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Sample records for a-encoding messenger ribonucleic

  1. Control of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Leys, E.J.; Kellems, R.E.

    1981-11-01

    The authors used methotrexate-resistant mouse cells in which dihydrofolate reductase levels are approximately 500 times normal to study the effect of growth stimulation on dihydrofolate reductase gene expression. As a result of growth stimulation, the relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase protein synthesis increased threefold, reaching a maximum between 25 and 30 h after stimulation. The relative rate of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid production (i.e., the appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm) increased threefold after growth stimulation and was accompanied by a corresponding increase in the relative steady-state level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid in the nucleus. However, the increase in the nuclear level of dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid was not accompanied by a significant increase in the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes. These data indicated that the relative rate of appearance of dihydrofolate reductase messenger ribonucleic acid in the cytoplasm depends on the relative stability of the dihydrofolate reductase ribonucleic acid sequences in the nucleus and is not dependent on the relative rate of transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase genes.

  2. Comparison of methods of extracting messenger Ribonucleic Acid from ejaculated Porcine (Sus Scrofa) Spermatozoa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    H. D. Guthrie, G.R. Welch, and L. A. Blomberg. Comparison of Methods of Extracting Messenger Ribonucleic Acid from Ejaculated Porcine (Sus Scrofa) Spermatozoa. Biotechnology and Germplasm Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service U. S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD 20705 The purpos...

  3. Effect of Thymine Starvation on Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Luzzati, Denise

    1966-01-01

    Luzzati, Denise (Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Paris, France). Effect of thymine starvation on messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:1435–1446. 1966.—During the course of thymine starvation, the rate of synthesis of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA, the rapidly labeled fraction of the RNA which decays in the presence of dinitrophenol or which hybridizes with deoxyribonucleic acid) decreases exponentially, in parallel with the viability of the thymine-starved bacteria. The ability of cell-free extracts of starved bacteria to incorporate ribonucleoside triphosphates into RNA was determined; it was found to be inferior to that of extracts from control cells. The analysis of the properties of cell-free extracts of starved cells shows that their decreased RNA polymerase activity is the consequence of a modification of their deoxyribonucleic acid, the ability of which to serve as a template for RNA polymerase decreases during starvation. PMID:5332402

  4. Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis and Degradation in Escherichia coli During Inhibition of Translation

    PubMed Central

    Pato, Martin L.; Bennett, Peter M.; Von Meyenburg, Kaspar

    1973-01-01

    Various aspects of the coupling between the movement of ribosomes along messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) and the synthesis and degradation of mRNA have been investigated. Decreasing the rate of movement of ribosomes along an mRNA does not affect the rate of movement of some, and possibly most, of the RNA polymerases transcribing the gene coding for that mRNA. Inhibiting translation with antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, tetracycline, or fusidic acid protects extant mRNA from degradation, presumably by immobilizing ribosomes, whereas puromycin exposes mRNA to more rapid degradation than normal. The promoter distal (3′) portion of mRNA, synthesized after ribosomes have been immobilized by chloramphenicol on the promoter proximal (5′) portion of the mRNA, is subsequently degraded. PMID:4583248

  5. Metabolism of arginine-specific messenger ribonucleic acid in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Natter, W; Sens, D; James, E

    1977-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid (RNA-DNA) hybridization was employed for the determination of the level of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcribed from seven of the nine genes of the arginine regulon of Escherichia coli K-12. The quantity of RNA complexing with each of the separated DNA strands of the argA, argF, argE, and argCBH operons carried on specialized transducing phages was measured. The derepressed:repressed ratio of mRNA formed in vivo was found to vary between about 3 and 4 when measured by hybridization to DNA isolated from specialized transducing phages carrying the argA, argE, argCBH, argF, and argI operons. PMID:326762

  6. Expression and regulation of the messenger ribonucleic acid encoding the prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor in the rat myometrium during pregnancy and labor.

    PubMed

    Ou, C W; Chen, Z Q; Qi, S; Lye, S J

    2000-04-01

    We examined expression of messenger ribonucleic acid encoding the prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor in the rat myometrium throughout late gestation and its regulation by progesterone and mechanical stretch. Normal pregnant rats were killed on gestational day 15, 22, or 23 (during labor) or 1 day post partum. The effects of progesterone on prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels were investigated by daily injections of progesterone (4 mg) from day 20 of normal gestation or from day 17 in rats bilaterally ovariectomized on day 17. To investigate the effects of myometrial stretch, unilaterally pregnant rats underwent either sham surgery or placement of a polyvinyl tube 3 mm in diameter in the nongravid uterine horn on day 15 or 18 and were killed 5 days later. Prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the myometrium were determined by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method. Myometrial prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels significantly increased during both term and ovariectomy-induced preterm labor. This increase was blocked by progesterone. In rats with unilateral pregnancies prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the nongravid horns were similar to those in the contralateral gravid horns on day 20 and during labor regardless of whether they were stretched by a 3-mm tube. Increased myometrial expression of prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor messenger ribonucleic acid during term and preterm labor is temporally associated with progesterone withdrawal but is not dependent on mechanical stretch of the myometrium.

  7. Isoleucine and Valine Metabolism in Escherichia coli K-12: Detection and Measurement of ilv-Specific Messenger Ribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Haar, R. A. Vonder; Umbarger, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid (RNA-DNA) hybridization was employed for the determination of messenger RNA transcribed from the ilv gene cluster of Escherichia coli K-12. Strains with derepressed levels of the isoleucine and valine biosynthetic enzymes owing to linked or unlinked genetic lesions were found to exhibit ilv messenger RNA levels from 1.5- to 4-fold higher than did their isogenic parents. When grown under conditions that specifically repressed the synthesis of isoleucine- and valine-forming enzymes, most strains exhibited drastically reduced ilv messenger RNA levels. Hybridization performed with the separated strands of ilv DNA showed that all the ilv genes are transcribed from the same strand, the “l strand” of λφ80CI857St68dilv DNA. Sucrose gradient analyses of RNA extracted from cells starved for isoleucine, valine, or leucine resulted in the detection of at least two distinct types of ilv messenger RNA. PMID:4616946

  8. Growth hormone increases somatostatin release and messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Aguila, M C; McCann, S M

    1993-09-24

    Growth hormone (GH) suppresses its own secretion by stimulating somatostatin (SRIF) release. Thus, the possible regulation of GH-releasing factor (GRF) and SRIF release and SRIF messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) by GH was studied in the hypothalamus of male rats in vitro. The median eminences (ME's) were incubated in buffer containing 10(-7)-10(-11) M GH for 30 min. SRIF and GRF released into the medium were quantitated by RIA. The release of SRIF from ME fragments was significantly increased (P < 0.001) by 10(-9) M GH; however, 10(-9) M GH also inhibited (P < 0.01) GRF release from the ME. To determine the effect of GH on SRIF mRNA levels, periventricular nucleus (PeN) explants were cultured during 6 h in medium with 10(-7)-10(-11) M GH. Levels of SRIF mRNA (determined by an S1 nuclease protection assay) were significantly elevated in the presence of 10(-10)-10(-7) M GH. Likewise, 10(-9) M GH significantly stimulated SRIF release from PeN explants at 30 min and at 6 h. Surprisingly, 10(-9) M GH also significantly increased GRF release from the PeN explants at these times as well. This GRF was not responsible for the increased SRIF release or SRIF mRNA induced by GH since GRF antibody did not modify the GH-induced increases in SRIF release and mRNA levels. These results demonstrate a negative short-loop feedback of GH mediated at the ME by suppression of GRF and stimulation of SRIF release, whereas in the PeN GH increased both SRIF release and SRIF mRNA levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Alterations in polyribosome and messenger ribonucleic acid metabolism and messenger ribonucleoprotein utilization in osmotically stressed plant seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Polyribosome aggregation state in growing tissues of barley and wheat leaf of stems of pea and squash was studied in relation to seedling growth and water status of the growing tissue in plants at various levels of osmotic stress. It was found to be highly correlated with water potential and osmotic potential of the growing tissue and with leaf of stem elongation rate. Stress rapidly reduced polyribosome content and water status in growing tissues of barley leaves; changes were slow and slight in the non-growing leaf blade. Membrane-bound and free polyribosomes were equally sensitive to stress-induced disaggregation. Incorporation of /sup 32/PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ into ribosomal RNA was rapidly inhibited by stress, but stability of poly(A)/sup +/RNA relative to ribosomal RNA was similar in stressed and unstressed tissues, with a half-life of about 12 hours. Stress also caused progressive loss of poly(A)/sup +/RNA from these tissues. Quantitation of poly(A) and in vitro messenger template activity in polysome gradient fractions showed a shift of activity from the polysomal region to the region of 20-60 S in stressed plants. Messenger RNA in the 20-60 S region coded for the same peptides as mRNA found in the polysomal fraction. Nonpolysomal and polysome-derived messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes (mRNP) were isolated, and characteristic proteins were found associated with either fraction. Polysomal mRNP from stressed or unstressed plants were translated with similar efficiency in a wheat germ cell-free system. It was concluded that no translational inhibitory activity was associated with nonpolysomal mRNP from barley prepared as described.

  10. Expression of P450c17 messenger ribonucleic acid in postmenopausal human ovary tissues.

    PubMed

    José, M; Puche, C; Cabero, A; Cabero, L; Meseguer, A

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the expression of the P450c17 gene in postmenopausal human ovaries compared with normal cycling ovaries. Prospective nonrandomized clinical research study. Servei de Medicina Reproductiva and Centre d'Investigacions en Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Hospitals Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. Six premenopausal women and four postmenopausal women undergoing bilateral oophorectomy for nonovarian gynecologic disease. Extraction of 10 mL of peripheral venous blood for hormone measurements. Extraction of RNA from surgically removed ovaries for Northern blot, ribonuclease protection, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assays. Definition of the reproductive cycle state of each patient and determination of the level of P450c17 gene expression in all samples with the use of the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction Southern blot assay. P450c17 messenger RNA levels in postmenopausal ovaries varied considerably between samples. Although the levels were similar to those detected in the early follicular phase, one of the samples had levels as high as those observed in the late follicular phase. Although the degree varied from one sample to another, all the postmenopausal ovaries studied expressed the P450c17 gene at the messenger RNA level. In a sample from a patient with endometrial adenocarcinoma, the level was as high as the levels observed in the late follicular phase.

  11. Prostanoid-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 messenger ribonucleic acid in rat osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Connolly, T. J.; Bergman, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    Individual prostanoids have distinct potencies in activating intracellular signaling pathways and regulating gene expression in osteoblastic cells. The E-series prostaglandins (PGs) are known to stimulate matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) synthesis and secretion in certain rodent and human osteoblastic cells, yet the intracellular events involved remain unclear. To further characterize this response and its signal transduction pathway(s), we examined prostanoid-induced expression of the MMP-1 gene in the rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE1 were very potent stimulators (40-fold) of MMP-1 transcript abundance, PGF2 alpha and prostacyclin were weak stimulators (4-fold), and thromboxane-B2 had no effect. The marked increase in MMP-1 transcript abundance after PGE2 treatment was first detected at 2 h, became maximal at 4 h, and persisted beyond 24 h. This response was dose dependent and elicited maximal and half-maximal effects with concentrations of 10(-6) and 0.6 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, completely blocked this effect of PGE2, suggesting that the expression of other genes is required. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that PGE2 rapidly activates MMP-1 gene transcription, with a maximal increase at 2-4 h. The second messenger analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, mimicked the effects of PGE2 by stimulating a dose-dependent increase in MMP-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, with a maximal effect quantitatively similar to that observed with PGE2. Thus, in UMR 106-01 cells, different prostanoids have distinct potencies in stimulating MMP-1 mRNA abundance. Our data suggest that PGE2 stimulation of MMP-1 synthesis is due to activation of MMP-1 gene transcription and a subsequent marked increase in MMP-1 mRNA abundance. This effect is dependent on de novo protein synthesis and is mimicked by protein kinase-A activation.

  12. Prostanoid-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 messenger ribonucleic acid in rat osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clohisy, J. C.; Connolly, T. J.; Bergman, K. D.; Quinn, C. O.; Partridge, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    Individual prostanoids have distinct potencies in activating intracellular signaling pathways and regulating gene expression in osteoblastic cells. The E-series prostaglandins (PGs) are known to stimulate matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) synthesis and secretion in certain rodent and human osteoblastic cells, yet the intracellular events involved remain unclear. To further characterize this response and its signal transduction pathway(s), we examined prostanoid-induced expression of the MMP-1 gene in the rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE1 were very potent stimulators (40-fold) of MMP-1 transcript abundance, PGF2 alpha and prostacyclin were weak stimulators (4-fold), and thromboxane-B2 had no effect. The marked increase in MMP-1 transcript abundance after PGE2 treatment was first detected at 2 h, became maximal at 4 h, and persisted beyond 24 h. This response was dose dependent and elicited maximal and half-maximal effects with concentrations of 10(-6) and 0.6 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, completely blocked this effect of PGE2, suggesting that the expression of other genes is required. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that PGE2 rapidly activates MMP-1 gene transcription, with a maximal increase at 2-4 h. The second messenger analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, mimicked the effects of PGE2 by stimulating a dose-dependent increase in MMP-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, with a maximal effect quantitatively similar to that observed with PGE2. Thus, in UMR 106-01 cells, different prostanoids have distinct potencies in stimulating MMP-1 mRNA abundance. Our data suggest that PGE2 stimulation of MMP-1 synthesis is due to activation of MMP-1 gene transcription and a subsequent marked increase in MMP-1 mRNA abundance. This effect is dependent on de novo protein synthesis and is mimicked by protein kinase-A activation.

  13. Protein malnutrition increases plasma adrenocorticotropin and anterior pituitary proopiomelanocortin messenger ribonucleic acid in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, L; Zurakowski, D; Majzoub, J A

    1997-03-01

    The mechanism by which protein malnutrition increases circulating glucocorticoids is unclear. To determine whether ACTH synthesis and secretion also increase in protein malnutrition, rats were sham adrenalectomized or adrenalectomized and replaced with varying amounts of corticosterone before dietary protein deprivation. Pair-fed rats served as controls for reduced voluntary food intake in protein-deprived rats. Dietary protein deficiency, but not pair-feeding, increased resting plasma corticosterone in sham-adrenalectomized rats. Restraint-induced ACTH secretion was not inhibited by the increased basal corticosterone levels in protein-deficient rats. When increases in corticosterone were eliminated by adrenalectomy or controlled by adrenalectomy with low level corticosterone replacement, increases in resting plasma ACTH and anterior pituitary POMC messenger RNA expression occurred with protein deprivation that could be statistically discriminated by regression analysis from changes due to caloric restriction (pair-feeding) and overt glucocorticoid feedback resistance. We conclude that protein malnutrition increases pituitary-adrenocortical activity at least in part by specifically increasing the drive for ACTH synthesis and secretion.

  14. Homologous down-regulation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aleppo, G; Moskal, S F; De Grandis, P A; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1997-03-01

    Repeated stimulation of pituitary cell cultures with GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) results in diminished responsiveness, a phenomenon referred to as homologous desensitization. One component of GHRH-induced desensitization is a reduction in GHRH-binding sites, which is reflected by the decreased ability of GHRH to stimulate a rise in intracellular cAMP. In the present study, we sought to determine if homologous down-regulation of GHRH receptor number is due to a decrease in GHRH receptor synthesis. To this end, we developed and validated a quantitative RT-PCR assay system that was capable of assessing differences in GHRH-R messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in total RNA samples obtained from rat pituitary cell cultures. Treatment of pituitary cells with GHRH, for as little as 4 h, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GHRH-R mRNA levels. The maximum effect was observed with 0.1 and 1 nM GHRH, which reduced GHRH-R mRNA levels to 49 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) and 54 +/- 11% of control values, respectively (n = three separate experiments; P < 0.05). Accompanying the decline in GHRH-R mRNA levels was a rise in GH release; reaching 320 +/- 31% of control values (P < 0.01). Because of the possibility that the rise in medium GH level is the primary regulator of GHRH-R mRNA, we pretreated pituitary cultures for 4 h with GH to achieve a concentration comparable with that induced by a maximal stimulation with GHRH (8 micrograms GH/ml medium). Following pretreatment, cultures were stimulated for 15 min with GHRH and intracellular cAMP accumulation was measured by RIA. GH pretreatment did not impair the ability of GHRH to induce a rise in cAMP concentrations. However, as anticipated, GHRH pretreatment (10 nM) significantly reduced subsequent GHRH-stimulated cAMP to 46% of untreated controls. These data suggest that GHRH, but not GH, directly reduces GHRH-R mRNA levels. To determine whether this effect was mediated through cAMP, cultures were treated with forskolin, a direct stimulator of

  15. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  16. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  17. Prolactin messenger ribonucleic acid levels, prolactin synthesis, and radioimmunoassayable prolactin during the estrous cycle in the Golden Syrian hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, J.S. ); Blask, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the molecular dynamics of pituitary prolactin (PRL) gene expression during the estrous cycle of the Golden Syrian hamster. PRL messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels, PRL synthesis were measured in the morning on each day of the cycle. We observed that all of these PRL indices declined or did not change from Day 2 to Day 3 of the cycle. From Day 3 to Day 4 however, PRL mRNA levels increased 33-38% and media {sup 3}H-PRL increased 32-42%, while there were no significant changes in pituitary {sup 3}H-PRL, or RIA-PRL in the media or pituitary. From Day 4 to Day 1 (estrus) there was reciprocal change in the levels of {sup 3}H-PRL in the pituitary vs. the media, with the former increasing 37-50% and the latter decreasing 25-32%. Pituitary RIA-PRL did also increased 45-64% from Day 4 to Day 1 while media RIA-PRL did not change. These data are consistent with the following hypothesis: On the morning of proestrus(Day 4) in the hamster, PRL mRNA levels are elevated compared to those on Day 3, signaling an increase in PRL synthesis. This newly synthesized PRL is shunted into a readily releasable pool on the morning of Day 4 (contributing to the afternoon surge of serum PRL), and into a preferentially stored pool by the morning of Day 1.

  18. A simple procedure for the isolation and purification of protamine messenger ribonucleic acid from trout testis.

    PubMed

    Gedamu, L; Iatrou, K; Dixon, G H

    1978-06-01

    Preparation of milligram quantities of purified poly(A)+ (polyadenylated) protamine mRNA from trout testis tissue was accomplished by a simple procedure using gentle conditions. This involves chromatography of the total nucleic acids isolated by dissociation of polyribosomes with 25 mM-EDTA to release messenger ribonucleoprotein particles and deproteinization of the total postmitochondrial supernatant with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulphate in 0.25 M-NaCl by binding it to a DEAE-cellulose column. Total RNA was bound under these conditions, and low-molecular-weight RNA, lacking 18S and 28S RNA, could be eluted with 0.5 M-NaCl and chromatographed on oligo(dT)-cellulose columns to select for poly(A)+ RNA. Further purification of both the unbound poly(A)- RNA and the bound poly(A)+ mRNA on sucrose density gradients showed that both 18S and 28S rRNA were absent, being removed during the DEAE-cellulose chromatography step. Poly(A)- RNA sedimented in the 4S region whereas the bound poly(A)+ RNA fraction showed a main peak at 6S [poly(A+) protamine mRNA] and a shoulder in the 3-4S region. Analysis of the main peak and the shoulder on a second gradient showed that most of the main peak sedimented at 6S, whereas the shoulder sedimented slower than 4S. The identity of the poly(A)+ protamine mRNA was established by the following criteria: (1) purified protamine mRNA migrated as a set of four bands on urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis; (2) analysis of the polypeptides synthesized in the wheat-germ extract by starch-gel electrophoresis showed a single band of radioactivity which co-migrated exactly with the carrier trout testis protamine standard; and (3) chromatography of the polypeptide products on CM-cellulose (CM-52) showed the presence of three or four radioactively labelled protamine components that were co-eluted with the unlabelled trout testis protamine components added as carrier. The availability of large quantities of purified protamine mRNA should now permit a more

  19. Regulation of rat luteinizing hormone subunit messenger ribonucleic acids by gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, S D; Bowers, S M; Need, L R; Chin, W W

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) biosynthesis. We have studied the regulation of LH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by gonadal-steroid hormones in the rat. In one set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically gonadectomized (GDX) and killed 1, 3, 7, 14, 22, and 31 d postoperatively. In another set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically GDX and were injected subcutaneously with testosterone propionate (500 micrograms/100 g body wt per d) or 17 beta-estradiol 3-benzoate (10 micrograms/100 g body wt per d), respectively, beginning 3 wk postoperatively. Levels of serum LH were determined by radioimmunoassay and levels of LH subunit mRNAs in single pituitary glands were determined by blot hybridization analysis using labeled synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes that correspond to portions of the coding regions of the rat alpha- and LH beta-subunit mRNAs. 4 wk after gonadectomy, serum LH levels rose nine- and 20-fold, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels rose six- and 10-fold, and LH beta-subunit levels rose seven- and 14-fold, compared with controls in males and females, respectively. In gonadal-steroid hormone-treated male and female GDX rats, serum LH levels fell to 8 and 36% of control values, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels declined to 22 and 19%, and LH beta-subunit mRNA levels declined to 6 and 10% of control values, 48 h after injections were initiated, in males and females, respectively. We conclude that gonadal-steroid hormones negatively regulate the levels of both subunit mRNAs in GDX rats in a pattern that parallels the changes in serum LH values. These data suggest that gonadal-steroid hormone regulation of LH biosynthesis occurs, at least in part, at the level of LH subunit mRNAs due to effects at the transcriptional and/or RNA stability levels. Images PMID:2418065

  20. Characterization of messenger-like ribonucleic acid from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the use of chromatography on methylated albumin–kieselguhr

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roger

    1970-01-01

    Chromatography on methylated albumin–kieselguhr of RNA from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to separate stable RNA from a tenaciously bound DNA-like RNA fraction. The tenaciously bound RNA, which was eluted with a dilute solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate, was characterized as messenger-like RNA by its sedimentation behaviour, nucleotide composition, lack of methylated bases and labelling kinetics. Chromatography of purified ribosomal RNA indicated a minor contamination of the tenaciously bound fraction with ribosomal RNA. On the other hand, a large portion of pulse-labelled polyribosomal RNA from protoplasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tenaciously bound to the columns. The `chase' of isotopic label from the messenger-like RNA was found to be retarded during inhibition of protein synthesis both by cycloheximide and by starvation for a carbon source. PMID:4321853

  1. Expression of luteinizing hormone and chorionic gonadotropin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in human corpora lutea during menstrual cycle and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nishimori, K; Dunkel, L; Hsueh, A J; Yamoto, M; Nakano, R

    1995-04-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of LH and CG receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) in human corpora lutea (CL) during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Poly(A)-enriched RNA was extracted from CL and analyzed by Northern and slot blots, using a radiolabeled complementary RNA probe derived from the human LH receptor complementary DNA. Northern blot analysis indicated the presence of multiple LH receptor mRNA transcripts with molecular sizes of 8.0, 7.0 and 4.5 kilobases in human CL during the menstrual cycle. The predominant transcript was 4.5 kilobases in size. However, no hybridization signals were observed in nongonadal tissues (heart, liver, and kidney). Densitometric analyses revealed that the levels of LH receptor mRNA increased from early luteal phase to midluteal phase and subsequently decreased during late luteal phase. After the onset of menstruation, the LH receptor mRNA level was undetectable in the regressing CL. Moreover, radioligand receptor assay (RRA) showed a close parallelism between LH receptor mRNA levels and LH receptor content in CL throughout the menstrual cycle. LH receptor mRNA expression was also found in CL during early pregnancy. The level of LH receptor mRNA was relatively high in early pregnancy CL, whereas LH receptor content was low. Using in situ hybridization, LH receptor mRNAs were uniformly expressed in both large and small luteal cells during early and midluteal phase and early pregnancy, but not in regressing CL. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the regulation of LH receptor content in human CL during luteal phase is associated with similar changes in the receptor message levels, suggesting the physiological roles for LH receptor mRNA during the menstrual cycle in the human. In addition, the expression of LH receptor mRNA was demonstrated in human CL during early pregnancy.

  2. Endothelin in human brain and pituitary gland: Presence of immunoreactive endothelin, endothelin messenger ribonucleic acid, and endothelin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Ghatei, M.A.; Jones, P.M.; Murphy, J.K.; Lam, H.C.; O'Halloran, D.J.; Bloom, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The presence of immunoreactive (IR) endothelin, endothelin mRNA, and endothelin receptors in human brain and pituitary gland has been studied by RIA, Northern blot hybridization, and receptor assay. IR endothelin was detected in all five brain regions examined (cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus) (6-10 fmol/g wet wt) and spinal cord (22 +/- 6 fmol/g wet wt, n = 7, mean +/- SEM). Higher concentrations of IR endothelin were found in the pituitary gland (147 +/- 30 fmol/g wet wt). Fast protein liquid chromatographic analysis of the IR endothelin in pituitary gland showed a large IR peak in the position of endothelin-3 and a smaller peak in the position of endothelin-1, whereas IR endothelin in the hypothalamus and brain stem was mainly endothelin-1. Endothelin messenger RNA was detected by Northern blot hybridization in the pituitary but not in hypothalamus. The receptor assay showed that 125I-endothelin-1 binding sites were present in large numbers in all five brain regions but were much less abundant in the pituitary gland. Binding capacity and dissociation constant were 5052 +/- 740 fmol/mg protein and 0.045 +/- 0.007 nM in brain stem and 963 +/- 181 fmol/mg protein and 0.034 +/- 0.009 nM in hypothalamus. In the pituitary gland, there were two classes of binding sites for endothelin with dissociation constants of 0.059 +/- 0.002 nM (binding capacity = 418 +/- 63 fmol/mg protein) and 0.652 +/- 0.103 nM (binding capacity = 1717 +/- 200 fmol/mg protein). Endothelin-1, -2 and -3 were almost equipotent in displacing the binding (IC50 approximately 0.04 nM). These findings are in accord with the possibility that endothelin acts as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone in man.

  3. Fasting and leptin modulate adipose and muscle uncoupling protein: divergent effects between messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Sivitz, W I; Fink, B D; Donohoue, P A

    1999-04-01

    Leptin is believed to act through hypothalamic centers to decrease appetite and increase energy utilization, in part through enhanced thermogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of fasting for 2 days and exogenous s.c. leptin, 200 microg every 8 h for 2 days, on the regulation of uncoupling protein (UCP) subtypes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and gastrocnemius muscle. Northern blot analysis (UCP-1) and ribonuclease protection (UCP-2 and 3) were used for quantitative messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis, and specific antibodies were used to measure UCP-1 and UCP-3 total protein expression. Leptin, compared with vehicle, did not alter BAT UCP-1 or UCP-3 mRNA or protein expression when administered to normal ad libitum fed rats. Fasting significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 and UCP-3 mRNA expression, to 31% and 30% of ad libitum fed controls, respectively, effects which were prevented by administration of leptin to fasted rats. Fasting also significantly decreased BAT UCP-1 protein expression, to 67% of control; however, that effect was not prevented by leptin treatment. Fasting also decreased BAT UCP-3 protein, to 85% of control, an effect that was not statistically significant. Fasting, with or without leptin administration, did not affect BAT UCP-2 mRNA; however, leptin administration to ad libitum fed rats significantly increased BAT UCP-2 mRNA, to 138% of control. Fasting significantly enhanced gastrocnemius muscle UCP-3 mRNA (411% of control) and protein expression (168% of control), whereas leptin administration to fasted rats did not alter either of these effects. In summary, UCP subtype mRNA and protein are regulated in tissue- and subtype-specific fashion by leptin and food restriction. Under certain conditions, the effects of these perturbations on UCP mRNA and protein are discordant.

  4. Identification of novel chicken estrogen receptor-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid isoforms generated by alternative splicing and promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Flouriot, G; Sonntag-Buck, V; Nestor, P; Gannon, F

    1998-11-01

    Using the rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (RACE) methodology we have identified three new chicken estrogen receptor-alpha (cER alpha) messenger RNA (mRNA) variants in addition to the previously described form (isoform A). Whereas one of the new variants (isoform B) presents a 5'-extremity contiguous to the 5'-end of isoform A, the two other forms (isoforms C and D) are generated by alternative splicing of upstream exons (C and D) to a common site situated 70 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site in the previously assigned exon 1 (A). The 3'-end of exon 1C has been located at position -1334 upstream of the transcription start site of the A isoform (+1). Whereas the genomic location of exon 1D is unknown, 700 bp 5' to this exon were isolated by genomic walking, and their sequence was determined. The transcription start sites of the cER alpha mRNA isoforms were defined. In transfection experiments, the regions immediately upstream of the A-D cER alpha mRNA isoforms were shown to possess cell-specific promoter activities. Three of these promoters were down-regulated in the presence of estradiol and ER alpha protein. It is concluded, therefore, that the expression of the four different cER alpha mRNA isoforms is under the control of four different promoters. Finally, RT-PCR, S1 nuclease mapping, and primer extension analysis of these different cER alpha mRNA isoforms revealed a differential pattern of expression of the cER alpha gene in chicken tissues. Together, the results suggest that alternative 5'-splicing and promoter usage may be mechanisms used to modulate the levels of expression of the chicken ER alpha gene in a tissue-specific and/or developmental stage-specific manner.

  5. Hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid activity profiles in experimental azotemia in the rat. Relationship to food intake and thyroid function.

    PubMed Central

    Kinlaw, W B; Schwartz, H L; Mariash, C N; Bingham, C; Carr, F E; Oppenheimer, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) activity profile in chronically azotemic rats and sought to determine whether the observed changes could be mediated either by reduced food intake or diminished thyroid function at the tissue level. mRNA activity profiles were produced by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of radioactively labeled products of an in vitro reticulocyte lysate system which had been programmed by hepatic RNA. Of the approximately 240 translational products identified in this system, seven sequences were consistently altered in azotemia. In pair-fed animals six of these also decreased, but the alterations in three were depressed to a significantly lesser extent in the pair-fed group. Moreover, analysis of covariance suggested that food intake could account for the differences in only one sequence. The possibility that the mRNA activity profile in azotemia could represent the effects of diminished thyroid function was minimized by the finding that the reductions in plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels observed were due largely to reduced plasma protein binding, with maintenance of the mean free T4 and free T3 concentrations within the normal range. The changes in only one mRNA sequence could be related to free T3 levels alone. Our findings, therefore, indicate that although diminished food intake and reduced thyroid function may contribute to some of the observed changes in the mRNA activity profiles, the bulk of alterations in azotemia appear to be mediated by other mechanisms. The striking overlap between the sequences affected by azotemia and pair-feeding raises the speculation that altered gene expression in azotemia may reflect an impaired hepatic response at the pretranslational level to metabolic signals associated with food intake. Images PMID:6511910

  6. Effects of estradiol-17beta administration on steady-state messenger ribonucleic acid (MRNA) encoding equine alpha and LH/CGbeta subunits in pituitaries of ovariectomized pony mares.

    PubMed

    Sharp, D C; Wolfe, M W; Cleaver, B D; Nilson, J

    2001-03-15

    The process of sexual recrudescence in the springtime in mares is characterized by renewal of follicular growth and acquisition of steroidogenic competence. Concomitant with renewal of follicular steroidogenesis is re-establishment of LH biosynthesis and secretion. Research results from our laboratory indicate that increased estradiol and LH secretion occur in close temporal association before the first ovulation of the year. Therefore, the hypothesis tested in this experiment was that estrogen administration to ovariectomized pony mares during the equivalent time of early vernal transition would enhance LH biosynthesis as monitored by messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encoding for the pituitary subunits of LH (alpha and LH/CGbeta). Mares were administered either sesame oil vehicle control, or estradiol (5 mg i.m. twice daily in sesame oil) for 3, 6 or 9 days, beginning on February 2. The pituitary glands were harvested, and examined for LH subunit mRNA by Northern Blot and slot blot analysis. There was a significant increase in LH secretion after 6 days of estradiol secretion compared with control vehicle administration. Similarly, there was a significant increase in both alpha and LH/CGbeta subunit mRNA when estradiol was administered for 9 days. These data indicate that estrogen stimulates LH subunit formation in mares during early equivalent vernal transition. These data do not, however, discriminate between a direct pituitary effect of estrogen, and a hypothalamic effect. Whether the surge of estradiol just prior to the first ovulation of the year is essential for the renewed biosynthesis of LH subunits cannot be determined from these data. However an important role of estrogen in the final stages of sexual recrudescence is indicated.

  7. Disc distraction shows evidence of regenerative potential in degenerated intervertebral discs as evaluated by protein expression, magnetic resonance imaging, and messenger ribonucleic acid expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Guehring, Thorsten; Omlor, Georg W; Lorenz, Helga; Engelleiter, Karl; Richter, Wiltrud; Carstens, Claus; Kroeber, Markus

    2006-07-01

    An animal model of degeneration was used to determine the effects of disc distraction, and was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as gene and protein expression levels. To investigate gene expression and MRI effects of distraction. Disc degeneration can result from hyper-physiologic loading. Distracted discs with degeneration showed histologic signs of tissue recovery. There were 18 rabbits that underwent 28 days of compression (200 N) to induce moderate disc degeneration followed by 28 days of distraction (120 N; attached and loaded distraction device) or sham distraction (attached but unloaded distraction device). Comparison was performed with 56 days of compressed discs without distraction. Quantitative outcome measures were MRI signal intensity and gene expression analysis to determine: messenger ribonucleic acid levels for extracellular matrix genes, including collagen 1, collagen 2, biglycan, decorin, aggrecan, fibromodulin, and osteonectin; and matrix-regulative genes, including matrix metalloproteinase-13, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. Immunohistology was performed for collagen 2 and BMP-2 to label cells semiquantitatively by staining of the cell-surrounding matrix. A total of 28 days of compression decreased signal intensity. Distraction over the same period reestablished physiologic signal intensity, however, a persistent reduction was found in sham distraction. Distraction resulted in gene expression up-regulation of collagen 1 (5.4-fold), collagen 2 (5.5-fold), biglycan (7.7-fold), and decorin (3.4-fold), while expression of fibromodulin (0.16-fold), tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (0.05-fold), and BMP-2 (0.15-fold) was decreased, as compared with 56 days compression. Distracted discs showed more BMP-2 (19.67 vs. 3.67 in 56 days compression) and collagen 2 (18.67 vs. 11.33 in 56 days compression) positive cells per field. Distraction results in disc rehydration

  8. Insulin-like growth factor I modulates hypothalamic somatostatin through a growth hormone releasing factor increased somatostatin release and messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Aguila, M C; Boggaram, V; McCann, S M

    1993-10-22

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) has been shown to participate in feedback inhibition of growth hormone (GH) secretion at the level of both the pituitary and hypothalamus. Therefore, we tested the possible involvement of IGF-I on somatostatin (SRIF) and GH-releasing factor (GRF) release in median eminence (ME) fragments and periventricular nucleus (PeN) of male rats. The levels of SRIF messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) were also determined in PeN incubated in vitro with IGF-I. The ME's were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in the presence of various concentrations of IGF-I (10(-7) to 10(-11) M) for 30 min. SRIF and GRF released into the medium were quantitated by RIA. The release of SRIF and GRF from the ME's was stimulated significantly (P < 0.025 and P < 0.05, respectively) by 10(-9) M IGF-I. To determine whether the effect of IGF-I on SRIF release is mediated by GRF release in the ME, a specific GRF antibody (ab) (1:500) was used concomitantly with IGF-I (10(-9) M). The release of SRIF induced by IGF-I was blocked by the GRF ab (P < 0.001), but not by normal rabbit serum used at the same dilution. To determine the effect of IGF-I on the regulation of SRIF mRNA levels, SRIF mRNA was determined in PeN explants incubated in the presence of IGF-I (10(-8) to 10(-10) M) for 2 to 6 h. Levels of SRIF mRNA were determined by a S1 nuclease protection assay using a 32P-labelled rat SRIF riboprobe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Elevation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with Gsalpha protein mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoyuki; Kim, Kyongsong; Sanno, Naoko; Yoshida, Daizo; Teramoto, Akira; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates not only the synthesis and secretion of GH but also the proliferation of normal somatotrophs. The expression of GHRH receptor (GHRHR) is regulated by GHRH, both of which are known to be expressed in human GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. Somatic mutations in the subunit of Gsalpha protein (gsp), lead to the constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary adenomas that secrete GH. It has not been examined how gsp mutations influence GHRHR expression in GH-secreting adenomas. We therefore analyzed the expression levels of GHRHR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in GH-secreting pituitary adenomas focusing on a gsp mutation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of GHRH on the expression of GHRHR mRNA in primary cultures of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. GHRHR mRNA expression levels were significantly elevated in gsp mutation-positive GH-secreting adenomas compared with those in gsp mutation-negative ones. In primary-cultured GH-secreting adenoma cells, the increase of GH secretion in response to GHRH was shown in both gsp mutation-positive and -negative adenoma cells with a significantly higher response in the latter adenoma cells. GHRH increased GHRHR mRNA expression level in gsp mutation-negative adenoma cells while it was not influenced by GHRH in gsp mutation-positive adenoma cells. These results suggest that gsp mutations up-regulate GHRHR mRNA expression in GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, and that gsp mutations desensitize the adenoma cells to GHRH in terms of their GHRHR mRNA expression probably because of their saturation of GHRH signaling.

  10. 17beta-estradiol treatment decreases steroidogenic enzyme messenger ribonucleic acid levels in the rainbow trout testis.

    PubMed

    Govoroun, M; McMeel, O M; Mecherouki, H; Smith, T J; Guiguen, Y

    2001-05-01

    In fish, estrogens are well known for their involvement in ovarian differentiation and have been shown to be very potent feminizing agents when administrated in vivo during early development. However, the mechanism of action of exogenous estrogens is poorly understood. We report here on the feminizing effects of estrogen treatment on the testicular levels of some steroidogenic enzyme messenger RNAs [mRNAs; cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc), 17-hydroxylase/lyase (P450c17), 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD), 11beta-hydroxylase (P45011beta), and aromatase (P450aro)] in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Treatment was carried out by dietary administration of 17beta-estradiol (E(2); dosage of 20 mg/kg diet) to a genetically all male population. Steroidogenesis in the differentiating testis was demonstrated to be strongly altered by E(2), as this treatment resulted in considerable decrease in P450c17, 3betaHSD, and P45011beta mRNAs after only 10 days of treatment. In contrast, P450scc and P450aro mRNA levels were unaffected by E(2), with P450scc mRNA levels remaining unaltered and P450aro not stimulated by this feminizing estrogen treatment. To better characterize this E(2) effect, the same treatment was applied on postdifferentiating males, and roughly the same expression pattern was detected with a considerable decrease in testicular P450c17, 3betaHSD, and P45011beta mRNAs and a significant, but reduced, decrease in P450scc mRNA. In the interrenal, these steroidogenic enzyme mRNAs were not significantly affected by this E(2) treatment, except for a slight, but significant, decrease in P450scc mRNA. These results clearly demonstrate that estrogens have profound effects on testicular steroidogenesis and that they are acting specifically on the testis by decreasing mRNA steady state levels of many steroidogenic enzyme genes. The decrease in P45011beta mRNA, and thus inhibition of the synthesis of testicular 11-oxygenated androgens, may be an

  11. Sucrose ingestion normalizes central expression of corticotropin-releasing-factor messenger ribonucleic acid and energy balance in adrenalectomized rats: a glucocorticoid-metabolic-brain axis?

    PubMed

    Laugero, K D; Bell, M E; Bhatnagar, S; Soriano, L; Dallman, M F

    2001-07-01

    Both CRF and norepinephrine (NE) inhibit food intake and stimulate ACTH secretion and sympathetic outflow. CRF also increases anxiety; NE increases attention and cortical arousal. Adrenalectomy (ADX) changes CRF and NE activity in brain, increases ACTH secretion and sympathetic outflow and reduces food intake and weight gain; all of these effects are corrected by administration of adrenal steroids. Unexpectedly, we recently found that ADX rats drinking sucrose, but not saccharin, also have normal caloric intake, metabolism, and ACTH. Here, we show that ADX (but not sham-ADX) rats prefer to consume significantly more sucrose than saccharin. Voluntary ingestion of sucrose restores CRF and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase messenger RNA expression in brain, food intake, and caloric efficiency and fat deposition, circulating triglyceride, leptin, and insulin to normal. Our results suggest that the brains of ADX rats, cued by sucrose energy (but not by nonnutritive saccharin) maintain normal activity in systems that regulate neuroendocrine (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal), behavioral (feeding), and metabolic functions (fat deposition). We conclude that because sucrose ingestion, like glucocorticoid replacement, normalizes energetic and neuromodulatory effects of ADX, many of the actions of the steroids on the central nervous system under basal conditions may be indirect and mediated by signals that result from the metabolic effects of adrenal steroids.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of inhibin beta B messenger ribonucleic acid levels in TM.4 or primary rat Sertoli cells by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, H; Rosenberg, L A; Yuan, Q X; Reyaz, G; Bhasin, S

    1993-04-01

    FSH, a major regulator of inhibin production in the testis, is believed to exert its effects via cAMP second messenger system. Inhibin alpha-subunit gene appears to be regulated by cAMP and has a palindromic cAMP response element sequence TGACGTCA. However, the regulation of the inhibin beta B-subunit gene by cAMP has been less clear. It has been assumed that beta B may not be regulated by cAMP, based mainly on observations that FSH stimulates only alpha, not beta B, mRNA levels, and that the 5'-up-stream regulatory region of the beta B gene does not contain the classical cAMP response element. However, we have observed that 8-bromo-cAMP stimulates beta B mRNA levels in both primary Sertoli (approximately 2-fold) and TM.4 cells (approximately 5-fold). We examined whether this cAMP-induced increase in beta B mRNA levels is the result of increased transcription or altered mRNA stability. Data from nuclear run-on assays demonstrate about a 2-fold increase in relative mRNA synthesis rates in primary Sertoli-cells and about a 4- to 5-fold increase in TM.4 cells. Transfection studies in TM.4 and JEG.3 cell lines with beta B:luciferase chimeric reporter gene constructs containing 1.5 kilobases of the beta B 5'-up-stream regulatory region revealed marked cAMP induction of reporter gene activity in both cell types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  14. Regulation of progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in the rat medial preoptic nucleus by estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Shughrue, P J; Lane, M V; Merchenthaler, I

    1997-12-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) messenger RNA (mRNA) is concentrated in neurons of the preoptic area and other regions of the rat hypothalamus where it is colocalized with the estrogen receptor and regulated by changes in the steroid hormonal milieu. To date, little is known about the regulation of PR mRNA by estrogens and whether antiestrogenic compounds are capable of modulating its expression. The present studies used in situ hybridization to ascertain the time course of PR mRNA regulation in the medial preoptic nucleus by 17beta-estradiol, determine the effective dose required to elicit a response, and compare the efficacy of 17beta-estradiol with a variety of estrogenic or antiestrogenic compounds. The first series of studies revealed that the treatment of ovariectomized rats with 17beta-estradiol resulted in an increase in PR expression within 2 h, after which it remained elevated until 10 h postinjection and then returned to baseline levels. When ovariectomized rats were injected with 25-1000 ng/kg of 17beta-estradiol and euthanized 6 h later, a dose-dependent increase in the level of PR mRNA was observed, with a maximal response at 1000 ng/kg and an EC50 of 93.5 ng/kg. Subsequent studies evaluated the efficacy of a variety of estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the rat preoptic nucleus. 17Beta-estradiol, diethylstilbestrol, and 17alpha-estradiol all significantly increased the level of PR mRNA, although the degree of induction varied with each compound. The injection of tamoxifen, raloxifene, toremifene, droloxifene, clomiphene, GW 5638, or ICI 182,780 had no significant estrogenic effect on PR gene expression at the dose evaluated. In contrast, when tamoxifen or raloxifene, but not ICI 182,780, was administered in the antagonist mode, a significant dose-related decrease in the estradiol-induced level of PR mRNA was seen in the preoptic area. The results of these studies clearly demonstrate that PR mRNA expression in the rat preoptic area is rapidly

  15. The effects of orbital spaceflight on bone histomorphometry and messenger ribonucleic acid levels for bone matrix proteins and skeletal signaling peptides in ovariectomized growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolina, J. M.; Evans, G. L.; Harris, S. A.; Zhang, M.; Westerlind, K. C.; Turner, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    A 14-day orbital spaceflight was performed using ovariectomized Fisher 344 rats to determine the combined effects of estrogen deficiency and near weightlessness on tibia radial bone growth and cancellous bone turnover. Twelve ovariectomized rats with established cancellous osteopenia were flown aboard the space shuttle Columbia (STS-62). Thirty ovariectomized rats were housed on earth as ground controls: 12 in animal enclosure modules, 12 in vivarium cages, and 6 killed the day of launch for baseline measurements. An additional 18 ovary-intact rats were housed in vivarium cages as ground controls: 8 rats were killed as baseline controls and the remaining 10 rats were killed 14 days later. Ovariectomy increased periosteal bone formation at the tibia-fibula synostosis; cancellous bone resorption and formation in the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibial metaphysis; and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for the prepro-alpha2(1) subunit of type 1 collagen, osteocalcin, transforming growth factor-beta, and insulin-like growth factor I in the contralateral proximal tibial metaphysis and for the collagen subunit in periosteum pooled from tibiae and femora and decreased cancellous bone area. Compared to ovariectomized weight-bearing rats, the flight group experienced decreases in periosteal bone formation, collagen subunit mRNA levels, and cancellous bone area. The flight rats had a small decrease in the cancellous mineral apposition rate, but no change in the calculated bone formation rate. Also, spaceflight had no effect on cancellous osteoblast and osteoclast perimeters or on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins and signaling peptides. On the other hand, spaceflight resulted in an increase in bone resorption, as ascertained from the diminished retention of a preflight fluorochrome label. This latter finding suggests that osteoclast activity was increased. In a follow-up ground-based experiment, unilateral sciatic neurotomy of ovariectomized rats resulted in cancellous

  16. Promoter elements and transcription factors involved in differentiation-dependent human chorionic gonadotrophin-alpha messenger ribonucleic acid expression of term villous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, M; Saleh, L; Bauer, S; Vasicek, R; Griesinger, G; Strohmer, H; Helmer, H; Husslein, P

    2000-10-01

    Differentiation of primary villous cytotrophoblasts into syncytia is associated with increasing production of alpha and beta human CG subunits, which is predominantly governed at the level of messenger RNA expression. Here, we present a detailed study on the mechanisms involved in the differentiation-dependent regulation of the trophoblast-specific CGalpha gene promoter. Site-directed mutations in each of the five DNA-elements of the composite enhancer were performed to investigate the contribution of the individual regulatory sequences to the overall transcriptional activity of the promoter at two different stages of trophoblast in vitro differentiation. We show that deletion of one cyclic AMP response element (CRE) did not affect CGalpha promoter activity in cytotrophoblasts; however, it reduced transcription by 33% in differentiating cultures. Removal of both CREs almost abolished transcription at early and later stages of in vitro differentiation. Upon mutation the enhancer elements alphaACT, JRE, and CCAAT significantly decreased luciferase reporter transcription; however their contribution to the total promoter activity did not change during in vitro differentiation. Contrary to that, mutated TSE diminished promoter activity by 19% during 12 and 48 h of cultivation but reduced luciferase expression by 78% between 48 and 84 h of differentiation. In electrophoretic mobility shift assay, the TSE interacted with activating protein (AP)-2alpha in both primary trophoblasts and choriocarcinoma cells. While CRE-interacting proteins were detectable 12 h after isolation, the TSE-binding complex did not appear before 36 h of in vitro differentiation. During syncytium formation increasing protein expression of activating transcription factor (ATF)-1, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-1, and AP-2alpha was observed on Western blots. Moreover, phosphorylated CREB-1 and ATF-1 accumulated between 24 and 78 h of trophoblast cultivation. By fluorescence

  17. Comparing the effects of tetrabromobisphenol-A, bisphenol A, and their potential replacement alternatives, TBBPA-bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) and bisphenol S, on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid expression in chicken embryonic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Melissa; Crump, Doug; Farmahin, Reza; Kennedy, Sean W

    2015-02-01

    A market for alternative brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has emerged recently due to the phase out of persistent and inherently toxic BFRs. Several of these replacement compounds have been detected in environmental matrices, including wild birds. A chicken embryonic hepatocyte (CEH) assay was utilized to assess the effects of the BFR, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), and its replacement alternative, tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether [TBBPA-DBPE]) on cell viability and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 of its replacement alternatives, bisphenol S (BPS), were also screened for effects. Both TBBPA and BPA decreased CEH viability with calculated median lethal concentration (LC50) values of 40.6 μM and 61.7 μM, respectively. However, the replacement alternatives, TBBPA-DBPE and BPS, did not affect cell viability (up to 300 μM). Effects on mRNA expression were determined using an Avian ToxChip polymerse chain reaction (PCR) array and a real-time (RT)-PCR assay for the estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoproteinII (ApoII) and vitellogenin (Vtg). A luciferase reporter gene assay was used to assess dioxin-like effects. Tetrabromobisphenol-A altered mRNA levels of 4 genes from multiple toxicity pathways and increased luciferase activity in the luciferase reporter gene assay, whereas its alternative, TBBPA-DBPE, only altered 1 gene on the array, Cyp1a4, and increased luciferase activity. At 300 μM, a concentration that decreased cell viability for TBBPA and BPA, the BPA replacement, BPS, altered the greatest number of transcripts, including both ApoII and Vtg. Bisphenol A exposure did not alter any genes on the array but did up-regulate Vtg at 10 μM. Characterization of the potential toxicological and molecular-level effects of these compounds will ideally be useful to chemical regulators tasked with assessing the risk of new and existing chemicals.

  18. Prostaglandin E2-induced up-regulation of c-fos messenger ribonucleic acid is primarily mediated by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Dietz, T. J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism by which the proto-oncogene, c-fos, is up-regulated in response to PGE2 in the mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cell line was investigated using RT-PCR. c-fos messenger RNA up-regulation by dmPGE2 is rapid, starting 10 min post stimulation, and transient. The specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, inhibited c-fos induction. Moreover, down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment had no effect on the induction of c-fos by dmPGE2. We conclude that up-regulation of c-fos by dmPGE2 is primarily dependent on PKA in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In S49 lymphoma wild-type but not S49 cyc- cells, which are deficient in cAMP signaling, dmPGE2 up-regulates c-fos and increases cell growth compared with unstimulated cells. Thus in S49 lymphoma cells, c-fos induction by PGE2 is also dependent on cAMP signaling. The minimal c-fos promoter region required for dmPGE2-induced expression was identified by transfecting c-fos promoter deletion constructs coupled to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene into Vero cells. Transfection of a plasmid containing 99 bp c-fos proximal promoter was sufficient to direct c-fos/CAT expression following stimulation with dmPGE2. Because induction of c-fos is mediated by cAMP, these data are consistent with activation of c-fos via the CRE/ATF cis element.

  19. Altered insulin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid splicing in liver is associated with deterioration of glucose tolerance in the spontaneously obese and diabetic rhesus monkey: Analysis of controversy between monkey and human studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ze; Shuldiner, A.R.; Zenilman, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    There are two insulin receptor (IR) isoforms (designated type A and type B), derived from alternative splicing of exon 11 of the IR gene. Recently, we reported that an increase in the exon 11- (i.e. lacking exon 11) (type A) IR messenger RNA (mRNA) variant in muscle is associated with hyperinsulinemia, an early risk factor for noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), in the spontaneously obese, diabetic rhesus monkey. To explore further the role of IR mRNA splicing in insulin resistance of NIDDM, we studied liver, another target organ that is resistant to insulin action in NIDDM. The relative amounts of the two IR mRNA-splicing variants in liver were quantitated by RT-PCR in normal, prediabetic, and diabetic (NIDDM) monkeys. The percentage of the exon 11- mRNA variant in liver (n = 24) was significantly correlated with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.55, P < 0.01) and intravenous glucose disappearance rate (r = -0.45, P < 0.05). The exon 11- mRNA variant was increased significantly from 29.8 {+-} 1.6% in monkeys with normal fasting glucose to 39.2 {+-} 2.9% in monkeys with elevated fasting glucose (P < 0.01). These studies provide the first direct evidence in vivo that the relative expression of the two IR mRNA-splicing variants is altered in liver and suggest that increased expression of the exon 11- IR isoform may contribute to hepatic insulin resistance and NIDDM or may compensate for some yet unidentified defect. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Prostaglandin E2-induced up-regulation of c-fos messenger ribonucleic acid is primarily mediated by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Dietz, T. J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism by which the proto-oncogene, c-fos, is up-regulated in response to PGE2 in the mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cell line was investigated using RT-PCR. c-fos messenger RNA up-regulation by dmPGE2 is rapid, starting 10 min post stimulation, and transient. The specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, inhibited c-fos induction. Moreover, down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment had no effect on the induction of c-fos by dmPGE2. We conclude that up-regulation of c-fos by dmPGE2 is primarily dependent on PKA in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In S49 lymphoma wild-type but not S49 cyc- cells, which are deficient in cAMP signaling, dmPGE2 up-regulates c-fos and increases cell growth compared with unstimulated cells. Thus in S49 lymphoma cells, c-fos induction by PGE2 is also dependent on cAMP signaling. The minimal c-fos promoter region required for dmPGE2-induced expression was identified by transfecting c-fos promoter deletion constructs coupled to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene into Vero cells. Transfection of a plasmid containing 99 bp c-fos proximal promoter was sufficient to direct c-fos/CAT expression following stimulation with dmPGE2. Because induction of c-fos is mediated by cAMP, these data are consistent with activation of c-fos via the CRE/ATF cis element.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increases resistin messenger ribonucleic acid through the pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase-activating transcription factor 4-CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein pathway in THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junpei; Onuma, Hiroshi; Ochi, Fumihiro; Hirai, Hiroki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyoshi, Akiko; Matsushita, Manami; Kadota, Yuko; Ohashi, Jun; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Nishida, Wataru; Hashida, Seiichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Osawa, Haruhiko

    2016-05-01

    Resistin, secreted from adipocytes, causes insulin resistance in mice. In humans, the resistin gene is mainly expressed in monocytes and macrophages. Tunicamycin is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduce resistin gene expression in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether ER stress affects resistin gene expression in human monocytes. The relationship between resistin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and ER stress markers mRNA was analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in isolated monocytes of 30 healthy volunteers. The effect of endotoxin/lipopolysaccharides or tunicamycin on resistin gene expression was analyzed in THP-1 human monocytes. Signaling pathways leading to resistin mRNA were assessed by the knockdown using small interfering RNA or overexpression of key molecules involved in unfolded protein response. Resistin mRNA was positively associated with immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) or CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA in human isolated monocytes. In THP-1 cells, lipopolysaccharides increased mRNA of BiP, pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase (PERK) and CHOP, as well as resistin. Tunicamycin also increased resistin mRNA. This induction appeared to be dose- and time-dependent. Tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA was inhibited by chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid. The knockdown of either PERK, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or CHOP reduced tunicamycin-induced resistin mRNA. Conversely, overexpression of ATF4 or CHOP increased resistin mRNA. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by tunicamycin increased resistin mRNA through the PERK-ATF4-CHOP pathway in THP-1 human monocytes. ER stress could lead to insulin resistance through enhanced resistin gene expression in human monocytes.

  2. Inhibition by interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha of the insulin-like growth factor I messenger ribonucleic acid response to growth hormone in rat hepatocyte primary culture.

    PubMed

    Thissen, J P; Verniers, J

    1997-03-01

    The cytokines are the putative mediators of the catabolic reaction that accompanies infection and trauma. Evidence suggests that their catabolic actions are indirect and potentially mediated through changes in hormonal axis such as the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a GH-dependent growth factor that regulates the protein metabolism. To determine whether cytokines can directly inhibit the production of IGF-I by the liver, we investigated the regulation of IGF-I gene expression by interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (10 ng/ml) in a model of rat primary cultured hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated by liver collagenase perfusion and cultured on Matrigel 48 h before experiments. Each experiment was performed in at least three different animals. In the absence of GH, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha did not affect the IGF-I messenger RNA (mRNA) basal levels, whereas IL-6 increased it by a factor of 2.5 after 24 h (P < 0.05). GH (500 ng/ml) alone stimulated the IGF-I gene expression markedly (5-to 10-fold increase) after 24 h (P < 0.001). IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha to a lesser extent, dramatically inhibited the IGF-I mRNA response to GH (IL-1 beta: -82%, P < 0.001 and TNF-alpha: -47%, P < 0.01). The half-maximal inhibition of the IGF-I mRNA response to GH was observed for a concentration of IL-1 beta between 0.1 and 1 ng/ml. Moreover, IL-1 beta abolished the IL-6-induced IGF-I mRNA response. In contrast, IL-6 did not impair the IGF-I mRNA response to GH. To determine the potential role of the GH receptor (GHR) and the GH-binding protein (GHBP) in this GH resistance, we assessed the GHR and GHBP mRNAs response to these cytokines. GH alone did not affect the GHR/GHBP mRNA levels. IL-1 beta markedly decreased the GHR and GHBP mRNA levels (respectively, -68% and -60%, P < 0.05). Neither TNF-alpha nor IL-6 affected the GHR/GHBP gene expression. In conclusion, our results show that IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha to

  3. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  4. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  5. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  6. SYNTHESIS OF RIBONUCLEIC ACID BY X-IRRADIATED BACTERIA1

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, E. W.

    1964-01-01

    Frampton, E. W. (The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston). Synthesis of ribonucleic acid by X-irradiated bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:1369–1376. 1964.—Postirradiation synthesis of total ribonucleic acid (RNA) and of RNA components was measured after exposure of Escherichia coli B/r to X rays. Net synthesis of RNA measured by the orcinol reaction and by the incorporation of uridine-2-C14 was depressed in irradiated cells, but paralleled the period of postirradiation growth (30 to 40 min). Incorporation of uridine-2-C14, added after net synthesis of RNA had ceased, detected an apparent turnover in a portion of the RNA. Irradiated cells retained their ability to adjust RNA synthesis to growth rate. After a shift-down in growth rate, irradiated cells incorporated radioactive uridine, while the net synthesis of RNA ceased—presumptive evidence for a continued synthesis of messenger RNA. Chloramphenicol addition (100 μg/ml) did not influence the total amount of RNA synthesized. Synthesis of ribosomes and transfer RNA preceded by 0, 5, 10, and 15 min of postirradiation incubation was observed by the resolution of cell-free extracts on sucrose density gradients. Little immediate influence of irradiation could be detected on the synthesis of 50S and 30S ribosomes. A decline was observed in the synthesis of 50S ribosomes with continued postirradiation incubation; 30S ribosomes, ribosomal precursors, and 4S RNA continued to be synthesized. PMID:14188715

  7. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  8. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  9. Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Do

    2006-11-28

    We consider gauge messenger models in which X and Y gauge bosons and gauginos are messengers of supersymmetry breaking. In simple gauge messenger models, all the soft parameters except {mu} and B{mu} are calculated in terms of a single scale parameter MSUSY which is proportional to F / MGUT. Unique prediction on dark matter in gauge messenger models is discussed. (Based on hep-ph/0601036 and hep-ph/0607169)

  10. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  11. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells. PMID:6965093

  12. Role of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Replication of Deoxyribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pato, Martin L.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment previously interpreted to show a ribonucleic acid requirement for propagation of deoxyribonucleic replication is reexamined and the earlier interpretation is shown to be incorrect. PMID:1090599

  13. Transmembrane Signalling: Membrane messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockroft, Scott L.

    2017-05-01

    Life has evolved elaborate means of communicating essential chemical information across cell membranes. Inspired by biology, two new artificial mechanisms have now been developed that use synthetic messenger molecules to relay chemical signals into or across lipid membranes.

  14. About The ESO Messenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjär, K.

    2000-06-01

    The present Messenger is the hundredth issue to be published. This may be a good moment to look back to the beginning and to the development of this publication. The idea of an internal ESO newsletter was born in the early seventies. Using the words of Professor Blaauw, Director General of ESO at that time and the person who launched The Messenger in its orbit, the purpose of The ESO Messenger should be “first of all, to promote the participation of ESO staff in what goes on in the Organization, especially at places of duty other than our own. Moreover, The Messenger may serve to give the world outside some impression of what happens inside ESO. The need for more internal communication is felt by many of the staff. The dispersion of our resources over several countries in widely separated continents demands a special effort to keep us aware of what is going on at the other establishments...”

  15. MESSENGER Laser Altimeter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter sends out laser pulses that hit the ground and return to the instrument. The amount of light that returns for each pulse gives the reflectance at that point on t...

  16. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  17. The role of renin-angiotensin aldosterone system related micro-ribonucleic acids in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Bo; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are small (21-25 nucleotide) single-stranded, evolutionarily conserved non-protein-coding RNAs, which control diverse cellular functions by interacting with the 3’ untranslated region of specific target messenger RNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Research shows that an aberrant expression profile of miRNAs has been linked to a series of diseases, including hypertension. In the past few decades, it has been demonstrated that excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) involves in the pathogenesis of hypertension. This article reviews the latest insights in the identification of RAAS-correlative miRNAs and the potential mechanisms for their roles in hypertension. PMID:26446323

  18. Protein and Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis During the Diploid Life Cycle of Allomyces arbuscula

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Daniel J.; Seale, Thomas W.; McCarthy, Brian J.

    1972-01-01

    The diploid life cycle of Allomyces arbuscula may be divided into four parts: spore induction, germination, vegetative growth, and mitosporangium formation. Spore induction, germination, and mitosporangium formation are insensitive to inhibition of actinomycin D, probably indicating that stable, pre-existing messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA) is responsible for these developmental events. Protein synthesis is necessary during the entire life cycle except for cyst formation. A system for obtaining synchronous germination of mitospores is described. During germination there is a characteristic increase in the rate of synthesis of RNA and protein although none of the other morphogenetic changes occurring during the life cycle are necessarily accompanied by an appreciable change in the rate of macromolecular synthesis. PMID:4113121

  19. Normal level of thyroglobulin messenger ribonucleic acid in a human congenital goiter with thyroglobulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cabrer, B; Brocas, H; Perez-Castillo, A; Pohl, V; Navas, J J; Targovnik, H; Centenera, J A; Vassart, G

    1986-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital goiter were investigated from clinical, biochemical, and molecular biology standpoints. The association of clinical and biological hypothyroidism with undetectable levels of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and the presence of iodohistidines in the urine suggested the diagnosis of defective Tg gene expression. This conclusion was confirmed by analysis of proteins present in goiter extracts. Only minute amounts of Tg-related material was detected by RIA (0.28 and 0.17 mg/g tissue compared to 80-100 mg/g in normal thyroid tissue), by Sepharose 6B chromatography, and by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Surprisingly, the goiters contained normal amounts of Tg mRNA. The size of the mRNA and the sequence organization of its first five exons also were normal. We conclude that no gross alteration of structure or transcription of the Tg gene was present in these patients. The results are compatible with a lesion affecting the mRNA sequence (point mutation, splicing error etc.), leading to defective translation or abnormal routing of the translation product through the membrane system of the cell. This latter hypothesis is supported by the extreme distension of the goiter endoplasmic reticulum found on electron microscopy.

  20. Differentiation of human pituitary adenomas determines the pattern of chromogranin/secretogranin messenger ribonucleic acid expression.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Chandler, W F; Smart, J B; England, B G; Lloyd, R V

    1993-03-01

    The distribution of chromogranin/secretogranin (Cg/Sg) mRNAs, determined by Northern and in situ hybridization, was analyzed in 14 cultured pituitary adenomas characterized by immunohistochemistry and hormone secretion in a defined medium in vitro. There were 5 functional GH adenomas, 1 silent GH adenoma, 7 null cell adenomas, and 1 oncocytoma. The null cell adenomas, oncocytoma, and silent GH adenomas were also analyzed by electron microscopy. Most null cell adenomas and the oncocytoma secreted FSH and LH into the culture medium. GH adenomas, which are examples of well differentiated tumors based on morphological examination, expressed significantly more SgIII mRNA compared to the null cell adenomas and oncocytoma (70 +/- 6% vs. 22 +/- 5%; P < 0.001). GH adenomas also expressed significantly less CgA mRNA compared to the less well differentiated null cell adenomas and oncocytoma (27 +/- 6% vs. 67 +/- 4%; P < 0.001), which could be considered less well differentiated based on ultrastructural morphological features. After treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10(-7) M) for 7 days, there was an increase in the mRNA for CgB and SgII mRNAs in GH and null cell tumors, while dexamethasone treatment for 7 days increased CgA mRNA in GH and null cell adenomas. GnRH treatment for 7 days increased CgB mRNA in null cell adenomas. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also decreased the percentage of immunoreactive GH cells and GHm RNA, determined by in situ and Northern hybridization analyses. These results indicate that pituitary adenomas have a distinct pattern of Cg/Sg mRNA expression, which appears to be related to the degree of morphological differentiation of these neoplasms, and suggest that the effects of secretagogues on various Cg/Sg mRNA levels may be related to the stimulation of hormone secretion.

  1. Accumulation of methyl-deficient rat liver messenger ribonucleic acid on ethionine administration

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, B.B.; Sharma, O.K.

    1980-01-01

    Highly purified poly(adenylic acid)-containing RNA isolated from livers of rats fed 0.25% DL-etionine in the diet for 7 days accepted methyl groups from S-adenosyl(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine, when incubated in vitro with mRNA methyltransferases from vaccinia virus or Ehrlich ascites cells, whereas RNA from control rats had no such activity. Nuclease digestion followed by chromatographic analyses of mRNA methylated in vitro revealed that the methyl groups were incorporated at the 5' end into cap 1 structures (m/sup 7/GpppNmp...) by the viral enzyme, whereas both cap 0 (m/sup 7/GpppNp...) and cap 1 (m/sup 7/Gpppm/sup 6/Am...) structures were formed by the Ehrlich ascites cell enzymes. the methyl-deficient mRNA isolated from the liver of ethionine-fed rats differed in its translational properties from mRNA isolated from control animals in an in vitro protein synthesizing system from wheat germ.

  2. Melanocortin-4 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems.

    PubMed

    Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Jenny Wu, C-S; Dumont, Laurence M; Wild, J Martin

    2003-12-01

    We determined melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) mRNA ontogeny in the rat using in situ hybridization and a rat MC4-R riboprobe and showed numerous peripheral sites of expression for MC4-R. The developing heart showed MC4-R mRNA expression as early as embryonic day (E) 14. In the lungs of E16-E20 fetuses, the cells surrounding developing bronchi expressed relatively strong in situ signal. Muscles associated with the respiratory system such as diaphragm and intercostal muscle expressed MC4-R mRNA as early as E14. Occipital and tongue muscles, in particular the genioglossus, showed diffuse signal at E15-E20. In the eye, a discrete signal was detected in an outer neuroblastic layer which may correspond to retina or extraocular muscle. Developing limb buds expressed relatively strong signal at E14, whereas skull bone and joint capsules of the paw of the forelimb showed signal at E18-E20. Using RT-PCR and ribonuclease protection assays, we determined that MC4-R mRNA is also expressed in adult rat heart, lung, kidney, and testis. The expression of the MC4-R in cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems supports functional roles for the MC4-R in addition to its roles in appetite, weight control, and regulation of linear growth.

  3. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  4. Estradiol increases amounts of messenger ribonucleic acid for gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hamernik, D L; Clay, C M; Turzillo, A; Van Kirk, E A; Moss, G E

    1995-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted simultaneously to investigate regulation of amounts of mRNA for GnRH receptors during the periovulatory period in sheep. In the first experiment, amounts of mRNA for GnRH receptors were measured before and after preovulatory surge of LH following regression of the CL by prostaglandin F2 alpha(PGF2 alpha). So that the time of the preovulatory surge of LH could be accurately predicted, ewes received two injections of PGF2 alpha on Day 14 of the estrous cycle. Anterior pituitary glands were collected from 5 control ewes on Day 14 of the estrous cycle (0 h after PGF2 alpha) and at 48, 72, and 96 h after PGF2 alpha (5 ewes per group). The second experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of 17 beta-estradiol on amounts of mRNA for GnRH receptors. On Day 14 of the estrous cycle, 20 ewes were ovariectomized (OVX); 15 of these ewes received estradiol implants when they were OVX (OVXEI). Sixteen hours after OVX, anterior pituitary glands were collected from 5 OVX and 5 OVXEI ewes, and the remaining OVXEI ewes received an i.m. injection of estradiol (25 micrograms in corn oil; OVXEI + E) to induce a preovulatory-like surge of LH. Anterior pituitary glands were collected from OVXEI + E ewes 18 or 54 h after injection of estradiol (n = 5 per group). Half of each anterior pituitary gland was used to measure the number of GnRH receptors. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the remaining half of each anterior pituitary gland, applied to slot blots, and hybridized with a radioactive cDNA probe encoding the ovine GnRH receptor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Mercury MESSENGER Stamp Unveiling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-03

    Daughters of NASA astronaut Alan Shepard, Laura Shepard Churchley, left, Alice Wackermann and Julie Jenkins, right, speak during an unveiling ceremony of two USPS stamps that commemorate and celebrate 50 years of US Spaceflight and the MESSENGER program during an event, Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. One stamp commemorates NASA’s Project Mercury, America’s first manned spaceflight program, and NASA astronaut Alan Shepard’s historic flight on May 5, 1961, aboard spacecraft Freedom 7. The other stamp draws attention to NASA’s unmanned MESSENGER mission, a scientific investigation of the planet Mercury. On March 17, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to enter into orbit around Mercury. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Mercury MESSENGER Stamp Unveiling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-03

    Daughters of NASA astronaut Alan Shepard, Laura Shepard Churchley, standing left, Alice Wackermann and Julie Jenkins, standing right, speak during an unveiling ceremony of two USPS stamps that commemorate and celebrate 50 years of US Spaceflight and the MESSENGER program during an event, Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. One stamp commemorates NASA’s Project Mercury, America’s first manned spaceflight program, and NASA astronaut Alan Shepard’s historic flight on May 5, 1961, aboard spacecraft Freedom 7. The other stamp draws attention to NASA’s unmanned MESSENGER mission, a scientific investigation of the planet Mercury. On March 17, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to enter into orbit around Mercury. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Mercury MESSENGER Stamp Unveiling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-03

    United States Postal Service Vice President of Finance Steve Masse, left, and NASA Mercury Astronaut Scott Carpenter, unveil two USPS stamps to commemorate and celebrate 50 years of US Spaceflight and the MESSENGER program during an event, Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. One stamp commemorates NASA’s Project Mercury, America’s first manned spaceflight program, and NASA astronaut Alan Shepard’s historic flight on May 5, 1961, aboard spacecraft Freedom 7. The other stamp draws attention to NASA’s unmanned MESSENGER mission, a scientific investigation of the planet Mercury. On March 17, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to enter into orbit around Mercury. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Mercury MESSENGER Stamp Unveiling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-03

    NASA Administrator Charles Boldin speaks during an unveiling ceremony of two USPS stamps that commemorate and celebrate 50 years of US Spaceflight and the MESSENGER program during an event, Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. One stamp commemorates NASA’s Project Mercury, America’s first manned spaceflight program, and NASA astronaut Alan Shepard’s historic flight on May 5, 1961, aboard spacecraft Freedom 7. The other stamp draws attention to NASA’s unmanned MESSENGER mission, a scientific investigation of the planet Mercury. On March 17, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to enter into orbit around Mercury. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) and control of citrus pests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, applications and function are described for the non-scientist to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control. ...

  10. Messenger RNA transcripts

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to DNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) in complex substrata is rarely analyzed, in large part because labile RNA molecules are difficult to purify. Nucleic acid extractions from fungi that colonize soil are particularly difficult and plagued by humic substances that interfere with Taq polymerase (Tebbe and Vahjen 1993 and references therein). Magnetic capture...

  11. Diphosphoinositol Polyphosphates: Metabolic Messengers?

    PubMed Central

    Shears, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    The diphosphoinositol polyphosphates (“inositol pyrophosphates”) are a specialized subgroup of the inositol phosphate signaling family. This review proposes that many of the current data concerning the metabolic turnover and biological effects of the diphosphoinositol polyphosphates are linked by a common theme: these polyphosphates act as metabolic messengers. This review will also discuss the latest proposals concerning possible molecular mechanisms of action of this intriguing class of molecules. PMID:19439500

  12. Mercury MESSENGER Stamp Unveiling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-03

    From left, NASA Deputy Director, Planetary Science Division, Science Mission Directorate, Jim Adams, NASA Kennedy Space Center Director of Education and External Relations Cheryl Hurst, United States Postal Service Vice President of Finance Steve Masse, NASA Mercury Astronaut Scott Carpenter, NASA Administrator Charles Boldin, Daughters of NASA astronaut Alan Shepard, Alice Wackermann, Laura Shepard Churchley, and Julie Jenkins, and NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana pose for a photograph during an unveiling ceremony of two USPS stamps that commemorate and celebrate 50 years of US Spaceflight and the MESSENGER program during an event, Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. One stamp commemorates NASA’s Project Mercury, America’s first manned spaceflight program, and NASA astronaut Alan Shepard’s historic flight on May 5, 1961, aboard spacecraft Freedom 7. The other stamp draws attention to NASA’s unmanned MESSENGER mission, a scientific investigation of the planet Mercury. On March 17, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to enter into orbit around Mercury. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis During Germination of Myxococcus xanthus Myxospores

    PubMed Central

    Juengst, Fredrick W.; Dworkin, Martin

    1973-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein synthesis during myxospore germination were examined. When RNA synthesis was inhibited more than 90% by either actinomycin D (Act D) or rifampin, germination was prevented. The data were consistent with the interpretation that rifampin did not interfere with protein synthesis in any way other than by inhibition of messenger RNA formation. Act D concentrations as high as 20 μg/ml did not totally inhibit RNA synthesis. In the presence of 8 μg of Act D/ml, germinating myxospores synthesized transfer RNA, 16S RNA, and 23S RNA. Evidence was presented which indicated that messenger RNA was also synthesized early in the germination period both in the presence and absence of 8 μg of Act D/ml. One explanation for the escape synthesis of RNA in germinating myxospores is that Act D exerts a differential effect on the transcription of larger versus smaller cistrons, the latter having a lower probability of binding Act D. We have found that in the presence of 8 μg of Act D/ml, escape RNA synthesis in myxospores was 25% for 23S RNA, 55% for 16S RNA, and more than 90% for 4S RNA. We have shown that germination of myxospores requires both RNA and protein synthesis during the first 25 to 35 min in germination medium. This finding does not support the earlier suggestion by Ramsey and Dworkin that a stable germination messenger RNA is required for germination of the myxospores of Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:4690965

  14. Who discovered messenger RNA?

    PubMed

    Cobb, Matthew

    2015-06-29

    The announcement of the discovery of messenger RNA (mRNA) and the cracking of the genetic code took place within weeks of each other in a climax of scientific excitement during the summer of 1961. Although mRNA is of decisive importance to our understanding of gene function, no Nobel Prize was awarded for its discovery. The large number of people involved, the complex nature of the results, and the tortuous path that was taken over half a century ago, all show that simple claims of priority may not reflect how science works.

  15. MESSENGER: Science payload status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R.; Solomon, S.; Gold, R.

    2003-04-01

    MESSENGER is a NASA Discovery mission to reach Mercury and orbit that planet for an Earth year, gathering data with a miniaturized scientific payload. The MESSENGER project is now entering the integration and test phase as the spacecraft is assembled and the instruments are calibrated and delivered to the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray and Neutron spectrometer (GRNS) and X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) experienced detector changes in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (based upon more experience with similar instrumentation on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous, NEAR-Shoemaker, mission and on Mars Odyssey). The gamma-ray portion of GRNS uses a high-purity germanium crystal cooled to ˜90K and surrounded by an active shield to detect characteristic gamma-rays from the planet. The neutron spectrometer uses Li-glass and plastic scintillators to detect and separate thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. The XRS spectrometer uses three gas-filled proportional counters looking at the planet and a solar monitor to measure X-ray fluorescence lines from the planet's surface. These instruments thus provide information on elemental abundances. The optical remote-sensing instruments map the planet in several spectral bands (Mercury Dual Imaging System -- MDIS), measure surface spectral reflectance in the visible and infra-red and exospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet and visible (Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer -- MASCS), and measure surface topography (Mercury Laser Altimeter -- MLA). The combination of altimetry with MLA and radio-science (RS) measurements will allow maps of the gravitational field of the planet and inference of the planet's obliquity and physical amplitude. The combination of boom-mounted magnetometer (MAG) and combined Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) allows internal and external sources of magnetic field to be separated, providing knowledge of both Mercury's internal structure and its magnetosphere and

  16. Dynamical Messengers for Gauge Mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, Anson; Torroba, Gonzalo; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-17

    We construct models of indirect gauge mediation where the dynamics responsible for breaking supersymmetry simultaneously generates a weakly coupled subsector of messengers. This provides a microscopic realization of messenger gauge mediation where the messenger and hidden sector fields are unified into a single sector. The UV theory is SQCD with massless and massive quarks plus singlets, and at low energies it flows to a weakly coupled quiver gauge theory. One node provides the primary source of supersymmetry breaking, which is then transmitted to the node giving rise to the messenger fields. These models break R-symmetry spontaneously, produce realistic gaugino and sfermion masses, and give a heavy gravitino.

  17. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  18. Hybridizable ribonucleic acid of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bondy, S. C.; Roberts, Sidney

    1968-01-01

    1. Cerebral RNA of adult and newborn rats was labelled in vivo by intracervical injection of [5-3H]uridine or [32P]phosphate. Hepatic RNA of similar animals was labelled by intraperitoneal administration of [6-14C]orotic acid. Nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions were isolated and purified by procedures involving extraction with phenol and repeated precipitation with ethanol. 2. The fraction of pulse-labelled RNA from cerebral nuclei that hybridized to homologous DNA exhibited a wide range of turnover values and was heterogeneous in sucrose density gradients. 3. Base composition of the hybridizable RNA was similar to that of the total pulse-labelled material; both were DNA-like. 4. Pulse-labelled cerebral nuclear RNA hybridized to a greater extent than cytoplasmic RNA for at least a week after administration of labelled precursor. This finding suggested that cerebral nuclei contained a hybridizable component that was not transferred to cytoplasm. 5. The rates of decay of the hybridizable fractions of cerebral nuclei and cytoplasm were faster in the newborn animal than in the adult. Presumably a larger proportion of labile messenger RNA molecules was present in the immature brain. 6. Cerebral nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions from newborn or adult rats, labelled either in vivo for periods varying from 4min. to 7 days or in vitro by exposure to [3H]-dimethyl sulphate, uniformly hybridized more effectively than the corresponding hepatic preparation. These data suggested that a larger proportion of RNA synthesis was oriented towards messenger RNA formation in brain than in liver. PMID:5683505

  19. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  20. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  1. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  2. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  3. 12 CFR 7.1012 - Messenger service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Messenger service. 7.1012 Section 7.1012 Banks... Bank Powers § 7.1012 Messenger service. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a “messenger... establish and operate a messenger service, or use, with its customers, a third party messenger service....

  4. The MESSENGER science payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Robert E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; MESSENGER Team

    2003-11-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft will orbit Mercury and gather data for one Earth year with a miniaturized scientific payload. The MESSENGER project is in the integration and test phase in mid 2003. Seven assembled and calibrated instruments are mounted on the spacecraft. The Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer has a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer to measure atomic composition with a high-purity germanium detector and a Neutron Spectrometer that uses lithium-glass and boron-loaded plastic scintillators for sensing thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. The X-Ray Spectrometer measures Mercury surface elemental abundances by examining solar-flare-induced X-ray fluorescence lines. Three gas-filled proportional counters detect the X-ray fluorescence lines from the planet's surface, and a solid-state solar monitor measures the X-ray input to the planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) has both wide-field and narrow-field cameras to map the surface of the planet. MDIS is also multi-spectral, with a 12-position filter wheel for the wide-field camera. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measures both surface spectral reflectance in the visible and near infrared and exospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet and visible. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) determines the range to the planet with a resolution of 0.3 m. MLA will be combined with the radio-science investigation to map the gravitational field of the planet and determine the obliquity and physical libration amplitude. A magnetometer, mounted on a 3.6-m boom, will map the internal and external magnetic field. The Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer will measure particles accelerated in the magnetosphere and the interactions of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. MDIS has its own pivot platform. All of the other instruments are fixed to the spacecraft. Pointing is accomplished by steering the entire spacecraft. All of the instruments are designed to deal with the extreme thermal

  5. Towards the elements of successful insect Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi), the sequence-specific suppression of gene expression, offers great opportunities for insect science, especially to analyze gene function, manage pest populations, and reduce disease pathogens. The accumulating body of literature on insect RNAi has revealed that ...

  6. Saliva of Lygus lineolaris digests double stranded ribonucleic acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prospects for development of highly specific pesticides based on double stranded ribonucleic acid have been a recent focus of scientific research. Creative applications have been proposed and demonstrated. However, not all insects are sensitive to double stranded RNA (dsRNA) gene knockdown effec...

  7. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  8. MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  9. The MESSENGER Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, James C.; Conde, Richard F.; Dakermanji, George; Engelbrecht, Carl S.; Ercol, Carl J.; Fielhauer, Karl B.; Grant, David G.; Hartka, Theodore J.; Hill, Tracy A.; Jaskulek, Stephen E.; Mirantes, Mary A.; Mosher, Larry E.; Paul, Michael V.; Persons, David F.; Rodberg, Elliot H.; Srinivasan, Dipak K.; Vaughan, Robin M.; Wiley, Samuel R.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was designed and constructed to withstand the harsh environments associated with achieving and operating in Mercury orbit. The system can be divided into eight subsystems: structures and mechanisms (e.g., the composite core structure, aluminum launch vehicle adapter, and deployables), propulsion (e.g., the state-of-the-art titanium fuel tanks, thruster modules, and associated plumbing), thermal (e.g., the ceramic-cloth sunshade, heaters, and radiators), power (e.g., solar arrays, battery, and controlling electronics), avionics (e.g., the processors, solid-state recorder, and data handling electronics), software (e.g., processor-supported code that performs commanding, data handling, and spacecraft control), guidance and control (e.g., attitude sensors including star cameras and Sun sensors integrated with controllers including reaction wheels), radio frequency telecommunications (e.g., the spacecraft antenna suites and supporting electronics), and payload (e.g., the science instruments and supporting processors). This system architecture went through an extensive (nearly four-year) development and testing effort that provided the team with confidence that all mission goals will be achieved.

  10. MESSENGER Final Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-30

    Today, the MESSENGER spacecraft sent its final image. Originally planned to orbit Mercury for one year, the mission exceeded all expectations, lasting for over four years and acquiring extensive datasets with its seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation. This afternoon, the spacecraft succumbed to the pull of solar gravity and impacted Mercury's surface. The image shown here is the last one acquired and transmitted back to Earth by the mission. The image is located within the floor of the 93-kilometer-diameter crater Jokai. The spacecraft struck the planet just north of Shakespeare basin. Date acquired: April 30, 2015 Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 72716050 Image ID: 8422953 Instrument: Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Center Latitude: 72.0° Center Longitude: 223.8° E Resolution: 2.1 meters/pixel Scale: This image is about 1 kilometers (0.6 miles) across Incidence Angle: 57.9° Emission Angle: 56.5° Phase Angle: 40.7° http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19448

  11. NASA Now: MESSENGER in Orbit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Dr. Larry Evans, Senior Scientist for MESSENGER, discusses the difficulty of getting to Mercury, the challenges of visiting a planet so close to the sun and what we hope to discover when the spacec...

  12. MESSENGER Departing Earth Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-03

    Artist impression of NASA MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging MESSENGER spacecraft as it leaves Earth, following its Aug. 3, 2004 launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. aboard a Delta II rocket.

  13. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuña, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Livi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet’s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury’s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only ˜1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere, allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury’s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury’s interior. In addition, Mercury’s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted beneath the solid surface as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, ˜1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury’s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury’s proximity to the sun, 0.3-0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and recycling of neutrals and ions among the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury’s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection, and pick-up of planetary ions all playing roles in the generation of field-aligned electric currents. However, these field

  14. Nuclear Fraction of Bacillus subtilis as a Template for Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, S.; Whiteley, H. R.

    1968-01-01

    A “nuclear fraction” prepared from Bacillus subtilis was a more efficient template than purified deoxyribonucleic acid for the synthesis of ribonucleic acid by exogenously added ribonucleic acid polymerase isolated from B. subtilis. The initial rate of synthesis with the nuclear fraction was higher and synthesis continued for several hours, yielding an amount of ribonucleic acid greater than the amount of deoxyribonucleic acid used as the template. The product was heterogenous in size, with a large portion exceeding 23S. When purified deoxyribonucleic acid was the template, a more limited synthesis was observed with a predominantly 7S product. However, the ribonucleic acids produced in vitro from these templates were very similar to each other and to in vivo synthesized ribonucleic acid as determined by the competition of ribonucleic acid from whole cells in the annealing of in vitro synthesized ribonucleic acids to deoxyribonucleic acid. Treatment of the nuclear fraction with heat (60 C for 15 min) or trypsin reduced the capacity of the nuclear fraction to synthesize ribonucleic acid to the level observed with purified deoxyribonucleic acid. PMID:4296512

  15. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity in Sendai Virions and Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William S.

    1971-01-01

    After dissociation of purified Sendai virus with the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40 and 2-mercaptoethanol, it catalyzed the incorporation of ribonucleoside triphosphates into an acid-insoluble product. The enzyme activity was associated with viral nucleocapsid as well as whole virions. The reaction product was ribonucleic acid (RNA) which annealed specifically with virion RNA. Sedimentation of the 3H-RNA reaction product revealed two components, a 45S component with properties of double-stranded RNA and 4 to 6S component which appeared to be mostly single-stranded RNA. PMID:4328418

  16. Zona pellucida protein B2 messenger ribonucleic acid expression varies with follicular development and granulosa cell location.

    PubMed

    Benson, A P; Malloy, M N; Steed, J R; Christensen, V L; Fairchild, B D; Davis, A J

    2017-09-01

    The freshly ovulated ovum in avian species is surrounded by a protein layer called the inner perivitelline layer (IPVL). The IPVL contains zona pellucida proteins and 6 distinct zona pellucida genes have been identified (ZPA, ZPB1, ZPB2, ZPC, ZPD and ZPX1) in the chicken. In the present research, the expression of the mRNA for ZPA, ZPB2, and ZPX1 was investigated in 2 lines of turkey hens selected for either increased egg production (E line) or increased body weight (F line). Theca and granulosa cell expression of the mRNA for ZPA and ZPB2 was also investigated in hierarchical and prehierarchical follicles from broiler breeder hens. Granulosa tissue was collected from F1 through F4 and F1 through F10 follicles in E line and F line hens, respectively. A one cm2 section of the granulosa layer around the germinal disc (GD) and an equivalent sized nongerminal disc (NGD) area was also collected from the F1 and F2 follicles from other hens from each genetic line. Granulosa and theca tissue was collected from hierarchical and prehierarchical follicles of broiler breeder hens. Total RNA was extracted from the samples. Minor groove-binding probes and primers for detecting ZPA, ZPB2, and ZPX1, were made for real-time PCR analyses. Expression of ZPA, ZPB2, and ZPX1 was detected in all follicle sizes from both genetic lines of hens. No significant differences in ZPA and ZPX1 mRNA expression were detected between the GD and NGD granulosa cells. However, the expression of the mRNA for ZPB2 was significantly greater in the GD granulosa cells when compared to the NGD granulosa cells in F1 and F2 follicles from E line and F line hens. In broiler breeder hens, the mRNA expression of ZPA and ZPB2 was greatest in the smallest prehierarchical follicles. The results suggest that higher expression of ZPB2 in the germinal disc area may be important for the preferential binding of sperm to this region of the IPVL. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Decreases Mammary Gland Lipoprotein Lipase Activity and Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Dolado, Laura; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia; Herrera, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a reduction of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in adipose tissue and development of hypertriglyceridemia. To determine how a condition of severe insulin deficiency affects mammary gland LPL activity and mRNA expression during late pregnancy, streptozotocin (STZ) treated (40 mg/kg) and non-treated (control) virgin and 20 day pregnant rats were studied. In control rats, both LPL activity and mRNA were higher in pregnant than in virgin rats. When compared to control rats, STZ-treated rats, either pregnant or virgin, showed decreased LPL activity and mRNA content. Furthermore, mammary gland LPL activity was linearly correlated with mRNA content, and either variable was linearly correlated with plasma insulin levels. Thus, insulin deficiency impairs the expression of LPL in mammary glands, revealing the role of insulin as a modulator of the enzyme at the mRNA expression level. PMID:11900280

  18. Heat shock of cultured GC cells enhances the level of triiodothyronine induced growth hormone (GH) and GH messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L E; Katz, C P; DeFesi, C R; Surks, M I

    1989-07-01

    We have previously proposed that the effects of heat shock on thyroid hormone-responsive rat pituitary tumor (GC) cells may be a model relevant to the in vivo effects of nonthyroidal disease on thyroid hormone action. To determine the effects of heat shock on thyroid hormone responses, GC cells (normally cultured at 37 C) were studied after incubation at 41 C. After 18 h at 41 C there was enhanced synthesis of proteins (mol wt, 70,000 and 90,000) considered to be universal markers of the cellular response to heat shock. Incubation at 41 C also resulted in a significant decrease in GC cell viability and (after 24 h) arrest of GC cell growth. However, the induction of GH synthesis by T3 was significantly enhanced in GC cells stressed by incubation at 41 C. The addition of 5 nM T3 to thyroid hormone-depeleted GC cells resulted in a significantly greater (P less than 0.001) accumulation of GH (2642 +/- 280 ng/18 h) during 41 C incubation than during 37 C incubation (1223 +/- 175 ng/18 h). The enhanced T3-induced production of GH was coincident with a proportional increase (P less than 0.05) in cellular GH mRNA determined by dot hybridization analysis. Thus, the stress of 41 C incubation elicits a heat shock response in GC cells characterized by decreased viability and growth arrest, but enhanced accumulation of GH mRNA in response to T3. Our recent report on the identical effects due to the stress of implantation of the Walker 256 carcinoma on T3-induced rat pituitary GH mRNA in vivo suggests that heat shock of cultured GC cells is a valid in vitro model of nonthyroidal disease.

  19. Effect of ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolation methods on putative reference genes messenger RNA abundance in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barragán, M; Martínez, A; Llonch, S; Pujol, A; Vernaeve, V; Vassena, R

    2015-07-01

    Although the male gamete participates in a significant proportion of infertility cases, there are currently no proven molecular markers of sperm quality. The search for significant gene expression markers is partially hindered by the lack of a recognized set of reference genes (RGs) to normalize reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) data across studies. The aim of this study is to define a set of RGs in assisted reproduction patients undergoing different sample collection and RNA isolation methods. Twenty-two normozoospermic men were included in the study. From each man, semen was either cryopreserved by slow freezing or analyzed fresh, and, for each, RNA was extracted with either phenol-free or phenol-based methods. In two cases, both methods were used to isolate RNA. Twenty putative RGs were analyzed and their mRNA abundance across samples was estimated by RT-qPCR. To determine the genes whose steady-state mRNA abundance remains unchanged, three different algorithms (geNorm, BestKeeper and NormFinder) were applied to the qPCR data. We found that RGs such as GAPDH or ACTB, useful in other biological contexts, cannot be used as reference for human spermatozoa. It is possible to compare gene expression from fresh and cryopreserved sperm samples using the same isolation method, while the mRNA abundance of expressed genes becomes different depending on the RNA isolation technique employed. In our conditions, the most appropriate RGs for RT-qPCR analysis were RPLP1, RPL13A, and RPLP2. Published discrepancies in gene expression studies in human spermatozoa may be due in part to inappropriate RGs selection, suggesting a possible different interpretation of PCR data in several reports, which were normalized using unstable RGs.

  20. Expression of messenger ribonucleic acid splice variants for vascular endothelial growth factor in the penis of adult rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Burchardt, M; Burchardt, T; Chen, M W; Shabsigh, A; de la Taille, A; Buttyan, R; Shabsigh, R

    1999-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction is often associated with problems in vascular perfusion to the erectile components of the penis. In order to better understand the factors that control vascular formation and perfusion in the erectile tissues of the penis, we have begun to characterize the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in penis tissues. VEGF is one of several polypeptides that have significant angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. Extensive characterization of the VEGF gene and its products has shown that several different mature mRNA transcripts exist, originating from alternative splicing of the basic VEGF transcript. These variant transcripts can encode peptides with different biological activities. Penile tissue was obtained from adult rats and from human patients undergoing penile prosthesis implantation. Analysis of the forms of VEGF transcripts was performed using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique with primer pairs derived from the first and eighth exon of the VEGF gene. The expression levels of the various isoforms in the rat penis were then quantified using RNase protection assays. Four previously described splice variants of VEGF mRNA (VEGF 120, 144, 164, 188) were detected in rat and human penile tissues. In contrast to what is seen in the rat lung, where the most abundant form of VEGF mRNA is the 188 splice isoform, VEGF 164 is the most abundant transcript detected in the penis. Finally, sequence analysis of numerous VEGF cDNA clones obtained from the rat penis demonstrated the presence of a previously undescribed VEGF splice variant that could give rise to a protein of 110 amino acid residues (VEGF 110, GenBank accession no. AF080594). In summary, a number of VEGF mRNA isoforms are expressed in the rat and human penis, with the splice variant encoding a 164-amino acid protein present in greatest abundance. This study is a prelude to attempts to genetically manipulate VEGF expression in the penis as a therapy for erectile dysfunction.

  1. Effects of irradiation and semistarvation on rat thyrotropin beta subunit messenger ribonucleic acid, pituitary thyrotropin content, and thyroid hormone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z. ); Carr, F.E. ); Fein, H.G.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced anorexia on serum thyrotropin (TSH), pituitary TSH-{beta} mRNA, pituitary TSH content, serum thyroxine (T{sub 4}), and serum 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) was investigated using feed-matched controls. Rats received 10 Gy gamma whole-body irradiation and were examined 1-3 days postirradiation. Feed-matched and untreated controls were also studied. The average food intake of the irradiated and feed-matched groups was approximately 18% of the untreated controls. Over the three day period both the irradiated and feed-matched groups lost a significant amount of body weight. The serum T{sub 4} levels of both the irradiated and feed-matched groups were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly depressed when compared to the untreated control group. The serum TSH and T{sub 3} were, however, significantly greater in the irradiated than the feed-matched groups at day 3 posttreatment. To determine if the difference in the serum TSH level between the two groups was due to a pretranslational alteration in TSH production, we measured the TSH-{beta} mRNA using an RNA blot hybridization assay. We found that the TSH-{beta} mRNA level was the same in the irradiated and feed-matched groups, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the radiation-induced increase in the serum TSH level is posttranscriptional. Pituitary TSH content in the irradiated rats was significantly less than in pair-fed controls, suggesting that irradiation may permit enhanced secretion of stored hormone.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acids are synthesized in the choroid plexus of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.A.; Brooks, P.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.; Lund, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrating the presence of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors in the brain suggest a role of the IGFs in the central nervous system. IGF-II has been implicated as the predominant IGF in brain of mature animals based on studies of immunoreactive peptide and of IGF-II mRNAs. To obtain information about the sites of synthesis of IGF-II in adult rat brain, a /sup 32/P-labeled 31 base long synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary in sequence to trailer peptide coding sequences in rat IGF-II mRNA (IGF-II 31 mer) was hybridized with coronal sections of fixed rat brain. The IGF-II 31 mer showed specific hybridization with the choroid plexus throughout rat brain, whereas in other brain regions, structures or cells, hybridization was not discernibly above background. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is a primary site of synthesis of IGF-II, a probable source of IGF-II in cerebrospinal fluid, and a potential source of IGF-II for actions on target cells within the adult rat brain.

  3. Prolactin messenger ribonucleic acid concentrations throughout the ovine estrous cycle: Assessment relative to prolactin serum and pituitary amounts

    SciTech Connect

    Landefeld, T.; Roulia, V.; Bagnell, T.; Ballard, T.; Levitan, I. )

    1991-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) mRNA concentrations were assessed by nucleic acid hybridization assays in pituitaries of ewes representing the defined stages of the ovine estrous cycle. Concomitantly, pituitary and serum PRL concentrations were measured in these ewes using radioimmunoassays. It was observed that PRL serum, pituitary and mRNA concentrations tended to increase near the time of the gonadotropin preovulatory surge, particularly between 24 hrs before behavioral estrus to 5 hours after estrus. However, the changes in PRL mRNA, serum and pituitary concentrations were shown not to be statistically significant. These data suggest that PRL production during the sheep estrous cycle is maintained without dramatic changes in synthesis or secretion.

  4. Changes in hepatic lipid parameters and hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid expression following estradiol administration in laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Lee, B K; Kim, J S; Ahn, H J; Hwang, J H; Kim, J M; Lee, H T; An, B K; Kang, C W

    2010-12-01

    Fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) is characterized by increased hepatic triacylglycerol content associated with liver hemorrhages and results in a sudden decline in egg production. Genetic, environmental, nutritional, and hormonal factors have all been implicated in the etiology of FLHS, but the exact cause of FLHS is still unknown. Estrogens have been implicated in the development of excess fat content of the liver and in the etiology of FLHS. This study investigated estradiol (E(2)) administration in hens and its effect on lipid metabolism. Hy-Line Brown laying hens were intramuscularly injected with E(2) on a daily basis for 3 wk. The dosages were 0, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg of BW, with corn oil injections used as a control. Egg production and quality were measured among the groups, with no significant difference seen in egg production. Liver weights of hens treated with E(2) were greater than those of control hens, but the increase was not statistically significant. Serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activities and E(2) plasma concentrations increased in a dose-dependent manner, with plasma concentration of E(2) increasing from 6,900 to 19,000 pg/mL. No significant differences in free cholesterol or phospholipids were observed, but there was a significant increase in hepatic triacylglycerol levels. Injection with E(2) showed an increased expression of mRNA for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (23-fold), but not for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. A statistically significant increase was seen for fatty acid synthase, apolipoprotein B, and adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase, but not for acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, apolipoprotein VLDL-II, microsomal triglyceride transport protein, or malic enzyme. For proteins involved in the oxidation of E(2), only cytochrome P450 3A37 showed a statistically significant increase. The present results suggest that E(2) upregulates the synthesis of fatty acids and triacylglycerols and the accumulation of hepatic lipids by increasing mRNA expression related to lipid metabolism, and that excess E(2) in the blood leads to activation of E(2) catabolic metabolism (cytochrome P450 3A37)-related mRNA expression.

  5. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor messenger ribonucleic acids are widely distributed in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Ureña, P; Kong, X F; Abou-Samra, A B; Jüppner, H; Kronenberg, H M; Potts, J T; Segre, G V

    1993-08-01

    PTH/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) receptor mRNAs are widely distributed in rat tissues. PTH and PTHrP, a peptide responsible for hypercalcemia associated with cancers, bind equivalently to common receptors that initially were cloned from rat bone and opossum renal cell cDNA libraries. In this study we used rat PTH/PTHrP receptor cDNA to probe for receptor expression in different rat tissues by Northern blot analysis. PTH/PTHrP receptor transcripts are highly expressed in PTH target tissues, kidney and bone. Receptor transcripts, however, also are expressed in many other tissues, including aorta, adrenal gland, bladder, brain, cerebellum, breast, heart, ileum, liver, lung, skeletal muscle, ovary, placenta, skin, spleen, stomach, uterus, and testes. The major transcript in most tissues is 2.3-2.5 kilobases in size. At least two larger mRNAs are observed in kidney and liver, and smaller transcripts are found in kidney, skin, and testes. The most abundant testicular transcript is 1.4-1.5 kilobases in size, and it hybridizes with two different cDNA probes that encode portions of the receptor sequence from the putative fourth transmembrane domain to its C-terminal end. It does not hybridize, however, with a probe encoding the first 107 residues of the receptor sequence. Although, PTH/PTHrP receptor mRNAs are highly expressed in kidney and bone, classic PTH targets that are associated with calcium homeostasis, their wide tissue distribution suggests that PTH and/or PTHrP have other physiological roles, particularly in these other tissues. The mechanisms leading to tissue-specific expression of PTH/PTHrP receptor transcripts of different sizes and the functions of these mRNAs remain to be determined.

  6. Tirandamycin, an Inhibitor of Bacterial Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Fritz

    1976-01-01

    The antibiotic tirandamycin (a 3-acyltetramic acid structurally related to streptolydigin) specifically inhibits transcription by interfering with the function of bacterial ribonucleic acid polymerase. Ribonucleic acid polymerases from rat liver nuclei are not subject to tirandamycin inhibition. Qualitatively, the mode of action of the antibiotic is identical to that of streptolydigin in inhibiting chain initiation as well as chain elongation during the transcriptional process. However, tirandamycin is approximately 40 times less potent than streptolydigin. The structures of the 3-acyl groups of the two acyltetramic acid antibiotics tirandamycin and streptolydigin differ only slightly in the degree of oxidation of the terminal dioxabicyclo (3.1)nonane system and possess the same stereochemistry (D. J. Duchamp, A. R. Branfman, A. C. Button, and K. L. Rinehart, 1973). More significantly, major differences occur at the 1 and 5 positions of the tetramic acids. Tirandamycin contains no substituents; streptolydigin contains a substituted acetamide function at position 5 and a sugar moiety at position 1. The lack of substituents at the 1 and 5 positions of the tetramic acid portion in tirandamycin is probably responsible for the reduced biopotency of tirandamycin as compared with streptolydigin. PMID:791108

  7. The MESSENGER Spacecraft and Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, R. E.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Santo, A. G.

    2002-01-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission will send the first spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. A Mercury orbiter mission is challenging from thermal and mass perspectives. MESSENGER overcomes these challenges while avoiding esoteric technologies by using an innovative approach with commonly available materials, minimal moving parts, and maximum heritage. The key concepts are a ceramic-cloth thermal shade, an integrated lightweight structure, a high performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors. A miniaturized set of seven instruments, along with the spacecraft telecommunications system, satisfy all scientific objectives of the mission. The payload includes a combined wide-angle and narrow-angle imaging system; amma-ray, neutron, and X-ray spectrometers for remote geochemical sensing; a vector magnetometer; a laser altimeter; a combined ultraviolet-visible and visible-infrared spectrometer to detect atmospheric species and map mineralogical absorption features; and an energetic particle and plasma spectrometer to characterize ionized species in the magnetosphere. MESSENGER construction is nearly complete and the integration and test phase is just beginning. Launch is March 2004.

  8. Geodesy at Mercury with MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria t.; Peale, Stanley J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    In 2011 the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft will enter Mercury orbit and begin the mapping phase of the mission. As part of its science objectives the MESSENGER mission will determine the shape and gravity field of Mercury. These observations will enable the topography and the crustal thickness to be derived for the planet and will determine the small libration of the planet about its axis, the latter critical to constraining the state of the core. These measurements require very precise positioning of the MESSENGER spacecraft in its eccentric orbit, which has a periapsis altitude as low as 200 km, an apoapsis altitude near 15,000 km, and a closest approach to the surface varying from latitude 60 to about 70 N. The X-band tracking of MESSENGER and the laser altimetry are the primary data that will be used to measure the planetary shape and gravity field. The laser altimeter, which has an expected range of 1000 to 1200 km, is expected to provide significant data only over the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. For the southern hemisphere, radio occultation measurements obtained as the spacecraft passes behind the planet as seen from Earth and images obtained with the imaging system will be used to provide the long-wavelength shape of the planet. Gravity, derived from the tracking data, will also have greater resolution in the northern hemisphere, but full global models for both topography and gravity will be obtained at low harmonic order and degree. The limiting factor for both gravity and topography is expected to be knowledge of the spacecraft location. Present estimations are that in a combined tracking, altimetry, and occultation solution the spacecraft position uncertainty is likely to be of order 10 m. This accuracy should be adequate for establishing an initial geodetic coordinate system for Mercury that will enable positioning of imaged features on the surface, determination of

  9. Transcription During the Development of Bacteriophage φ29: Production of Host-and φ29-Specific Ribonucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Schachtele, Charles F.; De Sain, Carol V.; Hawley, Louise A.; Anderson, Dwight L.

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) during development of the virulent Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage φ29 has been analyzed. Transcription of host deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) continues at the preinfection rate throughout the latent period of viral growth. RNA-DNA hybridization was used to show that host messenger RNA synthesis continues late into the phage lytic cycle. Amino acid-labeling experiments show that this RNA is continuously used to produce protein. Ribosomal RNA production is not inhibited by phage infection. Small quantities of phage-specific RNA first appear between min 6 and 9 after infection. This RNA is made exclusively from one of the φ29 DNA strands. At 12 min postinfection, when phage DNA replication commences, large quantities of viral RNA start to be synthesized. This RNA appears to be transcribed from both strands of φ29 DNA. Studies with rifamycin and rifamycin-resistant host strains showed that the production of all phage φ29-specific RNA requires those components of the host RNA polymerase which are sensitive to this antibiotic. Thus, phage φ29 does not stop transcription of host DNA and may produce only one element for regulation of transcription of its own DNA. These findings may reflect the limited amount of genetic information carried by this phage. PMID:4630153

  10. Structure of the Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophage R17

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Cesar; Granboulan, Nicole; Franklin, Richard M.

    1966-01-01

    Vasquez, Cesar (Institut de Recherches sur le Cancer, Villejuif, Seine, France), Nicole Granboulan, and Richard M. Franklin. Structure of the ribonucleic acid bacteriophage R17. J. Bacteriol. 92:1779–1786. 1966.—The morphology of bacteriophage R17 was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained virions. The hexagonal shape, the presence of a maximum of 10 units at the periphery, and especially the observation of central fivefold points of symmetry with neighboring five and six coordinated units indicated icosahedral symmetry with 32 morphological units. Although the exact shape of the polyhedron could not be specified, the number of morphological units agreed with the chemically estimated number of structural units. Images PMID:5958109

  11. Photochemical Inactivation of Deoxyribonucleic and Ribonucleic Acid Viruses by Chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Carl Veith

    1979-01-01

    Chlorpromazine, a widely used tranquilizing drug of the phenothiazine group, was found to be a very potent photochemical inactivator of both deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses in the presence of long-wave ultraviolet light (320 to 380 nm). Neither the light alone nor chlorpromazine alone caused any appreciable inactivation. The known chlorpromazine photoreactions with nucleic acids are somewhat similar to those of psoralen (furocoumarin) derivatives. As in the case of the psoralens, chlorpromazine is capable of photoinactivating viruses totally within a few minutes under near-physiological or other gentle conditions. The antiviral effects of the chlorpromazine photoreaction could make it valuable for the development of inactivated viral vaccines as well as for use in the photochemotherapy of viral dermatoses. PMID:464574

  12. Melatonin: a universal time messenger.

    PubMed

    Erren, Thomas C; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-01-01

    Temporal organization plays a key role in humans, and presumably all species on Earth. A core building block of the chronobiological architecture is the master clock, located in the suprachi asmatic nuclei [SCN], which organizes "when" things happen in sub-cellular biochemistry, cells, organs and organisms, including humans. Conceptually, time messenging should follow a 5 step-cascade. While abundant evidence suggests how steps 1 through 4 work, step 5 of "how is central time information transmitted througout the body?" awaits elucidation. Step 1: Light provides information on environmental (external) time; Step 2: Ocular interfaces between light and biological (internal) time are intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells [ipRGS] and rods and cones; Step 3: Via the retinohypothalamic tract external time information reaches the light-dependent master clock in the brain, viz the SCN; Step 4: The SCN translate environmental time information into biological time and distribute this information to numerous brain structures via a melanopsin-based network. Step 5: Melatonin, we propose, transmits, or is a messenger of, internal time information to all parts of the body to allow temporal organization which is orchestrated by the SCN. Key reasons why we expect melatonin to have such role include: First, melatonin, as the chemical expression of darkness, is centrally involved in time- and timing-related processes such as encoding clock and calendar information in the brain; Second, melatonin travels throughout the body without limits and is thus a ubiquitous molecule. The chemial conservation of melatonin in all tested species could make this molecule a candidate for a universal time messenger, possibly constituting a legacy of an all-embracing evolutionary history.

  13. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) Technology for control of Asian citrus psyllid - You Tube

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNAi, Ribonucleic acid interference, function and application are described to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control to the citrus industry....

  14. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and markedly different system-level responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active, with large magnetic field components normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was stable. In contrast, the IMF during the third flyby varied from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited during that encounter to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Instead, plasmoid release was highly correlated with four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects provide a basis for comparison and contrast with what is known about the response of the Earth s magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  15. Details of MESSENGER Impact Location

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-29

    These graphics show the current best prediction of the location and time of NASA MESSENGER impact on Mercury surface. These current best estimates are: Date: 30 April 2015 Time: 3:26:02 pm EDT 19:26:02 UTC Latitude: 54.4° N Longitude: 210.1° E. Traveling at 3.91 kilometers per second (over 8,700 miles per hour), the MESSENGER spacecraft will collide with Mercury's surface, creating a crater estimated to be 16 meters (52 feet) in diameter. View this image to learn about the named features and geology of this region on Mercury. Instruments: Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) and Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) Top Image Latitude Range: 49°-59° N Top Image Longitude Range: 204°-217° E Topography in Top Image: Exaggerated by a factor of 5.5. Colors in Top Image: Coded by topography. The tallest regions are colored red and are roughly 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) higher than low-lying areas such as the floors of impact craters, colored blue. Scale in Top Image: The large crater on the left side of the image is Janacek, with a diameter of 48 kilometers (30 miles) http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19443

  16. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  17. Bifunctional transfer-messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Nitya S.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is a bifunctional RNA that has properties of a tRNA and an mRNA. tmRNA uses these two functions to release ribosomes stalled during translation and target the nascent polypeptides for degradation. This concerted reaction, known as trans-translation, contributes to translational quality control and regulation of gene expression in bacteria. tmRNA is conserved throughout bacteria, and is one of the most abundant RNAs in the cell, suggesting that trans-translation is of fundamental importance for bacterial fitness. Mutants lacking tmRNA activity typically have severe phenotypes, including defects in viability, virulence, and responses to environmental stresses. PMID:21664408

  18. Neutralino Dark Matter in Gauge Messenger Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Kyu Jung

    2008-11-23

    The lightest neutralino is one of the best candidate for dark matter. In gauge messenger models, It is generic that bino and wino masses are almostly degenerate. Because of this, neutralino annihilation becomes more efficient. Also, gauge messenger models have squeezed mass spectrum so that there are many resonance and co-annihilation regions, and can give correct amount of neutralino relic density.

  19. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  20. Properties of Caulobacter Ribonucleic Acid Bacteriophage φCb5

    PubMed Central

    Bendis, Inakaren; Shapiro, Lucille

    1970-01-01

    The ribonucleic acid (RNA) bacteriophage φCb5, which specifically infects only one form of the dimorphic stalked bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, has been obtained in high yield. Since the phage is extremely salt-sensitive, a purification procedure was devised which avoided contact with solutions of high ionic strength. Phage φCb5 was studied with respect to the physical and chemical properties of both the phage and its RNA. In an electron microscope, the phage particles appear as small polyhedra, 23 nm in diameter. The phage is similar to the Escherichia coli RNA phages in that it (i) sediments at an S20, w of 70.6S, (ii) is composed of a single molecule of single-stranded RNA and a protein coat, (iii) contains two structural proteins, and (iv) apparently contains the genetic capacity to code for a coat protein subunit, a maturation-like protein, and an RNA polymerase. Phage φCb5 differs from the E. coli RNA phages in (i) host specificity, (ii) salt sensitivity, and (iii) the presence of histidine, but not methionine, in the coat protein. Images PMID:5495512

  1. INFECTIVITY OF RIBONUCLEIC ACID FROM POLIOVIRUS IN HUMAN CELL MONOLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Hattie E.; Koch, Gebhard; Mountain, Isabel Morgan; Van Damme, Olga

    1958-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid prepared by the method of Gierer and Schramm from concentrated and partially purified types I and II polioviruses has been demonstrated to be infectious for HeLa and human amnion cells in monolayers. In areas of cytopathogenic action resulting from invasion of cells by RNA, intact poliovirus, of the type from which the RNA had been prepared, is present. The infectivity of the RNA was completely inactivated by a 2 minute exposure to purified ribonuclease or to whole normal monkey serum shown to contain measurable concentrations of this enzyme. Whole virus infectivity was not influenced by RNAase or whole normal monkey serum. Normal and polio-immune globulin, desoxyribonuclease, lysozyme, proteolytic enzymes, and bovine albumin failed to inactivate the infectivity of RNA. The degree of infectivity of isolated RNA from poliovirus for cells in monolayer was greatly influenced by the ionic strength of the environment. The experimental evidence suggests that isolated poliovirus RNA is the carrier of the biological activity responsible for infection of cells and for transmission of genetic information which controls type specificity. PMID:13575680

  2. Stimulation of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Chloramphenicol in a rel+ Aminoacyl-Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Synthetase Mutant of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yegian, Charles D.; Vanderslice, Rebecca W.

    1971-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain 9D3 possesses a highly temperature-sensitive valyl-transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthetase (EC 6.1.1.9). Since 9D3 is a rel+ strain, it cannot carry out net RNA synthesis at high temperature. A 100-μg amount of chloramphenicol (CAP) per ml added in the absence of valine cannot stimulate RNA synthesis. Either 300 μg of CAP or 100 μg of CAP plus 50 μg of valine per ml, however, promotes nearly maximal RNA synthesis. These results can be understood as follows. (i) Valyl-tRNA is required for net RNA synthesis, (ii) the synthetase lesion is incomplete, (iii) the rate of mutant acylation of tRNAval at high temperature is valine-dependent, and (iv) the CAP concentration determines the rate of residual protein synthesis. Data are also presented which demonstrate that the rate of net RNA synthesis can greatly increase long after the addition of CAP, if the amount of valyl-tRNA increases. PMID:4942766

  3. MESSENGER: Exploring the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    One of Earth's closest planetary neighbors, Mercury remained comparatively unexplored for the more than three decades that followed the three flybys of the innermost planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft in 1974-75. Mariner 10 imaged 45% of Mercury's surface at about 1 km/pixel average resolution, confirmed Mercury's anomalously high bulk density and implied large fractional core size, discovered Mercury's internal magnetic field, documented that H and He are present in the planet's tenuous exosphere, and made the first exploration of Mercury's magnetosphere and solar wind environment. Ground-based astronomers later reported Na, K, and Ca in Mercury's exosphere; the presence of deposits in the floors of polar craters having radar characteristics best matched by water ice; and strong evidence from the planet's forced libration amplitude that Mercury has a fluid outer core. Spacecraft exploration of Mercury resumed with the selection for flight, under NASA's Discovery Program, of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. Launched in 2004, MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet three times in 2008-2009 en route to becoming the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury in March of this year. MESSENGER's first chemical remote sensing measurements of Mercury's surface indicate that the planet's bulk silicate fraction differs from those of the other inner planets, with a low-Fe surface composition intermediate between basalts and ultramafic rocks and best matched among terrestrial rocks by komatiites. Moreover, surface materials are richer in the volatile constituents S and K than predicted by most planetary formation models. Global image mosaics and targeted high-resolution images (to resolutions of 10 m/pixel) reveal that Mercury experienced globally extensive volcanism, including large expanses of plains emplaced as flood lavas and widespread examples of pyroclastic deposits likely emplaced during explosive eruptions of volatile

  4. The Mercury exosphere after MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary; McClintock, William; Vervack, Ronald; Merkel, Aimee; Burger, Matthew; Cassidy, Timothy; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2016-07-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed sodium, calcium and magnesium emisison in Mercury's exosphere on a near-daily basis for >16 Mercury years. The MASCS observations showed that calcium in Mercury's exosphere is persistently concentrated in the dawn hemisphere and is of extreme temperature (>50,000 K). The column abundance varies seasonally, and is extremely repeatable each Mercury year. In addition, the calcium exhibits a persistent maximum not at perihelion but 20° after perihelion, an enhancement that was shown to be coincident with the probable intersection of Mercury's orbit with a dust stream originating at Comet Encke. Any mechanism producing the Mercurian Ca exosphere must explain the facts that the Ca is extremely hot, that it is seen almost exclusively on the dawnside of the planet, and that its content varies seasonally, not sporadically. Energization of the Ca atoms was suggested to originate through dissociation of Ca-bearing molecules ejected by meteoritic impacts. Magnesium was also observed on a daily basis throughout the MESSENGER orbital phase. Mg has its own spatial and temporal pattern, peaking at mid-morning instead of early morning like Ca, and exhibiting a warm thermal profile, about 5000 K, unlike the extreme temperature of Ca which is an order of magnitude hotter. Although Mercury's sodium exosphere has been observed from the ground for many decades, the MASCS observations showed that, like calcium, the sodium exosphere is dominated by seasonal variations, not sporadic variations. However a conundrum exists as to why ground-based observations show highly variable high-latitude variations that eluded the MASCS. The origin of a persistent south polar enhancement has not been explained. The more volatile element, Na, is again colder, about 1200 K, but not thermally accommodated to the surface temperature. A

  5. The Magnetometer Instrument on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Acuña, Mario H.; Lohr, David A.; Scheifele, John; Raval, Asseem; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.

    2007-08-01

    The Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is a low-noise, tri-axial, fluxgate instrument with its sensor mounted on a 3.6-m-long boom. The boom was deployed on March 8, 2005. The primary MAG science objectives are to determine the structure of Mercury’s intrinsic magnetic field and infer its origin. Mariner 10 observations indicate a planetary moment in the range 170 to 350 nT R {M/3} (where R M is Mercury’s mean radius). The uncertainties in the dipole moment are associated with the Mariner 10 trajectory and variability of the measured field. By orbiting Mercury, MESSENGER will significantly improve the determination of dipole and higher-order moments. The latter are essential to understanding the thermal history of the planet. MAG has a coarse range, ±51,300 nT full scale (1.6-nT resolution), for pre-flight testing, and a fine range, ±1,530 nT full scale (0.047-nT resolution), for Mercury operation. A magnetic cleanliness program was followed to minimize variable and static spacecraft-generated fields at the sensor. Observations during and after boom deployment indicate that the fixed residual field is less than a few nT at the location of the sensor, and initial observations indicate that the variable field is below 0.05 nT at least above about 3 Hz. Analog signals from the three axes are low-pass filtered (10-Hz cutoff) and sampled simultaneously by three 20-bit analog-to-digital converters every 50 ms. To accommodate variable telemetry rates, MAG provides 11 output rates from 0.01 s-1 to 20 s-1. Continuous measurement of fluctuations is provided with a digital 1-10 Hz bandpass filter. This fluctuation level is used to trigger high-time-resolution sampling in eight-minute segments to record events of interest when continuous high-rate sampling is not possible. The MAG instrument will provide accurate characterization of the intrinsic planetary field, magnetospheric structure, and

  6. MESSENGER'S First and Second Flybys of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only approximately 1000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th and October 6th, 2008 close flybys of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

  7. MESSENGER Team Presents Latest Science Results

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-30

    This mosaic was assembled using NAC images acquired as the MESSENGER spacecraft approached the planet during the mission second Mercury flyby The Rembrandt impact basin is seen at the center of the mosaic.

  8. Characterization of the Subunit Structure of the Ribonucleic Acid Genome of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, L. J.; Content, J.; Leppla, S. H.

    1971-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid extracted from influenza virus was labeled at the 3′ termini with 3H and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Influenza virus was found to contain a minimum of seven and possibly as many as 10 polynucleotide chains, most of which appear to terminate at the 3′ end in uridine. PMID:4332140

  9. Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) technology for control of Asian citrus psyllid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribonucleic acid interference, RNAi, applications and function are described for the non-scientist to bring a better understanding of how this emerging technology is providing environmentally friendly, non-transgenic, insect pest control to the citrus industry. Two part Video presentation....

  10. Higgs mass from neutrino-messenger mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byakti, Pritibhajan; Khosa, Charanjit K.; Mummidi, V. S.; Vempati, Sudhir K.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV has put strong constraints on minimal messenger models of gauge mediation, pushing the stop masses into the multi-TeV regime. Extensions of these models with matter-messenger mixing terms have been proposed to generate a large trilinear parameter, A t , relaxing these constraints. The detailed survey of these models [1, 2] so far considered messenger mixings with only MSSM superfields. In the present work, we extend the survey to MSSM with inverse-seesaw mechanism. The neutrino-sneutrino corrections to the Higgs mass in the inverse seesaw model are not significant in the minimal gauge mediation model, unless one considers messenger-matter interaction terms. We classify all possible models with messenger-matter interactions and perform thorough numerical analysis to find out the promising models. We found that out of the 17 possible models 9 of them can lead to Higgs mass within the observed value without raising the sfermion masses significantly. The successful models have stop masses ˜1.5 TeV with small or negligible mixing and yet a light CP even Higgs at 125 GeV.

  11. Sweet spot supersymmetry and composite messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2008-05-01

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenological effective Lagrangian of weak scale supersymmetry with a certain set of natural assumptions. This framework is designed to avoid problems in low-energy phenomenology and cosmology of supersymmetric models. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation, whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 105 GeV ≲Mmess ≲1010 GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields Nmess are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  12. Sweet Spot Supersymmetry and Composite Messengers

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro

    2007-10-30

    Sweet spot supersymmetry is a phenomenologically and cosmologically perfect framework to realize a supersymmetric world at short distance. We discuss a class of dynamical models of supersymmetry breaking and its mediation whose low-energy effective description falls into this framework. Hadron fields in the dynamical models play a role of the messengers of the supersymmetry breaking. As is always true in the models of the sweet spot supersymmetry, the messenger scale is predicted to be 10{sup 5} GeV {approx}< M{sub mess} {approx}< 10{sup 10} GeV. Various values of the effective number of messenger fields N{sub mess} are possible depending on the choice of the gauge group.

  13. Messenger ribonucleoprotein complexes isolated by oligodeoxythymidylate-cellulose chromatography from Neurospora crassa polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Mirkes, P E

    1977-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes were isolated from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dissociated polysomes of Neurospora crassa. Approximately 15% of the [3H]uridine incorporated into polysomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) during a 15-min pulse was eluted from oligodeoxythymidylate-cellulose as an mRNP complex. The isolated mRNP complexes exhibited sedimentation coefficients ranging from 15S to greater than 60S. RNA isolated from these mRNP complexes sedimented in sucrose gradients between 4S and 40S, with broad peaks at 15S and 24S. The buoyant density of mRNP complexes eluted with 25% formamide was 1.42 to 1.44 g/cm3, whereas for mRNP complexes eluted with 50% formamide it was 1.48 to 1.50 g/cm3. Six polypeptides, with molecular weights of 14,000, 19,000, 24,000, 31,000, 44,000, and 66,000, were associated with mRNP complexes eluted with 25% formamide. The mRNP complexes eluted with 50% formamide had one associated polypeptide, of molecular weight 27,000. PMID:141447

  14. Intercultural Learning via Instant Messenger Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Li; Erben, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating the viability of instant messenger (IM) interaction to facilitate intercultural learning in a foreign language class. Eight students in a Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) class participated in the study. Each student was paired with a native speaker (NS) of Chinese, and each pair…

  15. MESSENGER Gets Closer to Mercury than Ever Before

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-28

    MESSENGER Gets Closer to Mercury than Ever Before. This image is one of the highest resolution images taken by NASA MESSENGER spacecraft to date. It features a field of secondary craters in Mercury northern smooth plains.

  16. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in yeast. The effect of cycloheximide on the synthesis of ribonucleic acid in Saccharomyces carlsbergensis

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, S. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Cycloheximide causes the release of the control amino acids have over RNA synthesis in Saccharomyces carlsbergensis N.C.T.C. 74. 2. The antibiotic causes a gradual deceleration of RNA formation. After incubation for 60min. at 30° RNA synthesis usually proceeds at a rate only a few per cent of that of the untreated control. 3. In the presence of cycloheximide two types of RNA accumulate in the cell: soluble RNA and a high-molecular-weight RNA. The latter has a base composition intermediate between those of yeast DNA and yeast ribosomal RNA, and sediments in a sucrose gradient at a rate faster than that of the 23s ribosomal RNA component. 4. Yeast ribosomal RNA contains methylated bases. Judged from the incorporation of [Me-14C]methionine, the extent of methylation of ribosomal RNA is about 20% of that of the `soluble' RNA fraction. The high-molecular-weight RNA formed in the presence of cycloheximide is less methylated than normal RNA. In this case the sucrose-density-gradient sedimentation patterns of newly methylated and newly synthesized RNA do not coincide. 5. In the presence of cycloheximide, polysomal material accumulates, indicating that messenger RNA is formed. 6. The effect of the antibiotic on protein and RNA synthesis can be abolished by washing of the cells. The RNA that has accumulated during incubation of the cells with the antibiotic is not stable on removal of cycloheximide. 7. The results presented in this study are discussed in relation to the regulation of RNA formation in yeast. PMID:5964958

  17. Shift in the prevalent human rotavirus detected by ribonucleic acid segment differences.

    PubMed

    Espejo, R T; Muñóz, O; Serafin, F; Romero, P

    1980-02-01

    Rotavirus was purified from nine patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis from October to December, 1978, in Mexico City. Analysis of their ribonucleic acids by gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two distinct patterns (2s and 22) which had been observed in 1977, but which now were found in a very different proportion: the pattern called 2s, observed in only 11% (6 of 52) of the patients in 1977, was found in 90% (8 of 9) of the patients in 1978. Improvements in the electrophoretic method allowed us to observe differences in the migration of up to seven segments between the two patterns and to distinguish small differences in one or two segments within either of the two ribonucleic acid patterns.

  18. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Slavin, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90%coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80%coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission angles

  19. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early orbital operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Slavin, James A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Finnegan, Eric J.; Grant, David G.; MESSENGER Team

    2014-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  20. MESSENGER at Mercury: Early Orbital Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr; Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 under NASA's Discovery Program, was inserted into orbit about the planet Mercury in March 2011. MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury in 2008-2009 marked the first spacecraft visits to the innermost planet since the Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975. The unprecedented orbital operations are yielding new insights into the nature and evolution of Mercury. The scientific questions that frame the MESSENGER mission led to the mission measurement objectives to be achieved by the seven payload instruments and the radio science experiment. Interweaving the full set of required orbital observations in a manner that maximizes the opportunity to satisfy all mission objectives and yet meet stringent spacecraft pointing and thermal constraints was a complex optimization problem that was solved with a software tool that simulates science observations and tracks progress toward meeting each objective. The final orbital observation plan, the outcome of that optimization process, meets all mission objectives. MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring a global monochromatic image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution, a global color image mosaic at better than 90% coverage and at least 1 km average resolution, and global stereo imaging at better than 80% coverage and at least 250 m average resolution. Higher-resolution images are also being acquired of targeted areas. The elemental remote sensing instruments, including the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer and the X-Ray Spectrometer, are being operated nearly continuously and will establish the average surface abundances of most major elements. The Visible and Infrared Spectrograph channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer is acquiring a global map of spectral reflectance from 300 to 1450 nm wavelength at a range of incidence and emission

  1. Gene organization around the phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase locus in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Comer, M M

    1981-01-01

    The organization of seven genes located at about 38 min on the genetic map of Escherichia coli was examined; these genes included pheS and pheT, which code for the alpha and beta subunits of phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase, and thrS, the structural gene for threonyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase. Deletion mutants were isolated from an F-prime-containing merodiploid strain and were characterized genetically. Seventeen different kinds of deletions extending into pheS of pheT were identified. These deletions unambiguously defined the gene order as aroD pps himA pheT pheS thrS pfkB. Mutants with deletions covering either pheS or pheT, but not both, were analyzed further by assay of phenylalanyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase. The phenotype of the mutants with a deletion from pfkB through pheS was anomalous; although the pheT gene was apparently still present, its product, the beta subunit, was much reduced in activity. PMID:7012115

  2. Attitude Sensor and Gyro Calibration for Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Pittelkau, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    The Redundant Inertial Measurement Unit Attitude Determination/Calibration (RADICAL(TM)) filter was used to estimate star tracker and gyro calibration parameters using MESSENGER telemetry data from three calibration events. We present an overview of the MESSENGER attitude sensors and their configuration is given, the calibration maneuvers are described, the results are compared with previous calibrations, and variations and trends in the estimated calibration parameters are examined. The warm restart and covariance bump features of the RADICAL(TM) filter were used to estimate calibration parameters from two disjoint telemetry streams. Results show that the calibration parameters converge faster with much less transient variation during convergence than when the filter is cold-started at the start of each telemetry stream.

  3. The Energy Messenger, Number 1, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, J.

    1995-01-01

    `The Energy Messenger` is a Department of Energy publication on energy activities of interest to American Indians. The first issue of 1995 (in a magazine format) includes articles on: tribes winning grants to develop energy resources, recruiting of internships for DOE, information about Title XXVI-Indian Energy Resources, American Indian Heritage Month, tribal perspective on DOE actions, joint ventures between tribes and the DOE, and brief description of recent DOE activities.

  4. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  5. Messenger RNA Methylation Regulates Glioblastoma Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Deobrat; Xie, Qi; Rich, Jeremy N; Zhao, Jing Crystal

    2017-04-10

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) modification provides an additional layer of gene regulation in cells. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Zhang et al. report that ALKBH5, a demethylase of the mRNA modification N(6)-methyladenosine, regulates proliferation and self-renewal of glioblastoma stem-like cells by modulating pre-mRNA stability and expression of the FOXM1 gene.

  6. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-10-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft to infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The hot portion of the source appears to be highly variable. The authors acknowledge support from NASA through the MESSENGER Participating Scientist Program and Planetary Atmospheres research grants.

  7. Holographic gauge mediation via strongly coupled messengers

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirk, Paul; Shiu, Gary; Sumitomo, Yoske

    2010-01-15

    We consider a relative of semidirect gauge mediation where the hidden sector exists at large 't Hooft coupling. Such scenarios can be difficult to describe using perturbative field theory methods but may fall into the class of holographic gauge mediation scenarios, meaning that they are amenable to the techniques of gauge/gravity duality. We use a recently found gravity solution to examine one such case, where the hidden sector is a cascading gauge theory resulting in a confinement scale not much smaller than the messenger mass. In the original construction of holographic gauge mediation, as in other examples of semidirect gauge mediation at strong coupling, the primary contributions to visible sector soft terms come from weakly coupled messenger mesons. In contrast to these examples, we describe the dual of a gauge theory where there are significant contributions from scales in which the strongly coupled messenger quarks are the effective degrees of freedom. In this regime, the visible sector gaugino mass can be calculated entirely from holography.

  8. Occupational injuries among Boston bicycle messengers.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Jack Tigh; Meeker, John D

    2002-12-01

    Urban bicycle couriers may have a high incidence of injuries. Most messengers work as contractors and hence their injuries are not well documented. To quantify injury rates and severity among urban bicycle couriers a convenience sample of 113 couriers in the city of Boston completed a two-page self-administered survey. Most working couriers have suffered at least one injury resulting either in days lost from work (70%) and in visits to a health-care professional or hospital (55%). The annual incidence rate for injuries resulting in days away from work was 47/100-bike couriers. Bone fractures accounted for the most days lost from work, followed by dislocations, sprains, and strains. Collisions and avoiding collisions with motor vehicles, including being "doored," and collisions with pedestrians accounted for the majority (66%) of events leading to injury. Twenty-four percent of messengers reported wearing a helmet on a regular basis, and 32% have health insurance. Urban bicycle messengers are a poorly documented, largely unstudied workforce who suffer a very high rate of occupational injury. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. MESSENGER: The Discovery Mission to Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.; Gold, R. E.; Domingue, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    NASA's MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochenistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched on 3 August 2004, has begun its voyage to initiate a new era in our understanding of the terrestrial planets. The mission, spacecraft, and payload are designed to answer six fundamental questions regarding the innermost planet: What planetary formational processes led to Mercury's high metal/silicate ratio? What is the geological history of Mercury? What are the nature and origin of Mercury's magnetic field? What are the structure and state of Mercury's core? What are the radar-reflective materials at Mercury's poles? What are the important volatile species and their sources and sinks on and near Mercury? Planet formational hypotheses will be tested by measuring the surface abundances of major elements by X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. The geological history will be determined from high-resolution color imaging of the heavily cratered highlands, intercrater plains, and smooth plains. MESSENGER will provide detailed views of both the Caloris basin and its antipodal terrain. Topographic, mineralogical, and elemental abundance data will be used to seek evidence of volcanic features and units. Measurement of Mercury's magnetic field and its interaction with the solar wind will distinguish the intrinsic dipole and quadrupole components while separating these from the current systems driven by solar-wind-induced convection. The structure of the internal field will put constraints on dynamo models. Such models will also be constrained by measuring Mercury's libration to determine the extent of a fluid outer core. Both water ice and sulfur have been postulated as major constituents of the high-radar-backscatter polar deposits. MESSENGER will combine gamma-ray and neutron spectrometry of the surface with ultraviolet spectrometry and in situ particle measurements to detect both neutral and charged species originating from the surface. Such measurements will address the

  10. Chronic improvement of amino acid nutrition stimulates initiation of global messenger ribonucleic acid translation in tissues of sheep without affecting protein elongation.

    PubMed

    Connors, M T; Poppi, D P; Cant, J P

    2010-02-01

    Initiation of mRNA translation and elongation of the polypeptide chain are 2 regulated processes responsible for the short-term postprandial acceleration of protein synthesis in animal tissues. It is known that a chronic increase in the absorptive supply of AA stimulates protein synthesis in ruminant animals, but effects on translation initiation and elongation are unknown. To determine whether initiation or elongation phases of global mRNA translation are affected by chronic elevation of AA supply, 24 ewe lambs of 25.9 +/- 2.5 kg of BW were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups of 6 lambs each. All lambs received a basal diet of barley and hay at 1.2 times maintenance ME intake. Treatments were an intravenous (i.v.) saline infusion as a control, i.v. infusion of 6 essential AA (EAA; Arg, Lys, His, Thr, Met, Cys) for 10 d, i.v. infusion of the same EAA excluding Met and Cys (EAA-SAA) for 10 d, and an oral drench of fishmeal twice daily for 17 d. Fishmeal supplementation supplied an extra 719 mg of N x kg(-0.75) x d(-1) and N retention was increased 519 mg x kg(-0.75) x d(-1) over the control. The EAA treatment supplied an extra 343 mg of N x kg(-0.75) x d(-1) directly into the blood, and N balance was increased by 268 mg x kg(-0.75) x d(-1). Deletion of Met plus Cys from EAA had no effect on N balance. The results indicate that Met plus Cys did not limit body protein gain on the basal diet alone or the basal diet plus 6 AA. Protein fractional synthesis rates in liver, duodenum, skin, rumen, semimembranosus, and LM were measured by a flooding dose procedure using L-[ring-2,6-(3)H]-Phe. Ribosome transit times were estimated from the ratio of nascent to total protein-bound radioactivities. Fishmeal and EAA treatments had no effect on RNA, DNA, or protein contents of tissues, but fractional synthesis rate, translational efficiency, and concentrations of active ribosomes were consistently elevated. Ribosome transit time was not affected by long-term AA supply. We conclude that the chronic stimulation of protein synthesis by long-term i.v. infusion of EAA or supplementation with an undegradable protein source is brought about by an improvement in the rate of initiation of mRNA translation with no change in the rate of polypeptide chain elongation.

  11. Effects of heat stress on proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of heat shock protein messenger ribonucleic acid in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Hathaway, M R; Dayton, W R

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that heat stress (HS) negatively affects growth rate in swine. Although reduced feed intake undoubtedly plays a significant role in this reduction, studies in laboratory animals and other nonswine species indicate muscle growth also is affected by HS-related alterations in muscle physiology. Evidence is now emerging that heat shock proteins (Hsp), produced in response to HS and other types of cellular stress, may play an important role in regulating the rate and efficiency of muscle growth. Because muscle satellite cells play a crucial role in postnatal muscle growth, the effects of HS on rates of satellite cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation play an important role in determining the rate and extent of muscle growth. Consequently, in the current study we have examined the effects of mild HS (40.5°C for 48 h) on the rates of proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation and on quantities of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA and protein in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells (PSC). Mild HS of PSC cultures resulted in 2.5-, 1.4-, and 6.5-fold increases (P < 0.05) in the abundance of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA, respectively, relative to control cultures. Abundance of Hsp 90, 70, and 25/27 proteins was also increased in HS PSC cultures compared with those in control cultures. Proliferation rates in HS PSC cultures were 35% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. Protein synthesis rates in HS-fused PSC cultures were 85% greater (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures, and protein degradation rates in HS-fused PSC were 23% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. In light of the crucial role satellite cells play in postnatal muscle growth, the HS-induced changes we have observed in rates of proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of Hsp mRNA and Hsp protein in PSC cultures indicate that mild HS affects the physiology of PSC in ways that could affect muscle growth in swine.

  12. Studies on the intracellular segregation of polyribosome-associated messenger ribonucleic acid species in the lactating guinea-pig mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, R K; Boulton, A P; Harrison, O S; Parker, D; Campbell, P N

    1979-01-01

    1. Free and membrane-bound polyribosomes were isolated and the associated mRNA species characterized by cell-free protein synthesis, RNA-complexity analysis and polyribosome run-off in vitro. 2. Of the recovered polyribosomal RNA 85% was associated with membrane-bound polyribosomes and contained 87--93% of the total milk-protein mRNA species as assessed by cell-free protein synthesis or RNA-complexity analysis. 3. RNA-complexity analysis showed that the abundant (milk-protein mRNA assumed) species constituted 55% of the post-nuclear poly(A)-containing RNA population, the remainder consisting of a moderately abundant population (18%) and a low abundance population (27%). Calculations suggest that each population contained up to 2, 48 and 5000 different species respectively. 4. RNA-complexity analysis of the free polyribosomal poly(A)-containing RNA demonstrated that all the species in the post-nuclear fraction were present, though in different proportions, the abundant, moderately abundant and low-abundance groups representing 38, 30 and 32% of this population. 5. RNA-complexity analysis of the membrane-bound polyribosomal poly(A)-containing RNA revealed a more limited population, 72% consisting of the abundant (milk-protein mRNA) species, and 28% a population of up to 900 RNA species. 6. Polyribosome run-off confirmed that milk-protein mRNA was associated with the membrane-bound and free polyribosomes, but represented only a small fraction of the total protein synthesized by the latter. 7. Comparative analysis of milk proteins synthesized in mRNA-directed cell-free systems, or by run-off of free and of membrane-bound polyribosomes, is consistent with the interpretation that in vivo the initiation of protein synthesis occurs on free polyribosomes, followed by the attachment of a limited population to the endoplasmic reticulum. After attachment, but before completion of peptide synthesis, the detachable N-terminal peptide sequence of one of these(pre-alpha-lactalbumin) is removed. 8. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms involved in the intracellular segregation of mRNA species in the lactating guinea-pig mammary gland. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. PMID:518553

  13. Control of oestradiol secretion and of cytochrome P450 aromatase messenger ribonucleic acid accumulation by FSH involves different intracellular pathways in oestrogenic bovine granulosa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Silva, J M; Hamel, M; Sahmi, M; Price, C A

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the major intracellular signalling pathways used by FSH and insulin to stimulate cytochrome P450 aromatase (Cyp19) mRNA and oestradiol accumulation in oestrogenic bovine granulosa cells in vitro. Bovine granulosa cells from small follicles (2-4 mm diameter) were cultured for 6 days under non-luteinizing conditions in the presence of insulin at 100 ng/ml, or insulin (10 ng/ml) and FSH (1 ng/ml). On day 4 of culture, specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY-294002), protein kinase C (PKC; GF-109203X), protein kinase A (PKA; H-89) or mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation (PD-98059) were added. The addition of PI3K and PKC inhibitors, but not of PKA inhibitor, significantly decreased insulin-stimulated Cyp19 mRNA levels and oestradiol accumulation (P < 0.001). The PKA inhibitor significantly decreased FSH-stimulated Cyp19 mRNA abundance and oestradiol secretion, whereas PI3K and PKC inhibitors decreased oestradiol secretion without affecting Cyp19 mRNA accumulation. Inhibition of MAP kinase pathway significantly increased Cyp19 mRNA abundance in insulin- and FSH-stimulated cells. P450scc mRNA levels and progesterone secretion were not affected by any inhibitor in either experiment. Although FSH stimulates Cyp19 expression predominantly through PKA, oestradiol secretion is altered by PI3K and PKC pathways independently of Cyp19 mRNA levels. In addition, we suggest that Cyp19 is under tonic inhibition mediated through a MAP kinase pathway.

  14. Regulation of rat APJ receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in magnocellular neurones of the paraventricular and supraopric nuclei by osmotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    O'Carroll, A-M; Lolait, S J

    2003-07-01

    The novel apelin receptor (APJ receptor, APJR) has a restricted expression in the central nervous system suggestive of an involvement in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. The endogenous ligand for APJR, apelin, is also highly concentrated in regions that are involved in the control of drinking behaviour. While the physiological roles of APJR and apelin are not fully known, apelin has been shown to stimulate drinking behaviour in rats and to have a regulatory effect on vasopressin release from magnocellular neurones of the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. To determine the role of APJR in the regulation of water balance, this study examined the effects of osmotic stimulation on the expression of APJR mRNA in the magnocellular PVN (mPVN) and SON of salt-loaded and water-deprived rats. Intake of 2% NaCl and water deprivation for 48 h induced expression of APJR mRNA in the mPVN and SON. Using dual-label in situ hybridization histochemistry, we also investigated whether APJR is colocalized within vasopressin neurones in control, salt-loaded and water-deprived rats. APJR mRNA was found to colocalize with a small population of vasopressin-containing magnocellular neurones in control and water-deprived rats. Salt-loading resulted in an increased colocalization of APJR and vasopressin mRNAs in the SON. These data verify a role for APJ receptors in body fluid regulation and suggest a role for apelin in the regulation of vasopressin-containing neurones via a local autocrine/paracrine action of the peptide.

  15. Uncoupling protein-1 and related messenger ribonucleic acids in human epicardial and other adipose tissues: epicardial fat functioning as brown fat.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Harold S; Fain, John N; Holman, Ben; Cheema, Paramjeet; Chary, Aron; Parks, Frank; Karas, James; Optican, Robert; Bahouth, Suleiman W; Garrett, Edward; Wolf, Rodney Y; Carter, Russell A; Robbins, Todd; Wolford, David; Samaha, Joseph

    2009-09-01

    Uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) is the inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is a specific marker for and mediator of nonshivering thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. This study was performed to better understand the putative thermogenic function of human epicardial fat. We measured the expression of UCP-1 and brown adipocyte differentiation transcription factors PR-domain-missing 16 (PRDM16) and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha) in epicardial, substernal, and sc thoracic, abdominal, and leg fat. The study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital cardiac center. Forty-four patients had coronary artery bypass surgery, and six had heart valve replacement. Fat samples were taken at open heart surgery. UCP-1 expression was 5-fold higher in epicardial fat than substernal fat and barely detectable in sc fat. Epicardial fat UCP-1 expression decreased with age, increased with body mass index, was similar in women and men and patients on and not on statin therapy, and showed no relationship to epicardial fat volume or waist circumference. UCP-1 expression was similar in patients without and with severe coronary atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. PRDM16 and PGC-1 alpha expression was 2-fold greater in epicardial than sc fat. Epicardial fat UCP-1, PRDM16, and PGC1-alpha mRNAs were similar in diabetics treated with thiazolidinediones compared to diabetics not treated with thiazolidinediones. Because UCP-1 is expressed at high levels in epicardial fat as compared to other fat depots, the possibility should be considered that epicardial fat functions like brown fat to defend the myocardium and coronary vessels against hypothermia. This process could be blunted in the elderly.

  16. Expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and chicken GnRH-II precursor messenger ribonucleic acids in the brain and ovary of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Lin, X W; Peter, R E

    1996-03-01

    The complementary DNAs (cDNA) encoding the [Trp7Leu8]gonadotropin-releasing hormone (salmon GnRH; sGnRH) precursor and the [His5Trp7Tyr8]GnRH (chicken GnRH-II; cGnRH-II) precursor of the goldfish brain were isolated and sequenced using reverse transcription and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The sGnRH precursor cDNA consists of 540 bp, including an open reading frame of 282 bp, and the cGnRH-II precursor cDNA consists of 682 bp, including an open reading frame of 258 bp. The 94 amino acid-long goldfish sGnRH precursor and 86 amino acid-long goldfish cGnRH-II precursor have the same molecular architecture as GnRH precursors identified to date in other vertebrate species. Using two sets of primers designed to be sense and antisense to the goldfish brain sGnRH precursor cDNA sequence, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of total RNA from brain and ovary at gonadal recrudescent, mature ( = prespawning), and postovulatory stages resulted in two predicted sizes of PCR products. The intensities of staining signals of ethidium bromide were similar between brain and ovary samples. The same RT-PCRs were carried out with two sets of primers for cGnRH-II precursor cDNA, resulting in two PCR products of predicted size; however, the ethidium bromide staining signals are much weaker for products amplified from ovarian cDNA than that from brain cDNA. Restriction enzyme analysis verified the expected RT-PCR products. Sequence analysis of ovarian sGnRH precursor cDNA generated by RACE of total RNA from recrudescent ovarian tissue revealed the identical sequence to that of the brain sGnRH cDNA. Northern blot analysis detected a single mRNA transcript of approximately 650 bases for the sGnRH precursor in both the brain and ovary, and 750 bases for the cGnRH-II precursor in the brain. These results demonstrate that two forms of GnRH precursor (sGnRH and cGnRH-II) mRNA are expressed in goldfish brain tissue and that the sGnRH transcript and a low level of cGnRH-II transcript are also expressed in the goldfish ovary.

  17. Differential regulation of two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid by gonadotropins in human immortalized ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Auersperg, Nelly; Leung, Peter C K

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been shown to play a role as an autocrine/ paracrine regulator of cell growth in ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer, the factors which regulate the expression of GnRH and its receptor in these cells are not well characterized. In the present study, we employed real-time PCR to determine the potential regulatory effect of gonadotropins on the expression levels of GnRH I (the mammalian GnRH), GnRH II (a second form of GnRH) and their common receptor (GnRHR) in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE-80 and IOSE-80PC) cells and ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1, CaOV-3, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3). The cells were treated with increasing concentrations (100 and 1000 ng/ml) of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) for 24 h. Treatment with FSH or LH reduced GnRH II mRNA levels in both IOSE cell lines and in three out of five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1 and OVCAR-3). A significant decrease in GnRHR mRNA levels was observed in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells, except CaOV-3 cells, following treatment with FSH or LH. In contrast, treatment with either FSH or LH had no effect on GnRH I mRNA levels in these cells, suggesting that gonadotropins regulate the two forms of GnRH and its receptor differentially. In separate experiments, the effect of gonadotropins on the anti-proliferative action of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in IOSE-80, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells was investigated. The cells were pretreated with FSH or LH (100 ng/ml) for 24 h after which they were treated with either GnRH I or GnRH II (100 ng/ml) for 2 days, and cell growth was assessed by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] assay. Pretreatment of the cells with FSH or LH significantly reversed the growth inhibitory effect of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in these cell types. These results provide the first demonstration of a potential interaction between gonadotropins and the GnRH system in the growth regulation of normal ovarian surface epithelium and its neoplastic counterparts.

  18. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat) binding sites but not stat3 are required for fasting-induced transcription of agouti-related protein messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kaelin, Christopher B; Gong, Lijie; Xu, Allison Wanting; Yao, Fayi; Hockman, Kristin; Morton, Gregory J; Schwartz, Michael W; Barsh, Gregory S; MacKenzie, Robert G

    2006-10-01

    Energy homeostasis depends on the regulation of hypothalamic neurons by leptin, an adipocyte hormone whose circulating levels communicate body energy stores. Leptin activates the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in hypothalamic neurons, including neuronal subtypes producing Agouti-related protein (Agrp), a neuropeptide that stimulates feeding. Previous studies have suggested a model in which high levels of Agrp transcription during fasting represent a default state that is actively repressed by phospho-Stat3 induced by leptin signaling in the fed state. We identify putative Stat3 binding elements in the Agrp promoter that have been highly conserved during vertebrate evolution. Using a reporter assay in transgenic mice that faithfully recapitulates normal regulation of Agrp, we show that these sites are required, but in a way opposite to that predicted by the existing model: mutation of the sites leads to a default state characterized by a low level of Agrp transcription and insensitivity to fasting. We also find that removing activatable Stat3 from Agrp neurons has no detectable effect on steady-state levels of Agrp mRNA in the fed or fasted state. These results suggest a new model for transcriptional regulation of orexigenic neuropeptides in which the default level of expression is low in the fed state, and transcriptional activation in response to fasting is mediated by factors other than Stat3.

  19. Molecular cloning of otoconin-22 complementary deoxyribonucleic acid in the bullfrog endolymphatic sac: effect of calcitonin on otoconin-22 messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tomura, Hideaki; Sasayama, Yuichi; Kikuyama, Sakae; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2003-08-01

    Anuran amphibians have a special organ called the endolymphatic sac (ELS), containing many calcium carbonate crystals, which is believed to have a calcium storage function. The major protein of aragonitic otoconia, otoconin-22, which is considered to be involved in the formation of calcium carbonate crystals, has been purified from the saccule of the Xenopus inner ear. In this study, we cloned a cDNA encoding otoconin-22 from the cDNA library constructed for the paravertebral lime sac (PVLS) of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, and sequenced it. The bullfrog otoconin-22 encoded a protein consisting of 147 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The protein had cysteine residues identical in a number and position to those conserved among the secretory phospholipase A(2) family. The mRNA of bullfrog otoconin-22 was expressed in the ELS, including the PVLS and inner ear. This study also revealed the presence of calcitonin receptor-like protein in the ELS, with the putative seven-transmembrane domains of the G protein-coupled receptors. The ultimobranchialectomy induced a prominent decrease in the otoconin-22 mRNA levels of the bullfrog PVLS. Supplementation of the ultimobranchialectomized bullfrogs with synthetic salmon calcitonin elicited a significant increase in the mRNA levels of the sac. These findings suggest that calcitonin secreted from the ultimobranchial gland, regulates expression of bullfrog otoconin-22 mRNA via calcitonin receptor-like protein on the ELS, thereby stimulating the formation of calcium carbonate crystals in the lumen of the ELS.

  20. The Small Intestinal Epithelia of Beef Steers Differentially Express Sugar Transporter Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Response to Abomasal Versus Ruminal Infusion of Starch Hydrolysate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In mammals, the absorption of mono¬saccharides from small intestinal lumen involves at least 3 sugar transporters (SugT): sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1; gene SLC5A1) transports glucose and galactose, whereas glucose transporter (GLUT) 5 (GLUT5; gene SLC2A5) transports fructose, acros...

  1. Dietary protein composition influences abundance of peptide and amino acid transporter messenger ribonucleic acid in the small intestine of 2 lines of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, E R; Li, H; Emmerson, D A; Webb, K E; Wong, E A

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dietary protein composition on mRNA abundance of a peptide transporter (peptide transporter 1, PepT1), amino acid (AA) transporters [Na(+)-independent cationic and zwitterionic AA transporter (b(o,+)AT), excitatory AA transporter 3 (EAAT3), Na(+)-independent cationic and Na(+)-dependent neutral AA transporter 2 (y(+)LAT2), L-type AA transporter 1 (LAT1), and cationic AA transporter 1 (CAT1)], and a digestive enzyme (aminopeptidase N) in 2 lines (A and B) of broilers that differentially express PepT1 mRNA (line B > line A). From d 8 to 15 posthatch, birds were fed 1 of 3 diets. Protein sources included whey protein concentrate, a whey partial hydrolysate (WPH), or a mixture of free AA (AA) identical to the composition of whey. Quantities of mRNA were assayed by real-time PCR in the small intestine of males at d 8, 9, 11, 13, and 15. For all genes except LAT1, abundance of mRNA was greatest in line B birds that consumed the WPH diet (P < 0.006). When mRNA abundance was normalized to beta-actin quantities, this effect disappeared, demonstrating a generalized effect on gene expression in line B birds that consumed the hydrolysate. There was a greater villus height:crypt depth ratio (P < 0.05) in line B birds fed the WPH diet as compared with line A. In conclusion, line B birds, which express greater PepT1, displayed enhanced intestinal mucosal absorptive surface area and differential regulation of PepT1, AA transporters, and aminopeptidase N in response to dietary protein composition.

  2. Correlation Between the Rate of Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis and the Level of Valyl Transfer Ribonucleic Acid in Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Sam

    1969-01-01

    By use of a mutant of Escherichia coli with a partially thermolabile transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) synthase, it was possible to regulate the rate of RNA synthesis over a 10-fold range. The addition of chloramphenicol to cultures kept at the nonpermissive temperature stimulated RNA synthesis. The longer the culture was kept at the nonpermissive temperature prior to addition of chloramphenicol, the lower was the resulting rate of RNA synthesis. The decrease in the rate of incorporation of labeled uracil into RNA was correlated with the decrease in the level of valyl tRNA. Additional experiments provided evidence which may be interpreted as indicating that valyl tRNA does not, by itself, react with the RNA-forming system. PMID:4891259

  3. Unsupervised Classification of MESSENGER MASC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sanctis, M. Cristina; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Ammannito, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft flew by Mercury as part of its journey to Mercury orbit insertion. The Mercury At-mospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) observed Mercury during the first two flybys, includ-ing high-spatial-and spectral-resolution visible to near-infrared (IR) spectra of the Mercury surface. The Visible and InfraRed Spectrograph (VIRS) component of MASCS consists of two linear photodiode arrays covering a spectral range 320-1450 nm. We applied classification method to MASCS data in order to extract information on the mineralogy of Mercury. The classification of the Messenger data will permit to obtain maps of Mercury surface, giving us indication of the different mineralogy and maturity present on the Hermean surface. The data were pre-processed applying photometric correction and the VIS and NIR data were collected in a single spectrum. The data set show very similar featureless spectra. The main differences are in the reflectance levels and in the spectral slopes. To emphasize the spectral differences we have normalized the spectra to an average reflectance spectrum for each flyby. This allows to point out variation of different regions with respect to the aver-age spectral behaviour. Two different approaches have been used to analyze MASCS data of the two Messenger flybys: ISODATA unsupervised classification and a classification based on three different spectral slopes (in the wavelengths' ranges 0.3-0.55, 0.55-0.8 and 0.95-1.49 µm). The identified classes shows differences linked with slopes and reflectance's level: the proposed methods allows to correlate the most important classes with different morphological features on Mercury's surface which differ for weathering, maturity and composition. Our analysis is done in order to test and verify these classification methods that shall be necessary to analyze similar data harvested by SIMBIO-SYS/VIHI (Visible and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager) aboard the future ESA's BepiColombo mission

  4. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  5. Mercury's Na Exosphere from MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.; Vervack, R. J.; McClintock, W. El; Merkel, A. W.; Sprague, A. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    MESSENGER entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UWS) channel of MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) has been observing Mercury's exosphere nearly continuously. Daily measurements of Na brightness were fitted with non-uniform exospheric models. With Monte Carlo sampling we traced the trajectories of a representative number of test particles, generally one million per run per source process, until photoionization, escape from the gravitational well, or permanent sticking at the surface removed the atom from the simulation. Atoms were assumed to partially thermally accommodate on each encounter with the surface with accommodation coefficient 0.25. Runs for different assumed source processes are run separately, scaled and co-added. Once these model results were saved onto a 3D grid, we ran lines of sight from the MESSENGER spacecraft :0 infinity using the SPICE kernels and we computed brightness integrals. Note that only particles that contribute to the measurement can be constrained with our method. Atoms and molecules produced on the nightside must escape the shadow in order to scatter light if the excitation process is resonant-light scattering, as assumed here. The aggregate distribution of Na atoms fits a 1200 K gas, with a PSD distribution, along with a hotter component. Our models constrain the hot component, assumed to be impact vaporization, to be emitted with a 2500 K Maxwellian. Most orbits show a dawnside enhancement in the hot component broadly spread over the leading hemisphere. However, on some dates there is no dawn/dusk asymmetry. The portion of the hot/cold source appears to be highly variable.

  6. [Pathophysiological implications of the chemical messengers].

    PubMed

    Blázquez Fernández, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    To maintain a physical organization and a different composition of its surroundings environment, living beings use a great part of the energy that they produce. Vital processes require an elevated number of reactions which are regulated and integrated by chemical messengers. They use autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and synaptic signals through receptors of cell surface, nuclear or associated with ionic chanels, enzymes, trimeric G proteins and to intracellular kinases. Through these mechanisms pheromones play an important role in the relationships between different individuals, and hormones are able to regulate the integrative functions of our organism. In the nervous system, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, sensors and receptors between other messengers, play functions of great relevance, while growth factors stimulate cell proliferation and cytokines have many effects but the most important is the ones related with the control of the immflamatory process. Alterations of these messengers permit us a better understanding of the diseases and possibly of its treatments in a near future. Modifications of the expression of genes from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomas are responsible of monogenic, polygenic and mitochondrial diseases, while alterations in the activities of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters are related with schizophrenia, Parkinson disease and depression, respectively. Other example is the hyperthyroidism of the Graves-Bassedow disease due to the competitive interference of the LATS immunoglobulin with TSH at the level of the folicular cells producing thyroid hormones Twenty five years ago in the reviews on the mechanisms of insulin action, there was presentations in which the insulin receptor was located in the plasma membrane of the target cells while in the cytoplasm only a big interrogative was observed, that at present is replaced by chemical mediators cascades responsible of the multiple effects of insulin. This finding is similar to

  7. [Posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Laptev, I G; Golovina, A Ya; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Genomewide mapping of posttranscriptional modification in eukaryotic RNA allowed to reveal tens of thousands modification sites. Among modified nucleotides of eukaryotic RNA 6-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytidine, pseudouridine, inosine, and others. Many modification sites are conserved, many are regulated. Function is known for a small subset of modified nucleotides, while the role of majority of them is still obscure. Global character of mRNA modifications allowed scientists to coin a new term, RNA epigenetics. The review is about posttranscriptional messenger RNA modifications in eukaryotes. Main modifications, their role in cell, their mapping techniques and proteins, that are responsible for such RNA modifications are observed.

  8. Gravitational Waves and Multi-Messenger Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves are produced by a wide variety of sources throughout the cosmos, including the mergers of black hole and neutron star binaries/compact objects spiraling into central black holes in galactic nuclei, close compact binaries/and phase transitions and quantum fluctuations in the early universe. Observing these signals can bring new, and often very precise, information about their sources across vast stretches of cosmic time. In this talk we will focus on thee opening of this gravitational-wave window on the universe, highlighting new opportunities for discovery and multi-messenger astronomy.

  9. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's Plasma Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; DiBraccio, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a survey of plasma mantle observations identified in particle and magnetic field data from four years of MESSENGER spacecraft measurements of Mercury's magnetosphere. The plasma mantle is a region of solar wind plasma entry into the nightside high-latitude magnetosphere. The two common observational signatures of this region are ion energy latitude dispersions as well as diamagnetic depressions. From these observations we estimate the contribution of plasma from the solar wind via the mantle and infer magnitude and variability in the cross-magnetospheric electric fields present at Mercury's dynamic magnetosphere.

  10. Multi-Messenger Astronomy and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars

    This chapter presents the elaborated lecture notes on Multi-Messenger Astronomy and Dark Matter given by Lars Bergström at the 40th Saas-Fee Advanced Course on "Astrophysics at Very High Energies". One of the main problems of astrophysics and astro-particle physics is that the nature of dark matter remains unsolved. There are basically three complementary approaches to try to solve this problem. One is the detection of new particles with accelerators, the second is the observation of various types of messengers from radio waves to gamma-ray photons and neutrinos, and the third is the use of ingenious experiments for direct detection of dark matter particles. After giving an introduction to the particle universe, the author discusses the relic density of particles, basic cross sections for neutrinos and gamma-rays, supersymmetric dark matter, detection methods for neutralino dark matter, particular dark matter candidates, the status of dark matter detection, a detailled calculation on an hypothetical "Saas-Fee Wimp", primordial black holes, and gravitational waves.

  11. MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    On 18 March 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, providing a new opportunity to study the outer boundary of the innermost planet's magnetosphere - the magnetopause. The 12-hour orbital period yields a minimum of four magnetopause crossings per day, which facilitates the investigation of the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the magnetopause structure. Here we use data from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) to characterize the magnetopause. A minimum variance analysis (MVA) is executed to transform the MAG data into current-sheet coordinates. In this new coordinate system we determine (1) the temporal duration and, with assumptions, the thickness of the magnetopause, (2) the magnetic shear angle across the boundary, and (3) the normal magnetic field across the current sheet, from which we infer the rate of reconnection. FIPS measurements provide a validation of the structure of the magnetopause determined from the MAG data, i.e., whether the magnetopause is magnetically open or closed, on the basis of its permeability to solar wind ions. The results of our analysis indicate that the structure of Mercury's magnetopause is highly responsive to IMF direction and, whenever the shear angle is greater than 90°, is generally open to the solar wind plasma under normal magnetic field components of order 1-10 nT.

  12. Multi-messenger aspects of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The recent observation of TeV-PeV neutrinos by IceCube has opened a new window to the high-energy Universe. I will discuss this signal in the context of multi-messenger astronomy. For extragalactic source scenarios the corresponding gamma-rays are not directly observable due to interactions with the cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma ray background observed by Fermi-LAT contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. Interestingly, the overall energy density of the observed neutrino flux is close to a theoretical limit for neutrino production in ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources and might indicate a common origin of these phenomena. I will highlight various multi-messenger relations and their implications for neutrino source scenarios. This article is an excerpt from an ICRC 2015 proceedings contribution [1].

  13. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Purucker, Michael E.; Korth, Haje; Anderson, Brian J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Al Asad, Manar M. H.; Slavin, James A.; Alexeev, Igor. I.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the innermost planet. The model, constructed under the approximation that the magnetospheric shape can be represented as a paraboloid of revolution, includes two external (magnetopause and magnetotail) current systems and an internal (dipole) field and allows for reconnection. We take advantage of the geometry of the orbital Magnetometer data to estimate all but one of the model parameters, and their ranges, directly from the observations. These parameters are then used as a priori constraints in the paraboloid magnetospheric model, and the sole remaining parameter, the dipole moment, is estimated as 190 nT RM3 from a grid search. We verify that the best fit dipole moment is insensitive to changes in the other parameters within their determined ranges. The model provides an excellent first-order fit to the MESSENGER observations, with a root-mean-square misfit of less than 20 nT globally. The results show that the magnetopause field strength ranges from 10% to 50% of the dipole field strength at observation locations on the dayside and at nightside latitudes north of 60°N. Globally, the residual signatures observed to date are dominated by the results of magnetospheric processes, confirming the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  14. Development of a Single-Step Subtraction Method for Eukaryotic 18S and 28S Ribonucleic Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Article Development of a Single-Step SubtractionMethod for Eukaryotic 18S and 28S Ribonucleic Acids Marie J. Archer and Baochuan Lin Center for Bio...real-time RT-PCR revealed capture-efficiencies comparable with commercially available enrichment kits. The performance of the solid phase can be...Method For Eukaryotic 18S And 28S Ribonucleic Acids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  15. Imaging During MESSENGER's Second Flyby of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Prockter, L. M.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Laslo, N. R.; Kang, H. K.; Hawkins, S. E.; Vaughan, R. M.; Head, J. W.; Solomon, S. C.; MESSENGER Team

    2008-12-01

    During MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury on October 6, 2008, the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) will acquire 1287 images. The images will include coverage of about 30% of Mercury's surface not previously seen by spacecraft. A portion of the newly imaged terrain will be viewed during the inbound portion of the flyby. On the outbound leg, MDIS will image additional previously unseen terrain as well as regions imaged under different illumination geometry by Mariner 10. These new images, when combined with images from Mariner 10 and from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, will enable the first regional- resolution global view of Mercury constituting a combined total coverage of about 96% of the planet's surface. MDIS consists of both a Wide Angle Camera (WAC) and a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the following imaging activities are planned: about 86 minutes before the spacecraft's closest pass by the planet, the WAC will acquire images through 11 different narrow-band color filters of the approaching crescent planet at a resolution of about 5 km/pixel. At slightly less than 1 hour to closest approach, the NAC will acquire a 4-column x 11-row mosaic with an approximate resolution of 450 m/pixel. At 8 minutes after closest approach, the WAC will obtain the highest-resolution multispectral images to date of Mercury's surface, imaging a portion of the surface through 11 color filters at resolutions of about 250-600 m/pixel. A strip of high-resolution NAC images, with a resolution of approximately 100 m/pixel, will follow these WAC observations. The NAC will next acquire a 15-column x 13- row high-resolution mosaic of the northern hemisphere of the departing planet, beginning approximately 21 minutes after closest approach, with resolutions of 140-300 m/pixel; this mosaic will fill a large gore in the Mariner 10 data. At about 42 minutes following closest approach, the WAC will acquire a 3x3, 11-filter, full- planet mosaic with an

  16. The cosmic mult-messenger background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    The cosmic star formation history associated with baryon flows within the large scale structure of the expanding Universe has many important consequences, such as cosmic chemical- and galaxy evolution. Stars and accreting compact objects subsequently produce light, from the radio band to the highest photon energies, and dust within galaxies reprocesses a significant fraction of this light into the IR region. The Universe creates a radiation background that adds to the relic field from the big bang, the CMB. In addition, Cosmic Rays are created on variouys scales, and interact with this diffuse radiation field, and neutrinos are added as well. A multi-messenger field is created whose evolution with redshift contains a tremendous amount of cosmological information. We discuss several aspects of this story, emphasizing the background in the HE regime and the neutrino sector, and disccus the use of gamma-ray sources as probes.

  17. Messenger RNA modifications: Form, distribution, and function.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Wendy V; Bell, Tristan A; Schaening, Cassandra

    2016-06-17

    RNA contains more than 100 distinct modifications that promote the functions of stable noncoding RNAs in translation and splicing. Recent technical advances have revealed widespread and sparse modification of messenger RNAs with N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C), and pseudouridine (Ψ). Here we discuss the rapidly evolving understanding of the location, regulation, and function of these dynamic mRNA marks, collectively termed the epitranscriptome. We highlight differences among modifications and between species that could instruct ongoing efforts to understand how specific mRNA target sites are selected and how their modification is regulated. Diverse molecular consequences of individual m(6)A modifications are beginning to be revealed, but the effects of m(5)C and Ψ remain largely unknown. Future work linking molecular effects to organismal phenotypes will broaden our understanding of mRNA modifications as cell and developmental regulators. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Gauge mediation models with adjoint messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Mustafayev, Azar; Shafi, Qaisar; Ün, Cem Salih

    2016-10-01

    We present a class of models in the framework of gauge mediation supersymmetry breaking where the messenger fields transform in the adjoint representation of the standard model gauge symmetry. To avoid unacceptably light right-handed sleptons in the spectrum we introduce a nonzero U (1 )B-L D-term. This leads to an additional contribution to the soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms which makes the right-handed slepton masses compatible with the current experimental bounds. We show that in this framework the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson mass can be accommodated with the sleptons accessible at the LHC, while the squarks and gluinos lie in the multi-TeV range. We also discuss the issue of the fine-tuning and show that the desired relic dark matter abundance can also be accommodated.

  19. Mercury's magnetosphere after MESSENGER's first flyby.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Killen, Rosemary M; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2008-07-04

    Observations by MESSENGER show that Mercury's magnetosphere is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions. The most abundant, Na+, is broadly distributed but exhibits flux maxima in the magnetosheath, where the local plasma flow speed is high, and near the spacecraft's closest approach, where atmospheric density should peak. The magnetic field showed reconnection signatures in the form of flux transfer events, azimuthal rotations consistent with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetopause, and extensive ultralow-frequency wave activity. Two outbound current sheet boundaries were observed, across which the magnetic field decreased in a manner suggestive of a double magnetopause. The separation of these current layers, comparable to the gyro-radius of a Na+ pickup ion entering the magnetosphere after being accelerated in the magnetosheath, may indicate a planetary ion boundary layer.

  20. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  1. [Irisin: a messenger from the gods?].

    PubMed

    Moreno, María; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the need to understand the basis of the metabolic benefits of exercise, irisin was discovered a few years ago. This cytokine, secreted by skeletal muscle due to exercise, should have positive effects on energetic metabolism. In particular, it could act as a messenger on white adipose tissue, modifying its phenotype into the beige adipocyte, and increasing its thermogenic capacity. Since it was described, there have been numerous studies led to depict its function, with the aim of determining if irisin could become a therapeutic target in the context of diseases associated with a caloric excess, such as obesity and diabetes. In this review, the irisin discovery is summarized, along with its in vitro and in vivo effects described up until now.

  2. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters with Mercury have provided new measurements dynamic variations in the coupled atmosphere magnetosphere system. The two flybys took place under very different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The northward IMF during the first encounter produced a very quiet, stable magnetosphere. Neutral sodium atoms and photo-ions were observed to high altitudes ; > 2000 km, even in the subsolar region demonstrating the important role played by more energetic neutral atom production processes such as sputtering. Consistent with predictions of magnetospheric models for northward IMF, the neutral atmosphere was observed to have its strongest sources in the high latitude northern hemisphere for the first flyby. The southward IMF for the second encounter revealed a highly dynamic magnetosphere. Reconnection between the interplanetary and planetary magnetic fields is known to control the rate of energy transfer from the solar wind and to drive magnetospheric convection. The MESSENGER magnetic field measurements revealed that the rate at which interplanetary magnetic fields were reconnecting to planetary fields was a factor of 10 greater than is usually observed at Earth. This extremely high reconnection results in a large magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause and the formation of flux transfer events that are much larger relative to the size of the forward magnetosphere than is observed at Earth. The resulting magnetospheric configuration allows the solar wind access to much of the dayside surface of the Mercury. This widespread impingement of the solar wind on Mercury's surface is a likely source of the less structured sodium exosphere imaged during the second flyby and quite possibly the high degree of exospheric temporal variability observed by ground-based telescopes.

  3. Current Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere before MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    The MESSENGER spacecraft is scheduled to be launched mid-May, 2004 on a trajectory that includes two flybys (October 07, July 08) and eventual orbit insertion in July 2009 around the planet Mercury. Embedded in its payload are instruments to examine the basic properties of the planet's magnetosphere, including magnetometer, plasma, and energetic particle measurements (Gold et al, 2001). Our present knowledge of Mercury's magnetosphere is derived from two nightside Mariner 10 flybys in 1974, 1975 that established the presence of an intrinsic magnetic field and some energetic particles. Unfortunately not even the magnetic dipole term was well-resolved, and the fluxes and identity of energetic particles have been a subject of extensive discussion and varying interpretations (e.g. Armstrong et al, 1975, Christon, 1989). There has been evidence of field-aligned currents (e.g. Slavin et al, 1997), but alternative interpretations of magnetic signatures suggest that the magnetosphere may be driven by changing external boundary conditions (Luhman et al, 1998). These uncertainties, coupled with the observed presence of volatiles (H, He, O, Na, K, Ca) raise obvious questions on current closure, hot plasma injection and acceleration, the frequency with which the planetary surface is exposed to the solar wind, and potential sputtering of material due to particle impingement on the regolith. The talk will review our current knowledge and describe the measurements expected from MESSENGER that will address some of the key science questions. Armstrong et al, JGR, 80, 4015, 1975 Gold et al, Planet and Space Sci, 49, 1467, 2001 Christon, S.P., JGR, 94, 6481, 1989 Slavin et al, Planet and Space Sci, 45, 133, 1997 Luhman et al, JGR, 103, 9113, 1998

  4. Lack of protection afforded by ribonucleic acid preparations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; Youmans, A Y; Youmans, G P

    1977-01-01

    Mycobacterial ribonucleic acid preparations from H37Ra, an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide their usual marked protection against M. tuberculosis challenge; however, they provided no protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge. Suspensions of intact H37Ra were not effective against M. leprae. Suspensions of BCG gave their usual distinct protection against M. leprae challenge. PMID:404242

  5. Control of larval and egg development in Aedes aegypti with Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) against juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including mosquitoes and many other insects. Little has been done, however, to harness this approach in order to control adult and larval mosquitoes. Juvenile hormone (JH) plays a pi...

  6. Striking similarities are exhibited by two small Epstein-Barr virus-encoded ribonucleic acids and the adenovirus-associated ribonucleic acids VAI and VAII

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, M.D.; Gottlieb, E.; Lerner, M.R.; Steitz, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the region of the Epstein-Barr virus genome that specified two small ribonucleic acids (RNAs), EBER 1 and EBER 2, has been determined. Both of these RNAs are encoded by the right-hand 1,000 base pairs of the EcoRI J fragment of EBV deoxyribonucleic acid. EBER 1 is 166 (167) nucleotides long and EBER 2 is 172 +- 1 nucleotides long; the heterogeneity resides at the 3' termini. The EBER genes are separated by 161 base pairs and are transcribed from the same deoxyribonucleic acid strand. In vitro, both EBER genes can be transcribed by RNA polymerase III; sequences homologous to previously identified RNA polymerase III intragenic transcription control regions are present. Striking similarities are therefore apparent both between the EBERs and the two adenovirus-associated RNAs, VAI and VAII, and between the regions of the two viral genomes that specify these small RNAs. We have shown that VAII RNA as well as VAI RNA and the EBERs exist in ribonucleoprotein complexes which are precipitable by anti-La antibodies associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally the authors have demonstrated that the binding of protein(s) from uninfected cells confers antigenicity on each of the four virus-encoded small RNAs.

  7. Mercury's interior from MESSENGER geodetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft completed more than 4 years of operations in orbit about Mercury. One of the main mission goals was the determination of the interior structure of Mercury enabled by geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, rotation, and tides by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system. MLA acquired over 25 million individual measurements of Mercury's shape that are mostly limited to the northern hemisphere because of MESSENGER's eccentric orbit. However, the lack of laser altimetry in the southern hemisphere has been partly compensated by ˜400 occultations of spacecraft radio signals. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2. The combination of altimetry and radio measurements provides a powerful tool for the investigation of Mercury's orientation and tides, which enable a better understanding of the interior structure of the planet. The MLA measurements have been assembled into a digital elevation model (DEM) of the northern hemisphere. We then used individual altimetric measurements from the spacecraft for orbit determination, together with the radio tracking, over a continuous span of time using a batch least-squares filter. All observations were combined to recover directly the gravity field coefficients, obliquity, librations, and tides by minimizing the discrepancies between the computed observables and actual measurements. We will present the estimated 100×100 gravity field model, the obliquity, the Love number k2, and, for the first time, the tidal phase lag φ and the amplitude of the longitudinal libration from radio and altimetry data. The k2 phase provides information on Mercury's dissipation and mantle viscosity and allows a determination of the Q factor. A refinement of

  8. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee; Vervack, Ronald J.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere comprised of atomic species including hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and likely oxygen. Because it is collisionless. the exosphere's composition represents a balance of the active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment. GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data has been the substantial differences in the spatial distribution of each species, Our modeling demonstrates that these differences cannot be due to post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure. but instead point to differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry. with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere significantly greater than over the dusk. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced in a molecular exosphere (e.g., one consisting of CaO). Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Preliminary results suggest a high temperature ( I-2x 10(exp 4) K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. The high temperature is consistent with the dissociation of CaO in a near-surface exosphere with scale height <= 100 km, which imparts 2 eV to the freshly produced Ca atom. This

  9. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  10. Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Ilan, J; Ilan, J

    1969-05-02

    Aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid synthetases for leucine tyrosine, histidine, valine, proline, threonine, and lysine were obtainnned from cell-free extract of Plasmodium berghei. The leucyl-tRNA synthetase cane charge tRNA from liver or Escherichia coli with leucine-c(14), liver tRNA being a better substrate. The amount of aminoacylation increses linerly with respect to the quantity of tRNA added from either source and is dependent on the amount of enzyme added. The rate of aminoacylation is constant for 10 minutes and then decreases. It is enhanced by polyvinylsulfate. One-tenth millimoler pyrimethamine, hydroxystilbamidine, quinacrine, and acriflavine inhibited the formation of C(14)-valyl-tRNA. Species specificity between tRNA and its charging enzyme with respect to the recognition site is discussed.

  11. [Ubiquitous Ribonucleic Acid:miRNA is the Ubiquitin of RNA].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-fei

    2015-10-01

    Small RNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs),widely exist in eukaryotic cells, with their main functions being regulating gene expression and function of target molecules through the degradation of cellular target RNAs by the ribonuclease-based system. Ubiquitins and ubiquitin-like proteins are polypeptides that exist in most eukaryotic cells, and their main function is almost to regulate protein level through the degradation of cellular proteins by ubiquitin proteasome system. Small RNAs, including miRNAs,and ubiquitins or ubiquitin-like proteins have similarities in many aspects although small RNAs and ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins interact different substrates respectively. Therefore, miRNAs can be defined as ubiquitra (ubiquitous ribonucleic acid, ubiquitra or uRNA), and the other small RNAs can be defined as ubiquitra-like RNA or uRNA-like RNA. The concept of ubiquitra may be applied for explaining the biological essence of small RNAs diversity.

  12. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  13. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-01

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  14. Messenger Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, M.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14.2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER'S Magnetometer (MAG) (2.3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury.

  15. Messenger RNA processing in Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Olsen, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) processing plays important roles in gene expression in all domains of life. A number of cases of mRNA cleavage have been documented in Archaea, but available data are fragmentary. We have examined RNAs present in Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii for evidence of RNA processing upstream of protein-coding genes. Of 123 regions covered by the data, 31 were found to be processed, with 30 including a cleavage site 12–16 nucleotides upstream of the corresponding translation start site. Analyses with 3′-RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and 5′-RACE indicate that the processing is endonucleolytic. Analyses of the sequences surrounding the processing sites for functional sites, sequence motifs, or potential RNA secondary structure elements did not reveal any recurring features except for an AUG translation start codon and (in most cases) a ribosome binding site. These properties differ from those of all previously described mRNA processing systems. Our data suggest that the processing alters the representation of various genes in the RNA pool and therefore, may play a significant role in defining the balance of proteins in the cell. PMID:19717546

  16. Neutrinos as the messengers of CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Liubomir Anguelov

    CPT violation has the potential to explain all three existing neutrino oscillation signals without enlarging the neutrino sector. CPT violation in the Dirac mass terms of the three neutrino flavors preserves Lorentz invariance, but generates in dependent masses for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This specific signature can be motivated by braneworld scenarios with extra dimensions, where neutrinos are the natural messengers for Standard Model physics of CPT violation in the bulk. A simple model of maximal CPT violation is sufficient to explain the exisiting neutrino data, while accommodating the recent results from the KamLAND experiment and making dramatic predictions for the ongoing MiniBooNE experiment. In addition, the model fits the existing SuperKamiokande data, at least as well as the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillation models. Another attractive feature of the presented model is that it provides a new promising mechanism for baryogenesis, which obviates two of the three Sakharov conditions necessary to generate the baryon asymmetry of the universe. CPT-violating scenarios can give new insights about the possible nature of neutrinos. Majorana neutrino masses are still allowed, but in general, there are no longer Majorana neutrinos in the conventional sense. However, CPT-violating models still have interesting consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay. Compared to the usual case, while the larger mass scale (from LSND) may appear, a greater degree of suppression can also occur.

  17. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variations, but there are no obvious year-to-year variations in most of the observations. We do not see the episodic variability reported by some ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere, at about 1200 K, is much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  18. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variation but there is little or no year-to-year variation; we do not see the episodic variability reported by ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere is about 1200 K, much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  19. Mercury's Seasonal Sodium Exosphere: MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Burger, Matthew H.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft now orbiting Mercury provides the first close-up look at the planet's sodium exosphere. UVVS has observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for over 10 Mercury years. In this paper we describe and analyze a subset of these data: altitude profiles taken above the low-latitude dayside and south pole. The observations show spatial and temporal variation but there is little or no year-to-year variation; we do not see the episodic variability reported by ground-based observers. We used these altitude profiles to make estimates of sodium density and temperature. The bulk of the exosphere is about 1200 K, much warmer than Mercury's surface. This value is consistent with some ground-based measurements and suggests that photon-stimulated desorption is the primary ejection process. We also observe a tenuous energetic component but do not see evidence of the predicted thermalized (or partially thermalized) sodium near Mercury's surface temperature. Overall we do not see the variable mixture of temperatures predicted by most Monte Carlo models of the exosphere.

  20. ACTH Action on Messenger RNA Stability Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Cherradi, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of mRNA stability has emerged as a critical control step in dynamic gene expression. This process occurs in response to modifications of the cellular environment, including hormonal variations, and regulates the expression of subsets of proteins whose levels need to be rapidly adjusted. Modulation of messenger RNA stability is usually mediated by stabilizing or destabilizing RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BP) that bind to the 3′-untranslated region regulatory motifs, such as AU-rich elements (AREs). Destabilizing ARE-binding proteins enhance the decay of their target transcripts by recruiting the mRNA decay machineries. Failure of such mechanisms, in particular misexpression of RNA-BP, has been linked to several human diseases. In the adrenal cortex, the expression and activity of mRNA stability regulatory proteins are still understudied. However, ACTH- or cAMP-elicited changes in the expression/phosphorylation status of the major mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11b/BRF1 or in the subcellular localization of the stabilizing protein Human antigen R have been reported. They suggest that this level of regulation of gene expression is also important in endocrinology. PMID:28163695

  1. 3. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, STAIRWAY - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  2. 5. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, SITTING ROOM, DETAIL OF FIREPLACE - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury will provide the first new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet since the Mariner 10 flybys that took place over 30 years ago. The closest approach distance for this first MESSENGER flyby is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 km and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries observed by MESSENGER will be examined and compared against those found in the earlier Mariner 10 measurements and the predictions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. The structure of the magnetopause will be investigated for the presence of flux transfer events or other evidence of magnetic reconnection as will the more general implications of these new MESSENGER bow shock and magnetopause observations for the global solar wind interaction with Mercury.

  4. Release, Identification, and Isolation of Messenger RNA from Mammalian Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Günter

    1971-01-01

    The puromycin-induced dissociation, at high ionic strength, of active ribosomes from reticulocytes resulted in the release of protein-free, apparently undegraded, messenger RNA for globin, which was identified by centrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. This procedure should make messenger RNA from various cells available for isolation on a large scale, and has several advantages over procedures that use detergents or magnesium chelators. PMID:5279524

  5. Processivity and Coupling in Messenger RNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Alexander, Ross D.; Goryanin, Igor; Bertrand, Edouard; Beggs, Jean D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model. Methodology In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range. Conclusions We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low—as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise—a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence. PMID

  6. Mercury's global evolution: New views from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, S. A., II; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Grott, M.; McCoy, T.; Stanley, S.

    2015-12-01

    MESSENGER's exploration of Mercury has revealed the planet's rich and dynamic history and provided new constraints on the processes that control its internal evolution. Mercury's surface records evidence of an extensive geological history. This evidence includes resurfacing by impacts and volcanism prior to the end of the late heavy bombardment (LHB) and a subsequent rapid waning of effusive volcanism. Volcanism is an important indicator of the history of melt production. Thousands of globally distributed, contractional tectonic landforms collectively have accommodated a decrease in Mercury's radius of 5-7 km since the end of the LHB. Such contraction results from planetary cooling and crystallization within Mercury's metallic core. Measurements of surface chemistry have provided constraints on internal radiogenic heat production necessary to understand more fully Mercury's thermal evolution. Elemental abundances also reveal that Mercury is strongly chemically reduced, suggesting that the core's iron is alloyed with silicon as well as sulfur, which constrains the dynamics and crystallization of the metallic core. Magnetometer observations show that Mercury's dynamo-generated, dominantly dipolar field is displaced ~500 km northward along the rotation axis. Low-altitude magnetic field observations late in the mission led to the discovery of crustal magnetization in Mercury's ancient crust, dating to at least 3.7 Ga, which places a new constraint on the timing of the dynamo. Monte Carlo parameterized mantle convection models, constrained by these observations, indicate that for global contraction of 7 km or less, mantle convection persists to the present ~40% of the time, with the likelihood of modern convection decreasing with less global contraction. Slow present cooling in these models indicates that dynamo generation is strongly influenced by both a static layer at the top of the core and convective motions within the core driven by compositional buoyancy.

  7. MESSENGER observations of magnetopause structure at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Raines, J. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-04-01

    MESSENGER Magnetometer (MAG) data from the first series of "hot-season" orbits at Mercury, when periapsis was positioned over the subsolar region, have been used to augment our initial studies to characterize the magnetopause structure as a function of local time. Minimum variance analysis (MVA) was applied to transform the MAG data into boundary-normal coordinates in order to determine (1) the thickness of the magnetopause, (2) the magnetic shear angle across the boundary, and (3) the normal magnetic field, BN, across the current sheet and, by inference, the rate of reconnection and the magnetosphere electric potential. We applied the MVA to all distinct magnetopause crossings within the subsolar region between 0800 and 1600 local time and within ± 25° latitude. A well-defined normal direction, specified by a ratio of the eigenvalue for intermediate variance to that for minimum variance that is greater than 8, was determined for 72 crossings. For this data set, 72.2% of the magnetopause traversals had a substantial normal component (i.e., BN > 4 nT). For a mean boundary motion velocity of 10 km s-1, the average current sheet thickness was 29 km, which is comparable to 2 gyroradii for solar wind protons. The mean ratio of the normal magnetic field component to the total field magnitude, a measure of the reconnection rate, was 0.2 and is independent of magnetic field shear angle across the magnetopause. We conclude that Mercury's magnetopause structure is generally open to the solar wind plasma under a wide range of interplanetary magnetic field shear angles.

  8. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  9. Neutrino-Gamma Multi-Messenger Source Detection via the Astrophysical Multi-Messenger Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixelle, Josh; Miles, S.; AMON

    2014-01-01

    The idea of multi-messenger event detection has long been explored in the context of above-threshold analysis performed by the IceCube collaboration using Swift BAT and by the Amanda collaboration using BATSE. While these investigations produced null results, they left the event space of sub-threshold events untouched. This untapped event space, combined with the addition of new observatories for various bands and messenger types, provides the obvious niche for a GBN style network to exist: AMON. We consider Monte-carlo models of pair-wise detection between sub-threshold IceCube neutrino doublets, sub-threshold neutrino-gamma doublets with Swift BAT, and with sub-threshold higher multiplicity neutrino-gamma coincidences with Fermi LAT. Several detection methods were considered and compared to the status quo analyses of neutrino doublets by IceCube, demonstrating significant sensitivity gain. The MC model analysis was followed by an archival doublet analysis between IceCube-40 and Fermi LAT data within their co-temporal window of observation. Several methods for detecting statistical signal excess in the archival analysis were considered, providing an upper limit on source population parameters for the given analysis sensitivity.

  10. Ovalbumin Messenger RNA: Evidence That the Initial Product of Transcription Is the Same Size as Polysomal Ovalbumin Messenger

    PubMed Central

    McKnight, G. Stanley; Schimke, Robert T.

    1974-01-01

    The messenger RNA for ovalbumin, the major secretory protein of the chick oviduct, appears not to be made as a high-molecular-weight precursor when artifacts due to aggregation are eliminated. No ovalbumin messenger RNA sequences that will hybridize to complementary DNA made against ovalbumin mRNA are found in concentrated samples of hen oviduct RNA larger than 28 S. The sensitivity of the hybridization assay is sufficient to detect less than one molecule of ovalbumin mRNA precursor per tubular gland cell. Newly synthesized ovalbumin messenger RNA isolated from immature chicks stimulated briefly by estrogen is the same size as that found in hen polyribosomes. We conclude that ovalbumin messenger RNA does not undergo any significant change in molecular weight from its initial transcription to its incorporation into polyribosomes. PMID:4530986

  11. Accumulation of nucleotides by starved Escherichia coli cells as a probe for the involvement of ribonucleases in ribonucleic acid degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, L; Kaplan, R

    1977-01-01

    The acid-soluble ribonucleic acid degradation products formed by Escherichia coli cells starved for a carbon source have been identified. They comprise oligonucleotides, nucleoside diphosphates, 5'- and 3'-nucleoside monophosphates, nucleosides, and free bases. The majority of these products are excreted phates, nucleosides, and free bases. The majority of these products are excreted into the medium, and only small and constant amounts are kept in the pool. During carbon starvation at elevated temperatures, mutants deficient in ribonuclease I do not form oligonucleotides and 3'-nucleoside monophosphates, and mutants that contain a modified form of polynucleotide phosphorylase do not accumulate nucleoside diphosphates. 5'-Nucleoside monophosphates do accumulate, however, in a mutant containing thermoabile ribonuclease II, under conditions where more than 95% of all enzyme activity had been destroyed. The data presented confirm the participation of ribonuclease I and polynucleotide phosphorylase in the final steps of ribonucleic acid degradation and indicate that an exonuclease forming 5'-nucleoside monophosphates is also involved. PMID:320188

  12. A Spectral Map Of Mercury From MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; Pahsai, P.; Klima, R. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Goudge, T. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Mercury Surface and Atmospheric Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) Visible and Near Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study subtle compositional variations across the surface of Mercury. VIRS reflectance spectra obtained from orbit allow identification and classification of spectral units, many of which collocate with geologic features such as pyroclastic deposits; low-reflectance material (LRM); bright, fresh-appearing impact craters; and hollows. The vast majority of the surface is composed of plains units with brightness and spectral reflectance ratios (e.g., 415 nm / 750 nm and 310 nm / 390 nm) that vary within a small range about mean values for the planet. Analysis of VIRS reflectance data in the context of Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) color and high-resolution images enables identification of large regions with similar spectral properties. Our spectral map of Mercury covers approximately 70% of the planet (excluding polar regions and two regions for which calibration refinement is pending). On the basis of brightness, spectral ratio variations, and superposition relationships in the image data, we define four large-scale spectral units in Mercury plains, as well as six additional spectral units of smaller area. The four large-scale spectral units cover (1) 48.7% (brightness and spectral ratio parameters within a few percent of planetary mean values) (2) 31.6% (higher reflectance, higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean), (3) 12.9% (higher reflectance, lower 415 nm / 750 nm values than mean), and (4) 6.8% (lower reflectance and higher 310 nm / 390 nm values than mean) of the mapped area. Spectrally defined plains units correspond broadly to plains units defined by morphology and color imaging; e.g., unit 2 corresponds to the previously defined high-reflectance red plains (HRP), unit 3 to the northern smooth plains and the smooth plains

  13. Thermal evolution of Mercury as constrained by MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Nathalie C.; Hauck, Steven A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Phillips, Roger J.; Roberts, James H.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2013-05-01

    observations of Mercury by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft provide new constraints on that planet's thermal and interior evolution. Specifically, MESSENGER observations have constrained the rate of radiogenic heat production via measurement of uranium, thorium, and potassium at the surface, and identified a range of surface compositions consistent with high-temperature, high-degree partial melts of the mantle. Additionally, MESSENGER data have placed new limits on the spatial and temporal variation in volcanic and tectonic activity and enabled determination that the planet's core is larger than previously estimated. Because Mercury's mantle layer is also thinner than previously thought, this result gives greater likelihood to the possibility that mantle convection is marginally supercritical or even that the mantle is not convecting. We simulate mantle convection and magma generation within Mercury's mantle under two-dimensional axisymmetry and a broad range of conditions to understand the implications of MESSENGER observations for the thermal evolution of the planet. These models demonstrate that mantle convection can persist in such a thin mantle for a substantial portion of Mercury's history, and often to the present, as long as the mantle is thicker than ~300 km. We also find that magma generation in Mercury's convecting mantle is capable of producing widespread magmas by large-degree partial melting, consistent with MESSENGER observations of the planet's surface chemistry and geology.

  14. MESSENGER Measurements of Mercury's Magnetic Field during the First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    On 14 January 2008 the MESSENGER spacecraft will encounter Mercury for the first time. Depending upon the solar wind conditions, this initial flyby will return Magnetometer measurements of Mercury's magnetic field over a time interval lasting between - 30 md 60 min. Closest approach for MESSENGER is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 krn and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. Furthermore, the differences in the MESSENGER and Mariner 10 encounter trajectories, with respect both to magnetospheric and body-fixed coordinates are highly complementary and expected to lead to significant improvements in our knowledge of Mercury's magnetic field. We present an overview of the MESSENGER magnetic field observations, an initial subtraction of the magnetic fields attributable to magnetospheric current systems from the total measured magnetic field, and an improved model of Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field. We also discuss the expected advances afforded by the two additional MESSENGER flybys, which occur in October 2008 and September 2009, as well as the orbital phase that will begin in March 201 1.

  15. Incorporation of Precursors into Ribonucleic Acid, Protein, Glycoprotein, and Lipoprotein of Avian Myeloblastosis Virions

    PubMed Central

    Baluda, M. A.; Nayak, D. P.

    1969-01-01

    Freshly explanted leukemic myeloblasts produce avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) at a constant rate without any obvious cytopathic effect; therefore, subviral components are continually synthesized at a steady rate. The incorporation of various radioactive precursors into virions was monitored by determination of radioactivity in purified virus after density equilibrium sedimentation in preformed sucrose gradients. The kinetics of incorporation of 3H-uridine have shown that there is an average time interval of 3 to 4 hr (half-life) between the time viral ribo-nucleic acid (RNA) is synthesized and the time it is released as a mature virus particle; this represents the average time interval spent by AMV-RNA in an intracellular pool. Studies with 14C-phenylalanine have revealed that some protein synthesis takes place at or near the cell surface immediately prior to maturation and release of virus. 14C-glucosamine also appears to be incorporated into the outer viral envelope shortly before maturation. On the other hand, there is an average lag of about 16 to 20 hr before 14C-ethanolamine incorporated into intracellular lipoprotein appears in free virions; this probably reflects the kinetics of replacement of cellular surface membrane. Actinomycin D inhibits AMV-RNA within 30 min but permits the maturation of AMV to continue for at least 2 hr. AMV released in the presence of actinomycin D contains AMV-RNA synthesized before the addition of the drug. PMID:4311791

  16. Double-stranded Ribonucleic Acid from Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus of the Silkworm

    PubMed Central

    Miura, K.; Fujii, I.; Sakaki, T.; Fuke, M.; Kawase, S.

    1968-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted by phenol treatment from cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus isolated from the midgut of infected silkworms. This RNA appears as threads when precipitated in alcohol. Two components having different sedimentation constants were observed. The molecular weight of the RNA preparation obtained by sedimentation coefficient (weight-averaged) and intrinsic viscosity was about 2 × 106 to 3 × 106. It was one-half to one-third the size of the calculated molecular weight for an entire RNA molecule in a virion. Electron micrographs of this RNA preparation showed two peaks in the distribution of contour length, at 0.4 and 1.3 μm, which would correspond to molecular weights of 106 and 3 × 106, respectively. The extracted RNA seemed to split into segments at a preferential breaking point. This RNA was soluble in concentrated salt solution, differing from single stranded high-molecular-weight RNA. The base composition of this RNA was complementary in the ratios of adenosine to uridine and guanosine to cytosine. It contained 43% guanosine plus cytosine. Based on its filamentous appearance by electron microscopy, typical pattern of optical rotatory dispersion and circular dichroism, sharp transition of the optical properties on heating, great hyperchromicity on degradation, nonreactivity with formaldehyde, and resistance to ribonucleases, it is concluded that this RNA is double-stranded and has regular base pairings of guanosine-cytosine and adenosine-uridine. Images PMID:16789087

  17. Evaluating the reproducibility of quantifying modified nucleosides from ribonucleic acids by LC–UV–MS

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Susan P.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional chemical covalent modification of adenosine, guanosine, uridine and cytidine occurs frequently in all types of ribonucleic acids (RNAs). In ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA) these modifications make important contributions to RNA structure and stability and to the accuracy and efficiency of protein translation. The functional dynamics, synergistic nature and regulatory roles of these posttranscriptional nucleoside modifications within the cell are not well characterized. These modifications are present at very low levels and isolation of individual nucleosides for analysis requires a complex multi-step approach. The focus of this study is to characterize the reproducibility of a liquid chromatography method used to isolate and quantitatively characterize modified nucleosides in tRNA and rRNA when nucleoside detection is performed using ultraviolet and mass spectrometric detection (UV and MS, respectively). Despite the analytical challenges of sample isolation and dynamic range, quantitative profiling of modified nucleosides obtained from bacterial tRNAs and rRNAs is feasible at relative standard deviations of 5% RSD or less. PMID:23500350

  18. Characterization of hybrid plasmids carrying individual ribosomal ribonucleic acid transcription units of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kenerley, M E; Morgan, E A; Post, L; Lindahl, L; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the strains with ColE1 hybrid plasmids constructed by Clarke and Carbon (Cell 9:91-99, 1976) for the presence of ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) genes on the plasmids and identified 16 strains whose plasmids carry rRNA genes. The structures of these 16 plasmids were compared by heteroduplex analysis, and the plasmids were classified into six groups on the basis of their chromosomal origins. Homology with known transducing-phage deoxyribonucleic acids and genetic mapping have assigned locations on the Escherichia coli chromosome to three of the six groups. These are rrnB near rif at 88 min, rrnC near ilvE at 83 min, and rrnD near aroE at 71 min. A fourth group is probably rrnA at 85 min (T. Ikemura and M. Nomura, Cell, 11:779-793, 1977). We conclude that the minimum number of rRNA transcription units per haploid chromosomes is seven, that is, the six groups identified in this work plus a known operon (rrnE near metA at 89 min) that we failed to find among the hybrid plasmids. This heteroduplex analysis also suggests that there are only two kinds of rRNA operons with respect to their spacer region; three of the six rRNA operon groups studied here have one kind, whereas the remaining three have the other kind. Images PMID:336613

  19. Evaluating the reproducibility of quantifying modified nucleosides from ribonucleic acids by LC-UV-MS.

    PubMed

    Russell, Susan P; Limbach, Patrick A

    2013-04-01

    Post-transcriptional chemical covalent modification of adenosine, guanosine, uridine and cytidine occurs frequently in all types of ribonucleic acids (RNAs). In ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and transfer RNA (tRNA) these modifications make important contributions to RNA structure and stability and to the accuracy and efficiency of protein translation. The functional dynamics, synergistic nature and regulatory roles of these posttranscriptional nucleoside modifications within the cell are not well characterized. These modifications are present at very low levels and isolation of individual nucleosides for analysis requires a complex multi-step approach. The focus of this study is to characterize the reproducibility of a liquid chromatography method used to isolate and quantitatively characterize modified nucleosides in tRNA and rRNA when nucleoside detection is performed using ultraviolet and mass spectrometric detection (UV and MS, respectively). Despite the analytical challenges of sample isolation and dynamic range, quantitative profiling of modified nucleosides obtained from bacterial tRNAs and rRNAs is feasible at relative standard deviations of 5% RSD or less.

  20. Bisphenol S alters embryonic viability, development, gallbladder size, and messenger RNA expression in chicken embryos exposed via egg injection.

    PubMed

    Crump, Doug; Chiu, Suzanne; Williams, Kim L

    2016-06-01

    Amid concerns about the toxicological effects and environmental prevalence of bisphenol A (BPA), efforts to find suitable, safer replacement alternatives are essential. Bisphenol S (BPS) is a potential chemical substitute for BPA; however, few studies are available confirming that it has a more desirable ecotoxicological profile. In the present study, BPS was injected into the air cell of unincubated, fertilized chicken embryos at 6 concentrations ranging from 0 μg/g to 207 μg/g egg to determine effects on pipping success, development, hepatic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression, thyroid hormone levels, and circulating bile acid concentrations. Concentrations of BPS increased in a dose-dependent manner in whole-embryo homogenates, and exposure to the highest dose, 207 μg/g, resulted in decreased pipping success (estimated median lethal dose  = 279 μg/g; 95% confidence interval = 161-486 μg/g). Exposure to BPS also reduced growth metrics including embryo mass and tarsus length, whereas the most pronounced phenotypic effect was the concentration-dependent, significant increase in gallbladder size at concentrations ≥52.8 μg/g. These adverse phenotypic outcomes were associated with the modulation of gene targets from a chicken ToxChip polymerase chain reaction array, which are involved with xenobiotic metabolism, lipid homeostasis, bile acid synthesis, and the thyroid hormone pathway. Expression levels of 2 estrogen-responsive genes, apolipoprotein II and vitellogenin, were too low at the sampling time point assessed (i.e., pipping embryos) to quantify changes, and no effects were observed on circulating free thyroxine or bile acid concentrations. The present study provides novel, whole-animal toxicological data for a BPA replacement alternative that is not well characterized. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1541-1549. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  1. Steroid hormone receptor gene expression in human breast cancer cells: inverse relationship between oestrogen and glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Hall, R E; Lee, C S; Alexander, I E; Shine, J; Clarke, C L; Sutherland, R L

    1990-12-15

    The relative expression in human breast cancer cells of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA) encoding different steroid hormone receptors is unknown. Accordingly, mRNA levels in total RNA extracted from 13 human breast cancer cell lines were measured by Northern analysis employing complementary DNA probes for the human oestrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), androgen (AR), vitamin D3 (VDR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR). The 7 ER+ lines expressed a single 6.4 kilobases (kb) ER mRNA. Interestingly, low concentrations of ER mRNA were detected in the ER- cell lines, MDA-MB-330 and BT 20. PR mRNA, predominantly a 13.5 kb species, was expressed in the 6 lines known to be ER+, PR+ by radioligand binding; however, one ER+ cell line, MDA-MB-134, failed to express PR mRNA. A 10.5 kb AR mRNA was expressed at significantly higher levels in ER+ than ER- cell lines. All cell lines expressed a single 4.6 kb mRNA for VDR and a single 7.4 kb mRNA for GR. ER and PR mRNA levels were positively correlated (p = 0.011) and each was positively correlated with androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels (p less than or equal to 0.009). ER, PR and AR mRNAs were negatively associated with GR levels (p less than or equal to 0.012), while ER and AR mRNA levels were negatively correlated with mRNA for the epidermal growth factor receptor. In contrast, levels of VDR mRNA were unrelated to the concentration of any other steroid receptor mRNA. Our data demonstrate the coordinate expression of ER, PR and AR genes, and an inverse relationship between sex steroid hormone receptor and GR gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

  2. Imaging second messenger dynamics in developing neural circuits

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Timothy A.; Feller, Marla B.

    2010-01-01

    A characteristic feature of developing neural circuits is that they are spontaneously active. There are several examples, including the retina, spinal cord and hippocampus, where spontaneous activity is highly correlated amongst neighboring cells, with large depolarizing events occurring with a periodicity on the order of minutes. One likely mechanism by which neurons can “decode” these slow oscillations is through activation of second messengers cascades that either influence transcriptional activity or drive posttranslational modifications. Here we describe recent experiments where imaging has been used to characterize slow oscillations in the cAMP/PKA second messenger cascade in retinal neurons. We review the latest techniques in imaging this specific second messenger cascade, its intimate relationship with changes in intracellular calcium concentration, and several hypotheses regarding its role in neurodevelopment. PMID:18383551

  3. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from MESSENGER Orbital Observations at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Lugaz, N.; Philpott, L. C.; Schwadron, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    We use observations from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER, the first spacecraft since the 1980s to make in-situ measurements at distances < 0.5 AU, presents a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere. It also allows studies of ICME evolution as they expand and propagate outward, interacting with the solar wind. In order to catalog ICME events observed by MESSENGER, we design a strict set of selection criteria to identify them based on magnetic field observations only, since reliable solar wind plasma observations are not available from MESSENGER. We identify 61 ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2014, and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing datasets of ICMEs at 1 AU we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. We find good agreement with previous studies for the magnetic field strength dependence on heliospheric distance, r. We have also established three different lines of evidence that ICME deceleration continues beyond the orbit of Mercury: 1) we find a shallow decrease with distance of ˜r-0.45 for the ICME shock speed from Mercury to 1 AU, 2) the average transit speed from the Sun to Mercury for ICMEs in our catalog is ˜20% faster than the average speed from the Sun to 1 AU, 3) the ICME transit time to 1 AU has a weaker dependence on the CME initial coronagraphic speed, as compared to what we predict based on our MESSENGER ICME catalog. Based on our results, future ICME propagation studies should account for ICME speed changes beyond Mercury's heliocentric distances to improve ICME arrival time forecasting. Our ICME database will also prove particularly useful for multipoint spacecraft studies of recent ICMEs, as well as for model validation of ICME properties.

  4. How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshon, B.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach (Epo) Team

    2010-12-01

    How MESSENGER Meshes Simulations and Games with Citizen Science In the film The Last Starfighter, an alien civilization grooms their future champion—a kid on Earth—using a video game. As he gains proficiency in the game, he masters the skills he needs to pilot a starship and save their civilization. The NASA MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team is using the same tactic to train citizen scientists to help the Science Team explore the planet Mercury. We are building a new series of games that appear to be designed primarily for fun, but that guide players through a knowledge and skill set that they will need for future science missions in support of MESSENGER mission scientists. As players score points, they gain expertise. Once they achieve a sufficiently high score, they will be invited to become participants in Mercury Zoo, a new program being designed by Zooniverse. Zooniverse created Galaxy Zoo and Moon Zoo, programs that allow interested citizens to participate in the exploration and interpretation of galaxy and lunar data. Scientists use the citizen interpretations to further refine their exploration of the same data, thereby narrowing their focus and saving precious time. Mercury Zoo will be designed with input from the MESSENGER Science Team. This project will not only support the MESSENGER mission, but it will also add to the growing cadre of informed members of the public available to help with other citizen science projects—building on the concept that engaged, informed citizens can help scientists make new discoveries. The MESSENGER EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for Educational Resources (CERES) at Montana State University (MSU) - Bozeman; National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE); Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL); National Air and Space Museum (NASM); Science

  5. RIBONUCLEIC ACID SYNTHESIS DURING MITOSIS AND MEIOSIS IN THE MOUSE TESTIS

    PubMed Central

    Monesi, Valerio

    1964-01-01

    The pattern of ribonucleic acid synthesis during germ cell development, from the stem cell to the mature spermatid, was studied in the mouse testis, by using uridine-H3 or cytidine-H3 labeling and autoradiography. Incorporation of tritiated precursors into the RNA occurs in spermatogonia, resting primary spermatocytes (RPS), throughout the second half of pachytene stage up to early diplotene, and in the Sertoli cells. Cells in leptotene, zygotene, and in the first half of pachytene stage do not synthesize RNA. No RNA synthesis was detected in meiotic stages later than diplotene, with the exception of a very low rate of incorporation in a fraction of secondary spermatocytes and very early spermatids. At long intervals after administration of the tracer, as labeled cells develop to more mature stages, late stages of spermatogenesis also become labeled. The last structures to become labeled are the residual bodies of Regaud. Thus, the RNA synthesized during the active meiotic stages is partially retained within the cell during further development. The rate of RNA synthesis declines gradually with the maturation from type A to intermediate to type B spermatogonia and to resting primary spermatocytes. "Dormant" type A spermatogonia synthesize little or no RNA. The incorporation of RNA precursors occurs exclusively within the nucleus: at later postinjection intervals the cytoplasm also becomes labeled. In spermatogonia all mitotic stages, except metaphase and anaphase, were shown to incorporate uridine-H3. RNA synthesis is then a continuous process throughout the cell division cycle in spermatogonia (generation time about 30 hours), and stops only for a very short interval (1 hour) during metaphase and anaphase. PMID:14206420

  6. To Be Connected or Not To Be Connected? Mobile Messenger Overload, Fatigue, and Mobile Shunning.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaewook; Shin, Mincheol

    2016-10-01

    With the increased adoption of mobile devices, mobile communication is all around us and we are connected anywhere, anytime. Mobile communication in general and mobile messenger service in particular make interpersonal communication in Korea so frequent and convenient. However, being connected too much anywhere and anytime via mobile messenger service appears to lead an increasing number of people to feel fatigue and to decrease mobile communication under some conditions. Based on a sample of 334 respondents, this study empirically investigated the relationships among commercial, noncommercial mobile messenger overload, mobile messenger fatigue, relational self-concept, and mobile shunning behavior. The findings show that (a) the effect of noncommercial mobile messenger overload is stronger than that of commercial mobile messenger overload in increasing mobile messenger fatigue although both positively affect mobile messenger fatigue, (b) relational self-concept has moderating effects on the relationship between mobile messenger overload and mobile messenger fatigue, and that (c) mobile messenger fatigue triggers mobile communicators' shunning behavior through which the communicators increase their intention to avoid mobile communication, to change their mobile phone numbers, and to subscribe to dual number service on one mobile device. When confronted with mobile messenger fatigue caused by mobile messenger overload, mobile messaging service users are likely to shun their mobile communication. Being constantly and conveniently connected appears to be a blessing in disguise.

  7. Messenger in the Barn: Networking in a Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutter, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    This case study describes the use of a synchronous communication application (MSN Messenger) in a large academic computing environment. It draws on data from interviews, questionnaires and student marks to examine the link between use of the application and success measured through module marks. The relationship is not simple. Total abstainers and…

  8. Instant Messenger in Enrollment Management: Evaluating Use and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalanowski, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This study represented a formal quantitative evaluation of the potential for instant messenger (IM) technology as an outreach tool for undergraduate college admission. Conclusions focused on the popularity of IM, and student use in a formal counselor/student relationship. (Contains 4 tables and 2 figures.)

  9. 4. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph (from Fort Dodge Messenger, no issue or date known) Photographer and date unknown INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, DETAIL OF ARCHED OPENING BETWEEN LIVING ROOM AND DINING ROOM - Swain-Vincent House, 824 Third Avenue, South, Fort Dodge, Webster County, IA

  10. MESSENGER First Images of Comets Encke and ISON

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-14

    As comets C/2012 S1 ISON and the well-known short-period comet 2P/Encke both approached their closest distances to the Sun in November, 2013, they also passed close to the MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting the innermost planet Mercury.

  11. MESSENGER Observation of Mercury's Magnetopause: Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Boardsen, S. A.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Sarantos, M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury has provided new observations of the magnetopause of this small magnetosphere, particularly concerning the effect of the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the structure and dynamics of this boundary. The IMF was northward immediately prior to and following the passage of the MESSENGER spacecraft through Mercury's magnetosphere. However, several-minute episodes of southward IMF were observed in the magnetosheath during the inbound portion of the encounter. Evidence for reconnection at the dayside magnetopause in the form of well-developed flux transfer events (FTEs) was observed in the magnetosheath following some of these southward-B, intervals. The inbound magnetopause crossing seen in the magnetic field measurements is consistent with a transition from the magnetosheath into the plasma sheet. Immediately following MESSENGER'S entry into the magnetosphere, rotational perturbations in the magnetic field similar to those seen at the Earth in association with large-scale plasma sheet vortices driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the magnetotail boundary at the Earth were observed. The outbound magnetopause occurred during northward IMF B(sub z) and had the characteristics of a tangential discontinuity. These new observations by MESSENGER may be combined and compared with the magnetopause measurements collected by Mariner 10 to derive new understanding of the response of Mercury's magnetopause to IMF direction and its effect on the rate of solar wind energy and mass input to this small magnetosphere.

  12. First Laser Altimeter Measurements of Mercury from the MESSENGER Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A.; Cavanaugh, John F.; McGarry, Jan F.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter performed the first laser ranging measurements to Mercury during the Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) flyby in January 2008. The instrument successfully ranged to 600 km at an off-nadir angle >60 and to >1600 km in the nadir direction.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus trans-activator of transcription peptide detection via ribonucleic acid aptamer on aminated diamond biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim Ruslinda, A.; Wang, Xianfen; Ishii, Yoko; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Tanabe, Kyosuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    The potential of ribonucleic acid (RNA) as both informational and ligand binding molecule have opened a scenario in the development of biosensors. An aminated diamond-based RNA aptasensor is presented for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) trans-activator of transcription (Tat) peptide protein detection that not only gives a labeled or label-free detection method but also provides a reusable platform for a simple, sensitive, and selective detection of proteins. The immobilized procedure was based on the binding interaction between positively charged amine terminated diamond and the RNA aptamer probe molecules with the negatively charged surface carboxylic compound linker molecule such as terephthalic acid.

  14. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  15. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  16. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  17. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  18. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  19. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  20. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  1. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  2. 29 CFR 516.30 - Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped workers employed under special...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or handicapped... the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.30 Learners, apprentices, messengers, students, or... to persons employed as learners, apprentices, messengers or full-time students employed outside...

  3. 29 CFR 520.400 - Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who are messengers, learners, and apprentices? 520.400... LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.400...

  4. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires...

  5. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such systems...

  6. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  7. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  8. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  9. 30 CFR 75.705-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded....705-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger wires used to suspend the cables of such...

  10. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  11. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  12. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  13. 30 CFR 77.704-11 - Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded... AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-11 Use of grounded messenger wires; ungrounded systems. Solely for purposes of grounding ungrounded high-voltage power systems, grounded messenger...

  14. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's bow shock and magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuña, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Trávníček, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14, 2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) (2,3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury. Here we present new models of bow shock and magnetopause shape and location that incorporate both the MESSENGER and earlier Mariner 10 measurements of these boundaries. A fast magnetosonic Mach number for the solar wind at Mercury's distance from the Sun of ~ 3 is derived from the shape of the bow shock. This value is consistent with earlier observations at these distances from the Sun by the Helios mission. The shape of Mercury's magnetopause and the thickness of the magnetosheath are found to be similar to that of the Earth, suggesting that the solar wind interaction is dominated by its dipolar magnetic field. MESSENGER measurements near the magnetopause do, however, indicate that internal plasma pressure does contribute to the pressure balance across this boundary. MAG and FIPS measurements are used to estimate the ratio of plasma thermal pressure to magnetic pressure at the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and dawn terminator regions, under the assumption that pressure is balanced across the inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings. To investigate the possible origins of the plasma ions in these regions, we utilize a combination of FIPS measurements and the results of 3-D hybrid [6] and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with Mercury for the upstream conditions

  15. Spermatozoa micro ribonucleic acid-34c level is correlated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Long; Fang, Li; Shi, Biwei; Qiu, Sunquan; Ye, Yinghui

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effects of micro ribonucleic acid (miR)-34b/c expression levels in human spermatozoa on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes. Retrospective observational study. In vitro fertilization center. A total of 162 patients with idiopathic male infertility who had undergone first ICSI cycles. None. The levels of miR-34b/c in spermatozoa were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Fertilization, early cleavage, day-3 good-quality embryo, pregnancy, implantation, and live birth rate were assessed. A receiver operating characteristic curve was employed to analyze the cutoff values. No correlation was found between the spermatozoa miR-34b/c levels and the 2 pronuclei early cleavage rate. A correlation was seen between an increased level of miR-34c and a higher percentage of good-quality embryos on day 3. Although miR-34b and miR-34c levels were higher in the pregnancy group, compared with the nonpregnancy group, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that miR-34c levels in spermatozoa were more strongly correlated with ICSI treatment outcomes, compared with miR-34b (area under the curve = 0.75). Patients in the miR-34c-positive group were more likely to exhibit higher rates of good-quality embryos, implantation, pregnancy, and live birth. A multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that miR-34c in spermatozoa (odds ratio: 5.699, with 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.687-12.088) and woman's age (odds ratio: 0.843, with 95% CI: 0.736-0.966) were the 2 parameters that were significantly correlated with pregnancy. Our results demonstrate that miR-34c levels in spermatozoa are correlated with ICSI outcomes, suggesting that paternal miR-34c may play a role in the early phases of embryonic development. Levels of MiR-34c in human spermatozoa may be used as an indicator for ICSI outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mercury's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Third Flyby Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gloeckler, George; Killen, Rosemary M.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; hide

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury en route to orbit insertion about the innermost planet took place on 29 September 2009. The earlier 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is highly dipolar and stable over the 35 years since its discovery by Mariner 10; that a structured, temporally variable exosphere extends to great altitudes on the dayside and forms a long tail in the anti-sunward direction; a cloud of planetary ions encompasses the magnetosphere from the dayside bow shock to the downstream magnetosheath and magnetotail; and that the magnetosphere undergoes extremely intense magnetic reconnect ion in response to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field. Here we report on new results derived from observations from MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), Magnetometer (MAG), and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) taken during the third flyby.

  17. New discoveries from MESSENGER and insights into Mercury's exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, R. J.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Burger, M. H.; Cassidy, T. A.; Sarantos, M.

    2016-11-01

    For most of the orbital phase of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, a regular search for weakly emitting or less abundant species in Mercury's exosphere resulted in nondetections. However, during the final Earth year of the mission, emission from multiple lines of manganese, aluminum, and ionized calcium was detected. These observations validate the detection of a single line of ionized calcium during the third MESSENGER Mercury flyby, provide definitive confirmation for weak aluminum detections in ground-based observations, and represent the discovery of manganese in Mercury's exosphere. These detections occurred over a limited range of predawn local times and Mercury true anomaly angles (0°-70°), and each has a distinct spatial distribution. Equally interesting is the absence of detectable emission from oxygen at limits well below the levels reported for Mariner 10.

  18. Mercury's Atmosphere and Magnetosphere: MESSENGER Third Flyby Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Johnson, Catherine L.; Gloeckler, George; Killen, Rosemary M.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Sprague, Ann L.; Vevack, Ronald J., Jr.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury en route to orbit insertion about the innermost planet took place on 29 September 2009. The earlier 14 January and 6 October 2008 encounters revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is highly dipolar and stable over the 35 years since its discovery by Mariner 10; that a structured, temporally variable exosphere extends to great altitudes on the dayside and forms a long tail in the anti-sunward direction; a cloud of planetary ions encompasses the magnetosphere from the dayside bow shock to the downstream magnetosheath and magnetotail; and that the magnetosphere undergoes extremely intense magnetic reconnect ion in response to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field. Here we report on new results derived from observations from MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS), Magnetometer (MAG), and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) taken during the third flyby.

  19. Emerging trend in second messenger communication and myoendothelial feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Welsh, Donald G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, second messenger communication has emerged as one of the intriguing topics in the field of vasomotor control. Of particular interest has been the idea of second messenger flux from smooth muscle to endothelium initiating a feedback response that attenuates constriction. Mechanistic details of the precise signaling cascade have until recently remained elusive. In this perspective, we introduce readers to how myoendothelial gap junctions could enable sufficient inositol trisphosphate flux to initiate endothelial Ca2+ events that activate Ca2+ sensitive K+ channels. The resulting hyperpolarizing current would in turn spread back through the same myoendothelial gap junctions to moderate smooth muscle depolarization and constriction. In discussing this defined feedback mechanism, this brief manuscript will stress the importance of microdomains and of discrete cellular signaling. PMID:25071588

  20. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers.

    PubMed

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  1. Brain clock driven by neuropeptides and second messengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus; Sosík, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The master circadian pacemaker in mammals is localized in a small portion of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). It is unclear how the SCN produces circadian rhythms. A common interpretation is that the SCN produces oscillations through the coupling of genetic oscillators in the neurons. The coupling is effected by a network of neuropeptides and second messengers. This network is crucial for the correct function of the SCN. However, models that study a possible oscillatory behavior of the network itself have received little attention. Here we propose and analyze a model to examine this oscillatory potential. We show that an intercellular oscillator emerges in the SCN as a result of the neuropeptide and second messenger dynamics. We find that this intercellular clock can produce circadian rhythms by itself with and without genetic clocks. We also found that the model is robust to perturbation of parameters and can be entrained by light-dark cycles.

  2. MESSENGER Observations of Large Flux Transfer Events at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Six flux transfer events (FTEs) were encountered during MESSENGER's first two flybys of Mercury (M1 and M2). For M1 the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was predominantly northward and four FTEs with durations of 1 to 6 s were observed in the magnetosheath following southward IMF turnings. The IMF was steadily southward during M2, and an FTE 4 s in duration was observed just inside the dawn magnetopause followed approx. 32 s later by a 7 s FTE in the magnetosheath. Flux rope models were fit to the magnetic field data to determine FTE dimensions and flux content. The largest FTE observed by MESSENGER had a diameter of approx. 1 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury s radius), and its open magnetic field increased the fraction of the surface exposed to the solar wind by 10 - 20 percent and contributed up to approx. 30 kV to the cross-magnetospheric electric potential.

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Large Flux Transfer Events at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Wu, Chin-Chun; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McClintock, William E.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    Six flux transfer events (FTEs) were encountered during MESSENGER's first two flybys of Mercury (MI and M2). For MI the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was predominantly northward and four FTEs with durations of 1 to 6 s were observed in the magnetosheath following southward 1M F turnings. The IMF was steadily southward during M2, and an FTE 4 s in duration was observed just inside the dawn magnetopause followed approx.32 s later by a 7-s FTE in the magnetosheath. Flux rope models were fit to the magnetic field data to detem11ne PTE dimensions and flux content The largest FTE observed by MESSENGER had a diameter of approx. 1 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius), and its open magnetic field increased the fraction of the surface exposed to the solar wind by 10 - 20 percent and contributed up to approx.30 kV to the cross-magnetospheric electric potential.

  4. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification -- the epitranscriptome -- is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles.

  5. MESSENGER Observations of Asymmetries at Mercury's Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Gangkai; Slavin, James; Jia, Xianzhe; Raines, Jim; Sun, Wei-Jie; Genestreti, Kevin; Smith, Andy; Gershman, Daniel; Anderson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the Earth's magnetotail current sheet have been observed and remain an active area of research. With an internal magnetic dipole field structure similar to Earth's, similar dawn-dusk asymmetries might be expected in Mercury's magnetotail current sheet. However, no observation of dawn-dusk asymmetries has been reported in the structure of Mercury's magnetotail. Using 4 years of MESSENGER's magnetic field and plasma data, we analyzed 319 current sheet crossings. From the polarity of Bz in the cross-tail current sheet, we determined that MESSENGER is on closed field lines about 90% of the time. During the other 10% MESSENGER observed negative Bz indicating that it was tailward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). The Bz magnetic field is also observed to be higher at the dawnside than the duskside of the magnetotail current sheet by approximately a factor of three. Further the asymmetry decreases with increasing downstream distance. A reduction (enhancement) in Bz should correspond to a more (less) stretched and thinned (thickened) current sheet. Analysis of current sheet thickness based upon MESSENGER's observations confirms this behavior with mean current sheet thickness and Bz intensity having dawn-dusk asymmetries with the same sense. Plasma β in the current sheet also exhibits a dawn-dusk asymmetry opposite to that of Bz. This is consistent with expectations based on MHD stress balance. Earlier studies had shown a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the heavy ion in Mercury's magnetotail. We suggest that this enhancement of heavy ions in the duskside current sheet, due to centrifugal acceleration of ions from the cusp and gradient-curvature drift from the NMNL, may provide a partial explanation of the dawn-dusk current sheet asymmetries found in this study.

  6. Mercury's exosphere: observations during MESSENGER's First Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    McClintock, William E; Bradley, E Todd; Vervack, Ronald J; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Izenberg, Noam R; Solomon, Sean C

    2008-07-04

    During MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer measured Mercury's exospheric emissions, including those from the antisunward sodium tail, calcium and sodium close to the planet, and hydrogen at high altitudes on the dayside. Spatial variations indicate that multiple source and loss processes generate and maintain the exosphere. Energetic processes connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric interaction with the planet likely played an important role in determining the distributions of exospheric species during the flyby.

  7. Tomographic Reconstruction of Mercury's Exosphere from MESSENGER Flyby Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The exosphere of Mercury is among the best-studied examples of a common type of atmosphere, a surface-bounded exosphere. Mercury's exosphere was probed in 2008-2009 with Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) measurements obtained during three planetary flybys by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft [1-3]. The measurements detailed the distribution of two previously known metallic constituents of Mercury's exosphere, Na and Ca, and indicated the presence in the gas phase of yet another metallic species, Mg. Such measurements can answer fundamental scientific questions regarding the relative importance of possible source and loss processes for exospheric species ejected from a surface boundary [4]. The trajectory of MESSENGER during the last of its three flybys provided the best spatial coverage prior to orbit insertion. The measurements by MESSENGER of Na, Ca, and Mg during the third flyby have been analyzed with a novel tomographic method. This approach maximizes the amount of information that can be extracted from line-of-sight measurements because it yields three-dimensional distributions of neutrals consistent with the data.

  8. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations during the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; McClintock, William E.; Benna, Mehdi; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18,2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na. K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29. 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He(+), 0(+), and Na(+),

  9. The Morphology of Craters on Mercury: Results from MESSENGER Flybys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin, Oliver S.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Herrick, Robert R.; Chappelow, John E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic data measured from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft were used for investigations of the relationship between depth and diameter for impact craters on Mercury. Results using data from the MESSENGER flybys of the innermost planet indicate that most of the craters measured with MLA are shallower than those previously measured by using Mariner 10 images. MDIS images of these same MLA-measured craters show that they have been modified. The use of shadow measurement techniques, which were found to be accurate relative to the MLA results, indicate that both small bowl-shaped and large complex craters that are fresh possess depth-to-diameter ratios that are in good agreement with those measured from Mariner 10 images. The preliminary data also show that the depths of modified craters are shallower relative to fresh ones, and might provide quantitative estimates of crater in-filling by subsequent volcanic or impact processes. The diameter that defines the transition from simple to complex craters on Mercury based on MESSENGER data is consistent with that reported from Mariner 10 data.

  10. Mercury's Sodium Exosphere: Observations During the MESSENGER Orbital Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killen, R. M.; Cassidy, T.; Vervack, R. J.; Burger, M. H.; Merkel, A. W.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.; McClintock, W. E.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered into orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. We now have approximately five Mercury years of data from orbit. Prior to the MESSENGER mission, Mercury's surface-bounded exosphere was known to contain H, He, Na, K, and Ca. The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) began routine orbital observations of both the dayside and nightside exosphere on March 29, 2011, measuring altitude profiles for all previously detected neutral species except for He and K. We focus here on what we have learned about the sodium exosphere: its spatial, seasonal, and sporadic variation. Observations to date permit delineation of the relative roles of photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and impact vaporization (IV) from seasonal and spatial effects, as well as of the roles of ions both as sputtering agents and in their possible role to enhance the efficiency of PSD. Correlations of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere with measurements from MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) provide insight into the roles of ions and electrons. Models incorporating MAG observations provide a basis for identifying the location and area of the surface exposed to solar wind plasma, and EPPS observations reveal episodic populations of energetic electrons in the magnetosphere and the presence of planetary He+, O+, and Na+.

  11. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  12. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  13. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  14. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  15. 29 CFR 520.402 - How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners, or apprentices at subminimum wages?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners... MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.402 How do I obtain authority to employ messengers, learners,...

  16. Translation of satellite tobacco necrosis virus ribonucleic acid by an in vitro system from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Leung, D W; Gilbert, C W; Smith, R E; Sasavage, N L; Clark, J M

    1976-11-02

    The RNA of satellite tobacco necrosis virus (STNV) is an effective messenger RNA when translated in an in vitro system from wheat germ. This RNA codes for only STNV coat protein, as indicated (1) by coincidence of the tryptic fingerprints of the translation product and of STNV coat protein, (2) by equivalent size of the translation product and STNV coat protein, and (3) by isolation of an initial peptide of the in vitro product containing the amino acid sequence of the N terminus of STNV coat protein. STNV RNA does not contain a 5'-terminal m7G(5')ppp(5')Np---group and translation of STNV RNA by the wheat germ system does not involve prior formation of 5'-terminal m7G(5')ppp(5') nP---groups on STNV RNA. STNV RNA and 125I-labeled STNV RNA form a specific initiation complex when incubated with initiator tRNA, GTP, initiation factors, and wheat germ ribosomes. Treatment of this specific initiation complex with ribonuclease A allows isolation of an 125I-labeled oligonucleotide protected from ribonuclease A by the initiation complex. This specific oligonucleotide contains approximately 38 nucleotides, including nucleotide sequences that coincide with the codons of the N-terminal amino acids of STNV coat proteins.

  17. Rapid, simple method of preparing rotaviral double-stranded ribonucleic acid for analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Theil, K W; McCloskey, C M; Saif, L J; Redman, D R; Bohl, E H; Hancock, D D; Kohler, E M; Moorhead, P D

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for extracting rotaviral double-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) directly from fecal and intestinal specimens collected from calves and pigs is described. This procedure provides a rapid, simple, reproducible method of obtaining rotaviral double-stranded RNA preparations suitable for electrophoretic analysis in polyacrylamide-agarose composite gels. The rotaviral genome electrophoretic migration pattern produced by double-stranded RNA extracted directly from a specimen by this procedure was qualitatively identical to the electrophoretic migration pattern obtained with double-stranded RNA extracted from purified rotavirus derived from the same specimen. Direct extraction of specimens containing porcine rotavirus-like virus by this procedure gave preparations that had electrophoretic migration patterns similar, but not identical, to the characteristic electrophoretic migration pattern of the rotaviral genome. Sufficient rotaviral double-stranded RNA could be extracted from 6 ml of fecal or intestinal specimen by this procedure to permit 15 or more electrophoretic assays. Images PMID:6270190

  18. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  19. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  20. Simultaneous Rates of Ribonucleic Acid and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Syntheses for Estimating Growth and Cell Division of Aquatic Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Karl, David M.

    1981-01-01

    A method for measuring rates of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) syntheses using a single radioactive precursor has been devised and tested using bacterial cultures and natural assemblages of marine and freshwater microorganisms. The procedure is based upon the uptake and incorporation of exogenous [3H]adenine into cellular adenosine triphosphate and deoxyadenosine triphosphate pools which serve as the immediate precursors for the adenine incorporated into RNA and DNA, respectively. It is proposed that the DNA/RNA rate ratio is correlated with the specific growth rate of microorganisms and can be used as an index for estimating and comparing the productivities of microbial assemblages in nature. This technique can also be used to detect discontinuous growth and cell division processes which frequently occur in surface plankton populations. The DNA/RNA rate ratios measured in a variety of aquatic ecosystems ranged from 3.3 to 31.8% without significant correlation to total microbial biomass. PMID:16345882

  1. G8363A mutation in the mitochondrial DNA transfer ribonucleic acidLys gene: another cause of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shtilbans, A; Shanske, S; Goodman, S; Sue, C M; Bruno, C; Johnson, T L; Lava, N S; Waheed, N; DiMauro, S

    2000-11-01

    We identified a G-->A transition at nt-8363 in the mitochondrial DNA transfer ribonucleic acidLys gene in blood and muscle from a 13-month-old girl who had clinical and neuroradiologic evidence of Leigh syndrome and died at age 27 months. The mutation was less abundant in the same tissues from the patient's mother, who developed myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers (MERRF) in her late 20s. In both mother and daughter, muscle histochemistry showed ragged red and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers and biochemical analysis showed partial defects of multiple respiratory-chain enzymes. A maternal half-sister of the proband had died at 2.5 years of age from neuropathologically proven Leigh syndrome. The G8363A mutation, which previously had been associated with cardiomyopathy and hearing loss, MERRF, and multiple lipomas, also should be included in the differential diagnosis of maternally inherited Leigh syndrome.

  2. The X-Ray Spectrometer for Mercury MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R. D.; Ho, G. C.; Schlemm, C.; Gold, R. E.; Goldsten, J. O.; Boynton, W. V.; Trombka, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and because it is so close, it is difficult to study from Earth-based observatories. Its proximity to the Sun has also limited the number of spacecraft to visit this tiny planet to just one, Mariner 10, which flew by Mercury twice in 1974 and once in 1975. Mariner 10 provided a wealth of new information about Mercury, yet much still remains unknown about Mercury's geologic history and the processes that led to its formation. The origin of Mercury's metal-rich composition is just one area of investigation awaiting more and improved data to sort between competing hypotheses. Mercury plays an important role in comparative planetology, and many of the processes that were important during its formation are relevant to the Earth's early history. MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) is a Discovery mission that has been designed to fly by and orbit Mercury. It will launch in March 2004, flyby Mercury in 2007 and 2008 and enter an elliptical orbit in April 2009. During the one-year orbital phase, a suite of instruments on board the MESSENGER spacecraft will study the exosphere, magnetosphere, surface, and interior of Mercury. One of these instruments will be an X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) that will measure surface elemental abundances. Remote X-ray spectroscopy has been accomplished before on the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and more recently on NEAR Shoemaker. The MESSENGER XRS will measure characteristic X-ray emissions induced in the surface of Mercury by the incident solar flux. The Ka lines for the elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe will be detected with spatial resolution on the order of 40 km when counting statistics are not a limiting factor. These measurements can be used to obtain quantitative information on elemental composition.

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin. James A.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER'S second flyby of Mercury on October 6,2008, very intense reconnection was observed between the planet's magnetic field and a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dawn magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field normal to its surface, approx.14 nT, that implies a rate of reconnection approx.10 times the typical rate at Earth and a cross-magnetospheric electric potential drop of approx.30 kV. The highest magnetic field observed during this second flyby, approx.160 nT, was found at the core of a large dayside flux transfer event (FTE). This FTE is estimated to contain magnetic flux equal to approx.5% that of Mercury's magnetic tail or approximately one order of magnitude higher fraction of the tail flux than is typically found for FTEs at Earth. Plasmoid and traveling compression region (TCR) signatures were observed throughout MESSENGER'S traversal of Mercury's magnetotail with a repetition rate comparable to the Dungey cycle time of approx.2 min. The TCR signatures changed from south-north, indicating tailward motion, to north-south, indicating sunward motion, at a distance approx.2.6 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius) behind the terminator indicating that the near-Mercury magnetotail neutral line was crossed at that point. Overall, these new MESSENGER observations suggest that magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause is very intense relative to what is found at Earth and other planets, while reconnection in Mercury's tail is similar to that in other planetary magnetospheres, but with a very short Dungey cycle time.

  4. Mapping the Topography of Mercury with MESSENGER Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John F.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E..; Zubor, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter onboard MESSENGER involves unique design elements that deal with the challenges of being in orbit around Mercury. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of seven instruments on NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. MESSENGER was launched on 3 August 2004, and entered into orbit about Mercury on 18 March 2011 after a journey through the inner solar system. This involved six planetary flybys, including three of Mercury. MLA is designed to map the topography and landforms of Mercury's surface. It also measures the planet's forced libration (motion about the spin axis), which helps constrain the state of the core. The first science measurements from orbit taken with MLA were made on 29 March 2011 and continue to date. MLA had accumulated about 8.3 million laser ranging measurements to Mercury's surface, as of 31 July 2012, i.e., over six Mercury years (528 Earth days). Although MLA is the third planetary lidar built at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MLA must endure a much harsher thermal environment near Mercury than the previous instruments on Mars and Earth satellites. The design of MLA was derived in part from that of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on Mars Global Surveyor. However, MLA must range over greater distances and often in off-nadir directions from a highly eccentric orbit. In MLA we use a single-mode diode-pumped Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) laser that is highly collimated to maintain a small footprint on the planet. The receiver has both a narrow field of view and a narrow spectral bandwidth to minimize the amount of background light detected from the sunlit hemisphere of Mercury. We achieve the highest possible receiver sensitivity by employing the minimum receiver detection threshold.

  5. Constraints on Mercury's surface composition from MESSENGER neutron spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Taylor, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    The composition of Mercury's surface is poorly known, but the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission has provided a wealth of new data from three flybys. In particular, MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations reveal a surface enriched in neutron absorbing elements, consistent with interpretations of color and albedo observations suggesting a surface composition enriched in Fe-Mg-Ti oxides. In this study, we have computed the neutron absorption cross sections for all of the available proposed surface compositions of Mercury and evaluated the plausibility of each surface composition based on the neutron absorption cross section observed by MESSENGER. For identified plausible compositions, the implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury are discussed. The measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of Mercury is inconsistent with a crust formed from partial melting of plausible bulk mantle compositions, flotation in a magma ocean or adiabatic melting of upwelling cumulates during magma ocean overturn. However, the observed neutron absorption is consistent with model compositions of late-stage magma-ocean cumulates and some proposed compositions from spectral modeling and equilibrium modeling. This suggests that the enrichment of neutron absorbing elements may be indicative of the processes that acted to form Mercury's crust. The enrichment in neutron absorbing elements, in combination with spectral observations that constrain FeO in silicates (< 2 wt.%), offers strong evidence of a magma ocean on Mercury since global scale melting appears to be required to concentrate the major neutron absorbing elements while minimizing Fe in silicate minerals. We also find that iron plays a secondary role in the neutron absorption of plausible surface compositions and its variations within different Fe-Mg-Ti oxide solid solution series does not cause any overlap among the various oxide series in neutron

  6. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER and Venus Express spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MESSENGER data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed Venus Express data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left- and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MESSENGER, Venus Express, STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE were examined for multipoint signatures of the catalogued ICMEs. For spacecraft separations below 15° in heliocentric longitude, the second spacecraft observed the ICME flux rope in 82 % of cases; this percentage dropped to 49 % for separations between 15 and 30°, to 18 % for separations between 30 and 45°, and to 12 % for separations between 45 and 60°. As the spacecraft separation increased, it became increasingly likely that only the sheath and not the flux rope of the ICME was observed, in agreement with the notion that ICME flux ropes are smaller in longitudinal extent than the shocks or discontinuities that they often drive. Furthermore, this study has identified 23 ICMEs observed by pairs of spacecraft close to radial alignment. A detailed analysis of these events could lead to a better understanding of how ICMEs evolve during propagation.

  7. MESSENGER Observations of Cusp Plasma Filaments at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, G. K.; Slavin, J. A.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jia, X.; Raines, J. M.; Imber, S. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Gershman, D. J.; Zurbuchen, T.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    At Mercury, MESSENGER has documented ~1-2-s-long reductions in the dayside magnetospheric magnetic field with amplitudes up to 90% of the ambient intensity. These field reductions which we have termed cusp filaments are observed from just poleward of the magnetospheric cusp to mid-latitudes. During these events, MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) measured H+ ions with magnetosheath-like energies. Minimum variance analysis of the Magnetometer (MAG) data indicates that the filaments are simple two dimensional flux tubes filled with magnetosheath plasma that has a diamagnetic effect on the local background field. Here we analyze 139 filaments identified in 3 years of MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma data to determine the physical properties of these structures. Our results indicate that cusp filaments are common phenomena for all solar wind conditions. They occur over a range of magnetic latitudes from ~50 to 80oN, with durations of ~0.1-2.5s and magnetic field decreases of ~50-300 nT. If the filaments are associated with flux transfer events (FTEs) and move over the spacecraft at speeds comparable to the flank magnetosheath flow speed of 300 km/s, then these filaments have dimensions of ~30-750 km, which is larger than the gyro-radius of a 1 keV H+ ion, i.e., ~ 23 km. Correlation analyses show no obvious dependence of the duration or magnitude of the diamagnetic decrease on magnetic latitude. Overall, the MAG and FIPS observations analyzed here appear consistent with an origin for cusp plasma filaments by the inflow of magnetosheath plasma associated with the localized magnetopause reconnection process that produces FTEs. Further analysis will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. A Test of General Relativity with MESSENGER Mission Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, A.; Mazarico, E.; Goossens, S. J.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Nicholas, J. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft initiated collection of scientific data from the innermost planet during its first flyby of Mercury in January 2008. After two additional Mercury flybys, MESSENGER was inserted into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011 and operated for more than four Earth years through 30 April 2015. Data acquired during the flyby and orbital phases have provided crucial information on the formation and evolution of Mercury. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and the radio science system, for example, obtained geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, which helped constrain its surface and deep interior structure. X-band radio tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, as well as refinement of the planet's obliquity and estimation of the tidal Love number k2. These geophysical parameters are derived from the range-rate observables that measure precisely the motion of the spacecraft in orbit around the planet. However, the DSN stations acquired two other kinds of radio tracking data, range and delta-differential one-way ranging, which also provided precise measurements of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession, which was used by Einstein as confirmation of general relativity (GR) because of its inconsistency with the effects predicted from classical Newtonian theory. MESSENGER data allow the estimation of the GR parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β. Furthermore, determination of Mercury's orbit also allows estimation of the gravitational parameter (GM) and the flattening (J2) of the Sun. We modified our orbit determination software, NASA GSFC's GEODYN II, to enable simultaneous orbit integration of both MESSENGER and the planet Mercury. The

  9. Mapping the messenger RNA within the elongating ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jünemann, R.; Wadzack, J.; Burkhardt, N.; Schmitt, M.; Zhao, J.; Stuhrmann, H. B.; Nierhaus, K. H.

    1997-02-01

    The method of proton-spin contrast-variation was applied for determining the position of the messenger RNA within the elongating ribosome. Using an artificial mRNA fragment the mass center of the mRNA sequence covered by the ribosome could be localized for the pre- and the post-translocational elongation states. The mass center moves about 12 ± 5 Å upon translocation. The radius of gyration was 12 ± e Å. The data give an independent contribution for refining a structural model including the RNA ligands of the elongating ribosome.

  10. Chemical and structural effects of base modifications in messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt, Emily M.; Kietrys, Anna M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of nucleobase modifications in messenger RNA have been revealed through advances in detection and RNA sequencing. Although some of the biochemical pathways that involve modified bases have been identified, research into the world of RNA modification — the epitranscriptome — is still in an early phase. A variety of chemical tools are being used to characterize base modifications, and the structural effects of known base modifications on RNA pairing, thermodynamics and folding are being determined in relation to their putative biological roles. PMID:28102265

  11. Mercury's Plasma Mantle - a survey of MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Jamie Matthew; Slavin, James A.; Raines, Jim; DiBraccio, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The plasma mantle is a region of solar wind plasma entry into the nightside high-latitude magnetosphere. We present a survey of plasma mantles identified in particle and magnetic field measurements from four years of MESSENGER spacecraft observations of Mercury's magnetosphere. The two common observational signatures of this region are ion energy latitude dispersions as well as diamagnetic depressions. From these observations we estimate the contribution of plasma from the solar wind via the mantle and infer magnitude and variability in the cross-magnetospheric electric fields present at Mercury's dynamic magnetosphere.

  12. Current status of GW experiment and multi-messenger astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, V. N.

    2016-06-01

    A limited review of the status of advanced gravitational wave interferometers is presented. In addition, a new opto-acoustical gravitational detector OGRAN in the deep underground of BNO INR RAS is described. The second part of the paper contains a short description of the "multi-messenger astronomy" approach in the context of the GW detection. Various scenarios of such strategy proposed by different authors are discussed. Special attention is paid to the "neutrino-gravity correlation" which looks more or less realistic in respect of supernova events in the Milky Way and near-by galaxies.

  13. Mercury's Complex Exosphere: Results from MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Burger, Matthew H.; Bradley, E. Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal attitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere,

  14. Mercury's complex exosphere: results from MESSENGER's third flyby.

    PubMed

    Vervack, Ronald J; McClintock, William E; Killen, Rosemary M; Sprague, Ann L; Anderson, Brian J; Burger, Matthew H; Bradley, E Todd; Mouawad, Nelly; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2010-08-06

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer detected emission from ionized calcium concentrated 1 to 2 Mercury radii tailward of the planet. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles reveal altitude distributions that are distinct for each species. A two-component sodium distribution and markedly different magnesium distributions above the two poles are direct indications that multiple processes control the distribution of even single species in Mercury's exosphere.

  15. Laser altimeter observations from MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E; Solomon, Sean C; Phillips, Roger J; Peale, Stanton J; Head, James W; Hauck, Steven A; McNutt, Ralph L; Oberst, Jürgen; Neumann, Gregory A; Lemoine, Frank G; Sun, Xiaoli; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier; Harmon, John K

    2008-07-04

    A 3200-kilometers-long profile of Mercury by the Mercury Laser Altimeter on the MESSENGER spacecraft spans approximately 20% of the near-equatorial region of the planet. Topography along the profile is characterized by a 5.2-kilometer dynamic range and 930-meter root-mean-square roughness. At long wavelengths, topography slopes eastward by 0.02 degrees , implying a variation of equatorial shape that is at least partially compensated. Sampled craters on Mercury are shallower than their counterparts on the Moon, at least in part the result of Mercury's higher gravity. Crater floors vary in roughness and slope, implying complex modification over a range of length scales.

  16. Multi-messenger astronomy: gravitational waves, neutrinos, photons, and cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchesi, Marica

    2016-05-01

    In the next decade, multi-messenger astronomy will probe the rich physics of transient phenomena in the sky, such as the mergers of neutron stars and/or black holes, gamma-ray bursts, and core-collapse supernovae. The first observations of gravitational waves from the inspiral and merger of a binary black-hole system by the advanced LIGO interferometers marked the onset of gravitational-wave astronomy. The advanced detectors, LIGO and Virgo, observing together with space and ground-based electromagnetic telescopes, and neutrinos and cosmic-ray detectors will offer the great opportunity to explore the Universe through all its messengers. The paper provides a review of the astrophysical sources expected to emit transient multi-messenger signals and the multi-messenger obervational startegies and analysis. Challenges and perspectives of the multi-messenger astronomy are presented highlighting gravitational waves as new messenger.

  17. Multi-messenger particle astrophysics with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Cherenkov Telescope Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a next-generation array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Building on the success of H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS, in an energy range complementary to that of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), CTA will investigate the particle physics of the cosmos through observations of gamma rays between tens of GeV and several hundred TeV. The observatory is especially well suited for follow-up of transient events detected in other wavelengths and messengers including neutrinos and gravitational waves. CTA will feature one array in each hemisphere for full sky coverage. The largest telescopes will have a 20 GeV energy threshold and will be able to quickly (in less than 50 seconds) slew to transient targets. The excellent effective area of CTA (thousands of times greater than that of the Fermi LAT at 20 GeV) will enable it to provide powerful and unique contributions to multi-messenger particle astrophysics.

  18. MESSENGER Observations of Reconnection and Its Effects on Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic fields produced very intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and very different systemlevel responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active with very large magnetic fields normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 s to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was very stable. In contrast the third flyby experienced a variable IMF with it varying from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited this time to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Rather, plasmoid release was highly correlated with the four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects will be presented. The results will be examined in light of what is known about the response of the Earth's magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  19. Modeling MESSENGER Observations of Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew Howard; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sprague, Ann L.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2012-01-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft has made the first high-spatial-resolution observations of exospheric calcium at Mercury. We use a Monte Carlo model of the exosphere to track the trajectories of calcium atoms ejected from the surface until they are photoionized, escape from the system, or stick to the surface. This model permits an exploration of exospheric source processes and interactions among neutral atoms, solar radiation, and the planetary surface. The MASCS data have suggested that a persistent, high-energy source of calcium that was enhanced in the dawn, equatorial region of Mercury was active during MESSENGER's three flybys of Mercury and during the first seven orbits for which MASCS obtained data. The total Ca source rate from the surface varied between 1.2x10(exp 23) and 2.6x10(exp 23) Ca atoms/s, if its temperature was 50,000 K. The origin of this high-energy, asymmetric source is unknown, although from this limited data set it does not appear to be consistent with micrometeoroid impact vaporization, ion sputtering, electron-stimulated desorption, or vaporization at dawn of material trapped on the cold nightside.

  20. MESSENGER observations of substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Slavin, James; Fu, Suiyan; Raines, Jim; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Yao, Zhonghua; Pu, Zuyin; Shi, Quanqi; Poh, Gangkai; Boardsen, Scott; Imber, Suzanne; Sundberg, Torbjörn; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been examined for evidence of substorm activity. A total of 32 events were found during which an Earth-like growth phase was followed by clear near-tail expansion phase signatures. During the growth phase, the lobe of the tail loads with magnetic flux while the plasma sheet thins due to the increased lobe magnetic pressure. MESSENGER is often initially in the plasma sheet and then moves into the lobe during the growth phases. The averaged time scale of the loading is around 1 min, consistent with previous observations of Mercury's Dungey cycle. The dipolarization front that marks the initiation of the substorm expansion phase is only a few seconds in duration. The spacecraft then abruptly enters the plasma sheet due to the plasma sheet expansion as reconnection-driven flow from the near-Mercury neutral line encounters the stronger magnetic fields closer to the planet. Substorm activity in the near tail of Mercury is quantitatively very similar to the Earth despite the very compressed time scale.

  1. Translation of globin messenger RNA by the mouse ovum

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, R. L.; Chen, H. Y.; Trumbauer, M. E.; Avarbock, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the Xenopus oocyte can translate rabbit haemoglobin messenger RNA (mRNA) following microinjection of the message into the cell1. The Xenopus oocyte has since been shown to be capable of translating a variety of messenger RNAs from different species2–4. This system has proved useful in understanding the mechanism of message translation and has also provided information about the translation capability of the Xenopus oocyte5,6. Several other cell types, including HeLa cells and fibroblasts, can also translate exogenous message injected into the cell7,8. However, there have been no reports of injection of mRNA into oocytes or fertilised one-cell ova of mammalian species. Nevertheless, the latter system could be of considerable use in studying the processing of exogenous messages in a mammalian system undergoing development, as well as providing insight into the way the early embryo processes injected messages and the protein products of such messages. We report here the results of injecting message into the fertilised one-cell mouse ovum and show that both mouse and rabbit globin mRNA are translated in this system. PMID:7352032

  2. Pseudo–Messenger RNA: Phantoms of the Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Martin C; Wilming, Laurens G; Forrest, Alistair; Kawaji, Hideya; Tan, Sin Lam; Wahlestedt, Claes; Bajic, Vladimir B; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bailey, Timothy L; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian transcriptome harbours shadowy entities that resist classification and analysis. In analogy with pseudogenes, we define pseudo–messenger RNA to be RNA molecules that resemble protein-coding mRNA, but cannot encode full-length proteins owing to disruptions of the reading frame. Using a rigorous computational pipeline, which rules out sequencing errors, we identify 10,679 pseudo–messenger RNAs (approximately half of which are transposon-associated) among the 102,801 FANTOM3 mouse cDNAs: just over 10% of the FANTOM3 transcriptome. These comprise not only transcribed pseudogenes, but also disrupted splice variants of otherwise protein-coding genes. Some may encode truncated proteins, only a minority of which appear subject to nonsense-mediated decay. The presence of an excess of transcripts whose only disruptions are opal stop codons suggests that there are more selenoproteins than currently estimated. We also describe compensatory frameshifts, where a segment of the gene has changed frame but remains translatable. In summary, we survey a large class of non-standard but potentially functional transcripts that are likely to encode genetic information and effect biological processes in novel ways. Many of these transcripts do not correspond cleanly to any identifiable object in the genome, implying fundamental limits to the goal of annotating all functional elements at the genome sequence level. PMID:16683022

  3. MESSENGER observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at Mercury's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, T.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a survey of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orbit. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. Remarkably, the results show that MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub-sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopause are much larger than at Earth. The wave amplitude was often on the order of 100 nT or more, and the wave periods were ~10-20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is also present in the data, with all of the observed events taking place in the post-noon and the dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is likely related to finite ion-gyroradius effects and is in agreement with the results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. Similar to most terrestrial events, the wave observations were made almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward. Accompanying measurements from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) show that the waves were associated with a substantial transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  4. Mineralogical indicators of Mercury's hollows composition in MESSENGER color observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith; Domingue, Deborah L.; Helbert, Jörn; D'Amore, Mario; Maturilli, Alessandro; Klima, Rachel L.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Murchie, Scott L.; Izenberg, Noam R.; Blewett, David T.; Vaughan, William M.; Head, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Early during MErcury Surface Space ENvironment GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER)'s orbital mission, the Mercury Dual-Imaging System imaged the landform called hollows on the two craters Dominici and Hopper, using its Wide-Angle Camera with eight narrowband color filters ranging from 433 to 996 nm. An absorption feature centered in the MDIS 629 nm filter is evident in reflectance spectra for Dominici's south wall/rim hollows. A different absorption feature found in photometry of Dominici's center hollows extends through the MDIS 828 nm filter. Hollows in Hopper exhibit a weaker spectral absorption feature than that observed in Dominici's center. At Dominici, we postulate that fresher hollows-hosting material in the wall/rim was exposed to the space environment through a process of slumping of the overlying material. With time, local and global processes darken the hollows and change or mix the surface mineralogy, so that the spectral signature evolves. The hollows could contain low-density MgS and an opaque component, potentially derived from background material.

  5. Multi-Messenger Astronomy: White Dwarf Binaries, LISA and GAIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Michael; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of gravitational waves has ushered in a new era in astronomy. The low-frequency band covered by the future LISA detector provides unprecedented opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy. With the Global Astrometric Interferometer for Astrophysics (GAIA) mission, we expect to discover about 1,000 eclipsing binary systems composed of a WD and a main sequence star - a sizeable increase from the approximately 34 currently known binaries of this type. In advance of the first GAIA data release and the launch of LISA within the next decade, we used the Binary Stellar Evolution (BSE) code simulate the evolution of White Dwarf Binaries (WDB) in a fixed galaxy population of about 196,000 sources. Our goal is to assess the detectability of a WDB by LISA and GAIA using the parameters from our population synthesis, we calculate GW strength h, and apparent GAIA magnitude G. We can then use a scale factor to make a prediction of how many multi- messenger sources we expect to be detectable by both LISA and GAIA in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way. We create binaries 10 times to ensure randomness in distance assignment and average our results. We then determined whether or not astronomical chirp is the difference between the total chirp and the GW chirp. With Astronomical chirp and simulations of mass transfer and tides, we can gather more information about the internal astrophysics of stars in ultra-compact binary systems.

  6. Impacts of Center of Mass Shifts on Messenger Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; Vaughan, R. M.; Chouinard, T. L., III; Jaekle, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) has successfully completed its first three years of flight operations following launch on August 3, 2004. As part of NASA s Discovery Program, MESSENGER will observe Mercury during flybys in 2008 and 2009, as well as from orbit beginning in March 2011. This paper discusses the impact that center of mass (CM) location changes have had on many mission activities, particularly angular momentum management and maneuver execution. Momentum trends were altered significantly following the first deep-space maneuver, and these changes were related to a change in the CM. The CM location also impacts maneuver execution, and uncertainties in its location led to the significant direction errors experienced at trajectory correction maneuver 11. Because of the spacecraft sensitivity to CM location, efforts to estimate its position are important to momentum and maneuver prediction. This paper summarizes efforts to estimate the CM from flight data, as well as the operational strategy to handle CM uncertainties and their impact on momentum trends and maneuver execution accuracy.

  7. QUANTIFICATION OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) ZONA RADIATA AND VITELLOGENIN MESSENGER RIBONUCLEIC ACID (MRNA) LEVELS USING REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) AFTER IN VIVO TREATMENT WITH 17A-ESTRADIOL AND A-ZEARALENOL. (R826301)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. (Accumulation of methyl-deficient rat liver messenger ribonucleic acid on ethionine administration). Progress report. [Methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and effects of phorbol ester on methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, E.

    1980-01-01

    Enzyme fractions were isolated from Ehrlich ascites cells which introduced methyl groups into methyl deficient rat liver mRNA and unmethylated vaccinia mRNA. The methyl groups were incorporated at the 5' end into cap 1 structures by the viral enzyme, whereas both cap 0 and cap 1 structures were formed by the Ehrlich ascites cell enzymes. Preliminary results indicate the presence of adenine N/sup 6/-methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites cells. These results indicate that mRNA deficient in 5'-cap methylation and in internal methylation of adenine accumulated in rats on exposure to ethionine. The methyl-deficient mRNA isolated from the liver of ethionine-fed rats differed in its translational properties from mRNA isolated from control animals. Preliminary experiments indicate that single topical application of 17n moles of TPA to mouse skin altered tRNA methyltransferases. The extent of methylation was increased over 2-fold in mouse skin treated with TPA for 48 hours. These changes have been observed as early as 12 hours following TPA treatment. In contrast, the application of initiating dose of DMBA had no effect on these enzymes. It should be emphasized that the changes in tRNA methyltransferases produced by TPA are not merely an increase of the concentration of the enzyme, rather that they represent alterations of specificity of a battery of enzymes. In turn the change in enzyme specificity can produce alterations in the structure of tRNA. (ERB)

  9. Body weight loss in beef cows: I. The effect of increased beta-oxidation on messenger ribonucleic acid levels of uncoupling proteins two and three and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Brennan, K M; Michal, J J; Ramsey, J J; Johnson, K A

    2009-09-01

    Twenty-six Angus-cross cows were studied during BW loss (WL) and BW maintenance (WM) to examine the effects of elevated beta-oxidation on mRNA levels of NEFA-responsive signaling molecules in skeletal muscle. At the end of the WL and WM sampling periods, muscle biopsies were removed from the biceps femoris and mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. In comparison with WM, cows undergoing WL had elevated mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (4.6-fold), fatty acid binding protein 3 (2.0-fold), and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 (2.8-fold), all of which are indicators of beta-oxidation. Levels of mRNA of the NEFA-responsive signaling molecules PPAR alpha, delta, and gamma increased 2.0-fold, 2.2-fold, and 1.84-fold, respectively, during WL. Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 also had increased mRNA (3.0-fold and 6.0-fold, respectively) during WL, but Western blot analysis found no changes in protein abundance of uncoupling protein 3. Uncoupling protein expression can be directly stimulated by elevated NEFA, potentially to protect cells from damage by lipid oxidation by-products. Thus, an increase in mRNA levels of genes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids and fatty acid by-products occurs during BW loss in beef cattle. These data support previous findings in nonruminants and suggest that these genes play a role in the same physiological processes in ruminants.

  10. Growth hormone stimulates hepatic expression of bovine growth hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid through signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 activation of a major growth hormone receptor gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Honglin; Wang, Ying; Wu, Miaozong; Gu, Zhiliang; Frank, Stuart J; Torres-Diaz, Roberto

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether and how GH regulates hepatic expression of GH receptor (GHR) mRNA in cattle. Ribonuclease protection assays revealed that injection of GH in a slow-release formula increased both hepatic GHR and IGF-I mRNAs 1 wk after the injection. The increases in GHR and IGF-I mRNAs were highly correlated. Western blot analysis showed that the injection also increased liver GHR protein level. In cattle and other mammals, hepatic GHR mRNA is expressed as variants that differ in the 5'-untranslated region due to the use of different promoters in transcription and/or alternative splicing. We found that GH increased the expression of the liver-specific GHR mRNA variant GHR1A without affecting the other two major GHR mRNA variants in the bovine liver, GHR1B and GHR1C. In transient transfection analyses, GH could robustly activate reporter gene expression from a 2.7-kb GHR1A promoter, suggesting that GH augmentation of GHR1A mRNA expression in the liver is at least partially mediated at the transcriptional level. Additional transfection analyses of serially 5'-truncated fragments of this promoter narrowed the GH-responsive sequence element down to a 210-bp region that contained a putative signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) binding site. EMSAs demonstrated that this putative STAT5 binding site was able to bind to STAT5b protein. In cotransfection assays, deletion of this putative STAT5 binding site abolished most of the GH response of the GHR1A promoter. Like 1-wk GH action, 6-h (i.e. short-term) GH action also increased liver expression of GHR1A and total GHR mRNAs in cattle. These observations together suggest that GH directly stimulates the expression of one GHR mRNA variant, GHR1A, through binding STAT5 to its promoter, thereby increasing GHR mRNA and protein expression in the bovine liver.

  11. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 regulates leptin biosynthesis in adipocytes at the level of translation: the role of the 5'-untranslated region in the expression of leptin messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Partha; Anno, Takatoshi; Manning, Brendan D; Luo, Zhijun; Kandror, Konstantin V

    2008-10-01

    Leptin production by adipose cells in vivo is increased after feeding and decreased by food deprivation. However, molecular mechanisms that control leptin expression in response to food intake remain unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that leptin expression in adipose cells is regulated by nutrient- and insulin-sensitive mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-mediated pathway. The activity of mTORC1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was up-regulated by stable expression of either constitutively active Rheb or dominant-negative AMP-activated protein kinase. In both cases, expression of endogenous leptin was significantly elevated at the level of translation. To investigate the role of leptin 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in the regulation of protein expression, we created bicistronic reporter constructs with and without the 5'-UTR. We found that the presence of leptin 5'-UTR renders mRNA resistant to regulation by mTORC1. It appears, therefore, that mTORC1 controls translation of leptin mRNA via a novel mechanism that does not require the presence of either the 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract or the 5'-UTR.

  12. Expression of messenger ribonucleic acid and presence of immunoreactive proteins for epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and EGF/TGF alpha receptors and 125I-EGF binding sites in human fallopian tube.

    PubMed

    Chegini, N; Zhao, Y; McLean, F W

    1994-05-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the Fallopian tubes express epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF alpha), and EGF receptor (EGF-R) mRNA. The RT-PCR product was verified by restriction enzyme digestion analysis. Immunohistochemically, EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R were localized in Fallopian tubes by use of specific antibodies to human EGF, mature fragments of human TGF alpha, and monoclonal antibodies to the extracellular binding domain of EGF-R. The tubal epithelial cells were the primary site of immunoreactive EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R, which were present to a lesser extent in the stromal cells, smooth muscle cell layers, fibroblasts of serosal tissue, and arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Using antibodies generated against the amino and carboxy termini of TGF alpha precursor produced a similar cellular distribution to that observed for mature TGF alpha. The intensity of immunoreactive TGF alpha with these antibodies was similar to that seen with EGF. The ciliated and nonciliated epithelial cells in the ampullary and isthmus regions immunostained with similar intensity for EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R. The immunostaining for EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R was cycle-dependent, was considerably higher during late proliferative and early-to-mid-secretory phases than during early proliferative and late secretory phases of the menstrual cycle, and was reduced during the postmenopausal period. Specimens obtained 5-12 yr after tubal ligation immunostained for EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R similarly to sections from unligated tubes taken during the same phase of the cycle. Quantitative autoradiography of 125I-EGF binding generated a pattern similar to that of immunostaining for EGF-R binding. Net grain density/100 microns 2 calculated for different cell types indicated that the epithelial cells had a significantly higher grain density than did other tubal cell types (p < 0.05) without the cycle dependency seen in the immunohistochemical study. In summary, the results demonstrate that the human Fallopian tube expresses mRNA and contains immunoreactive proteins for EGF, TGF alpha, and EGF-R as well as binding sites for 125I-EGF. The cycle dependency and lower immunostaining in postmenopausal tubes suggest a potential regulation of their expression by ovarian steroids. The results imply the importance of EGF/TGF alpha in a variety of tubal biochemical and physiological functions and possibly early embryonic development.

  13. Characterization of the chicken follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (cFSH-R) complementary deoxyribonucleic acid, and expression of cFSH-R messenger ribonucleic acid in the ovary.

    PubMed

    You, S; Bridgham, J T; Foster, D N; Johnson, A L

    1996-11-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the chicken (c) FSH receptor (R) cDNA, and to evaluate expression of cFSH-R mRNA in the hen ovary at known stages during follicle development. A total of 2.5 kb of nucleic acid sequence including the complete cFSH-R coding region was isolated by a combination of the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends techniques. Overall, the nucleic acid sequence homology of the cFSH-R cDNA coding region is 71.8% and 72.2% compared to the rat and bovine FSH-R, respectively, while the deduced amino acid sequence identity for the receptor protein (693 amino acids) is 71.9% and 72.4%, respectively. By comparison, the cFSH-R nucleic acid and amino acid sequences are 60.1% and 49.4% identical to the respective cLH-R sequences. Northern blot analysis detected a single 4.3-kb cFSH-R mRNA transcript, which was selectively expressed in ovarian (granulosa, theca, and stromal) tissues, but not the oviduct, adrenal, liver, muscle, or brain. As the follicle developed from the prehierarchical (6- to 8-mm diameter) to the largest preovulatory (F1 follicle) stage, cFSH-R mRNA levels progressively declined within both the granulosa and theca layers (p < 0.05). Moreover, cFSH-R mRNA levels were lower in whole atretic than in morphologically normal 3- to 5-mm follicles (p = 0.0015). The pattern of cFSH-R mRNA expression within the granulosa layer during follicle development was notably different from that of the recently reported cLH-R, in that cLH-R mRNA levels increase to become readily detectable coincident with dramatically increased steroidogenic capacity during the last few days before ovulation of the follicle. On the other hand, highest levels of cFSH-R mRNA in 6- to 8-mm (prehierarchical) follicles were consistent with a role for the cFSH-R in maintaining the viability of prehierarchical follicles and in initiating granulosa cell differentiation at the time when follicles are selected into the preovulatory hierarchy.

  14. Cold stress and corticotropin-releasing hormone induced changes in messenger ribonucleic acid for the alpha(1)-subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel in the rat anterior pituitary and enriched populations of corticotropes.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Nagle, G T; Ritchie, A K; Collins, T J; Childs, G V

    1999-07-01

    In response to stress, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is secreted from anterior pituitary corticotropes. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a potent stimulator of ACTH secretion. The CRH stimulation of secretion is mediated by cAMP and is largely dependent on Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels. This study was designed to investigate whether the expression of L-type Ca(2+) channels in the rat anterior pituitary and in corticotropes is regulated by acute stress and CRH. RNase protection assays were used to quantify alpha(1C) mRNA of the L-type Ca(2+) channel. The alpha(1C) mRNA levels from stressed rats increased by 31% in anterior pituitaries of rats after 30 min of exposure to cold stress. Neither 60 min cold stress nor 30 min restraint stress had an effect on alpha(1C) mRNA levels. When alpha(1C) mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in a population of corticotropes enriched to 90%, 0.5 nM CRH (3 h) stimulated a 36% increase in the average area of label/cell and a 10% increase in the average density of label. Our results suggest that (1) the expression of alpha(1C) subunit mRNA of L-type Ca(2+) channels is increased in the rat anterior pituitary with a stress-specific response that might reflect an increase both in thyrotropes and corticotropes (both are known to be stimulated by cold stress), and (2) the CRH-mediated increase in alpha(1C) mRNA expression in individual rat corticotropes, in vitro, supports the hypothesis that some of the increase in vivo is due to changes in corticotropes.

  15. Novel mitochondrial DNA transversion mutation in transfer ribonucleic acid for leucine 2 (CUN) in a patient with the clinical features of MELAS.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Ozand, Pinar T; Al-Dhalaan, Hesham

    2006-11-01

    We describe an 11-year-old Saudi boy who had an encephalopathy suggestive of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS). We screened his entire mitochondrial DNA coding region and detected one novel transversion point mutation at nt-12299 A > C in the transfer ribonucleic acid for leucine 2 (CUN) that is located in the anticodon loop. We believe that this mutation is the cause of his disease condition.

  16. The Geology of Mercury as Seen by the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James; Murchie, Scott L.; Prockter, Louise M.; Robinson, Mark; Solomon, Sean C.; Strom, Robert; Chapman, Clark; Watters, Thomas; Blewett, David T.; Denevi, Brett; Chabot, Nancy

    The three MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have yielded images of most of the planet's sur-face (including portions unseen by Mariner 10); these data have helped to address a series of questions related to the nature of geological process operating on the planet and its geologi-cal history. Volcanism: New observations show evidence for numerous volcanic vents, in the form of irregularly shaped rimless depressions, around the interior margin of the Caloris basin and elsewhere on the planet, mostly on impact crater floors. Several depressions appear to be sources of explosive volcanism, and one is surrounded by a shield in excess of 100 km in diame-ter. The interior of the Caloris basin is filled with plains units spectrally distinct from the basin rim deposits; impact crater stratigraphy and comparisons to the filling of the lunar Imbrium basin support a volcanic origin. Some smooth plains surrounding the rim of the Caloris basin show distinct differences in ages, color, and morphological properties from their surroundings, supporting a volcanic origin. Impact Cratering: New data show the characteristics and on-set diameters of fresh impact craters and document the nature of peak-ring and multi-ringed basins and their global distribution. The newly discovered 715 km-diameter Rembrandt basin shows an unusual sequence of structures and evidence for interior volcanic fill, and several well-preserved peak-ring basins provide insight into why they are relatively more common on Mercury. Tectonism: The new coverage provides evidence for the nature and global distribu-tion of extensive tectonic scarps and wrinkle ridges, and a set of radial graben discovered in central Caloris basin (Pantheon Fossae) reveals evidence for enigmatic basin-related extensional deformation. Geological History: Impact crater size-frequency distributions and stratigraphic relationships are providing new insight into the temporal relationships of geological processes and the comparative planetological

  17. MESSENGER's Low-Altitude Campaign: Mercury at Unprecedented Close Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Nittler, L. R.; Byrne, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In March 2013, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft began its Second Extended Mission (XM2) to acquire observations of Mercury's surface and interior at unprecedented spatial resolution and measurements of the planet's dynamic magnetosphere and exosphere at high temporal resolution during the peak and declining phase of the current solar cycle. XM2 is framed by six science questions, each motivated by discoveries and observations made during MESSENGER's Primary and First Extended Missions: (1) What active and recent processes have affected Mercury's surface? (2) How has the state of stress in Mercury's crust evolved over time? (3) How have compositions of volcanic materials on Mercury evolved over time? (4) What are the characteristics of volatile emplacement and sequestration in Mercury's north polar region? (5) What are the consequences of precipitating ions and energetic electrons at Mercury? (6) How do Mercury's exosphere and magnetosphere respond to both extreme and stable solar wind conditions during solar maximum and the declining phase of the solar cycle? Also since March 2013, the periapsis altitude, or closest approach distance to Mercury's surface, has declined progressively with each orbit, in response to the gravitational attraction of the Sun, although the rate of that decline depends on the angle between the Mercury-Sun line and MESSENGER's orbit plane. For the first year of XM2, no propulsive orbit-correction maneuvers (OCMs) were conducted to change the evolution of the spacecraft's orbital parameters. Because sufficient propellant remained at the end of that year to complete four periapsis-raising OCMs, a low-altitude campaign was designed to use those maneuvers to maximize the number of orbits for which the periapsis altitude is as low as 15-25 km. The periapsis altitude passed below 200 km altitude for the first time on 20 April 2014 and below 100 km altitude for the first time on 25 July 2014

  18. MESSENGER Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Heyner, D.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study induction signals from Mercury's core. The weak dipole moment (190 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius) yields a mean subsolar magnetopause distance,RSS, from the dipole origin of 1.45 RM. Time variations in Mercury's magnetopause position, and hence in the magnetopause fields, are driven by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure, Pram, and induce currents in Mercury's interior, in particular at the top of the large, highly conductive core. Mercury's eccentric orbit leads to periodic, annual variations in Pram with an amplitude of ˜50% of the mean Pram. Shorter-timescale, higher-amplitude variations in Pram also occur due to variability in the solar wind. We use a model of Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER observations together with a two-layer, radial conductivity model to calculate the expected geometry and magnitude of induced field signatures. The inducing field geometry is obtained via a spherical harmonic expansion of the model magnetopause field at distinct RSS values corresponding to the range observed in MESSENGER MAG data. For the two-layer model and time variations in the field with periods longer than ~1 h, the transfer function between the inducing and induced fields depends only on the spherical harmonic degree and on the ratio of the core radius to the planetary radius. We observe two lines of evidence for an annual induced signature at Mercury. First, RSS varies with heliocentric distance, Rh, as Rhb where b < 1/3. Second, a stronger planetary dipole moment is observed at perihelion than at aphelion. The magnitudes of the observed signals are consistent with the recent estimate of Mercury's core radius (2020 × 30 km) derived from gravity and spin-state data, and independently rule out a core radius less than ˜1900 km. Larger amplitude induced signals are observed in association with

  19. Gravity, Topography, and Magnetic Field of Mercury from Messenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Barnouin, Olivier; Ernst, Carolyn; Goosens, Sander; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    On 18 March 2011, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft was inserted into a 12-hour, near-polar orbit around Mercury, with an initial periapsis altitude of 200 km, initial periapse latitude of 60 deg N, and apoapsis at approximately 15,200 km altitude in the southern hemisphere. This orbit has permitted the mapping of regional gravitational structure in the northern hemisphere, and laser altimetry from the MESSENGER spacecraft has yielded a geodetically controlled elevation model for the same hemisphere. The shape of a planet combined with gravity provides fundamental information regarding its internal structure and geologic and thermal evolution. Elevations in the northern hemisphere exhibit a unimodal distribution with a dynamic range of 9.63 km, less than that of the Moon (19.9 km), but consistent with Mercury's higher surface gravitational acceleration. After one Earth-year in orbit, refined models of gravity and topography have revealed several large positive gravity anomalies that coincide with major impact basins. These candidate mascons have anomalies that exceed 100 mGal and indicate substantial crustal thinning and superisostatic uplift of underlying mantle. An additional uncompensated 1000-km-diameter gravity and topographic high at 68 deg N, 33 deg E lies within Mercury's northern volcanic plains. Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is generally thicker at low latitudes than in the polar region. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR2 = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M=3.30 x 10(exp 23) kg and R=2440 km are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of Cm/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. One proposed model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes silicate crust and mantle layers overlying a dense solid (possibly Fe-S) layer, a liquid Fe

  20. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: spacecraft and mission design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Andrew G.; Gold, Robert E.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Ercol, Carl J.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Hartka, Theodore J.; Jenkins, Jason E.; McAdams, James V.; Mosher, Larry E.; Persons, David F.; Artis, David A.; Bokulic, Robert S.; Conde, Richard F.; Dakermanji, George; Goss, Milton E.; Haley, David R.; Heeres, Kenneth J.; Maurer, Richard H.; Moore, Robert C.; Rodberg, Elliot H.; Stern, Theodore G.; Wiley, Samuel R.; Williams, Bobby G.; Yen, Chen-wan L.; Peterson, Max R.

    2001-12-01

    A Mercury orbiter mission is challenging from thermal and mass perspectives. The Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission overcomes these challenges while avoiding esoteric technologies by using an innovative approach with commonly available materials, minimal moving parts, and maximum heritage. This approach yields a spacecraft with good margins in all categories and low technical risk. The key concepts are a ceramic-cloth sunshade, an integrated lightweight structure and high- performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors (OSRs). The sunshade maintains the spacecraft at room temperature. The integrated structure and propulsion system provides ample mass margin. The solar array with OSRs, which has already undergone significant testing, provides thermal margin even if the panels are inadvertently pointed directly at the Sun at 0.3 AU. 0.3 AU.

  1. The dynamic N(1)-methyladenosine methylome in eukaryotic messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Dominissini, Dan; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Peer, Eyal; Kol, Nitzan; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Dai, Qing; Di Segni, Ayelet; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Clark, Wesley C; Zheng, Guanqun; Pan, Tao; Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Hershkovitz, Vera; Han, Dali; Doré, Louis C; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; He, Chuan

    2016-02-25

    Gene expression can be regulated post-transcriptionally through dynamic and reversible RNA modifications. A recent noteworthy example is N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A), which affects messenger RNA (mRNA) localization, stability, translation and splicing. Here we report on a new mRNA modification, N(1)-methyladenosine (m(1)A), that occurs on thousands of different gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, at an estimated average transcript stoichiometry of 20% in humans. Employing newly developed sequencing approaches, we show that m(1)A is enriched around the start codon upstream of the first splice site: it preferentially decorates more structured regions around canonical and alternative translation initiation sites, is dynamic in response to physiological conditions, and correlates positively with protein production. These unique features are highly conserved in mouse and human cells, strongly indicating a functional role for m(1)A in promoting translation of methylated mRNA.

  2. Gravitational Wave Multi-Messenger Prospects for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) experiments are currently setting limits on the gravitational wave (GW) emission in the nanohertz frequency band. The primary source of GW emission in this band is expected to be a population of binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form following galactic mergers. This population of binary supermassive black holes is representative of a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. During this process, there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. In this talk, I will present recent work investigating the potential for jointly detecting a binary's electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. Such `multi-messenger' sources would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  3. Gravitational Wave Multi-Messenger Prospects for Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joseph; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) experiments are now setting limits on the gravitational wave (GW) emission in the nanohertz frequency band. The primary source of GW emission in this band is expected to be a population of binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form following galactic mergers. This population of binary supermassive black holes are representative of a crucial step in galaxy formation theories. During the extended interaction between SMBHs and their host galaxy throughout inspiral, there is the potential for many electromagnetic tracers to accompany the binary's evolution. Using results from a suite of simulations, I will present an investigation of the potential for jointly detecting a binary’s electromagnetic and gravitational radiation. The detection of a single ‘multi-messenger' source would provide a unique window into a pivotal stage of galaxy evolution, and would revolutionize the understanding of late-stage galaxy evolution.

  4. MESSENGER observations of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Acuña, Mario H; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Trávnícek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Solar wind energy transfer to planetary magnetospheres and ionospheres is controlled by magnetic reconnection, a process that determines the degree of connectivity between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and a planet's magnetic field. During MESSENGER's second flyby of Mercury, a steady southward IMF was observed and the magnetopause was threaded by a strong magnetic field, indicating a reconnection rate ~10 times that typical at Earth. Moreover, a large flux transfer event was observed in the magnetosheath, and a plasmoid and multiple traveling compression regions were observed in Mercury's magnetotail, all products of reconnection. These observations indicate that Mercury's magnetosphere is much more responsive to IMF direction and dominated by the effects of reconnection than that of Earth or the other magnetized planets.

  5. New Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere from MESSENGER'S First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Killen, M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, James M.; Schriver, David; Somomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft on 14 January 2008 have revealed new features of the solar system's smallest planetary magnetosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field orientation was unfavorable for large inputs of energy from the solar wind and no evidence of magnetic substorms, internal magnetic reconnection, or energetic particle acceleration was detected. Large-scale rotations of the magnetic field were measured along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere and ultra-tow frequency waves were frequently observed beginning near closest approach. Outbound the spacecraft encountered two current-sheet boundaries across which the magnetic field intensity decreased in a step-like manner. The outer current sheet is the magnetopause boundary. The inner current sheet is similar in structure, but weaker and -1000 km closer to the planet. Between these two current sheets the magnetic field intensity is depressed by the diamagnetic effect of planetary ions created by the photo-ionization of Mercury's exosphere.

  6. NO signaling in plant immunity: a tale of messengers.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Kulik, Anna; Lamotte, Olivier; Jeandroz, Sylvain; Bourque, Stéphane; Nicolas-Francès, Valérie; Rosnoblet, Claire; Besson-Bard, Angélique; Wendehenne, David

    2015-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas involved in a myriad of plant physiological processes including immune responses. How NO mediates its biological effects in plant facing microbial pathogen attack is an unresolved question. Insights into the molecular mechanisms by which it propagates signals reveal the contribution of this simple gas in complex signaling pathways shared with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the second messenger Ca(2+). Understanding of the subtle cross-talks operating between these signals was greatly improved by the recent identification and the functional analysis of proteins regulated through S-nitrosylation, a major NO-dependent post-translational protein modification. Overall, these findings suggest that NO is probably an important component of the mechanism coordinating and regulating Ca(2+) and ROS signaling in plant immunity.

  7. The lipid messenger OEA links dietary fat intake to satiety

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Gary J.; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Piomelli, Daniele

    2008-01-01

    Summary The association between fat consumption and obesity underscores the need to identify physiological signals that control fat intake. Previous studies have shown that feeding stimulates small-intestinal mucosal cells to produce the lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) which, when administered as a drug, decreases meal frequency by engaging peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-α (PPAR-α). Here we report that duodenal infusion of fat stimulates OEA mobilization in the proximal small intestine, whereas infusion of protein or carbohydrate does not. OEA production utilizes dietary oleic acid as a substrate and is disrupted in mutant mice lacking the membrane fatty-acid transporter CD36. Targeted disruption of CD36 or PPAR-α abrogates the satiety response induced by fat. The results suggest that activation of small-intestinal OEA mobilization, enabled by CD36-mediated uptake of dietary oleic acid, serves as a molecular sensor linking fat ingestion to satiety. PMID:18840358

  8. The lipid messenger OEA links dietary fat intake to satiety.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary J; Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Piomelli, Daniele

    2008-10-01

    The association between fat consumption and obesity underscores the need to identify physiological signals that control fat intake. Previous studies have shown that feeding stimulates small-intestinal mucosal cells to produce the lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) which, when administered as a drug, decreases meal frequency by engaging peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-alpha (PPAR-alpha). Here, we report that duodenal infusion of fat stimulates OEA mobilization in the proximal small intestine, whereas infusion of protein or carbohydrate does not. OEA production utilizes dietary oleic acid as a substrate and is disrupted in mutant mice lacking the membrane fatty-acid transporter CD36. Targeted disruption of CD36 or PPAR-alpha abrogates the satiety response induced by fat. The results suggest that activation of small-intestinal OEA mobilization, enabled by CD36-mediated uptake of dietary oleic acid, serves as a molecular sensor linking fat ingestion to satiety.

  9. Mercury's global color mosaic: An update from MESSENGER's orbital observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Murchie, Scott L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2015-09-01

    We report an update to the photometric correction used to produce global color mosaics of Mercury, derived from an analysis of photometric observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER's primary mission. Comparisons between versions of the color mosaic produced with photometric corrections derived from flyby and orbital data indicate that areas imaged at high incidence and emission angles (>50°) are better standardized to a common illumination and viewing geometry with the orbit-derived corrections. Seams between images taken at very different illumination geometries, however, are still present at visually detectable levels. Further improvements to the photometric correction await updates to the radiometric calibration that will enable data retrieval over a larger range of photometric angles.

  10. Geology of the Caloris basin, Mercury: a view from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Murchie, Scott L; Watters, Thomas R; Robinson, Mark S; Head, James W; Strom, Robert G; Chapman, Clark R; Solomon, Sean C; McClintock, William E; Prockter, Louise M; Domingue, Deborah L; Blewett, David T

    2008-07-04

    The Caloris basin, the youngest known large impact basin on Mercury, is revealed in MESSENGER images to be modified by volcanism and deformation in a manner distinct from that of lunar impact basins. The morphology and spatial distribution of basin materials themselves closely match lunar counterparts. Evidence for a volcanic origin of the basin's interior plains includes embayed craters on the basin floor and diffuse deposits surrounding rimless depressions interpreted to be of pyroclastic origin. Unlike lunar maria, the volcanic plains in Caloris are higher in albedo than surrounding basin materials and lack spectral evidence for ferrous iron-bearing silicates. Tectonic landforms, contractional wrinkle ridges and extensional troughs, have distributions and age relations different from their counterparts in and around lunar basins, indicating a different stress history.

  11. Imaging Mercury's polar deposits during MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Paige, David A.; Nair, Hari; Denevi, Brett W.; Blewett, David T.; Murchie, Scott L.; Deutsch, Ariel N.; Head, James W.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    Images obtained during the low-altitude campaign in the final year of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission provide the highest-spatial-resolution views of Mercury's polar deposits. Images for distinct areas of permanent shadow within 35 north polar craters were successfully captured during the campaign. All of these regions of permanent shadow were found to have low-reflectance surfaces with well-defined boundaries. Additionally, brightness variations across the deposits correlate with variations in the biannual maximum surface temperature across the permanently shadowed regions, supporting the conclusion that multiple volatile organic compounds are contained in Mercury's polar deposits, in addition to water ice. A recent large impact event or ongoing bombardment by micrometeoroids could deliver water as well as many volatile organic compounds to Mercury. Either scenario is consistent with the distinctive reflectance properties and well-defined boundaries of Mercury's polar deposits and the presence of volatiles in all available cold traps.

  12. BACTERIAL IDENTIFICATION USING SSRA ENCODING TRANSFER-MESSENGER RNA.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Shirai, Hiroki; Kato, Ayaka; Okuya, Yuma; Jikimoto, Takumi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2015-07-01

    Abstract. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences are widely used for phylogenetic and bacterial identification. However, rDNA of different species often reveals similar or identical same sequences. This study employed the bacterial stable small RNA (ssrA) gene encoding transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) as a tool for identification of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae from clinical isolates as representative groups using PCR and species specific primers. The method correctly identified 11 standard strains and 99 clinical isolates. Quantitative PCR revealed a limit of detection of 10(-5) µg of DNA for S. aureus and Enterococcus spp, and 10(-6) µg for Pseudomonas spp and Enterobacteriaceae. Further studies with a greater number of bacteria especially from clinical samples will need to be undertaken before this bacterial molecular marker can be applied in a clinical setting.

  13. Nuclear inositol lipid metabolism: more than just second messenger generation?

    PubMed

    Martelli, Alberto M; Follo, Matilde Yung; Evangelisti, Camilla; Falà, Federica; Fiume, Roberta; Billi, Anna Maria; Cocco, Lucio

    2005-10-01

    A distinct polyphosphoinositide cycle is present in the nucleus, and growing evidence suggests its importance in DNA replication, gene transcription, and apoptosis. Even though it was initially thought that nuclear inositol lipids would function as a source for second messengers, recent findings strongly indicate that lipids present in the nucleus also fulfil other roles. The scope of this review is to highlight the most intriguing advances made in the field over the last few years, such as the possibility that nuclear phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate is involved in maintaining chromatin in a transcriptionally active conformation, the new emerging roles for intranuclear phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5) trisphosphate and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and the evidence which suggests a tight relationship between a decreased level of nuclear phosphoinositide specific phospholipase C-beta1 and the evolution of myelodisplastic syndrome into acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  15. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  16. Neuronal Chemokines: Versatile Messengers In Central Nervous System Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS), chemokines are generally found under both physiological and pathological conditions. Whereas many reports describe chemokine expression in astrocytes and microglia and their role in the migration of leukocytes into the CNS, only few studies describe chemokine expression in neurons. Nevertheless, the expression of neuronal chemokines and the corresponding chemokine receptors in CNS cells under physiological and pathological conditions indicates that neuronal chemokines contribute to CNS cell interaction. In this study, we review recent studies describing neuronal chemokine expression and discuss potential roles of neuronal chemokines in neuron–astrocyte, neuron–microglia, and neuron–neuron interaction. PMID:17952658

  17. The dynamic N1-methyladenosine methylome in eukaryotic messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dominissini, Dan; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Moshitch-Moshkovitz, Sharon; Peer, Eyal; Kol, Nitzan; Ben-Haim, Moshe Shay; Dai, Qing; Di Segni, Ayelet; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Clark, Wesley C.; Zheng, Guanqun; Pan, Tao; Solomon, Oz; Eyal, Eran; Hershkovitz, Vera; Han, Dali; Doré, Louis C.; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated post-transcriptionally through dynamic and reversible RNA modifications. A recent noteworthy example is N6-methyladenosine (m6A), which affects messenger RNA (mRNA) localization, stability, translation and splicing. Here we report on a new mRNA modification, N1-methyladenosine (m1A), that occurs on thousands of different gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, at an estimated average transcript stoichiometry of 20% in humans. Employing newly developed sequencing approaches, we show that m1A is enriched around the start codon upstream of the first splice site: it preferentially decorates more structured regions around canonical and alternative translation initiation sites, is dynamic in response to physiological conditions, and correlates positively with protein production. These unique features are highly conserved in mouse and human cells, strongly indicating a functional role for m1A in promoting translation of methylated mRNA. PMID:26863196

  18. Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Zhang, Gong; Nagar, Apoorva; Ignatova, Zoya; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    A simple measure for the efficiency of protein synthesis by ribosomes is provided by the steady state amount of protein per messenger RNA (mRNA), the so-called translational ratio, which is proportional to the translation rate. Taking the degradation of mRNA into account, we show theoretically that both the translation rate and the translational ratio decrease with increasing mRNA length, in agreement with available experimental data for the prokaryote Escherichia coli. We also show that, compared to prokaryotes, mRNA degradation in eukaryotes leads to a less rapid decrease of the translational ratio. This finding is consistent with the fact that, compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes tend to have longer proteins.

  19. Turnover of messenger RNA: Polysome statistics beyond the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, A.; Ignatova, Z.; Nagar, A.; Lipowsky, R.

    2010-03-01

    The interplay between turnover or degradation and ribosome loading of messenger RNA (mRNA) is studied theoretically using a stochastic model that is motivated by recent experimental results. Random mRNA degradation affects the statistics of polysomes, i.e., the statistics of the number of ribosomes per mRNA as extracted from cells. Since ribosome loading of newly created mRNA chains requires some time to reach steady state, a fraction of the extracted mRNA/ribosome complexes does not represent steady state conditions. As a consequence, the mean ribosome density obtained from the extracted complexes is found to be inversely proportional to the mRNA length. On the other hand, the ribosome density profile shows an exponential decrease along the mRNA for prokaryotes and becomes uniform in eukaryotic cells.

  20. [Deregulation of pre-messenger RNA splicing and rare diseases].

    PubMed

    de la Grange, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Most of protein-coding human genes are subjected to alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This mechanism is highly regulated to precisely modulate detection of specific splice sites. This regulation is under control of the spliceosome and several splicing factors are also required to modulate the alternative usage of splice sites. Splicing factors and spliceosome components recognize splicing signals and regulatory sequences of the pre-mRNAs. These splicing sequences make splicing susceptible to polymorphisms and mutations. Examples of associations between human rare diseases and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing sequence (i.e., cis acting mutations), recent studies described the disruptive impact of mutations within spliceosome components or splicing factors (i.e., trans acting mutations). Following growing of knowledge regarding splicing regulation, several approaches have been developed to compensate for the effect of deleterious mutations and to restore sufficient amounts of functional protein.

  1. The Mercury Laser Altimeter Instrument for the MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanaugh, John F.; Smith, James C.; Sun, Xiaoli; Bartels, Arlin E.; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Krebs, Danny J.; Novo-Gradac, Anne marie; McGarry, Jan F.; Trunzo, Raymond; Britt, Jamie L.

    2006-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) is one of the payload science instruments on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, which launched on 3 August 2004. The altimeter will measure the round trip time-of-flight of transmitted laser pulses reflected from the surface of the planet that, in combination with the spacecraft orbit position and pointing data, gives a high-precision measurement of surface topography referenced to Mercury's center of mass. The altimeter measurements will be used to determine the planet's forced librations by tracking the motion of large-scale topographic features as a function of time. MLA's laser pulse energy monitor and the echo pulse energy estimate will provide an active measurement of the surface reflectivity at 1064 nm. This paper describes the instrument design, prelaunch testing, calibration, and results of post-launch testing.

  2. Lipid metabolites as metabolic messengers in inter-organ communication

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sihao; Alexander, Ryan K.; Lee, Chih-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved through coordinated regulation across several tissues. Studies using mouse genetic models have shown that perturbation of specific pathways of lipid metabolism in metabolically active tissues impacts systemic metabolic homeostasis. The use of metabolomic technologies combined with genetic models has helped identify several potential lipid mediators that serve as metabolic messengers to communicate energy status and modulate substrate utilization among tissues. When provided exogenously, these lipid metabolites exhibit biological effects on glucose and lipid metabolism, implicating a therapeutic potential for treating metabolic diseases. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in inter-organ communication through novel mechanisms with a focus on lipid mediators synthesized de novo or derived from dietary sources and discuss challenges and future directions. PMID:24895003

  3. Gravity field and internal structure of Mercury from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Solomon, Sean C; Hauck, Steven A; Lemoine, Frank G; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Peale, Stanton J; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L; Torrence, Mark H; Perry, Mark E; Rowlands, David D; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W; Taylor, Anthony H

    2012-04-13

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/MR(2) = 0.353 ± 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(m)/C = 0.452 ± 0.035. A model for Mercury's radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  4. The evolution of Mercury's crust: a global perspective from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Denevi, Brett W; Robinson, Mark S; Solomon, Sean C; Murchie, Scott L; Blewett, David T; Domingue, Deborah L; McCoy, Timothy J; Ernst, Carolyn M; Head, James W; Watters, Thomas R; Chabot, Nancy L

    2009-05-01

    Mapping the distribution and extent of major terrain types on a planet's surface helps to constrain the origin and evolution of its crust. Together, MESSENGER and Mariner 10 observations of Mercury now provide a near-global look at the planet, revealing lateral and vertical heterogeneities in the color and thus composition of Mercury's crust. Smooth plains cover approximately 40% of the surface, and evidence for the volcanic origin of large expanses of plains suggests that a substantial portion of the crust originated volcanically. A low-reflectance, relatively blue component affects at least 15% of the surface and is concentrated in crater and basin ejecta. Its spectral characteristics and likely origin at depth are consistent with its apparent excavation from a lower crust or upper mantle enriched in iron- and titanium-bearing oxides.

  5. The Global Magnetic Field of Mercury from MESSENGER Orbital Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Winslow, Reka M.; Slavin, James A.; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Raines, Jim M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2011-09-01

    Magnetometer data acquired by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit about Mercury permit the separation of internal and external magnetic field contributions. The global planetary field is represented as a southward-directed, spin-aligned, offset dipole centered on the spin axis. Positions where the cylindrical radial magnetic field component vanishes were used to map the magnetic equator and reveal an offset of 484 ± 11 kilometers northward of the geographic equator. The magnetic axis is tilted by less than 3° from the rotation axis. A magnetopause and tail-current model was defined by using 332 magnetopause crossing locations. Residuals of the net external and offset-dipole fields from observations north of 30°N yield a best-fit planetary moment of 195 ± 10 nanotesla-RM3, where RM is Mercury’s mean radius.

  6. The Messenger Spacecraft Power System Design and Early Mission Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakermanji, G.; Person, C.; Jenkins, J.; Kennedy, L.; Temkin, D.

    2005-05-01

    The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft was launched on August 3, 2004. The spacecraft will be inserted into Mercury orbit in March 2011 for one year of orbital operation. During the mission, the spacecraft distance to the Sun will vary between approximately 1 and 0.3 Astronomical Units (AU), imposing severe requirements on the spacecraft thermal and power systems design. The spacecraft is maintained behind a sunshade. The two single-axis, gimbaled solar array panels are designed to withstand the expected high temperatures. A peak power tracking system has been selected to allow operation over the widely varying solar array I-V curves. In order to reduce cost and risk while increasing the likelihood of mission success, the approach taken in the power system design, including the solar arrays, was to use conventional design, materials, and fabrication techniques.

  7. Messenger RNA modifications – Form, distribution, and function

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Wendy V.; Bell, Tristan A.; Schaening, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    RNA contains more than 100 distinct modifications that promote the functions of stable non-coding RNAs in translation and splicing. Recent technical advances have revealed widespread and sparse modification of messenger RNAs with N6-methyladenosine (m6A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine (Ψ). Here we discuss the rapidly evolving understanding of the location, regulation and function of these dynamic mRNA marks, collectively termed the epitranscriptome. We highlight differences among modifications and between species that could instruct ongoing efforts to understand how specific mRNAs target sites are selected and how their modification is regulated. Diverse molecular consequences of individual m6A modifications are beginning to be revealed but the effects of m5C and Ψ remain largely unknown. Future work linking molecular effects to organismal phenotypes will broaden our understanding of mRNA modifications as cell and developmental regulators. PMID:27313037

  8. A Study to Find Out the Most Preferred Free Messenger Service Used by University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Bicen, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the messenger usage of students in the technology departments of the Near East University (Cyprus), and also to learn which messenger service the participants prefer. The volunteer participants in this study consisted of 150 undergraduate students attending the technology departments of the Near East…

  9. Insights into the Nature of Mercury's Exosphere: Early Results from the MESSENGER Orbital Mission Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, William E.; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer aboard the MESSENGER spacecraft has been making routine observations of Mercury's exosphere since March 29, 2011. Correlations of the spatial distributions of Ca, Mg, and Na with MESSENGER magnetic field and energetic particle distribution data provide insight into the processes that populate the neutral exosphere

  10. One Small Collection of Images, Many Giant Strides Forward for MESSENGER

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-23

    This image compilation shows some of the most exciting images taken thus far on the MESSENGER mission. A mural-sized copy hangs next to the MESSENGER Science Operations Center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16364

  11. Using an Instant Messenger to Learn a Foreign Language in a Peer-Tutoring Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Joeun; Yoo, Yungtai; Lee, Kyungsuk; Jung, Bokmoon; Baek, Youngkyun

    2017-01-01

    This study explores useful ways of using an instant messenger in a peer-tutoring environment when two students exchange their mother languages. Seven learners of Korean and seven Korean students learning English were paired randomly to conduct language exchange via an instant messenger, KakaoTalk. The pairs (five of male and female pair and two of…

  12. "There's a Pony in the Hallway!" A Look at Messages and Messengers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    1995-01-01

    Discusses childrens' interest in messages and messengers; describes the role and impact of messages in a variety of books; and presents ideas for activities for elementary and secondary school students that suggest imaginative ways of using words, symbols, and language to offer children the chance to become messengers and communicators. (36…

  13. Messenger RNA-based vaccines: progress, challenges, applications.

    PubMed

    Kramps, Thomas; Probst, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Twenty years after the demonstration that messenger RNA (mRNA) was expressed and immunogenic upon direct injection in mice, the first successful proof-of-concept of specific protection against viral infection in small and large animals was reported. These data indicate wider applicability to infectious disease and should encourage continued translation of mRNA-based prophylactic vaccines into human clinical trials. At the conceptual level, mRNA-based vaccines-more than other genetic vectors-combine the simplicity, safety, and focused immunogenicity of subunit vaccines with favorable immunological properties of live viral vaccines: (1) mRNA vaccines are molecularly defined and carry no excess information. In the environment and upon physical contact, RNA is rapidly degraded by ubiquitous RNases and cannot persist. These characteristics also guarantee tight control over their immunogenic profile (including avoidance of vector-specific immune responses that could interfere with repeated administration), pharmacokinetics, and dosing. (2) mRNA vaccines are synthetically produced by an enzymatic process, just requiring information about the nucleic acid sequence of the desired antigen. This greatly reduces general complications associated with biological vaccine production, such as handling of infectious agents, genetic variability, environmental risks, or restrictions to vaccine distribution. (3) RNA can be tailored to provide potent adjuvant stimuli to the innate immune system by direct activation of RNA-specific receptors; this may reduce the need for additional adjuvants. The formation of native antigen in situ affords great versatility, including intracellular localization, membrane association, posttranslational modification, supra-molecular assembly, or targeted structural optimization of delivered antigen. Messenger RNA vaccines induce balanced immune responses including B cells, helper T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, rendering them an extremely adaptable

  14. MESSENGER Observations of ULF Waves in Mercury's Foreshock Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter J.; Bardsen, Scott; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth s is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury s bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury s foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury s foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the 1-Hz waves in the Earth s foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth s foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  15. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere: What Have We Learned from MESSENGER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is created by the solar wind interaction with its dipolar, spin-axis aligned, northward offset intrinsic magnetic field. Structurally it resembles that of the Earth in many respects, but the magnetic field intensities and plasma densities are all higher at Mercury due to conditions in the inner solar system. Magnetospheric plasma at Mercury appears to be primarily of solar wind origin, i.e. H+ and He++, but with 10% Na+ derived from the exosphere. Solar wind sputtering and other processes promote neutrals from the regolith into the exosphere where they may be ionized and incorporated into the magnetospheric plasma population. At this point in time, about one year after MESSENGER's impact and one year prior to BepiColombo's launch, we review MESSENGER's observations of magnetospheric dynamics and structure. In doing so we will provide our best answers to the following six questions: Question #1: How do magnetosheath conditions at Mercury differ from what is found at the other planets? Question #2: How do conditions in Mercury's magnetosheath contribute to the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere? How does magnetopause reconnection at Mercury differ from what is seen at Earth? Are flux transfer events (FTEs) a major driver of magnetospheric convection at Mercury? Question #3: Does reconnection ever erode the dayside magnetosphere to the point where the subsolar region of the surface is exposed to direct solar wind impact? To what extent do induction currents driven in Mercury's interior limit the solar wind flux to the surface? Do FTEs contribute significantly to the solar wind flux reaching the surface? Question #4: What effects do heavy planetary ions have on Mercury's magnetosphere? Question #5: Does Mercury's magnetotail store and dissipate magnetic energy in a manner analogous to substorms at Earth? How is the process affected by the lack of an ionosphere and the expected high electrical resistivity of the crust? Question #6: How

  16. MESSENGER Magnetometer Observations of the Plasma Distribution in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Purucker, M. E.; Winslow, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Since insertion of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft into orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011, the Magnetometer (MAG) has routinely observed localized reductions of the magnetic field magnitude below the level predicted by a planetary dipole model corrected for magnetospheric magnetic fields. These magnetic depressions are observed on almost every orbit, and the latitude at which they are observed is local-time dependent. The depression signatures are indicators for the presence of enhanced plasma populations, which inflate the magnetic field locally to maintain pressure balance, thus lowering the magnetic flux density. Mapping the magnetic depressions in local time and latitude, the MAG observations provide comprehensive insight into the plasma distribution near the planet, which is complementary to that provided by MESSENGER's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS). The spatial distribution shows that magnetic depressions are concentrated in two distinct regions. First, there is a population in the nightside equatorial region extending from dusk to dawn, which is offset northward from the planetary geographic equator by about 10°, commensurate with the offset of the planetary dipole. The extent of this population is indicative of the plasma sheet located in the equatorial magnetotail. A second concentration of magnetic depressions is found at high latitudes, predominantly on the dayside, and is associated with the magnetospheric cusp. The magnitude of the pressures associated with the depressions ranges from 0.1 to 3 nPa in the equatorial region, shows a systematic gradient from dusk to dawn, and reaches 10 nPa at high latitudes. We discuss the MAG observations and interpret the dusk-to-dawn gradient in the derived pressure distribution with a simple paradigm of particle drifts within Mercury's magnetosphere.

  17. MESSENGER observations of the plasma depletion layer in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Baker, D. N.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements made with the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft's Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) and Magnetometer (MAG) are used to determine the properties of the plasma depletion layer (PDL) that is found just exterior to Mercury's dayside magnetopause. PDLs form when interplanetary magnetic flux tubes drape around and are compressed against an obstacle to the solar wind. Such obstacles include not only planetary magnetic fields such as that of Mercury, but also the ionospheres of comets and planets without internal fields such as Venus. It is this compression of the draped flux tubes against the magnetopause that causes the solar wind plasma to flow away from the subsolar region and deplete the flux tubes of plasma. Observations of the PDL at Earth have shown that such properties of this layer as its thickness and its reduction in density are strong functions of the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The MESSENGER measurements show that a PDL is indeed present at Mercury and confirm the theoretical prediction that the thickness and degree of depletion is enhanced for the very low Alfvénic Mach numbers in the inner Solar System, on average a factor of ~2 smaller than those at Earth. For several transits of the spacecraft through the magnetosheath near local noon, each lasting only a few minutes, the plasma and magnetic field of the PDL have been sampled, capturing a snapshot of the shocked solar wind near the stagnation point. The relative density reduction and thickness of the PDL are examined for each magnetospheric pass and placed into context with the set of available solar wind forcing conditions and IMF orientations in order to study the formation of these layers at Mercury with and without the presence of dayside magnetic reconnection.

  18. A comprehensive study of Mercury and MESSENGER orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Antonio; Mazarico, Erwan; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nicholas, Joseph B.; Rowlands, David D.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-10-01

    The MErcury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury for more than 4 years. The probe started its science mission in orbit around Mercury on 18 March 2011. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) and radio science system were the instruments dedicated to geodetic observations of the topography, gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury. X-band radio-tracking range-rate data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) allowed the determination of Mercury's gravity field to spherical harmonic degree and order 100, the planet's obliquity, and the Love number k2.The extensive range data acquired in orbit around Mercury during the science mission (from April 2011 to April 2015), and during the three flybys of the planet in 2008 and 2009, provide a powerful dataset for the investigation of Mercury's ephemeris. The proximity of Mercury's orbit to the Sun leads to a significant perihelion precession attributable to the gravitational flattening of the Sun (J2) and the Parameterized Post-Newtonian (PPN) coefficients γ and β, which describe the space curvature produced by a unit rest mass and the nonlinearity in superposition of gravity, respectively. Therefore, the estimation of Mercury's ephemeris can provide crucial information on the interior structure of the Sun and Einstein's general theory of relativity. However, the high correlation among J2, γ, and β complicates the combined recovery of these parameters, so additional assumptions are required, such as the Nordtvedt relationship η = 4β - γ - 3.We have modified our orbit determination software, GEODYN II, to enable the simultaneous integration of the spacecraft and central body trajectories. The combined estimation of the MESSENGER and Mercury orbits allowed us to determine a more accurate gravity field, orientation, and tides of Mercury, and the values of GM and J2 for the Sun, where G is the gravitational constant and M is the solar mass

  19. The multi-messenger search programme and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Giulia

    2016-07-01

    The key-word of modern astronomy and astrophysics is multi-messenger: not only photons used as probes for the investigation of the Universe, but also cosmic-rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-messenger approach is important in particular for neutrino detectors: potential astrophysical sources are predicted to emit a very faint neutrino signal and the presence of an isotropic flux of atmospheric background requires the development of effective search strategies. The multi-messenger approach can increase the discovery potential, the statistical significance of the observations and the efficiency of the detection. The advantages of the multi-messenger approach are evident, in particular, when looking at transient or flaring sources. In ANTARES, a wide programme of multi-messenger searches is active; the most relevant results will be presented in this contribution.

  20. Impact of size, secondary structure, and counterions on the binding of small ribonucleic acids to layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Blanca V; Pescador, Jorge; Pollok, Nicole; Beall, Gary W; Maeder, Corina; Lewis, L Kevin

    2015-12-30

    Use of ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference to regulate protein expression has become an important research topic and gene therapy tool, and therefore, finding suitable vehicles for delivery of small RNAs into cells is of crucial importance. Layered double metal hydroxides such as hydrotalcite (HT) have shown great promise as nonviral vectors for transport of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA), proteins, and drugs into cells, but the adsorption of RNAs to these materials has been little explored. In this study, the binding of small RNAs with different lengths and levels of secondary structure to HT nanoparticles has been analyzed and compared to results obtained with small DNAs in concurrent experiments. Initial experiments established the spectrophotometric properties of HT in aqueous solutions and determined that HT particles could be readily sedimented with near 100% efficiencies. Use of RNA+HT cosedimentation experiments as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated strong adsorption of RNA 25mers to HT, with twofold greater binding of single-stranded RNAs relative to double-stranded molecules. Strong affinities were also observed with ssRNA and dsRNA 54mers and with more complex transfer RNA molecules. Competition binding and RNA displacement experiments indicated that RNA-HT associations were strong and were only modestly affected by the presence of high concentrations of inorganic anions.

  1. Gradient enhanced-fluidity liquid hydrophilic interaction chromatography of ribonucleic acid nucleosides and nucleotides: A "green" technique.

    PubMed

    Beilke, Michael C; Beres, Martin J; Olesik, Susan V

    2016-03-04

    A "green" hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) technique for separating the components of mixtures with a broad range of polarities is illustrated using enhanced-fluidity liquid mobile phases. Enhanced-fluidity liquid chromatography (EFLC) involves the addition of liquid CO2 to conventional liquid mobile phases. Decreased mobile phase viscosity and increased analyte diffusivity results when a liquefied gas is dissolved in common liquid mobile phases. The impact of CO2 addition to a methanol:water (MeOH:H2O) mobile phase was studied to optimize HILIC gradient conditions. For the first time a fast separation of 16 ribonucleic acid (RNA) nucleosides/nucleotides was achieved (16min) with greater than 1.3 resolution for all analyte pairs. By using a gradient, the analysis time was reduced by over 100% compared to similar separations conducted under isocratic conditions. The optimal separation using MeOH:H2O:CO2 mobile phases was compared to MeOH:H2O and acetonitrile:water (ACN:H2O) mobile phases. Based on chromatographic performance parameters (efficiency, resolution and speed of analysis) and an assessment of the environmental impact of the mobile phase mixtures, MeOH:H2O:CO2 mixtures are preferred over ACN:H2O or MeOH:H2O mobile phases for the separation of mixtures of RNA nucleosides and nucleotides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  3. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  4. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  5. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  6. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  7. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  8. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  9. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  10. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  11. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  12. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  13. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  14. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  15. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  16. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  17. 29 CFR 520.404 - What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I demonstrate in my application for a messenger... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.404 What must I demonstrate in...

  18. 29 CFR 520.410 - How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice certificate remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How long does a messenger, learner, or apprentice... HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding...

  19. 29 CFR 520.411 - Does a certificate authorizing payment of subminimum wages to messengers and/or learners remain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to messengers and/or learners remain in effect during the renewal process? 520.411 Section 520.411... EMPLOYMENT UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.411 Does a certificate...

  20. 29 CFR 520.406 - What happens once I have submitted my request for authorization to pay messengers, learners, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorization to pay messengers, learners, or apprentices subminimum wages? 520.406 Section 520.406 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.406 What happens once I...

  1. Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides-ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular nucleotides, and ATP in particular, are cellular signal substances involved in the control of numerous (patho)physiological mechanisms. They provoke nucleotide receptor-mediated mechanisms in select target cells. But nucleotides can considerably expand their range of action. They function as primary messengers in intercellular communication by stimulating the release of other extracellular messenger substances. These in turn activate additional cellular mechanisms through their own receptors. While this applies also to other extracellular messengers, its omnipresence in the vertebrate organism is an outstanding feature of nucleotide signaling. Intercellular messenger substances released by nucleotides include neurotransmitters, hormones, growth factors, a considerable variety of other proteins including enzymes, numerous cytokines, lipid mediators, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species. Moreover, nucleotides activate or co-activate growth factor receptors. In the case of hormone release, the initially paracrine or autocrine nucleotide-mediated signal spreads through to the entire organism. The examples highlighted in this commentary suggest that acting as ubiquitous triggers of intercellular messenger release is one of the major functional roles of extracellular nucleotides. While initiation of messenger release by nucleotides has been unraveled in many contexts, it may have been overlooked in others. It can be anticipated that additional nucleotide-driven messenger functions will be uncovered with relevance for both understanding physiology and development of therapy.

  2. Navigating the MESSENGER Spacecraft through End of Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, C. G.; Williams, B. G.; Williams, K. E.; Taylor, A. H.; Carranza, E.; Page, B. R.; Stanbridge, D. R.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; McAdams, J. V.; Calloway, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbited the planet Mercury from March 2011 until the end of April 2015, when it impacted the planetary surface after propellant reserves used to maintain the orbit were depleted. This highly successful mission was led by the principal investigator, Sean C. Solomon, of Columbia University. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) designed and assembled the spacecraft and served as the home for spacecraft operations. Spacecraft navigation for the entirety of the mission was provided by the Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics Practice (SNAFD) of KinetX Aerospace. Orbit determination (OD) solutions were generated through processing of radiometric tracking data provided by NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) using the MIRAGE suite of orbital analysis tools. The MESSENGER orbit was highly eccentric, with periapsis at a high northern latitude and periapsis altitude in the range 200-500 km for most of the orbital mission phase. In a low-altitude "hover campaign" during the final two months of the mission, periapsis altitudes were maintained within a narrow range between about 35 km and 5 km. Navigating a spacecraft so near a planetary surface presented special challenges. Tasks required to meet those challenges included the modeling and estimation of Mercury's gravity field and of solar and planetary radiation pressure, and the design of frequent orbit-correction maneuvers. Superior solar conjunction also presented observational modeling issues. One key to the overall success of the low-altitude hover campaign was a strategy to utilize data from an onboard laser altimeter as a cross-check on the navigation team's reconstructed and predicted estimates of periapsis altitude. Data obtained from the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on a daily basis provided near-real-time feedback that proved invaluable in evaluating alternative orbit estimation strategies, and

  3. Results and prospects in multi-messenger particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    In high-energy particle astrophysics the old days were certainly not better than these. Our field has thrived in the past decade with experiments covering thousands of square kilometers to measure the suppression in the flux of the highest energy cosmic rays ever observed, instrumenting a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice to discover astrophysical neutrinos, and measuring a change in arm length as small as 10-19 m for the ground-breaking direct observation of gravitational waves. Additionally, the current generation of space-borne and ground-based gamma-ray experiments have revealed a plethora of gamma-ray sources, including pulsars, compact binaries, the galactic center, and extragalactic sources such as starburst galaxies and radio galaxies. Before the next generation of instruments bring us yet another order of magnitude in sensitivity, we can combine current observations to probe physics beyond the standard model, and to extend the high-energy frontier well above the energies accessible to laboratory accelerators. One example of this potential is the search for dark-matter annihilation and decay products. To use the multi-messenger approach effectively for probing dark-matter signatures and physics beyond the LHC energy requires understanding the origin (or acceleration mechanism) and the propagation processes. High energy protons and nuclei, neutrinos, gamma-rays, X-rays, and gravitational waves bring new and complementary views of the astrophysical sources. By comparing observations through different windows, we can use the sites of violent phenomena as a laboratory to probe the physical processes under extreme conditions throughout the Universe, and to test the fundamental laws of particle physics and gravitation. As a community we need to engage in a bold synergistic approach to understanding the violent processes that give rise to the high-energy cosmic phenomena in the Universe. In this invited talk, I will present on-going multi-messenger studies to

  4. MESSENGER Observations of Magnetopause Structure and Dynamics at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raines, J. M.; Baker, D. N.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    MESSENGER observations during the first three Mercury years of orbit (one Mercury year equals 88 Earth days) have been used to characterize the structure of Mercury's dayside magnetopause as a function of magnetic field properties in the incident magnetosheath. Measurements collected by MESSENGER's Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer yielded a minimum of two dayside magnetopause encounters per day due to the 12-h orbit of the spacecraft during this interval. After applying a minimum variance analysis (MVA) to all distinct boundary crossings, we further examined only those with an intermediate to minimum eigenvalue ratio greater than 5. For the 43 events meeting this criterion, we determined (1) the normal component of the magnetic field across the current sheet, from which we inferred the rate of reconnection, (2) the temporal duration and, with certain assumptions, the speed and thickness of the magnetopause, and (3) the reconnection rate as a function of magnetic shear angle and plasma beta (the ratio of total thermal pressure to magnetic pressure) across the boundary. In boundary-normal coordinates we identified an average normal magnetic field component of 20 nT, enabling the entry of solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere. The magnetopause velocity is estimated to be on the order of 10 km/s by assuming a current sheet thickness of 7 times the gyroradius of a 1 keV solar wind proton. From this result we infer the average boundary thickness to be 49 ± 7 km, which is comparable to ~3 proton gyroradii. For a magnetosheath flow of 200 km/s and a reconnection X-line length of 3 RM, we calculate an average electric potential drop of 29 kV at the magnetopause. The rate of reconnection, the ratio of the normal magnetic field component to the total field magnitude just inside the magnetopause, is measured to be 0.15 ± 0.02. This rate, which is approximately one order of magnitude larger than typical Earth observations, is determined to be independent

  5. Observations of Mercury's Northern Cusp Region with MESSENGER's Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Purucker, M. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    We have identified Mercury's northern cusp region from orbital observations with the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The cusp is identified from the dayside depression in the total magnetic field after removing the field predicted by a paraboloid magnetospheric model from the data. The model includes long-wavelength fields due to the internal dipole, the magnetopause, and the magnetotail, parameterized by a dipole moment of 195 nT-RM3 (where RM is Mercury's radius), offset northward from the planetary center by 484 km and aligned with the planet's spin axis, a paraboloidal magnetopause with a subsolar standoff distance of 1.4 RM, a distance to the inner edge of the tail current sheet of 1.43 RM, a tail current sheet half-width of 0.1 RM, and tail lobe field of 100 nT. We have confirmed that the cusp identification is robust with respect to changes in the parameters in the baseline magnetospheric model. An increase in the high-frequency (1-10 Hz) variability of the magnetic field is also observed on each pass at these times. A superposed epoch analysis, in which individual profiles are aligned in time on their respective cusp midpoints and stacked, indicates that on average the latitudinal extent of the cusp region is 11°, centered on 71.2° N. Cusp observations extend in local time from 7.1 hr to 17.1 hr. The minimum southerly latitude of the cusp observed to date is 56.5° N, and the maximum is 83.1° N. The general location and dimensions of the high-latitude cusp region are in agreement with those indicated by observations with MESSENGER'S Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer. To date, no clear correlation is observed between the cusp traversal time or the magnitude of the magnetic field depression and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, solar wind density, or solar wind velocity. However, the largest-amplitude magnetic field depressions associated with the cusp are observed

  6. Relaxing a constraint on the number of messengers in a low-scale gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Ryosuke; Yonekura, Kazuya; Yanagida, T. T.

    2010-02-15

    We propose a mechanism for relaxing a constraint on the number of messengers in low-scale gauge mediation models. The Landau pole problem for the standard-model gauge coupling constants in the low-scale gauge mediation can be circumvented by using our mechanism. An essential ingredient is a large positive anomalous dimension of messenger fields given by a large Yukawa coupling in a conformal field theory at high energies. The positive anomalous dimension reduces the contribution of the messengers to the beta function of the standard-model gauge couplings.

  7. A discontinuous hammerhead ribozyme embedded in a mammalian messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Martick, Monika; Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.; Scott, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Structured RNAs embedded in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs can regulate gene expression. In bacteria, control of a metabolite gene is mediated by the self-cleaving activity of a ribozyme embedded in its 5′ UTR1. This discovery has raised the question of whether gene-regulating ribozymes also exist in eukaryotic mRNAs. Here we show that highly active hammerhead ribozymes2,3 are present in the 3′ UTRs of rodent C-type lectin type II (Clec2) genes4–7. Using a hammerhead RNA motif search with relaxed delimitation of the non-conserved regions, we detected ribozyme sequences in which the invariant regions, in contrast to the previously identified continuous hammerheads8–10, occur as two fragments separated by hundreds of nucleotides. Notably, a fragment pair can assemble to form an active hammerhead ribozyme structure between the translation termination and the poly-adenylation signals within the 3′ UTR. We demonstrate that this hammerhead structure can self-cleave both in vitro and in vivo, and is able to reduce protein expression in mouse cells. These results indicate that an unrecognized mechanism of post-transcriptional gene regulation involving association of discontinuous ribozyme sequences within an mRNA may be modulating the expression of several CLEC2 proteins that function in bone remodelling and the immune response of several mammals. PMID:18615019

  8. Multifunctional triblock copolymers for intracellular messenger RNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Connie; Convertine, Anthony J; Stayton, Patrick S; Bryers, James D

    2012-10-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a promising alternative to plasmid DNA (pDNA) for gene vaccination applications, but safe and effective delivery systems are rare. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to synthesize a series of triblock copolymers designed to enhance the intracellular delivery of mRNA. These materials are composed of a cationic dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) segment to mediate mRNA condensation, a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) segment to enhance stability and biocompatibility, and a pH-responsive endosomolytic copolymer of diethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) designed to facilitate cytosolic entry. The blocking order and PEGMA segment length were systematically varied to investigate the effect of different polymer architectures on mRNA delivery efficacy. These polymers were monodisperse, exhibited pH-dependent hemolytic activity, and condensed mRNA into 86-216 nm particles. mRNA polyplexes formed from polymers with the PEGMA segment in the center of the polymer chain displayed the greatest stability to heparin displacement and were associated with the highest transfection efficiencies in two immune cell lines, RAW 264.7 macrophages (77%) and DC2.4 dendritic cells (50%). Transfected DC2.4 cells were shown to be capable of subsequently activating antigen-specific T cells, demonstrating the potential of these multifunctional triblock copolymers for mRNA-based vaccination strategies.

  9. Multi-messenger tests of the IceCube excess

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Collaboration has recently found evidence for an excess of high energy neutrinos above atmospheric backgrounds. The origin of this “IceCube excess” is unknown, but multi-messenger relations with cosmic rays (CRs) and γ-rays can help to pinpoint possible candidate sources. The primary CRs associated with the signal are expected to reach energies of about 40 PeV per nucleon which can be satisfied by (extreme) Galactic or extragalactic sources. I discuss possible relations of the IceCube excess with the sources of ultra-high energy CRs and implications of γ-ray observations for various Galactic or extragalactic candidate sources. The contribution of Galactic sources can be tested via primary TeV-PeV γ-rays from the decay of neutral pions produced by the same CRs responsible for the neutrino emission. Hadronuclear interactions of CRs in extragalactic sources can be constrained by the GeV-TeV diffuse extragalactic γ-ray background.

  10. MESSENGER observations of energetic electron acceleration in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Ryan; Slavin, James A.; Baker, Daniel; Raines, Jim; Lawrence, David

    2016-10-01

    Energetic particle bursts within Mercury's magnetosphere have been a source of curiosity and controversy since Mariner 10's flybys. Unfortunately, instrumental effects prevent an unambiguous determination of species, flux, and energy spectrum for the Mariner 10 events. MESSENGER data taken by the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) have now shown that these energetic particle bursts are composed entirely of electrons. EPS made directional measurements of these electrons from ~30 to 300 keV at 3 s resolution, and while the energy of these electrons sometimes exceeded 200 keV, the energy distributions usually exhibited a cutoff near 100 keV. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has also provided measurements of these electron events, at higher time resolution (10 ms) and energetic threshold (> 50 keV) compared to EPS. We focus on GRS electron events near the plasma sheet in Mercury's magnetotail to identify reconnection-associated acceleration mechanisms. We present observations of acceleration associated with dipolarization events (betratron acceleration), flux ropes (Fermi acceleration), and tail loading/unloading (X-line acceleration). We find that the most common source of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetosphere are dipolarization events similar to those first observed by Mariner 10. Further, a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry is found with dipolarization-associated energetic particle bursts being more common on the dawn side of the magnetotail.

  11. Mercury's gravity, tides, and spin from MESSENGER radio science data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    We analyze radio tracking data obtained during 1311 orbits of the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft in the period March 2011 to April 2014. A least squares minimization of the residuals between observed and computed values of two-way range and Doppler allows us to solve for a model describing Mercury's gravity, tidal response, and spin state. We use a spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field to degree and order 40 and report error bars corresponding to 10 times the formal uncertainties of the fit. Our estimate of the product of Mercury's mass and the gravitational constant, GM = (22031.87404 ± 9×10-4) km3 s-2, is in excellent agreement with published results. Our solution for the geophysically important second-degree coefficients (C¯2,0=-2.25100×10-5±1.3×10-9, C¯2,2=1.24973×10-5±1.2×10-9) confirms previous estimates to better than 0.4% and, therefore, inferences about Mercury's moment of inertia and interior structure. Our estimate of the tidal Love number k2 = 0.464 ± 0.023 indicates that Mercury's mantle may be hotter and weaker than previously thought. Our spin state solution suggests that gravity-based estimates of Mercury's spin axis orientation are marginally consistent with previous measurements of the orientation of the crust.

  12. Internet messenger based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umam, K.; Mardi, S. N. S.; Hariadi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Internet messenger (IM) has become an important educational technology component in college education, IM makes it possible for students to engage in learning and collaborating at smart virtual class learning (SVCL) using ubiquitous computing. However, the model of IM-based smart virtual class learning using ubiquitous computing and empirical evidence that would favor a broad application to improve engagement and behavior are still limited. In addition, the expectation that IM based SVCL using ubiquitous computing could improve engagement and behavior on smart class cannot be confirmed because the majority of the reviewed studies followed instructions paradigms. This article aims to present the model of IM-based SVCL using ubiquitous computing and showing learners’ experiences in improved engagement and behavior for learner-learner and learner-lecturer interactions. The method applied in this paper includes design process and quantitative analysis techniques, with the purpose of identifying scenarios of ubiquitous computing and realize the impressions of learners and lecturers about engagement and behavior aspect and its contribution to learning

  13. Endogenous Arabidopsis messenger RNAs transported to distant tissues.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Christoph J; Rojas-Triana, Monica; Stecyk, Ewelina; Schudoma, Christian; Zhang, Wenna; Yang, Lei; Miñambres, Miguel; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X; Paz-Ares, Javier; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Kragler, Friedrich

    2015-03-23

    The concept that proteins and small RNAs can move to and function in distant body parts is well established. However, non-cell-autonomy of small RNA molecules raises the question: To what extent are protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) exchanged between tissues in plants? Here we report the comprehensive identification of 2,006 genes producing mobile RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. The analysis of variant ecotype transcripts that were present in heterografted plants allowed the identification of mRNAs moving between various organs under normal or nutrient-limiting conditions. Most of these mobile transcripts seem to follow the phloem-dependent allocation pathway transporting sugars from photosynthetic tissues to roots via the vasculature. Notably, a high number of transcripts also move in the opposite, root-to-shoot direction and are transported to specific tissues including flowers. Proteomic data on grafted plants indicate the presence of proteins from mobile RNAs, allowing the possibility that they may be translated at their destination site. The mobility of a high number of mRNAs suggests that a postulated tissue-specific gene expression profile might not be predictive for the actual plant body part in which a transcript exerts its function.

  14. Topicality and Impact in Social Media: Diverse Messages, Focused Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user’s interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact. PMID:25710685

  15. Purification of Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particles via a Tagged Nascent Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Inchaustegui Gil, Diana P.; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic fates of mRNAs are influenced by interactions between RNA-binding proteins and cis regulatory motifs. In the cytoplasm, mRNAs are present as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which include not only proteins that bind directly to the mRNA, but also additional proteins that are recruited via protein-protein interactions. Many labs have sought to purify such particles from cells, with limited success. We here describe a simple two-step procedure to purify actively translated mRNAs, with their associated proteins, from polysomes. We use a reporter mRNA that encodes a protein with three streptavidin binding peptides at the N-terminus. The polysomal reporter mRNA, with associated proteins, is purified via binding to a streptavidin matrix. The method takes four days, and can be applied in any cell that can be genetically manipulated. Using Trypanosoma brucei as a model system, we routinely purified 8% of the input reporter mRNA, with roughly 22-fold enrichment relative to un-tagged mRNAs, a final reporter-mRNA:total-mRNA ratio of about 1:10, and a protein purification factor of slightly over 1000-fold. Although the overall reporter mRNP composition is masked by the presence of proteins that are associated with many polysomal mRNAs, our method can be used to detect association of an RNA-binding protein that binds to specifically to a reporter mRNA. PMID:26808308

  16. Second Messenger-Operated Calcium Entry Through TRPC6.

    PubMed

    Bouron, Alexandre; Chauvet, Sylvain; Dryer, Stuart; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) proteins assemble into heteromultimeric structures forming non-selective cation channels. In addition, many TRPC6-interacting proteins have been identified like some enzymes, channels, pumps, cytoskeleton-associated proteins, immunophilins, or cholesterol-binding proteins, indicating that TRPC6 are engaged into macromolecular complexes. Depending on the cell type and the experimental conditions used, TRPC6 activity has been reported to be controlled by diverse modalities. For instance, the second messenger diacylglycerol, store-depletion, the plant extract hyperforin or H2O2 have all been shown to trigger the opening of TRPC6 channels. A well-characterized consequence of TRPC6 activation is the elevation of the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+). This latter response can reflect the entry of Ca(2+) through open TRPC6 channels but it can also be due to the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (operating in its reverse mode) or voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (recruited in response to a TRPC6-mediated depolarization). Although TRPC6 controls a diverse array of biological functions in many tissues and cell types, its pathophysiological functions are far from being fully understood. This chapter covers some key features of TRPC6, with a special emphasis on their biological significance in kidney and blood cells.

  17. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; hide

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  18. MESSENGER Observations of the Plasma Environment near Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raines, J. M.; Zurbuchen, T.; Gloeckler, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L.; Solomon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft measured the bulk plasma characteristics of Mercury’s magnetosphere and solar wind environment with the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) sensor during three flybys of the planet on 14 January 2008, 6 October 2008, and 29 September 2009. FIPS has a near-hemispheric instantaneous field of view and provides plasma and compositional parameters for particles from 100 eV to 13 keV energy per charge at 8-s time resolution. In combination with magnetic field data, we first identified macroscopic features of Mercury's plasma environment observed during the three flybys, including bow-shock and magnetopause crossings as well as the magnetospheric plasma sheet and lobe. We then devised procedures to recover density and temperature through use of a software instrument model that includes the time-dependent instrument field of view, as well as spacecraft position and velocity coordinates. Finally, we recovered parameters from flow-breaking regions, where magnetospheric flow stagnates. In these regions, recovery is greatly simplified by the assumption of zero plasma velocity toward the planet, thus providing a good place for the first application of our recovery procedure.

  19. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  20. Topicality and impact in social media: diverse messages, focused messengers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user's interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact.

  1. Gravity Field and Internal Structure of Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Lemoine, Frank G.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Peale, Stanton J.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Catherine L.; Torrence, Mark H.; Perry, Mark E.; Rowlands, David D.; Goossens, Sander; Head, James W.; Taylor, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Radio tracking of the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided a model of Mercury's gravity field. In the northern hemisphere, several large gravity anomalies, including candidate mass concentrations (mascons), exceed 100 milli-Galileos (mgal). Mercury's northern hemisphere crust is thicker at low latitudes and thinner in the polar region and shows evidence for thinning beneath some impact basins. The low-degree gravity field, combined with planetary spin parameters, yields the moment of inertia C/M(R(exp 2) = 0.353 +/- 0.017, where M and R are Mercury's mass and radius, and a ratio of the moment of inertia of Mercury's solid outer shell to that of the planet of C(sub m)/C = 0.452 +/- 0.035. A model for Mercury s radial density distribution consistent with these results includes a solid silicate crust and mantle overlying a solid iron-sulfide layer and an iron-rich liquid outer core and perhaps a solid inner core.

  2. A Protein of Molecular Weight 78,000 Bound to the Polyadenylate Region of Eukaryotic Messenger RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Günter

    1973-01-01

    Two distinct proteins were found to be tightly bound to the heterogeneous messenger RNAs associated with polysomes in mouse L cells and rat hepatocytes. The molecular weight (78,000) of the larger of these two proteins is identical to that of the protein previously found associated with rabbit globin messenger RNA. This protein is shown to be bound to the adenylate-rich region of messenger RNA. The molecular weight of the smaller protein associated with messenger RNAs from hepatic and L-cell polysomes is similar to that found in globin messenger ribonucleoprotein. Images PMID:4515002

  3. High prevalence of hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid positivity in anti-hepatitis C virus negative renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Hooda, AK; Varma, PP; Chopra, GS; Kaur, Jasmeet

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common in renal transplant (RT) patients. Some of these patients remain anti-HCV negative despite presence of infection and these are identified by a positive HCV-ribonucleic acid (RNA) test. Methods We studied 404 RT patients for prevalence of HCV-RNA positivity in anti-HCV negative patients. Serum was tested for presence of anti-HCV antibodies using a third generation HCV micro-ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test, which utilises a combination of HCV structural and nonstructural antigens. The RNA was extracted from patient serum for HCV viral quantification using Quiagen Ql Amp Viral RNA mini extraction kit. The HCV-RNA viral load was performed on Corbet Rotor Gene 3000 thermocycler using Taqman principle. Results About 308 patients were anti-HCV negative and 96 were anti-HCV positive, resulting in prevalence of overt HCV infection of 23.7%. A total of 130 anti-HCV negative patients tested positive for HCV-RNA making a prevalence of occult HCV infection of 42.2%. There was no significant difference in the rate of overt or occult HCV infection between males and females. Patients with HCV infection (whether overt or occult) had received more number of dialysis sessions (62.5 vs 32.2) and blood transfusions (2.78 vs 1.99) when compared to those without HCV infection (P=0.001). The mean duration on dialysis was also longer (8.15 months vs 4.53 months) in patients with HCV infection (P= 0.0001). Conclusion A direct test for HCV viraemia is important to accurately determine the epidemiology of HCV infection in RT patients who remain anti-HCV negative despite harbouring active HCV infection. PMID:24669050

  4. Purification of Immunogenically Active Ribonucleic Acid Preparations of Salmonella typhimurium: Molecular-Sieve and Anion-Exchange Chromatography 1

    PubMed Central

    Venneman, Martin R.

    1972-01-01

    Immunogenic Salmonella typhimurium ribonucleic acid (RNA) preparations, prepared by differential centrifugation, phenol extraction at 65 C, and ethanol precipitation from 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, maintained their immunogenicity through lyophilization. As measured by survival, differential pathogen counts 5 days postchallenge, or clearance of the infecting organism from the tissues, immunization with 50 μg (dry weight) of the lyophilized preparation proved as effective as immunization with 0.1 LD50 of attenuated S. typhimurium cells. Chromatography of the immunogenic fraction through Biogel P-6 (exclusion limit > 4,600) or through Biogel P-300 (exclusion limit > 300,000) resulted in only one immunogenically active protein of the eluate found in the void volume of the columns. Diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose anion-exchange chromatography of the RNA preparations showed that the immunogenic activity was eluted from the column at 0.8 to 1.0 m NaCl in a linear 0.1 to 2.0 m NaCl gradient. Nonimmunogenic, protein-containing minor peaks were eluted at 0.1 to 0.5 m NaCl. Serial fractionation of the crude RNA preparations over Biogel P-6 to DEAE cellulose to Biogel P-300 molecular-sieve or anion-exchange columns did not alter the immunogenicity of the RNA preparation. Incorporation of the column fractions into Freund's incomplete adjuvant did not increase their relative effectiveness in eliciting anti-salmonella resistance. Chemical analysis of the immunogenic preparations indicated that they were lacking in detectable protein, lipid, and deoxyribonucleic acid. These results suggest that the immunogenic moiety of the crude nucleic acid fraction is either RNA or an as yet undefined polysaccharide of greater than 300,000 molecular weight. PMID:4564556

  5. Circulating ribonucleic acids and metabolic stress parameters may reflect progression of autoimmune or inflammatory conditions in juvenile type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Gordana; Pavlovic, Radmila; Najman, Stevo; Nikolic, Goran; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Musovic, Dijana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Radivoj; Djindjic, Natasa

    2011-07-28

    The sensing of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) by the monocyte/macrophage system occurs through the TLR7/8 Toll-like receptor family, the retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I), and the melanoma differentiation-associated protein-5 (MDA-5). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of circulating RNAs, isolated from juvenile type 1 diabetic patients and healthy control children, on the inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from a healthy donor. Obtained effects were compared to the effects of metabolic stress parameters (hyperglycemia, oxidative and nitrosative stress). Forty-eight patients with juvenile type 1 diabetes and control children were included in the study. By performing the chromatographic analysis of circulating RNAs, the peak at the retention time 0.645 min for diabetic and control RNA samples was identified. To determine whether circulating RNAs have an agonistic or antagonistic effect on the signaling pathways involved in inflammatory, apoptotic, and antiviral cascade, their effect on TLR8, RIG-I, MDA-5, MyD88, NF-KB, IRF-3, phosphoIRF-3, IRF-7, RIP, and p38 was evaluated. A significantly lower level was achieved by cultivating PBMCs with circulating RNAs isolated from type 1 diabetic children, compared to the intact PBMCs, in relation to TLR-8, MDA-5, NF-KB, phospho IRF-3, and RIP, while it was higher for Bax. All the metabolic stress conditions up-regulated NF-KB, Bcl-2, and Bax. The NF-êB determination seems to be the most sensitive parameter that may reflect disease processes associated with the progression of autoimmune or inflammatory conditions, while the IRF3/phosphoIRF3 ratio may suggest an insufficient antiviral response.

  6. Reagentless Measurement of Aminoglycoside Antibiotics in Blood Serum via an Electrochemical, Ribonucleic Acid Aptamer-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Aaron A.; Miller, Erin A.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2011-01-01

    Biosensors built using ribonucleic acid (RNA) aptamers show promise as tools for point-of-care medical diagnostics, but they remain vulnerable to nuclease degradation when deployed in clinical samples. To explore methods for protecting RNA-based biosensors from such degradation we have constructed and characterized an electrochemical, aptamer-based sensor for the detection of aminoglycosidic antibiotics. We find that while this sensor achieves low micromolar detection limits and subminute equilibration times when challenged in buffer, it deteriorates rapidly when immersed directly in blood serum. In order to circumvent this problem, we have developed and tested sensors employing modified versions of the same aptamer. Our first effort to this end entailed the methylation of all of the 2′-hydroxyl groups outside of the aptamer’s antibiotic binding pocket. However, while devices employing this modified aptamer are as sensitive as those employing an unmodified parent, the modification fails to confer greater stability when the sensor is challenged directly in blood serum. As a second potentially naive alternative, we replaced the RNA bases in the aptamer with their more degradation-resistant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) equivalents. Surprisingly and unlike control DNA-stem loops employing other sequences, this DNA aptamer retains the ability to bind aminoglycosides, albeit with poorer affinity than the parent RNA aptamer. Unfortunately, however, while sensors fabricated using this DNA aptamer are stable in blood serum, its lower affinity pushes their detection limits above the therapeutically relevant range. Finally, we find that ultrafiltration through a low-molecular-weight-cutoff spin column rapidly and efficiently removes the relevant nucleases from serum samples spiked with gentamicin, allowing the convenient detection of this aminoglycoside at clinically relevant concentrations using the original RNA-based sensor. PMID:20687587

  7. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  8. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  9. Planetary ephemeris construction and general relativity tests of PPN-formalism with MESSENGER radioscience data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of Mercury orbit is mainly brought by the direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and five Mercury flybys made by Mariner 10 in the 70s, and MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft orbiting Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the Mercury orbit. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity test of PPN-formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (β and γ) are most stringent than previous results.

  10. Early MESSENGER Results for Less Abundant or Weakly Emitting Species in Mercury's Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; McClintock, William E.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Sarantos, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    Now that the Messenger spacecraft is in orbit about Mercury, the extended observing time enables searches for exospheric species that are less abundant or weakly emitting compared with those for which emission has previously been detected. Many of these species cannot be observed from the ground because of terrestrial atmospheric absorption. We report here on the status of MESSENGER orbital-phase searches for additional species in Mercury's exosphere.

  11. m6A-dependent regulation of messenger RNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Zhike; Gomez, Adrian; Hon, Gary C.; Yue, Yanan; Han, Dali; Fu, Ye; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Jia, Guifang; Ren, Bing; Pan, Tao; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most prevalent internal (non-cap) modification present in the messenger RNA (mRNA) of all higher eukaryotes1,2. Although essential to cell viability and development3–5, the exact role of m6A modification remains to be determined. The recent discovery of two m6A demethylases in mammalian cells highlighted the importance of m6A in basic biological functions and disease6–8. Here we show that m6A is selectively recognized by the human YTH domain family 2 (YTHDF2) protein to regulate mRNA degradation. We identified over 3,000 cellular RNA targets of YTHDF2, most of which are mRNAs, but which also include non-coding RNAs, with a conserved core motif of G(m6A)C. We further establish the role of YTHDF2 in RNA metabolism, showing that binding of YTHDF2 results in the localization of bound mRNA from the translatable pool to mRNA decay sites, such as processing bodies9. The C-terminal domain of YTHDF2 selectively binds to m6A-containing mRNA whereas the N-terminal domain is responsible for the localization of the YTHDF2-mRNA complex to cellular RNA decay sites. Our results indicate that the dynamic m6A modification is recognized by selective-binding proteins to affect the translation status and lifetime of mRNA. PMID:24284625

  12. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  13. Basin Formation and Cratering on Mercury Revealed by MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Fassett, C.; Marchi, S.; Merline, W. J.; Ostrach, L. R.; Prockter, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury has been bombarded by asteroids and comets throughout its history. The resulting craters and basins are the dominant topographic features on the planet. Although visible basins contain some of the most interesting tectonic features, plains, and evidence of vertical stratigraphy, they fall far short of saturating the surface. Nevertheless, Mercury has a greater spatial density of peak-ring basins and protobasins than any other Solar System body, partly because these morphologies begin at smaller sizes than on most bodies. Cratering at approximately three times the cratering rate on the Moon, combined with likely plains-forming volcanism, prevents recognition of surface features older than 4.0 to 4.1 Ga. Severe losses of craters <50 km in diameter (<20 km in some places) are ascribed to extensive formation of intercrater plains. Estimates of the cratering chronology of Mercury suggest that most plains formation ended about 3.6 to 3.7 Ga, though activity has continued in a few small regions until much more recently (e.g., inside the Rachmaninoff basin). Mercury, compared with other terrestrial bodies, is struck by projectiles impacting at much higher velocities, which is probably responsible for the formation of abundant secondary craters that dominate the numbers of craters <10 km diameter on older plains surfaces. The history of high-velocity bombardment has resulted in the production of abundant impact melts and has churned and processed the regolith, and eroded older topography, more thoroughly than on other Solar System bodies. Although the possible role of Mercury-specific impactors ("vulcanoids") cannot be excluded, imaging searches by MESSENGER have revealed no remaining vulcanoids and no other evidence suggests that Mercury has been bombarded by anything other than the same populations of asteroids and comets that have impacted the Moon and other terrestrial planets from the end of the period of heavy bombardment 3.8 to 3.9 Ga to the present.

  14. Human Bocavirus Capsid Messenger RNA Detection in Children With Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schlaberg, Robert; Ampofo, Krow; Tardif, Keith D; Stockmann, Chris; Simmon, Keith E; Hymas, Weston; Flygare, Steven; Kennedy, Brett; Blaschke, Anne; Eilbeck, Karen; Yandell, Mark; McCullers, Jon A; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn; Arnold, Sandra R; Bramley, Anna; Jain, Seema; Pavia, Andrew T

    2017-09-15

    The role of human bocavirus (HBoV) in respiratory illness is uncertain. HBoV genomic DNA is frequently detected in both ill and healthy children. We hypothesized that spliced viral capsid messenger RNA (mRNA) produced during active replication might be a better marker for acute infection. As part of the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, children aged <18 years who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and children asymptomatic at the time of elective outpatient surgery (controls) were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal specimens were tested for HBoV mRNA and genomic DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HBoV DNA was detected in 10.4% of 1295 patients with CAP and 7.5% of 721 controls (odds ratio [OR], 1.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.0-2.0]); HBoV mRNA was detected in 2.1% and 0.4%, respectively (OR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.6-26]). When adjusted for age, enrollment month, and detection of other respiratory viruses, HBoV mRNA detection (adjusted OR, 7.6 [95% CI, 1.5-38.4]) but not DNA (adjusted OR, 1.2 [95% CI, .6-2.4]) was associated with CAP. Among children with no other pathogens detected, HBoV mRNA (OR, 9.6 [95% CI, 1.9-82]) was strongly associated with CAP. Detection of HBoV mRNA but not DNA was associated with CAP, supporting a pathogenic role for HBoV in CAP. HBoV mRNA could be a useful target for diagnostic testing.

  15. In-Flight performance of MESSENGER's Mercury dual imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkins, S.E.; Murchie, S.L.; Becker, K.J.; Selby, C.M.; Turner, F.S.; Noble, M.W.; Chabot, N.L.; Choo, T.H.; Darlington, E.H.; Denevi, B.W.; Domingue, D.L.; Ernst, C.M.; Holsclaw, G.M.; Laslo, N.R.; Mcclintock, W.E.; Prockter, L.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Solomon, S.C.; Sterner, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Mercury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched in August 2004 and planned for insertion into orbit around Mercury in 2011, has already completed two flybys of the innermost planet. The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) acquired nearly 2500 images from the first two flybys and viewed portions of Mercury's surface not viewed by Mariner 10 in 1974-1975. Mercury's proximity to the Sun and its slow rotation present challenges to the thermal design for a camera on an orbital mission around Mercury. In addition, strict limitations on spacecraft pointing and the highly elliptical orbit create challenges in attaining coverage at desired geometries and relatively uniform spatial resolution. The instrument designed to meet these challenges consists of dual imagers, a monochrome narrow-angle camera (NAC) with a 1.5?? field of view (FOV) and a multispectral wide-angle camera (WAC) with a 10.5?? FOV, co-aligned on a pivoting platform. The focal-plane electronics of each camera are identical and use a 1024??1024 charge-coupled device detector. The cameras are passively cooled but use diode heat pipes and phase-change-material thermal reservoirs to maintain the thermal configuration during the hot portions of the orbit. Here we present an overview of the instrument design and how the design meets its technical challenges. We also review results from the first two flybys, discuss the quality of MDIS data from the initial periods of data acquisition and how that compares with requirements, and summarize how in-flight tests are being used to improve the quality of the instrument calibration. ?? 2009 SPIE.

  16. Limits to Mercury's Magnesium Exosphere from MESSENGER Second Flyby Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Bradley, E. Todd; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery measurements of Mercury's exospheric magnesium, obtained by the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment, GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) probe during its second Mercury flyby, are modeled to constrain the source and loss processes for this neutral species. Fits to a Chamberlain exosphere reveal that at least two source temperatures are required to reconcile the distribution of magnesium measured far from and near the planet: a hot ejection process at the equivalent temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees K, and a competing, cooler source at temperatures as low as 400 K. For the energetic component, our models indicate that the column abundance that can be attributed to sputtering under constant southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions is at least a factor of five less than the rate dictated by the measurements, Although highly uncertain, this result suggests that another energetic process, such as the rapid dissociation of exospheric MgO, may be the main source of the distant neutral component. If meteoroid and micrometeoroid impacts eject mainly molecules, the total amount of magnesium at altitudes exceeding approximately 100 km is found to be consistent with predictions by impact vaporization models for molecule lifetimes of no more than two minutes. Though a sharp increase in emission observed near the dawn terminator region can be reproduced if a single meteoroid enhanced the impact vapor at equatorial dawn, it is much more likely that observations in this region, which probe heights increasingly near the surface, indicate a reservoir of volatile Mg being acted upon by lower-energy source processes.

  17. MESSENGER observations of flux ropes in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBraccio, Gina A.; Slavin, James A.; Imber, Suzanne M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Raines, Jim M.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-09-01

    We report an investigation of magnetic reconnection in Mercury's magnetotail conducted with MESSENGER Magnetometer and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer measurements during seven "hot seasons" when the periapsis of the spacecraft orbit is on Mercury's dayside. Flux ropes are formed in the cross-tail current sheet by reconnection. We have analyzed 49 flux ropes observed between 1.7 RM and 2.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) down the tail from the center of the planet, for which minimum variance analysis indicates that the spacecraft passed near the central axis of the structure. An average Alfvén speed of 465 km s-1 is measured in the plasma sheet surrounding these flux ropes. Under the assumption that the flux ropes moved at the local Alfvén speed, the mean duration of 0.74±0.15 s determined for these structures implies a typical diameter of ~345 km, or ~0.14 RM, which is comparable to a proton gyroradius in the plasma sheet of ~380 km. We successfully fit the magnetic signatures of 16 flux ropes to a force-free model. The mean radius and core field determined in this manner were ~450 km, or ~0.18 RM, and ~40 nT, respectively. A superposed epoch analysis of the magnetic field during these events shows variations similar to those observed at Earth, including the presence of a post-plasmoid plasma sheet, filled with disconnected magnetic flux, but the timescales are 40 times shorter at Mercury. The results of this flux rope survey indicate that intense magnetic reconnection occurs frequently in the cross-tail current layer of this small but extremely dynamic magnetosphere.

  18. Limits to Mercury's magnesium exosphere from MESSENGER second flyby observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Todd Bradley, E.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Benna, Mehdi; Slavin, James A.

    2011-12-01

    The discovery measurements of Mercury's exospheric magnesium, obtained by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) probe during its second Mercury flyby, are modeled to constrain the source and loss processes for this neutral species. Fits to a Chamberlain exosphere reveal that at least two source temperatures are required to reconcile the distribution of magnesium measured far from and near the planet: a hot ejection process at the equivalent temperature of several tens of thousands of degrees K, and a competing, cooler source at temperatures as low as 400 K. For the energetic component, our models indicate that the column abundance that can be attributed to sputtering under constant southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions is at least a factor of five less than the rate dictated by the measurements. Although highly uncertain, this result suggests that another energetic process, such as the rapid dissociation of exospheric MgO, may be the main source of the distant neutral component. If meteoroid and micrometeoroid impacts eject mainly molecules, the total amount of magnesium at altitudes exceeding ˜100 km is found to be consistent with predictions by impact vaporization models for molecule lifetimes of no more than two minutes. Though a sharp increase in emission observed near the dawn terminator region can be reproduced if a single meteoroid enhanced the impact vapor at equatorial dawn, it is much more likely that observations in this region, which probe heights increasingly near the surface, indicate a reservoir of volatile Mg being acted upon by lower-energy source processes.

  19. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-05-01

    We have established the average shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to midpoints of boundary crossings and probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause was fit by a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1 + cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, the subsolar standoff distance Rss is 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and the flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure PRam of 14.3 nPa. The best fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shapes remain unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range of 8.8-21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 to 1.89 RM for MA in the range of 4.12-11.8. The boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional quantifiable effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. The magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance of 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss.

  20. Reference surfaces of the planet Mercury from MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Roohollah; Ardalan, Alireza A.; Farahani, Soheil Vasheghani

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the reference surfaces of the planet Mercury obtained by the MESSENGER mission in order to provide a geodetic reference system (GRS) for the planet. The reference surfaces under consideration are the geoid and the reference ellipsoid. The reference ellipsoid is a triaxial planetocentric equipotential ellipsoid that best fits the geoid. To determine the reference surfaces, two methods are presented. In this line, the shape of the planet is sampled by expanding the global shape model (GSM) GTMES_125V03_SHA only up to the degree strength of the global gravity model (GGM) GGMES_50V06_SHA. The spatial resolution of the sampling points is selected based on the degree strength and the latitude of the location. According to our preferred method, we estimate the values for the semi-major equatorial axis, semi-minor equatorial axis, and polar axis of the reference ellipsoid equal to 2, 439, 422 ± 368m , 2, 439, 304 ± 368m , and 2, 439, 178 ± 368m , respectively. Moreover, we estimate the geoid potential value equal to 9, 032, 044 ± 1361m2 /s2 . The three axes of the reference ellipsoid give the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (100 ± 213) ×10-6 and (48 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. However, we show that the best-fitting ellipsoid gives the polar and equatorial flattenings equal to (896 ± 213) ×10-6 and (426 ± 213) ×10-6 , respectively. The best-fitting ellipsoid is a triaxial ellipsoid that fits the shape of Mercury in a least-squares sense. The significant discrepancy observed between the flattenings of the two ellipsoids is a consequence of Mercury's geophysical characteristics together with its non-hydrostatic equilibrium. The results provided in the present work prove adequate for defining a promised GRS for the planet Mercury.

  1. Survival Strategies in the Aquatic and Terrestrial World: The Impact of Second Messengers on Cyanobacterial Processes

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Marco; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Second messengers are intracellular substances regulated by specific external stimuli globally known as first messengers. Cells rely on second messengers to generate rapid responses to environmental changes and the importance of their roles is becoming increasingly realized in cellular signaling research. Cyanobacteria are photooxygenic bacteria that inhabit most of Earth’s environments. The ability of cyanobacteria to survive in ecologically diverse habitats is due to their capacity to adapt and respond to environmental changes. This article reviews known second messenger-controlled physiological processes in cyanobacteria. Second messengers used in these systems include the element calcium (Ca2+), nucleotide-based guanosine tetraphosphate or pentaphosphate (ppGpp or pppGpp, represented as (p)ppGpp), cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), cyclic guanosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cGMP), and cyclic dimeric AMP (c-di-AMP), and the gaseous nitric oxide (NO). The discussion focuses on processes central to cyanobacteria, such as nitrogen fixation, light perception, photosynthesis-related processes, and gliding motility. In addition, we address future research trajectories needed to better understand the signaling networks and cross talk in the signaling pathways of these molecules in cyanobacteria. Second messengers have significant potential to be adapted as technological tools and we highlight possible novel and practical applications based on our understanding of these molecules and the signaling networks that they control. PMID:25411927

  2. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  3. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  4. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  5. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  6. 29 CFR 520.407 - What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I do to comply with the terms of my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the subminimum wage for messengers and what must I... CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.407 What is the subminimum wage for messengers and...

  7. Formation of Viral Ribonucleic Acid and Virus in Cells that are Permissive or Nonpermissive for Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (GDVII) 1

    PubMed Central

    Sturman, Lawrence S.; Tamm, Igor

    1969-01-01

    GDVII virus growth in BHK-21 cells, a permissive host for the virus, resembled productive infections with other picornaviruses. Virus yields ranged from 100 to 600 plaque-forming units (PFU)/cell. Virus replication in HeLa cells, a nonpermissive host for GDVII virus, was characterized by virus yields of only 0.1 to 5 PFU/cell. Similar low yields of virus have been obtained from HeLa cells at all multiplicities of input up to 6,000 per cell. The progeny particles from HeLa cells were, like the infecting particles, restricted in the HeLa cell host. Despite the great difference in final yields of virus from BHK-21 and HeLa cells, the times when maximal yields were reached were similar. GDVII virus stock grown in BHK-21 cells was designated HeLa-. A variant of GDVII virus which is capable of extensive growth in HeLa cells was obtained. This variant, designated HeLa+ GDVII virus, was passaged serially in HeLa cells. Virus yields of 50 to 150 infective virus particles per cell were obtained from infection of HeLa cells with HeLa+ GDVII virus. The major species of HeLa+ virus-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) produced was single stranded and sedimented with an S value of 35S. The rate of accumulation of HeLa+ virus-specific RNA in HeLa cell cultures was about four times that of HeLa- RNA. The amount of virus-specific HeLa+ RNA formed in HeLa cells was several-fold greater than that of HeLa- RNA. With HeLa- parent GDVII virus undergoing productive replication in BHK-21 cells or abortive replication in HeLa cells, the major species of virus-specific RNA produced was single stranded and sedimented with an approximate S value of 35S. The amount of HeLa- virus-specific RNA extracted from BHK-21 cells was several-fold greater than the amount obtained from HeLa cells. PMID:4306304

  8. Evolution and structure of Mercury's interior from MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    During the past four years, the MESSENGER mission (MErcury Surface, Space Environment, GEochemistry and Ranging) has delivered a wealth of information that has been dramatically advancing the understanding of the geological, chemical, and physical state of Mercury. Taking into account the latest constraints on the interior structure, surface composition, volcanic and tectonic history, we employed numerical models to simulate the thermo-chemical evolution of the planet's interior [1]. Typical evolution scenarios that allow the observational constraints to be satisfied consist of an initial phase of mantle heating accompanied by planetary expansion and the production of a substantial amount of partial melt. The evolution subsequent to 2 Ga is characterised by secular cooling that proceeds approximately at a constant rate and implies that contraction should be still ongoing. Most of the models also predict mantle convection to cease after 3-4 Ga, indicating that Mercury may be no longer dynamically active. In addition, the topography, measured by laser altimetry and the gravity field, obtained from radio-tracking, represent fundamental observations that can be interpreted in terms of the chemical and mechanical structure of the interior. The observed geoid-to-topography ratios at intermediate wavelengths are well explained by the isostatic compensation of the topography associated with lateral variations of the crustal thickness, whose mean value can be estimated to be ~35 km, broadly confirming the predictions of the evolution simulations [2]. Finally, we will show that the degree-2 and 4 of the topography and geoid spectra can be explained in terms of the long-wavelength deformation of the lithosphere resulting from deep thermal anomalies caused by the large latitudinal and longitudinal variations in temperature experienced by Mercury's surface. [1] Tosi N., M. Grott, A.-C. Plesa and D. Breuer (2013). Thermo-chemical evolution of Mercury's interior. Journal of

  9. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Slavin, J. A.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Baker, D. N.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We establish the time-averaged shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to the midpoints of boundary crossings as well as to probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause is fit by two different surfaces: (1) a paraboloid, and (2) a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1+cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, and α is a flaring parameter that governs whether the magnetotail is closed (α < 0.5) or open (α ≥ 0.5). The paraboloid magnetopause model is not able to fit simultaneously both the dayside and nightside magnetopause crossings, but the second surface gives the best-fit overall shape to the observations with a subsolar stand-off distance, Rss, of 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and a flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure, PRam, of 14.3 nPa. The best-fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA ) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shape remains unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 RM to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range 8.8 to 21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 RM to 1.89 RM for MA in the range 4.12 to 11.8. To first order, the boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. Despite the moderate average magnetic shear conditions at Mercury, the magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss. This result may indicate that reconnection

  10. MESSENGER Observations of Internal and External Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Alexeev, I. I.; Al Asad, M.; Korth, H.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Winslow, R. M.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Orbital observations with the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow global-scale modeling of Mercury's internal and external magnetic fields. We use a paraboloid model with a cross-tail current sheet to quantify the external magnetic fields and examine possible origins for any residual long-wavelength signals. Observations inside the magnetosphere extend from ~60°S to 86°N; those below 1000 km altitude are confined to the northern hemisphere, with global coverage in body-fixed longitude and in local time. We use MAG data to constrain the magnetopause sub-solar standoff distance, the dipole tilt and offset along the rotation axis, the tail field, and the distance to the inner edge of the tail current sheet. Additional parameters, including the dipole moment, are constrained by the goodness of fit of the model to the MAG data. Inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings are identified on each magnetosphere pass. The mean magnetopause shape for the first 120 days in orbit is modeled by a paraboloid of revolution having a subsolar standoff distance of 1.4 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius). Observations of Mercury's magnetic equator indicate a southward-directed dipole, offset northward along the rotation axis from the planetary center by 484 km, with a tilt of less than 2.5°. These observations constrain the dipole moment to be 195 ± 10 nT-RM3. The paraboloid model successfully matches the first-order global signature of the field, with residual amplitudes typically less than 50 nT. Residuals contain signatures from several different sources: (1) variations in the long-wavelength field that are slow relative to the magnetospheric transit time and which correspond to differences in the baseline magnetospheric currents; (2) multipolar contributions to the internal field of either core or crustal origin; (3) plasma and current systems within the magnetosphere that are not captured in the

  11. MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach Arranges a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, H. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Vanhala, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach Team

    2010-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Team for MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is making sure the public gets quite a show. Since 2004, when MESSENGER was launched, MESSENGER has been gathering intriguing data and information about the Solar System's innermost planet. That journey will continue at a quickened pace after March 18, 2011, when MESSENGER enters into orbit around Mercury for one year of observations of the planet and its environment. The EPO Team - an extensive network of individuals and institutions - has sought to convey the excitement and complexity of the mission as MESSENGER's team overcomes challenges, achieves triumphs, and shares the adventure of space exploration with the American and global public. The EPO Team has developed a broad and comprehensive set of educational and outreach activities, ranging from curricular materials, teacher training, and unique mission-related student investigations to museum displays and special outreach to underserved communities and minority students. One of the most visible aspects of this effort is the MESSENGER Educator Fellows program: master science educators who conduct teacher training workshops throughout the nation for pre-K-12 educators. Educator Fellows train teachers on the EPO Team's MESSENGER Education Modules, which are also relevant to other NASA missions reaching important milestones this year (see http://www.messenger-education.org/teachers/educ_modules.php). By the time MESSENGER goes into orbit, Educator Fellows will have trained an estimated 18,000 teachers, who in turn, facilitate classroom experiences to over 1.8 million students. The EPO Team comprises individuals from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE); Center for

  12. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2015-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany) brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i) c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology, with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology. PMID:26055111

  13. Mid-year Status of MESSENGER SciBox Science Planning and Commanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L.; Choo, T. H.; Steele, R. J.; Lucks, M.; Nair, H.; Perry, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Berman, A. F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    More than halfway into its primary orbital mission, MESSENGER has successfully exploited the SciBox planning and commanding system to automate science observation scheduling and command generation for its full instrument suite, as well as its radio-frequency communication and guidance and control systems. MESSENGER's SciBox software coordinates instrument observations to determine the optimal conflict-free science schedule for the entire orbital mission and generates weekly command sequences for submission to mission operations. SciBox maximizes science return by filling all available observing opportunities and fully utilizing onboard storage and downlink bandwidth. As of four months into its one-year orbital mission, MESSENGER SciBox had scheduled the acquisition and downlink of nearly 40,000 images and comparable data sets from the spacecraft's six other instruments. The flexibility of MESSENGER SciBox allows for rapid re-optimization of schedules in the event of unforeseen circumstances. It has also allowed the science and planning teams to analyze rapidly the effects of modifying operational parameters and adding new observations. Within two hours, the entire mission can be re-optimized, schedules and command sequences generated, and a full set of plots and reports produced. The effects on resource usage, observational coverage, and compliance with operational constraints may be quickly assessed. This rapid turnaround ensures that optimal schedules are produced regardless of circumstances. We present an overview of the MESSENGER SciBox design and its operation.

  14. Ribonucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Martins, R; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2014-08-15

    Research on RNA has led to many important biological discoveries and improvement of therapeutic technologies. From basic to applied research, many procedures employ pure and intact RNA molecules; however their isolation and purification are critical steps because of the easy degradability of RNA, which can impair chemical stability and biological functionality. The current techniques to isolate and purify RNA molecules still have several limitations and the requirement for new methods able to improve RNA quality to meet regulatory demands is growing. In fact, as basic research improves the understanding of biological roles of RNAs, the biopharmaceutical industry starts to focus on them as a biotherapeutic tools. Chromatographic bioseparation is a high selective unit operation and is the major option in the purification of biological compounds, requiring high purity degree. In addition, its application in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is well established. This paper discusses the importance and the progress of RNA isolation and purification, considering RNA applicability both in research and clinical fields. In particular and in view of the high specificity, affinity chromatography has been recently applied to RNA purification processes. Accordingly, recent chromatographic investigations based on biorecognition phenomena occurring between RNA and amino acids are focused. Histidine and arginine have been used as amino acid ligands, and their ability to isolate different RNA species demonstrated a multipurpose applicability in molecular biology analysis and RNA therapeutics preparation, highlighting the potential contribution of these methods to overcome the challenges of RNA purification.

  15. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus: A Dual Spacecraft Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Barabash, S.; Benna, M.; Boardsen, S. A.; Fraenz, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Sarantos, M.; Solomon, S. C.; Zhang, T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    At 23:08 UT on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude (338 krn) during its second flyby of Venus en route to its 201 1 orbit insertion at Mercury. Whereas no measurements were collected during MESSENGER'S first Venus flyby in October 2006, the Magnetometer (MAG) and the Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) operated successfully throughout this second encounter. Venus provides the solar system's best example to date of a solar wind - ionosphere planetary interaction. Pioneer Venus Orbiter measurements have shown that this interaction affects the upper atmosphere and ionosphere down to altitudes of - 150 km. Here we present an initial overview of the MESSENGER observations during the - 4 hrs that the spacecraft spent within 10 planet radii of Venus and, together with Venus Express measurements, examine the influence of solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field conditions on the solar wind interaction at solar minimum.

  16. Involvement of the second messenger cAMP in gravity-signal transduction in physarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, I.; Rabien, H.; Ivanova, K.

    The aim of the investigation was to clarify, whether cellular signal processing following graviperception involves second messenger pathways. The test object was a most gravisensitive free-living ameboid cell, the myxomycete (acellular slime mold) Physarum polycephalum. It was demonstrated that the motor response is related to acceleration-dependent changes in the levels of the cellular second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Rotating Physarum plasmodia in the gravity field of the Earth about a horizontal axis increased their cAMP concentration. Depriving the cells for a few days of the acceleration stimulus (near weightlessness in a space experiment on STS-69) slightly lowered plasmodial cAMP levels. Thus, the results provide first indications that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  17. Nuclear networking fashions pre-messenger RNA and primary microRNA transcripts for function

    PubMed Central

    Pawlicki, Jan M.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression of protein-coding genes is enhanced by the exquisite coupling of transcription by RNA polymerase II with pre-messenger RNA processing reactions, such as 5′-end capping, splicing and 3′-end formation. Integration between cotranscriptional processing events extends beyond the nucleus, as proteins that bind cotranscriptionally can affect the localization, translation and degradation of the mature messenger RNA. MicroRNAs are RNA polymerase II transcripts with crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression. Recent data demonstrate that processing of primary microRNA transcripts might be yet another cotranscriptional event that is woven into this elaborate nuclear network. This review discusses the extensive molecular interactions that couple the earliest steps in gene expression and therefore influence the final fate and function of the mature messenger RNA or microRNA produced. PMID:20004579

  18. TIPE3 Is The Transfer Protein Of Lipid Second Messengers That Promote Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fayngerts, Svetlana A.; Wu, Jianping; Oxley, Camilla L.; Liu, Xianglan; Vourekas, Anastassios; Cathopoulis, Terry; Wang, Zhaojun; Cui, Jian; Liu, Suxia; Sun, Honghong; Lemmon, Mark A.; Zhang, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Summary More than half of human cancers have aberrantly upregulated phosphoinositide signals; yet how phospholipid signals are controlled during tumorigenesis is not fully understood. We report here that TIPE3 (TNFAIP8L3) is the transfer protein of phosphoinositide second messengers that promote cancer. High-resolution crystal structure of TIPE3 shows a large hydrophobic cavity that is occupied by a phospholipid-like molecule. TIPE3 preferentially captures and shuttles two lipid second messengers, i.e., phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, and increases their levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, human cancers have markedly upregulated TIPE3 expression. Knocking out TIPE3 diminishes tumorigenesis whereas enforced TIPE3 expression enhances it in vivo. Thus, the function and metabolism of phosphoinositide second messengers are controlled by a specific transfer protein during tumorigenesis. PMID:25242044

  19. MESSENGER and Venus Express Observations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Barabash, Stas; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Fraenz, Markus; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho,George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Solomon, Sean C.; Zhang, Tielong; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    At 23:08 UTC on 5 June 2007 the MESSENGER spacecraft reached its closest approach altitude of 338 kin during its final flyby of Venus en route to its 2011 orbit insertion at Mercury. The availability of the simultaneous Venus Express solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements provides a rare opportunity to examine the influence of upstream conditions on this planet's solar wind interaction. We present MESSENGER observations of new features of the Venus - solar wind interaction including hot flow anomalies upstream of the bow shock, a flux rope in the near-tail and a two-point determination of the timescale for magnetic flux transport through this induced magnetosphere. Citation: Stavin, J. A., et al. (2009), MESSENGER and Venus Express observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus,

  20. Coulomb Interactions between Cytoplasmic Electric Fields and Phosphorylated Messenger Proteins Optimize Information Flow in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gatenby, Robert A.; Frieden, B. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Background Normal cell function requires timely and accurate transmission of information from receptors on the cell membrane (CM) to the nucleus. Movement of messenger proteins in the cytoplasm is thought to be dependent on random walk. However, Brownian motion will disperse messenger proteins throughout the cytosol resulting in slow and highly variable transit times. We propose that a critical component of information transfer is an intracellular electric field generated by distribution of charge on the nuclear membrane (NM). While the latter has been demonstrated experimentally for decades, the role of the consequent electric field has been assumed to be minimal due to a Debye length of about 1 nanometer that results from screening by intracellular Cl− and K+. We propose inclusion of these inorganic ions in the Debye-Huckel equation is incorrect because nuclear pores allow transit through the membrane at a rate far faster than the time to thermodynamic equilibrium. In our model, only the charged, mobile messenger proteins contribute to the Debye length. Findings Using this revised model and published data, we estimate the NM possesses a Debye-Huckel length of a few microns and find this is consistent with recent measurement using intracellular nano-voltmeters. We demonstrate the field will accelerate isolated messenger proteins toward the nucleus through Coulomb interactions with negative charges added by phosphorylation. We calculate transit times as short as 0.01 sec. When large numbers of phosphorylated messenger proteins are generated by increasing concentrations of extracellular ligands, we demonstrate they generate a self-screening environment that regionally attenuates the cytoplasmic field, slowing movement but permitting greater cross talk among pathways. Preliminary experimental results with phosphorylated RAF are consistent with model predictions. Conclusion This work demonstrates that previously unrecognized Coulomb interactions between

  1. The gravity field and orientation of Mercury after the MESSENGER mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, E.; Genova, A.; Goossens, S. J.; Lemoine, F. G.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    After more than four years in orbit about Mercury, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft impacted the planet's surface north of Shakespeare crater (54.44° N, 210.12° E,) on 30 April 2015. One of the main goals of the mission was to determine the gravity field of Mercury in order to learn about Mercury's interior. Together with ground-based radar measurements of the obliquity and forced librations, MESSENGER-derived gravity models helped revise models of Mercury's interior. Nevertheless, the refinement of Mercury's orientation with the latest data from MESSENGER can further improve the interior modeling of the planet. The last eight months of the mission provided a special opportunity to conduct low-altitude measurements, with extensive radio tracking coverage below 200 km altitude north of ~30°N. MESSENGER's Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) mapped the topography of Mercury's northern hemisphere with a sub-meter vertical precision, an along-track sampling of ~500 m, and a longitudinal resolution (~0.1°) limited by the number of spacecraft orbits (~4,000). The combination of gravity and topography helps determine crustal thickness and interior properties. Altimetric ranges provide geodetic constraints to improve the spacecraft orbit determination, and thus the gravity field model. In particular, whereas the MESSENGER spacecraft was not tracked at each periapsis passage, MLA operated nearly continuously (outside of thermally challenging periods). From an analysis of the entire radiometric and altimetric datasets acquired by MESSENGER, a new gravity field to degree and order 100 has been obtained, resolving features down to ~75 km horizontal scale. The altimetric data help reduce the uncertainties in the determination of the pole position. A reanalysis of the Mercury flybys also constrains the spin rate over the longest available time span.

  2. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit on gravitational-wave physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Márka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H.; Riles, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  3. Linking the Universe to the Community: Students as Starry Messengers for IYA2009---Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantoja, C. A.; Lebrón Santos, M. E.

    2008-11-01

    This poster presents a project to establish a working team of undergraduate students (``Starry Messengers'') to promote and experience the wonders of space science and education with all the senses. The students are expected to assist during the activities of the IYA2009. During 2008 the students will receive the appropriate instruction on observational astronomy through two workshops. An innovative model of inclusion will be developed, adapting all materials to include the visually impaired. We will encourage the participation of at least one visually impaired student or teacher on the Starry Messenger team. The workshops will serve as templates for future K--12 teacher workshops.

  4. Solid-phase synthesis of branched oligoribonucleotides related to messenger RNA splicing intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Damha, M J; Ganeshan, K; Hudson, R H; Zabarylo, S V

    1992-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of oligoribonucleotides containing vicinal (2'-5')- and (3'-5')-phosphodiester linkages is described. The solid-phase method, based on silyl-phosphoramidite chemistry, was applied to the synthesis of a series of branched RNA [(Xp)nA2' (pN)n3'(pN)n] related to the splicing intermediates derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae rp51a pre-messenger RNA. The branched oligonucleotides have been thoroughly characterized by nucleoside and branched nucleotide composition analysis. Branched oligoribonucleotides will be useful in the study of messenger RNA splicing and in determining the biological role of RNA 'lariats' and 'forks' in vivo. Images PMID:1480476

  5. Mercury's Exosphere During MESSENGER's Second Flyby: Detection of Magnesium and Distinct Distributions of Neutral Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; Killen, Rosemary M.; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer observed emission from Mercury's neutral exosphere. These observations include the first detection of emission from magnesium. Differing spatial distributions for sodium, calcium, and magnesium were revealed by observations beginning in Mercury's tail region, approximately 8 Mercury radii anti-sunward of the planet, continuing past the nightside, and ending near the dawn terminator. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  6. Students Engaging the Public in Exciting Discoveries by NASA's MESSENGER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K. G.; Morison, J.; Schuele, H.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft entered into orbit around Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun. As the first mission to orbit and study Mercury in depth, MESSENGER sought to answer six primary scientific questions: why is Mercury so dense; what is the geologic history of Mercury; what is the nature of Mercury's magnetic field; what is the structure of Mercury's core; what are the unusual materials at Mercury's poles; and what volatiles are important at Mercury? In the first year of orbit, MESSENGER answered all of these questions, and also made several surprising discoveries. Student interns working with the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team are using MESSENGER Mosaic Postcards (MPC) in both print and digital formats to present this new information to a broad audience. These MPCs, in conjunction with the rest of the MESSENGER EPO tools, present a unified and global resource for the public. By creating this resource in a variety of media, from printable cards to interactive features on the EPO website (http://www.messenger-education.org/), the EPO team can reach a larger audience, further the goal of the MPC project to share newly discovered features and phenomena with the general public, and thereby generate increased interest in and excitement about science and planetary exploration. One side of each MPC shows a MESSENGER image of a portion of Mercury's surface, and together the postcards can be arranged to form a complete image of the planet. On the reverse side of some cards is information pertaining to an item of interest in view on the image-side. One of us (physics undergraduate JEM) researches interesting features on the surface of Mercury and creates descriptions for the informational side of the postcards, and another (computer science undergraduate HCS) creates the digital versions of cards and associated resources for the Surface Interactive, an interactive tool on the MESSENGER EPO website. Postcards already in distribution

  7. Mobile Immersion: An Experiment Using Mobile Instant Messenger to Support Second-Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Immersion has been an acclaimed approach for second-language acquisition, but is not available to most students. The idea of this study was to create a mobile immersion environment on a smartphone using a mobile instant messenger, WhatsApp™. Forty-five Form-1 (7th grade) students divided into the Mobile Group and Control Group participated in a…

  8. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: are there effects from messenger fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David

    2015-09-01

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenger fields are expected, and under which conditions they can safely be neglected. In particular, we point out how to construct realisations where, despite the fact that the inflaton field values are above the messenger mass scale, the predictions for the observables are (to a good approximation) identical to the ones calculated in the effective theory treatment where the messenger mass scale is identified with the (apparent) cutoff scale.

  9. Integrating Instant Messenger into Online Office Hours to Enhance Synchronous Online Interaction in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lih-Ching, Chen Wang; Beasley, William

    2006-01-01

    Modern communication technologies have modified the tradition of instructor's office hours in numerous ways. This article explores the use of Instant Messenger (IM) software in the context of "online office hours". The authors discuss strengths and weaknesses of IM interactions for instructor/student communication, and examine a sample of such…

  10. Audience and Witnessing: Research into Dramatherapy using Vignettes and aMSN Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phil

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the process of research undertaken to examine therapists' responses to the concept of the core processes of change in dramatherapy. The research uses a combination of vignette description and analysis using aMSN messenger. The article describes the theoretical underpinning and rationale to the approach, and the…

  11. Social and Virtual Networks: Evaluating Synchronous Online Interviewing Using Instant Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchcliffe, Vanessa; Gavin, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of the quality and utility of synchronous online interviewing for data collection in social network research. Synchronous online interviews facilitated by Instant Messenger as the communication medium, were undertaken with ten final year university students. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of…

  12. Shoot the Messenger and Disregard the Message? Children's Attitudes toward Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnhagen, Connie K.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses children's attitudes toward spelling using a person perception paradigm. Indicates that even second graders had a negative attitude toward both the message and the messenger as a function of misspellings, and that children's negative attitudes increased across grades. Finds that attitude was related to spelling ability; better…

  13. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: are there effects from messenger fields?

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David E-mail: david.nolde@unibas.ch

    2015-09-01

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenger fields are expected, and under which conditions they can safely be neglected. In particular, we point out how to construct realisations where, despite the fact that the inflaton field values are above the messenger mass scale, the predictions for the observables are (to a good approximation) identical to the ones calculated in the effective theory treatment where the messenger mass scale is identified with the (apparent) cutoff scale.

  14. Recognition of the bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanylate by its cognate riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshina, Nadia; Baird, Nathan J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.

    2009-12-03

    The cyclic diguanylate (bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate, c-di-GMP) riboswitch is the first known example of a gene-regulatory RNA that binds a second messenger. c-di-GMP is widely used by bacteria to regulate processes ranging from biofilm formation to the expression of virulence genes. The cocrystal structure of the c-di-GMP responsive GEMM riboswitch upstream of the tfoX gene of Vibrio cholerae reveals the second messenger binding the RNA at a three-helix junction. The two-fold symmetric second messenger is recognized asymmetrically by the monomeric riboswitch using canonical and noncanonical base-pairing as well as intercalation. These interactions explain how the RNA discriminates against cyclic diadenylate (c-di-AMP), a putative bacterial second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering and biochemical analyses indicate that the RNA undergoes compaction and large-scale structural rearrangement in response to ligand binding, consistent with organization of the core three-helix junction of the riboswitch concomitant with binding of c-di-GMP.

  15. Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger Learning Activities in NS-NNS and NNS-NNS Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotillo, Susana

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examines corrective feedback in native speaker-nonnative speaker (NS-NNS) and NNS-NNS dyads while participants were engaged in communicative and problem-solving activities via "Yahoo! Instant Messenger" (YIM). As "negotiation of meaning" studies of the 1990s have shown, linguistic items which learners negotiate in…

  16. Radioautographic localization of prolactin messenger RNA on histological sections by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pochet, R; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Toubeau, G; Seo, H; Refetoff, S; Dumont, J E; Pasteels, J L

    1981-05-04

    In situ hybridization of complementary [H3]DNA ([H3]cDNA) synthetized from purified rat prolactin messenger RNA (rPRL mRNA) was performed to specifically identify on histologic sections of rat hypophysis cells expressing the PRL gene. Radioautographic labelling occurred over weakly acidophilic cells, while other acidophils, with darker cytoplasm did not contain more silver grains than blood vessels.

  17. The Gravity Field of Mercury After the Messenger Low-Altitude Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Frank G.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Neumann, Gary A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    The final year of the MESSENGER mission was designed to take advantage of the remaining propellant onboard to provide a series of lowaltitude observation campaigns and acquire novel scientific data about the innermost planet. The lower periapsis altitude greatly enhances the sensitivity to the short-wavelength gravity field, but only when the spacecraft is in view of Earth. After more than 3 years in orbit around Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft was tracked for the first time below 200-km altitude on 5 May 2014 by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). Between August and October, periapsis passages down to 25-km altitude were routinely tracked. These periods considerably improved the quality of the data coverage. Before the end of its mission, MESSENGER will fly at very low altitudes for extended periods of time. Given the orbital geometry, however the periapses will not be visible from Earth and so no new tracking data will be available for altitudes lower than 75 km. Nevertheless, the continuous tracking of MESSENGER in the northern hemisphere will help improve the uniformity of the spatial coverage at altitudes lower than 150 km, which will further improve the overall quality of the Mercury gravity field.

  18. Social and Virtual Networks: Evaluating Synchronous Online Interviewing Using Instant Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchcliffe, Vanessa; Gavin, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of the quality and utility of synchronous online interviewing for data collection in social network research. Synchronous online interviews facilitated by Instant Messenger as the communication medium, were undertaken with ten final year university students. Quantitative and qualitative content analysis of…

  19. Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger Learning Activities in NS-NNS and NNS-NNS Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotillo, Susana

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examines corrective feedback in native speaker-nonnative speaker (NS-NNS) and NNS-NNS dyads while participants were engaged in communicative and problem-solving activities via "Yahoo! Instant Messenger" (YIM). As "negotiation of meaning" studies of the 1990s have shown, linguistic items which learners negotiate in…

  20. Realising effective theories of tribrid inflation: are there effects from messenger fields?

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Nolde, David

    2015-09-22

    Tribrid inflation is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation in which the inflaton is a matter field (which can be charged under gauge symmetries) and inflation ends by a GUT-scale phase transition of a waterfall field. These features make tribrid inflation a promising framework for realising inflation with particularly close connections to particle physics. Superpotentials of tribrid inflation involve effective operators suppressed by some cutoff scale, which is often taken as the Planck scale. However, these operators may also be generated by integrating out messenger superfields with masses below the Planck scale, which is in fact quite common in GUT and/or flavour models. The values of the inflaton field during inflation can then lie above this mass scale, which means that for reliably calculating the model predictions one has to go beyond the effective theory description. We therefore discuss realisations of effective theories of tribrid inflation and specify in which cases effects from the messenger fields are expected, and under which conditions they can safely be neglected. In particular, we point out how to construct realisations where, despite the fact that the inflaton field values are above the messenger mass scale, the predictions for the observables are (to a good approximation) identical to the ones calculated in the effective theory treatment where the messenger mass scale is identified with the (apparent) cutoff scale.

  1. Farm Women, Solidarity, and "The Suffrage Messenger": Nebraska Suffrage Activism on the Plains, 1915-1917

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heider, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In 1914 Nebraska men once again voted against the amendment that would have granted full suffrage to Nebraska women. This article focuses on the three years immediately after that defeat. It explores the remaining seventeen issues of the "Suffrage Messenger" and asks the following question: how did the suffrage newspaper portray and…

  2. Unit Messengers, First Trial Materials, Inspection Set, [Australian Science Education Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Australian Science Education Project is producing material designed for use in grades 7-10 of Australian schools. This is the first trial version of a unit concerned with sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. The teacher's guide outlines the use of the two booklets ("Messengers" and "Use of the Senses") intended for all…

  3. Unit Messengers, First Trial Materials, Inspection Set, [Australian Science Education Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Australian Science Education Project is producing material designed for use in grades 7-10 of Australian schools. This is the first trial version of a unit concerned with sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. The teacher's guide outlines the use of the two booklets ("Messengers" and "Use of the Senses") intended for all…

  4. Farm Women, Solidarity, and "The Suffrage Messenger": Nebraska Suffrage Activism on the Plains, 1915-1917

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heider, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In 1914 Nebraska men once again voted against the amendment that would have granted full suffrage to Nebraska women. This article focuses on the three years immediately after that defeat. It explores the remaining seventeen issues of the "Suffrage Messenger" and asks the following question: how did the suffrage newspaper portray and…

  5. Mobile Immersion: An Experiment Using Mobile Instant Messenger to Support Second-Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Immersion has been an acclaimed approach for second-language acquisition, but is not available to most students. The idea of this study was to create a mobile immersion environment on a smartphone using a mobile instant messenger, WhatsApp™. Forty-five Form-1 (7th grade) students divided into the Mobile Group and Control Group participated in a…

  6. Messenger RNA patterns in rat liver nuclei before and after treat-ment with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Drews, J; Brawerman, G

    1967-06-09

    Like cortisol, growth hormone enhances RNA synthesis in rat liver nuclei. However, DNA-RNA hybridization experiments show that the application of growth hormone does not stimulate the formation of new species of messenger RNA. The latter phenomenon was observed after treatment with cortisol.

  7. Use of MESSENGER radioscience data to improve planetary ephemeris and to test general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A. K.; Fienga, A.; Laskar, J.; Manche, H.; Gastineau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of Mercury's orbit has mainly been gained by direct radar ranging obtained from the 60s to 1998 and by five Mercury flybys made with Mariner 10 in the 70s, and with MESSENGER made in 2008 and 2009. On March 18, 2011, MESSENGER became the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The radioscience observations acquired during the orbital phase of MESSENGER drastically improved our knowledge of the orbit of Mercury. An accurate MESSENGER orbit is obtained by fitting one-and-half years of tracking data using GINS orbit determination software. The systematic error in the Earth-Mercury geometric positions, also called range bias, obtained from GINS are then used to fit the INPOP dynamical modeling of the planet motions. An improved ephemeris of the planets is then obtained, INPOP13a, and used to perform general relativity tests of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. Our estimations of PPN parameters (γ and β) are more stringent than previous results.

  8. An international program for Mercury exploration: synergy of MESSENGER and BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R.; Solomon, S.; Grard, R.; Novara, M.; Mukai, T.

    Mariner 10 has been the only spacecraft to visit the innermost planet Mercury. Its visits, more than 25 years ago, used three rapid flybys to yield the first view of this little-understood world. With advances in spacecraft technology and a growing realization of how important Mercury is to our understanding of the solar system and its formation, two missions are now in development for more intensive Mercury exploration. The first is the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission, competitively selected under the NASA Discovery Program, that will send a spacecraft to fly by Mercury in 2007 and 2008 and to orbit Mercury for one Earth year beginning in April 2009. The second is the more comprehensive BepiColombo mission, consisting of three elements: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), and the Mercury Surface Element (MSE). Still in final definition stage, BepiColombo is a partnership between the European Space Agency ESA and the Japanese space agency ISAS. With one or two launches (depending upon the final architecture) BepiColombo will use solar electric propulsion to launch two orbiters (MPO from ESA and MMO from ISAS) and a lander (MSE) to Mercury as early as 2009. The BepiColombo orbiters, in orbits complementary to that of MESSENGER, will extend geochemical, spectral, and photometric mapping of the planet. With its factor-of-ten larger downlink, BepiColombo will complete the intensive study of Mercury begun with the exploration by MESSENGER. Synergistic strategies of exploration will enable efficient use of BepiColombo resources in a more detailed study of the planet than can be accomplished by MESSENGER alone. For example, the earlier MESSENGER mission can help identify appropriate landing sites for the MSE, while BepiColombo can provide complementary orbital measurements of surface features from different phase angles and exploit MESSENGER observations to target high

  9. An international program for Mercury exploration: synergy of MESSENGER and BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Solomon, Sean C.; Grard, Réjean; Novara, Mauro; Mukai, Toshifumi

    2004-01-01

    Mariner 10 has been the only spacecraft to visit the innermost planet Mercury. Its three flybys, more than 25 years ago, yielded the first view of this little-understood world. With advances in spacecraft technology and a growing realization of how important Mercury is to our understanding of the solar system and its formation, two missions are now in development for more intensive Mercury exploration. The first is the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) mission, competitively selected under the NASA Discovery Program, that will send a spacecraft to fly by Mercury in 2007 and 2008 and to orbit Mercury for one Earth year beginning in April 2009. The second is the more comprehensive BepiColombo mission, consisting of three elements: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), and the Mercury Surface Element (MSE). Still in final definition stage, BepiColombo is a partnership between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). With one or two launches (depending upon the final mission architecture) BepiColombo will use solar electric propulsion to send two orbiters (MPO from ESA and MMO from ISAS) and a lander (MSE) to Mercury as early as 2011. The BepiColombo orbiters, in orbits complementary to that of MESSENGER, will extend geochemical, spectral, and photometric mapping of the planet. With its factor-of-ten larger downlink, BepiColombo will complete the intensive study of Mercury begun with the exploration by MESSENGER. Synergistic strategies of exploration will enable efficient use of BepiColombo resources in a more detailed study of the planet than can be accomplished by MESSENGER alone. For example, the earlier MESSENGER mission can help identify appropriate landing sites for the MSE, while BepiColombo can provide complementary orbital measurements of surface features from different phase angles and exploit MESSENGER observations to

  10. 29 CFR 520.405 - Must I notify my employees that I am applying for a certificate to employ messengers and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certificate to employ messengers and/or learners at subminimum wages? 520.405 Section 520.405 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.405 Must I notify my employees...

  11. 29 CFR 520.405 - Must I notify my employees that I am applying for a certificate to employ messengers and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certificate to employ messengers and/or learners at subminimum wages? 520.405 Section 520.405 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.405 Must I notify my employees...

  12. 29 CFR 520.405 - Must I notify my employees that I am applying for a certificate to employ messengers and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certificate to employ messengers and/or learners at subminimum wages? 520.405 Section 520.405 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.405 Must I notify my employees...

  13. 29 CFR 520.405 - Must I notify my employees that I am applying for a certificate to employ messengers and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate to employ messengers and/or learners at subminimum wages? 520.405 Section 520.405 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.405 Must I notify my employees...

  14. 29 CFR 520.405 - Must I notify my employees that I am applying for a certificate to employ messengers and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certificate to employ messengers and/or learners at subminimum wages? 520.405 Section 520.405 Labor... UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF MESSENGERS, LEARNERS (INCLUDING STUDENT-LEARNERS), AND APPRENTICES Messengers, Learners (Excluding Student-Learners), and Apprentices § 520.405 Must I notify my employees...

  15. Engaging the Public in the MESSENGER Spacecraft's Confirmation of Water Ice on Mercury by Using Actual Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Goldstein, J. J.; Hamel, S.; Hirshon, B.; Malaret, E.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Weir, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft have provided compelling support for the 20-year-old hypothesis that Mercury hosts abundant water ice and other frozen volatile materials in its permanently shadowed polar craters. MESSENGER's Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team is creating a suite of materials to engage the public in the scientific process that led to this discovery. The Water Ice Data Exploration (WIDE) suite will consist of a video presentation from a mission scientist and engineer, a pencil-and-paper activity, and a web-based interactive data-mapping tool. Each of these individual parts will examine Mariner 10 flyby data from the 1970s, Earth-based radar data from the early 1990s, and MESSENGER flyby and orbital data from various instruments to help show the progression of evidence in support of this conclusion. The QuickMap interactive data mapping tool will be customized for this project and will also serve as an introduction to the larger QuickMap tool, with which publicly released MESSENGER data can be viewed (http://messenger-act.actgate.com/msgr_public_released/react_quickmap.html). The WIDE suite of materials will be accessible from a dedicated HTML page on the MESSENGER EPO website (temporary draft: http://www.messenger-education.org/workshops/cod.php), enabling free and simple dissemination to broad audiences.

  16. Mercury Conditions for the MESSENGER Mission Simulated in High- Solar-Radiation Vacuum Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2003-01-01

    The MESSENGER (Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, planned for launch in March 2004, will perform two flybys of Mercury before entering a year-long orbit of the planet in September 2009. The mission will provide opportunities for detailed characterization of the surface, interior, atmosphere, and magnetosphere of the closest planet to the Sun. The NASA Glenn Research Center and the MESSENGER spacecraft integrator, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, have partnered under a Space Act Agreement to characterize a variety of critical components and materials under simulated conditions expected near Mercury. Glenn's Vacuum Facility 6, which is equipped with a solar simulator, can simulate the vacuum and high solar radiation anticipated in Mercury orbit. The MESSENGER test hardware includes a variety of materials and components that are being characterized during the Tank 6 vacuum tests, where the hardware will be exposed to up to 11 suns insolation, simulating conditions expected in Mercury orbit. In 2002, ten solar vacuum tests were conducted, including beginning of life, end of life, backside exposure, and solar panel thermal shock cycling tests. Components tested include candidate solar array panels, sensors, thermal shielding materials, and communication devices. As an example, for the solar panel thermal shock cycling test, two candidate solar array panels were suspended on a lift mechanism that lowered the panels into a liquid-nitrogen-cooled box. After reaching -140 C, the panels were then lifted out of the box and exposed to the equivalent of 6 suns (8.1 kilowatts per square meters). After five cold soak/heating cycles were completed successfully, there was no apparent degradation in panel performance. An anticipated 100-hr thermal shield life test is planned for autumn, followed by solar panel flight qualification tests in winter. Glenn's ongoing support to the MESSENGER program has been instrumental in

  17. WhatsApp Messenger as an Adjunctive Tool for Telemedicine: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The advent of telemedicine has allowed physicians to deliver medical treatment to patients from a distance. Mobile apps such as WhatsApp Messenger, an instant messaging service, came as a novel concept in all fields of social life, including medicine. The use of instant messaging services has been shown to improve communication within medical teams by providing means for quick teleconsultation, information sharing, and starting treatment as soon as possible. Objective The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of present literature on the use of the WhatsApp Messenger app as an adjunctive health care tool for medical doctors. Methods Searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the term “whatsapp*” in articles published before January 2016. A bibliography of all relevant original articles that used the WhatsApp Messenger app was created. The level of evidence of each study was determined according to the Oxford Levels of Evidence ranking system produced by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The impact and the indications of WhatsApp Messenger are discussed in order to understand the extent to which this app currently functions as an adjunctive tool for telemedicine. Results The database search identified a total of 30 studies in which the term “whatsapp*” was used. Each article’s list of references was evaluated item-by-item. After literature reviews, letters to the editor, and low-quality studies were excluded, a total of 10 studies were found to be eligible for inclusion. Of these studies, 9 had been published in the English language and 1 had been published in Spanish. Five were published by medical doctors. Conclusions The pooled data presents compelling evidence that the WhatsApp Messenger app is a promising system, whether used as a communication tool between health care professionals, as a means of communication between health care professionals and the general public

  18. WhatsApp Messenger as an Adjunctive Tool for Telemedicine: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Koch, Hilton; Godoy-Santos, Alexandre; Dias Belangero, William; Esteves Santos Pires, Robinson; Labronici, Pedro

    2017-07-21

    The advent of telemedicine has allowed physicians to deliver medical treatment to patients from a distance. Mobile apps such as WhatsApp Messenger, an instant messaging service, came as a novel concept in all fields of social life, including medicine. The use of instant messaging services has been shown to improve communication within medical teams by providing means for quick teleconsultation, information sharing, and starting treatment as soon as possible. The aim of this study was to perform a comprehensive systematic review of present literature on the use of the WhatsApp Messenger app as an adjunctive health care tool for medical doctors. Searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the term "whatsapp*" in articles published before January 2016. A bibliography of all relevant original articles that used the WhatsApp Messenger app was created. The level of evidence of each study was determined according to the Oxford Levels of Evidence ranking system produced by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The impact and the indications of WhatsApp Messenger are discussed in order to understand the extent to which this app currently functions as an adjunctive tool for telemedicine. The database search identified a total of 30 studies in which the term "whatsapp*" was used. Each article's list of references was evaluated item-by-item. After literature reviews, letters to the editor, and low-quality studies were excluded, a total of 10 studies were found to be eligible for inclusion. Of these studies, 9 had been published in the English language and 1 had been published in Spanish. Five were published by medical doctors. The pooled data presents compelling evidence that the WhatsApp Messenger app is a promising system, whether used as a communication tool between health care professionals, as a means of communication between health care professionals and the general public, or as a learning tool for providing health care information

  19. An allosteric self-splicing ribozyme triggered by a bacterial second messenger.

    PubMed

    Lee, Elaine R; Baker, Jenny L; Weinberg, Zasha; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2010-08-13

    Group I self-splicing ribozymes commonly function as components of selfish mobile genetic elements. We identified an allosteric group I ribozyme, wherein self-splicing is regulated by a distinct riboswitch class that senses the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. The tandem RNA sensory system resides in the 5' untranslated region of the messenger RNA for a putative virulence gene in the pathogenic bacterium Clostridium difficile. c-di-GMP binding by the riboswitch induces folding changes at atypical splice site junctions to modulate alternative RNA processing. Our findings indicate that some self-splicing ribozymes are not selfish elements but are harnessed by cells as metabolite sensors and genetic regulators.

  20. Involvement of secondary messengers and small organic molecules in auxin perception and signaling.

    PubMed

    Di, Dong-Wei; Zhang, Caiguo; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-06-01

    Auxin is a major phytohormone involved in most aspects of plant growth and development. Generally, auxin is perceived by three distinct receptors: TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT1-Auxin/INDOLE ACETIC ACID, S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A and AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN1. The auxin perception is regulated by a variety of secondary messenger molecules, including nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, calcium, cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP, inositol triphosphate, diacylglycerol and by physiological pH. In addition, some small organic molecules, including inositol hexakisphosphate, yokonolide B, p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, toyocamycin and terfestatin A, are involved in auxin signaling. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress in understanding the functions of these secondary messengers and small organic molecules, which are now thoroughly demonstrated to be pervasive and important in auxin perception and signal transduction.

  1. Global Distribution of Mercury's Neutrals from MESSENGER Measurements Combined with a Tomographic Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarantos, Menelaos; McClintock, Bill; Vervack, Ron, Jr.; Killen, Rosemary; Merkel, Aimee; Slavin, James; Solomon, Sean C.

    2011-01-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered orbit about Mercury on March 18, 2011. Since then, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) onboard this spacecraft has been observing Mercury's collisionless exosphere. We present measurements by MESSENGER UVVS of the sodium, calcium, and magnesium distributions that were obtained during multiple passes through the tail over a period of one month. Global maps of the exosphere were constructed daily from such measurements using a recently developed tomographic technique. During this period, Mercury moved towards the Sun from being about 0.44 astronomical units (AU) to approximately 0.32 AU from the Sun. Hence, our reconstructions provide information about the three-dimensional structure of the exosphere, the source processes for these species, and their dependence with orbital distance during the entire in-leg of Mercury's orbit.

  2. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury’s ancient crustal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Phillips, Roger J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Anderson, Brian J.; Byrne, Paul K.; Denevi, Brett W.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Hauck, Steven A.; Head, James W.; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury’s crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury’s history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury’s present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury’s crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data.

  3. Is the Pharmacological Mode of Action of Chromium(III) as a Second Messenger?

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B

    2015-07-01

    Although recent studies have shown that chromium (as the trivalent ion) is not an essential trace element, it has been demonstrated to generate beneficial effects at pharmacologically relevant doses on insulin sensitivity and cholesterol levels of rodent models of insulin insensitivity, including models of type 2 diabetes. The mode of action of Cr(III) at a molecular level is still an area of active debate; however, the movement of Cr(III) in the body, particularly in response to changes in insulin concentration, suggests that Cr(III) could act as a second messenger, amplifying insulin signaling. The evidence for the pharmacological mechanism of Cr(III)'s ability to increase insulin sensitivity by acting as a second messenger is reviewed, and proposals for testing this hypothesis are described.

  4. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit to reach out to a young adult audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Márka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H.; Riles, Keith

    2010-05-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. In 2010, an extended version of this exhibit will appear in a New York City venue that is accessible to a large and diverse cross section of the general public. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  5. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 min. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approx.10 times less and typical durations are approx.1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of sub storms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere. suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby.

  6. Mercury's rotational state from combined MESSENGER laser altimeter and image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Alexander; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank; Margot, Jean-Luc; Phillips, Roger J.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-04-01

    With orbital data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, we measured the rotational state of Mercury. We developed a novel approach that combined digital terrain models from stereo images (stereo DTMs) and laser altimeter data, and we applied it to 3 years of MESSENGER observations. We find a large libration amplitude, which in combination with the measured obliquity confirms that Mercury possesses a liquid outer core. Our results confirm previous Earth-based observations of Mercury's rotational state. However, we measured a rotation rate that deviates significantly from the mean resonant rotation rate. The larger rotation rate can be interpreted as the signature of a long-period libration cycle. From these findings we derived new constraints on the interior structure of Mercury. The measured rotational parameters define Mercury's body-fixed frame and are critical for the coordinate system of the planet as well as for planning the future BepiColombo spacecraft mission.

  7. MESSENGER observations of extreme loading and unloading of Mercury's magnetic tail.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel M; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2010-08-06

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetic tail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 minutes. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is lower by a factor of approximately 10 and typical durations are approximately 1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of substorms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines the substorm time scale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby.

  8. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, a series of 2-3 minute long enhancements of the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail were observed. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approximately 10 times less and the durations are 1 hr. These observations of extreme loading imply that the relative intensity of substorms at Mercury must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail enhancements and the calculated approximately 2 min Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles. Such signatures are puzzlingly absent from the MESSENGER flyby measurements.

  9. Return to Mercury: a global perspective on MESSENGER's first Mercury flyby.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L; Watters, Thomas R; Lawrence, David J; Feldman, William C; Head, James W; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Murchie, Scott L; Phillips, Roger J; Slavin, James A; Zuber, Maria T

    2008-07-04

    In January 2008, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft became the first probe to fly past the planet Mercury in 33 years. The encounter revealed that Mercury is a dynamic system; its liquid iron-rich outer core is coupled through a dominantly dipolar magnetic field to the surface, exosphere, and magnetosphere, all of which interact with the solar wind. MESSENGER images confirm that lobate scarps are the dominant tectonic landform and record global contraction associated with cooling of the planet. The history of contraction can be related to the history of volcanism and cratering, and the total contractional strain is at least one-third greater than inferred from Mariner 10 images. On the basis of measurements of thermal neutrons made during the flyby, the average abundance of iron in Mercury's surface material is less than 6% by weight.

  10. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    PubMed

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-06

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history.

  11. Planetary science. Low-altitude magnetic field measurements by MESSENGER reveal Mercury's ancient crustal field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Catherine L; Phillips, Roger J; Purucker, Michael E; Anderson, Brian J; Byrne, Paul K; Denevi, Brett W; Feinberg, Joshua M; Hauck, Steven A; Head, James W; Korth, Haje; James, Peter B; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A; Philpott, Lydia C; Siegler, Matthew A; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Solomon, Sean C

    2015-05-22

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of the magnetic field of a planet, a key constraint for understanding its evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft at altitudes below 150 kilometers, we have detected remanent magnetization in Mercury's crust. We infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7 to 3.9 billion years. Our findings indicate that a global magnetic field driven by dynamo processes in the fluid outer core operated early in Mercury's history. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust inferred from MESSENGER elemental composition data.

  12. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's exosphere: detection of magnesium and distribution of constituents.

    PubMed

    McClintock, William E; Vervack, Ronald J; Bradley, E Todd; Killen, Rosemary M; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L; Burger, Matthew H; Solomon, Sean C; Izenberg, Noam R

    2009-05-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a tenuous exosphere that is supplied primarily by the planet's surface materials and is known to contain sodium, potassium, and calcium. Observations by the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer during MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby revealed the presence of neutral magnesium in the tail (anti-sunward) region of the exosphere, as well as differing spatial distributions of magnesium, calcium, and sodium atoms in both the tail and the nightside, near-planet exosphere. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby, as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  13. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  14. Defective control of pre-messenger RNA splicing in human disease.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Benoit; Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-04

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies.

  15. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  16. Comparison of MESSENGER Optical Images with Thermal and Radar Data for the Surface of MERCURY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Chabot, N. L.; Izenberg, N. R.; Harmon, J. K.; Neish, C.

    2010-12-01

    Images collected by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its three Mercury flybys cover nearly the entire surface of the planet that was not imaged by Mariner 10. The MESSENGER data now allow us to observe features at optical wavelengths that were previously known only through remote sensing in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. For example, the Mariner 10 infrared (IR) radiometer made measurements along a track on the night side of Mercury during the spacecraft's first encounter in 1974. Analysis of the IR radiometer data identified several thermal anomalies that we have correlated to craters with extensive rays or ejecta deposits, including Xiao Zhao and Eminescu. The thermal properties are consistent with a greater exposure of bare rock (exposed in steep walls or as boulders and cobbles) in and around these craters compared with the lower-thermal-inertia, finer-grained regolith of the surrounding older surface. The portion of Mercury not viewed by Mariner 10 has also been imaged by Earth-based radar. The radar backscatter gives information on the wavelength-scale surface roughness. Arecibo S-band (12.6-cm wavelength) radar observations have produced images of Eminescu and also revealed two spectacular rayed craters (Debussy and Hokusai) that have since been imaged by MESSENGER. We are examining radial profiles for these craters, extracted from both the radar images and MESSENGER narrow-angle camera mosaics, that extend from the crater center outwards to a distance of several crater diameters. Comparison of optical and radar profiles for the craters, as well as similar profiles for lunar craters, can provide insight into ejecta deposition, the effect of surface gravity on the cratering process, and space weathering.

  17. Report from the Multi-Messenger Working Group at UHECR-2014 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karg, Timo; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Kuempel, Daniel; Settimo, Mariangela; Rubtsov, Grigory; Troitsky, Sergey

    The IceCube, Pierre Auger and Telescope Array Collaborations have recently reported results on neutral particles (neutrons, photons and neutrinos) which complement the measurements on charged primary cosmic rays at ultra-high energy. The complementarity between these messengers and between their detections are outlined. The current status of their search is reviewed and a cross-correlation analysis between the available results is performed. The expectations for photon and neutrino detections in the near future are also presented.

  18. Radial Evolution of a Magnetic Cloud: MESSENGER, STEREO, and Venus Express Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. W.; Forsyth, R. J.; Raines, J. M.; Gershman, D. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-07-01

    The Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions will provide observations of magnetic clouds closer to the Sun than ever before, and it will be good preparation for these missions to make full use of the most recent in situ data sets from the inner heliosphere—namely, those provided by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and Venus Express—for magnetic cloud studies. We present observations of the same magnetic cloud made by MESSENGER at Mercury and later by Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory-B (STEREO-B), while the spacecraft were radially aligned in 2011 November. Few such radial observations of magnetic clouds have been previously reported. Estimates of the solar wind speed at MESSENGER are also presented, calculated through the application of a previously established technique. The cloud's flux rope has been analyzed using force-free fitting; the rope diameter increased from 0.18 to 0.41 AU (corresponding to an {r}{{H}}0.94 dependence on heliocentric distance, rH), and the axial magnetic field strength dropped from 46.0 to 8.7 nT (an {r}{{H}}-1.84 dependence) between the spacecraft, clear indications of an expanding structure. The axial magnetic flux was ˜0.50 nT AU2 at both spacecraft, suggesting that the rope underwent no significant erosion through magnetic reconnection between MESSENGER and STEREO-B. Further, we estimate the change in the cloud's angular width by assuming helicity conservation. It has also been found that the rope axis rotated by 30° between the spacecraft to lie close to the solar equatorial plane at STEREO-B. Such a rotation, if it is a common feature of coronal mass ejection propagation, would have important implications for space weather forecasting.

  19. The Mercury Surface Interactive: Exploring MESSENGER data and images from orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K. G.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Goldstein, J. J.; Hirshon, B.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H. A.; Weir, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    In anticipation of NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entering orbit around Mercury, the mission's Education and Public Outreach team wanted to create materials in a format that would be engaging and easy to update as new data and images were obtained in the course of orbital operations. To achieve these goals, the team produced print materials, an online interactive Surface Explorer, and a blog-like feature, all of which are available from a central website (http://www.messenger-education.org/mosaic/). The print materials are large-format "Mosaic Postcards from Mercury" that highlight small sections of Mercury using flyby data. The postcards can be assembled into a partial mosaic image of Mercury, which will be gradually expanded with orbital data. The Mercury Surface Interactive employs Flash animation and interactivity to explore features on Mercury's surface; the interactive is visually compelling, but this format is difficult to update regularly. Since MESSENGER entered orbit around Mercury on March 18, 2011, the team has used a blog feature to quickly add links to new findings and to leverage other outreach resources created by the mission's science and engineering teams. Together, these three formats of outreach materials have helped engage students, teachers, and communities in anticipation of orbit and during the rapidly advancing unveiling of Mercury from orbit.

  20. Monte Carlo Modeling of Sodium in Mercury's Exosphere During the First Two MESSENGER Flybys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; McClintock, William E.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Benna, Mehdi; Mouawad, Nelly

    2010-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model of the distribution of neutral sodium in Mercury's exosphere and tail using data from the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft during the first two flybys of the planet in January and September 2008. We show that the dominant source mechanism for ejecting sodium from the surface is photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and that the desorption rate is limited by the diffusion rate of sodium from the interior of grains in the regolith to the topmost few monolayers where PSD is effective. In the absence of ion precipitation, we find that the sodium source rate is limited to approximately 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) per square centimeter per second, depending on the sticking efficiency of exospheric sodium that returns to the surface. The diffusion rate must be at least a factor of 5 higher in regions of ion precipitation to explain the MASCS observations during the second MESSENGER f1yby. We estimate that impact vaporization of micrometeoroids may provide up to 15% of the total sodium source rate in the regions observed. Although sputtering by precipitating ions was found not to be a significant source of sodium during the MESSENGER flybys, ion precipitation is responsible for increasing the source rate at high latitudes through ion-enhanced diffusion.