suggest that the C-terminal domain (CTD), which is conserved by trifunctional PutAs and certain bifunctional PutAs, is essential for functional switching in trifunctional PutAs. PMID:27742866

  15. A DNA methylation microarray-based study identifies ERG as a gene commonly methylated in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Jacob; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Corless, Christopher L; Jin, Jennifer; Zarour, Luai; Higano, Celestia; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert L; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Bova, G Steven; Partin, Alan W; Mori, Motomi; Alumkal, Joshi

    2011-10-01

    DNA methylation of promoter regions is a common event in prostate cancer, one of the most common cancers in men worldwide. Because prior reports demonstrating that DNA methylation is important in prostate cancer studied a limited number of genes, we systematically quantified the DNA methylation status of 1505 CpG dinucleotides for 807 genes in 78 paraffin-embedded prostate cancer samples and three normal prostate samples. The ERG gene, commonly repressed in prostate cells in the absence of an oncogenic fusion to the TMPRSS2 gene, was one of the most commonly methylated genes, occurring in 74% of prostate cancer specimens. In an independent group of patient samples, we confirmed that ERG DNA methylation was common, occurring in 57% of specimens, and cancer-specific. The ERG promoter is marked by repressive chromatin marks mediated by polycomb proteins in both normal prostate cells and prostate cancer cells, which may explain ERG's predisposition to DNA methylation and the fact that tumors with ERG DNA methylation were more methylated, in general. These results demonstrate that bead arrays offer a high-throughput method to discover novel genes with promoter DNA methylation such as ERG, whose measurement may improve our ability to more accurately detect prostate cancer.

  16. Stability, denaturation and refolding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, a DNA mimicking protein that confers antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khrapunov, Sergei; Brenowitz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    MfpA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a founding member of the pentapeptide repeat class of proteins (PRP) that is believed to confer bacterial resistance to the drug fluoroquinolone by mimicking the size, shape and surface charge of duplex DNA. We show that phenylalanine side chain stacking stabilizes the N-terminus of MfpA’s pentapeptide thus extending the DNA mimicry analogy. The Lumry-Eyring model was applied to multiple spectral measures of MfpA denaturation revealing that the MfpA dimer dissociates to monomers which undergo a structural transition that leads to aggregation. MfpA retains high secondary and tertiary structure content under denaturing conditions. Dimerization stabilizes MfpA’s pentapeptide repeat fold. The high Arrhenius activation energy of the barrier to aggregate formation rationalizes its stability. The mechanism of MfpA denaturation and refolding is a ‘double funnel’ energy landscape where the ‘native’ and ‘aggregate’ funnels are separated by the high barrier that is not overcome during in vitro refolding. PMID:21605934

  17. Hey Buddy can you spare a DNA? New surveillance technologies and the growth of mandatory volunteerism in collecting personal information.

    PubMed

    Marx, Gary T

    2007-01-01

    The new social surveillance can be defined as scrutiny through the use of technical means to extract or create personal or group data, whether from individuals or contexts. Examples include: video cameras; computer matching, profiling and data mining; work, computer and electronic location monitoring; biometrics; DNA analysis; drug tests; brain scans for lie detection; various forms of imaging to reveal what is behind walls and enclosures. There are two problems with the new surveillance technologies. One is that they don't work and the other is that they work too well. If the first, they fail to prevent disasters, bring miscarriages of justice, and waste resources. If the second, they can further inequality and invidious social categorization; they chill liberty. These twin threats are part of the enduring paradox of democratic government that must be strong enough to maintain reasonable order, but not so strong as to become undemocratic.

  18. Serum Cytokine Profiles Associated with Specific Adjuvants Used in a DNA Prime-Protein Boost Vaccination Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Buglione-Corbett, Rachel; Pouliot, Kimberly; Marty-Roix, Robyn; West, Kim; Wang, Shixia; Lien, Egil; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, heterologous prime-boost vaccines have been demonstrated to be an effective strategy for generating protective immunity, consisting of both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against a variety of pathogens including HIV-1. Previous reports of preclinical and clinical studies have shown the enhanced immunogenicity of viral vector or DNA vaccination followed by heterologous protein boost, compared to using either prime or boost components alone. With such approaches, the selection of an adjuvant for inclusion in the protein boost component is expected to impact the immunogenicity and safety of a vaccine. In this study, we examined in a mouse model the serum cytokine and chemokine profiles for several candidate adjuvants: QS-21, Al(OH)3, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, in the context of a previously tested pentavalent HIV-1 Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation, DP6-001. Our data revealed that the candidate adjuvants in the context of the DP6-001 formulation are characterized by unique serum cytokine and chemokine profiles. Such information will provide valuable guidance in the selection of an adjuvant for future AIDS vaccine development, with the ultimate goal of enhancing immunogenicity while minimizing reactogenicity associated with the use of an adjuvant. More significantly, results reported here will add to the knowledge on how to include an adjuvant in the context of a heterologous prime-protein boost vaccination strategy in general. PMID:24019983

  19. From Puffins to Plankton: A DNA-Based Analysis of a Seabird Food Chain in the Northern Gulf of Maine

    PubMed Central

    Bowser, A. Kirsten; Diamond, Antony W.; Addison, Jason A.

    2013-01-01

    The predator-prey interactions within food chains are used to both characterize and understand ecosystems. Conventional methods of constructing food chains from visual identification of prey in predator diet can suffer from poor taxonomic resolution, misidentification, and bias against small or completely digestible prey. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has become a powerful tool for diet reconstruction through barcoding of DNA in stomach content or fecal samples. Here we use multi-locus (16S and CO1) next-generation sequencing of DNA barcodes on the feces of Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica) chicks (n=65) and adults (n=64) and the stomach contents of their main prey, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus, n=44) to investigate a previously studied food chain. We compared conventional and molecular-derived chick diet, tested the similarity between the diets of puffin adults and chicks, and determined whether herring prey can be detected in puffin diet samples. There was high variability in the coverage of prey groups between 16S and CO1 markers. We identified more unique prey with our 16S compared to CO1 barcoding markers (51 and 39 taxa respectively) with only 12 taxa identified by both genes. We found no significant difference between the 16S-identified diets of puffin adults (n=17) and chicks (n=41). Our molecular method is more taxonomically resolved and detected chick prey at higher frequencies than conventional field observations. Many likely planktonic prey of herring were detected in feces from puffin adults and chicks, highlighting the impact secondary consumption may have on the interpretation of molecular dietary analysis. This study represents the first simultaneous molecular investigation into the diet of multiple components of a food chain and highlights the utility of a multi-locus approach to diet reconstruction that is broadly applicable to food web analysis. PMID:24358258

  20. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Second-harmonic generation as a DNA malignancy indicator of prostate glandular epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Han-Ping; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Zhuo, Shuang-Mu; Yu, Bi-Ying; Deng, Xiao-Yuan

    2010-04-01

    This paper first demonstrates second-harmonic generation (SHG) in the intact cell nucleus, which acts as an optical indicator of DNA malignancy in prostate glandular epithelial cells. Within a scanning region of 2.7 μm×2.7 μm in cell nuclei, SHG signals produced from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (PC) tissues (mouse model C57BL/6) have been investigated. Statistical analyses (t test) of a total of 405 measurements (204 nuclei from BPH and 201 nuclei from PC) show that SHG signals from BPH and PC have a distinct difference (p < 0.05), suggesting a potential optical method of revealing very early malignancy in prostate glandular epithelial cells based upon induced biochemical and/or biophysical modifications in DNA.

  1. Quantitative detection of RASSF1A DNA promoter methylation in tumors and serum of patients with serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondurant, Amy E; Huang, Zhiqing; Whitaker, Regina S; Simel, Lauren R; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K

    2011-12-01

    Detection of cell free tumor-specific DNA methylation has been proposed as a potentially useful noninvasive mechanism to detect malignancies, including ovarian cancer, and to monitor response to treatment. However, there are few easily implemented quantitative approaches available for DNA methylation analysis. Our objectives were to develop an absolute quantitative method for detection of DNA methylation using RASSF1A, a known target of promoter methylation in ovarian cancer, and test the ability to detect RASSF1A methylation in tumors and serum specimens of women with ovarian cancer. Bisulfite modified DNAs were subjected to real time PCR using nondiscriminatory PCR primers and a probe with sequence containing a single CpG site, theoretically able to capture the methylation status of that CpG for every allele within a given specimen. Input DNA was normalized to ACTB levels detected simultaneously by assay multiplexing. Methylation levels were established by comparison to results obtained from universally methylated DNA. The assay was able to detect one methylated RASSF1A allele in 100,000 unmethylated alleles. RASSF1A was methylated in 54 of 106 (51%) invasive serous ovarian cancers analyzed and methylation status was concordant in 20/20 matched preoperative serum-tumor pairs. Serial serum specimens taken over the course of treatment for 8 of 9 patients showed fluctuations in RASSF1A methylation concomitant with disease status. This novel assay provides a real-time PCR-based method for absolute quantitation of DNA methylation. Our results support feasibility of monitoring RASSF1A methylation from serum samples taken over the course of treatment from women with ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  3. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. PMID:26896800

  4. Quantitative sampling of conformational heterogeneity of a DNA hairpin using molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Voltz, Karine; Léonard, Jérémie; Touceda, Patricia Tourón; Conyard, Jamie; Chaker, Ziyad; Dejaegere, Annick; Godet, Julien; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Stote, Roland H

    2016-04-20

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and time resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy were combined to quantitatively describe the conformational landscape of the DNA primary binding sequence (PBS) of the HIV-1 genome, a short hairpin targeted by retroviral nucleocapsid proteins implicated in the viral reverse transcription. Three 2-aminopurine (2AP) labeled PBS constructs were studied. For each variant, the complete distribution of fluorescence lifetimes covering 5 orders of magnitude in timescale was measured and the populations of conformers experimentally observed to undergo static quenching were quantified. A binary quantification permitted the comparison of populations from experimental lifetime amplitudes to populations of aromatically stacked 2AP conformers obtained from simulation. Both populations agreed well, supporting the general assumption that quenching of 2AP fluorescence results from pi-stacking interactions with neighboring nucleobases and demonstrating the success of the proposed methodology for the combined analysis of TRF and MD data. Cluster analysis of the latter further identified predominant conformations that were consistent with the fluorescence decay times and amplitudes, providing a structure-based rationalization for the wide range of fluorescence lifetimes. Finally, the simulations provided evidence of local structural perturbations induced by 2AP. The approach presented is a general tool to investigate fine structural heterogeneity in nucleic acid and nucleoprotein assemblies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Validation of a DNA IQ-based extraction method for TECAN robotic liquid handling workstations for processing casework.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Fourney, Ron M

    2010-10-01

    A semi-automated DNA extraction process for casework samples based on the Promega DNA IQ™ system was optimized and validated on TECAN Genesis 150/8 and Freedom EVO robotic liquid handling stations configured with fixed tips and a TECAN TE-Shake™ unit. The use of an orbital shaker during the extraction process promoted efficiency with respect to DNA capture, magnetic bead/DNA complex washes and DNA elution. Validation studies determined the reliability and limitations of this shaker-based process. Reproducibility with regards to DNA yields for the tested robotic workstations proved to be excellent and not significantly different than that offered by the manual phenol/chloroform extraction. DNA extraction of animal:human blood mixtures contaminated with soil demonstrated that a human profile was detectable even in the presence of abundant animal blood. For exhibits containing small amounts of biological material, concordance studies confirmed that DNA yields for this shaker-based extraction process are equivalent or greater to those observed with phenol/chloroform extraction as well as our original validated automated magnetic bead percolation-based extraction process. Our data further supports the increasing use of robotics for the processing of casework samples. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Recombinase polymerase and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as a DNA amplification-detection strategy for food analysis.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Felipe, S; Tortajada-Genaro, L A; Puchades, R; Maquieira, A

    2014-02-06

    Polymerase chain reaction in conjunction with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) is a well-established technique that provides a suitable rapid, sensitive, and selective method for a broad range of applications. However, the need for precise rapid temperature cycling of PCR is an important drawback that can be overcome by employing isothermal amplification reactions such as recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The RPA-ELISA combination is proposed for amplification at a low, constant temperature (40°C) in a short time (40 min), for the hybridisation of labelled products to specific 5'-biotinylated probes/streptavidin in coated microtiter plates at room temperature, and for detection by colorimetric immunoassay. RPA-ELISA was applied to screen common safety threats in foodstuffs, such as allergens (hazelnut, peanut, soybean, tomato, and maize), genetically modified organisms (P35S and TNOS), pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella sp. and Cronobacter sp.), and fungi (Fusarium sp.). Satisfactory sensitivity and reproducibility results were achieved for all the targets. The RPA-ELISA technique does away with thermocycling and provides a suitable sensitive, specific, and cost-effective method for routine applications, and proves particularly useful for resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bifidobacterium breve B-3 exerts metabolic syndrome-suppressing effects in the liver of diet-induced obese mice: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, S; Kamei, A; Xiao, J Z; Iwatsuki, K; Abe, K

    2013-09-01

    We previously reported that supplementation with Bifidobacterium breve B-3 reduced body weight gain and accumulation of visceral fat in a dose-dependent manner, and improved serum levels of total cholesterol, glucose and insulin in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes in the liver using DNA microarray analysis and q-PCR to reveal the mechanism of these anti-obesity effects in this mouse model. Administration of B. breve B-3 led to regulated gene expression of pathways involved in lipid metabolism and response to stress. The results indicate that these regulations in the liver are related to the anti-metabolic syndrome effects of B. breve B-3.

  8. Recognition of O6-benzyl-2′-deoxyguanosine by a perimidinone-derived synthetic nucleoside: a DNA interstrand stacking interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Ewa A.; Lad, Rahul R.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Dhummakupt, Elizabeth; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Egli, Martin; Sturla, Shana J.; Stone, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    The 2′-deoxynucleoside containing the synthetic base 1-[(2R,4S,5R)-4-hydroxy-5-(hydroxymethyl)-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-perimidin-2(3H)-one] (dPer) recognizes in DNA the O6-benzyl-2′-deoxyguanosine nucleoside (O6-Bn-dG), formed by exposure to N-benzylmethylnitrosamine. Herein, we show how dPer distinguishes between O6-Bn-dG and dG in DNA. The structure of the modified Dickerson–Drew dodecamer (DDD) in which guanine at position G4 has been replaced by O6-Bn-dG and cytosine C9 has been replaced with dPer to form the modified O6-Bn-dG:dPer (DDD-XY) duplex [5′-d(C1G2C3X4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3′]2 (X = O6-Bn-dG, Y = dPer) reveals that dPer intercalates into the duplex and adopts the syn conformation about the glycosyl bond. This provides a binding pocket that allows the benzyl group of O6-Bn-dG to intercalate between Per and thymine of the 3′-neighbor A:T base pair. Nuclear magnetic resonance data suggest that a similar intercalative recognition mechanism applies in this sequence in solution. However, in solution, the benzyl ring of O6-Bn-dG undergoes rotation on the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale. In contrast, the structure of the modified DDD in which cytosine at position C9 is replaced with dPer to form the dG:dPer (DDD-GY) [5′-d(C1G2C3G4A5A6T7T8Y9G10C11G12)-3′]2 duplex (Y = dPer) reveals that dPer adopts the anti conformation about the glycosyl bond and forms a less stable wobble pairing interaction with guanine. PMID:23748954

  9. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a DNA region involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis reveals the molecular basis of the nontypeability of two Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroya; Ogawa, Torata; Fukamizu, Dai; Morinaga, Yuiko; Kusumoto, Masahiro

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study was to reveal the molecular basis of the serologic nontypeability of 2 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae field isolates. Nine field strains of A. pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, were isolated from pigs raised on the same farm and sent to our diagnostic laboratory for serotyping. Seven of the 9 strains were identified as serovar 15 strains by immunodiffusion tests. However, 2 strains, designated FH24-2 and FH24-5, could not be serotyped with antiserum prepared against serovars 1-15. Strain FH24-5 showed positive results in 2 serovar 15-specific PCR tests, whereas strain FH24-2 was only positive in 1 of the 2 PCR tests. The nucleotide sequence analysis of gene clusters involved in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis of the 2 nontypeable strains revealed that both had been rendered nontypeable by the action of ISApl1, a transposable element of A. pleuropneumoniae belonging to the IS30 family. The results showed that ISApl1 of A. pleuropneumoniae can interfere with both the serologic and molecular typing methods, and that nucleotide sequence analysis across the capsular gene clusters is the best means of determining the cause of serologic nontypeability in A. pleuropneumoniae. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Building-Up of a DNA Barcode Library for True Bugs (Insecta: Hemiptera: Heteroptera) of Germany Reveals Taxonomic Uncertainties and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hendrich, Lars; Küchler, Stefan M.; Deister, Fabian; Morinière, Jérome; Gossner, Martin M.

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance <2.2% within 21 species pairs (39 species). For ten of these species pairs (18 species), minimum pairwise distances were zero. In contrast to this, deep intraspecific sequence divergences with maximum pairwise distances >2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species) our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae), Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae), Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae)) as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833) (Aradidae) or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811) (Anthocoridae)). PMID:25203616

  11. Impact of the Location of CpG Methylation within the GSTP1 Gene on Its Specificity as a DNA Marker for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Surbhi; Boldbaatar, Batbold; Hamilton, James P.; Lin, Selena Y.; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Chen, Shun-Hua; Song, Wei; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Block, Timothy M.; Su, Ying-Hsiu

    2012-01-01

    Hypermethylation of the glutathione S-transferase π 1 (GSTP1) gene promoter region has been reported to be a potential biomarker to distinguish hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from other liver diseases. However, reports regarding how specific a marker it is have ranged from 100% to 0%. We hypothesized that, to a large extent, the variation of specificity depends on the location of the CpG sites analyzed. To test this hypothesis, we compared the methylation status of the GSTP1 promoter region of the DNA isolated from HCC, cirrhosis, hepatitis, and normal liver tissues by bisulfite–PCR sequencing. We found that the 5′ region of the position −48 nt from the transcription start site of the GSTP1 gene is selectively methylated in HCC, whereas the 3′ region is methylated in all liver tissues examined, including normal liver and the HCC tissue. Interestingly, when DNA derived from fetal liver and 11 nonhepatic normal tissue was also examined by bisulfite-PCR sequencing, we found that methylation of the 3′ region of the promoter appeared to be liver-specific. A methylation-specific PCR assay targeting the 5′ region of the promoter was developed and used to quantify the methylated GSTP1 gene in various diseased liver tissues including HCC. When we used an assay targeting the 3′ region, we found that the methylation of the 5′-end of the GSTP1 promoter was significantly more specific than that of the 3′-end (97.1% vs. 60%, p<0.0001 by Fisher's exact test) for distinguishing HCC (n = 120) from hepatitis (n = 35) and cirrhosis (n = 35). Encouragingly, 33.8% of the AFP-negative HCC contained the methylated GSTP1 gene. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of the location of CpG site methylation for HCC specificity and how liver-specific DNA methylation should be considered when an epigenetic DNA marker is studied for detection of HCC. PMID:22536438

  12. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient withmore » a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.« less

  13. The presence of nuclear families in prehistoric collective burials revisited: the bronze age burial of Montanissell Cave (Spain) in the light of aDNA.

    PubMed

    Simón, Marc; Jordana, Xavier; Armentano, Nuria; Santos, Cristina; Díaz, Nancy; Solórzano, Eduvigis; López, Joan B; González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2011-11-01

    Ancient populations have commonly been thought to have lived in small groups where extreme endogamy was the norm. To contribute to this debate, a genetic analysis has been carried out on a collective burial with eight primary inhumations from Montanissell Cave in the Catalan pre-Pyrenees. Radiocarbon dating clearly placed the burial in the Bronze Age, around 3200 BP. The composition of the group-two adults (one male, one female), one young woman, and five children from both sexes-seemed to represent the structure of a typical nuclear family. The genetic evidence proves this assumption to be wrong. In fact, at least five out of the eight mitochondrial haplotypes were different, denying the possibility of a common maternal ancestor for all of them. Nevertheless, 50% of the inhumations shared haplogroup J, so the possibility of a maternal relationship cannot be ruled out. Actually, combining different analyses performed using ancient and living populations, the probability of having four related J individuals in Montanissell Cave would range from 0.9884 to 0.9999. Owing to the particularities of this singular collective burial (small number of bodies placed altogether in a hidden cave, the evidence of non-simultaneous interments, close dating and unusual grave goods), we suggest that it might represent a small group with a patrilocal mating system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Amolimogene bepiplasmid, a DNA-based therapeutic encoding the E6 and E7 epitopes from HPV, for cervical and anal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2008-12-01

    MGI Pharma Biologics is developing amolimogene bepiplasmid as a potential therapy for HPV-associated diseases, including cervical dysplasia. Amolimogene bepiplasmid is a polymer-encapsulated DNA vaccine consisting of a plasmid expressing a chimeric peptide comprising immunogenic hybrid epitopes from HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 proteins and an HLA-DRalpha intracellular trafficking peptide. In phase I and I/II clinical trials of ZYC-101 (the precursor of amolimogene bepiplasmid containing a single epitope from HPV-16 E7) in patients with cervical dysplasia and patients with anal dysplasia, ZYC-101 produced significant histological regression and was safe and well tolerated. Results from this trial led to a phase II clinical trial of amolimogene bepiplasmid in patients with cervical dysplasia. This phase II trial demonstrated that treatment with amolimogene bepiplasmid resolution of disease was not significantly superior to placebo except in the predefined group of women who were less than 25 years of age. A phase II/III clinical trial was ongoing at the time of publication examining amolimogene bepiplasmid in this patient population.

  15. Discovery of a Potent BTK Inhibitor with a Novel Binding Mode by Using Parallel Selections with a DNA-Encoded Chemical Library.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, John W; Centrella, Paolo A; Gikunju, Diana; Habeshian, Sevan; Hupp, Christopher D; Keefe, Anthony D; Sigel, Eric A; Soutter, Holly H; Thomson, Heather A; Zhang, Ying; Clark, Matthew A

    2017-05-04

    We have identified and characterized novel potent inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) from a single DNA-encoded library of over 110 million compounds by using multiple parallel selection conditions, including variation in target concentration and addition of known binders to provide competition information. Distinct binding profiles were observed by comparing enrichments of library building block combinations under these conditions; one enriched only at high concentrations of BTK and was competitive with ATP, and another enriched at both high and low concentrations of BTK and was not competitive with ATP. A compound representing the latter profile showed low nanomolar potency in biochemical and cellular BTK assays. Results from kinetic mechanism of action studies were consistent with the selection profiles. Analysis of the co-crystal structure of the most potent compound demonstrated a novel binding mode that revealed a new pocket in BTK. Our results demonstrate that profile-based selection strategies using DNA-encoded libraries form the basis of a new methodology to rapidly identify small molecule inhibitors with novel binding modes to clinically relevant targets. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Naturally occurring polyphenol, morin hydrate, inhibits enzymatic activity of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase, a DNA repair enzyme with various roles in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Monica; Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Karmahapatra, Soumendra Krishna; Devito, Stephen; Vasudevan, Sona; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Adhikari, Sanjay; Yenugonda, Venkata M.; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of DNA repair pathways, including the base excision repair (BER) pathway specifically, has heightened since these pathways have been shown to modulate important aspects of human disease. Modulation of the expression or activity of a particular BER enzyme, N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG), has been demonstrated to play a role in carcinogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy as well as neurodegenerative diseases, which has intensified the focus on studying MPG-related mechanisms of repair. A specific small molecule inhibitor for MPG activity would be a valuable biochemical tool for understanding these repair mechanisms. By screening several small molecule chemical libraries, we identified a natural polyphenolic compound, morin hydrate, which inhibits MPG activity specifically (IC50 = 2.6 µM). Detailed mechanism analysis showed that morin hydrate inhibited substrate DNA binding of MPG, and eventually the enzymatic activity of MPG. Computational docking studies with an x-ray derived MPG structure as well as comparison studies with other structurally-related flavanoids offer a rationale for the inhibitory activity of morin hydrate observed. The results of this study suggest that the morin hydrate could be an effective tool for studying MPG function and it is possible that morin hydrate and its derivatives could be utilized in future studies focused on the role of MPG in human disease. PMID:25650313

  17. Modular Nuclease-Responsive DNA Three-Way Junction-Based Dynamic Assembly of a DNA Device and Its Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Wei, Haiping; Jiang, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Here, we explored a modular strategy for rational design of nuclease-responsive three-way junctions (TWJs) and fabricated a dynamic DNA device in a "plug-and-play" fashion. First, inactivated TWJs were designed, which contained three functional domains: the inaccessible toehold and branch migration domains, the specific sites of nucleases, and the auxiliary complementary sequence. The actions of different nucleases on their specific sites in TWJs caused the close proximity of the same toehold and branch migration domains, resulting in the activation of the TWJs and the formation of a universal trigger for the subsequent dynamic assembly. Second, two hairpins (H1 and H2) were introduced, which could coexist in a metastable state, initially to act as the components for the dynamic assembly. Once the trigger initiated the opening of H1 via TWJs-driven strand displacement, the cascade hybridization of hairpins immediately switched on, resulting in the formation of the concatemers of H1/H2 complex appending numerous integrated G-quadruplexes, which were used to obtain label-free signal readout. The inherent modularity of this design allowed us to fabricate a flexible DNA dynamic device and detect multiple nucleases through altering the recognition pattern slightly. Taking uracil-DNA glycosylase and CpG methyltransferase M.SssI as models, we successfully realized the butt joint between the uracil-DNA glycosylase and M.SssI recognition events and the dynamic assembly process. Furthermore, we achieved ultrasensitive assay of nuclease activity and the inhibitor screening. The DNA device proposed here will offer an adaptive and flexible tool for clinical diagnosis and anticancer drug discovery.

  18. Agonists and Antagonists of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Discovered within a DNA-Encoded Chemical Library Using Mutational Stabilization of the Target.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Brown, Giles A; Centrella, Paolo; Certel, Kaan; Cooke, Robert M; Cuozzo, John W; Dekker, Niek; Dumelin, Christoph E; Ferguson, Andrew; Fiez-Vandal, Cédric; Geschwindner, Stefan; Guié, Marie-Aude; Habeshian, Sevan; Keefe, Anthony D; Schlenker, Oliver; Sigel, Eric A; Snijder, Arjan; Soutter, Holly T; Sundström, Linda; Troast, Dawn M; Wiggin, Giselle; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Clark, Matthew A

    2018-06-01

    The discovery of ligands via affinity-mediated selection of DNA-encoded chemical libraries is driven by the quality and concentration of the protein target. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other membrane-bound targets can be difficult to isolate in their functional state and at high concentrations, and therefore have been challenging for affinity-mediated selection. Here, we report a successful selection campaign against protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Using a thermo-stabilized mutant of PAR2, we conducted affinity selection using our >100-billion-compound DNA-encoded library. We observed a number of putative ligands enriched upon selection, and subsequent cellular profiling revealed these ligands to comprise both agonists and antagonists. The agonist series shared structural similarity with known agonists. The antagonists were shown to bind in a novel allosteric binding site on the PAR2 protein. This report serves to demonstrate that cell-free affinity selection against GPCRs can be achieved with mutant stabilized protein targets.

  19. Opening the treasure chest: A DNA-barcoding primer set for most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals from museum collections.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Sylvia; Zachos, Frank E; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    DNA-barcoding is a rapidly developing method for efficiently identifying samples to species level by means of short standard DNA sequences. However, reliable species assignment requires the availability of a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library, and hence numerous initiatives aim at generating such barcode databases for particular taxa or geographic regions. Historical museum collections represent a potentially invaluable source for the DNA-barcoding of many taxa. This is particularly true for birds and mammals, for which collecting fresh (voucher) material is often very difficult to (nearly) impossible due to the special animal welfare and conservation regulations that apply to vertebrates in general, and birds and mammals in particular. Moreover, even great efforts might not guarantee sufficiently complete sampling of fresh material in a short period of time. DNA extracted from historical samples is usually degraded, such that only short fragments can be amplified, rendering the recovery of the barcoding region as a single fragment impossible. Here, we present a new set of primers that allows the efficient amplification and sequencing of the entire barcoding region in most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals in six overlapping fragments, thus greatly increasing the value of historical museum collections for generating DNA barcode reference libraries. Applying our new primer set in recently established NGS protocols promises to further increase the efficiency of barcoding old bird and mammal specimens.

  20. Activity of levofloxacin alone and in combination with a DnaK inhibitor against gram-negative rods, including levofloxacin-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-02-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of > or =4 microg/ml).

  1. Activity of Levofloxacin Alone and in Combination with a DnaK Inhibitor against Gram-Negative Rods, Including Levofloxacin-Resistant Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Koeth, Laura; Sturgess, Michael A.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Synergy time-kill testing of levofloxacin alone and in combination with CHP-105, a representative DnaK inhibitor, against 50 gram-negative rods demonstrated that 34 of the 50 strains tested showed significant synergy between levofloxacin and CHP-105 after 12 h and 24 h. Fourteen of these 34 organisms were quinolone resistant (levofloxacin MICs of ≥4 μg/ml). PMID:19015359

  2. A DNA and morphology based phylogenetic framework of the ant genus Lasius with hypotheses for the evolution of social parasitism and fungiculture.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Munetoshi; Steiner, Florian M; Stauffer, Christian; Akino, Toshiharu; Crozier, Ross H; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C

    2008-08-19

    Ants of the genus Lasius are ecologically important and an important system for evolutionary research. Progress in evolutionary research has been hindered by the lack of a well-founded phylogeny of the subgenera, with three previous attempts disagreeing. Here we employed two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 16S ribosomal RNA), comprising 1,265 bp, together with 64 morphological characters, to recover the phylogeny of Lasius by Bayesian and Maximum Parsimony inference after exploration of potential causes of phylogenetic distortion. We use the resulting framework to infer evolutionary pathways for social parasitism and fungiculture. We recovered two well supported major lineages. One includes Acanthomyops, Austrolasius, Chthonolasius, and Lasius pallitarsis, which we confirm to represent a seventh subgenus, the other clade contains Dendrolasius, and Lasius sensu stricto. The subgenus Cautolasius, displaying neither social parasitism nor fungiculture, probably belongs to the second clade, but its phylogenetic position is not resolved at the cutoff values of node support we apply. Possible causes for previous problems with reconstructing the Lasius phylogeny include use of other reconstruction techniques, possibly more prone to instabilities in some instances, and the inclusion of phylogenetically distorting characters. By establishing an updated phylogenetic framework, our study provides the basis for a later formal taxonomic revision of subgenera and for studying the evolution of various ecologically and sociobiologically relevant traits of Lasius, although there is need for future studies to include nuclear genes and additional samples from the Nearctic. Both social parasitism and fungiculture evolved twice in Lasius, once in each major lineage, which opens up new opportunities for comparative analyses. The repeated evolution of social parasitism has been established for other groups of ants, though not for temporary social parasitism as found in Lasius. For fungiculture, the independent emergence twice in a monophyletic group marks a novel scenario in ants. We present alternative hypotheses for the evolution of both traits, with one of each involving loss of the trait. Though less likely for both traits than later evolution without reversal, we consider reversal as sufficiently plausible to merit independent testing.

  3. Identification of a DNA-binding site for the transcription factor Haa1, required for Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to acetic acid stress

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Nuno P.; Henriques, Sílvia F.; Keller, Greg; Teixeira, Miguel C.; Matos, Rute G.; Arraiano, Cecília M.; Winge, Dennis R.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor Haa1 is the main player in reprogramming yeast genomic expression in response to acetic acid stress. Mapping of the promoter region of one of the Haa1-activated genes, TPO3, allowed the identification of an acetic acid responsive element (ACRE) to which Haa1 binds in vivo. The in silico analysis of the promoter regions of the genes of the Haa1-regulon led to the identification of an Haa1-responsive element (HRE) 5′-GNN(G/C)(A/C)(A/G)G(A/G/C)G-3′. Using surface plasmon resonance experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift assays it is demonstrated that Haa1 interacts with high affinity (KD of 2 nM) with the HRE motif present in the ACRE region of TPO3 promoter. No significant interaction was found between Haa1 and HRE motifs having adenine nucleotides at positions 6 and 8 (KD of 396 and 6780 nM, respectively) suggesting that Haa1p does not recognize these motifs in vivo. A lower affinity of Haa1 toward HRE motifs having mutations in the guanine nucleotides at position 7 and 9 (KD of 21 and 119 nM, respectively) was also observed. Altogether, the results obtained indicate that the minimal functional binding site of Haa1 is 5′-(G/C)(A/C)GG(G/C)G-3′. The Haa1-dependent transcriptional regulatory network active in yeast response to acetic acid stress is proposed. PMID:21586585

  4. Mutation of a Conserved Active Site Residue Converts Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase l Into a DNA Topoisomerase l-Dependent Poison

    SciTech Connect

    He,X.; van Waardenburg, R.; Babaoglu, K.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) catalyzes the resolution of 3' and 5' phospho-DNA adducts. A defective mutant, associated with the recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1, accumulates Tdp1-DNA complexes in vitro. To assess the conservation of enzyme architecture, a 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of yeast Tdp1 was determined that is very similar to human Tdp1. Poorly conserved regions of primary structure are peripheral to an essentially identical catalytic core. Enzyme mechanism was also conserved, because the yeast SCAN1 mutant (H{sub 432}R) enhanced cell sensitivity to the DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) poison camptothecin. A more severe Top1-dependent lethality of Tdp1H{sub 432}N was drug-independent, coincidingmore » with increased covalent Top1-DNA and Tdp1-DNA complex formation in vivo. However, both H432 mutants were recessive to wild-type Tdp1. Thus, yeast H{sub 432} acts in the general acid/base catalytic mechanism of Tdp1 to resolve 3' phosphotyrosyl and 3' phosphoamide linkages. However, the distinct pattern of mutant Tdp1 activity evident in yeast cells, suggests a more severe defect in Tdp1H{sub 432}N-catalyzed resolution of 3' phospho-adducts.« less

  5. A DNA Microarray Analysis of Chemokine and Receptor Genes in the Rat Dental Follicle – Role of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein-1 in Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dawen; Wise, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue sac that surrounds the unerupted tooth, appears to regulate the osteoclastogenesis needed for eruption; i.e., bone resorption to form an eruption pathway. Thus, DNA microarray studies were conducted to determine which chemokines and their receptors were expressed chronologically in the dental follicle, chemokines that might attract osteoclast precursors. In the rat first mandibular molar, a major burst of osteoclastogenesis occurs at day 3 with a minor burst at day 10. The results of the microarray confirmed our previous studies showing the gene expression of molecules such as CSF-1 and MCP-1 in the dental follicle cells. Other new genes also were detected, including secreted frizzled-related protein-1 (SFRP-1), which was found to be down-regulated at days 3 and 9. Using rat bone marrow cultures to conduct in vitro osteoclastogenic assays, it was demonstrated that SFRP-1 inhibited osteoclast formation in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, with increasing concentrations of SFRP-1, the number of TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased suggesting that SFRP-1 inhibits osteoclast formation by inhibiting the fusion of mononuclear cells (osteoclast precursors). Co-culturing bone marrow mononuclear cells and dental follicle cells demonstrated that the dental follicle cells were secreting a product(s) that inhibited osteoclastogenesis, as measured by counting of TRAP-positive osteoclasts. Adding an antibody either to SFRP-1 or OPG partially restored osteoclastogenesis. Adding both anti-SFRP-1 and anti-OPG fully negated the inhibitory effect of the follicle cells upon osteoclastogenesis. These results strongly suggest that SFRP-1 and OPG, both secreted by the dental follicle cells, use different pathways to exert their inhibitory effect on osteoclastogenesis. Based on these in vitro studies of osteoclastogenesis, it is likely that the down-regulation of SFRP-1 gene expression in the dental follicle at days 3 and 9 is a contributory factor in allowing the major and minor bursts of osteoclastogenesis to occur. Thus, inhibition of SFRP-1 gene expression in combination with inhibition of OPG gene expression likely are critical events in enabling alveolar bone resorption to occur such that teeth will erupt. PMID:17540629

  6. The ANGULATA7 gene encodes a DnaJ-like zinc finger-domain protein involved in chloroplast function and leaf development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Nortes, Tamara; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Ponce, María Rosa; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of mutants with altered leaf shape and pigmentation has previously allowed the identification of nuclear genes that encode plastid-localized proteins that perform essential functions in leaf growth and development. A large-scale screen previously allowed us to isolate ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with small rosettes and pale green leaves with prominent marginal teeth, which were assigned to a phenotypic class that we dubbed Angulata. The molecular characterization of the 12 genes assigned to this phenotypic class should help us to advance our understanding of the still poorly understood relationship between chloroplast biogenesis and leaf morphogenesis. In this article, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the angulata7-1 (anu7-1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which we found to be a hypomorphic allele of the EMB2737 gene, which was previously known only for its embryonic-lethal mutations. ANU7 encodes a plant-specific protein that contains a domain similar to the central cysteine-rich domain of DnaJ proteins. The observed genetic interaction of anu7-1 with a loss-of-function allele of GENOMES UNCOUPLED1 suggests that the anu7-1 mutation triggers a retrograde signal that leads to changes in the expression of many genes that normally function in the chloroplasts. Many such genes are expressed at higher levels in anu7-1 rosettes, with a significant overrepresentation of those required for the expression of plastid genome genes. Like in other mutants with altered expression of plastid-encoded genes, we found that anu7-1 exhibits defects in the arrangement of thylakoidal membranes, which appear locally unappressed. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A subset of platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents kill cells by inducing ribosome biogenesis stress rather than by engaging a DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Peter M.; Liu, Yunpeng; Park, Ga Young; Murai, Junko; Koch, Catherine E.; Eisen, Timothy J.; Pritchard, Justin R.; Pommier, Yves; Lippard, Stephen J.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin and its platinum analogues, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, are some of the most widely used cancer chemotherapeutics. However, although cisplatin and carboplatin are primarily used in germ cell, breast and lung malignancies, oxaliplatin is instead used almost exclusively in colorectal and other gastrointestinal cancers. Here, we utilize a unique multi-platform genetic approach to study the mechanism of action of these clinically established platinum anti-cancer agents as well as more recently developed cisplatin analogues. We show that oxaliplatin, unlike cisplatin and carboplatin, does not kill cells via the DNA damage response. Rather, oxaliplatin kills cells by inducing ribosome biogenesis stress. This difference in drug mechanism explains the distinct clinical implementation of oxaliplatin relative to cisplatin and may enable mechanistically informed selection of distinct platinum drugs for distinct malignancies. These data highlight the functional diversity of core components of front line cancer therapy and the potential benefits of applying a mechanism-based rationale to the use of our current arsenal of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:28263311

  8. The effect of S-substitution at the O6-guanine site on the structure and dynamics of a DNA oligomer containing a G:T mismatch

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The effect of S-substitution on the O6 guanine site of a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a G:T mismatch is studied using molecular dynamics. The structure, dynamic evolution and hydration of the S-substituted duplex are compared with those of a normal duplex, a duplex with S-substitution on guanine, but no mismatch and a duplex with just a G:T mismatch. The S-substituted mismatch leads to cell death rather than repair. One suggestion is that the G:T mismatch recognition protein recognises the S-substituted mismatch (GS:T) as G:T. This leads to a cycle of futile repair ending in DNA breakage and cell death. We find that some structural features of the helix are similar for the duplex with the G:T mismatch and that with the S-substituted mismatch, but differ from the normal duplex, notably the helical twist. These differences arise from the change in the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the base pair. However a marked feature of the S-substituted G:T mismatch duplex is a very large opening. This showed considerable variability. It is suggested that this enlarged opening would lend support to an alternative model of cell death in which the mismatch protein attaches to thioguanine and activates downstream damage-response pathways. Attack on the sulphur by reactive oxygen species, also leading to cell death, would also be aided by the large, variable opening. PMID:28910418

  9. A DNA segment spanning the mouse Tnfsf11 transcription unit and its upstream regulatory domain rescues the pleiotropic biologic phenotype of the RANKL null mouse.

    PubMed

    Onal, Melda; Bishop, Kathleen A; St John, Hillary C; Danielson, Allison L; Riley, Erin M; Piemontese, Marilina; Xiong, Jinhu; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is a TNFα-like cytokine that is produced by a diverse set of lineage-specific cells and is involved in a wide variety of physiological processes that include skeletal remodeling, lymph node organogenesis, mammary gland development, and thermal regulation. Consistent with these diverse functions, control of RANKL expression is accomplished in a cell-specific fashion via a set of at least 10 regulatory enhancers that are located up to 170 kb upstream of the gene's transcriptional start site. Here we examined the in vivo consequence of introducing a contiguous DNA segment containing these components into a genetically deleted RANKL null mouse strain. In contrast to RANKL null littermates, null mice containing the transgene exhibited normalized body size, skeletal development, and bone mass as well as normal bone marrow cavities, normalized spleen weights, and the presence of developed lymph nodes. These mice also manifested normalized reproductive capacity, including the ability to lactate and to produce normal healthy litters. Consistent with this, the transgene restored endogenous-like RANKL transcript levels in several RANKL-expressing tissues. Most importantly, restoration of RANKL expression from this segment of DNA was fully capable of rescuing the complex aberrant skeletal and immune phenotype of the RANKL null mouse. RANKL also restored appropriate levels of B220+ IgM+ and B220+ IgD+ B cells in spleen. Finally, we found that RANKL expression from this transgene was regulated by exogenously administered 1,25(OH)2 D3 , parathyroid hormone (PTH), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), thus recapitulating the ability of these same factors to regulate the endogenous gene. These findings fully highlight the properties of the Tnfsf11 gene locus predicted through previous in vitro dissection. We conclude that the mouse Tnfsf11 gene locus identified originally through unbiased chromatin immunoprecipitation with DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) analysis contains the necessary genetic information to direct appropriate tissue-specific and factor-regulated RANKL expression in vivo. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. DNA hypomethylation induces a DNA replication-associated cell cycle arrest to block hepatic outgrowth in uhrf1 mutant zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Vinitha; Chernyavskaya, Yelena; Chen, Xintong; Tan, Poh Seng; Kent, Brandon; Hoshida, Yujin; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2015-01-01

    UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains, 1) recruits DNMT1 to hemimethylated DNA during replication and is essential for maintaining DNA methylation. uhrf1 mutant zebrafish have global DNA hypomethylation and display embryonic defects, including a small liver, and they die as larvae. We make the surprising finding that, despite their reduced organ size, uhrf1 mutants express high levels of genes controlling S-phase and have many more cells undergoing DNA replication, as measured by BrdU incorporation. In contrast to wild-type hepatocytes, which are continually dividing during hepatic outgrowth and thus dilute the BrdU label, uhrf1 mutant hepatocytes retain BrdU throughout outgrowth, reflecting cell cycle arrest. Pulse-chase-pulse experiments with BrdU and EdU, and DNA content analysis indicate that uhrf1 mutant cells undergo DNA re-replication and that apoptosis is the fate of many of the re-replicating and arrested hepatocytes. Importantly, the DNA re-replication phenotype and hepatic outgrowth failure are preceded by global loss of DNA methylation. Moreover, uhrf1 mutants are phenocopied by mutation of dnmt1, and Dnmt1 knockdown in uhrf1 mutants enhances their small liver phenotype. Together, these data indicate that unscheduled DNA replication and failed cell cycle progression leading to apoptosis are the mechanisms by which DNA hypomethylation prevents organ expansion in uhrf1 mutants. We propose that cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis is a strategy that restricts propagation of epigenetically damaged cells during embryogenesis. PMID:25564650

  11. DNA hypomethylation induces a DNA replication-associated cell cycle arrest to block hepatic outgrowth in uhrf1 mutant zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Vinitha; Chernyavskaya, Yelena; Chen, Xintong; Tan, Poh Seng; Kent, Brandon; Hoshida, Yujin; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2015-02-01

    UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains, 1) recruits DNMT1 to hemimethylated DNA during replication and is essential for maintaining DNA methylation. uhrf1 mutant zebrafish have global DNA hypomethylation and display embryonic defects, including a small liver, and they die as larvae. We make the surprising finding that, despite their reduced organ size, uhrf1 mutants express high levels of genes controlling S-phase and have many more cells undergoing DNA replication, as measured by BrdU incorporation. In contrast to wild-type hepatocytes, which are continually dividing during hepatic outgrowth and thus dilute the BrdU label, uhrf1 mutant hepatocytes retain BrdU throughout outgrowth, reflecting cell cycle arrest. Pulse-chase-pulse experiments with BrdU and EdU, and DNA content analysis indicate that uhrf1 mutant cells undergo DNA re-replication and that apoptosis is the fate of many of the re-replicating and arrested hepatocytes. Importantly, the DNA re-replication phenotype and hepatic outgrowth failure are preceded by global loss of DNA methylation. Moreover, uhrf1 mutants are phenocopied by mutation of dnmt1, and Dnmt1 knockdown in uhrf1 mutants enhances their small liver phenotype. Together, these data indicate that unscheduled DNA replication and failed cell cycle progression leading to apoptosis are the mechanisms by which DNA hypomethylation prevents organ expansion in uhrf1 mutants. We propose that cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis is a strategy that restricts propagation of epigenetically damaged cells during embryogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of a DNA-based method for spice/herb authentication, so you do not have to worry about what is in your curry, buon appetito!

    PubMed

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Ounjai, Sarawut; Osathanunkul, Rossarin; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    It is long believed that some spices may help protect against certain chronic conditions. Spices are usually parts of plants that have been powdered into small pieces. Have you ever wondered what the curry powder in your dish is made of? The aim of this work was to develop an appropriate DNA-based method for assessment of spice identity. Selecting the best marker for species recognition in the Zingiberaceae family. Six DNA regions were investigated in silico, including ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoC, trnH-psbA and trnL. Then, only four regions (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA) were included in the simulated HRM (High-resolution Melting) analysis as the results from previous analysis showed that rpoC and trnL may not be suitable to be used to identify Zingiberaceae species in HRM analysis based on both the percentage of nucleotide variation and GC content. Simulated HRM analysis was performed to test the feasibility of Bar-HRM. We found that ITS2 is the most effective region to be used for identification of the studied species and thus was used in laboratory HRM analysis. All seven tested Zingiberaceae plants were then able to be distinguished using the ITS2 primers in laboratory HRM. Most importantly the melting curves gained from fresh and dried tissue overlapped, which is a crucial outcome for the applicability of the analysis. The method could be used in an authentication test for dried products. In the authentication test, only one of seven store-sold Zingiberaceae products that were tested contained the species listed on their labels, while we found substitution/contamination of the tested purchased products in the rest.

  13. Evaluation of a DNA-based method for spice/herb authentication, so you do not have to worry about what is in your curry, buon appetito!

    PubMed Central

    Ounjai, Sarawut; Osathanunkul, Rossarin; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    It is long believed that some spices may help protect against certain chronic conditions. Spices are usually parts of plants that have been powdered into small pieces. Have you ever wondered what the curry powder in your dish is made of? The aim of this work was to develop an appropriate DNA-based method for assessment of spice identity. Selecting the best marker for species recognition in the Zingiberaceae family. Six DNA regions were investigated in silico, including ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoC, trnH-psbA and trnL. Then, only four regions (ITS, matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA) were included in the simulated HRM (High-resolution Melting) analysis as the results from previous analysis showed that rpoC and trnL may not be suitable to be used to identify Zingiberaceae species in HRM analysis based on both the percentage of nucleotide variation and GC content. Simulated HRM analysis was performed to test the feasibility of Bar-HRM. We found that ITS2 is the most effective region to be used for identification of the studied species and thus was used in laboratory HRM analysis. All seven tested Zingiberaceae plants were then able to be distinguished using the ITS2 primers in laboratory HRM. Most importantly the melting curves gained from fresh and dried tissue overlapped, which is a crucial outcome for the applicability of the analysis. The method could be used in an authentication test for dried products. In the authentication test, only one of seven store-sold Zingiberaceae products that were tested contained the species listed on their labels, while we found substitution/contamination of the tested purchased products in the rest. PMID:29020084

  14. SMAD3 augments FoxO3-induced MuRF-1 promoter activity in a DNA-binding-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bollinger, Lance M.; Witczak, Carol A.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle-specific RING finger-1 (MuRF-1), a ubiquitin ligase and key regulator of proteasome-dependent protein degradation, is highly expressed during skeletal muscle atrophy. The transcription factor forkhead box O3 (FoxO3) induces MuRF-1 expression, but the direct role of other major atrophy-related transcription factors, such as SMAD3, is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to determine whether SMAD3 individually regulates, or with FoxO3 coordinately regulates, MuRF-1 expression. In cultured myotubes or human embryonic kidney cells, MuRF-1 mRNA content and promoter activity were increased by FoxO3 but not by SMAD3 overexpression. However, FoxO3 and SMAD3 coexpression synergistically increased MuRF-1 mRNA and promoter activity. Mutation of the SMAD-binding element (SBE) in the proximal MuRF-1 promoter or overexpression of a SMAD3 DNA-binding mutant attenuated FoxO3-dependent MuRF-1 promoter activation, showing that SMAD binding to DNA is required for optimal activation of FoxO3-induced transcription of MuRF-1. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, SMAD3 DNA binding increased FoxO3 abundance and SBE mutation reduced FoxO3 abundance on the MuRF-1 promoter. Furthermore, SMAD3 overexpression dose-dependently increased FoxO3 protein content, and coexpression of FoxO3 and SMAD3 synergistically increased FoxO-dependent gene transcription [assessed with a FoxO response element (FRE)-driven reporter]. Collectively, these results show that SMAD3 regulates transcription of MuRF-1 by increasing FoxO3 binding at a conserved FRE-SBE motif within the proximal promoter region, and by increasing FoxO3 protein content and transcriptional activity. These data are the first to indicate that two major transcription factors regulating protein degradation, FoxO3 and SMAD3, converge to coordinately and directly regulate transcription of MuRF-1. PMID:24920680

  15. Abundant constitutive expression of the immediate-early 94K protein from cytomegalovirus (Colburn) in a DNA-transfected mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Jeang, K.T.; Cho, M.S.; Hayward, G.S.

    1984-10-01

    A 94-kilodalton phosphoprotein known as IE94 is the only viral polypeptide synthesized in abundance under immediate-early conditions after infection by cytomegalovirus (CMV) strain Colburn in either permissive primate or nonpermissive rodent cells. The authors isolated a clonal Ltk/sup +/ cell line which expressed the /sup 35/methionine-labeled IE94 polypeptide in sufficient abundance to be visualized directly in autoradiographs after gel electrophoresis of total-cell-culture protein extracts. The IE94 polypeptide synthesized in the transfected cells was indistinguishable in size and overall net charge from that produced in virus-infected cells. In addition, the IE94 protein expressed in LH/sub 2/p198-3 cells was phosphorylated (presumably bymore » a cellular protein kinase) and generated similar phosphopeptide patterns after partial tryptic digestion to those obtained with the CMV IE94 protein from infected cells. The cell line contained two to four stably integrated copies of the IE94 gene and synthesized a single virus-specific mRNA of 2.5 kilobases detectable on Northern blots. A new antigen, detectable by indirect anticomplement immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibody against the human CMV IE68 protein, was present in the nuclei of more than 95% of the LH/sub 2/l198-3 cells. This evidence suggests that (unlike most herpesvirus genes) the CMV IE94 gene, together with its complex promoter and spliced mRNA structure, may contain all of the regulatory elements necessary for strong constitutive expression in mammalian cells in the absence of other viral factors.« less

  16. Building-up of a DNA barcode library for true bugs (insecta: hemiptera: heteroptera) of Germany reveals taxonomic uncertainties and surprises.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Michael J; Hendrich, Lars; Küchler, Stefan M; Deister, Fabian; Morinière, Jérome; Gossner, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years, DNA barcoding has become an efficient method for the identification of species. In the case of insects, most published DNA barcoding studies focus on species of the Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Hymenoptera and especially Lepidoptera. In this study we test the efficiency of DNA barcoding for true bugs (Hemiptera: Heteroptera), an ecological and economical highly important as well as morphologically diverse insect taxon. As part of our study we analyzed DNA barcodes for 1742 specimens of 457 species, comprising 39 families of the Heteroptera. We found low nucleotide distances with a minimum pairwise K2P distance <2.2% within 21 species pairs (39 species). For ten of these species pairs (18 species), minimum pairwise distances were zero. In contrast to this, deep intraspecific sequence divergences with maximum pairwise distances >2.2% were detected for 16 traditionally recognized and valid species. With a successful identification rate of 91.5% (418 species) our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of true bugs and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for true bugs in Germany and Central Europe as well. Our study also highlights the urgent necessity of taxonomic revisions for various taxa of the Heteroptera, with a special focus on various species of the Miridae. In this context we found evidence for on-going hybridization events within various taxonomically challenging genera (e.g. Nabis Latreille, 1802 (Nabidae), Lygus Hahn, 1833 (Miridae), Phytocoris Fallén, 1814 (Miridae)) as well as the putative existence of cryptic species (e.g. Aneurus avenius (Duffour, 1833) (Aradidae) or Orius niger (Wolff, 1811) (Anthocoridae)).

  17. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  18. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Didier J.; Hain, Karolina O.; Allan, Lindsey A.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies. PMID:25761368

  19. DNA Polymerases η and ζ Combine to Bypass O(2)-[4-(3-Pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl]thymine, a DNA Adduct Formed from Tobacco Carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Gowda, A S Prakasha; Spratt, Thomas E

    2016-03-21

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) are important human carcinogens in tobacco products. They are metabolized to produce a variety 4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobutyl (POB) DNA adducts including O(2)-[4-(3-pyridyl)-4-oxobut-1-yl]thymidine (O(2)-POB-dT), the most abundant POB adduct in NNK- and NNN-treated rodents. To evaluate the mutagenic properties of O(2)-POB-dT, we measured the rate of insertion of dNTPs opposite and extension past O(2)-POB-dT and O(2)-Me-dT by purified human DNA polymerases η, κ, ι, and yeast polymerase ζ in vitro. Under conditions of polymerase in excess, polymerase η was most effective at the insertion of dNTPs opposite O(2)-alkyl-dTs. The time courses were biphasic suggesting the formation of inactive DNA-polymerase complexes. The kpol parameter was reduced approximately 100-fold in the presence of the adduct for pol η, κ, and ι. Pol η was the most reactive polymerase for the adducts due to a higher burst amplitude. For all three polymerases, the nucleotide preference was dATP > dTTP ≫ dGTP and dCTP. Yeast pol ζ was most effective in bypassing the adducts; the kcat/Km values were reduced only 3-fold in the presence of the adducts. The identity of the nucleotide opposite the O(2)-alkyl-dT did not significantly affect the ability of pol ζ to bypass the adducts. The data support a model in which pol η inserts ATP or dTTP opposite O(2)-POB-dT, and then, pol ζ extends past the adduct.

  20. Toward a DNA Taxonomy of Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae) Using a Mixed Yule-Coalescent Analysis of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vuataz, Laurent; Sartori, Michel; Wagner, André; Monaghan, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic larvae of many Rhithrogena mayflies (Ephemeroptera) inhabit sensitive Alpine environments. A number of species are on the IUCN Red List and many recognized species have restricted distributions and are of conservation interest. Despite their ecological and conservation importance, ambiguous morphological differences among closely related species suggest that the current taxonomy may not accurately reflect the evolutionary diversity of the group. Here we examined the species status of nearly 50% of European Rhithrogena diversity using a widespread sampling scheme of Alpine species that included 22 type localities, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of one standard mtDNA marker and one newly developed nDNA marker, and morphological identification where possible. Using sequences from 533 individuals from 144 sampling localities, we observed significant clustering of the mitochondrial (cox1) marker into 31 GMYC species. Twenty-one of these could be identified based on the presence of topotypes (expertly identified specimens from the species' type locality) or unambiguous morphology. These results strongly suggest the presence of both cryptic diversity and taxonomic oversplitting in Rhithrogena. Significant clustering was not detected with protein-coding nuclear PEPCK, although nine GMYC species were congruent with well supported terminal clusters of nDNA. Lack of greater congruence in the two data sets may be the result of incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphism. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of both gene regions recovered four of the six recognized Rhithrogena species groups in our samples as monophyletic. Future development of more nuclear markers would facilitate multi-locus analysis of unresolved, closely related species pairs. The DNA taxonomy developed here lays the groundwork for a future revision of the important but cryptic Rhithrogena genus in Europe. PMID:21611178

  1. [A DNA study of rat liver oligonucleosomes enriched by transcriptionally active genes during induction due to the administration of an amino acid mixture].

    PubMed

    Vardevanian, P O; Davtian, A M; Tiratsuian, S G; Vardevanian, A O

    1990-01-01

    A highly active fraction of rat liver oligonucleosome DNA has been isolated and studied by means of thermal denaturation after induction by amino acid mixture or hydrocortisone. A considerable redistribution of DNA content has been shown in sucrose gradient fractions during these forms of induction. The changes are revealed in melting temperature, differential melting profile of DNA, isolated from actively transcribed chromatine fractions. Analysis of melting profiles shows changes of GC content of oligonucleosome DNA, suggesting that there are differences in activation during two studied forms of induction.

  2. Identification and characterization of PhbF: a DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Marco A S; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Rego, Fabiane G M; Souza, Emanuel M; Yates, Marshall G; Monteiro, Rose A; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Steffens, Maria B R

    2011-10-14

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  3. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta. PMID:21999748

  4. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G –5C –4 andmore » central C 0/G 0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.« less

  5. PhyloFlu, a DNA microarray for determining the phylogenetic origin of influenza A virus gene segments and the genomic fingerprint of viral strains.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Luis F; de los D Soto-Del Río, María; Sánchez, Iván; Hernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M; López-Martínez, Irma; Wong-Chew, Rosa M; Parissi-Crivelli, Aurora; Isa, P; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2014-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that most influenza A virus gene segments can contribute to the pathogenicity of the virus. In this regard, the hemagglutinin (HA) subtype of the circulating strains has been closely surveyed, but the reassortment of internal gene segments is usually not monitored as a potential source of an increased pathogenicity. In this work, an oligonucleotide DNA microarray (PhyloFlu) designed to determine the phylogenetic origins of the eight segments of the influenza virus genome was constructed and validated. Clades were defined for each segment and also for the 16 HA and 9 neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. Viral genetic material was amplified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with primers specific to the conserved 5' and 3' ends of the influenza A virus genes, followed by PCR amplification with random primers and Cy3 labeling. The microarray unambiguously determined the clades for all eight influenza virus genes in 74% (28/38) of the samples. The microarray was validated with reference strains from different animal origins, as well as from human, swine, and avian viruses from field or clinical samples. In most cases, the phylogenetic clade of each segment defined its animal host of origin. The genomic fingerprint deduced by the combined information of the individual clades allowed for the determination of the time and place that strains with the same genomic pattern were previously reported. PhyloFlu is useful for characterizing and surveying the genetic diversity and variation of animal viruses circulating in different environmental niches and for obtaining a more detailed surveillance and follow up of reassortant events that can potentially modify virus pathogenicity.

  6. Structure of the apo form of the catabolite control protein A (CcpA) from Bacillus megaterium with a DNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Palm, Gottfried J.; Panjikar, Santosh

    2007-04-01

    Crystal structure analysis of the apo form of catabolite control protein A reveals the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain. In the crystal packing, this domain interacts with the binding site for the corepressor protein. Crystal structure determination of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) at 2.6 Å resolution reveals for the first time the structure of a full-length apo-form LacI-GalR family repressor protein. In the crystal structures of these transcription regulators, the three-helix bundle of the DNA-binding domain has only been observed in cognate DNA complexes; it has not been observed in other crystal structures owing to its mobility. Inmore » the crystal packing of apo-CcpA, the protein–protein contacts between the N-terminal three-helix bundle and the core domain consisted of interactions between the homodimers that were similar to those between the corepressor protein HPr and the CcpA N-subdomain in the ternary DNA complex. In contrast to the DNA complex, the apo-CcpA structure reveals large subdomain movements in the core, resulting in a complete loss of contacts between the N-subdomains of the homodimer.« less

  7. Comparison of four species-delimitation methods applied to a DNA barcode data set of insect larvae for use in routine bioassessment for use in routine bioassessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species delimitation (grouping individuals into distinct taxonomic groups) is an essential part of evolutionary, conservation, and molecular ecology. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcodes, short fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, are being used in environm...

  8. Zalypsis has in vitro activity in acute myeloid blasts and leukemic progenitor cells through the induction of a DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Colado, Enrique; Paíno, Teresa; Maiso, Patricia; Ocio, Enrique M.; Chen, Xi; Álvarez-Fernández, Stela; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; Martín-Sánchez, Jesús; Flores-Montero, Juan; San Segundo, Laura; Garayoa, Mercedes; Fernández-Lázaro, Diego; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Avilés, Pablo; Cuevas, Carmen; Pandiella, Atanasio; San-Miguel, Jesús F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia initially respond to conventional chemotherapy, relapse is still the leading cause of death, probably because of the presence of leukemic stem cells that are insensitive to current therapies. We investigated the antileukemic activity and mechanism of action of zalypsis, a novel alkaloid of marine origin. Design and Methods The activity of zalypsis was studied in four acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and in freshly isolated blasts taken from patients with acute myeloid leukemia before they started therapy. Zalypsis-induced apoptosis of both malignant and normal cells was measured using flow cytometry techniques. Gene expression profiling and western blot studies were performed to assess the mechanism of action of the alkaloid. Results Zalypsis showed a very potent antileukemic activity in all the cell lines tested and potentiated the effect of conventional antileukemic drugs such as cytarabine, fludarabine and daunorubicin. Interestingly, zalypsis showed remarkable ex vivo potency, including activity against the most immature blast cells (CD34+ CD38− Lin−) which include leukemic stem cells. Zalypsis-induced apoptosis was the result of an important deregulation of genes involved in the recognition of double-strand DNA breaks, such as Fanconi anemia genes and BRCA1, but also genes implicated in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks, such as RAD51 and RAD54. These gene findings were confirmed by an increase in several proteins involved in the pathway (pCHK1, pCHK2 and pH2AX). Conclusions The potent and selective antileukemic effect of zalypsis on DNA damage response mechanisms observed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and in patients’ samples provides the rationale for the investigation of this compound in clinical trials. PMID:21330323

  9. Ultraviolet radiation-induced interleukin 6 release in HeLa cells is mediated via membrane events in a DNA damage-independent way.

    PubMed

    Kulms, D; Pöppelmann, B; Schwarz, T

    2000-05-19

    Evidence exists that ultraviolet radiation (UV) affects molecular targets in the nucleus or at the cell membrane. UV-induced apoptosis was found to be mediated via DNA damage and activation of death receptors, suggesting that nuclear and membrane effects are not mutually exclusive. To determine whether participation of nuclear and membrane components is also essential for other UV responses, we studied the induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by UV. Exposing HeLa cells to UV at 4 degrees C, which inhibits activation of surface receptors, almost completely prevented IL-6 release. Enhanced repair of UV-mediated DNA damage by addition of the DNA repair enzyme photolyase did not affect UV-induced IL-6 production, suggesting that in this case membrane events predominant over nuclear effects. UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated via NFkappaB since the NFkappaB inhibitor MG132 or transfection of cells with a super-repressor form of the NFkappaB inhibitor IkappaB reduced IL-6 release. Transfection with a dominant negative mutant of the signaling protein TRAF-2 reduced IL-6 release upon exposure to UV, indicating that UV-induced IL-6 release is mediated by activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1. These data demonstrate that UV can exert biological effects mainly by affecting cell surface receptors and that this is independent of its ability to induce nuclear DNA damage.

  10. Leading-edge forensic DNA analyses and the necessity of including crime scene investigators, police officers and technicians in a DNA elimination database.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Martine; Rogic, Anita; Bourgoin, Sarah; Jolicoeur, Christine; Séguin, Diane

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, sophisticated technology has significantly increased the sensitivity and analytical power of genetic analyses so that very little starting material may now produce viable genetic profiles. This sensitivity however, has also increased the risk of detecting unknown genetic profiles assumed to be that of the perpetrator, yet originate from extraneous sources such as from crime scene workers. These contaminants may mislead investigations, keeping criminal cases active and unresolved for long spans of time. Voluntary submission of DNA samples from crime scene workers is fairly low, therefore we have created a promotional method for our staff elimination database that has resulted in a significant increase in voluntary samples since 2011. Our database enforces privacy safeguards and allows for optional anonymity to all staff members. We also offer information sessions at various police precincts to advise crime scene workers of the importance and success of our staff elimination database. This study, a pioneer in its field, has obtained 327 voluntary submissions from crime scene workers to date, of which 46 individual profiles (14%) have been matched to 58 criminal cases. By implementing our methods and respect for individual privacy, forensic laboratories everywhere may see similar growth and success in explaining unidentified genetic profiles in stagnate criminal cases. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic investigation of the relationship between high myopia and polymorphisms of the MMP2, TIMP2, and TIMP3 genes by a DNA pooling approach.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kim Hung; Yiu, Wai Chi; Yap, Maurice K H; Ng, Po Wah; Fung, Wai Yan; Sham, Pak Chung; Yip, Shea Ping

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between high myopia and three myopia candidate genes--matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and -3 (TIMP2 and TIMP3)--involved in scleral remodeling. Recruited for the study were unrelated adult Han Chinese who were high myopes (spherical equivalent, ≤ -6.0 D in both eyes; cases) and emmetropes (within ±1.0 D in both eyes; controls). Sample set 1 had 300 cases and 300 controls, and sample set 2 had 356 cases and 354 controls. Forty-nine tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from these candidate genes. The first stage was an initial screen of six case pools and six control pools constructed from sample set 1, each pool consisting of 50 distinct subjects of the same affection status. In the second stage, positive SNPs from the first stage were confirmed by genotyping individual samples forming the DNA pools. In the third stage, positive SNPs from stage 2 were replicated, with sample set 2 genotyped individually. Of the 49 SNPs screened by DNA pooling, three passed the lenient threshold of P < 0.10 (nested ANOVA) and were followed up by individual genotyping. Of the three SNPs genotyped, two TIMP3 SNPs were found to be significantly associated with high myopia by single-marker or haplotype analysis. However, the initial positive results could not be replicated by sample set 2. MMP2, TIPM2, and TIMP3 genes were not associated with high myopia in this Chinese sample and hence are unlikely to play a major role in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia.

  12. Opening the treasure chest: A DNA-barcoding primer set for most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals from museum collections

    PubMed Central

    Schäffer, Sylvia; Zachos, Frank E.

    2017-01-01

    DNA-barcoding is a rapidly developing method for efficiently identifying samples to species level by means of short standard DNA sequences. However, reliable species assignment requires the availability of a comprehensive DNA barcode reference library, and hence numerous initiatives aim at generating such barcode databases for particular taxa or geographic regions. Historical museum collections represent a potentially invaluable source for the DNA-barcoding of many taxa. This is particularly true for birds and mammals, for which collecting fresh (voucher) material is often very difficult to (nearly) impossible due to the special animal welfare and conservation regulations that apply to vertebrates in general, and birds and mammals in particular. Moreover, even great efforts might not guarantee sufficiently complete sampling of fresh material in a short period of time. DNA extracted from historical samples is usually degraded, such that only short fragments can be amplified, rendering the recovery of the barcoding region as a single fragment impossible. Here, we present a new set of primers that allows the efficient amplification and sequencing of the entire barcoding region in most higher taxa of Central European birds and mammals in six overlapping fragments, thus greatly increasing the value of historical museum collections for generating DNA barcode reference libraries. Applying our new primer set in recently established NGS protocols promises to further increase the efficiency of barcoding old bird and mammal specimens. PMID:28358863

  13. Immunization with a DNA adenine methylase over-producing Yersinia pseudotuberculosis vaccine confers robust cross-protection against heterologous pathogenic serotypes.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Heithoff, Douglas M; Ersoy, Selvi C; Shimp, William R; Mahan, Michael J

    2014-03-14

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious human illness. Although the source and route of transmission often remain obscure, livestock have been implicated in some cases. The diversity of yersiniae present on farms and their widespread distribution in animal and environmental reservoirs necessitates the use of broad prophylactic strategies that are efficacious against many serotypes simultaneously. Herein, immunization of mice with a modified, live attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis vaccine that overproduces the DNA adenine methylase (Dam(OP)) conferred robust protection against virulent challenge (150-fold LD50) with homologous and heterologous serotypes that have been associated with human disease (O:1, O:1a, O:3). Further, the dam gene was shown to be essential for cell viability in all (7 of 7) Y. pseudotuberculosis strains tested. Direct selection for the inheritance of dam mutant alleles in Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in dam strain variants that contained compensatory (second-site suppressor) mutations in genes encoding methyl-directed mismatch repair proteins (mutHLS) that are involved in suppression of the non-viable cell phenotype in all (19/19) strains tested. Such dam mutH variants exhibited a significant increase in virulence and spontaneous mutation frequency relative to that of a Dam(OP) vaccine strain. These studies indicate that Y. pseudotuberculosis Dam(OP) strains conferred potent cross-protective efficacy as well as decreased virulence and spontaneous mutation frequency relative to those that lack Dam, which have compensatory mutations in mutHLS loci. These data suggest that development of yersiniae livestock vaccines based on Dam overproduction is a viable mitigation strategy to reduce these potential foodborne contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A family of long intergenic non-coding RNA genes in human chromosomal region 22q11.2 carry a DNA translocation breakpoint/AT-rich sequence

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    FAM230C, a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) gene in human chromosome 13 (chr13) is a member of lincRNA genes termed family with sequence similarity 230. An analysis using bioinformatics search tools and alignment programs was undertaken to determine properties of FAM230C and its related genes. Results reveal that the DNA translocation element, the Translocation Breakpoint Type A (TBTA) sequence, which consists of satellite DNA, Alu elements, and AT-rich sequences is embedded in the FAM230C gene. Eight lincRNA genes related to FAM230C also carry the TBTA sequences. These genes were formed from a large segment of the 3’ half of the FAM230C sequence duplicated in chr22, and are specifically in regions of low copy repeats (LCR22)s, in or close to the 22q.11.2 region. 22q11.2 is a chromosomal segment that undergoes a high rate of DNA translocation and is prone to genetic deletions. FAM230C-related genes present in other chromosomes do not carry the TBTA motif and were formed from the 5’ half region of the FAM230C sequence. These findings identify a high specificity in lincRNA gene formation by gene sequence duplication in different chromosomes. PMID:29668722

  15. rahu is a mutant allele of Dnmt3c, encoding a DNA methyltransferase homolog required for meiosis and transposon repression in the mouse male germline

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Julian; Lailler, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing by heritable cytosine-5 methylation is an ancient strategy to repress transposable elements. It was previously thought that mammals possess four DNA methyltransferase paralogs—Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b and Dnmt3l—that establish and maintain cytosine-5 methylation. Here we identify a fifth paralog, Dnmt3c, that is essential for retrotransposon methylation and repression in the mouse male germline. From a phenotype-based forward genetics screen, we isolated a mutant mouse called ‘rahu’, which displays severe defects in double-strand-break repair and homologous chromosome synapsis during male meiosis, resulting in sterility. rahu is an allele of a transcription unit (Gm14490, renamed Dnmt3c) that was previously mis-annotated as a Dnmt3-family pseudogene. Dnmt3c encodes a cytosine methyltransferase homolog, and Dnmt3crahu mutants harbor a non-synonymous mutation of a conserved residue within one of its cytosine methyltransferase motifs, similar to a mutation in human DNMT3B observed in patients with immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome. The rahu mutation lies at a potential dimerization interface and near the potential DNA binding interface, suggesting that it compromises protein-protein and/or protein-DNA interactions required for normal DNMT3C function. Dnmt3crahu mutant males fail to establish normal methylation within LINE and LTR retrotransposon sequences in the germline and accumulate higher levels of transposon-derived transcripts and proteins, particularly from distinct L1 and ERVK retrotransposon families. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that Dnmt3c arose during rodent evolution by tandem duplication of Dnmt3b, after the divergence of the Dipodoidea and Muroidea superfamilies. These findings provide insight into the evolutionary dynamics and functional specialization of the transposon suppression machinery critical for mammalian sexual reproduction and epigenetic regulation. PMID:28854222

  16. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N.; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor, first identified by its inactivation in Wilms Tumor. While one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells which conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning (ChIP-cloning) analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS) regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity (PCP) gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33 nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in both mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway. PMID:20571064

  17. The predominant WT1 isoform (+KTS) encodes a DNA-binding protein targeting the planar cell polarity gene Scribble in renal podocytes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Julie; Rivera, Miguel N; Kim, Woo Jae; Starbuck, Kristen; Haber, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    WT1 encodes a tumor suppressor first identified by its inactivation in Wilms' Tumor. Although one WT1 splicing variant encodes a well-characterized zinc finger transcription factor, little is known about the function of the most prevalent WT1 isoform, whose DNA binding domain is disrupted by a three-amino acid (KTS) insertion. Using cells that conditionally express WT1(+KTS), we undertook a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and cloning analysis to identify candidate WT1(+KTS)-regulated promoters. We identified the planar cell polarity gene Scribble (SCRB) as the first WT1(+KTS) target gene in podocytes of the kidney. WT1 and SCRB expression patterns overlap precisely in developing renal glomeruli of mice, and WT1(+KTS) binds to a 33-nucleotide region within the Scribble promoter in mouse and human cell lines and kidneys. Together, our results support a role for the predominant WT1(+KTS) isoform in transcriptional regulation and suggest a link between the WT1-dependent tumor suppressor pathway and a key component of the planar cell polarity pathway.

  18. Recombinant Invasive Lactococcus lactis Carrying a DNA Vaccine Coding the Ag85A Antigen Increases INF-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α Cytokines after Intranasal Immunization.

    PubMed

    Mancha-Agresti, Pamela; de Castro, Camila Prosperi; Dos Santos, Janete S C; Araujo, Maíra A; Pereira, Vanessa B; LeBlanc, Jean G; Leclercq, Sophie Y; Azevedo, Vasco

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major threat throughout the world and in 2015 it caused the death of 1.4 million people. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is the only existing vaccine against this ancient disease; however, it does not provide complete protection in adults. New vaccines against TB are eminently a global priority. The use of bacteria as vehicles for delivery of vaccine plasmids is a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we evaluated the use of, an engineered invasive Lactococcus lactis (expressing Fibronectin-Binding Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus ) for the delivery of DNA plasmid to host cells, especially to the mucosal site as a new DNA vaccine against tuberculosis. One of the major antigens documented that offers protective responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the Ag85A. L. lactis FnBPA + (pValac: Ag85A) which was obtained and used for intranasal immunization of C57BL/6 mice and the immune response profile was evaluated. In this study we observed that this strain was able to produce significant increases in the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-6) in the stimulated spleen cell supernatants, showing a systemic T helper 1 (Th1) cell response. Antibody production (IgG and sIgA anti-Ag85A) was also significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage, as well as in the serum of mice. In summary, these findings open new perspectives in the area of mucosal DNA vaccine, against specific pathogens using a Lactic Acid Bacteria such as L. lactis.

  19. Sox5 is a DNA binding co-factor for BMP R-Smads that directs target specificity during patterning of the early ectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Kara; LaBonne, Carole

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The SoxD factor, Sox5, is expressed in ectodermal cells at times and places where BMP signaling is active, including the cells of the animal hemisphere at blastula stages, and the neural plate border (NPB) and neural crest (NC) at neurula stages. Sox5 is required for proper ectoderm development, and deficient embryos display patterning defects characteristic of perturbations of BMP signaling, including loss of neural crest and epidermis and expansion of the neural plate. We show that Sox5 is essential for activation of BMP target genes in embryos and explants, that it physically interacts with BMP R-Smads, and that it is essential for recruitment of Smad1/4 to BMP regulatory elements. Our findings identify Sox5 as the long sought DNA binding partner for BMP R-Smads essential to plasticity and pattern in the early ectoderm. PMID:25453832

  20. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    PubMed

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bright Two-Photon Emission and Ultra-Fast Relaxation Dynamics in a DNA-Templated Nanocluster Investigated by Ultra-Fast Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Michigan 3003 S. State St Ann Arbor, MI 48109 -1274 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE b . ABSTRACT UU c. THIS PAGE UU 2. REPORT TYPE New Reprint 17. LIMITATION OF...Figure 1: Steady state absorption for Au25 Au55, Au140, Au2406 and Mie theory calculation using parameter similar to Au25.7 B . Emission Mechanism of...short-lived (hundreds of fs), and it is most likely to be associated with the metal core (State B ).7,17 The near-infrared emission is related to the

  2. Immunological responses induced by a DNA vaccine expressing RON4 and by immunogenic recombinant protein RON4 failed to protect mice against chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Imran; Hedhli, Dorsaf; Moiré, Nathalie; Pierre, Josette; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Mévélec, Marie Noëlle

    2011-11-08

    The development of an effective vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important issue due to the seriousness of the related public health problems, and the economic importance of this parasitic disease worldwide. Rhoptry neck proteins (RONs) are components of the moving junction macromolecular complex formed during invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vaccine potential of RON4 using two vaccination strategies: DNA vaccination by the intramuscular route, and recombinant protein vaccination by the nasal route. We produced recombinant RON4 protein (RON4S2) using the Schneider insect cells expression system, and validated its antigenicity and immunogenicity. We also constructed optimized plasmids encoding full length RON4 (pRON4), or only the N-terminal (pNRON4), or the C-terminal part (pCRON4) of RON4. CBA/J mice immunized with pRON4, pNRON4 or pCRON4 plus a plasmid encoding the granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor showed high IgG titers against rRON4S2. Mice immunized by the nasal route with rRON4S2 plus cholera toxin exhibited low levels of anti-RON4S2 IgG antibodies, and no intestinal IgA antibodies specific to RON4 were detected. Both DNA and protein vaccination generated a mixed Th1/Th2 response polarized towards the IgG1 antibody isotype. Both DNA and protein vaccination primed CD4+ T cells in vivo. In addition to the production of IFN-γ, and IL-2, Il-10 and IL-5 were also produced by the spleen cells of the immunized mice stimulated with RON4S2, suggesting that a mixed Th1/Th2 type immune response occurred in all the immunized groups. No cytokine was detectable in stimulated mesenteric lymph nodes from mice immunized by the nasal route. Immune responses were induced by both DNA and protein vaccination, but failed to protect the mice against a subsequent oral challenge with T. gondii cysts. In conclusion, strategies designed to enhance the immunogenicity and to redirect the cellular response towards a Th1 type response against RON4 could lead to more encouraging results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Structure and Specificity of the Type III Secretion System Effector NleC Suggest a DNA Mimicry Mechanism of Substrate