Science.gov

Sample records for a-form nucleic acid

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  3. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  4. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  6. Nucleic Acid Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G

    2017-01-01

    Organisms throughout biology need to maintain the integrity of their genome. From bacteria to vertebrates, life has established sophisticated mechanisms to detect and eliminate foreign genetic material or to restrict its function and replication. Tremendous progress has been made in the understanding of these mechanisms which keep foreign or unwanted nucleic acids from viruses or phages in check. Mechanisms reach from restriction-modification systems and CRISPR/Cas in bacteria and archaea to RNA interference and immune sensing of nucleic acids, altogether integral parts of a system which is now appreciated as nucleic acid immunity. With inherited receptors and acquired sequence information, nucleic acid immunity comprises innate and adaptive components. Effector functions include diverse nuclease systems, intrinsic activities to directly restrict the function of foreign nucleic acids (e.g., PKR, ADAR1, IFIT1), and extrinsic pathways to alert the immune system and to elicit cytotoxic immune responses. These effects act in concert to restrict viral replication and to eliminate virus-infected cells. The principles of nucleic acid immunity are highly relevant for human disease. Besides its essential contribution to antiviral defense and restriction of endogenous retroelements, dysregulation of nucleic acid immunity can also lead to erroneous detection and response to self nucleic acids then causing sterile inflammation and autoimmunity. Even mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which are not established in vertebrates are relevant for human disease when they are present in pathogens such as bacteria, parasites, or helminths or in pathogen-transmitting organisms such as insects. This review aims to provide an overview of the diverse mechanisms of nucleic acid immunity which mostly have been looked at separately in the past and to integrate them under the framework nucleic acid immunity as a basic principle of life, the understanding of which has great potential to

  7. Portable nucleic acid thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Almassian, David R; Cockrell, Lisa M; Nelson, William M

    2013-11-21

    A nucleic acid thermal cycler is considered to be portable if it is under ten pounds, easily carried by one individual, and battery powered. Nucleic acid amplification includes both polymerase chain reaction (e.g. PCR, RT-PCR) and isothermal amplification (e.g. RPA, HDA, LAMP, NASBA, RCA, ICAN, SMART, SDA). There are valuable applications for portable nucleic acid thermocyclers in fields that include clinical diagnostics, biothreat detection, and veterinary testing. A system that is portable allows for the distributed detection of targets at the point of care and a reduction of the time from sample to answer. The designer of a portable nucleic acid thermocycler must carefully consider both thermal control and the detection of amplification. In addition to thermal control and detection, the designer may consider the integration of a sample preparation subsystem with the nucleic acid thermocycler. There are a variety of technologies that can achieve accurate thermal control and the detection of nucleic acid amplification. Important evaluation criteria for each technology include maturity, power requirements, cost, sensitivity, speed, and manufacturability. Ultimately the needs of a particular market will lead to user requirements that drive the decision between available technologies.

  8. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  9. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids formore » a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.« less

  10. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  11. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  12. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Shaping up nucleic acid computation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Ellington, Andrew D

    2010-08-01

    Nucleic acid-based nanotechnology has always been perceived as novel, but has begun to move from theoretical demonstrations to practical applications. In particular, the large address spaces available to nucleic acids can be exploited to encode algorithms and/or act as circuits and thereby process molecular information. In this review we not only revisit several milestones in the field of nucleic acid-based computation, but also highlight how the prospects for nucleic acid computation go beyond just a large address space. Functional nucleic acid elements (aptamers, ribozymes, and deoxyribozymes) can serve as inputs and outputs to the environment, and can act as logical elements. Into the future, the chemical dynamics of nucleic acids may prove as useful as hybridization for computation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reactivity of Nucleic Acid Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid oxidation plays a vital role in the etiology and treatment of diseases, as well as aging. Reagents that oxidize nucleic acids are also useful probes of the biopolymers’ structure and folding. Radiation scientists have contributed greatly to our understanding of nucleic acid oxidation using a variety of techniques. During the past two decades organic chemists have applied the tools of synthetic and mechanistic chemistry to independently generate and study the reactive intermediates produced by ionizing radiation and other nucleic acid damaging agents. This approach has facilitated resolving mechanistic controversies and lead to the discovery of new reactive processes. PMID:28529390

  15. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Cassandra L.; Yaar, Ron; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Cantor, Charles R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  16. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  17. A Simpler Nucleic Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    It has been supposed that for a nucleic acid analog to pair with RNA it must, like RNA, have a backbone with at least a sixatom repeat; a shorter backbone presumably would not stretch far enough to bind RNA properly. The Eschenmoser group has shown, however, that this first impression is incorrect.As they report in their new paper, Eschenmoser and co-workers ( I ) have now synthesized a substantial number of these polymers, which are called (L)-a-threofuranosyl oligonucleotides or TNAs. They are composed of bases linked to a threose sugar-phosphate backbone, with phosphodiester bonds connecting the nucleotides. The investigators discovered that pairs of complementary TNAs do indeed form stable Watson-Crick double helices and, perhaps more importantly, that TNAs form stable double helices with complementary RNAs and DNAs.

  18. Nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Sano, Takeshi; Misasi, John; Hatch, Anson; Cantor, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to high density nucleic acid arrays and methods of synthesizing nucleic acid sequences on a solid surface. Specifically, the present invention contemplates the use of stabilized nucleic acid primer sequences immobilized on solid surfaces, and circular nucleic acid sequence templates combined with the use of isothermal rolling circle amplification to thereby increase nucleic acid sequence concentrations in a sample or on an array of nucleic acid sequences.

  19. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanoconstructs

    Cancer.gov

    Focuses on the design, synthesis, characterization, and development of spherical nucleic acid constructs as effective nanotherapeutic, single-entity agents for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and prostate cancers.

  20. Identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2005-02-08

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  1. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  2. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing a plurality of a nucleic acid array, comprising, in order, the steps of amplifying in situ nucleic acid molecules of a first randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array comprising a heterogeneous pool of nucleic acid molecules affixed to a support, transferring at least a subset of the nucleic acid molecules produced by such amplifying to a second support, and affixing the subset so transferred to the second support to form a second randomly-patterned, immobilized nucleic acid array, wherein the nucleic acid molecules of the second array occupy positions that correspond to those of the nucleic acid molecules from which they were amplified on the first array, so that the first array serves as a template to produce a plurality, is disclosed.

  3. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. Method for sequencing nucleic acid molecules

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2006-05-30

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  5. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  6. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1999-10-12

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  7. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, Charles R.; Niemeyer, Christof M.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    1996-01-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products.

  8. Self-assembling multimeric nucleic acid constructs

    DOEpatents

    Cantor, C.R.; Niemeyer, C.M.; Smith, C.L.; Sano, Takeshi; Hnatowich, D.J.; Rusckowski, M.

    1996-10-01

    The invention is directed to constructs and compositions containing multimeric forms of nucleic acid. Multimeric nucleic acids comprise single-stranded nucleic acids attached via biotin to streptavidin and bound with a functional group. These constructs can be utilized in vivo to treat or identify diseased tissue or cells. Repeated administrations of multimeric nucleic acid compositions produce a rapid and specific amplification of nucleic acid constructs and their attached functional groups. For treatment purposes, functional groups may be toxins, radioisotopes, genes or enzymes. Diagnostically, labeled multimeric constructs may be used to identify specific targets in vivo or in vitro. Multimeric nucleic acids may also be used in nanotechnology and to create self-assembling polymeric aggregates such as membranes of defined porosity, microcircuits and many other products. 5 figs.

  9. Multiplexed microfluidic approach for nucleic acid enrichment

    DOEpatents

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Langevin, Stanley Alan; Bent, Zachary; Renzi, Ronald F.; Ferko, Scott M.; Van De Vreugde, James L.; Lane, Todd; Patel, Kamlesh; Branda, Steven

    2016-04-26

    A system for enhancing a nucleic acid sample may include a one pump, a denaturing chamber; a microfluidic hydroxyapatite chromatography device configured for performing hydroxyapatite chromatography on the nucleic acid sample, a sample collector, and tubing connecting the pump with the denaturing chamber, the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and the sample collector such that the pump may be used to move the nucleic acid sample from the denaturing chamber to the hydroxyapatite chromatography device and then to the sample collector.

  10. Circulating nucleic acids and evolution.

    PubMed

    Anker, Philippe; Stroun, Maurice

    2012-06-01

    J.B. Lamarck in 1809 was the first to present a theory of evolution. He proposed it was due to the adaptation of species to environmental changes, this adaptation being acquired by the offspring. In 1868, Darwin suggested that cells excrete gemmules, which circulate through the body and reach the gonads where they are transmitted to the next generation. His main argument came from graft hybrids. In the fifties and sixties, Russian geneticists, rejecting neo-Darwinism, said that acquired characteristics were the basis of evolution. The main experiments on which they based their theory were the transmission of hereditary characteristics by a special technique of grafting between two varieties of plants. We repeated this kind of experiment and also succeeded in obtaining hereditary modifications of the pupil plants that acquired some characteristics of the mentor variety. Rather than adopting the views of the Russian scientists, we suggested that DNA was circulating between the mentor and pupil plants. Hirata's group have shown recently, by using molecular techniques such as cloning, RFLP PCR and sequencing some genes of their graft hybrids of pepper plants, that transfer of informative molecules from the mentor to the pupil plant does exist. Nucleic acids are actively released by cells; they circulate in the body. They can transform oncogenically or trigger antibody response but the only genetic transformation showing that DNA can go from the soma to the germen comes from graft hybrids. This suggests that circulating nucleic acids, in this case DNA, like Darwin's gemmules, play a role in the mechanism of evolution.

  11. Methods for Identifying Ligands that Target Nucleic Acid Molecules and Nucleic Acid Structural Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L. (Inventor); Disney, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for identifying a nucleic acid (e.g., RNA, DNA, etc.) motif which interacts with a ligand. The method includes providing a plurality of ligands immobilized on a support, wherein each particular ligand is immobilized at a discrete location on the support; contacting the plurality of immobilized ligands with a nucleic acid motif library under conditions effective for one or more members of the nucleic acid motif library to bind with the immobilized ligands; and identifying members of the nucleic acid motif library that are bound to a particular immobilized ligand. Also disclosed are methods for selecting, from a plurality of candidate ligands, one or more ligands that have increased likelihood of binding to a nucleic acid molecule comprising a particular nucleic acid motif, as well as methods for identifying a nucleic acid which interacts with a ligand.

  12. Chip-based sequencing nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2014-08-26

    A system for fast DNA sequencing by amplification of genetic material within microreactors, denaturing, demulsifying, and then sequencing the material, while retaining it in a PCR/sequencing zone by a magnetic field. One embodiment includes sequencing nucleic acids on a microchip that includes a microchannel flow channel in the microchip. The nucleic acids are isolated and hybridized to magnetic nanoparticles or to magnetic polystyrene-coated beads. Microreactor droplets are formed in the microchannel flow channel. The microreactor droplets containing the nucleic acids and the magnetic nanoparticles are retained in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel and sequenced.

  13. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  14. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  15. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M [Brookline, MA; Zhang, Kun [Brighton, MA

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  16. Hybridization and sequencing of nucleic acids using base pair mismatches

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  17. Method of Identifying a Base in a Nucleic Acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    1999-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  18. Probe kit for identifying a base in a nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2001-01-01

    Devices and techniques for hybridization of nucleic acids and for determining the sequence of nucleic acids. Arrays of nucleic acids are formed by techniques, preferably high resolution, light-directed techniques. Positions of hybridization of a target nucleic acid are determined by, e.g., epifluorescence microscopy. Devices and techniques are proposed to determine the sequence of a target nucleic acid more efficiently and more quickly through such synthesis and detection techniques.

  19. Framework Nucleic Acids-Enabled Biosensor Development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Fan, Chunhai

    2018-05-03

    Nucleic acids have been actively exploited to develop various exquisite nanostructures due to their unparalleled programmability. Especially, framework nucleic acids (FNAs) with tailorable functionality and precise addressability hold great promise for biomedical applications. In this review, we summarize recent progress of FNA-enabled biosensing in homogeneous solutions, on heterogeneous surfaces and inside cells. We describe the strategies to translate the structural order and rigidity of FNAs to interfacial engineering with high controllability, and approaches to realize multiplexing for highly parallel in-vitro detection. We also envision the marriage of the currently available FNA toolsets with other emerging technologies to develop a new generation of biosensors for precision diagnosis and bioimaging.

  20. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  1. Nucleic acid-coupled colorimetric analyte detectors

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Jonas, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes and membrane conformational changes through the detection of color changes in biopolymeric materials. In particular, the present invention provide for the direct colorimetric detection of analytes using nucleic acid ligands at surfaces of polydiacetylene liposomes and related molecular layer systems.

  2. Nucleic acid-based electrochemical nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Abi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Zahra; Zuo, Xiaolei; Safavi, Afsaneh

    2018-04-15

    The detection of biomarkers using sensitive and selective analytical devices is critically important for the early stage diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The synergy between the high specificity of nucleic acid recognition units and the great sensitivity of electrochemical signal transductions has already shown promise for the development of efficient biosensing platforms. Yet nucleic-acid based electrochemical biosensors often rely on target amplification strategies (e.g., polymerase chain reactions) to detect analytes at clinically relevant concentration ranges. The complexity and time-consuming nature of these amplification methods impede moving nucleic acid-based electrochemical biosensors from laboratory-based to point-of-care test settings. Fortunately, advancements in nanotechnology have provided growing evidence that the recruitment of nanoscaled materials and structures can enhance the biosensing performance (particularly in terms of sensitivity and response time) to the level suitable for use in point-of-care diagnostic tools. This Review highlights the significant progress in the field of nucleic acid-based electrochemical nanobiosensing with the focus on the works published during the last five years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Modification of quantum dots with nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherginskaya, P. B.; Romanova, A. V.; Prokhorenko, I. A.; Itkis, Daniil M.; Korshun, V. A.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2011-12-01

    The key principles and modern approaches to targeted modification of semiconductor colloidal nanoparticles, quantum dots, which exhibit unique photophysical properties and are a promising class of luminescent markers, are discussed. Attention is given to the preparation of their bioconjugates with nucleic acids, promising tools for biological microchips and resonance energy transfer sensors. The bibliography includes 80 references.

  4. Miniaturized isothermal nucleic acid amplification, a review.

    PubMed

    Asiello, Peter J; Baeumner, Antje J

    2011-04-21

    Micro-Total Analysis Systems (µTAS) for use in on-site rapid detection of DNA or RNA are increasingly being developed. Here, amplification of the target sequence is key to increasing sensitivity, enabling single-cell and few-copy nucleic acid detection. The several advantages to miniaturizing amplification reactions and coupling them with sample preparation and detection on the same chip are well known and include fewer manual steps, preventing contamination, and significantly reducing the volume of expensive reagents. To-date, the majority of miniaturized systems for nucleic acid analysis have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for amplification and those systems are covered in previous reviews. This review provides a thorough overview of miniaturized analysis systems using alternatives to PCR, specifically isothermal amplification reactions. With no need for thermal cycling, isothermal microsystems can be designed to be simple and low-energy consuming and therefore may outperform PCR in portable, battery-operated detection systems in the future. The main isothermal methods as miniaturized systems reviewed here include nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), helicase-dependent amplification (HDA), rolling circle amplification (RCA), and strand displacement amplification (SDA). Also, important design criteria for the miniaturized devices are discussed. Finally, the potential of miniaturization of some new isothermal methods such as the exponential amplification reaction (EXPAR), isothermal and chimeric primer-initiated amplification of nucleic acids (ICANs), signal-mediated amplification of RNA technology (SMART) and others is presented.

  5. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe.

  6. Method for identifying and quantifying nucleic acid sequence aberrations

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method is disclosed for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first and a second nucleic acid sequence type, the presence of the first and second sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. The method uses a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is complementary to a first sequence type and a first complexing agent capable of attaching to a second complexing agent and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that selectively hybridizes to the second nucleic acid sequence type over the first sequence type and includes a detectable marker for detecting the second hybridization probe. 11 figs.

  7. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, David E.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification.

  8. Method for nucleic acid isolation using supercritical fluids

    DOEpatents

    Nivens, D.E.; Applegate, B.M.

    1999-07-13

    A method is disclosed for detecting the presence of a microorganism in an environmental sample involves contacting the sample with a supercritical fluid to isolate nucleic acid from the microorganism, then detecting the presence of a particular sequence within the isolated nucleic acid. The nucleic acid may optionally be subjected to further purification. 4 figs.

  9. Nucleic acid analysis using terminal-phosphate-labeled nucleotides

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas [Ithaca, NY; Webb, Watt W [Ithaca, NY; Levene, Michael [Ithaca, NY; Turner, Stephen [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY; Foquet, Mathieu [Ithaca, NY

    2008-04-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  10. Rapid hybridization of nucleic acids using isotachophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bercovici, Moran; Han, Crystal M.; Liao, Joseph C.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2012-01-01

    We use isotachophoresis (ITP) to control and increase the rate of nucleic acid hybridization reactions in free solution. We present a new physical model, validation experiments, and demonstrations of this assay. We studied the coupled physicochemical processes of preconcentration, mixing, and chemical reaction kinetics under ITP. Our experimentally validated model enables a closed form solution for ITP-aided reaction kinetics, and reveals a new characteristic time scale which correctly predicts order 10,000-fold speed-up of chemical reaction rate for order 100 pM reactants, and greater enhancement at lower concentrations. At 500 pM concentration, we measured a reaction time which is 14,000-fold lower than that predicted for standard second-order hybridization. The model and method are generally applicable to acceleration of reactions involving nucleic acids, and may be applicable to a wide range of reactions involving ionic reactants. PMID:22733732

  11. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. Nucleic acids, compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia [Gainesville, FL; Nong, Guang [Gainesville, FL; Rice, John D [Gainesville, FL; John, Franz J [Baltimore, MD

    2012-02-21

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  13. Nucleic Acid Templated Reactions for Chemical Biology.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Seitz, Oliver

    2017-06-21

    Nucleic acid directed bioorthogonal reactions offer the fascinating opportunity to unveil and redirect a plethora of intracellular mechanisms. Nano- to picomolar amounts of specific RNA molecules serve as templates and catalyze the selective formation of molecules that 1) exert biological effects, or 2) provide measurable signals for RNA detection. Turnover of reactants on the template is a valuable asset when concentrations of RNA templates are low. The idea is to use RNA-templated reactions to fully control the biodistribution of drugs and to push the detection limits of DNA or RNA analytes to extraordinary sensitivities. Herein we review recent and instructive examples of conditional synthesis or release of compounds for in cellulo protein interference and intracellular nucleic acid imaging. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Counting the ions surrounding nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Nucleic acids are strongly negatively charged, and thus electrostatic interactions—screened by ions in solution—play an important role in governing their ability to fold and participate in biomolecular interactions. The negative charge creates a region, known as the ion atmosphere, in which cation and anion concentrations are perturbed from their bulk values. Ion counting experiments quantify the ion atmosphere by measuring the preferential ion interaction coefficient: the net total number of excess ions above, or below, the number expected due to the bulk concentration. The results of such studies provide important constraints on theories, which typically predict the full three-dimensional distribution of the screening cloud. This article reviews the state of nucleic acid ion counting measurements and critically analyzes their ability to test both analytical and simulation-based models. PMID:28034959

  15. Digital Microfluidics for Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Veigas, Bruno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Águas, Hugo; Igreja, Rui; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2017-01-01

    Digital Microfluidics (DMF) has emerged as a disruptive methodology for the control and manipulation of low volume droplets. In DMF, each droplet acts as a single reactor, which allows for extensive multiparallelization of biological and chemical reactions at a much smaller scale. DMF devices open entirely new and promising pathways for multiplex analysis and reaction occurring in a miniaturized format, thus allowing for healthcare decentralization from major laboratories to point-of-care with accurate, robust and inexpensive molecular diagnostics. Here, we shall focus on DMF platforms specifically designed for nucleic acid amplification, which is key for molecular diagnostics of several diseases and conditions, from pathogen identification to cancer mutations detection. Particular attention will be given to the device architecture, materials and nucleic acid amplification applications in validated settings. PMID:28672827

  16. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  17. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  18. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  19. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  20. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2012-01-22

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed 'toehold exchange' probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg(2+) to 47 mM Mg(2+), and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 µM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination.

  1. Optimizing the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, David Yu; Chen, Sherry Xi; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The specific hybridization of complementary sequences is an essential property of nucleic acids, enabling diverse biological and biotechnological reactions and functions. However, the specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is compromised for long strands, except near the melting temperature. Here, we analytically derived the thermodynamic properties of a hybridization probe that would enable near-optimal single-base discrimination and perform robustly across diverse temperature, salt and concentration conditions. We rationally designed ‘toehold exchange’ probes that approximate these properties, and comprehensively tested them against five different DNA targets and 55 spurious analogues with energetically representative single-base changes (replacements, deletions and insertions). These probes produced discrimination factors between 3 and 100+ (median, 26). Without retuning, our probes function robustly from 10 °C to 37 °C, from 1 mM Mg2+ to 47 mM Mg2+, and with nucleic acid concentrations from 1 nM to 5 μM. Experiments with RNA also showed effective single-base change discrimination. PMID:22354435

  2. Virus inactivation by nucleic acid extraction reagents.

    PubMed

    Blow, Jamie A; Dohm, David J; Negley, Diane L; Mores, Christopher N

    2004-08-01

    Many assume that common methods to extract viral nucleic acids are able to render a sample non-infectious. It may be that inactivation of infectious virus is incomplete during viral nucleic acid extraction methods. Accordingly, two common viral nucleic acid extraction techniques were evaluated for the ability to inactivate high viral titer specimens. In particular, the potential for TRIzol LS Reagent (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA) and AVL Buffer (Qiagen, Valencia, CA) were examined to render suspensions of alphaviruses, flaviviruses, filoviruses and a bunyavirus non-infectious to tissue culture assay. The dilution series for both extraction reagents consistently caused cell death through a 100-fold dilution. Except for the DEN subtype 4 positive control, all viruses had titers of at least 10(6)pfu/ml. No plaques were detected in any extraction reagent plus virus combination in this study, therefore, the extraction reagents appeared to inactivate completely each of the high-titer viruses used in this study. These results support the reliance upon either TRIzol LS Reagent or AVL Buffer to render clinical or environmental samples non-infectious, which has implications for the handling and processing of samples under austere field conditions and low level containment.

  3. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2003-12-09

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  4. Method for analyzing nucleic acids by means of a substrate having a microchannel structure containing immobilized nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing nucleic acids includes immobilizing nucleic probes at specific sites within a microchannel structure and moving target nucleic acids into proximity to the probes in order to allow hybridization and fluorescence detection of specific target sequences.

  5. Mesoscopic modeling for nucleic acid chain dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sales-Pardo, M.; Guimerà, R.; Moreira, A. A.; Widom, J.; Amaral, L. A. N.

    2007-01-01

    To gain a deeper insight into cellular processes such as transcription and translation, one needs to uncover the mechanisms controlling the configurational changes of nucleic acids. As a step toward this aim, we present here a mesoscopic-level computational model that provides a new window into nucleic acid dynamics. We model a single-stranded nucleic as a polymer chain whose monomers are the nucleosides. Each monomer comprises a bead representing the sugar molecule and a pin representing the base. The bead-pin complex can rotate about the backbone of the chain. We consider pairwise stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We use a modified Monte Carlo dynamics that splits the dynamics into translational bead motion and rotational pin motion. By performing a number of tests, we first show that our model is physically sound. We then focus on a study of the kinetics of a DNA hairpin—a single-stranded molecule comprising two complementary segments joined by a noncomplementary loop—studied experimentally. We find that results from our simulations agree with experimental observations, demonstrating that our model is a suitable tool for the investigation of the hybridization of single strands. PMID:16089566

  6. Nucleic Acid-Induced Resistance to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Kouichi; Warren, Joel; Jensen, Keith E.; Neal, Alan L.

    1965-01-01

    Takano, Kouichi (Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Terre Haute, Ind.), Joel Warren, Keith E. Jensen, and Alan L. Neal. Nucleic acid resistance to viral infection. J. Bacteriol. 90:1542–1547. 1965.—Administration of nonviral nucleic acids to mice increased their resistance to a subsequent infection with influenza or encephalomyocarditis viruses. Injection of ribonucleic acid or deoxyribonucleic acid by peripheral routes did not modify susceptibility to intranasal infection. Lung tissue extracts from animals previously treated with yeast nucleic acid inhibited the growth of vaccinia and influenza viruses. The protective effect of exogenous nucleic acids persisted in mice for several days, but gradually diminished to undetectable levels. PMID:4285332

  7. Helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yun; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Li, Ying; Kong, Huimin; Lemieux, Bertrand

    2013-10-11

    Helicase-dependent amplification (HDA) is a novel method for the isothermal in vitro amplification of nucleic acids. The HDA reaction selectively amplifies a target sequence by extension of two oligonucleotide primers. Unlike the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), HDA uses a helicase enzyme to separate the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strands, rather than heat denaturation. This allows DNA amplification without the need for thermal cycling. The helicase used in HDA is a helicase super family II protein obtained from a thermophilic organism, Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TteUvrD). This thermostable helicase is capable of unwinding blunt-end nucleic acid substrates at elevated temperatures (60° to 65°C). The HDA reaction can also be coupled with reverse transcription for ribonucleic acid (RNA) amplification. The products of this reaction can be detected during the reaction using fluorescent probes when incubations are conducted in a fluorimeter. Alternatively, products can be detected after amplification using a disposable amplicon containment device that contains an embedded lateral flow strip. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Therapeutic nucleic acids: current clinical status

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are simple linear polymers that have been the subject of considerable research in the last two decades and have now moved into the realm of being stand‐alone therapeutic agents. Much of this has stemmed from the appreciation that they carry out myriad functions that go beyond mere storage of genetic information and protein synthesis. Therapy with nucleic acids either uses unmodified DNA or RNA or closely related compounds. From both a development and regulatory perspective, they fall somewhere between small molecules and biologics. Several of these compounds are in clinical development and many have received regulatory approval for human use. This review addresses therapeutic uses of DNA based on antisense oligonucleotides, DNA aptamers and gene therapy; and therapeutic uses of RNA including micro RNAs, short interfering RNAs, ribozymes, RNA decoys and circular RNAs. With their specificity, functional diversity and limited toxicity, therapeutic nucleic acids hold enormous promise. However, challenges that need to be addressed include targeted delivery, mass production at low cost, sustaining efficacy and minimizing off‐target toxicity. Technological developments will hold the key to this and help accelerate drug approvals in the years to come. PMID:27111518

  9. Interfacing Neural Network Components and Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Translating neural activity into nucleic acid modifications in a controlled manner harbors unique advantages for basic neurobiology and bioengineering. It would allow for a new generation of biological computers that store output in ultra-compact and long-lived DNA and enable the investigation of animal nervous systems at unprecedented scales. Furthermore, by exploiting the ability of DNA to precisely influence neuronal activity and structure, it could be possible to more effectively create cellular therapy approaches for psychiatric diseases that are currently difficult to treat. PMID:29255707

  10. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  11. Nucleic acid amplification using modular branched primers

    DOEpatents

    Ulanovsky, Levy; Raja, Mugasimangalam C.

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions expand the options for making primers for use in amplifying nucleic acid segments. The invention eliminates the step of custom synthesis of primers for Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). Instead of being custom-synthesized, a primer is replaced by a combination of several oligonucleotide modules selected from a pre-synthesized library. A modular combination of just a few oligonucleotides essentially mimics the performance of a conventional, custom-made primer by matching the sequence of the priming site in the template. Each oligonucleotide module has a segment that matches one of the stretches within the priming site.

  12. Lipid and polymeric carrier-mediated nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Mahato, Ram I

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and RNA interference (RNAi) molecules, have a great potential to be used as therapeutics for the treatment of various genetic and acquired diseases. To design a successful nucleic acid delivery system, the pharmacological effect of nucleic acids, the physiological condition of the subjects or sites, and the physicochemical properties of nucleic acid and carriers have to be thoroughly examined. Areas covered in this review The commonly used lipids, polymers and corresponding delivery systems are reviewed in terms of their characteristics, applications, advantages and limitations. What the reader will gain This article aims to provide an overview of biological barriers and strategies to overcome these barriers by properly designing effective synthetic carriers for nucleic acid delivery. Take home message A thorough understanding of biological barriers and the structure–activity relationship of lipid and polymeric carriers is the key for effective nucleic acid therapy. PMID:20836625

  13. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. NALDB: nucleic acid ligand database for small molecules targeting nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Mishra, Subodh; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid ligand database (NALDB) is a unique database that provides detailed information about the experimental data of small molecules that were reported to target several types of nucleic acid structures. NALDB is the first ligand database that contains ligand information for all type of nucleic acid. NALDB contains more than 3500 ligand entries with detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information such as target name, target sequence, ligand 2D/3D structure, SMILES, molecular formula, molecular weight, net-formal charge, AlogP, number of rings, number of hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, potential energy along with their Ki, Kd, IC50 values. All these details at single platform would be helpful for the development and betterment of novel ligands targeting nucleic acids that could serve as a potential target in different diseases including cancers and neurological disorders. With maximum 255 conformers for each ligand entry, our database is a multi-conformer database and can facilitate the virtual screening process. NALDB provides powerful web-based search tools that make database searching efficient and simplified using option for text as well as for structure query. NALDB also provides multi-dimensional advanced search tool which can screen the database molecules on the basis of molecular properties of ligand provided by database users. A 3D structure visualization tool has also been included for 3D structure representation of ligands. NALDB offers an inclusive pharmacological information and the structurally flexible set of small molecules with their three-dimensional conformers that can accelerate the virtual screening and other modeling processes and eventually complement the nucleic acid-based drug discovery research. NALDB can be routinely updated and freely available on bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php. Database URL: http://bsbe.iiti.ac.in/bsbe/naldb/HOME.php PMID:26896846

  15. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2014-02-25

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  18. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-12

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  19. EGVIII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-23

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl8, and the corresponding EGVIII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVIII, recombinant EGVIII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2010-10-05

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. EGVI endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-06-06

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6, and the corresponding EGVI amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2009-05-05

    The present invention provides an endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2013-07-16

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2012-02-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. EGVII endoglucanase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl7, and the corresponding EGVII amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVII, recombinant EGVII proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. Cytosolic nucleic acid sensors and innate immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Ori, Daisuke; Murase, Motoya; Kawai, Taro

    2017-03-04

    During viral and bacterial infections, pathogen-derived cytosolic nucleic acids are recognized by the intracellular RNA sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma-differentiated gene 5 and intracellular DNA sensors, including cyclic-di-GMP-AMP synthase, absent in melanoma 2, interferon (IFN)-gamma inducible protein 16, polymerase III, and so on. Binding of intracellular nucleic acids to these sensors activates downstream signaling cascades, resulting in the production of type I IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines to induce appropriate systematic immune responses. While these sensors also recognize endogenous nucleic acids and activate immune responses, they can discriminate between self- and non-self-nucleic acids. However, dysfunction of these sensors or failure of regulatory mechanisms causes aberrant activation of immune response and autoimmune disorders. In this review, we focus on how intracellular immune sensors recognize exogenous nucleic acids and activate the innate immune system, and furthermore, how autoimmune diseases result from dysfunction of these sensors.

  7. Nucleic acid based fluorescent sensor for mercury detection

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2013-02-05

    A nucleic acid enzyme comprises an oligonucleotide containing thymine bases. The nucleic acid enzyme is dependent on both Hg.sup.2+and a second ion as cofactors, to produce a product from a substrate. The substrate comprises a ribonucleotide, a deoxyribonucleotide, or both.

  8. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. PMID:27020066

  9. Development of Sorbents for Extraction and Stabilization of Nucleic Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-13

    ensure safe food and water supplies and to maintain the health and readiness of deployed troops. Identification of molecular signatures (genomic...biological, environmental, forensics, and food safety, drive the need for preservation of nucleic acid integrity during sample collection, transportation... antimicrobial activity as well as the potential for multiple and complex cationic interactions with nucleic acids (Fig. 10). Two different approaches were used

  10. Nucleic acids encoding metal uptake transporters and their uses

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Julian I.; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.; Schachtman, Daniel P.; Clemens, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides LCT1 nucleic acids which encode metal ion uptake transporters. The invention also provides methods of modulating heavy metal and alkali metal uptake in plants. The methods involve producing transgenic plants comprising a recombinant expression cassette containing an LCT1 nucleic acid linked to a plant promoter.

  11. Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing in Suspected Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esernio-Jenssen, Debra; Barnes, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that site-specific cultures be obtained, when indicated, for sexually victimized children. Nucleic acid amplification testing is a highly sensitive and specific methodology for identifying sexually transmitted infections. Nucleic acid amplification tests are also less invasive than culture, and this…

  12. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  13. Nucleic acid sensor for insecticide detection.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Pratima R; Prabhakar, Nirmal; Pandey, M K; Malhotra, B D

    2008-01-01

    Nucleic acid sensor based on polyaniline (PANI) has been fabricated by covalently immobilizing double stranded calf thymus (dsCT) DNA onto perchlorate (ClO(-) (4))-doped PANI film deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass plate using 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. These dsCT-DNA-PANI-ClO(4)/ITO and PANI-ClO(4)/ITO electrodes have been characterized using square wave voltammetry, electrochemical impedance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform-infrared (FTIR) measurements. This disposable dsCT-DNA-PANI-ClO(4)/ITO bioelectrode, stable for about 4 months, can be used to detect cypermethrin (0.005 ppm) and trichlorfon (0.01 ppm) in 30 and 60 s, respectively. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  14. Learning nucleic acids solving by bioinformatics problems.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Rhewter; Barbosa de Almeida Júnior, Edivaldo; Pessoa Pinto de Menezes, Ivandilson; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the development of a new approach to teach molecular biology to undergraduate biology students. The 34 students who participated in this research belonged to the first period of the Biological Sciences teaching course of the Instituto Federal Goiano at Urutaí Campus, Brazil. They were registered in Cell Biology in the first semester of 2013. They received four 55 min-long expository/dialogued lectures that covered the content of "structure and functions of nucleic acids". Later the students were invited to attend four meetings (in a computer laboratory) in which some concepts of Bioinformatics were presented and some problems of the Rosalind platform were solved. The observations we report here are very useful as a broad groundwork to development new research. An interesting possibility is research into the effects of bioinformatics interventions that improve molecular biology learning. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Phosphodiester models for cleavage of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Nucleic acids that store and transfer biological information are polymeric diesters of phosphoric acid. Cleavage of the phosphodiester linkages by protein enzymes, nucleases, is one of the underlying biological processes. The remarkable catalytic efficiency of nucleases, together with the ability of ribonucleic acids to serve sometimes as nucleases, has made the cleavage of phosphodiesters a subject of intensive mechanistic studies. In addition to studies of nucleases by pH-rate dependency, X-ray crystallography, amino acid/nucleotide substitution and computational approaches, experimental and theoretical studies with small molecular model compounds still play a role. With small molecules, the importance of various elementary processes, such as proton transfer and metal ion binding, for stabilization of transition states may be elucidated and systematic variation of the basicity of the entering or departing nucleophile enables determination of the position of the transition state on the reaction coordinate. Such data is important on analyzing enzyme mechanisms based on synergistic participation of several catalytic entities. Many nucleases are metalloenzymes and small molecular models offer an excellent tool to construct models for their catalytic centers. The present review tends to be an up to date summary of what has been achieved by mechanistic studies with small molecular phosphodiesters. PMID:29719577

  16. Nucleic Acid-Based Nanodevices in Biological Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Veetil, Aneesh T; Jaffrey, Samie R; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-06-02

    The nanoscale engineering of nucleic acids has led to exciting molecular technologies for high-end biological imaging. The predictable base pairing, high programmability, and superior new chemical and biological methods used to access nucleic acids with diverse lengths and in high purity, coupled with computational tools for their design, have allowed the creation of a stunning diversity of nucleic acid-based nanodevices. Given their biological origin, such synthetic devices have a tremendous capacity to interface with the biological world, and this capacity lies at the heart of several nucleic acid-based technologies that are finding applications in biological systems. We discuss these diverse applications and emphasize the advantage, in terms of physicochemical properties, that the nucleic acid scaffold brings to these contexts. As our ability to engineer this versatile scaffold increases, its applications in structural, cellular, and organismal biology are clearly poised to massively expand.

  17. Cellular nucleic acid binding protein binds G-rich single-stranded nucleic acids and may function as a nucleic acid chaperone.

    PubMed

    Armas, Pablo; Nasif, Sofía; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2008-02-15

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) is a small single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein made of seven Zn knuckles and an Arg-Gly rich box. CNBP is strikingly conserved among vertebrates and was reported to play broad-spectrum functions in eukaryotic cells biology. Neither its biological function nor its mechanisms of action were elucidated yet. The main goal of this work was to gain further insights into the CNBP biochemical and molecular features. We studied Bufo arenarum CNBP (bCNBP) binding to single-stranded nucleic acid probes representing the main reported CNBP putative targets. We report that, although bCNBP is able to bind RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes in vitro, it binds RNA as a preformed dimer whereas both monomer and dimer are able to bind to ssDNA. A systematic analysis of variant probes shows that the preferred bCNBP targets contain unpaired guanosine-rich stretches. These data expand the knowledge about CNBP binding stoichiometry and begins to dissect the main features of CNBP nucleic acid targets. Besides, we show that bCNBP presents a highly disordered predicted structure and promotes the annealing and melting of nucleic acids in vitro. These features are typical of proteins that function as nucleic acid chaperones. Based on these data, we propose that CNBP may function as a nucleic acid chaperone through binding, remodeling, and stabilizing nucleic acids secondary structures. This novel CNBP biochemical activity broadens the field of study about its biological function and may be the basis to understand the diverse ways in which CNBP controls gene expression. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Quantitative thermodynamic predication of interactions between nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species using Microsoft excel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiaqi; Li, Na

    2013-09-01

    Proper design of nucleic acid sequences is crucial for many applications. We have previously established a thermodynamics-based quantitative model to help design aptamer-based nucleic acid probes by predicting equilibrium concentrations of all interacting species. To facilitate customization of this thermodynamic model for different applications, here we present a generic and easy-to-use platform to implement the algorithm of the model with Microsoft(®) Excel formulas and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros. Two Excel spreadsheets have been developed: one for the applications involving only nucleic acid species, the other for the applications involving both nucleic acid and non-nucleic acid species. The spreadsheets take the nucleic acid sequences and the initial concentrations of all species as input, guide the user to retrieve the necessary thermodynamic constants, and finally calculate equilibrium concentrations for all species in various bound and unbound conformations. The validity of both spreadsheets has been verified by comparing the modeling results with the experimental results on nucleic acid sequences reported in the literature. This Excel-based platform described here will allow biomedical researchers to rationalize the sequence design of nucleic acid probes using the thermodynamics-based modeling even without relevant theoretical and computational skills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; Tan, Li Huey

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insights gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed. PMID:25205057

  20. Applications of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques in studying nucleic acids and nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Peiwen; Yu, Yang; McGhee, Claire E.; ...

    2014-09-10

    In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopic techniques for nucleic acid research that takes advantage of high-flux and high-brilliance electromagnetic radiation from synchrotron sources. The first section of the review focuses on the characterization of the structure and folding processes of nucleic acids using different types of synchrotron-based spectroscopies, such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism, X-ray footprinting and small-angle X-ray scattering. In the second section, the characterization of nucleic acid-based nanostructures, nucleic acid-functionalized nanomaterials and nucleic acid-lipid interactions using these spectroscopic techniques is summarized. Insightsmore » gained from these studies are described and future directions of this field are also discussed.« less

  1. Computational Approaches to Nucleic Acid Origami.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Hosna; Aminpour, Maral; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-10-12

    Recent advances in experimental DNA origami have dramatically expanded the horizon of DNA nanotechnology. Complex 3D suprastructures have been designed and developed using DNA origami with applications in biomaterial science, nanomedicine, nanorobotics, and molecular computation. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) origami has recently been realized as a new approach. Similar to DNA, RNA molecules can be designed to form complex 3D structures through complementary base pairings. RNA origami structures are, however, more compact and more thermodynamically stable due to RNA's non-canonical base pairing and tertiary interactions. With all these advantages, the development of RNA origami lags behind DNA origami by a large gap. Furthermore, although computational methods have proven to be effective in designing DNA and RNA origami structures and in their evaluation, advances in computational nucleic acid origami is even more limited. In this paper, we review major milestones in experimental and computational DNA and RNA origami and present current challenges in these fields. We believe collaboration between experimental nanotechnologists and computer scientists are critical for advancing these new research paradigms.

  2. Nucleic acid-binding polymers as anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaewoo; Sohn, Jang Wook; Zhang, Ying; Leong, Kam W.; Pisetsky, David; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Dead and dying cells release nucleic acids. These extracellular RNAs and DNAs can be taken up by inflammatory cells and activate multiple nucleic acid-sensing toll-like receptors (TLR3, 7, 8, and 9). The inappropriate activation of these TLRs can engender a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The redundancy of the TLR family encouraged us to seek materials that can neutralize the proinflammatory effects of any nucleic acid regardless of its sequence, structure or chemistry. Herein we demonstrate that certain nucleic acid-binding polymers can inhibit activation of all nucleic acid-sensing TLRs irrespective of whether they recognize ssRNA, dsRNA or hypomethylated DNA. Furthermore, systemic administration of such polymers can prevent fatal liver injury engendered by proinflammatory nucleic acids in an acute toxic shock model in mice. Therefore these polymers represent a novel class of anti-inflammatory agent that can act as molecular scavengers to neutralize the proinflammatory effects of various nucleic acids. PMID:21844380

  3. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  4. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  5. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  6. Thermodynamics of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides insights into the influence of modified nucleotide residues on stability of nucleic acids and is crucial for designing duplexes with given properties. In this article, we introduce detailed thermodynamic analysis of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotide residues. We investigate UNA single substitutions as well as model mismatch and dangling end effects. UNA residues placed in a central position makes RNA duplex structure less favourable by 4.0–6.6 kcal/mol. Slight destabilization, by ∼0.5–1.5 kcal/mol, is observed for 5′- or 3′-terminal UNA residues. Furthermore, thermodynamic effects caused by UNA residues are extremely additive with ΔG°37 conformity up to 98%. Direct mismatches involving UNA residues decrease the thermodynamic stability less than unmodified mismatches in RNA duplexes. Additionally, the presence of UNA residues adjacent to unpaired RNA residues reduces mismatch discrimination. Thermodynamic analysis of UNA 5′- and 3′-dangling ends revealed that stacking interactions of UNA residues are always less favourable than that of RNA residues. Finally, circular dichroism spectra imply no changes in overall A-form structure of UNA–RNA/RNA duplexes relative to the unmodified RNA duplexes. PMID:20562222

  7. Selenium Derivatization of Nucleic Acids for Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang,J.; Sheng, J.; Carrasco, N.

    2007-01-01

    The high-resolution structure of the DNA (5'-GTGTACA-C-3') with the selenium derivatization at the 2'-position of T2 was determined via MAD and SAD phasing. The selenium-derivatized structure (1.28 {angstrom} resolution) with the 2'-Se modification in the minor groove is isomorphorous to the native structure (2.0 {angstrom}). To directly compare with the conventional bromine derivatization, we incorporated bromine into the 5-postion of T4, determined the bromine-derivatized DNA structure at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, and found that the local backbone torsion angles and solvent hydration patterns were altered in the structure with the Br incorporation in the major groove. Furthermore, while the native andmore » Br-derivatized DNAs needed over a week to form reasonable-size crystals, we observed that the Se-derivatized DNAs grew crystals overnight with high-diffraction quality, suggesting that the Se derivatization facilitated the crystal formation. In addition, the Se-derivatized DNA sequences crystallized under a broader range of buffer conditions, and generally had a faster crystal growth rate. Our experimental results indicate that the selenium derivatization of DNAs may facilitate the determination of nucleic acid X-ray crystal structures in phasing and high-quality crystal growth. In addition, our results suggest that the Se derivatization can be an alternative to the conventional Br derivatization.« less

  8. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  9. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  10. Continuously Tunable Nucleic Acid Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lucia R.; Wang, J. Sherry; Fang, John Z.; Reiser, Emily; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J.; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-01-01

    In silico designed nucleic acid probes and primers often fail to achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. Here, we present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity via the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, allowing independent and decoupled adjustment of hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieve near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy (0.03 kcal·mol−1 granularity). As applications, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content 0% – 100%), maximized signal difference for 11 pairs of single nucleotide variants, and performed tunable hybrid-capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples (FFPE). PMID:26480474

  11. Cationic nanoemulsions as nucleic acids delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Helder Ferreira; Bruxel, Fernanda; Fraga, Michelle; Schuh, Roselena Silvestri; Zorzi, Giovanni Konat; Matte, Ursula; Fattal, Elias

    2017-12-20

    Since the first clinical studies, knowledge in the field of gene therapy has advanced significantly, and these advances led to the development and subsequent approval of the first gene medicines. Although viral vectors-based products offer efficient gene expression, problems related to their safety and immune response have limited their clinical use. Thus, design and optimization of nonviral vectors is presented as a promising strategy in this scenario. Nonviral systems are nanotechnology-based products composed of polymers or lipids, which are usually biodegradable and biocompatible. Cationic liposomes are the most studied nonviral carriers and knowledge about these systems has greatly evolved, especially in understanding the role of phospholipids and cationic lipids. However, the search for efficient delivery systems aiming at gene therapy remains a challenge. In this context, cationic nanoemulsions have proved to be an interesting approach, as their ability to protect and efficiently deliver nucleic acids for diverse therapeutic applications has been demonstrated. This review focused on cationic nanoemulsions designed for gene therapy, providing an overview on their composition, physicochemical properties, and their efficacy on biological response in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Dioxaphosphorinane-constrained nucleic Acid dinucleotides as tools for structural tuning of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Catana, Dan-Andrei; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Maturano, Marie; Payrastre, Corinne; Tarrat, Nathalie; Escudier, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    We describe a rational approach devoted to modulate the sugar-phosphate backbone geometry of nucleic acids. Constraints were generated by connecting one oxygen of the phosphate group to a carbon of the sugar moiety. The so-called dioxaphosphorinane rings were introduced at key positions along the sugar-phosphate backbone allowing the control of the six-torsion angles α to ζ defining the polymer structure. The syntheses of all the members of the D-CNA family are described, and we emphasize the effect on secondary structure stabilization of a couple of diastereoisomers of α,β-D-CNA exhibiting wether B-type canonical values or not.

  14. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, K.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure.

  15. Nucleic acid duplexes incorporating a dissociable covalent base pair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kui; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1999-01-01

    We have used molecular modeling techniques to design a dissociable covalently bonded base pair that can replace a Watson-Crick base pair in a nucleic acid with minimal distortion of the structure of the double helix. We introduced this base pair into a potential precursor of a nucleic acid double helix by chemical synthesis and have demonstrated efficient nonenzymatic template-directed ligation of the free hydroxyl groups of the base pair with appropriate short oligonucleotides. The nonenzymatic ligation reactions, which are characteristic of base paired nucleic acid structures, are abolished when the covalent base pair is reduced and becomes noncoplanar. This suggests that the covalent base pair linking the two strands in the duplex is compatible with a minimally distorted nucleic acid double-helical structure. PMID:10611299

  16. Flexibility of nucleic acids: From DNA to RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bao; Xi, Zhang; Lei, Jin; Zhi-Jie, Tan

    2016-01-01

    The structural flexibility of nucleic acids plays a key role in many fundamental life processes, such as gene replication and expression, DNA-protein recognition, and gene regulation. To obtain a thorough understanding of nucleic acid flexibility, extensive studies have been performed using various experimental methods and theoretical models. In this review, we will introduce the progress that has been made in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids including DNAs and RNAs, and will emphasize the experimental findings and the effects of salt, temperature, and sequence. Finally, we will discuss the major unanswered questions in understanding the flexibility of nucleic acids. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB933600), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175132, 11575128, and 11374234), and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents, China (Grant No. NCET 08-0408).

  17. Nucleic acid and nucleotide-mediated synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Lorenzo; Burley, Glenn A.

    2008-02-01

    Since the advent of practical methods for achieving DNA metallization, the use of nucleic acids as templates for the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) has become an active area of study. It is now widely recognized that nucleic acids have the ability to control the growth and morphology of inorganic NPs. These biopolymers are particularly appealing as templating agents as their ease of synthesis in conjunction with the possibility of screening nucleotide composition, sequence and length, provides the means to modulate the physico-chemical properties of the resulting NPs. Several synthetic procedures leading to NPs with interesting photophysical properties as well as studies aimed at rationalizing the mechanism of nucleic acid-templated NP synthesis are now being reported. This progress article will outline the current understanding of the nucleic acid-templated process and provides an up to date reference in this nascent field.

  18. Heat Capacity Changes Associated with Nucleic Acid Folding

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas heat capacity changes (ΔCPs) associated with folding transitions are commonplace in the literature of protein folding, they have long been considered a minor energetic contributor in nucleic acid folding. Recent advances in the understanding of nucleic acid folding and improved technology for measuring the energetics of folding transitions have allowed a greater experimental window for measuring these effects. We present in this review a survey of current literature that confronts the issue of ΔCPs associated with nucleic acid folding transitions. This work helps to gather the molecular insights that can be gleaned from analysis of ΔCPs and points toward the challenges that will need to be overcome if the energetic contribution of ΔCP terms are to be put to use in improving free energy calculations for nucleic acid structure prediction. PMID:16429398

  19. Fluorogenic, catalytic, photochemical reaction for amplified detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Subrata; Fülöp, Annabelle; Mokhir, Andriy

    2013-09-18

    Photochemical, nucleic acid-induced reactions, which are controlled by nontoxic red light, are well-suited for detection of nucleic acids in live cells, since they do not require any additives and can be spatially and temporally regulated. We have recently described the first reaction of this type, in which a phenylselenyl derivative of thymidine (5'-PhSeT-ODNa) is cleaved in the presence of singlet oxygen (Fülöp, A., Peng, X., Greenberg, M. M., Mokhir, A. (2010) A nucleic acid directed, red light-induced chemical reaction. Chem. Commun. 46, 5659-5661). The latter reagent is produced upon exposure of a photosensitizer 3'-PS-ODNb (PS = Indium(III)-pyropheophorbide-a-chloride: InPPa) to >630 nm light. In 2012 we reported on a fluorogenic version of this reaction (Dutta, S., Flottmann, B., Heilemann, M., Mokhir, A. (2012) Hybridization and reaction-based, fluorogenic nucleic acid probes. Chem. Commun. 47, 9664-9666), which is potentially applicable for the detection of nucleic acids in cells. Unfortunately, its yield does not exceed 25% and no catalytic turnover could be observed in the presence of substrate excess. This problem occurs due to the efficient, competing oxidation of the substrate containing an electron rich carbon-carbon double bonds (SCH═CHS) in the presence of singlet oxygen with formation of a noncleavable product (SCH═CHSO). Herein we describe a related, but substantially improved photochemical, catalytic transformation of a fluorogenic, organic substrate, which consists of 9,10-dialkoxyanthracene linked to fluorescein, with formation of a bright fluorescent dye. In highly dilute solution this reaction occurs only in the presence of a nucleic acid template. We developed three types of such a reaction and demonstrated that they are high yielding and generate over 7.7 catalytic turnovers, are sensitive to single mismatches in nucleic acid targets, and can be applied for determination of both the amount of nucleic acids and potentially their

  20. Assembly of barcode-like nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Tian, Cheng; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde

    2014-10-15

    Barcode-like (BC) nanopatterns from programmed self-assembly of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) are reported. BC nanostructures are generated by the introduction of open spaces at selected sites to an otherwise closely packed, plain, rectangle nucleic acid nanostructure. This strategy is applied to nanostructures assembled from both origami approach and single stranded tile approach. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-viral nucleic acid containing nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Rui, Yuan; Green, Jordan J

    2016-10-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids such as DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) is promising for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer, by enabling novel biological mechanisms of action. Non-viral nanoparticles are a promising class of nucleic acid carriers that can be designed to be safer and more versatile than traditional viral vectors. In this review, recent advances in the intracellular delivery of DNA and siRNA are described with a focus on non-viral nanoparticle-based delivery methods. Material properties that have enabled successful delivery are discussed as well as applications that have directly been applied to cancer therapy. Strategies to co-deliver different nucleic acids are highlighted, as are novel targets for nucleic acid co-delivery. The treatment of complex genetically-based diseases such as cancer can be enabled by safe and effective intracellular delivery of multiple nucleic acids. Non-viral nanoparticles can be fabricated to deliver multiple nucleic acids to the same cell simultaneously to prevent tumor cells from easily compensating for the knockdown or overexpression of one genetic target. The continued innovation of new therapeutic modalities and non-viral nanotechnologies to provide target-specific and personalized forms of gene therapy hold promise for genetic medicine to treat diseases like cancer in the clinic.

  3. Single-stranded nucleic acids promote SAMHD1 complex formation.

    PubMed

    Tüngler, Victoria; Staroske, Wolfgang; Kind, Barbara; Dobrick, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; Schmidt, Franziska; Krug, Claudia; Lorenz, Mike; Chara, Osvaldo; Schwille, Petra; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2013-06-01

    SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) is a dGTP-dependent triphosphohydrolase that degrades deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) thereby limiting the intracellular dNTP pool. Mutations in SAMHD1 cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), an inflammatory encephalopathy that mimics congenital viral infection and that phenotypically overlaps with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Both disorders are characterized by activation of the antiviral cytokine interferon-α initiated by immune recognition of self nucleic acids. Here we provide first direct evidence that SAMHD1 associates with endogenous nucleic acids in situ. Using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 specifically interacts with ssRNA and ssDNA and establish that nucleic acid-binding and formation of SAMHD1 complexes are mutually dependent. Interaction with nucleic acids and complex formation do not require the SAM domain, but are dependent on the HD domain and the C-terminal region of SAMHD1. We finally demonstrate that mutations associated with AGS exhibit both impaired nucleic acid-binding and complex formation implicating that interaction with nucleic acids is an integral aspect of SAMHD1 function.

  4. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  5. Non-viral nucleic acid containing nanoparticles as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kozielski, Kristen L.; Rui, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The delivery of nucleic acids such as DNA and short interfering RNA (siRNA) is promising for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer, by enabling novel biological mechanisms of action. Non-viral nanoparticles are a promising class of nucleic acid carriers that can be designed to be safer and more versatile than traditional viral vectors. Areas covered In this review, recent advances in the intracellular delivery of DNA and siRNA are described with a focus on non-viral nanoparticle-based delivery methods. Material properties that have enabled successful delivery are discussed as well as applications that have directly been applied to cancer therapy. Strategies to co-deliver different nucleic acids are highlighted, as are novel targets for nucleic acid co-delivery. Expert opinion The treatment of complex genetically-based diseases such as cancer can be enabled by safe and effective intracellular delivery of multiple nucleic acids. Non-viral nanoparticles can be fabricated to deliver multiple nucleic acids to the same cell simultaneously to prevent tumor cells from easily compensating for the knockdown or overexpression of one genetic target. The continued innovation of new therapeutic modalities and non-viral nanotechnologies to provide target-specific and personalized forms of gene therapy hold promise for genetic medicine to treat diseases like cancer in the clinic. PMID:27248202

  6. Nucleic acid in-situ hybridization detection of infectious agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Curtis T.

    2000-04-01

    Limitations of traditional culture methods and newer polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and speciation of infectious agents demonstrate the need for more rapid and better diagnostics. Nucleic acid hybridization is a detection technology that has gained wide acceptance in cancer and prenatal cytogenetics. Using a modification of the nucleic acid hybridization technique known as fluorescence in-situ hybridization, infectious agents can be detected in a variety of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. The specimens derive from all types of human and animal sources including body fluids, tissue aspirates and biopsy material. Nucleic acid hybridization can be performed in less than one hour. The result can be interpreted either using traditional fluorescence microscopy or automated platforms such as micro arrays. This paper demonstrates proof of concept for nucleic acid hybridization detection of different infectious agents. Interpretation within a cytologic and histologic context is possible with fluorescence microscopic analysis, thereby providing confirmatory evidence of hybridization. With careful probe selection, nucleic acid hybridization promises to be a highly sensitive and specific practical diagnostic alternative to culture, traditional staining methods, immunohistochemistry and complicated nucleic acid amplification tests.

  7. Glowing locked nucleic acids: brightly fluorescent probes for detection of nucleic acids in cells.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Michael E; Cheguru, Pallavi; Papasani, Madhusudhan R; Hill, Rodney A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2010-10-13

    Fluorophore-modified oligonucleotides have found widespread use in genomics and enable detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, real-time monitoring of PCR, and imaging of mRNA in living cells. Hybridization probes modified with polarity-sensitive fluorophores and molecular beacons (MBs) are among the most popular approaches to produce hybridization-induced increases in fluorescence intensity for nucleic acid detection. In the present study, we demonstrate that the 2'-N-(pyren-1-yl)carbonyl-2'-amino locked nucleic acid (LNA) monomer X is a highly versatile building block for generation of efficient hybridization probes and quencher-free MBs. The hybridization and fluorescence properties of these Glowing LNA probes are efficiently modulated and optimized by changes in probe backbone chemistry and architecture. Correctly designed probes are shown to exhibit (a) high affinity toward RNA targets, (b) excellent mismatch discrimination, (c) high biostability, and (d) pronounced hybridization-induced increases in fluorescence intensity leading to formation of brightly fluorescent duplexes with unprecedented emission quantum yields (Φ(F) = 0.45-0.89) among pyrene-labeled oligonucleotides. Finally, specific binding between messenger RNA and multilabeled quencher-free MBs based on Glowing LNA monomers is demonstrated (a) using in vitro transcription assays and (b) by quantitative fluorometric assays and direct microscopic observation of probes bound to mRNA in its native form. These features render Glowing LNA as promising diagnostic probes for biomedical applications.

  8. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Miller, P.S.; Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1999-06-15

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid is provided. It includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional. 16 figs.

  10. Oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate derivatives capable of crosslinking with or cleaving nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul S.; Ts'o, Paul O.P.

    1999-06-15

    A composition for inactivating a target nucleic acid which comprises an oligonucleoside alkyl or arylphosphonate analogue which is complementary to the sequence of the target nucleic acid and includes a functional group which reacts with the target nucleic acid to render the target nucleic acid inactive or nonfunctional.

  11. Nucleic acid aptamer-based methods for diagnosis of infections.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo

    2018-04-15

    Infectious diseases are a serious global problem, which not only take an enormous human toll but also incur tremendous economic losses. In combating infectious diseases, rapid and accurate diagnostic tests are required for pathogen identification at the point of care (POC). In this review, investigations of diagnostic strategies for infectious diseases that are based on aptamers, especially nucleic acid aptamers, oligonucleotides that have high affinities and specificities toward their targets, are described. Owing to their unique features including low cost of production, easy chemical modification, high chemical stability, reproducibility, and low levels of immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers have been widely utilized as bio-recognition elements (bio-receptors) for the development of infection diagnostic systems. We discuss nucleic acid aptamer-based methods that have been developed for diagnosis of infections using a format that organizes discussion according to the target pathogenic analytes including toxins or proteins, whole cells and nucleic acids. Also included is, a summary of recent advances made in the sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria utilizing the isothermal nucleic acid amplification method. Lastly, a nucleic acid aptamer-based POC system is described and future directions of studies in this area are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Methods And Devices For Characterizing Duplex Nucleic Acid Molecules

    DOEpatents

    Akeson, Mark; Vercoutere, Wenonah; Haussler, David; Winters-Hilt, Stephen

    2005-08-30

    Methods and devices are provided for characterizing a duplex nucleic acid, e.g., a duplex DNA molecule. In the subject methods, a fluid conducting medium that includes a duplex nucleic acid molecule is contacted with a nanopore under the influence of an applied electric field and the resulting changes in current through the nanopore caused by the duplex nucleic acid molecule are monitored. The observed changes in current through the nanopore are then employed as a set of data values to characterize the duplex nucleic acid, where the set of data values may be employed in raw form or manipulated, e.g., into a current blockade profile. Also provided are nanopore devices for practicing the subject methods, where the subject nanopore devices are characterized by the presence of an algorithm which directs a processing means to employ monitored changes in current through a nanopore to characterize a duplex nucleic acid molecule responsible for the current changes. The subject methods and devices find use in a variety of applications, including, among other applications, the identification of an analyte duplex DNA molecule in a sample, the specific base sequence at a single nulceotide polymorphism (SNP), and the sequencing of duplex DNA molecules.

  13. Nucleic acid-based nanoengineering: novel structures for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanying; LaBean, Thomas H.; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoengineering exploits the interactions of materials at the nanometre scale to create functional nanostructures. It relies on the precise organization of nanomaterials to achieve unique functionality. There are no interactions more elegant than those governing nucleic acids via Watson–Crick base-pairing rules. The infinite combinations of DNA/RNA base pairs and their remarkable molecular recognition capability can give rise to interesting nanostructures that are only limited by our imagination. Over the past years, creative assembly of nucleic acids has fashioned a plethora of two-dimensional and three-dimensional nanostructures with precisely controlled size, shape and spatial functionalization. These nanostructures have been precisely patterned with molecules, proteins and gold nanoparticles for the observation of chemical reactions at the single molecule level, activation of enzymatic cascade and novel modality of photonic detection, respectively. Recently, they have also been engineered to encapsulate and release bioactive agents in a stimulus-responsive manner for therapeutic applications. The future of nucleic acid-based nanoengineering is bright and exciting. In this review, we will discuss the strategies to control the assembly of nucleic acids and highlight the recent efforts to build functional nucleic acid nanodevices for nanomedicine. PMID:23050076

  14. Method for nucleic acid hybridization using single-stranded DNA binding protein

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1996-01-01

    Method of nucleic acid hybridization for detecting the presence of a specific nucleic acid sequence in a population of different nucleic acid sequences using a nucleic acid probe. The nucleic acid probe hybridizes with the specific nucleic acid sequence but not with other nucleic acid sequences in the population. The method includes contacting a sample (potentially including the nucleic acid sequence) with the nucleic acid probe under hybridizing conditions in the presence of a single-stranded DNA binding protein provided in an amount which stimulates renaturation of a dilute solution (i.e., one in which the t.sub.1/2 of renaturation is longer than 3 weeks) of single-stranded DNA greater than 500 fold (i.e., to a t.sub.1/2 less than 60 min, preferably less than 5 min, and most preferably about 1 min.) in the absence of nucleotide triphosphates.

  15. Nucleic acids for the rational design of reaction circuits.

    PubMed

    Padirac, Adrien; Fujii, Teruo; Rondelez, Yannick

    2013-08-01

    Nucleic acid-based circuits are rationally designed in vitro assemblies that can perform complex preencoded programs. They can be used to mimic in silico computations. Recent works emphasized the modularity and robustness of these circuits, which allow their scaling-up. Another new development has led to dynamic, time-responsive systems that can display emergent behaviors like oscillations. These are closely related to biological architectures and provide an in vitro model of in vivo information processing. Nucleic acid circuits have already been used to handle various processes for technological or biotechnological purposes. Future applications of these chemical smart systems will benefit from the rapidly growing ability to design, construct, and model nucleic acid circuits of increasing size. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hybrids of Nucleic Acids and Carbon Nanotubes for Nanobiotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the combination of nucleic acids and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been briefly reviewed here. Since discovering the hybridization phenomenon of DNA molecules and CNTs in 2003, a large amount of fundamental and applied research has been carried out. Among thousands of papers published since 2003, approximately 240 papers focused on biological applications were selected and categorized based on the types of nucleic acids used, but not the types of CNTs. This survey revealed that the hybridization phenomenon is strongly affected by various factors, such as DNA sequences, and for this reason, fundamental studies on the hybridization phenomenon are important. Additionally, many research groups have proposed numerous practical applications, such as nanobiosensors. The goal of this review is to provide perspective on biological applications using hybrids of nucleic acids and CNTs. PMID:28347014

  17. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  18. Recent advances in peptide nucleic acid for cancer bionanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun-Chen; Meng, Qing-Chun; Ren, Hong-Mei; Wang, Hong-Tao; Wu, Jie; Wang, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is an oligomer, in which the phosphate backbone has been replaced by a pseudopeptide backbone that is meant to mimic DNA. Peptide nucleic acids are of the utmost importance in the biomedical field because of their ability to hybridize with neutral nucleic acids and their special chemical and biological properties. In recent years, PNAs have emerged in nanobiotechnology for cancer diagnosis and therapy due to their high affinity and sequence selectivity toward corresponding DNA and RNA. In this review, we summarize the recent progresses that have been made in cancer detection and therapy with PNA biotechnology. In addition, we emphasize nanoparticle PNA-based strategies for the efficient delivery of drugs in anticancer therapies.

  19. Soni-removal of nucleic acids from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Mysore, Sumukh; Gandham, Sai Hari A

    2014-05-23

    Inclusion bodies (IBs) are commonly formed in Escherichia coli due to over expression of recombinant proteins in non-native state. Isolation, denaturation and refolding of these IBs is generally performed to obtain functional protein. However, during this process IBs tend to form non-specific interactions with sheared nucleic acids from the genome, thus getting carried over into downstream processes. This may hinder the refolding of IBs into their native state. To circumvent this, we demonstrate a methodology termed soni-removal which involves disruption of nucleic acid-inclusion body interaction using sonication; followed by solvent based separation. As opposed to conventional techniques that use enzymes and column-based separations, soni-removal is a cost effective alternative for complete elimination of buried and/or strongly bound short nucleic acid contaminants from IBs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inorganic nanoparticles as nucleic acid transporters into eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, R. N.; Zarytova, V. F.; Zenkova, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The review is concerned with inorganic nanoparticles (gold, titanium dioxide, silica, iron oxides, calcium phosphate) used as nucleic acid transporters into mammalian cells. Methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and approaches to surface modification through covalent or noncovalent attachment of low- or high-molecular-weight compounds are considered. The data available from the literature on biological action of nucleic acids delivered into the cells by nanoparticles and on the effect of nanoparticles and their conjugates and complexes on the cell survival are summarized. Pathways of cellular internalization of nanoparticles and the mechanism of their excretion, as well as the ways of release of nucleic acids from their complexes with nanoparticles after the cellular uptake are described. The bibliography includes 161 references.

  1. Hybrids of Nucleic Acids and Carbon Nanotubes for Nanobiotechnology.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-03-12

    Recent progress in the combination of nucleic acids and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been briefly reviewed here. Since discovering the hybridization phenomenon of DNA molecules and CNTs in 2003, a large amount of fundamental and applied research has been carried out. Among thousands of papers published since 2003, approximately 240 papers focused on biological applications were selected and categorized based on the types of nucleic acids used, but not the types of CNTs. This survey revealed that the hybridization phenomenon is strongly affected by various factors, such as DNA sequences, and for this reason, fundamental studies on the hybridization phenomenon are important. Additionally, many research groups have proposed numerous practical applications, such as nanobiosensors. The goal of this review is to provide perspective on biological applications using hybrids of nucleic acids and CNTs.

  2. Thermodynamics of Nucleic Acid ‘Shape Readout’ by an Aminosugar†

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hongjuan; Davis, Erik; Ranjan, Nihar; Xue, Liang; Hyde-Volpe, David; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of nucleic acids is important for our understanding of nucleic acid structure as well as for our understanding of nucleic acid-protein interactions. In addition to the direct readout mechanisms of nucleic acids such as H-bonding, shape recognition of nucleic acids is being increasingly recognized to play an equally important role in DNA recognition. Competition Dialysis, UV, Flourescent Intercalator displacement (FID), Computational Docking, and calorimetry studies were conducted to study the interaction of neomycin with a variety of nucleic acid conformations (shapes). At pH 5.5, these results suggest: (1) Neomycin binds three RNA structures (16S A site rRNA, poly(rA)•poly(rA), and poly(rA)•poly(rU)) with high affinities, Ka~107M−1. (2) The binding of neomycin to A-form GC-rich oligomer d(A2G15C15T2)2 has comparable affinity to RNA structures. (3) The binding of neomycin to DNA•RNA hybrids shows a three-fold variance attributable to their structural differences (poly(dA) •poly(rU), Ka=9.4×106M−1 and poly(rA)•poly(dT), Ka=3.1×106M−1). (4) The interaction of neomycin with DNA triplex poly(dA)•2poly(dT) yields a binding affinity of Ka=2.4×105M−1. (5) Poly(dA-dT)2 showed the lowest association constant for all nucleic acids studied (Ka=<105). (6) Neomycin binds to G-quadruplexes with Ka~104-105M−1. (7) Computational studies show that the decrease in major groove width in the B to A transition correlates with increasing neomycin affinity. Neomycin’s affinity for various nucleic acid structures can be ranked as follows, RNAs and GC-rich d(A2G15C15T2)2 structures > poly(dA)•poly(rU) > poly(rA)•poly(dT) > T•A-T triplex , G-quadruplexes, B-form AT-rich or GC-rich DNA sequences. The results illustrate the first example of a small molecule based ‘shape readout’ of different nucleic acid conformations. PMID:21863895

  3. Kit for detecting nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2001-01-01

    A kit is provided for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample, the kit comprising: a first hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent; and a second hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the first hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker; a third hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a first portion of the target sequence, the third hybridization probe including the same detectable marker as the second hybridization probe; and a fourth hybridization probe which includes a nucleic acid sequence that is sufficiently complementary to selectively hybridize to a second portion of the target sequence to which the third hybridization probe does not selectively hybridize, the fourth hybridization probe including the first complexing agent for forming a binding pair with the second complexing agent; wherein the first and second hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence and the third and fourth hybridization probes are capable of simultaneously hybridizing to the target sequence, the detectable marker is not present on the first or fourth hybridization probes and the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes each include a competitive nucleic acid sequence which is sufficiently complementary to a third portion of the target sequence that the competitive sequences of the first, second, third, and fourth hybridization probes compete with each other to hybridize to the third portion of the

  4. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  5. Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical sciences, especially in the field of human genetics, is increasingly considered to facilitate a new frontier in development of novel disease-modifying therapeutics. One of major challenges in the development of nucleic acid therapeutics is efficient and specific delivery of the molecules to the target tissue and cell upon systemic administration. In this report, I discuss our strategy to develop combinatorial-designed multifunctional nanoparticle assemblies based on natural biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for nucleic acid delivery in: (1) overcoming tumor drug resistance and (2) genetic modulation of macrophage functional phenotype from M1 to M2 in treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  6. Methods of introducing nucleic acids into cellular DNA

    DOEpatents

    Lajoie, Marc J.; Gregg, Christopher J.; Mosberg, Joshua A.; Church, George M.

    2017-06-27

    A method of introducing a nucleic acid sequence into a cell is provided where the cell has impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaG primase activity or impaired or inhibited or disrupted DnaB helicase activity, or larger or increased gaps or distance between Okazaki fragments or lowered or reduced frequency of Okazaki fragment initiation, or the cell has increased single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on the lagging strand of the replication fork including transforming the cell through recombination with a nucleic acid oligomer.

  7. Recent Advances in Chemical Modification of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Rozners, Eriks

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has become an extremely powerful tool in chemistry and biology. Although PNA recognizes single-stranded nucleic acids with exceptionally high affinity and sequence selectivity, there is considerable ongoing effort to further improve properties of PNA for both fundamental science and practical applications. The present paper discusses selected recent studies that improve on cellular uptake and binding of PNA to double-stranded DNA and RNA. The focus is on chemical modifications of PNA's backbone and heterocyclic nucleobases. The paper selects representative recent studies and does not attempt to provide comprehensive coverage of the broad and vibrant field of PNA modification. PMID:22991652

  8. Nucleic acid aptamers: an emerging frontier in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guizhi; Ye, Mao; Donovan, Michael J; Song, Erqun; Zhao, Zilong; Tan, Weihong

    2012-11-04

    The last two decades have witnessed the development and application of nucleic acid aptamers in a variety of fields, including target analysis, disease therapy, and molecular and cellular engineering. The efficient and widely applicable aptamer selection, reproducible chemical synthesis and modification, generally impressive target binding selectivity and affinity, relatively rapid tissue penetration, low immunogenicity, and rapid systemic clearance make aptamers ideal recognition elements for use as therapeutics or for in vivo delivery of therapeutics. In this feature article, we discuss the development and biomedical application of nucleic acid aptamers, with emphasis on cancer cell aptamer isolation, targeted cancer therapy, oncology biomarker identification and drug discovery.

  9. Biomimetic High Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles For Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Tripathy, Sushant; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bobeica, Mariana; Shumaker, Dale K.; Luthi, Andrea J.; Helfand, Brian T.; Ardehali, Hossein; Mirkin, Chad A.; Volpert, Olga; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    We report a gold nanoparticle-templated high density lipoprotein (HDL AuNP) platform for gene therapy which combines lipid-based nucleic acid transfection strategies with HDL biomimicry. For proof-of-concept, HDL AuNPs are shown to adsorb antisense cholesterylated DNA. The conjugates are internalized by human cells, can be tracked within cells using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and regulate target gene expression. Overall, the ability to directly image the AuNP core within cells, the chemical tailorability of the HDL AuNP platform, and the potential for cell-specific targeting afforded by HDL biomimicry make this platform appealing for nucleic acid delivery. PMID:21319839

  10. Spherical Nucleic Acids as Intracellular Agents for Nucleic Acid Based Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liangliang

    Recent functional discoveries on the noncoding sequences of human genome and transcriptome could lead to revolutionary treatment modalities because the noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be applied as therapeutic agents to manipulate disease-causing genes. To date few nucleic acid-based therapeutics have been translated into the clinic due to challenges in the delivery of the oligonucleotide agents in an effective, cell specific, and non-toxic fashion. Unmodified oligonucleotide agents are destroyed rapidly in biological fluids by enzymatic degradation and have difficulty crossing the plasma membrane without the aid of transfection reagents, which often cause inflammatory, cytotoxic, or immunogenic side effects. Spherical nucleic acids (SNAs), nanoparticles consisting of densely organized and highly oriented oligonucleotides, pose one possible solution to circumventing these problems in both the antisense and RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. The unique three dimensional architecture of SNAs protects the bioactive oligonucleotides from unspecific degradation during delivery and supports their targeting of class A scavenger receptors and endocytosis via a lipid-raft-dependent, caveolae-mediated pathway. Owing to their unique structure, SNAs are able to cross cell membranes and regulate target genes expression as a single entity, without triggering the cellular innate immune response. Herein, my thesis has focused on understanding the interactions between SNAs and cellular components and developing SNA-based nanostructures to improve therapeutic capabilities. Specifically, I developed a novel SNA-based, nanoscale agent for delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides to manipulate microRNAs (miRNAs), the endogenous post-transcriptional gene regulators. I investigated the role of SNAs involving miRNAs in anti-cancer or anti-inflammation responses in cells and in in vivo murine disease models via systemic injection. Furthermore, I explored using different strategies to construct

  11. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Arrays of nucleic acid probes on biological chips

    DOEpatents

    Chee, Mark; Cronin, Maureen T.; Fodor, Stephen P. A.; Huang, Xiaohua X.; Hubbell, Earl A.; Lipshutz, Robert J.; Lobban, Peter E.; Morris, MacDonald S.; Sheldon, Edward L.

    1998-11-17

    DNA chips containing arrays of oligonucleotide probes can be used to determine whether a target nucleic acid has a nucleotide sequence identical to or different from a specific reference sequence. The array of probes comprises probes exactly complementary to the reference sequence, as well as probes that differ by one or more bases from the exactly complementary probes.

  13. A DNA origami nanorobot controlled by nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Marini, Monica; Palmano, Sabrina; Piantanida, Luca; Polano, Cesare; Scarpellini, Alice; Lazzarino, Marco; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2014-07-23

    A prototype for a DNA origami nanorobot is designed, produced, and tested. The cylindrical nanorobot (diameter of 14 nm and length of 48 nm) with a switchable flap, is able to respond to an external stimulus and reacts by a physical switch from a disarmed to an armed configuration able to deliver a cellular compatible message. In the tested design the robot weapon is a nucleic acid fully contained in the inner of the tube and linked to a single point of the internal face of the flap. Upon actuation the nanorobot moves the flap extracting the nucleic acid that assembles into a hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme catalyzing a colorimetric reaction or chemiluminescence generation. The actuation switch is triggered by an external nucleic acid (target) that interacts with a complementary nucleic acid that is beard externally by the nanorobot (probe). Hybridization of probe and target produces a localized structural change that results in flap opening. The flap movement is studied on a two-dimensional prototype origami using Förster resonance energy transfer and is shown to be triggered by a variety of targets, including natural RNAs. The nanorobot has potential for in vivo biosensing and intelligent delivery of biological activators. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mouse Vk gene classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity.

    PubMed

    Strohal, R; Helmberg, A; Kroemer, G; Kofler, R

    1989-01-01

    Analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region gene usage in the immune response, estimates of V gene germline complexity, and other nucleic acid hybridization-based studies depend on the extent to which such genes are related (i.e., sequence similarity) and their organization in gene families. While mouse Igh heavy chain V region (VH) gene families are relatively well-established, a corresponding systematic classification of Igk light chain V region (Vk) genes has not been reported. The present analysis, in the course of which we reviewed the known extent of the Vk germline gene repertoire and Vk gene usage in a variety of responses to foreign and self antigens, provides a classification of mouse Vk genes in gene families composed of members with greater than 80% overall nucleic acid sequence similarity. This classification differed in several aspects from that of VH genes: only some Vk gene families were as clearly separated (by greater than 25% sequence dissimilarity) as typical VH gene families; most Vk gene families were closely related and, in several instances, members from different families were very similar (greater than 80%) over large sequence portions; frequently, classification by nucleic acid sequence similarity diverged from existing classifications based on amino-terminal protein sequence similarity. Our data have implications for Vk gene analyses by nucleic acid hybridization and describe potentially important differences in sequence organization between VH and Vk genes.

  15. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared to patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. PMID:22086767

  17. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3225 - Enterovirus nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enterovirus nucleic acid assay. 866.3225 Section 866.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3225 Enterovirus...

  2. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J [Urbandale, IA; Lowe, Keith S [Johnston, IA; Larkins, Brian A [Tucson, AZ; Dilkes, Brian R [Tucson, AZ; Sun, Yuejin [Westfield, IN

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2017-09-05

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2010-06-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Localization of Bovine Papillomavirus Nucleic Acid in Equine Sarcoids.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, A M; Zhu, K W; Dela Cruz, F N; Affolter, V K; Pesavento, P A

    2016-05-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPV1/BPV2) have long been associated with equine sarcoids; deciphering their contribution has been difficult due to their ubiquitous presence on skin and in the environment, as well as the lack of decent techniques to interrogate their role in pathogenesis. We have developed and characterized an in situ hybridization (ISH) assay that uses a pool of probes complementary to portions of the E5, E6, and E7 genes. This assay is highly sensitive for direct visualization of viral transcript and nucleic acid in routinely processed histopathologic samples. We demonstrate here the visualization of BPV nucleic acid in 18 of 18 equine sarcoids, whereas no detectable viral DNA was present in 15 of 15 nonsarcoid controls by this technique. In nearly 90% (16/18) of the sarcoids, 50% or more of the fibroblastic cell nuclei distributed throughout the neoplasm had detectable hybridization. In the remaining 2 cases, fewer than half of the fibroblastic cells contained detectable hybridization, but viral nucleic acid was also detected in epithelial cells of the sebaceous glands, hair follicles and epidermis. A sensitive ISH assay is an indispensable addition to the molecular methods used to detect viral nucleic acid in tissue. We have used this technique to determine the specific cellular localization and distribution of BPV in a subset of equine sarcoids. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Structure, stability and behaviour of nucleic acids in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids have become a powerful tool in nanotechnology because of their conformational polymorphism. However, lack of a medium in which nucleic acid structures exhibit long-term stability has been a bottleneck. Ionic liquids (ILs) are potential solvents in the nanotechnology field. Hydrated ILs, such as choline dihydrogen phosphate (choline dhp) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) prepared from choline chloride and urea, are ‘green’ solvents that ensure long-term stability of biomolecules. An understanding of the behaviour of nucleic acids in hydrated ILs is necessary for developing DNA materials. We here review current knowledge about the structures and stabilities of nucleic acids in choline dhp and DES. Interestingly, in choline dhp, A–T base pairs are more stable than G–C base pairs, the reverse of the situation in buffered NaCl solution. Moreover, DNA triplex formation is markedly stabilized in hydrated ILs compared with aqueous solution. In choline dhp, the stability of Hoogsteen base pairs is comparable to that of Watson–Crick base pairs. Moreover, the parallel form of the G-quadruplex is stabilized in DES compared with aqueous solution. The behaviours of various DNA molecules in ILs detailed here should be useful for designing oligonucleotides for the development of nanomaterials and nanodevices. PMID:25013178

  9. Enhancing and targeting nucleic acid delivery by magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christian; Anton, Martina; Rudolph, Carsten; Rosenecker, Joseph; Krötz, Florian

    2003-08-01

    Insufficient contact of inherently highly active nucleic acid delivery systems with target cells is a primary reason for their often observed limited efficacy. Physical methods of targeting can overcome this limitation and reduce the risk of undesired side effects due to non-target site delivery. The authors and others have developed a novel means of physical targeting, exploiting magnetic force acting on nucleic acid vectors associated with magnetic particles in order to mediate the rapid contact of vectors with target cells. Here, the principles of magnetic drug and nucleic acid delivery are reviewed, and the facts and potentials of the technique for research and therapeutic applications are discussed. Magnetically enhanced nucleic acid delivery - magnetofection - is universally applicable to viral and non-viral vectors, is extraordinarily rapid, simple and yields saturation level transfection at low dose in vitro. The method is useful for site-specific vector targeting in vivo. Exploiting the full potential of the technique requires an interdisciplinary research effort in magnetic field physics, magnetic particle chemistry, pharmaceutical formulation and medical application.

  10. NMR studies of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Varani, Gabriele; Chen, Yu; Leeper, Thomas C

    2004-01-01

    Protein-DNA and protein-RNA complexes play key functional roles in every living organism. Therefore, the elucidation of their structure and dynamics is an important goal of structural and molecular biology. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of protein and nucleic acid complexes have common features with studies of protein-protein complexes: the interaction surfaces between the molecules must be carefully delineated, the relative orientation of the two species needs to be accurately and precisely determined, and close intermolecular contacts defined by nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) must be obtained. However, differences in NMR properties (e.g., chemical shifts) and biosynthetic pathways for sample productions generate important differences. Chemical shift differences between the protein and nucleic acid resonances can aid the NMR structure determination process; however, the relatively limited dispersion of the RNA ribose resonances makes the process of assigning intermolecular NOEs more difficult. The analysis of the resulting structures requires computational tools unique to nucleic acid interactions. This chapter summarizes the most important elements of the structure determination by NMR of protein-nucleic acid complexes and their analysis. The main emphasis is on recent developments (e.g., residual dipolar couplings and new Web-based analysis tools) that have facilitated NMR studies of these complexes and expanded the type of biological problems to which NMR techniques of structural elucidation can now be applied.

  11. A microcomputer program for analysis of nucleic acid hybridization data

    PubMed Central

    Green, S.; Field, J.K.; Green, C.D.; Beynon, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The study of nucleic acid hybridization is facilitated by computer mediated fitting of theoretical models to experimental data. This paper describes a non-linear curve fitting program, using the `Patternsearch' algorithm, written in BASIC for the Apple II microcomputer. The advantages and disadvantages of using a microcomputer for local data processing are discussed. Images PMID:7071017

  12. Assessment for Melting Temperature Measurement of Nucleic Acid by HRM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Pan, Xiaoming; Liang, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM), with a high sensitivity to distinguish the nucleic acid species with small variations, has been widely applied in the mutation scanning, methylation analysis, and genotyping. For the aim of extending HRM for the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid secondary structures on sequence dependence, we investigated effects of the dye of EvaGreen, metal ions, and impurities (such as dNTPs) on melting temperature ( T m ) measurement by HRM. The accuracy of HRM was assessed as compared with UV melting method, and little difference between the two methods was found when the DNA T m was higher than 40°C. Both insufficiency and excessiveness of EvaGreen were found to give rise to a little bit higher T m , showing that the proportion of dye should be considered for precise T m measurement of nucleic acids. Finally, HRM method was also successfully used to measure T m s of DNA triplex, hairpin, and RNA duplex. In conclusion, HRM can be applied in the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or secondary structural elements (even when dNTPs are present).

  13. Assessment for Melting Temperature Measurement of Nucleic Acid by HRM

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM), with a high sensitivity to distinguish the nucleic acid species with small variations, has been widely applied in the mutation scanning, methylation analysis, and genotyping. For the aim of extending HRM for the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid secondary structures on sequence dependence, we investigated effects of the dye of EvaGreen, metal ions, and impurities (such as dNTPs) on melting temperature (T m) measurement by HRM. The accuracy of HRM was assessed as compared with UV melting method, and little difference between the two methods was found when the DNA T m was higher than 40°C. Both insufficiency and excessiveness of EvaGreen were found to give rise to a little bit higher T m, showing that the proportion of dye should be considered for precise T m measurement of nucleic acids. Finally, HRM method was also successfully used to measure T ms of DNA triplex, hairpin, and RNA duplex. In conclusion, HRM can be applied in the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or secondary structural elements (even when dNTPs are present). PMID:27833775

  14. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    DOEpatents

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  15. Electricity-Free, Sequential Nucleic Acid and Protein Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, David R.; Karalus, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional and emerging pathogens such as Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), Yersinia pestis, or prion-based diseases are of significant concern for governments, industries and medical professionals worldwide. For example, EHECs, combined with Shigella, are responsible for the deaths of approximately 325,000 children each year and are particularly prevalent in the developing world where laboratory-based identification, common in the United States, is unavailable 1. The development and distribution of low cost, field-based, point-of-care tools to aid in the rapid identification and/or diagnosis of pathogens or disease markers could dramatically alter disease progression and patient prognosis. We have developed a tool to isolate nucleic acids and proteins from a sample by solid-phase extraction (SPE) without electricity or associated laboratory equipment 2. The isolated macromolecules can be used for diagnosis either in a forward lab or using field-based point-of-care platforms. Importantly, this method provides for the direct comparison of nucleic acid and protein data from an un-split sample, offering a confidence through corroboration of genomic and proteomic analysis. Our isolation tool utilizes the industry standard for solid-phase nucleic acid isolation, the BOOM technology, which isolates nucleic acids from a chaotropic salt solution, usually guanidine isothiocyanate, through binding to silica-based particles or filters 3. CUBRC's proprietary solid-phase extraction chemistry is used to purify protein from chaotropic salt solutions, in this case, from the waste or flow-thru following nucleic acid isolation4. By packaging well-characterized chemistries into a small, inexpensive and simple platform, we have generated a portable system for nucleic acid and protein extraction that can be performed under a variety of conditions. The isolated nucleic acids are stable and can be transported to a position where power is available for PCR amplification while

  16. Electricity-free, sequential nucleic acid and protein isolation.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, David R; Karalus, Richard J

    2012-05-15

    Traditional and emerging pathogens such as Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), Yersinia pestis, or prion-based diseases are of significant concern for governments, industries and medical professionals worldwide. For example, EHECs, combined with Shigella, are responsible for the deaths of approximately 325,000 children each year and are particularly prevalent in the developing world where laboratory-based identification, common in the United States, is unavailable (1). The development and distribution of low cost, field-based, point-of-care tools to aid in the rapid identification and/or diagnosis of pathogens or disease markers could dramatically alter disease progression and patient prognosis. We have developed a tool to isolate nucleic acids and proteins from a sample by solid-phase extraction (SPE) without electricity or associated laboratory equipment (2). The isolated macromolecules can be used for diagnosis either in a forward lab or using field-based point-of-care platforms. Importantly, this method provides for the direct comparison of nucleic acid and protein data from an un-split sample, offering a confidence through corroboration of genomic and proteomic analysis. Our isolation tool utilizes the industry standard for solid-phase nucleic acid isolation, the BOOM technology, which isolates nucleic acids from a chaotropic salt solution, usually guanidine isothiocyanate, through binding to silica-based particles or filters (3). CUBRC's proprietary solid-phase extraction chemistry is used to purify protein from chaotropic salt solutions, in this case, from the waste or flow-thru following nucleic acid isolation(4). By packaging well-characterized chemistries into a small, inexpensive and simple platform, we have generated a portable system for nucleic acid and protein extraction that can be performed under a variety of conditions. The isolated nucleic acids are stable and can be transported to a position where power is available for PCR amplification

  17. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reactionmore » chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.« less

  18. The use of solid supports to generate nucleic acid carriers.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Díaz-Mochón, Juan José; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Bradley, Mark

    2012-07-17

    Nucleic acids are the foundation stone of all cellular processes. Consequently, the use of DNA or RNA to treat genetic and acquired disorders (so called gene therapy) offers enormous potential benefits. The restitution of defective genes or the suppression of malignant genes could target a range of diseases, including cancers, inherited diseases (cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, etc.), and viral infections. However, this strategy has a major barrier: the size and charge of nucleic acids largely restricts their transit into eukaryotic cells. Potential strategies to solve this problem include the use of a variety of natural and synthetic nucleic acid carriers. Driven by the aim and ambition of translating this promising therapeutic approach into the clinic, researchers have been actively developing advanced delivery systems for nucleic acids for more than 20 years. A decade ago we began our investigations of solid-phase techniques to construct families of novel nucleic acid carriers for transfection. We envisaged that the solid-phase synthesis of polycationic dendrimers and derivatized polyamimes would offer distinct advantages over solution phase techniques. Notably in solid phase synthesis we could take advantage of mass action and streamlined purification procedures, while simplifying the handling of compounds with high polarities and plurality of functional groups. Parallel synthesis methods would also allow rapid access to libraries of compounds with improved purities and yields over comparable solution methodologies and facilitate the development of structure activity relationships. We also twisted the concept of the solid-phase support on its head: we devised miniaturized solid supports that provided an innovative cell delivery vehicle in their own right, carrying covalently conjugated cargos (biomolecules) into cells. In this Account, we summarize the main outcomes of this series of chemically related projects.

  19. Programming the Assembly of Unnatural Materials with Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Chad

    Nature directs the assembly of enormously complex and highly functional materials through an encoded class of biomolecules, nucleic acids. The establishment of a similarly programmable code for the construction of synthetic, unnatural materials would allow researchers to impart functionality by precisely positioning all material components. Although it is exceedingly difficult to control the complex interactions between atomic and molecular species in such a manner, interactions between nanoscale components can be directed through the ligands attached to their surface. Our group has shown that nucleic acids can be used as highly programmable surface ligands to control the spacing and symmetry of nanoparticle building blocks in structurally sophisticated and functional materials. These nucleic acids function as programmable ``bonds'' between nanoparticle ``atoms,'' analogous to a nanoscale genetic code for assembling materials. The sequence and length tunability of nucleic acid bonds has allowed us to define a powerful set of design rules for the construction of nanoparticle superlattices with more than 30 unique lattice symmetries, tunable defect structures and interparticle spacings, and several well-defined crystal habits. Further, the nature of the nucleic acid bond enables an additional level of structural control: temporal regulation of dynamic material response to external biomolecular and chemical stimuli. This control allows for the reversible transformation between thermodynamic states with different crystal symmetries, particle stoichiometries, thermal stabilities, and interparticle spacings on demand. Notably, our unique genetic approach affords functional nanoparticle architectures that, among many other applications, can be used to systematically explore and manipulate optoelectronic material properties, such as tunable interparticle plasmonic interactions, microstructure-directed energy emission, and coupled plasmonic and photonic modes.

  20. Improved DNA hybridization parameters by Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid (TINA).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uffe Vest

    2012-01-01

    This thesis establishes oligonucleotide design rules and applications of a novel group of DNA stabilizing molecules collectively called Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acid - TINA. Three peer-reviewed publications form the basis for the thesis. One publication describes an improved and rapid method for determination of DNA melting points and two publications describe the effects of positioning TINA molecules in parallel triplex helix and antiparallel duplex helix forming DNA structures. The third publication establishes that TINA molecules containing oligonucleotides improve an antiparallel duplex hybridization based capture assay's analytical sensitivity compared to conventionel DNA oligonucleotides. Clinical microbiology is traditionally based on pathogenic microorganisms' culture and serological tests. The introduction of DNA target amplification methods like PCR has improved the analytical sensitivity and total turn around time involved in clinical diagnostics of infections. Due to the relatively weak hybridization between the two strands of double stranded DNA, a number of nucleic acid stabilizing molecules have been developed to improve the sensitivity of DNA based diagnostics through superior binding properties. A short introduction is given to Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen based DNA binding and the derived DNA structures. A number of other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules are described. The stabilizing effect of TINA molecules on different DNA structures is discussed and considered in relation to other nucleic acid stabilizing molecules and in relation to future use of TINA containing oligonucleotides in clinical diagnostics and therapy. In conclusion, design of TINA modified oligonucleotides for antiparallel duplex helixes and parallel triplex helixes follows simple purpose dependent rules. TINA molecules are well suited for improving multiplex PCR assays and can be used as part of novel technologies. Future research should test whether combinations of TINA

  1. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral... simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral... simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral... simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral... simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3980 - Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid... § 866.3980 Respiratory viral panel multiplex nucleic acid assay. (a) Identification. A respiratory viral... simultaneously detect and identify multiple viral nucleic acids extracted from human respiratory specimens or...

  6. Triptycene: A Nucleic Acid Three-Way Junction Binder Scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ina

    Nucleic acids play a critical role in many biological processes such as gene regulation and replication. The development of small molecules that modulate nucleic acids with sequence or structure specificity would provide new strategies for regulating disease states at the nucleic acid level. However, this remains challenging mainly because of the nonspecific interactions between nucleic acids and small molecules. Three-way junctions are critical structural elements of nucleic acids. They are present in many important targets such as trinucleotide repeat junctions related to Huntington's disease, a temperature sensor sigma32 in E. coli, Dengue virus, and HIV. Triptycene-derived small molecules have been shown to bind to nucleic acid three-way junctions, resulting from their shape complementary. To develop a better understanding of designing molecules for targeting different junctions, a rapid screening of triptycene-based small molecules is needed. We envisioned that the installation of a linker at C9 position of the bicyclic core would allow for a rapid solid phase diversification. To achieve this aim, we synthesized 9-substituted triptycene scaffolds by using two different synthetic routes. The first synthetic route installed the linker from the amidation reaction between carboxylic acid at C9 position of the triptycene and an amine linker, beta-alanine ethyl ester. This new 9-substituted triptycene scaffold was then attached to a 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin for solid-phase diversification. This enabled a rapid diversification and an easy purification of mono-, di-, and tri-peptide triptycene derivatives. The binding affinities of these compounds were investigated towards a (CAG)˙(CTG) trinucleotide repeat junction. In the modified second synthetic route, we utilized a combined Heck coupling/benzyne Diels-Alder strategy. This improved synthetic strategy reduced the number of steps and total reaction times, increased the overall yield, improved solubilities of

  7. Isolated nucleic acids encoding antipathogenic polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Crane, Virginia C.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric J.; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-04-20

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include amino acid sequences, and variants and fragments thereof, for antipathogenic polypeptides that were isolated from fungal fermentation broths. Nucleic acids that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding antifungal polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, I. A.; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2010-11-02

    Compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a pathogen, particularly a fungal pathogen, are provided. Compositions include an amino acid sequence, and variants and fragments thereof, for an antipathogenic polypeptide that was isolated from a fungal fermentation broth. Nucleic acid molecules that encode the antipathogenic polypeptides of the invention, and antipathogenic domains thereof, are also provided. A method for inducing pathogen resistance in a plant using the nucleotide sequences disclosed herein is further provided. The method comprises introducing into a plant an expression cassette comprising a promoter operably linked to a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention. Compositions comprising an antipathogenic polypeptide or a transformed microorganism comprising a nucleic acid of the invention in combination with a carrier and methods of using these compositions to protect a plant from a pathogen are further provided. Transformed plants, plant cells, seeds, and microorganisms comprising a nucleotide sequence that encodes an antipathogenic polypeptide of the invention are also disclosed.

  9. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  10. Geometric Patterns for Neighboring Bases Near the Stacked State in Nucleic Acid Strands.

    PubMed

    Sedova, Ada; Banavali, Nilesh K

    2017-03-14

    Structural variation in base stacking has been analyzed frequently in isolated double helical contexts for nucleic acids, but not as often in nonhelical geometries or in complex biomolecular environments. In this study, conformations of two neighboring bases near their stacked state in any environment are comprehensively characterized for single-strand dinucleotide (SSD) nucleic acid crystal structure conformations. An ensemble clustering method is used to identify a reduced set of representative stacking geometries based on pairwise distances between select atoms in consecutive bases, with multiple separable conformational clusters obtained for categories divided by nucleic acid type (DNA/RNA), SSD sequence, stacking face orientation, and the presence or absence of a protein environment. For both DNA and RNA, SSD conformations are observed that are either close to the A-form, or close to the B-form, or intermediate between the two forms, or further away from either form, illustrating the local structural heterogeneity near the stacked state. Among this large variety of distinct conformations, several common stacking patterns are observed between DNA and RNA, and between nucleic acids in isolation or in complex with proteins, suggesting that these might be stable stacking orientations. Noncanonical face/face orientations of the two bases are also observed for neighboring bases in the same strand, but their frequency is much lower, with multiple SSD sequences across categories showing no occurrences of such unusual stacked conformations. The resulting reduced set of stacking geometries is directly useful for stacking-energy comparisons between empirical force fields, prediction of plausible localized variations in single-strand structures near their canonical states, and identification of analogous stacking patterns in newly solved nucleic acid containing structures.

  11. Valency-Controlled Framework Nucleic Acid Signal Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Ge, Zhilei; Mao, Xiuhai; Zhou, Guobao; Zuo, Xiaolei; Shen, Juwen; Shi, Jiye; Li, Jiang; Wang, Lihua; Chen, Xiaoqing; Fan, Chunhai

    2018-06-11

    Weak ligand-receptor recognition events are often amplified by recruiting multiple regulatory biomolecules to the action site in biological systems. However, signal amplification in in vitro biomimetic systems generally lack the spatiotemporal regulation in vivo. Herein we report a framework nucleic acid (FNA)-programmed strategy to develop valence-controlled signal amplifiers with high modularity for ultrasensitive biosensing. We demonstrated that the FNA-programmed signal amplifiers could recruit nucleic acids, proteins, and inorganic nanoparticles in a stoichiometric manner. The valence-controlled signal amplifier enhanced the quantification ability of electrochemical biosensors, and enabled ultrasensitive detection of tumor-relevant circulating free DNA (cfDNA) with sensitivity enhancement of 3-5 orders of magnitude and improved dynamic range. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Devices, systems, and methods for detecting nucleic acids using sedimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory J.

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, systems, and method for conducting nucleic acid purification and quantification using sedimentation. In one example, a method includes generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample, individual ones of the complexes comprising a nucleic acid molecule such as DNA or RNA and a labeling agent. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a density lower than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transportingmore » occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.« less

  13. NPIDB: Nucleic acid-Protein Interaction DataBase.

    PubMed

    Kirsanov, Dmitry D; Zanegina, Olga N; Aksianov, Evgeniy A; Spirin, Sergei A; Karyagina, Anna S; Alexeevski, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    The Nucleic acid-Protein Interaction DataBase (http://npidb.belozersky.msu.ru/) contains information derived from structures of DNA-protein and RNA-protein complexes extracted from the Protein Data Bank (3846 complexes in October 2012). It provides a web interface and a set of tools for extracting biologically meaningful characteristics of nucleoprotein complexes. The content of the database is updated weekly. The current version of the Nucleic acid-Protein Interaction DataBase is an upgrade of the version published in 2007. The improvements include a new web interface, new tools for calculation of intermolecular interactions, a classification of SCOP families that contains DNA-binding protein domains and data on conserved water molecules on the DNA-protein interface.

  14. Nucleic acid aptamers: research tools in disease diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Santosh, Baby; Yadava, Pramod K

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short sequences of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) or peptide molecules which adopt a conformation and bind cognate ligands with high affinity and specificity in a manner akin to antibody-antigen interactions. It has been globally acknowledged that aptamers promise a plethora of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Although use of nucleic acid aptamers as targeted therapeutics or mediators of targeted drug delivery is a relatively new avenue of research, one aptamer-based drug "Macugen" is FDA approved and a series of aptamer-based drugs are in clinical pipelines. The present review discusses the aspects of design, unique properties, applications, and development of different aptamers to aid in cancer diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment under defined conditions.

  15. Microfluidic "Pouch" Chips for Immunoassays and Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests.

    PubMed

    Mauk, Michael G; Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Chen, Dafeng; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic cassettes ("chips") for processing and analysis of clinical specimens and other sample types facilitate point-of-care (POC) immunoassays and nucleic acid based amplification tests. These single-use test chips can be self-contained and made amenable to autonomous operation-reducing or eliminating supporting instrumentation-by incorporating laminated, pliable "pouch" and membrane structures for fluid storage, pumping, mixing, and flow control. Materials and methods for integrating flexible pouch compartments and diaphragm valves into hard plastic (e.g., acrylic and polycarbonate) microfluidic "chips" for reagent storage, fluid actuation, and flow control are described. We review several versions of these pouch chips for immunoassay and nucleic acid amplification tests, and describe related fabrication techniques. These protocols thus offer a "toolbox" of methods for storage, pumping, and flow control functions in microfluidic devices.

  16. Nucleic Acid Engineering: RNA Following the Trail of DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejin; Park, Yongkuk; Kim, Jieun; Jeong, Jaepil; Han, Sangwoo; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-02-08

    The self-assembly feature of the naturally occurring biopolymer, DNA, has fascinated researchers in the fields of materials science and bioengineering. With the improved understanding of the chemical and structural nature of DNA, DNA-based constructs have been designed and fabricated from two-dimensional arbitrary shapes to reconfigurable three-dimensional nanodevices. Although DNA has been used successfully as a building block in a finely organized and controlled manner, its applications need to be explored. Hence, with the myriad of biological functions, RNA has recently attracted considerable attention to further the application of nucleic acid-based structures. This Review categorizes different approaches of engineering nucleic acid-based structures and introduces the concepts, principles, and applications of each technique, focusing on how DNA engineering is applied as a guide to RNA engineering.

  17. Nucleic acid delivery using magnetic nanoparticles: the Magnetofection technology.

    PubMed

    Laurentt, Nicolas; Sapet, Cédric; Le Gourrierec, Loic; Bertosio, Elodie; Zelphati, Olivier

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, gene therapy has received considerable interest as a potential method for the treatment of numerous inherited and acquired diseases. However, successes have so far been hampered by several limitations, including safety issues of viral-based nucleic acid vectors and poor in vivo efficiency of nonviral vectors. Magnetofection has been introduced as a novel and powerful tool to deliver genetic material into cells. This technology is defined as the delivery of nucleic acids, either 'naked' or packaged (as complexes with lipids or polymers, and viruses) using magnetic nanoparticles under the guidance of an external magnetic field. This article first discusses the principles of the Magnetofection technology and its benefits as compared with standard transfection methods. A number of relevant examples of its use, both in vitro and in vivo, will then be highlighted. Future trends in the development of new magnetic nanoparticle formulations will also be outlined.

  18. Cross-Linked Micellar Spherical Nucleic Acids from Thermoresponsive Templates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A one-pot synthesis of micellar spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanostructures using Pluronic F127 as a thermoresponsive template is reported. These novel constructs are synthesized in a chemically straightforward process that involves intercalation of the lipid tails of DNA amphiphiles (CpG motifs for TLR-9 stimulation) into the hydrophobic regions of Pluronic F127 micelles, followed by chemical cross-linking and subsequent removal of non-cross-linked structures. The dense nucleic acid shell of the resulting cross-linked micellar SNA enhances their stability in physiological media and facilitates their rapid cellular internalization, making them effective TLR-9 immunomodulatory agents. These constructs underscore the potential of SNAs in regulating immune response and address the relative lack of stability of noncovalent constructs. PMID:28207251

  19. Critical considerations for developing nucleic acid macromolecule based drug products.

    PubMed

    Muralidhara, Bilikallahalli K; Baid, Rinku; Bishop, Steve M; Huang, Min; Wang, Wei; Nema, Sandeep

    2016-03-01

    Protein expression therapy using nucleic acid macromolecules (NAMs) as a new paradigm in medicine has recently gained immense therapeutic potential. With the advancement of nonviral delivery it has been possible to target NAMs against cancer, immunodeficiency and infectious diseases. Owing to the complex and fragile structure of NAMs, however, development of a suitable, stable formulation for a reasonable product shelf-life and efficacious delivery is indeed challenging to achieve. This review provides a synopsis of challenges in the formulation and stability of DNA/m-RNA based medicines and probable mitigation strategies including a brief summary of delivery options to the target cells. Nucleic acid based drugs at various stages of ongoing clinical trials are compiled. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Recent developments in nucleic acid delivery with polyethylenimines.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, Patrick; Kichler, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylenimines (PEIs) have proven to be highly efficient and versatile agents for nucleic acid delivery in vitro and in vivo. Despite the low biodegradability of these polymers, they have been used in several clinical trials and the results suggest that the nucleic acid/PEI complexes have a good safety profile. The high transfection efficiency of PEIs probably relies on the fact that these polymers possess a stock of amines that can undergo protonation during the acidification of endosomes. This buffering capacity likely enhances endosomal escape of the polyplexes through the "proton sponge" effect. PEIs have also attracted great interest because the presence of many amino groups allow for easy chemical modifications or conjugation of targeting moieties and hydrophilic polymers. In the present chapter, we summarize and discuss the mechanism of PEI-mediated transfection, as well as the recent developments in PEI-mediated DNA, antisense oligonucleotide, and siRNA delivery.

  1. A quantitative measure of chirality inside nucleic acid databank.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-08-01

    We show the capability of a chirality index (Pietropaolo et al., Proteins 2008;70:667-677) to investigate nucleic acid structures because of its high sensitivity to helical conformations. By analyzing selected structures of DNA and RNA, we have found that sequences rich in cytosine and guanine have a tendency to left-handed chirality, in contrast to regions rich in adenine or thymine which show strong negative, right-handed, chirality values. We also analyze RNA structures, where specific loops and hairpin motifs are characterized by a well-defined chirality value. We find that in nucleosome the chirality is exalted, whereas in ribosome it is reduced. Our results illustrate the sensitivity of this descriptor for nucleic acid conformations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Microwave-Assisted Rapid Enzymatic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Hari Das, Rakha; Ahirwar, Rajesh; Kumar, Saroj; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-07-02

    Herein we report microwave-induced enhancement of the reactions catalyzed by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and avian myeloblastosis virus-reverse transcriptase. The reactions induced by microwaves result in a highly selective synthesis of nucleic acids in 10-50 seconds. In contrast, same reactions failed to give desired reaction products when carried out in the same time periods, but without microwave irradiation. Each of the reactions was carried out for different duration of microwave exposure time to find the optimum reaction time. The products produced by the respective enzyme upon microwave irradiation of the reaction mixtures were identical to that produced by the conventional procedures. As the microwave-assisted reactions are rapid, microwave could be a useful alternative to the conventional and time consuming procedures of enzymatic synthesis of nucleic acids.

  3. Biological activity and biotechnological aspects of locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Karin E; Højland, Torben; Hansen, Bo R; Persson, Robert; Bramsen, Jesper B; Kjems, Jørgen; Koch, Troels; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2013-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most promising new nucleic acid analogues that has been produced under the past two decades. In this chapter, we have tried to cover many of the different areas, where this molecule has been used to improve the function of synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs). The use of LNA in antisense ONs, including gapmers, splice-switching ONs, and siLNA, as well as antigene ONs, is reviewed. Pharmacokinetics as well as pharmacodynamics of LNA ONs and a description of selected compounds in, or close to, clinical testing are described. In addition, new LNA modifications and the adaptation of enzymes for LNA incorporation are reviewed. Such enzymes may become important for the development of stabilized LNA-containing aptamers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Caged molecular beacons: controlling nucleic acid hybridization with light.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Zhu, Zhi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2011-05-28

    We have constructed a novel class of light-activatable caged molecular beacons (cMBs) that are caged by locking two stems with a photo-labile biomolecular interaction or covalent bond. With the cMBs, the nucleic acid hybridization process can be easily controlled with light, which offers the possibility for a high spatiotemporal resolution study of intracellular mRNAs. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  5. NanoDrop Microvolume Quantitation of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Philippe; Conklin, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Biomolecular assays are continually being developed that use progressively smaller amounts of material, often precluding the use of conventional cuvette-based instruments for nucleic acid quantitation for those that can perform microvolume quantitation. The NanoDrop microvolume sample retention system (Thermo Scientific NanoDrop Products) functions by combining fiber optic technology and natural surface tension properties to capture and retain minute amounts of sample independent of traditional containment apparatus such as cuvettes or capillaries. Furthermore, the system employs shorter path lengths, which result in a broad range of nucleic acid concentration measurements, essentially eliminating the need to perform dilutions. Reducing the volume of sample required for spectroscopic analysis also facilitates the inclusion of additional quality control steps throughout many molecular workflows, increasing efficiency and ultimately leading to greater confidence in downstream results. The need for high-sensitivity fluorescent analysis of limited mass has also emerged with recent experimental advances. Using the same microvolume sample retention technology, fluorescent measurements may be performed with 2 μL of material, allowing fluorescent assays volume requirements to be significantly reduced. Such microreactions of 10 μL or less are now possible using a dedicated microvolume fluorospectrometer. Two microvolume nucleic acid quantitation protocols will be demonstrated that use integrated sample retention systems as practical alternatives to traditional cuvette-based protocols. First, a direct A260 absorbance method using a microvolume spectrophotometer is described. This is followed by a demonstration of a fluorescence-based method that enables reduced-volume fluorescence reactions with a microvolume fluorospectrometer. These novel techniques enable the assessment of nucleic acid concentrations ranging from 1 pg/ μL to 15,000 ng/ μL with minimal consumption of

  6. Spontaneous mutual ordering of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed that the prebiotic ordering of nucleic acid and peptide sequences was a cooperative process in which nearly random populations of both kinds of polymers went through a codependent series of self-organisation events that simultaneously refined not only the accuracy of genetic replication and coding but also the functional specificity of protein catalysts, especially nascent aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase "urzymes".

  7. Excited-state properties of nucleic acid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salet, C.; Bensasson, R. V.; Becker, R. S.

    1981-12-01

    Measurements were made of the fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra and lifetimes, and also of the absorption spectra, lifetimes, extinction coefficients, and quantum yields of the T1 lower triplet states of thymine, uracil, their N, N'-dimethyl derivatives, thymidine, thymidine monophosphate, uridine, and uridine monophosphate in various solvents at 300 °K. The influence of the solvent on the quantum yield of the T1 state of nucleic acid components is discussed.

  8. DNA Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Sensors for Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Ferapontova, Elena E

    2018-06-12

    Sensitive, specific, and fast analysis of nucleic acids (NAs) is strongly needed in medicine, environmental science, biodefence, and agriculture for the study of bacterial contamination of food and beverages and genetically modified organisms. Electrochemistry offers accurate, simple, inexpensive, and robust tools for the development of such analytical platforms that can successfully compete with other approaches for NA detection. Here, electrode reactions of DNA, basic principles of electrochemical NA analysis, and their relevance for practical applications are reviewed and critically discussed.

  9. Method and apparatus for staining immobilized nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Foote, Robert S.; Jacobson, Stephen C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for staining immobilized nucleic acids includes the steps of affixing DNA probes to a solid substrate, moving target DNA material into proximity with the DNA probes, whereby the target DNA hybridized with specific ones of the DNA probes, and moving a fluorescent dye into proximity with the hybridized target DNA, whereby the fluorescent dye binds to the hybridized DNA to enable subsequent detection of fluorescence.

  10. System for portable nucleic acid testing in low resource settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsiang-Wei; Roskos, Kristina; Hickerson, Anna I.; Carey, Thomas; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to enable timely diagnosis of infectious diseases through nucleic acid testing at the point-of-care and in low resource settings, via a compact system that integrates nucleic acid sample preparation, isothermal DNA amplification, and nucleic acid lateral flow (NALF) detection. We herein present an interim milestone, the design of the amplification and detection subsystem, and the characterization of thermal and fluidic control and assay execution within this system. Using an earlier prototype of the amplification and detection unit, comprised of a disposable cartridge containing flexible pouches, passive valves, and electrolysis-driven pumps, in conjunction with a small heater, we have demonstrated successful execution of an established and clinically validated isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) reaction targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) DNA, coupled to NALF detection. The refined design presented herein incorporates miniaturized and integrated electrolytic pumps, novel passive valves, overall design changes to facilitate integration with an upstream sample preparation unit, and a refined instrument design that automates pumping, heating, and timing. Nucleic acid amplification occurs in a two-layer pouch that facilitates fluid handling and appropriate thermal control. The disposable cartridge is manufactured using low-cost and scalable techniques and forms a closed system to prevent workplace contamination by amplicons. In a parallel effort, we are developing a sample preparation unit based on similar design principles, which performs mechanical lysis of mycobacteria and DNA extraction from liquefied and disinfected sputum. Our next step is to combine sample preparation, amplification, and detection in a final integrated cartridge and device, to enable fully automated sample-in to answer-out diagnosis of active tuberculosis in primary care facilities of low-resource and high-burden countries.

  11. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  12. Histidine-lysine peptides as carriers of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Leng, Qixin; Goldgeier, Lisa; Zhu, Jingsong; Cambell, Patricia; Ambulos, Nicholas; Mixson, A James

    2007-03-01

    With their biodegradability and diversity of permutations, peptides have significant potential as carriers of nucleic acids. This review will focus on the sequence and branching patterns of peptide carriers composed primarily of histidines and lysines. While lysines within peptides are important for binding to the negatively charged phosphates, histidines are critical for endosomal lysis enabling nucleic acids to reach the cytosol. Histidine-lysine (HK) polymers by either covalent or ionic bonds with liposomes augment transfection compared to liposome carriers alone. More recently, we have examined peptides as sole carriers of nucleic acids because of their intrinsic advantages compared to the bipartite HK/liposome carriers. With a protocol change and addition of a histidine-rich tail, HK peptides as sole carriers were more effective than liposomes alone in several cell lines. While four-branched polymers with a primary repeating sequence pattern of -HHK- were more effective as carriers of plasmids, eight-branched polymers with a sequence pattern of -HHHK- were more effective as carriers of siRNA. Compared to polyethylenimine, HK carriers of siRNA and plasmids had reduced toxicity. When injected intravenously, HK polymers in complex with plasmids encoding antiangiogenic proteins significantly decreased tumor growth. Furthermore, modification of HK polymers with polyethylene glycol and vascular-specific ligands increased specificity of the polyplex to the tumor by more than 40-fold. Together with further development and insight on the structure of HK polyplexes, HK peptides may prove to be useful as carriers of different forms of nucleic acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei [Darien, IL

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  14. A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay based on strand displacement.

    PubMed Central

    Vary, C P

    1987-01-01

    A homogeneous nucleic acid hybridization assay which is conducted in solution and requires no separation steps is described. The assay is based on the concept of strand displacement. In the strand displacement assay, an RNA "signal strand" is hybridized within a larger DNA strand termed the "probe strand", which is, in turn, complementary to the target nucleic acid of interest. Hybridization of the target nucleic acid with the probe strand ultimately results in displacement of the RNA signal strand. Strand displacement, therefore, causes conversion of the RNA from double to single-stranded form. The single-strand specificity of polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8) allows discrimination between double-helical and single-stranded forms of the RNA signal strand. As displacement proceeds, free RNA signal strands are preferentially phosphorolyzed to component nucleoside diphosphates, including adenosine diphosphate. The latter nucleotide is converted to ATP by pyruvate kinase(EC 2.7.1.40). Luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence is employed to measure the ATP generated as a result of strand displacement. Images PMID:3309890

  15. Immune activation by nucleic acids: A role in pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Konečná, B; Lauková, L; Vlková, B

    2018-04-01

    Cell-free self-DNA or RNA may induce an immune response by activating specific sensing receptors. During pregnancy, placental nucleic acids present in the maternal circulation further activate these receptors due to the presence of unmethylated CpG islands. A higher concentration of cell-free foetal DNA is associated with pregnancy complications and a higher risk for foetal rejection. Cell-free foetal DNA originates from placental trophoblasts. It appears in different forms: free, bound to histones in nucleosomes, in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and in extracellular vesicles (EVs). In several pregnancy complications, cell-free foetal DNA triggers the production of proinflammatory cytokines, and this production results in a cellular and humoral immune response. This review discusses preeclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, foetal growth restriction, gestational diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and obesity in pregnancy from an immunological point of view and closely examines the different pathways that result in maternal inflammation. Understanding the role of cell-free nucleic acids, as well as the biogenesis of NETs and EVs, will help us to specify their functions or targets, which seem to be important in pregnancy complications. It is still not clear whether higher concentrations of cell-free nucleic acids in the maternal circulation are the cause or consequence of various complications. Therefore, further clinical studies and, even more importantly, animal experiments that focus on the involved immunological pathways are needed. © 2018 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  16. The role of immunostimulatory nucleic acids in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand; Kumar, Aseem

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis and its associated syndromes represent the systemic host response to severe infection and is manifested by varying degrees of hypotension, coagulopathy, and multiorgan dysfunction. Despite great efforts being made to understand this condition and designing therapies to treat sepsis, mortality rates are still high in septic patients. Characterization of the complex molecular signaling networks between the various components of host-pathogen interactions, highlights the difficulty in identifying a single driving force responsible for sepsis. Although triggering the inflammatory response is generally considered as protective against pathogenic threats, the interplay between the signaling pathways that are induced or suppressed during sepsis may harm the host. Numerous surveillance mechanisms have evolved to discriminate self from foreign agents and accordingly provoke an effective cellular response to target the pathogens. Nucleic acids are not only an essential genetic component, but sensing their molecular signature is also an important quality control mechanism which has evolved to maintain the integrity of the human genome. Evidence that has accumulated recently indicated that distinct pattern recognition receptors sense nucleic acids released from infectious organisms or from damaged host cells, resulting in the modulation of intracellular signalling cascades. Immunoreceptor-mediated detection of these nucleic acids induces antigen-specific immunity, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and thus are implicated in a range of diseases including septic shock. PMID:22328944

  17. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  18. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-12-19

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Nucleic acid aptamers as adjuncts to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kristian C D; Becker, Richard C

    2006-04-01

    Nucleic acid 'aptamers', a term derived from the Latin word aptus, 'to fit', are RNA or DNA oligonucleotides that conform to the three-dimensional structure of a selected protein, peptide or small molecules' functional moiety. The 'lock and key' relationship between aptamers and their binding partner permits distinction between closely related but non-identical members of a protein family, or between different functional or conformational states of the same protein. This, along with other properties, separates aptamers from antibodies--the most popular class of molecular recognition tool for the past three decades. Despite the chemical, biological and manufacturing advantages offered by nucleic acid aptamers in a wide variety of conditions, and their generation against a range of clinically relevant targets, including growth factors, transcription factors and coagulation proteins, by two dozen or more companies devoted to the technology platform, only one aptamer, developed for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration, is currently available for use in humans. Nevertheless, phase I and II clinical trials for several indications are proceeding with considerable enthusiasm. The potential application of nucleic acid aptamers in novel arenas, including molecular imaging, vaccine development, immunomodulation, decoys for natural RNA-binding events, antiviral therapeutics and both cancer prophylaxis and treatment, is emerging with a pioneering mentality destined to change the paradigm of patient care.

  20. DNA Polymorphism: A Comparison of Force Fields for Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Swarnalatha Y.; Leclerc, Fabrice; Karplus, Martin

    2003-01-01

    The improvements of the force fields and the more accurate treatment of long-range interactions are providing more reliable molecular dynamics simulations of nucleic acids. The abilities of certain nucleic acid force fields to represent the structural and conformational properties of nucleic acids in solution are compared. The force fields are AMBER 4.1, BMS, CHARMM22, and CHARMM27; the comparison of the latter two is the primary focus of this paper. The performance of each force field is evaluated first on its ability to reproduce the B-DNA decamer d(CGATTAATCG)2 in solution with simulations in which the long-range electrostatics were treated by the particle mesh Ewald method; the crystal structure determined by Quintana et al. (1992) is used as the starting point for all simulations. A detailed analysis of the structural and solvation properties shows how well the different force fields can reproduce sequence-specific features. The results are compared with data from experimental and previous theoretical studies. PMID:12609851

  1. Nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategy for biochemical analysis: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Qing, Taiping; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Wen, Li; Shangguan, Jingfang; Mao, Zhengui; Lei, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Owing to their highly efficient catalytic effects and substrate specificity, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are applied as 'nano-tools' for manipulating different nucleic acid substrates both in the test-tube and in living organisms. In addition to the function as molecular scissors and molecular glue in genetic engineering, the application of nucleic acid tool enzymes in biochemical analysis has also been extensively developed in the past few decades. Used as amplifying labels for biorecognition events, the nucleic acid tool enzymes are mainly applied in nucleic acids amplification sensing, as well as the amplification sensing of biorelated variations of nucleic acids. With the introduction of aptamers, which can bind different target molecules, the nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided signal amplification strategies can also be used to sense non-nucleic targets (e.g., ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells). This review describes and discusses the amplification strategies of nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors for biochemical analysis applications. Various analytes, including nucleic acids, ions, small molecules, proteins, and cells, are reviewed briefly. This work also addresses the future trends and outlooks for signal amplification in nucleic acid tool enzymes-aided biosensors.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  3. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  4. Selective Attachment of Nucleic Acid Molecules to Patterned Self-Assembled Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    of different sequence is accomplished by placement of 8 liquid portions of nucleic acids at the desired position on the 9 filter. This method is...acids are selectively 24 bound from regions to which nucleic acids are excluded, other than 25 by placement of liquid aliquots (generally >1 Al) of...is typically non-covalent (i.e., ionic 16 bonding, or, less often, hydrogen bonding). Advantageously, non- 17 covalent bonding of nucleic acid

  5. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  6. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert B.

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  7. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  8. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  9. Nonenzymatic catalytic signal amplification for nucleic acid hybridization assays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wenhong (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices, methods, and kits for amplifying the signal from hybridization reactions between nucleic acid probes and their cognate targets are presented. The devices provide partially-duplexed, immobilized probe complexes, spatially separate from and separately addressable from immobilized docking strands. Cognate target acts catalytically to transfer probe from the site of probe complex immobilization to the site of immobilized docking strand, generating a detectable signal. The methods and kits of the present invention may be used to identify the presence of cognate target in a fluid sample.

  10. Phosphoryl Guanidines: A New Type of Nucleic Acid Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Kupryushkin, M. S.; Pyshnyi, D. V.; Stetsenko, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    A new type of nucleic acid analogues with a phosphoryl guanidine group is described. Oxidation of polymer-supported dinucleoside 2-cyanoethyl phosphite by iodine in the presence of 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl guanidine yields a dinucleotide with an internucleoside tetramethyl phosphoryl guanidine (Tmg) group as the main product. The Tmg group is stable under conditions of solid-phase DNA synthesis and subsequent cleavage and deprotection with ammonia. Oligonucleotides with one or more Tmg groups bind their complementary DNA or RNA with affinity similar to that of natural oligodeoxyribonucleotides. PMID:25558402

  11. Nucleic acid constructs containing orthogonal site selective recombinases (OSSRs)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Dueber, John E.

    The present invention provides for a recombinant nucleic acid comprising a nucleotide sequence comprising a plurality of constructs, wherein each construct independently comprises a nucleotide sequence of interest flanked by a pair of recombinase recognition sequences. Each pair of recombinase recognition sequences is recognized by a distinct recombinase. Optionally, each construct can, independently, further comprise one or more genes encoding a recombinase capable of recognizing the pair of recombinase recognition sequences of the construct. The recombinase can be an orthogonal (non-cross reacting), site-selective recombinase (OSSR).

  12. Nucleic acid chaperone activity of retroviral Gag proteins.

    PubMed

    Rein, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Retrovirus particles in which the Gag protein has not yet been cleaved by the viral protease are termed immature particles. The viral RNA within these particles shows clear evidence of the action of a nucleic acid chaperone (NAC): the genomic RNA is dimeric, and a cellular tRNA molecule is annealed, by its 3' 18 nucleotides, to a complementary stretch in the viral RNA, in preparation for priming reverse transcription in the next round of infection. It seems very likely that the NAC that has catalyzed dimerization and tRNA annealing is the NC domain of the Gag protein itself. However, neither the dimeric linkage nor the tRNA:viral RNA complex has the same structure as those in mature virus particles: thus the conformational effects of Gag within the particles are not equivalent to those of the free NC protein present in mature particles. It is not known whether these dissimilarities reflect intrinsic differences in the NAC activities of Gag and NC, or limitations on Gag imposed by the structure of the immature particle. Analysis of the interactions of recombinant Gag proteins with nucleic acids is complicated by the fact that they result in assembly of virus-like particles. Nevertheless, the available data indicates that the affinity of Gag for nucleic acids can be considerably higher than that of free NC. This enhanced affinity may be due to contributions of the matrix domain, a positively charged region at the N-terminus of Gag; interactions of neighboring Gag molecules with each other may also increase the affinity due to cooperativity of the binding. Recombinant HIV-1 Gag protein clearly exhibits NAC activity. In two well-studied experimental systems, Gag was more efficient than NC, as its NAC effects could be detected at a significantly lower molar ratio of protein to nucleotide than with NC. In one system, binding of nucleic acid by the matrix domain of Gag retarded the Gag-induced annealing of two RNAs; this effect could be ameliorated by the competitive

  13. Real-time assays with molecular beacons and other fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E; Tyagi, Sanjay; Kramer, Fred Russell

    2006-01-01

    A number of formats for nucleic acid hybridization have been developed to identify DNA and RNA sequences that are involved in cellular processes and that aid in the diagnosis of genetic and infectious diseases. The introduction of hybridization probes with interactive fluorophore pairs has enabled the development of homogeneous hybridization assays for the direct identification of nucleic acids. A change in the fluorescence of these probes indicates the presence of a target nucleic acid, and there is no need to separate unbound probes from hybridized probes. The advantages of homogeneous hybridization assays are their speed and simplicity. In addition, homogeneous assays can be combined with nucleic acid amplification, enabling the detection of rare target nucleic acids. These assays can be followed in real time, providing quantitative determination of target nucleic acids over a broad range of concentrations.

  14. Introduction of structural affinity handles as a tool in selective nucleic acid separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, III, Richard Coale (Inventor); Cano, Luis Antonio (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The method is used for separating nucleic acids and other similar constructs. It involves selective introduction, enhancement, or stabilization of affinity handles such as single-strandedness in the undesired (or desired) nucleic acids as compared to the usual structure (e.g., double-strandedness) of the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids. The undesired (or desired) nucleic acids are separated from the desired (or undesired) nucleic acids due to capture by methods including but not limited to immobilized metal affinity chromatography, immobilized single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) protein, and immobilized oligonucleotides. The invention is useful to: remove contaminating genomic DNA from plasmid DNA; remove genomic DNA from plasmids, BACs, and similar constructs; selectively separate oligonucleotides and similar DNA fragments from their partner strands; purification of aptamers, (deoxy)-ribozymes and other highly structured nucleic acids; Separation of restriction fragments without using agarose gels; manufacture recombinant Taq polymerase or similar products that are sensitive to host genomic DNA contamination; and other applications.

  15. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) for Detecting Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hellman, Lance M.; Fried, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) is used to detect protein complexes with nucleic acids. It is the core technology underlying a wide range of qualitative and quantitative analyses for the characterization of interacting systems. In the classical assay, solutions of protein and nucleic acid are combined and the resulting mixtures are subjected to electrophoresis under native conditions through polyacrylamide or agarose gel. After electrophoresis, the distribution of species containing nucleic acid is determined, usually by autoradiography of 32P-labeled nucleic acid. In general, protein-nucleic acid complexes migrate more slowly than the corresponding free nucleic acid. In this article, we identify the most important factors that determine the stabilities and electrophoretic mobilities of complexes under assay conditions. A representative protocol is provided and commonly used variants are discussed. Expected outcomes are briefly described. References to extensions of the method and a troubleshooting guide are provided. PMID:17703195

  16. Small molecule-mediated duplex formation of nucleic acids with 'incompatible' backbones.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Musetti, Caterina; Kim, Keunsoo; Horowitz, Eric D; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-07

    Proflavine, a known intercalator of DNA and RNA, promotes duplex formation by nucleic acids with natural and non-natural backbones that otherwise form duplexes with low thermal stability, and even some that show no sign of duplex formation in the absence of proflavine. These findings demonstrate the potential for intercalators to be used as cofactors for the assembly of rationally designed nucleic acid structures, and could provide fundamental insights regarding intercalation of natural nucleic acid duplexes.

  17. Prebiotic synthesis of carboxylic acids, amino acids and nucleic acid bases from formamide under photochemical conditions⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Lorenzo; Mattia Bizzarri, Bruno; Piccinino, Davide; Fornaro, Teresa; Robert Brucato, John; Saladino, Raffaele

    2017-07-01

    The photochemical transformation of formamide in the presence of a mixture of TiO2 and ZnO metal oxides as catalysts afforded a large panel of molecules of biological relevance, including carboxylic acids, amino acids and nucleic acid bases. The reaction was less effective when performed in the presence of only one mineral, highlighting the role of synergic effects between the photoactive catalysts. Taken together, these results suggest that the synthesis of chemical precursors for both the genetic and the metabolic apparatuses might have occurred in a simple environment, consisting of formamide, photoactive metal oxides and UV-radiation.

  18. Accelerated digestion of nucleic acids by pepsin from the stomach of chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Guo, H; Wu, W; Dong, P; Liang, X

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acids have become an important nutritional supplement in poultry feed; however, the digestion of nucleic acids in poultry is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the digestion of nucleic acids by chicken pepsin in vitro. The extracted pepsinogen from the stomach of the chicken was purified to homogeneity. Upon activation at pH 2.0, chicken pepsinogen was converted to its active form. Nucleic acids, including λ-DNA, salmon sperm DNA and single-strand DNA (ssDNA), can be used as substrates and digested into short-chain oligonucleotides by pepsin. Interestingly, the digestion of the nucleic acids was inhibited when pepsin was treated by alkaline solution (pH 8.0) or pepstatin A. Also, the digestion of the nucleic acids was not affected by the addition of haemoglobin or bovine serum albumin. The results suggested that nucleic acids could be digested by chicken pepsin. Thus pepsin may have a role in digesting nucleic acids in vivo. Nucleic acids added to poultry fed may be digested, starting from the stomach.

  19. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2013-01-29

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  20. BGL6 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2012-10-02

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  1. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-02-28

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  2. BGL5 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl5, and the corresponding BGL5 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL5, recombinant BGL5 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  3. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2007-09-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  4. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-04-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  5. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2011-12-06

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  6. BGL4 .beta.-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2006-05-16

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  7. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2011-06-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  8. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2009-09-01

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  9. BGL3 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yao, Jian

    2012-10-30

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl3, and the corresponding BGL3 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL3, recombinant BGL3 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  10. BGL4 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel [Los Gatos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA; Yao, Jian [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-01-22

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl4, and the corresponding BGL4 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL4, recombinant BGL4 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  12. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-04

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-04-14

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  14. BGL7 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl7, and the corresponding BGL7 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL7, recombinant BGL7 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  15. BGL6 beta-glucosidase and nucleic acids encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Ward, Michael

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides a novel .beta.-glucosidase nucleic acid sequence, designated bgl6, and the corresponding BGL6 amino acid sequence. The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding BGL6, recombinant BGL6 proteins and methods for producing the same.

  16. New Approaches Towards Recognition of Nucleic Acid Triple Helices

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    We show that groove recognition of nucleic acid triple helices can be achieved with aminosugars. Among these aminosugars, neomycin is the most effective aminoglycoside (groove binder) for stabilizing a DNA triple helix. It stabilizes both the T·A·T triplex and mixed-base DNA triplexes better than known DNA minor groove binders (which usually destabilize the triplex) and polyamines. Neomycin selectively stabilizes the triplex (T·A·T and mixed base) without any effect on the DNA duplex. The selectivity of neomycin likely originates from its potential and shape complementarity to the triplex Watson–Hoogsteen groove, making it the first molecule that selectively recognizes a triplex groove over a duplex groove. The groove recognition of aminoglycosides is not limited to DNA triplexes, but also extends to RNA and hybrid triple helical structures. Intercalator–neomycin conjugates are shown to simultaneously probe the base stacking and groove surface in the DNA triplex. Calorimetric and spectrosocopic studies allow the quantification of the effect of surface area of the intercalating moiety on binding to the triplex. These studies outline a novel approach to the recognition of DNA triplexes that incorporates the use of non-competing binding sites. These principles of dual recognition should be applicable to the design of ligands that can bind any given nucleic acid target with nanomolar affinities and with high selectivity. PMID:21073199

  17. Evolution of sequence-defined highly functionalized nucleic acid polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Lichtor, Phillip A.; Berliner, Adrian P.; Chen, Jonathan C.; Liu, David R.

    2018-03-01

    The evolution of sequence-defined synthetic polymers made of building blocks beyond those compatible with polymerase enzymes or the ribosome has the potential to generate new classes of receptors, catalysts and materials. Here we describe a ligase-mediated DNA-templated polymerization and in vitro selection system to evolve highly functionalized nucleic acid polymers (HFNAPs) made from 32 building blocks that contain eight chemically diverse side chains on a DNA backbone. Through iterated cycles of polymer translation, selection and reverse translation, we discovered HFNAPs that bind proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and interleukin-6, two protein targets implicated in human diseases. Mutation and reselection of an active PCSK9-binding polymer yielded evolved polymers with high affinity (KD = 3 nM). This evolved polymer potently inhibited the binding between PCSK9 and the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that specific side chains at defined positions in the polymers are required for binding to their respective targets. Our findings expand the chemical space of evolvable polymers to include densely functionalized nucleic acids with diverse, researcher-defined chemical repertoires.

  18. Optimization of Diamond Nucleic Acid Dye for quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Tobe, Shanan S; Linacre, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Here, we evaluate Diamond Nucleic Acid Dye (DD) for use in quantitative PCR (qPCR) applications. Although DD is a commercially available stain for detection of DNA separated by gel electrophoresis, its use as a detection dye in qPCR has yet to be described. To determine if DD can be used in qPCR, we investigated its inhibitory effects on qPCR at concentrations ranging 0.1-2.5×. Serial dilution of DNA was used to determine the efficiency, sensitivity, and linearity of DD-generated qPCR data in comparison to other commonly used fluorescent dyes such as SYBR Green (SG), EvaGreen (EG), and BRYT Green (BG). DD was found to be comparable with other dyes for qPCR applications, with an R2 value >0.9 and an efficiency of 0.83. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) target signals were successfully produced by DD over a DNA dilution range of ~28 ng- 0.28 pg, demonstrating comparable sensitivity to the other dyes investigated. Cq values obtained using DD were lower than those using EG by almost 7 cycles. We conclude that Diamond Nucleic Acid Dye is a cheaper, less toxic alternative for qPCR applications.

  19. Functional nucleic acids as in vivo metabolite and ion biosensors.

    PubMed

    Alsaafin, Alaa; McKeague, Maureen

    2017-08-15

    Characterizing the role of metabolites, metals, and proteins is required to understand normal cell function, and ultimately, elucidate the mechanism of disease. Metabolite concentration and transformation results collected from cell lysates or fixed-cells conceal important dynamic information and differences between individual cells that often have profound functional consequences. Functional nucleic acid-based biosensors are emerging tools that are capable of monitoring ions and metabolites in cell populations or whole animals. Functional nucleic acids (FNAs) are a class of biomolecules that can exhibit either ligand binding or enzymatic activity. Unlike their protein analogues or the use of instrument-based analysis, FNA-based biosensors are capable of entering cells without disruption to the cellular environment and can report on the concentration, dynamics, and spatial localization of molecules in cells. Here, we review the types of FNAs that have been used as in vivo biosensors, and how FNAs can be coupled to transduction systems and delivered inside cells. We also provide examples from the literature that demonstrate their impact in practical applications. Finally, we comment on the critical limitations that need to be addressed to enable their use for single-cell dynamic tracking of metabolites and ions in vivo. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rapid and simple method for purification of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Boom, R; Sol, C J; Salimans, M M; Jansen, C L; Wertheim-van Dillen, P M; van der Noordaa, J

    1990-03-01

    We have developed a simple, rapid, and reliable protocol for the small-scale purification of DNA and RNA from, e.g., human serum and urine. The method is based on the lysing and nuclease-inactivating properties of the chaotropic agent guanidinium thiocyanate together with the nucleic acid-binding properties of silica particles or diatoms in the presence of this agent. By using size-fractionated silica particles, nucleic acids (covalently closed circular, relaxed circular, and linear double-stranded DNA; single-stranded DNA; and rRNA) could be purified from 12 different specimens in less than 1 h and were recovered in the initial reaction vessel. Purified DNA (although significantly sheared) was a good substrate for restriction endonucleases and DNA ligase and was recovered with high yields (usually over 50%) from the picogram to the microgram level. Copurified rRNA was recovered almost undegraded. Substituting size-fractionated silica particles for diatoms (the fossilized cell walls of unicellular algae) allowed for the purification of microgram amounts of genomic DNA, plasmid DNA, and rRNA from cell-rich sources, as exemplified for pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, we show representative experiments illustrating some characteristics of the procedure which may have wide application in clinical microbiology.

  1. Semiquantitative Nucleic Acid Test with Simultaneous Isotachophoretic Extraction and Amplification.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrew T; Borysiak, Mark D; Levenson, Amanda M; Lillis, Lorraine; Boyle, David S; Posner, Jonathan D

    2018-06-19

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) provide high diagnostic accuracy for infectious diseases and quantitative results for monitoring viral infections. The majority of NAATs require complex equipment, cold chain dependent reagents, and skilled technicians to perform the tests. This largely confines NAATs to centralized laboratories and can significantly delay appropriate patient care. Low-cost, point-of-care (POC) NAATs are especially needed in low-resource settings to provide patients with diagnosis and treatment planning in a single visit to improve patient care. In this work, we present a rapid POC NAAT with integrated sample preparation and amplification using electrokinetics and paper substrates. We use simultaneous isotachophoresis (ITP) and recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) to rapidly extract, amplify, and detect target nucleic acids from serum and whole blood in a paper-based format. We demonstrate simultaneous ITP and RPA can consistently detect 5 copies per reaction in buffer and 10 000 copies per milliliter of human serum with no intermediate user steps. We also show preliminary extraction and amplification of DNA from whole blood samples. Our test is rapid (results in less than 20 min) and made from low-cost materials, indicating its potential for detecting infectious diseases and monitoring viral infections at the POC in low resource settings.

  2. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    DOEpatents

    Nolan, John P [Santa Fe, NM; White, P Scott [Los Alamos, NM

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  3. Compatible solute influence on nucleic acids: Many questions but few answers

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic osmolytes including but not limited to sugars, polyols, amino acids, and their derivatives. They are compatible with cell metabolism even at molar concentrations. A variety of organisms synthesize or take up compatible solutes for adaptation to extreme environments. In addition to their protective action on whole cells, compatible solutes display significant effects on biomolecules in vitro. These include stabilization of native protein and nucleic acid structures. They are used as additives in polymerase chain reactions to increase product yield and specificity, but also in other nucleic acid and protein applications. Interactions of compatible solutes with nucleic acids and protein-nucleic acid complexes are much less understood than the corresponding interactions of compatible solutes with proteins. Although we may begin to understand solute/nucleic acid interactions there are only few answers to the many questions we have. I summarize here the current state of knowledge and discuss possible molecular mechanisms and thermodynamics. PMID:18522725

  4. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a... cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays is a device intended to help monitor reliability of a test system by...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material for...

  9. Apparatus for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2016-04-19

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  10. Methods for point-of-care detection of nucleic acid in a sample

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.

    2015-12-29

    Provided herein are methods and apparatus for detecting a target nucleic acid in a sample and related methods and apparatus for diagnosing a condition in an individual. The condition is associated with presence of nucleic acid produced by certain pathogens in the individual.

  11. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  12. Refinement of Generalized Born Implicit Solvation Parameters for Nucleic Acids and their Complexes with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai; Pérez, Alberto; Bermeo, Sherry; Simmerling, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The Generalized Born (GB) implicit solvent model has undergone significant improvements in accuracy for modeling of proteins and small molecules. However, GB still remains a less widely explored option for nucleic acid simulations, in part because fast GB models are often unable to maintain stable nucleic acid structures, or they introduce structural bias in proteins, leading to difficulty in application of GB models in simulations of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Recently, GB-neck2 was developed to improve the behavior of protein simulations. In an effort to create a more accurate model for nucleic acids, a similar procedure to the development of GB-neck2 is described here for nucleic acids. The resulting parameter set significantly reduces absolute and relative energy error relative to Poisson Boltzmann for both nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, when compared to its predecessor GB-neck model. This improvement in solvation energy calculation translates to increased structural stability for simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes, quadruplexes, and protein-nucleic acid complexes. The GB-neck2 model also enables successful folding of small DNA and RNA hairpins to near native structures as determined from comparison with experiment. The functional form and all required parameters are provided here and also implemented in the AMBER software. PMID:26574454

  13. Availability: A Metric for Nucleic Acid Strand Displacement Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DNA strand displacement systems have transformative potential in synthetic biology. While powerful examples have been reported in DNA nanotechnology, such systems are plagued by leakage, which limits network stability, sensitivity, and scalability. An approach to mitigate leakage in DNA nanotechnology, which is applicable to synthetic biology, is to introduce mismatches to complementary fuel sequences at key locations. However, this method overlooks nuances in the secondary structure of the fuel and substrate that impact the leakage reaction kinetics in strand displacement systems. In an effort to quantify the impact of secondary structure on leakage, we introduce the concepts of availability and mutual availability and demonstrate their utility for network analysis. Our approach exposes vulnerable locations on the substrate and quantifies the secondary structure of fuel strands. Using these concepts, a 4-fold reduction in leakage has been achieved. The result is a rational design process that efficiently suppresses leakage and provides new insight into dynamic nucleic acid networks. PMID:26875531

  14. 2011 Rita Schaffer lecture: nanoparticles for intracellular nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan J

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles are a promising technology for delivery of new types of therapeutics. A polymer library approach has allowed engineering of polymeric particles that are particularly effective for the delivery of DNA and siRNA to human cells. Certain chemical structural motifs, degradable linkages, hydrophobicity, and biophysical properties are key for successful intracellular delivery. Small differences to biomaterial structure, and especially the type of degradable linkage in the polymers, can be critical for successful delivery of siRNA vs. DNA. Furthermore, subtle changes to biomaterial structure can facilitate cell-type gene delivery specificity between human brain cancer cells and healthy cells as well as between human retinal endothelial cells and epithelial cells. These polymeric nanoparticles are effective for nucleic acid delivery in a broad range of human cell types and have applications to regenerative medicine, ophthalmology, and cancer among many other biomedical research areas.

  15. Availability: A Metric for Nucleic Acid Strand Displacement Systems.

    PubMed

    Olson, Xiaoping; Kotani, Shohei; Padilla, Jennifer E; Hallstrom, Natalya; Goltry, Sara; Lee, Jeunghoon; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L; Graugnard, Elton

    2017-01-20

    DNA strand displacement systems have transformative potential in synthetic biology. While powerful examples have been reported in DNA nanotechnology, such systems are plagued by leakage, which limits network stability, sensitivity, and scalability. An approach to mitigate leakage in DNA nanotechnology, which is applicable to synthetic biology, is to introduce mismatches to complementary fuel sequences at key locations. However, this method overlooks nuances in the secondary structure of the fuel and substrate that impact the leakage reaction kinetics in strand displacement systems. In an effort to quantify the impact of secondary structure on leakage, we introduce the concepts of availability and mutual availability and demonstrate their utility for network analysis. Our approach exposes vulnerable locations on the substrate and quantifies the secondary structure of fuel strands. Using these concepts, a 4-fold reduction in leakage has been achieved. The result is a rational design process that efficiently suppresses leakage and provides new insight into dynamic nucleic acid networks.

  16. Spherical Nucleic Acids: A New Form of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Joshua Isaac

    Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) are a new class of nucleic acid-based nanomaterials that exhibit unique properties currently being explored in the contexts of gene-based cancer therapies and in the design of programmable nanoparticle-based materials. The properties of SNAs differ from canonical, linear nucleic acids by virtue of their dense packing into an oriented 3-dimensional array. SNAs can be synthesized from a number of useful nanoparticle templates, such as plasmonic gold and silver, magnetic oxides, luminescent semi-conductor quantum dots, and silica. In addition, by crosslinking the oligonucleotides and dissolving the core, they can be made in a hollow form as well. This dissertation describes the evolution of SNAs from initial studies of inorganic nanoparticle-based materials densely functionalized with oligonucleotides to the proving of a hypothesis that their unique properties can be observed in a core-less structure if the nucleic acids are densely packed and highly oriented. Chapter two describes the synthesis of densely functionalized polyvalent oligonucleotide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. These particles are shown to exhibit cooperative binding in a density- and salt concentration-dependent fashion, with nearly identical behaviors to those of SNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Importantly, these particles are the first non-gold particles shown to be capable of entering cells in high numbers via the SNA-mediated cellular uptake pathway, and provided the first evidence that SNA-mediated cellular uptake is core-independent. In the third chapter, a gold nanoparticle catalyzed alkyne cross-linking reaction is described that is capable of forming hollow organic nanoparticles using polymers with alkyne-functionalized backbones. With this method, the alkyne-modified polymers adsorb to the particle surfaces, cross-link on the surface, allowing the gold nanoparticle to be

  17. Accelerated isothermal nucleic acid amplification in betaine-free reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cuiping; Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Pansong; Shi, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Betaine was used as a common additive to isothermal nucleic acid amplification reactions because of lowering the melting temperature (Tm) of DNA. Herein, we reported a novel finding that betaine was inhibiting the reaction efficiency of isothermal amplification reactions. In this work, we have verified this finding by classical loop-mediated isothermal amplification that the addition of 0.8 M betaine inhibited the efficiency of reaction dropping to approximately 1%. Additionally, we clarified the mechanism of betaine hindering isothermal amplification reactions with a molecular barrier to lower associate rate constant K1 for intermolecular hybridization. This finding would be very significant for studies on the interaction between small molecule substance and DNA, and the development of point-of-care testing because of simplifying reaction system and increasing reaction efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nucleic acids--genes, drugs, molecular lego and more.

    PubMed

    Häner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Chemically modified nucleic acids find widespread use as tools in research, as diagnostic reagents and even as pharmaceutical compounds. On the background of antisense research and development, the synthesis and evaluation of modified oligonucleotides was intensively pursued in the early to mid nineties in corporate research of former Ciba. Most of these efforts concentrated on the development of sugar and/or backbone-modified derivatives for pharmaceutical applications. Additionally, oligonucleotide metal conjugates were investigated with the goal to develop artificial ribonucleases. Since the turn of the millennium also the potential of non-nucleosidic and non-hydrogen bonding building blocks has increasingly been recognized. Such derivatives possess unique properties that may have an impact in the fields of materials and genetic research. In this brief account, we take a personal look back on some past as well as some recent results.

  19. Mfold web server for nucleic acid folding and hybridization prediction.

    PubMed

    Zuker, Michael

    2003-07-01

    The abbreviated name, 'mfold web server', describes a number of closely related software applications available on the World Wide Web (WWW) for the prediction of the secondary structure of single stranded nucleic acids. The objective of this web server is to provide easy access to RNA and DNA folding and hybridization software to the scientific community at large. By making use of universally available web GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces), the server circumvents the problem of portability of this software. Detailed output, in the form of structure plots with or without reliability information, single strand frequency plots and 'energy dot plots', are available for the folding of single sequences. A variety of 'bulk' servers give less information, but in a shorter time and for up to hundreds of sequences at once. The portal for the mfold web server is http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/mfold. This URL will be referred to as 'MFOLDROOT'.

  20. Multi-chamber nucleic acid amplification and detection device

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Lawrence

    A nucleic acid amplification and detection device includes an amplification cartridge with a plurality of reaction chambers for containing an amplification reagent and a visual detection reagent, and a plurality of optically transparent view ports for viewing inside the reaction chambers. The cartridge also includes a sample receiving port which is adapted to receive a fluid sample and fluidically connected to distribute the fluid sample to the reaction chamber, and in one embodiment, a plunger is carried by the cartridge for occluding fluidic communication to the reaction chambers. The device also includes a heating apparatus having a heating element whichmore » is activated by controller to generate heat when a trigger event is detected. The heating apparatus includes a cartridge-mounting section which positioned a cartridge in thermal communication with the heating element so that visual changes to the contents of the reaction chambers are viewable through the view ports.« less

  1. Nucleic Acid-Based Approaches for Detection of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Ranjbar, Reza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determining suitable nucleic acid diagnostics for individual viral hepatitis agent, an extensive search using related keywords was done in major medical library and data were collected, categorized, and summarized in different sections. Results: Various types of molecular biology tools can be used to detect and quantify viral genomic elements and analyze the sequences. These molecular assays are proper technologies for rapidly detecting viral agents with high accuracy, high sensitivity, and high specificity. Nonetheless, the application of each diagnostic method is completely dependent on viral agent. Conclusions: Despite rapidity, automation, accuracy, cost-effectiveness, high sensitivity, and high specificity of molecular techniques, each type of molecular technology has its own advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25789132

  2. Drug delivery systems based on nucleic acid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan Willem; Zhang, Feng; Herrmann, Andreas

    2013-12-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has progressed rapidly in recent years and hence a large variety of 1D-, 2D- and 3D DNA nanostructures with various sizes, geometries and shapes is readily accessible. DNA-based nanoobjects are fabricated by straight forward design and self-assembly processes allowing the exact positioning of functional moieties and the integration of other materials. At the same time some of these nanosystems are characterized by a low toxicity profile. As a consequence, the use of these architectures in a biomedical context has been explored. In this review the progress and possibilities of pristine nucleic acid nanostructures and DNA hybrid materials for drug delivery will be discussed. For the latter class of structures, a distinction is made between carriers with an inorganic core composed of gold or silica and amphiphilic DNA block copolymers that exhibit a soft hydrophobic interior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nucleic acid extraction techniques and application to the microchip.

    PubMed

    Price, Carol W; Leslie, Daniel C; Landers, James P

    2009-09-07

    As recently as the early 1990s, DNA purification was time-consuming, requiring the use of toxic, hazardous reagents. The advent of solid phase extraction techniques and the availability of commercial kits for quick and reliable DNA extraction has relegated those early techniques largely to the history books. High quality DNA can now be extracted from whole blood, serum, saliva, urine, stool, cerebral spinal fluid, tissues, and cells in less time without sacrificing recovery. Having achieved such a radical change in the methodology of DNA extraction, focus has shifted to adapting these methods to a miniaturized system, or "lab-on-a-chip" (A. Manz, N. Graber and H. M. Widmer, Sens. Actuators, B, 1990, 1, 244-248). Manz et al.'s concept of a "miniaturized total chemical analysis system" (microTAS) involved a silicon chip that incorporated sample pretreatment, separation and detection. This review will focus on the first of these steps, sample pretreatment in the form of DNA purification. The intention of this review is to provide an overview of the fundamentals of nucleic acid purification and solid phase extraction (SPE) and to discuss specific microchip DNA extraction successes and challenges. In order to fully appreciate the advances in DNA purification, a brief review of the history of DNA extraction is provided so that the reader has an understanding of the impact that the development of SPE techniques have had. This review will highlight the different methods of nucleic acid extraction (Table 1), including relevant citations, but without an exhaustive summary of the literature. A recent review by Wen et al. (J. Wen, L. A. Legendre, J. M. Bienvenue and J. P. Landers, Anal. Chem., 2008, 80, 6472-6479) covers solid phase extraction methods with a greater focus on their incorporation into integrated microfluidic systems.

  4. Revealing Nucleic Acid Mutations Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Junager, Nina P. L.; Kongsted, Jacob; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid mutations are of tremendous importance in modern clinical work, biotechnology and in fundamental studies of nucleic acids. Therefore, rapid, cost-effective and reliable detection of mutations is an object of extensive research. Today, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes are among the most often used tools for the detection of nucleic acids and in particular, for the detection of mutations. However, multiple parameters must be taken into account in order to create efficient FRET probes that are sensitive to nucleic acid mutations. In this review; we focus on the design principles for such probes and available computational methods that allow for their rational design. Applications of advanced, rationally designed FRET probes range from new insights into cellular heterogeneity to gaining new knowledge of nucleic acid structures directly in living cells. PMID:27472344

  5. RIG-I detects infection with live Listeria by sensing secreted bacterial nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Schlee, Martin; Roth, Susanne; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Barchet, Winfried; Böttcher, Jan; Hain, Torsten; Geiger, Sergej; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Fritz, Jörg H; Civril, Filiz; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Ruland, Jürgen; Hartmann, Gunther; Chakraborty, Trinad; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-01-01

    Immunity against infection with Listeria monocytogenes is not achieved from innate immune stimulation by contact with killed but requires viable Listeria gaining access to the cytosol of infected cells. It has remained ill-defined how such immune sensing of live Listeria occurs. Here, we report that efficient cytosolic immune sensing requires access of nucleic acids derived from live Listeria to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that Listeria released nucleic acids and that such secreted bacterial RNA/DNA was recognized by the cytosolic sensors RIG-I, MDA5 and STING thereby triggering interferon β production. Secreted Listeria nucleic acids also caused RIG-I-dependent IL-1β-production and inflammasome activation. The signalling molecule CARD9 contributed to IL-1β production in response to secreted nucleic acids. In conclusion, cytosolic recognition of secreted bacterial nucleic acids by RIG-I provides a mechanistic explanation for efficient induction of immunity by live bacteria. PMID:23064150

  6. Nucleic Acid Extraction from Synthetic Mars Analog Soils for in situ Life Detection.

    PubMed

    Mojarro, Angel; Ruvkun, Gary; Zuber, Maria T; Carr, Christopher E

    2017-08-01

    Biological informational polymers such as nucleic acids have the potential to provide unambiguous evidence of life beyond Earth. To this end, we are developing an automated in situ life-detection instrument that integrates nucleic acid extraction and nanopore sequencing: the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Genomes (SETG) instrument. Our goal is to isolate and determine the sequence of nucleic acids from extant or preserved life on Mars, if, for example, there is common ancestry to life on Mars and Earth. As is true of metagenomic analysis of terrestrial environmental samples, the SETG instrument must isolate nucleic acids from crude samples and then determine the DNA sequence of the unknown nucleic acids. Our initial DNA extraction experiments resulted in low to undetectable amounts of DNA due to soil chemistry-dependent soil-DNA interactions, namely adsorption to mineral surfaces, binding to divalent/trivalent cations, destruction by iron redox cycling, and acidic conditions. Subsequently, we developed soil-specific extraction protocols that increase DNA yields through a combination of desalting, utilization of competitive binders, and promotion of anaerobic conditions. Our results suggest that a combination of desalting and utilizing competitive binders may establish a "universal" nucleic acid extraction protocol suitable for analyzing samples from diverse soils on Mars. Key Words: Life-detection instruments-Nucleic acids-Mars-Panspermia. Astrobiology 17, 747-760.

  7. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  8. Molecular self-assembly using peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Berger, Or; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are extensively studied for the control of genetic expression since their design in the 1990s. However, the application of PNAs in nanotechnology is much more recent. PNAs share the specific base-pair recognition characteristic of DNA together with material-like properties of polyamides, both proteins and synthetic polymers, such as Kevlar and Nylon. The first application of PNA was in the form of PNA-amphiphiles, resulting in the formation of either lipid integrated structures, hydrogels or fibrillary assemblies. Heteroduplex DNA-PNA assemblies allow the formation of hybrid structures with higher stability as compared with pure DNA. A systematic screen for minimal PNA building blocks resulted in the identification of guanine-containing di-PNA assemblies and protected guanine-PNA monomer spheres showing unique optical properties. Finally, the co-assembly of PNA with thymine-like three-faced cyanuric acid allowed the assembly of poly-adenine PNA into fibers. In summary, we believe that PNAs represent a new and important family of building blocks which converges the advantages of both DNA- and peptide-nanotechnologies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  10. BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AT SURFACES RELEVANT TO MICROARRAY PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Rao, Archana N; Grainger, David W

    2014-04-01

    Both clinical and analytical metrics produced by microarray-based assay technology have recognized problems in reproducibility, reliability and analytical sensitivity. These issues are often attributed to poor understanding and control of nucleic acid behaviors and properties at solid-liquid interfaces. Nucleic acid hybridization, central to DNA and RNA microarray formats, depends on the properties and behaviors of single strand (ss) nucleic acids (e.g., probe oligomeric DNA) bound to surfaces. ssDNA's persistence length, radius of gyration, electrostatics, conformations on different surfaces and under various assay conditions, its chain flexibility and curvature, charging effects in ionic solutions, and fluorescent labeling all influence its physical chemistry and hybridization under assay conditions. Nucleic acid (e.g., both RNA and DNA) target interactions with immobilized ssDNA strands are highly impacted by these biophysical states. Furthermore, the kinetics, thermodynamics, and enthalpic and entropic contributions to DNA hybridization reflect global probe/target structures and interaction dynamics. Here we review several biophysical issues relevant to oligomeric nucleic acid molecular behaviors at surfaces and their influences on duplex formation that influence microarray assay performance. Correlation of biophysical aspects of single and double-stranded nucleic acids with their complexes in bulk solution is common. Such analysis at surfaces is not commonly reported, despite its importance to microarray assays. We seek to provide further insight into nucleic acid-surface challenges facing microarray diagnostic formats that have hindered their clinical adoption and compromise their research quality and value as genomics tools.

  11. BIOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AT SURFACES RELEVANT TO MICROARRAY PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Archana N.; Grainger, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Both clinical and analytical metrics produced by microarray-based assay technology have recognized problems in reproducibility, reliability and analytical sensitivity. These issues are often attributed to poor understanding and control of nucleic acid behaviors and properties at solid-liquid interfaces. Nucleic acid hybridization, central to DNA and RNA microarray formats, depends on the properties and behaviors of single strand (ss) nucleic acids (e.g., probe oligomeric DNA) bound to surfaces. ssDNA’s persistence length, radius of gyration, electrostatics, conformations on different surfaces and under various assay conditions, its chain flexibility and curvature, charging effects in ionic solutions, and fluorescent labeling all influence its physical chemistry and hybridization under assay conditions. Nucleic acid (e.g., both RNA and DNA) target interactions with immobilized ssDNA strands are highly impacted by these biophysical states. Furthermore, the kinetics, thermodynamics, and enthalpic and entropic contributions to DNA hybridization reflect global probe/target structures and interaction dynamics. Here we review several biophysical issues relevant to oligomeric nucleic acid molecular behaviors at surfaces and their influences on duplex formation that influence microarray assay performance. Correlation of biophysical aspects of single and double-stranded nucleic acids with their complexes in bulk solution is common. Such analysis at surfaces is not commonly reported, despite its importance to microarray assays. We seek to provide further insight into nucleic acid-surface challenges facing microarray diagnostic formats that have hindered their clinical adoption and compromise their research quality and value as genomics tools. PMID:24765522

  12. Nucleic Acid Extraction from Synthetic Mars Analog Soils for in situ Life Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mojarro, Angel; Ruvkun, Gary; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Biological informational polymers such as nucleic acids have the potential to provide unambiguous evidence of life beyond Earth. To this end, we are developing an automated in situ life-detection instrument that integrates nucleic acid extraction and nanopore sequencing: the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Genomes (SETG) instrument. Our goal is to isolate and determine the sequence of nucleic acids from extant or preserved life on Mars, if, for example, there is common ancestry to life on Mars and Earth. As is true of metagenomic analysis of terrestrial environmental samples, the SETG instrument must isolate nucleic acids from crude samples and then determine the DNA sequence of the unknown nucleic acids. Our initial DNA extraction experiments resulted in low to undetectable amounts of DNA due to soil chemistry–dependent soil-DNA interactions, namely adsorption to mineral surfaces, binding to divalent/trivalent cations, destruction by iron redox cycling, and acidic conditions. Subsequently, we developed soil-specific extraction protocols that increase DNA yields through a combination of desalting, utilization of competitive binders, and promotion of anaerobic conditions. Our results suggest that a combination of desalting and utilizing competitive binders may establish a “universal” nucleic acid extraction protocol suitable for analyzing samples from diverse soils on Mars. Key Words: Life-detection instruments—Nucleic acids—Mars—Panspermia. Astrobiology 17, 747–760. PMID:28704064

  13. Histone-Targeted Nucleic Acid Delivery for Tissue Regenerative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsell, Erik V.

    Nucleic acid delivery has garnered significant attention as an innovative therapeutic approach for treating a wide variety of diseases. However, the design of non-viral delivery systems that negotiate efficient intracellular trafficking and nuclear entry represents a significant challenge. Overcoming these hurdles requires a combination of well-controlled materials approaches with techniques to understand and direct cellular delivery. Recent investigations have highlighted the roles histone tail sequences play in directing nuclear delivery and retention, as well as activating DNA transcription. We established the ability to recapitulate these natural histone tail activities within non-viral gene nanocarriers, driving gene transfer/expression by enabling effective navigation to the nucleus via retrograde vesicular trafficking. A unique finding of this histone-targeted approach was that nanocarriers gained enhanced access to the nucleus during mitosis. The work described in this dissertation builds off of these fundamental insights to facilitate the translation of this histone-targeted delivery approach toward regenerative medicine applications. During native tissue repair, actively proliferating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) respond to a complex series of growth factor signals that direct their differentiation. Accordingly, the investigations in this work focused on utilizing the histone-targeted nanocarriers to enhance osteogenic growth factor gene transfer in dividing MSCs leading to augmented MSC chondrogenic differentiation, an essential first step in skeletal tissue repair. Concurrently, additional studies focused on optimizing the histone-targeted nanocarrier design strategy to enable improved plasmid DNA (pDNA) binding stability and tunable harnessing of native cellular processing pathways for enhanced gene transfer. Overall, the work presented herein demonstrated substantial increases in growth factor expression following histone-targeted gene transfer. This

  14. Hyaluronic acid for anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Fattal, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely used in anticancer drug delivery, since it is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic; moreover, HA receptors are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Exploiting this ligand-receptor interaction, the use of HA is now a rapidly-growing platform for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells, to improve anticancer therapies. The rationale underlying approaches, chemical strategies, and recent advances in the use of HA to design drug carriers for delivering anticancer agents, are reviewed. Comprehensive descriptions are given of HA-based drug conjugates, particulate carriers (micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, microparticles), inorganic nanostructures, and hydrogels, with particular emphasis on reports of preclinical/clinical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nucleic Acids. From Tetranucleotides to the Ribosome.

    PubMed

    Šponer, Jiří; Banáš, Pavel; Jurečka, Petr; Zgarbová, Marie; Kührová, Petra; Havrila, Marek; Krepl, Miroslav; Stadlbauer, Petr; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-05-15

    We present a brief overview of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nucleic acids. We explain physical chemistry limitations of the simulations, namely, the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) approximation and limited time scale. Further, we discuss relations and differences between simulations and experiments, compare standard and enhanced sampling simulations, discuss the role of starting structures, comment on different versions of nucleic acid FFs, and relate MM computations with contemporary quantum chemistry. Despite its limitations, we show that MD is a powerful technique for studying the structural dynamics of nucleic acids with a fast growing potential that substantially complements experimental results and aids their interpretation.

  16. Polymorphic Nucleic Acid Binding of Bioactive Isoquinoline Alkaloids and Their Role in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Motilal; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive alkaloids occupy an important position in applied chemistry and play an indispensable role in medicinal chemistry. Amongst them, isoquinoline alkaloids like berberine, palmatine and coralyne of protoberberine group, sanguinarine of the benzophenanthridine group, and their derivatives represent an important class of molecules for their broad range of clinical and pharmacological utility. In view of their extensive occurrence in various plant species and significantly low toxicities, prospective development and use of these alkaloids as effective anticancer agents are matters of great current interest. This review has focused on the interaction of these alkaloids with polymorphic nucleic acid structures (B-form, A-form, Z-form, HL-form, triple helical form, quadruplex form) and their topoisomerase inhibitory activity reported by several research groups using various biophysical techniques like spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, thermal melting, circular dichroism, NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy, viscosity, isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, molecular modeling studies, and so forth, to elucidate their mode and mechanism of action for structure-activity relationships. The DNA binding of the planar sanguinarine and coralyne are found to be stronger and thermodynamically more favoured compared to the buckled structure of berberine and palmatine and correlate well with the intercalative mechanism of sanguinarine and coralyne and the partial intercalation by berberine and palmatine. Nucleic acid binding properties are also interpreted in relation to their anticancer activity. PMID:20814427

  17. Solution influence on biomolecular equilibria - Nucleic acid base associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Pratt, L. R.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Various attempts to construct an understanding of the influence of solution environment on biomolecular equilibria at the molecular level using computer simulation are discussed. First, the application of the formal statistical thermodynamic program for investigating biomolecular equilibria in solution is presented, addressing modeling and conceptual simplications such as perturbative methods, long-range interaction approximations, surface thermodynamics, and hydration shell. Then, Monte Carlo calculations on the associations of nucleic acid bases in both polar and nonpolar solvents such as water and carbon tetrachloride are carried out. The solvent contribution to the enthalpy of base association is positive (destabilizing) in both polar and nonpolar solvents while negative enthalpies for stacked complexes are obtained only when the solute-solute in vacuo energy is added to the total energy. The release upon association of solvent molecules from the first hydration layer around a solute to the bulk is accompanied by an increase in solute-solvent energy and decrease in solvent-solvent energy. The techniques presented are expectd to displace less molecular and more heuristic modeling of biomolecular equilibria in solution.

  18. What controls the hybridization thermodynamics of spherical nucleic acids?

    PubMed

    Randeria, Pratik S; Jones, Matthew R; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Banga, Resham J; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-03-18

    The hybridization of free oligonucleotides to densely packed, oriented arrays of DNA modifying the surfaces of spherical nucleic acid (SNA)-gold nanoparticle conjugates occurs with negative cooperativity; i.e., each binding event destabilizes subsequent binding events. DNA hybridization is thus an ever-changing function of the number of strands already hybridized to the particle. Thermodynamic quantification of this behavior reveals a 3 orders of magnitude decrease in the binding constant for the capture of a free oligonucleotide by an SNA conjugate as the fraction of pre-hybridized strands increases from 0 to ∼30%. Increasing the number of pre-hybridized strands imparts an increasing enthalpic penalty to hybridization that makes binding more difficult, while simultaneously decreasing the entropic penalty to hybridization, which makes binding more favorable. Hybridization of free DNA to an SNA is thus governed by both an electrostatic barrier as the SNA accumulates charge with additional binding events and an effect consistent with allostery, where hybridization at certain sites on an SNA modify the binding affinity at a distal site through conformational changes to the remaining single strands. Leveraging these insights allows for the design of conjugates that hybridize free strands with significantly higher efficiencies, some of which approach 100%.

  19. The Role of Structural Enthalpy in Spherical Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lam-Kiu; Wang, Ziwei; Schatz, George C; Luijten, Erik; Mirkin, Chad A

    2018-05-23

    DNA hybridization onto DNA-functionalized nanoparticle surfaces (e.g., in the form of a spherical nucleic acid (SNA)) is known to be enhanced relative to hybridization free in solution. Surprisingly, via isothermal titration calorimetry, we reveal that this enhancement is enthalpically, as opposed to entropically, dominated by ∼20 kcal/mol. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the observed enthalpic enhancement results from structurally confining the DNA on the nanoparticle surface and preventing it from adopting enthalpically unfavorable conformations like those observed in the solution case. The idea that structural confinement leads to the formation of energetically more stable duplexes is evaluated by decreasing the degree of confinement a duplex experiences on the nanoparticle surface. Both experiment and simulation confirm that when the surface-bound duplex is less confined, i.e., at lower DNA surface density or at greater distance from the nanoparticle surface, its enthalpy of formation approaches the less favorable enthalpy of duplex formation for the linear strand in solution. This work provides insight into one of the most important and enabling properties of SNAs and will inform the design of materials that rely on the thermodynamics of hybridization onto DNA-functionalized surfaces, including diagnostic probes and therapeutic agents.

  20. Mfold web server for nucleic acid folding and hybridization prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zuker, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The abbreviated name, ‘mfold web server’, describes a number of closely related software applications available on the World Wide Web (WWW) for the prediction of the secondary structure of single stranded nucleic acids. The objective of this web server is to provide easy access to RNA and DNA folding and hybridization software to the scientific community at large. By making use of universally available web GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces), the server circumvents the problem of portability of this software. Detailed output, in the form of structure plots with or without reliability information, single strand frequency plots and ‘energy dot plots’, are available for the folding of single sequences. A variety of ‘bulk’ servers give less information, but in a shorter time and for up to hundreds of sequences at once. The portal for the mfold web server is http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/mfold. This URL will be referred to as ‘MFOLDROOT’. PMID:12824337

  1. Functional nucleic acid entrapment in sol-gel derived materials.

    PubMed

    Carrasquilla, Carmen; Brennan, John D

    2013-10-01

    Functional nucleic acids (FNAs) are single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules, typically generated through in vitro selection, that have the ability to act as receptors for target molecules (aptamers) or perform catalysis of a chemical reaction (deoxyribozymes and ribozymes). Fluorescence-signaling aptamers and deoxyribozymes have recently emerged as promising biological recognition and signaling elements, although little has been done to evaluate their potential for solid-phase assays, particularly with species made of RNA due to their lack of chemical stability and susceptibility to nuclease attack. Herein, we present a detailed overview of the methods utilized for solid-phase immobilization of FNAs using a sol-gel entrapment method that can provide protection from nuclease degradation and impart long-term chemical stability to the FNA reporter systems, while maintaining their signaling capabilities. This article will also provide a brief review of the results of such entrapment studies involving fluorescence-signaling versions of a DNA aptamer, selected RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes, and two different RNA aptamers in a series of sol-gel derived composites, ranging from highly polar silica to hydrophobic methylsilsesquioxane-based materials. Given the ability to produce sol-gel derived materials in a variety of configurations, particularly as thin film coatings on electrodes, optical fibers, and other devices, this entrapment method should provide a useful platform for numerous solid-phase FNA-based biosensing applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene delivery by a steroid-peptide nucleic acid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Rebuffat, Alexandre G; Nawrocki, Andrea R; Nielsen, Peter E; Bernasconi, Alessio G; Bernal-Mendez, Eloy; Frey, Brigitte M; Frey, Felix J

    2002-09-01

    We previously introduced a method called steroid-mediated gene delivery (SMGD), which uses steroid receptors as shuttles to facilitate the nuclear uptake of transfected DNA. Here, we describe a SMGD strategy with peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) that allowed linkage of a steroid molecule to a defined position in a plasmid without disturbing its gene expression. We synthesized and tested several bifunctional steroid derivatives [patent in process of nationalization] and finally selected the compound named DEX-bisPNA, a molecule consisting of a dexamethasone moiety linked to a PNA clamp (bisPNA) through a 30-atom chemical spacer. Dex-bisPNA binds to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as well as to reporter plasmids containing the corresponding PNA binding sites, translocates the GR from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, and increases the delivery of plasmid to the nucleus, resulting in enhanced GR-dependent expression of the reporter gene. The SMGD effect was more pronounced in growth-arrested cells than in proliferating cells. The specificity for the GR was shown by the reversion of the SMGD effect in the presence of dexamethasone as well as an enhanced expression in GR-positive cells but not in GR-negative cells. Thus, SMGD with PNA is a promising strategy for nonviral gene delivery into target tissues expressing specific steroid receptors.

  3. Improved nucleic acid descriptors for siRNA efficacy prediction.

    PubMed

    Sciabola, Simone; Cao, Qing; Orozco, Modesto; Faustino, Ignacio; Stanton, Robert V

    2013-02-01

    Although considerable progress has been made recently in understanding how gene silencing is mediated by the RNAi pathway, the rational design of effective sequences is still a challenging task. In this article, we demonstrate that including three-dimensional descriptors improved the discrimination between active and inactive small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in a statistical model. Five descriptor types were used: (i) nucleotide position along the siRNA sequence, (ii) nucleotide composition in terms of presence/absence of specific combinations of di- and trinucleotides, (iii) nucleotide interactions by means of a modified auto- and cross-covariance function, (iv) nucleotide thermodynamic stability derived by the nearest neighbor model representation and (v) nucleic acid structure flexibility. The duplex flexibility descriptors are derived from extended molecular dynamics simulations, which are able to describe the sequence-dependent elastic properties of RNA duplexes, even for non-standard oligonucleotides. The matrix of descriptors was analysed using three statistical packages in R (partial least squares, random forest, and support vector machine), and the most predictive model was implemented in a modeling tool we have made publicly available through SourceForge. Our implementation of new RNA descriptors coupled with appropriate statistical algorithms resulted in improved model performance for the selection of siRNA candidates when compared with publicly available siRNA prediction tools and previously published test sets. Additional validation studies based on in-house RNA interference projects confirmed the robustness of the scoring procedure in prospective studies.

  4. Ligation with Nucleic Acid Sequence–Based Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Carmichael; Tai, Warren; Sarma, Aartik; Opal, Steven M.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for detecting nucleic acid targets using a ligation step along with an isothermal, exponential amplification step. We use an engineered ssDNA with two variable regions on the ends, allowing us to design the probe for optimal reaction kinetics and primer binding. This two-part probe is ligated by T4 DNA Ligase only when both parts bind adjacently to the target. The assay demonstrates that the expected 72-nt RNA product appears only when the synthetic target, T4 ligase, and both probe fragments are present during the ligation step. An extraneous 38-nt RNA product also appears due to linear amplification of unligated probe (P3), but its presence does not cause a false-positive result. In addition, 40 mmol/L KCl in the final amplification mix was found to be optimal. It was also found that increasing P5 in excess of P3 helped with ligation and reduced the extraneous 38-nt RNA product. The assay was also tested with a single nucleotide polymorphism target, changing one base at the ligation site. The assay was able to yield a negative signal despite only a single-base change. Finally, using P3 and P5 with longer binding sites results in increased overall sensitivity of the reaction, showing that increasing ligation efficiency can improve the assay overall. We believe that this method can be used effectively for a number of diagnostic assays. PMID:22449695

  5. Mechanisms controlling nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kensuke; Shibata, Takuma; Ohto, Umeharu; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Saitoh, Shin-Ichiroh; Fukui, Ryutaro; Murakami, Yusuke

    2018-03-08

    Nucleic acid (NA)-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLRs) respond to DNA/RNA derived from pathogens and dead cells. Structural studies have revealed a variety of molecular mechanisms by which TLRs sense NAs. Double-stranded RNA and single-stranded DNA directly bind to TLR3 and TLR9, respectively, whereas TLR7 and TLR8 bind to nucleosides and oligoribonucleotides derived from RNAs. Activation of ligand-bound TLRs is influenced by the functional status of TLRs. Proteolytic cleavage of NA-sensing TLRs enables ligand-dependent TLR dimerization. Trafficking of ligand-activated TLRs in endosomal and lysosomal compartments is requisite for production of type I interferons. Activation of NA-sensing TLRs is required for the control of viruses such as herpes simplex virus and endogenous retroviruses. On the other hand, excessive activation of NA-sensing TLRs drives disease progression in a variety of inflammatory diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, heart failure, arthritis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. NA-sensing TLRs are targets for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. We here focus on our recent progresses in our understanding of NA-sensing TLRs.

  6. Nucleic Acids for Ultra-Sensitive Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Kris P. F.; Knez, Karel; Spasic, Dragana; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Major advancements in molecular biology and clinical diagnostics cannot be brought about strictly through the use of genomics based methods. Improved methods for protein detection and proteomic screening are an absolute necessity to complement to wealth of information offered by novel, high-throughput sequencing technologies. Only then will it be possible to advance insights into clinical processes and to characterize the importance of specific protein biomarkers for disease detection or the realization of “personalized medicine”. Currently however, large-scale proteomic information is still not as easily obtained as its genomic counterpart, mainly because traditional antibody-based technologies struggle to meet the stringent sensitivity and throughput requirements that are required whereas mass-spectrometry based methods might be burdened by significant costs involved. However, recent years have seen the development of new biodetection strategies linking nucleic acids with existing antibody technology or replacing antibodies with oligonucleotide recognition elements altogether. These advancements have unlocked many new strategies to lower detection limits and dramatically increase throughput of protein detection assays. In this review, an overview of these new strategies will be given. PMID:23337338

  7. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  8. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  9. Membrane Protected Apoptotic Trophoblast Microparticles Contain Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Aaron F.; Jorgez, Carolina J.; Horne, Cassandra; Marquez-Do, Deborah A.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Rodgers, John R.; Bischoff, Farideh Z.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    2008-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) that circulate in blood may be a source of DNA for molecular analyses, including prenatal genetic diagnoses. Because MPs are heterogeneous in nature, however, further characterization is important before use in clinical settings. One key question is whether DNA is either bound to aggregates of blood proteins and lipid micelles or intrinsically associated with MPs from dying cells. To test the latter hypothesis, we asked whether MPs derived in vitro from dying cells were similar to those in maternal plasma. JEG-3 cells model extravillous trophoblasts, which predominate during the first trimester of pregnancy when prenatal diagnosis is most relevant. MPs were derived from apoptosis and increased over 48 hours. Compared with necrotic MPs, DNA in apoptotic MPs was more fragmented and resistant to plasma DNases. Membrane-specific dyes indicated that apoptotic MPs had more membranous material, which protects nucleic acids, including RNA. Flow cytometry showed that MPs derived from dying cells displayed light scatter and DNA staining similar to MPs found in maternal plasma. Quantification of maternal MPs using characteristics defined by MPs generated in vitro revealed a significant increase of DNA+ MPs in the plasma of women with preeclampsia compared with plasma from women with normal pregnancies. Apoptotic MPs are therefore a likely source of stable DNA that could be enriched for both early genetic diagnosis and monitoring of pathological pregnancies. PMID:18974299

  10. Proposed Ancestors of Phage Nucleic Acid Packaging Motors (and Cells)

    PubMed Central

    Serwer, Philip

    2011-01-01

    I present a hypothesis that begins with the proposal that abiotic ancestors of phage RNA and DNA packaging systems (and cells) include mobile shells with an internal, molecule-transporting cavity. The foundations of this hypothesis include the conjecture that current nucleic acid packaging systems have imprints from abiotic ancestors. The abiotic shells (1) initially imbibe and later also bind and transport organic molecules, thereby providing a means for producing molecular interactions that are links in the chain of events that produces ancestors to the first molecules that are both information carrying and enzymatically active, and (2) are subsequently scaffolds on which proteins assemble to form ancestors common to both shells of viral capsids and cell membranes. Emergence of cells occurs via aggregation and merger of shells and internal contents. The hypothesis continues by using proposed imprints of abiotic and biotic ancestors to deduce an ancestral thermal ratchet-based DNA packaging motor that subsequently evolves to integrate a DNA packaging ATPase that provides a power stroke. PMID:21994778

  11. Polymeric nucleic acid vehicles exploit active interorganelle trafficking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Katye M; Ingle, Nilesh P; McLendon, Patrick M; Reineke, Theresa M

    2013-01-22

    Materials that self-assemble with nucleic acids into nanocomplexes (e.g. polyplexes) are widely used in many fundamental biological and biomedical experiments. However, understanding the intracellular transport mechanisms of these vehicles remains a major hurdle in their effective usage. Here, we investigate two polycation models, Glycofect (which slowly degrades via hydrolysis) and linear polyethyleneimine (PEI) (which does not rapidly hydrolyze), to determine the impact of polymeric structure on intracellular trafficking. Cells transfected using Glycofect underwent increasing transgene expression over the course of 40 h and remained benign over the course of 7 days. Transgene expression in cells transfected with PEI peaked at 16 h post-transfection and resulted in less than 10% survival after 7 days. While saccharide-containing Glycofect has a higher buffering capacity than PEI, polyplexes created with Glycofect demonstrate more sustained endosomal release, possibly suggesting an additional or alternative delivery mechanism to the classical "proton sponge mechanism". PEI appeared to promote release of DNA from acidic organelles more than Glycofect. Immunofluorescence images indicate that both Glycofect and linear PEI traffic oligodeoxynucleotides to the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum, which may be a route towards nuclear delivery. However, Glycofect polyplexes demonstrated higher co-localization with the ER than PEI polyplexes, and co-localization experiments indicate the retrograde transport of polyplexes via COP I vesicles from the Golgi to the ER. We conclude that slow release and unique trafficking behaviors of Glycofect polyplexes may be due to the presence of saccharide units and the degradable nature of the polymer, allowing more efficacious and benign delivery.

  12. Self-assembling nucleic acid delivery vehicles via linear, water-soluble, cyclodextrin-containing polymers.

    PubMed

    Davis, M E; Pun, S H; Bellocq, N C; Reineke, T M; Popielarski, S R; Mishra, S; Heidel, J D

    2004-01-01

    Non-viral (synthetic) nucleic acid delivery systems have the potential to provide for the practical application of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. We have designed and prepared a tunable, non-viral nucleic acid delivery system that self-assembles with nucleic acids and centers around a new class of polymeric materials; namely, linear, water-soluble cyclodextrin-containing polymers. The relationships between polymer structure and gene delivery are illustrated, and the roles of the cyclodextrin moieties for minimizing toxicity and forming inclusion complexes in the self-assembly processes are highlighted. This vehicle is the first example of a polymer-based gene delivery system formed entirely by self-assembly.

  13. Gene Therapy for Advanced Melanoma: Selective Targeting and Therapeutic Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Joana R.; Rafael, Diana F.; Wagner, Ernst; Besch, Robert; Ogris, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances, the treatment of malignant melanoma still results in the relapse of the disease, and second line treatment mostly fails due to the occurrence of resistance. A wide range of mutations are known to prevent effective treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Hence, approaches with biopharmaceuticals including proteins, like antibodies or cytokines, are applied. As an alternative, regimens with therapeutically active nucleic acids offer the possibility for highly selective cancer treatment whilst avoiding unwanted and toxic side effects. This paper gives a brief introduction into the mechanism of this devastating disease, discusses the shortcoming of current therapy approaches, and pinpoints anchor points which could be harnessed for therapeutic intervention with nucleic acids. We bring the delivery of nucleic acid nanopharmaceutics into perspective as a novel antimelanoma therapeutic approach and discuss the possibilities for melanoma specific targeting. The latest reports on preclinical and already clinical application of nucleic acids in melanoma are discussed. PMID:23634303

  14. Salinity Effect on Adsorption of Nucleic Acids Compounds onto Montmorillonite: A Prebiotic Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafañe, S.; Baú, J.; Zaia, D.; Colín, M.; Negrón, A.; Heredia, A.

    2017-07-01

    Absorption of nucleic acids compounds in clay was studied using a primitive ocean analog. Results showed that the absorption process could be affected by high concentration of salts that are involved in the competition for available sites of mineral.

  15. Nucleic acid sensing and innate immunity: signaling pathways controlling viral pathogenesis and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Laura R H; Goodman, Alan G

    2016-09-01

    Innate immunity refers to the body's initial response to curb infection upon exposure to invading organisms. While the detection of pathogen-associated molecules is an ancient form of host defense, if dysfunctional, autoimmune disease may result. The innate immune response during pathogenic infection is initiated through the activation of receptors recognizing conserved molecular patterns, such as nucleic acids from a virus' genome or replicative cycle. Additionally, the host's own nucleic acids are capable of activating an immune response. Therefore, it follows that the nucleic acid-sensing pathways must be tightly controlled to avoid an autoimmune response from recognition of self, yet still be unimpeded to respond to viral infections. In this review, we will describe the nucleic acid sensing pathways and how they respond to virus infection. Moreover, we will discuss autoimmune diseases that develop when these pathways fail to signal properly and identify knowledge gaps that are prime for interrogation.

  16. Zinc complexes as fluorescent chemosensors for nucleic acids: new perspectives for a "boring" element.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, Alessio; Lauria, Antonino; Almerico, Anna Maria; Barone, Giampaolo

    2015-02-28

    Zinc(II) complexes are effective and selective nucleic acid-binders and strongly fluorescent molecules in the low energy range, from the visible to the near infrared. These two properties have often been exploited to quantitatively detect nucleic acids in biological samples, in both in vitro and in vivo models. In particular, the fluorescent emission of several zinc(II) complexes is drastically enhanced or quenched by the binding to nucleic acids and/or upon visible light exposure, in a different fashion in bulk solution and when bound to DNA. The twofold objective of this perspective is (1) to review recent utilisations of zinc(II) complexes as selective fluorescent probes for nucleic acids and (2) to highlight their novel potential applications as diagnostic tools based on their photophysical properties.

  17. Nucleic acid polymeric properties and electrostatics: Directly comparing theory and simulation with experiment.

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acids are biopolymers that carry genetic information and are also involved in various gene regulation functions such as gene silencing and protein translation. Because of their negatively charged backbones, nucleic acids are polyelectrolytes. To adequately understand nucleic acid folding and function, we need to properly describe its i) polymer/polyelectrolyte properties and ii) associating ion atmosphere. While various theories and simulation models have been developed to describe nucleic acids and the ions around them, many of these theories/simulations have not been well evaluated due to complexities in comparison with experiment. In this review, I discuss some recent experiments that have been strategically designed for straightforward comparison with theories and simulation models. Such data serve as excellent benchmarks to identify limitations in prevailing theories and simulation parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extraction of Total Nucleic Acids From Ticks for the Detection of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Rounds, Megan A.; Phillipson, Curtis A.; Picuri, John M.; Matthews, Heather E.; Halverson, Justina; Schutzer, Steven E.; Ecker, David J.; Eshoo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Ticks harbor numerous bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens that can cause serious infections in humans and domestic animals. Active surveillance of the tick vector can provide insight into the frequency and distribution of important pathogens in the environment. Nucleic-acid based detection of tick-borne bacterial, protozoan, and viral pathogens requires the extraction of both DNA and RNA (total nucleic acids) from ticks. Traditional methods for nucleic acid extraction are limited to extraction of either DNA or the RNA from a sample. Here we present a simple bead-beating based protocol for extraction of DNA and RNA from a single tick and show detection of Borrelia burgdorferi and Powassan virus from individual, infected Ixodes scapularis ticks. We determined expected yields for total nucleic acids by this protocol for a variety of adult tick species. The method is applicable to a variety of arthropod vectors, including fleas and mosquitoes, and was partially automated on a liquid handling robot. PMID:20180313

  19. Plants having modified response to ethylene by transformation with an ETR nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Meyerowitz, Elliott M.; Chang, Caren; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

  20. Nucleic Acid Extraction from Synthetic Mars Analog Soils for in situ Life Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojarro, Angel; Ruvkun, Gary; Zuber, Maria T.; Carr, Christopher E.

    2017-08-01

    Biological informational polymers such as nucleic acids have the potential to provide unambiguous evidence of life beyond Earth. To this end, we are developing an automated in situ life-detection instrument that integrates nucleic acid extraction and nanopore sequencing: the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Genomes (SETG) instrument. Our goal is to isolate and determine the sequence of nucleic acids from extant or preserved life on Mars, if, for example, there is common ancestry to life on Mars and Earth. As is true of metagenomic analysis of terrestrial environmental samples, the SETG instrument must isolate nucleic acids from crude samples and then determine the DNA sequence of the unknown nucleic acids. Our initial DNA extraction experiments resulted in low to undetectable amounts of DNA due to soil chemistry-dependent soil-DNA interactions, namely adsorption to mineral surfaces, binding to divalent/trivalent cations, destruction by iron redox cycling, and acidic conditions. Subsequently, we developed soil-specific extraction protocols that increase DNA yields through a combination of desalting, utilization of competitive binders, and promotion of anaerobic conditions. Our results suggest that a combination of desalting and utilizing competitive binders may establish a "universal" nucleic acid extraction protocol suitable for analyzing samples from diverse soils on Mars.

  1. How does hydroxyl introduction influence the double helical structure: the stabilization of an altritol nucleic acid:ribonucleic acid duplex

    PubMed Central

    Ovaere, Margriet; Sponer, Jiri; Sponer, Judit E.; Herdewijn, Piet; Van Meervelt, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Altritol nucleic acids (ANAs) are a promising new tool in the development of artificial small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) for therapeutical applications. To mimic the siRNA:messenger RNA (mRNA) interactions, the crystal structure of the ANA:RNA construct a(CCGUAAUGCC-P):r(GGCAUUACGG) was determined to 1.96 Å resolution which revealed the hybrid to form an A-type helix. As this A-form is a major requirement in the RNAi process, this crystal structure confirms the potential of altritol-modified siRNAs. Moreover, in the ANA strands, a new type of intrastrand interactions was found between the O2′ hydroxyl group of one residue and the sugar ring O4′ atom of the next residue. These interactions were further investigated by quantum chemical methods. Besides hydration effects, these intrastrand hydrogen bonds may also contribute to the stability of ANA:RNA duplexes. PMID:22638588

  2. The effects of borate minerals on the synthesis of nucleic acid bases, amino acids and biogenic carboxylic acids from formamide.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Barontini, Maurizio; Cossetti, Cristina; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Crestini, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    The thermal condensation of formamide in the presence of mineral borates is reported. The products afforded are precursors of nucleic acids, amino acids derivatives and carboxylic acids. The efficiency and the selectivity of the reaction was studied in relation to the elemental composition of the 18 minerals analyzed. The possibility of synthesizing at the same time building blocks of both genetic and metabolic apparatuses, along with the production of amino acids, highlights the interest of the formamide/borate system in prebiotic chemistry.

  3. Peptide nucleic acid probe for protein affinity purification based on biotin-streptavidin interaction and peptide nucleic acid strand hybridization.

    PubMed

    Tse, Jenny; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zengeya, Thomas; Rozners, Eriks; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new method for protein affinity purification that capitalizes on the high affinity of streptavidin for biotin but does not require dissociation of the biotin-streptavidin complex for protein retrieval. Conventional reagents place both the selectively reacting group (the "warhead") and the biotin on the same molecule. We place the warhead and the biotin on separate molecules, each linked to a short strand of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), synthetic polymers that use the same bases as DNA but attached to a backbone that is resistant to attack by proteases and nucleases. As in DNA, PNA strands with complementary base sequences hybridize. In conditions that favor PNA duplex formation, the warhead strand (carrying the tagged protein) and the biotin strand form a complex that is held onto immobilized streptavidin. As in DNA, the PNA duplex dissociates at moderately elevated temperature; therefore, retrieval of the tagged protein is accomplished by a brief exposure to heat. Using iodoacetate as the warhead, 8-base PNA strands, biotin, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, we demonstrate retrieval of the cysteine protease papain. We were also able to use our iodoacetyl-PNA:PNA-biotin probe for retrieval and identification of a thiol reductase and a glutathione transferase from soybean seedling cotyledons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimization of an AMBER Force Field for the Artificial Nucleic Acid, LNA, and Benchmarking with NMR of L(CAAU)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Locked Nucleic Acids (LNAs) are RNA analogues with an O2′-C4′ methylene bridge which locks the sugar into a C3′-endo conformation. This enhances hybridization to DNA and RNA, making LNAs useful in microarrays and potential therapeutics. Here, the LNA, L(CAAU), provides a simplified benchmark for testing the ability of molecular dynamics (MD) to approximate nucleic acid properties. LNA χ torsions and partial charges were parametrized to create AMBER parm99_LNA. The revisions were tested by comparing MD predictions with AMBER parm99 and parm99_LNA against a 200 ms NOESY NMR spectrum of L(CAAU). NMR indicates an A-Form equilibrium ensemble. In 3000 ns simulations starting with an A-form structure, parm99_LNA and parm99 provide 66% and 35% agreement, respectively, with NMR NOE volumes and 3J-couplings. In simulations of L(CAAU) starting with all χ torsions in a syn conformation, only parm99_LNA is able to repair the structure. This implies methods for parametrizing force fields for nucleic acid mimics can reasonably approximate key interactions and that parm99_LNA will improve reliability of MD studies for systems with LNA. A method for approximating χ population distribution on the basis of base to sugar NOEs is also introduced. PMID:24377321

  5. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using a bifunctional hybridization probe

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detecting and isolating a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids is provided using a bifunctional hybridization probe capable of hybridizing to the target sequence that includes a detectable marker and a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent. A kit is also provided for detecting a target sequence in a sample of nucleic acids using a bifunctional hybridization probe according to this method.

  6. 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis using 3[prime]-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, M.C.; Shuey, S.W.; Bradley, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5[prime] end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  7. 5'to 3' nucleic acid synthesis using 3'-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, Michael C.; Shuey, Steven W.; Bradley, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5' to 3' nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5' end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  8. Artificial specific binders directly recovered from chemically modified nucleic acid libraries.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yuuya; Kuwahara, Masayasu

    2012-01-01

    Specific binders comprised of nucleic acids, that is, RNA/DNA aptamers, are attractive functional biopolymers owing to their potential broad application in medicine, food hygiene, environmental analysis, and biological research. Despite the large number of reports on selection of natural DNA/RNA aptamers, there are not many examples of direct screening of chemically modified nucleic acid aptamers. This is because of (i) the inferior efficiency and accuracy of polymerase reactions involving transcription/reverse-transcription of modified nucleotides compared with those of natural nucleotides, (ii) technical difficulties and additional time and effort required when using modified nucleic acid libraries, and (iii) ambiguous efficacies of chemical modifications in binding properties until recently; in contrast, the effects of chemical modifications on biostability are well studied using various nucleotide analogs. Although reports on the direct screening of a modified nucleic acid library remain in the minority, chemical modifications would be essential when further functional expansion of nucleic acid aptamers, in particular for medical and biological uses, is considered. This paper focuses on enzymatic production of chemically modified nucleic acids and their application to random screenings. In addition, recent advances and possible future research are also described.

  9. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided.

  10. Selection of fluorophore and quencher pairs for fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of simple and relatively inexpensive methods for labeling nucleic acids with nonradioactive labels, doors have been opened that enable nucleic acid hybridization probes to be used for research and development, as well as for clinical diagnostic applications. The use of fluorescent hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. The use of hybridization probes that bind to the amplification products in real-time markedly improves the ability to obtain quantitative results. Furthermore, real-time nucleic acid amplification assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Because fluorescent hybridization probes are available in a wide range of colors, multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. It is therefore important to carefully select the labels of hybridization probes, based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This chapter outlines different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers.

  11. dbAMEPNI: a database of alanine mutagenic effects for protein–nucleic acid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ling; Xiong, Yi; Gao, Hongyun

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions play essential roles in various biological activities such as gene regulation, transcription, DNA repair and DNA packaging. Understanding the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein–nucleic acid binding affinities can help elucidate the molecular mechanism of protein–nucleic acid recognition. Until now, no comprehensive and updated database of quantitative binding data on alanine mutagenic effects for protein–nucleic acid interactions is publicly accessible. Thus, we developed a new database of Alanine Mutagenic Effects for Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions (dbAMEPNI). dbAMEPNI is a manually curated, literature-derived database, comprising over 577 alanine mutagenic data with experimentally determined binding affinities for protein–nucleic acidmore » complexes. Here, it contains several important parameters, such as dissociation constant (Kd), Gibbs free energy change (ΔΔG), experimental conditions and structural parameters of mutant residues. In addition, the database provides an extended dataset of 282 single alanine mutations with only qualitative data (or descriptive effects) of thermodynamic information.« less

  12. Evolution of functional nucleic acids in the presence of nonheritable backbone heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Simon G; Zhang, Na; Elenko, Mark P; Lupták, Andrej; Szostak, Jack W

    2011-08-16

    Multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the early evolution of life was dominated by RNA, which can both transfer information from generation to generation through replication directed by base-pairing, and carry out biochemical activities by folding into functional structures. To understand how life emerged from prebiotic chemistry we must therefore explain the steps that led to the emergence of the RNA world, and in particular, the synthesis of RNA. The generation of pools of highly pure ribonucleotides on the early Earth seems unlikely, but the presence of alternative nucleotides would support the assembly of nucleic acid polymers containing nonheritable backbone heterogeneity. We suggest that homogeneous monomers might not have been necessary if populations of heterogeneous nucleic acid molecules could evolve reproducible function. For such evolution to be possible, function would have to be maintained despite the repeated scrambling of backbone chemistry from generation to generation. We have tested this possibility in a simplified model system, by using a T7 RNA polymerase variant capable of transcribing nucleic acids that contain an approximately 11 mixture of deoxy- and ribonucleotides. We readily isolated nucleotide-binding aptamers by utilizing an in vitro selection process that shuffles the order of deoxy- and ribonucleotides in each round. We describe two such RNA/DNA mosaic nucleic acid aptamers that specifically bind ATP and GTP, respectively. We conclude that nonheritable variations in nucleic acid backbone structure may not have posed an insurmountable barrier to the emergence of functionality in early nucleic acids.

  13. Identification of Nucleic Acid Binding Sites on Translin-Associated Factor X (TRAX) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gagan Deep; Kumar, Vinay

    2012-01-01

    Translin and TRAX proteins play roles in very important cellular processes such as DNA recombination, spatial and temporal expression of mRNA, and in siRNA processing. Translin forms a homomeric nucleic acid binding complex and binds to ssDNA and RNA. However, a mutant translin construct that forms homomeric complex lacking nucleic acid binding activity is able to form fully active heteromeric translin-TRAX complex when co-expressed with TRAX. A substantial progress has been made in identifying translin sites that mediate its binding activity, while TRAX was thought not to bind DNA or RNA on its own. We here for the first time demonstrate nucleic acid binding to TRAX by crosslinking radiolabeled ssDNA to heteromeric translin-TRAX complex using UV-laser. The TRAX and translin, photochemically crosslinked with ssDNA, were individually detected on SDS-PAGE. We mutated two motifs in TRAX and translin, designated B2 and B3, to help define the nucleic acid binding sites in the TRAX sequence. The most pronounced effect was observed in the mutants of B3 motif that impaired nucleic acid binding activity of the heteromeric complexes. We suggest that both translin and TRAX are binding competent and contribute to the nucleic acid binding activity. PMID:22427937

  14. Detection and isolation of nucleic acid sequences using competitive hybridization probes

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1997-04-01

    A method for detecting a target nucleic acid sequence in a sample is provided using hybridization probes which competitively hybridize to a target nucleic acid. According to the method, a target nucleic acid sequence is hybridized to first and second hybridization probes which are complementary to overlapping portions of the target nucleic acid sequence, the first hybridization probe including a first complexing agent capable of forming a binding pair with a second complexing agent and the second hybridization probe including a detectable marker. The first complexing agent attached to the first hybridization probe is contacted with a second complexing agent, the second complexing agent being attached to a solid support such that when the first and second complexing agents are attached, target nucleic acid sequences hybridized to the first hybridization probe become immobilized on to the solid support. The immobilized target nucleic acids are then separated and detected by detecting the detectable marker attached to the second hybridization probe. A kit for performing the method is also provided. 7 figs.

  15. Nucleic acid purification from plants, animals and microbes in under 30 seconds

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yiping; Wang, Yuling; Wee, Eugene; Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J.; Trau, Matt; Botella, Jose Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a powerful molecular biology tool, although its use outside the modern laboratory environment is limited due to the relatively cumbersome methods required to extract nucleic acids from biological samples. To address this issue, we investigated a variety of materials for their suitability for nucleic acid capture and purification. We report here that untreated cellulose-based paper can rapidly capture nucleic acids within seconds and retain them during a single washing step, while contaminants present in complex biological samples are quickly removed. Building on this knowledge, we have successfully created an equipment-free nucleic acid extraction dipstick methodology that can obtain amplification-ready DNA and RNA from plants, animals, and microbes from difficult biological samples such as blood and leaves from adult trees in less than 30 seconds. The simplicity and speed of this method as well as the low cost and availability of suitable materials (e.g., common paper towelling), means that nucleic acid extraction is now more accessible and affordable for researchers and the broader community. Furthermore, when combined with recent advancements in isothermal amplification and naked eye DNA visualization techniques, the dipstick extraction technology makes performing molecular diagnostic assays achievable in limited resource settings including university and high school classrooms, field-based environments, and developing countries. PMID:29161268

  16. Prospects for nucleic acid-based therapeutics against hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2013-12-21

    In this review, we discuss recent advances in nucleic acid-based therapeutic technologies that target hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Because the HCV genome is present exclusively in RNA form during replication, various nucleic acid-based therapeutic approaches targeting the HCV genome, such as ribozymes, aptamers, siRNAs, and antisense oligonucleotides, have been suggested as potential tools against HCV. Nucleic acids are potentially immunogenic and typically require a delivery tool to be utilized as therapeutics. These limitations have hampered the clinical development of nucleic acid-based therapeutics. However, despite these limitations, nucleic acid-based therapeutics has clinical value due to their great specificity, easy and large-scale synthesis with chemical methods, and pharmaceutical flexibility. Moreover, nucleic acid therapeutics are expected to broaden the range of targetable molecules essential for the HCV replication cycle, and therefore they may prove to be more effective than existing therapeutics, such as interferon-α and ribavirin combination therapy. This review focuses on the current status and future prospects of ribozymes, aptamers, siRNAs, and antisense oligonucleotides as therapeutic reagents against HCV.

  17. dbAMEPNI: a database of alanine mutagenic effects for protein–nucleic acid interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Ling; Xiong, Yi; Gao, Hongyun; ...

    2018-04-02

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions play essential roles in various biological activities such as gene regulation, transcription, DNA repair and DNA packaging. Understanding the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein–nucleic acid binding affinities can help elucidate the molecular mechanism of protein–nucleic acid recognition. Until now, no comprehensive and updated database of quantitative binding data on alanine mutagenic effects for protein–nucleic acid interactions is publicly accessible. Thus, we developed a new database of Alanine Mutagenic Effects for Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions (dbAMEPNI). dbAMEPNI is a manually curated, literature-derived database, comprising over 577 alanine mutagenic data with experimentally determined binding affinities for protein–nucleic acidmore » complexes. Here, it contains several important parameters, such as dissociation constant (Kd), Gibbs free energy change (ΔΔG), experimental conditions and structural parameters of mutant residues. In addition, the database provides an extended dataset of 282 single alanine mutations with only qualitative data (or descriptive effects) of thermodynamic information.« less

  18. Comparative evaluation of three commercial systems for nucleic acid extraction from urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Wei; Sefers, Susan E; Li, Haijing; Kohn, Debra J; Procop, Gary W

    2005-09-01

    A nucleic acid extraction system that can handle small numbers of specimens with a short test turnaround time and short hands-on time is desirable for emergent testing. We performed a comparative validation on three systems: the MagNA Pure compact system (Compact), the NucliSens miniMAG extraction instrument (miniMAG), and the BioRobot EZ1 system (EZ1). A total of 75 urine specimens submitted for polyomavirus BK virus detection were used. The human beta-actin gene was detected on 75 (100%), 75 (100%), and 72 (96%) nucleic acid extracts prepared by the miniMAG, EZ1, and Compact, respectively. The miniMAG produced the highest quantity of nucleic acids and the best precision among the three systems. The agreement rate was 100% for BKV detection on nucleic acid extracts prepared by the three extraction systems. When a full panel of specimens was run, the hands-on time and test turnaround time were 105.7 and 121.1 min for miniMAG, 6.1 and 22.6 min for EZ1, and 7.4 and 33.7 min for Compact, respectively. The EZ1 and Compact systems processed automatic nucleic acid extraction properly, providing a good solution to the need for sporadic but emergent specimen detection. The miniMAG yielded the highest quantity of nucleic acids, suggesting that this system would be the best for specimens containing a low number of microorganisms of interest.

  19. Logic gates and antisense DNA devices operating on a translator nucleic Acid scaffold.

    PubMed

    Shlyahovsky, Bella; Li, Yang; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2009-07-28

    A series of logic gates, "AND", "OR", and "XOR", are designed using a DNA scaffold that includes four "footholds" on which the logic operations are activated. Two of the footholds represent input-recognition strands, and these are blocked by complementary nucleic acids, whereas the other two footholds are blocked by nucleic acids that include the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme sequence. The logic gates are activated by either nucleic acid inputs that hybridize to the respective "footholds", or by low-molecular-weight inputs (adenosine monophosphate or cocaine) that yield the respective aptamer-substrate complexes. This results in the respective translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the footholds carrying the HRP-mimicking DNAzyme sequence, and the concomitant release of the respective DNAzyme. The released product-strands then self-assemble into the hemin/G-quadruplex-HRP-mimicking DNAzyme that biocatalyzes the formation of a colored product and provides an output signal for the different logic gates. The principle of the logic operation is, then, implemented as a possible paradigm for future nanomedicine. The nucleic acid inputs that bind to the blocked footholds result in the translocation of the blocking nucleic acids to the respective footholds carrying the antithrombin aptamer. The released aptamer inhibits, then, the hydrolytic activity of thrombin. The system demonstrates the regulation of a biocatalytic reaction by a translator system activated on a DNA scaffold.

  20. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  1. DSSR-enhanced visualization of nucleic acid structures in Jmol.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert M; Lu, Xiang-Jun

    2017-07-03

    Sophisticated and interactive visualizations are essential for making sense of the intricate 3D structures of macromolecules. For proteins, secondary structural components are routinely featured in molecular graphics visualizations. However, the field of RNA structural bioinformatics is still lagging behind; for example, current molecular graphics tools lack built-in support even for base pairs, double helices, or hairpin loops. DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA) is an integrated and automated command-line tool for the analysis and annotation of RNA tertiary structures. It calculates a comprehensive and unique set of features for characterizing RNA, as well as DNA structures. Jmol is a widely used, open-source Java viewer for 3D structures, with a powerful scripting language. JSmol, its reincarnation based on native JavaScript, has a predominant position in the post Java-applet era for web-based visualization of molecular structures. The DSSR-Jmol integration presented here makes salient features of DSSR readily accessible, either via the Java-based Jmol application itself, or its HTML5-based equivalent, JSmol. The DSSR web service accepts 3D coordinate files (in mmCIF or PDB format) initiated from a Jmol or JSmol session and returns DSSR-derived structural features in JSON format. This seamless combination of DSSR and Jmol/JSmol brings the molecular graphics of 3D RNA structures to a similar level as that for proteins, and enables a much deeper analysis of structural characteristics. It fills a gap in RNA structural bioinformatics, and is freely accessible (via the Jmol application or the JSmol-based website http://jmol.x3dna.org). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Targeting Cytosolic Nucleic Acid-Sensing Pathways for Cancer Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Rinaldi, Monica

    2018-01-01

    The innate immune system provides the first line of defense against pathogen infection though also influences pathways involved in cancer immunosurveillance. The innate immune system relies on a limited set of germ line-encoded sensors termed pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), signaling proteins and immune response factors. Cytosolic receptors mediate recognition of danger damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) signals. Once activated, these sensors trigger multiple signaling cascades, converging on the production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines. Recent studies revealed that PRRs respond to nucleic acids (NA) released by dying, damaged, cancer cells, as danger DAMPs signals, and presence of signaling proteins across cancer types suggests that these signaling mechanisms may be involved in cancer biology. DAMPs play important roles in shaping adaptive immune responses through the activation of innate immune cells and immunological response to danger DAMPs signals is crucial for the host response to cancer and tumor rejection. Furthermore, PRRs mediate the response to NA in several vaccination strategies, including DNA immunization. As route of double-strand DNA intracellular entry, DNA immunization leads to expression of key components of cytosolic NA-sensing pathways. The involvement of NA-sensing mechanisms in the antitumor response makes these pathways attractive drug targets. Natural and synthetic agonists of NA-sensing pathways can trigger cell death in malignant cells, recruit immune cells, such as DCs, CD8 + T cells, and NK cells, into the tumor microenvironment and are being explored as promising adjuvants in cancer immunotherapies. In this minireview, we discuss how cGAS-STING and RIG-I-MAVS pathways have been targeted for cancer treatment in preclinical translational researches. In addition, we present a targeted selection of recent clinical trials employing agonists of cytosolic NA-sensing pathways showing how these pathways

  3. Guanine base stacking in G-quadruplex nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Christopher Jacques; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes constitute a class of nucleic acid structures defined by stacked guanine tetrads (or G-tetrads) with guanine bases from neighboring tetrads stacking with one another within the G-tetrad core. Individual G-quadruplexes can also stack with one another at their G-tetrad interface leading to higher-order structures as observed in telomeric repeat-containing DNA and RNA. In this study, we investigate how guanine base stacking influences the stability of G-quadruplexes and their stacked higher-order structures. A structural survey of the Protein Data Bank is conducted to characterize experimentally observed guanine base stacking geometries within the core of G-quadruplexes and at the interface between stacked G-quadruplex structures. We couple this survey with a systematic computational examination of stacked G-tetrad energy landscapes using quantum mechanical computations. Energy calculations of stacked G-tetrads reveal large energy differences of up to 12 kcal/mol between experimentally observed geometries at the interface of stacked G-quadruplexes. Energy landscapes are also computed using an AMBER molecular mechanics description of stacking energy and are shown to agree quite well with quantum mechanical calculated landscapes. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a structural explanation for the experimentally observed preference of parallel G-quadruplexes to stack in a 5′–5′ manner based on different accessible tetrad stacking modes at the stacking interfaces of 5′–5′ and 3′–3′ stacked G-quadruplexes. PMID:23268444

  4. Nucleic acid-based aptamers: applications, development and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Maremanda, Nihal G; Subramanian, Krishnakumar; Veedu, Rakesh N; Bawa, Raj; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2015-01-01

    Short single-stranded oligonucleotides called aptamers, often termed as chemical antibodies, have been developed as powerful alternatives to traditional antibodies with respect to their obvious advantages like high specificity and affinity, longer shelf-life, easier manufacturing protocol, freedom to introduce chemical modifications for further improvement, etc. Reiterative selection process of aptamers over 10-15 cycles starting from a large initial pool of random nucleotide sequences renders them with high binding affinity, thereby making them extremely specific for their targets. Aptamer-based detection systems are well investigated and likely to displace primitive detection systems. Aptamer chimeras (combination of aptamers with another aptamer or biomacromolecule or chemical moiety) have the potential activity of both the parent molecules, and thus hold the capability to perform diverse functions at the same time. Owing to their extremely high specificity and lack of immunogenicity or pathogenicity, a number of other aptamers have recently entered clinical trials and have garnered favorable attention from pharmaceutical companies. Promising results from the clinical trials provide new hope to change the conventional style of therapy. Aptamers have attained high therapeutic relevance in a short time as compared to synthetic drugs and/or other modes of therapy. This review follows the various trends in aptamer technology including production, selection, modifications and success in clinical fields. It focusses largely on the various applications of aptamers which mainly depend upon their selection procedures. The review also sheds light on various modifications and chimerizations that have been implemented in order to improve the stability and functioning of the aptamers, including introduction of locked nucleic acids (LNAs). The application of various aptamers in detection systems has been discussed elaborately in order to stress on their role as efficient

  5. Remote Enantioselection Transmitted by an Achiral Peptide Nucleic Acid Backbone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    2000-01-01

    short homochiral segment of DNA into a PNA helix could have guaranteed that the next short segment of DNA to be incorporated would have the same handedness as the first. Once two segments of the same handedness were present, the probability that a third segment would have the same handedness would increase, and so on. Evolution could then slowly dilute out the PNA part. This scenario would ultimately allow the formation of a chiral oligonucleotide by processes that are largely resistant to enantiomeric crossinhibition. It is important to note that the ligation of homochiral dinucleotides on a nucleic acid template would probably be at least as enantiospecific as the reaction that we have studied. The disadvantage of using chiral monomers as components of a replicating system arises from the difficulty of generating a first long homochiral template from a racemic mixture of monomers, although results of experiments designed to overcome this difficulty by employing homochiral tetramers have been reported.l l The probability of obtaining a homochiral n-mer from achiral substrates is approximately 1P-I if the nontemplate-directed extension of the primer is not enantioselective. Hence, it would be very hard to get started with a homochiral 40-mer, for example. No such difficulty exists in a scenario that originates with an achiral genetic material and in which the incorporation of very few chiral monomers in this achiral background gradually progresses towards homochirality. It seems possible that some PNA sequences could act as catalysts, analogous to ribozymes, even though PNA lacks clear metal binding sites. Although such catalysts could not be enantioselective, the incorporation of as few as two chiral nucleotides could then impose chiral specificity on the system. Furthermore, such patch chimeras could help to bridge the gap in catalytic potential between PNA and RNA, while guaranteeing enantioselectivity.

  6. Oxidative Stress and Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yuh-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate), deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies. PMID:24058721

  7. NUCLEIC ACID CONCENTRATION AND RADIOSENSITIVITY OF THE SCORPION ANDROCTONUS AMOREUXI AUD. AND SAV (in French)

    SciTech Connect

    Pascaud, X.; Niaussat, P.

    1963-01-01

    The concentration of desoxyribonucleic acid and of ribonucleic acid in the soft tissues was determined for the two invertebrates of the arid zone, the scorpion Androctonus amoreuxi Aud. and Sav. and the tenebrionide Pimelia angulata expiata Peyer. The radiosensitivity to gamma rays had been previously determined: LD/sub 50/30// days is 100,000 r for Androctonus and 40,000 for Pimelia. The mean rate of nucleic acids determined in the scorpion was relatively low. A possible relation between the high radioresistance of the scorpion and the low nucleic acid concentration was discussed. (J.S.R.)

  8. Self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsup; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Shin, Yong; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2016-01-07

    Over the past few decades, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technologies have played a great role in revolutionizing the way in vitro medical diagnostics are conducted and transforming bulky and expensive laboratory instruments and labour-intensive tests into easy to use, cost-effective miniaturized systems with faster analysis time, which can be used for near-patient or point-of-care (POC) tests. Fluidic pumps and valves are among the key components for LOC systems; however, they often require on-line electrical power or batteries and make the whole system bulky and complex, therefore limiting its application to POC testing especially in low-resource setting. This is particularly problematic for molecular diagnostics where multi-step sample processing (e.g. lysing, washing, elution) is necessary. In this work, we have developed a self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system (SSNES). The main components of SSNES are a powerless vacuum actuator using two disposable syringes and a switchgear made of PMMA blocks and an O-ring. In the vacuum actuator, an opened syringe and a blocked syringe are bound together and act as a working syringe and an actuating syringe, respectively. The negative pressure in the opened syringe is generated by a restoring force of the compressed air inside the blocked syringe and utilized as the vacuum source. The Venus symbol shape of the switchgear provides multiple functions including being a reagent reservoir, a push-button for the vacuum actuator, and an on-off valve. The SSNES consists of three sets of vacuum actuators, switchgears and microfluidic components. The entire system can be easily fabricated and is fully disposable. We have successfully demonstrated DNA extraction from a urine sample using a dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)-based extraction method and the performance of the DNA extraction has been confirmed by genetic (HRAS) analysis of DNA biomarkers from the extracted DNAs using the SSNES. Therefore, the SSNES can be widely

  9. Integrated sample-to-detection chip for nucleic acid test assays.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Pabbaraju, K; Wong, S; Tellier, R; Kaler, K V I S

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic acid based diagnostic techniques are routinely used for the detection of infectious agents. Most of these assays rely on nucleic acid extraction platforms for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids and a separate real-time PCR platform for quantitative nucleic acid amplification tests (NATs). Several microfluidic lab on chip (LOC) technologies have been developed, where mechanical and chemical methods are used for the extraction and purification of nucleic acids. Microfluidic technologies have also been effectively utilized for chip based real-time PCR assays. However, there are few examples of microfluidic systems which have successfully integrated these two key processes. In this study, we have implemented an electro-actuation based LOC micro-device that leverages multi-frequency actuation of samples and reagents droplets for chip based nucleic acid extraction and real-time, reverse transcription (RT) PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification from clinical samples. Our prototype micro-device combines chemical lysis with electric field assisted isolation of nucleic acid in a four channel parallel processing scheme. Furthermore, a four channel parallel qRT-PCR amplification and detection assay is integrated to deliver the sample-to-detection NAT chip. The NAT chip combines dielectrophoresis and electrostatic/electrowetting actuation methods with resistive micro-heaters and temperature sensors to perform chip based integrated NATs. The two chip modules have been validated using different panels of clinical samples and their performance compared with standard platforms. This study has established that our integrated NAT chip system has a sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the standard platforms while providing up to 10 fold reduction in sample/reagent volumes.

  10. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative and discriminative analysis of nucleic acid samples using luminometric nonspecific nanoparticle methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlasalo, S.; Mariani, L.; Härmä, H.

    2016-03-01

    Homogeneous simple assays utilizing luminescence quenching and time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) were developed for the quantification of nucleic acids without sequence information. Nucleic acids prevent the adsorption of a protein to europium nanoparticles which is detected as a luminescence quenching of europium nanoparticles with a soluble quencher or as a decrease of TR-LRET from europium nanoparticles to the acceptor dye. Contrary to the existing methods based on fluorescent dye binding to nucleic acids, equal sensitivities for both single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were measured and a detection limit of 60 pg was calculated for the quenching assay. The average coefficient of variation was 5% for the quenching assay and 8% for the TR-LRET assay. The TR-LRET assay was also combined with a nucleic acid dye selective to dsDNA in a single tube assay to measure the total concentration of DNA and the ratio of ssDNA and dsDNA in the mixture. To our knowledge, such a multiplexed assay is not accomplished with commercially available assays.Homogeneous simple assays utilizing luminescence quenching and time-resolved luminescence resonance energy transfer (TR-LRET) were developed for the quantification of nucleic acids without sequence information. Nucleic acids prevent the adsorption of a protein to europium nanoparticles which is detected as a luminescence quenching of europium nanoparticles with a soluble quencher or as a decrease of TR-LRET from europium nanoparticles to the acceptor dye. Contrary to the existing methods based on fluorescent dye binding to nucleic acids, equal sensitivities for both single- (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) were measured and a detection limit of 60 pg was calculated for the quenching assay. The average coefficient of variation was 5% for the quenching assay and 8% for the TR-LRET assay. The TR-LRET assay was also combined with a nucleic acid dye selective to dsDNA in a single tube

  12. [Genotoxic modification of nucleic acid bases and biological consequences of it. Review and prospects of experimental and computational investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poltev, V. I.; Bruskov, V. I.; Shuliupina, N. V.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R.; Miller, J.

    1993-01-01

    The review is presented of experimental and computational data on the influence of genotoxic modification of bases (deamination, alkylation, oxidation) on the structure and biological functioning of nucleic acids. Pathways are discussed for the influence of modification on coding properties of bases, on possible errors of nucleic acid biosynthesis, and on configurations of nucleotide mispairs. The atomic structure of nucleic acid fragments with modified bases and the role of base damages in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are considered.

  13. Recent advances in delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu; Oupický, David

    2013-12-10

    Cancer treatment that uses a combination of approaches with the ability to affect multiple disease pathways has been proven highly effective in the treatment of many cancers. Combination therapy can include multiple chemotherapeutics or combinations of chemotherapeutics with other treatment modalities like surgery or radiation. However, despite the widespread clinical use of combination therapies, relatively little attention has been given to the potential of modern nanocarrier delivery methods, like liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles, to enhance the efficacy of combination treatments. This lack of knowledge is particularly notable in the limited success of vectors for the delivery of combinations of nucleic acids with traditional small molecule drugs. The delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations is particularly challenging due to differences in the physicochemical properties of the two types of agents. This review discusses recent advances in the development of delivery methods using combinations of small molecule drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics to treat cancer. This review primarily focuses on the rationale used for selecting appropriate drug-nucleic acid combinations as well as progress in the development of nanocarriers suitable for simultaneous delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent Advances in Delivery of Drug-Nucleic Acid Combinations for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu; Oupický, David

    2013-01-01

    Cancer treatment that uses a combination of approaches with the ability to affect multiple disease pathways has been proven highly effective in the treatment of many cancers. Combination therapy can include multiple chemotherapeutics or combinations of chemotherapeutics with other treatment modalities like surgery or radiation. However, despite the widespread clinical use of combination therapies, relatively little attention has been given to the potential of modern nanocarrier delivery methods, like liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles, to enhance the efficacy of combination treatments. This lack of knowledge is particularly notable in the limited success of vectors for the delivery of combinations of nucleic acids with traditional small molecule drugs. The delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations is particularly challenging due to differences in the physicochemical properties of the two types of agents. This review discusses recent advances in the development of delivery methods using combinations of small molecule drugs and nucleic acid therapeutics to treat cancer. This review primarily focuses on the rationale used for selecting appropriate drug-nucleic acid combinations as well as progress in the development of nanocarriers suitable for simultaneous delivery of drug-nucleic acid combinations. PMID:23624358

  15. Phytoagents for Cancer Management: Regulation of Nucleic Acid Oxidation, ROS, and Related Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized nucleic acids causes genomic instability leading to senescence, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Phytoagents are known to reduce the risk of cancer development; whether such effects are through regulating the extent of nucleic acid oxidation remains unclear. Here, we outlined the role of reactive oxygen species in nucleic acid oxidation as a driving force in cancer progression. The consequential relationship between genome instability and cancer progression highlights the importance of modulation of cellular redox level in cancer management. Current epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrate the effects and modes of action of phytoagents in nucleic acid oxidation and provide rationales for the use of phytoagents as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents. Vitamins and various phytoagents antagonize carcinogen-triggered oxidative stress by scavenging free radicals and/or activating endogenous defence systems such as Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes or pathways. Moreover, metal ion chelation by phytoagents helps to attenuate oxidative DNA damage caused by transition metal ions. Besides, the prooxidant effects of some phytoagents pose selective cytotoxicity on cancer cells and shed light on a new strategy of cancer therapy. The “double-edged sword” role of phytoagents as redox regulators in nucleic acid oxidation and their possible roles in cancer prevention or therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:24454991

  16. Concentration methods for high-resolution THz spectroscopy of nucleic-acid biomolecules and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Zhang, W.; Mendoza, E. A.; Kuznetsova, Y.; Brueck, S. R. J.; Rahman, M.; Norton, M. L.

    2012-03-01

    Biomolecules can exhibit low-lying vibrational modes in the THz region which are detectable in transmission given a strong molecular dipole moment and optical depth, and a spectrometer of adequate sensitivity. The nucleic acids are particularly interesting because of applications such as label-free gene assay, bio-agent detection, etc. However for nucleic acids, sample preparation and THz coupling are of paramount importance because of the strong absorption by liquid water and the small concentration of molecules present in physiological solutions. Concentration methods become necessary to make the THz vibrational modes detectable, either by concentrating the nucleic-acid sample itself in a small volume but large area, or by concentrating the THz radiation down to the volume of the sample. This paper summarizes one type of the first method: nanofluidic channel arrays for biological nucleic acids; and two types of the second method: (1) a circular-waveguide pinhole, and (2) a circular-waveguide, conical-horn coupling structure, both for DNA crystals. The first method has been demonstrated on a very short artificial nucleic acid [small-interfering (si) RNA (17-to-25 bp)] and a much longer, biological molecule [Lambda-phage DNA (48.5 kbp)]. The second method has been demonstrated on small (~100 micron) single crystals of DNA grown by the sitting-drop method.

  17. Integrated magnetic tweezers and single-molecule FRET for investigating the mechanical properties of nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W; Stone, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Many enzymes promote structural changes in their nucleic acid substrates via application of piconewton forces over nanometer length scales. Magnetic tweezers (MT) is a single molecule force spectroscopy method widely used for studying the energetics of such mechanical processes. MT permits stable application of a wide range of forces and torques over long time scales with nanometer spatial resolution. However, in any force spectroscopy experiment, the ability to monitor structural changes in nucleic acids with nanometer sensitivity requires the system of interest to be held under high degrees of tension to improve signal to noise. This limitation prohibits measurement of structural changes within nucleic acids under physiologically relevant conditions of low stretching forces. To overcome this challenge, researchers have integrated a spatially sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy method, single molecule-FRET, with MT to allow simultaneous observation and manipulation of nanoscale structural transitions over a wide range of forces. Here, we describe a method for using this hybrid instrument to analyze the mechanical properties of nucleic acids. We expect that this method for analysis of nucleic acid structure will be easily adapted for experiments aiming to interrogate the mechanical responses of other biological macromolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated magnetic tweezers and single-molecule FRET for investigating the mechanical properties of nucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xi; Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Many enzymes promote structural changes in their nucleic acid substrates via application of piconewton forces over nanometer length scales. Magnetic tweezers (MT) is a single molecule force spectroscopy method widely used for studying the energetics of such mechanical processes. MT permits stable application of a wide range of forces and torques over long time scales with nanometer spatial resolution. However, in any force spectroscopy experiment, the ability to monitor structural changes in nucleic acids with nanometer sensitivity requires the system of interest to be held under high degrees of tension to improve signal to noise. This limitation prohibits measurement of structural changes within nucleic acids under physiologically relevant conditions of low stretching forces. To overcome this challenge, researchers have integrated a spatially sensitive fluorescence spectroscopy method, single molecule-FRET, with MT to allow simultaneous observation and manipulation of nanoscale structural transitions over a wide range of forces. Here, we describe a method for using this hybrid instrument to analyze the mechanical properties of nucleic acids. We expect that this method for analysis of nucleic acid structure will be easily adapted for experiments aiming to interrogate the mechanical responses of other biological macromolecules. PMID:27320203

  19. Magnetically enhanced nucleic acid delivery. Ten years of magnetofection-progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christian; Zelphati, Olivier; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Nucleic acids carry the building plans of living systems. As such, they can be exploited to make cells produce a desired protein, or to shut down the expression of endogenous genes or even to repair defective genes. Hence, nucleic acids are unique substances for research and therapy. To exploit their potential, they need to be delivered into cells which can be a challenging task in many respects. During the last decade, nanomagnetic methods for delivering and targeting nucleic acids have been developed, methods which are often referred to as magnetofection. In this review we summarize the progress and achievements in this field of research. We discuss magnetic formulations of vectors for nucleic acid delivery and their characterization, mechanisms of magnetofection, and the application of magnetofection in viral and nonviral nucleic acid delivery in cell culture and in animal models. We summarize results that have been obtained with using magnetofection in basic research and in preclinical animal models. Finally, we describe some of our recent work and end with some conclusions and perspectives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction of Nucleic Acid Content in Candida Yeast Cells by Bovine Pancreatic Ribonuclease A Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Castro, A. C.; Sinskey, A. J.; Tannenbaum, S. R.

    1971-01-01

    Yeast as a source of protein for human consumption is limited by its relatively high nucleic acid content. In this study, we developed an enzymatic method of decreasing the nucleic acid content. Candida utilis cells, heat-shocked at 80 C for 30 sec, were treated with bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A. Maximum leakage of nucleic acid was observed when the incubation temperature was between 55 and 65 C, the pH of the system from 6.75 to 8.0, and the enzyme-to-cell ratio 1:10,000 on a weight-by-weight basis. Other factors, such as yeast strain, age of cells, and method of propagation, did not influence the susceptibility of the yeast cells to the action of ribonuclease. Buffers and monovalent cations had no inhibiting effects. Magnesium and calcium ions at concentrations greater than 0.001 m showed marked inhibition on the rate of nucleic acid leakage. This enzymatic method reduced the nucleic acid content of yeast cells from 7.5 to 9.0% to 1.5 to 2.0% with no significant concomitant loss of protein. PMID:5165838

  1. Future microfluidic and nanofluidic modular platforms for nucleic acid liquid biopsy in precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Egatz-Gomez, Ana; Wang, Ceming; Klacsmann, Flora; Pan, Zehao; Marczak, Steve; Wang, Yunshan; Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid biomarkers have enormous potential in non-invasive diagnostics and disease management. In medical research and in the near future in the clinics, there is a great demand for accurate miRNA, mRNA, and ctDNA identification and profiling. They may lead to screening of early stage cancer that is not detectable by tissue biopsy or imaging. Moreover, because their cost is low and they are non-invasive, they can become a regular screening test during annual checkups or allow a dynamic treatment program that adjusts its drug and dosage frequently. We briefly review a few existing viral and endogenous RNA assays that have been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. These tests are based on the main nucleic acid detection technologies, namely, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarrays, and next-generation sequencing. Several of the challenges that these three technologies still face regarding the quantitative measurement of a panel of nucleic acids are outlined. Finally, we review a cluster of microfluidic technologies from our group with potential for point-of-care nucleic acid quantification without nucleic acid amplification, designed to overcome specific limitations of current technologies. We suggest that integration of these technologies in a modular design can offer a low-cost, robust, and yet sensitive/selective platform for a variety of precision medicine applications. PMID:27190565

  2. Use of Dimethyl Pimelimidate with Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acids Extraction without Electricity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Choong Eun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Koo, Bonhan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Chang, Suhwan; Park, Se Yoon; Kim, Ji Yeun; Kim, Sung-Han; Shin, Yong

    2017-07-18

    The isolation of nucleic acids in the lab on a chip is crucial to achieve the maximal effectiveness of point-of-care testing for detection in clinical applications. Here, we report on the use of a simple and versatile single-channel microfluidic platform that combines dimethyl pimelimidate (DMP) for nucleic acids (both RNA and DNA) extraction without electricity using a thin-film system. The system is based on the adaption of DMP into nonchaotropic-based nucleic acids and the capture of reagents into a low-cost thin-film platform for use as a microfluidic total analysis system, which can be utilized for sample processing in clinical diagnostics. Moreover, we assessed the use of the DMP system for the extraction of nucleic acids from various samples, including mammalian cells, bacterial cells, and viruses from human disease, and we also confirmed that the quality and quantity of the nucleic acids extracted were sufficient to allow for the robust detection of biomarkers and/or pathogens in downstream analysis. Furthermore, this DMP system does not require any instruments and electricity, and has improved time efficiency, portability, and affordability. Thus, we believe that the DMP system may change the paradigm of sample processing in clinical diagnostics.

  3. To be targeted: is the magic bullet concept a viable option for synthetic nucleic acid therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Ogris, Manfred; Wagner, Ernst

    2011-07-01

    Nucleic acids offer the possibility of tailor-made, individualized treatments for genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancer. As an alternative to viral vectors, synthetic delivery systems have a potentially improved safety profile, but often lack sufficient efficiency especially when applied in vivo. Receptor targeting of synthetic vectors can improve the specificity of the vector and increase the efficiency of nucleic acid delivery to the target site. This review covers recent concepts for targeted DNA and RNA delivery to organs like liver and lung, and also to solid cancers. Syntheses and applications of delivery systems targeted with proteins, peptides, and small molecules as ligands coupled to polymeric or lipidic nucleic acid carriers are reviewed. Therapeutic concepts for treatment of genetic and infectious diseases are explained. Systemic treatment regimens of metastasized malignancies in combination with chemotherapy and radiation have already been successfully applied in preclinical studies. In addition, a first clinical study in the human application of a targeted synthetic carrier has been performed.

  4. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol'li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. [Comparison of two nucleic acid extraction methods for norovirus in oysters].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiao; Li, Hui; Deng, Xiaoling; Mo, Yanling; Fang, Ling; Ke, Changwen

    2013-04-01

    To explore a convenient and effective method for norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters suitable for long-term viral surveillance. Two methods, namely method A (glycine washing and polyethylene glycol precipitation of the virus followed by silica gel centrifugal column) and method B (protease K digestion followed by application of paramagnetic silicon) were compared for their performance in norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters. Real-time RT-PCR was used to detect norovirus in naturally infected oysters and in oysters with induced infection. The two methods yielded comparable positive detection rates for the samples, but the recovery rate of the virus was higher with method B than with method A. Method B is a more convenient and rapid method for norovirus nucleic acid extraction from oysters and suitable for long-term surveillance of norovirus.

  6. Assessment of Damage to Nucleic Acids and Repair Machinery in Salmonella typhimurium Exposed to Chlorine

    PubMed Central

    Phe, M. H.; Hajj Chehade, M.; Guilloteau, H.; Merlin, C.; Block, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Water disinfection is usually evaluated using mandatory methods based on cell culturability. However, such methods do not consider the potential of cells to recover, which should also be kept as low as possible. In this paper, we hypothesized that a successful disinfection is achieved only when the applied chlorine leads to both intracellular nucleic acid damage and strong alterations of the DNA repair machinery. Monitoring the SOS system responsiveness with a umuC’-‘lacZ reporter fusion, we found that the expression of this important cellular machinery was altered after the beginning of membrane permeabilization but prior to the total decline of both the cell culturability and the nucleic acid integrity as revealed by Sybr-II staining. Rapid measurement of such nucleic acid alterations by fluorochrome-based staining could be used as an alternative method for assessing the effectiveness of disinfection with chlorine. PMID:19936107

  7. Reactive Derivatives of Nucleic Acids and Their Components as Affinity Reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorre, Dmitrii G.; Vlasov, Valentin V.

    1985-09-01

    The review is devoted to derivatives of nucleic acids and their components — nucleotides, nucleoside triphosphates, and oligonucleotides carrying reactive groups. Such derivatives are important tools for the investigation of protein-nucleic acid interactions and the functional topography of complex protein and nucleoprotein structures and can give rise to the prospect of being able to influence in a highly selective manner living organisms, including the nucleic acids and the nucleoproteins of the genetic apparatus. The review considers the principal groups of such reagents, the methods of their synthesis, and their properties which determine the possibility of their use for the selective (affinity) modification of biopolymers. The general principles of the construction of affinity reagents and their applications are analysed in relation to nucleotide affinity reagents. The bibliography includes 121 references.

  8. A Simple, Low-Cost Platform for Real-Time Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Craw, Pascal; Mackay, Ruth E.; Naveenathayalan, Angel; Hudson, Chris; Branavan, Manoharanehru; Sadiq, S. Tariq; Balachandran, Wamadeva

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microfluidics and the introduction of isothermal nucleic acid amplification assays have resulted in a range of solutions for nucleic acid amplification tests suited for point of care and field use. However, miniaturisation of instrumentation for such assays has not seen such rapid advances and fluorescence based assays still depend on complex, bulky and expensive optics such as fluorescence microscopes, photomultiplier tubes and sensitive lens assemblies. In this work we demonstrate a robust, low cost platform for isothermal nucleic acid amplification on a microfluidic device. Using easily obtainable materials and commercial off-the-shelf components, we show real time fluorescence detection using a low cost photodiode and operational amplifier without need for lenses. Temperature regulation on the device is achieved using a heater fabricated with standard printed circuit board fabrication methods. These facile construction methods allow fabrications at a cost compatible with widespread deployment to resource poor settings. PMID:26389913

  9. Engineering nucleic acid structures for programmable molecular circuitry and intracellular biocomputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang; Green, Alexander A.; Yan, Hao; Fan, Chunhai

    2017-11-01

    Nucleic acids have attracted widespread attention due to the simplicity with which they can be designed to form discrete structures and programmed to perform specific functions at the nanoscale. The advantages of DNA/RNA nanotechnology offer numerous opportunities for in-cell and in-vivo applications, and the technology holds great promise to advance the growing field of synthetic biology. Many elegant examples have revealed the potential in integrating nucleic acid nanostructures in cells and in vivo where they can perform important physiological functions. In this Review, we summarize the current abilities of DNA/RNA nanotechnology to realize applications in live cells and then discuss the key problems that must be solved to fully exploit the useful properties of nanostructures. Finally, we provide viewpoints on how to integrate the tools provided by DNA/RNA nanotechnology and related new technologies to construct nucleic acid nanostructure-based molecular circuitry for synthetic biology.

  10. The third annual BRDS on research and development of nucleic acid-based nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The completion of human genome project, decrease in the sequencing cost, and correlation of genome sequencing data with specific diseases led to the exponential rise in the nucleic acid-based therapeutic approaches. In the third annual Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Symposium (BRDS) held at the Center for Drug Discovery and Lozier Center for Pharmacy Sciences and Education at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), we highlighted the remarkable features of the nucleic acid-based nanomedicines, their significance, NIH funding opportunities on nanomedicines and gene therapy research, challenges and opportunities in the clinical translation of nucleic acids into therapeutics, and the role of intellectual property (IP) in drug discovery and development. PMID:27848223

  11. Label-free functional nucleic acid sensors for detecting target agents

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Xiang, Yu

    2015-01-13

    A general methodology to design label-free fluorescent functional nucleic acid sensors using a vacant site approach and an abasic site approach is described. In one example, a method for designing label-free fluorescent functional nucleic acid sensors (e.g., those that include a DNAzyme, aptamer or aptazyme) that have a tunable dynamic range through the introduction of an abasic site (e.g., dSpacer) or a vacant site into the functional nucleic acids. Also provided is a general method for designing label-free fluorescent aptamer sensors based on the regulation of malachite green (MG) fluorescence. A general method for designing label-free fluorescent catalytic and molecular beacons (CAMBs) is also provided. The methods demonstrated here can be used to design many other label-free fluorescent sensors to detect a wide range of analytes. Sensors and methods of using the disclosed sensors are also provided.

  12. The increasing application of multiplex nucleic acid detection tests to the diagnosis of syndromic infections.

    PubMed

    Gray, J; Coupland, L J

    2014-01-01

    On 14 January 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced permission for a multiplex nucleic acid test, the xTAG® Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP) (Luminex Corporation, USA), which simultaneously detects 11 common viral, bacterial and parasitic causes of infectious gastroenteritis, to be marketed in the USA. This announcement reflects the current move towards the development and commercialization of detection technologies based on nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of syndromic infections. We discuss the limitations and advantages of nucleic acid amplification techniques and the recent advances in Conformité Européene - in-vitro diagnostic (CE-IVD)-approved multiplex real-time PCR kits for the simultaneous detection of multiple targets within the clinical diagnostics market.

  13. Key Aspects of Nucleic Acid Library Design for in Vitro Selection

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyeva, Maria A.; Davydova, Anna S.; Vorobjev, Pavel E.; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V.; Venyaminova, Alya G.

    2018-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers capable of selectively recognizing their target molecules have nowadays been established as powerful and tunable tools for biospecific applications, be it therapeutics, drug delivery systems or biosensors. It is now generally acknowledged that in vitro selection enables one to generate aptamers to almost any target of interest. However, the success of selection and the affinity of the resulting aptamers depend to a large extent on the nature and design of an initial random nucleic acid library. In this review, we summarize and discuss the most important features of the design of nucleic acid libraries for in vitro selection such as the nature of the library (DNA, RNA or modified nucleotides), the length of a randomized region and the presence of fixed sequences. We also compare and contrast different randomization strategies and consider computer methods of library design and some other aspects. PMID:29401748

  14. Generation of Synthetic Copolymer Libraries by Combinatorial Assembly on Nucleic Acid Templates.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dehui; Yeung, Wayland; Hili, Ryan

    2016-07-11

    Recent advances in nucleic acid-templated copolymerization have expanded the scope of sequence-controlled synthetic copolymers beyond the molecular architectures witnessed in nature. This has enabled the power of molecular evolution to be applied to synthetic copolymer libraries to evolve molecular function ranging from molecular recognition to catalysis. This Review seeks to summarize different approaches available to generate sequence-defined monodispersed synthetic copolymer libraries using nucleic acid-templated polymerization. Key concepts and principles governing nucleic acid-templated polymerization, as well as the fidelity of various copolymerization technologies, will be described. The Review will focus on methods that enable the combinatorial generation of copolymer libraries and their molecular evolution for desired function.

  15. Beyond DNA origami: A look on the bright future of nucleic acid nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, Nicole; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Manzo, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acid nanotechnology exploits the programmable molecular recognition properties of natural and synthetic nucleic acids to assemble structures with nanometer-scale precision. In 2006, DNA origami transformed the field by providing a versatile platform for self-assembly of arbitrary shapes from one long DNA strand held in place by hundreds of short, site-specific (spatially addressable) DNA ”staples”. This revolutionary approach has led to the creation of a multitude of 2D and 3D scaffolds that form the basis for functional nanodevices. Not limited to nucleic acids, these nanodevices can incorporate other structural and functional materials, such as proteins and nanoparticles, making them broadly useful for current and future applications in emerging fields such as nanomedicine, nanoelectronics, and alternative energy. PMID:22131292

  16. A fully disposable and integrated paper-based device for nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruihua; Yang, Hui; Gong, Yan; You, MinLi; Liu, Zhi; Choi, Jane Ru; Wen, Ting; Qu, Zhiguo; Mei, Qibing; Xu, Feng

    2017-03-29

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) has been widely used for disease diagnosis, food safety control and environmental monitoring. At present, NAT mainly involves nucleic acid extraction, amplification and detection steps that heavily rely on large equipment and skilled workers, making the test expensive, time-consuming, and thus less suitable for point-of-care (POC) applications. With advances in paper-based microfluidic technologies, various integrated paper-based devices have recently been developed for NAT, which however require off-chip reagent storage, complex operation steps and equipment-dependent nucleic acid amplification, restricting their use for POC testing. To overcome these challenges, we demonstrate a fully disposable and integrated paper-based sample-in-answer-out device for NAT by integrating nucleic acid extraction, helicase-dependent isothermal amplification and lateral flow assay detection into one paper device. This simple device allows on-chip dried reagent storage and equipment-free nucleic acid amplification with simple operation steps, which could be performed by untrained users in remote settings. The proposed device consists of a sponge-based reservoir and a paper-based valve for nucleic acid extraction, an integrated battery, a PTC ultrathin heater, temperature control switch and on-chip dried enzyme mix storage for isothermal amplification, and a lateral flow test strip for naked-eye detection. It can sensitively detect Salmonella typhimurium, as a model target, with a detection limit of as low as 10 2 CFU ml -1 in wastewater and egg, and 10 3 CFU ml -1 in milk and juice in about an hour. This fully disposable and integrated paper-based device has great potential for future POC applications in resource-limited settings.

  17. Photochemistry of nucleic acid bases and their thio- and aza-analogues in solution.

    PubMed

    Pollum, Marvin; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    The steady-state and time-resolved photochemistry of the natural nucleic acid bases and their sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted analogues in solution is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the experimental studies performed over the last 3-5 years that showcase topical areas of scientific inquiry and those that require further scrutiny. Significant progress has been made toward mapping the radiative and nonradiative decay pathways of nucleic acid bases. There is a consensus that ultrafast internal conversion to the ground state is the primary relaxation pathway in the nucleic acid bases, whereas the mechanism of this relaxation and the level of participation of the (1)πσ*, (1) nπ*, and (3)ππ* states are still matters of debate. Although impressive research has been performed in recent years, the microscopic mechanism(s) by which the nucleic acid bases dissipate excess vibrational energy to their environment, and the role of the N-glycosidic group in this and in other nonradiative decay pathways, are still poorly understood. The simple replacement of a single atom in a nucleobase with a sulfur or nitrogen atom severely restricts access to the conical intersections responsible for the intrinsic internal conversion pathways to the ground state in the nucleic acid bases. It also enhances access to ultrafast and efficient inter-system crossing pathways that populate the triplet manifold in yields close to unity. Determining the coupled nuclear and electronic pathways responsible for the significantly different photochemistry in these nucleic acid base analogues serves as a convenient platform to examine the current state of knowledge regarding the photodynamic properties of the DNA and RNA bases from both experimental and computational perspectives. Further investigations should also aid in forecasting the prospective use of sulfur- and nitrogen-substituted base analogues in photochemotherapeutic applications.

  18. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  19. New nucleic acid testing devices to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Maffert, P; Reverchon, S; Nasser, W; Rozand, C; Abaibou, H

    2017-10-01

    Point-of-care diagnosis based on nucleic acid testing aims to incorporate all the analytical steps, from sample preparation to nucleic acid amplification and detection, in a single device. This device needs to provide a low-cost, robust, sensitive, specific, and easily readable analysis. Microfluidics has great potential for handling small volumes of fluids on a single platform. Microfluidic technology has recently been applied to paper, which is already used in low-cost lateral flow tests. Nucleic acid extraction from a biological specimen usually requires cell filtration and lysis on specific membranes, while affinity matrices, such as chitosan or polydiacetylene, are well suited to concentrating nucleic acids for subsequent amplification. Access to electricity is often difficult in resource-limited areas, so the amplification step needs to be equipment-free. Consequently, the reaction has to be isothermal to alleviate the need for a thermocycler. LAMP, NASBA, HDA, and RPA are examples of the technologies available. Nucleic acid detection techniques are currently based on fluorescence, colorimetry, or chemiluminescence. For point-of-care diagnostics, the results should be readable with the naked eye. Nowadays, interpretation and communication of results to health professionals could rely on a smartphone, used as a telemedicine device. The major challenge of creating an "all-in-one" diagnostic test involves the design of an optimal solution and a sequence for each analytical step, as well as combining the execution of all these steps on a single device. This review provides an overview of available materials and technologies which seem to be adapted to point-of-care nucleic acid-based diagnosis, in low-resource areas.

  20. Novel Bioluminescent Quantitative Detection of Nucleic Acid Amplification in Real-Time

    PubMed Central

    Gandelman, Olga A.; Church, Vicki L.; Moore, Cathy A.; Kiddle, Guy; Carne, Christopher A.; Parmar, Surendra; Jalal, Hamid; Tisi, Laurence C.; Murray, James A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background The real-time monitoring of polynucleotide amplification is at the core of most molecular assays. This conventionally relies on fluorescent detection of the amplicon produced, requiring complex and costly hardware, often restricting it to specialised laboratories. Principal Findings Here we report the first real-time, closed-tube luminescent reporter system for nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs) enabling the progress of amplification to be continuously monitored using simple light measuring equipment. The Bioluminescent Assay in Real-Time (BART) continuously reports through bioluminescent output the exponential increase of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced during the isothermal amplification of a specific nucleic acid target. BART relies on the coupled conversion of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced stoichiometrically during nucleic acid synthesis to ATP by the enzyme ATP sulfurylase, and can therefore be coupled to a wide range of isothermal NAATs. During nucleic acid amplification, enzymatic conversion of PPi released during DNA synthesis into ATP is continuously monitored through the bioluminescence generated by thermostable firefly luciferase. The assay shows a unique kinetic signature for nucleic acid amplifications with a readily identifiable light output peak, whose timing is proportional to the concentration of original target nucleic acid. This allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific targets, and readily differentiates between negative and positive samples. Since quantitation in BART is based on determination of time-to-peak rather than absolute intensity of light emission, complex or highly sensitive light detectors are not required. Conclusions The combined chemistries of the BART reporter and amplification require only a constant temperature maintained by a heating block and are shown to be robust in the analysis of clinical samples. Since monitoring the BART reaction requires only a simple light

  1. Quantifying Functional Group Interactions that Determine Urea Effects on Nucleic Acid Helix Formation

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Emily J.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Cha, Hyo Keun; McDevitt, Joseph L.; Merker, Wolf E.; Ritzer, Ryan; Muth, Gregory W.; Engelsgjerd, Samuel W.; Mangold, Kathryn E.; Thompson, Perry J.; Kerins, Michael J.; Record, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Urea destabilizes helical and folded conformations of nucleic acids and proteins, as well as protein-nucleic acid complexes. To understand these effects, extend previous characterizations of interactions of urea with protein functional groups, and thereby develop urea as a probe of conformational changes in protein and nucleic acid processes, we obtain chemical potential derivatives (μ23 = dμ2/dm3) quantifying interactions of urea (component 3) with nucleic acid bases, base analogs, nucleosides and nucleotide monophosphates (component 2) using osmometry and hexanol-water distribution assays. Dissection of these μ23 yields interaction potentials quantifying interactions of urea with unit surface areas of nucleic acid functional groups (heterocyclic aromatic ring, ring methyl, carbonyl and phosphate O, amino N, sugar (C,O)); urea interacts favorably with all these groups, relative to interactions with water. Interactions of urea with heterocyclic aromatic rings and attached methyl groups (as on thymine) are particularly favorable, as previously observed for urea-homocyclic aromatic ring interactions. Urea m-values determined for double helix formation by DNA dodecamers near 25°C are in the range 0.72 to 0.85 kcal mol−1 m−1 and exhibit little systematic dependence on nucleobase composition (17–42% GC). Interpretation of these results using the urea interaction potentials indicates that extensive (60–90%) stacking of nucleobases in the separated strands in the transition region is required to explain the m-value. Results for RNA and DNA dodecamers obtained at higher temperatures, and literature data, are consistent with this conclusion. This demonstrates the utility of urea as a quantitative probe of changes in surface area (ΔASA) in nucleic acid processes. PMID:23510511

  2. Study of nucleic acid-gold nanorod interactions and detecting nucleic acid hybridization using gold nanorod solutions in the presence of sodium citrate.

    PubMed

    Kanjanawarut, Roejarek; Su, Xiaodi

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the authors report that sodium citrate can aggregate hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium ion(+)-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs), and nucleic acids of different charge and structure properties, i.e., single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and PNA-DNA complex, can bind to the AuNRs and therefore retard the sodium citrate-induced aggregation to different extents. The discovery that hybridized dsDNA (and the PNA-DNA complex) has a more pronounced protection effect than ssDNA (and PNA) allows the authors to develop a homogeneous phase AuNRs-based UV-visible (UV-vis) spectral assay for detecting specific sequences of oligonucleotides (20 mer) with a single-base-mismatch selectivity and a limit of detection of 5 nM. This assay involves no tedious bioconjugation and on-particle hybridization. The simple "set and test" format allows for a highly efficient hybridization in a homogeneous phase and a rapid display of the results in less than a minute. By measuring the degree of reduction in AuNR aggregation in the presence of different nucleic acid samples, one can assess how different nucleic acids interact with the AuNRs to complement the knowledge of spherical gold nanoparticles. Besides UV-vis characterization, transmission electron microscopy and zeta potential measurements were conduced to provide visual evidence of the particle aggregation and to support the discussion of the assay principle.

  3. Depletion of Unwanted Nucleic Acid Templates by Selective Cleavage: LNAzymes, Catalytically Active Oligonucleotides Containing Locked Nucleic Acids, Open a New Window for Detecting Rare Microbial Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Dolinšek, Jan; Dorninger, Christiane; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Many studies of molecular microbial ecology rely on the characterization of microbial communities by PCR amplification, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of genes encoding rRNAs or functional marker enzymes. However, if the established clone libraries are dominated by one or a few sequence types, the cloned diversity is difficult to analyze by random clone sequencing. Here we present a novel approach to deplete unwanted sequence types from complex nucleic acid mixtures prior to cloning and downstream analyses. It employs catalytically active oligonucleotides containing locked nucleic acids (LNAzymes) for the specific cleavage of selected RNA targets. When combined with in vitro transcription and reverse transcriptase PCR, this LNAzyme-based technique can be used with DNA or RNA extracts from microbial communities. The simultaneous application of more than one specific LNAzyme allows the concurrent depletion of different sequence types from the same nucleic acid preparation. This new method was evaluated with defined mixtures of cloned 16S rRNA genes and then used to identify accompanying bacteria in an enrichment culture dominated by the nitrite oxidizer “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii.” In silico analysis revealed that the majority of publicly deposited rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes may be used as specific LNAzymes with no or only minor sequence modifications. This efficient and cost-effective approach will greatly facilitate tasks such as the identification of microbial symbionts in nucleic acid preparations dominated by plastid or mitochondrial rRNA genes from eukaryotic hosts, the detection of contaminants in microbial cultures, and the analysis of rare organisms in microbial communities of highly uneven composition. PMID:23263968

  4. Parallel nucleic acid recognition by the LNA (locked nucleic acid) stereoisomers beta-L-LNA and alpha-D-LNA; studies in the mirror image world.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Nanna K; Bryld, Torsten; Sørensen, Mads D; Arar, Khalil; Wengel, Jesper; Nielsen, Poul

    2004-02-07

    Two LNA (locked nucleic acid) stereoisomers (beta-L-LNA and alpha-D-LNA) are evaluated in the mirror-image world, that is by the study of two mixed sequences of LNA and alpha-L-LNA and their L-DNA and L-RNA complements. Both are found to display high-affinity RNA-recognition by the formation of duplexes with parallel strand orientation.

  5. Ordered Self-Assembled Monolayers of Peptide Nucleic Acids with DNA Recognition Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, C.; Mateo-Marti, E.; Gómez-Navarro, C.; Parro, V.; Román, E.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the formation of ordered self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of single-stranded peptide nucleic acids (ssPNA). In spite of their remarkable length (7nm) thiolated PNAs assemble standing up on gold surfaces similarly to the SAMs of short alkanethiols. SAMs of ssPNA recognize complementary nucleic acids, acting as specific biosensors that discriminate even a point mutation in target ssDNA. These results are obtained by surface characterization techniques that avoid labeling of the target molecule: x-ray photoemission, x-ray absorption and atomic force microscopy.

  6. Diagnostics based on nucleic acid sequence variant profiling: PCR, hybridization, and NGS approaches.

    PubMed

    Khodakov, Dmitriy; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, David Yu

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid sequence variations have been implicated in many diseases, and reliable detection and quantitation of DNA/RNA biomarkers can inform effective therapeutic action, enabling precision medicine. Nucleic acid analysis technologies being translated into the clinic can broadly be classified into hybridization, PCR, and sequencing, as well as their combinations. Here we review the molecular mechanisms of popular commercial assays, and their progress in translation into in vitro diagnostics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Content and synthesis of nucleic acids in the cartilage in chondromalacia patellae.

    PubMed

    Lund, F; Telhag, H

    1978-12-01

    The content and the synthesis of nucleic acids in chondromalacian, osteoarthritis and normal cartilage was compared. The chondromalacian cartilage differed from osteoarthritis in that the content of nucleic acids was less. Also, the cell density was less in chondromalacian than in normal cartilage as opposed to previous findings in osteoarthritis. The synthesis of DNA was greater in chondromalacian than in normal cartilage but less than in osteoarthritis. With regard to the RNA synthesis, however, the chondromalacian cartilage showed a higher rate than both normal and osteoarthritic cartilage.

  8. Methods and kits for nucleic acid analysis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Kwok, Pui-Yan; Chen, Xiangning

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a target nucleotide or sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid is disclosed. The method is comprised of forming an oligonucleotide labeled with two fluorophores on the nucleic acid target site. The doubly labeled oligonucleotide is formed by addition of a singly labeled dideoxynucleoside triphosphate to a singly labeled polynucleotide or by ligation of two singly labeled polynucleotides. Detection of fluorescence resonance energy transfer upon denaturation indicates the presence of the target. Kits are also provided. The method is particularly applicable to genotyping.

  9. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Accuracy assessment of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and reparametrization of the OBC generalized Born model for nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Esposito, Gennaro

    2015-04-05

    The generalized Born model in the Onufriev, Bashford, and Case (Onufriev et al., Proteins: Struct Funct Genet 2004, 55, 383) implementation has emerged as one of the best compromises between accuracy and speed of computation. For simulations of nucleic acids, however, a number of issues should be addressed: (1) the generalized Born model is based on a linear model and the linearization of the reference Poisson-Boltmann equation may be questioned for highly charged systems as nucleic acids; (2) although much attention has been given to potentials, solvation forces could be much less sensitive to linearization than the potentials; and (3) the accuracy of the Onufriev-Bashford-Case (OBC) model for nucleic acids depends on fine tuning of parameters. Here, we show that the linearization of the Poisson Boltzmann equation has mild effects on computed forces, and that with optimal choice of the OBC model parameters, solvation forces, essential for molecular dynamics simulations, agree well with those computed using the reference Poisson-Boltzmann model. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. New polymer of lactic-co-glycolic acid-modified polyethylenimine for nucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Liang, Zhengdong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Jianhua; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To develop an improved delivery system for nucleic acids. Materials & methods: We designed, synthesized and characterized a new polymer of lactic-co-glycolic acid-modified polyethylenimine (LGA-PEI). Functions of LGA-PEI polymer were determined. Results: The new LGA-PEI polymer spontaneously formed nanoparticles (NPs) with DNA or RNA, and showed higher DNA or RNA loading efficiency, higher or comparable transfection efficacy, and lower cytotoxicity in several cell types including PANC-1, Jurkat and HEK293 cells, when compared with lipofectamine 2000, branched or linear PEI (25 kDa). In nude mouse models, LGA-PEI showed higher delivery efficiency of plasmid DNA or miRNA mimic into pancreatic and ovarian xenograft tumors. LGA-PEI/DNA NPs showed much lower toxicity than control PEI NPs in mouse models. Conclusion: The new LGA-PEI polymer is a safer and more effective system to deliver DNA or RNA than PEI. PMID:27456396

  12. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.

    2012-05-15

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized bymore » interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.« less

  13. Structural aspects of catalytic mechanisms of endonucleases and their binding to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Balaev, V. V.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Lashkov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    Endonucleases (EC 3.1) are enzymes of the hydrolase class that catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of deoxyribonucleic and ribonucleic acids at any region of the polynucleotide chain. Endonucleases are widely used both in biotechnological processes and in veterinary medicine as antiviral agents. Medical applications of endonucleases in human cancer therapy hold promise. The results of X-ray diffraction studies of the spatial organization of endonucleases and their complexes and the mechanism of their action are analyzed and generalized. An analysis of the structural studies of this class of enzymes showed that the specific binding of enzymes to nucleic acids is characterized by interactions with nitrogen bases and the nucleotide backbone, whereas the nonspecific binding of enzymes is generally characterized by interactions only with the nucleic-acid backbone. It should be taken into account that the specificity can be modulated by metal ions and certain low-molecular-weight organic compounds. To test the hypotheses about specific and nonspecific nucleic-acid-binding proteins, it is necessary to perform additional studies of atomic-resolution three-dimensional structures of enzyme-nucleic-acid complexes by methods of structural biology.

  14. Principles of nucleic acid hybridization and comparison with monoclonal antibody technology for the diagnosis of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Edberg, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Until the 1980s the diagnosis of specific etiologic agents of infectious diseases rested with their isolation in vitro and identification by analysis of their phenotypic characteristics. In the 1970s the concept of a microbial species evolved from phenotypic analysis to nucleic acid homology. Currently, nucleic acid sequences specific for a given species are being isolated and amplified and utilized not only to identify the pathogen after it has been grown in vitro but also elucidate it directly in biological material. The procedures for making nucleic acid hybridization probes are analogous to the generation of monoclonal antibody tests. Currently, research and development are centered in choosing the particular nucleic acid to analyze, establishing the most efficient vector system for amplifying the nucleic acid, generating an efficient means of selecting the particular nucleic acid fragment specific for the microorganism, and in measuring the hybridization reaction. While immunological techniques have been utilized in the clinical laboratory for over thirty years, the means of detecting nucleic acid hybridization reactions are just beginning to be usable in the clinical diagnostic laboratory. Much of nucleic acid hybridization research is proprietary, and a particular challenge is to develop a means whereby information can be used for the progress of science as a whole when generated by private ownership. Images FIG. 4 PMID:3004048

  15. Potential in vivo roles of nucleic acid triple-helices

    PubMed Central

    Buske, Fabian A

    2011-01-01

    The ability of double-stranded DNA to form a triple-helical structure by hydrogen bonding with a third strand is well established, but the biological functions of these structures remain largely unknown. There is considerable albeit circumstantial evidence for the existence of nucleic triplexes in vivo and their potential participation in a variety of biological processes including chromatin organization, DNA repair, transcriptional regulation and RNA processing has been investigated in a number of studies to date. There is also a range of possible mechanisms to regulate triplex formation through differential expression of triplex-forming RNAs, alteration of chromatin accessibility, sequence unwinding and nucleotide modifications. With the advent of next generation sequencing technology combined with targeted approaches to isolate triplexes, it is now possible to survey triplex formation with respect to their genomic context, abundance and dynamical changes during differentiation and development, which may open up new vistas in understanding genome biology and gene regulation. PMID:21525785

  16. Nucleic Acid analysis by fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Frahm, J L; Muddiman, D C

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometers measure an intrinsic property (i.e., mass) of a molecule, which makes it an ideal platform for nucleic acid analysis. Importantly, the unparalleled capabilities of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry further extend its usefulness for nucleic acid analysis. The beginning of the twenty-first century has been marked with notable advances in the field of FT-ICR mass spectrometry analysis of nucleic acids. Some of these accomplishments include fundamental studies of nucleic acid properties, improvements in sample clean up and preparation, better methods to obtain higher mass measurement accuracy, analysis of noncovalent complexes, tandem mass spectrometry, and characterization of peptide nucleic acids. This diverse range of studies will be presented herein.

  17. Integrated printed circuit board device for cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Lewis A; Wu, Liang Li; Babikian, Sarkis; Bachman, Mark; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-11-06

    Preparation of raw, untreated biological samples remains a major challenge in microfluidics. We present a novel microfluidic device based on the integration of printed circuit boards and an isotachophoresis assay for sample preparation of nucleic acids from biological samples. The device has integrated resistive heaters and temperature sensors as well as a 70 μm × 300 μm × 3.7 cm microfluidic channel connecting two 15 μL reservoirs. We demonstrated this device by extracting pathogenic nucleic acids from 1 μL dispensed volume of whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum. We dispensed whole blood directly onto an on-chip reservoir, and the system's integrated heaters simultaneously lysed and mixed the sample. We used isotachophoresis to extract the nucleic acids into a secondary buffer via isotachophoresis. We analyzed the convective mixing action with micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) and verified the purity and amount of extracted nucleic acids using off-chip quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We achieved a clinically relevant limit of detection of 500 parasites per microliter. The system has no moving parts, and the process is potentially compatible with a wide range of on-chip hybridization or amplification assays.

  18. Efficient transfer of information from hexitol nucleic acids to RNA during nonenzymatic oligomerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; De Bouvere, B.; Van Aerschot, A.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acids (HNAs) are DNA analogues that contain the standard nucleoside bases attached to a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. We find that HNAs support efficient information transfer in nonensymatic template-directed reactions. HNA heterosequences appeared to be superior to the corresponding DNA heterosequences in facilitating synthesis of complementary oligonucleotides from nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides.

  19. Amplified electrochemical detection of nucleic acid hybridization via selective preconcentration of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Tian, Rui; Zheng, Xingwang; Huang, Rongfu

    2016-08-31

    The common drawback of optical methods for rapid detection of nucleic acid by exploiting the differential affinity of single-/double-stranded nucleic acids for unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is its relatively low sensitivity. In this article, on the basis of selective preconcentration of AuNPs unprotected by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding, a novel electrochemical strategy for nucleic acid sequence identification assay has been developed. Through detecting the redox signal mediated by AuNPs on 1, 6-hexanedithiol blocked gold electrode, the proposed method is able to ensure substantial signal amplification and a low background current. This strategy is demonstrated for quantitative analysis of the target microRNA (let-7a) in human breast adenocarcinoma cells, and a detection limit of 16 fM is readily achieved with desirable specificity and sensitivity. These results indicate that the selective preconcentration of AuNPs for electrochemical signal readout can offer a promising platform for the detection of specific nucleic acid sequence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recombinant host cells and nucleic acid constructs encoding polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity

    SciTech Connect

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Rapid Nucleic Acid Extraction and Purification Using a Miniature Ultrasonic Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Vreeland, Erika C.; McClain, Jamie L.

    Miniature ultrasonic lysis for biological sample preparation is a promising technique for efficient and rapid extraction of nucleic acids and proteins from a wide variety of biological sources. Acoustic methods achieve rapid, unbiased, and efficacious disruption of cellular membranes while avoiding the use of harsh chemicals and enzymes, which interfere with detection assays. In this work, a miniature acoustic nucleic acid extraction system is presented. Using a miniature bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array based on 36° Y-cut lithium niobate, acoustic waves were coupled into disposable laminate-based microfluidic cartridges. To verify the lysing effectiveness, the amount of liberated ATP andmore » the cell viability were measured and compared to untreated samples. The relationship between input power, energy dose, flow-rate, and lysing efficiency were determined. DNA was purified on-chip using three approaches implemented in the cartridges: a silica-based sol-gel silica-bead filled microchannel, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, and Nafion-coated electrodes. Using E. coli, the lysing dose defined as ATP released per joule was 2.2× greater, releasing 6.1× more ATP for the miniature BAW array compared to a bench-top acoustic lysis system. An electric field-based nucleic acid purification approach using Nafion films yielded an extraction efficiency of 69.2% in 10 min for 50 µL samples.« less

  2. The 2018 Nucleic Acids Research database issue and the online molecular biology database collection.

    PubMed

    Rigden, Daniel J; Fernández, Xosé M

    2018-01-04

    The 2018 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue contains 181 papers spanning molecular biology. Among them, 82 are new and 84 are updates describing resources that appeared in the Issue previously. The remaining 15 cover databases most recently published elsewhere. Databases in the area of nucleic acids include 3DIV for visualisation of data on genome 3D structure and RNArchitecture, a hierarchical classification of RNA families. Protein databases include the established SMART, ELM and MEROPS while GPCRdb and the newcomer STCRDab cover families of biomedical interest. In the area of metabolism, HMDB and Reactome both report new features while PULDB appears in NAR for the first time. This issue also contains reports on genomics resources including Ensembl, the UCSC Genome Browser and ENCODE. Update papers from the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology and DrugBank are highlights of the drug and drug target section while a number of proteomics databases including proteomicsDB are also covered. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (https://academic.oup.com/nar). The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection has been updated, reviewing 138 entries, adding 88 new resources and eliminating 47 discontinued URLs, bringing the current total to 1737 databases. It is available at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. 77 FR 16126 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    .... FDA-2012-N-0159] Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for... convened a meeting of the Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee (Microbiology Devices Panel) on June 29, 2011 (Ref. 2). Although not a formal reclassification meeting, panel...

  4. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kivlehan, Francine; Mavré, François; Talini, Luc; Limoges, Benoît; Marchal, Damien

    2011-09-21

    We described an electrochemical method to monitor in real-time the isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acids. The principle of detection is simple and well-adapted to the development of portable, easy-to-use and inexpensive nucleic acids detection technologies. It consists of monitoring a decrease in the electrochemical current response of a reporter DNA intercalating redox probe during the isothermal DNA amplification. The method offers the possibility to quantitatively analyze target nucleic acids in less than one hour at a single constant temperature, and to perform at the end of the isothermal amplification a DNA melt curve analysis for differentiating between specific and non-specific amplifications. To illustrate the potentialities of this approach for the development of a simple, robust and low-cost instrument with high throughput capability, the method was validated with an electrochemical system capable of monitoring up to 48 real-time isothermal HDA reactions simultaneously in a disposable microplate consisting of 48-electrochemical microwells. Results obtained with this approach are comparable to that obtained with a well-established but more sophisticated and expensive fluorescence-based method. This makes for a promising alternative detection method not only for real-time isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of nucleic acid, but also for other isothermal DNA amplification strategies.

  5. Modification of nucleic acids by azobenzene derivatives and their applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xingyu; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-12-01

    Azobenzene has been widely used as a photoregulator due to its reversible photoisomerization, large structural change between E and Z isomers, high photoisomerization yield, and high chemical stability. On the other hand, some azobenzene derivatives can be used as universal quenchers for many fluorophores. Nucleic acid is a good candidate to be modified because it is not only the template of gene expression but also widely used for building well-organized nanostructures and nanodevices. Because the size and polarity distribution of the azobenzene molecule is similar to a nucleobase pair, the introduction of azobenzene into nucleic acids has been shown to be an ingenious molecular design for constructing light-switching biosystems or light-driven nanomachines. Here we review recent advances in azobenzene-modified nucleic acids and their applications for artificial regulation of gene expression and enzymatic reactions, construction of photoresponsive nanostructures and nanodevices, molecular beacons, as well as obtaining structural information using the introduced azobenzene as an internal probe. In particular, nucleic acids bearing multiple azobenzenes can be used as a novel artificial nanomaterial with merits of high sequence specificity, regular duplex structure, and high photoregulation efficiency. The combination of functional groups with biomolecules may further advance the development of chemical biotechnology and biomolecular engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Nucleic acid detection using BRET-beacons based on bioluminescent protein-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Wouter; van de Wiel, Kayleigh M; Meijer, Lenny H H; Saha, Bedabrata; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-03-02

    Bioluminescent molecular beacons have been developed using a modular design approach that relies on BRET between the bright luciferase NanoLuc and a Cy3 acceptor. While classical molecular beacons are hampered by background fluorescence and scattering, these BRET-beacons allow detection of low pM concentrations of nucleic acids directly in complex media.

  7. PrPC has nucleic acid chaperoning properties similar to the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Edmund; Gabus, Caroline; Leblanc, Pascal; Chnaidermann, Jonas; Grave, Linda; Dormont, Dominique; Swietnicki, Wieslaw; Morillas, Manuel; Marck, Daniel; Nandi, Pradip; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2002-01-01

    The function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains obscure. Studies suggest that PrPC functions in several processes including signal transduction and Cu2+ metabolism. PrPC has also been established to bind nucleic acids. Therefore we investigated the properties of PrPC as a putative nucleic acid chaperone. Surprisingly, PrPC possesses all the nucleic acid chaperoning properties previously specific to retroviral nucleocapsid proteins. PrPC appears to be a molecular mimic of NCP7, the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1. Thus PrPC, like NCP7, chaperones the annealing of tRNA(Lys) to the HIV-1 primer binding site, the initial step of retrovirus replication. PrPC also chaperones the two DNA strand transfers required for production of a complete proviral DNA with LTRs. Concerning the functions of NCP7 during budding, PrPC also mimices NCP7 by dimerizing the HIV-1 genomic RNA. These data are unprecedented because, although many cellular proteins have been identified as nucleic acid chaperones, none have the properties of retroviral nucleocapsid proteins.

  8. Analysis of nucleic acid chaperoning by the prion protein and its inhibition by oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Guichard, Cécile; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Gabus, Caroline; Marc, Daniel; Mély, Yves; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases are unique neurodegenerative illnesses associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the aggregated misfolded scrapie isoform, named PrPSc. Recent studies on the physiological role of PrPC revealed that this protein has probably multiple functions, notably in cell–cell adhesion and signal transduction, and in assisting nucleic acid folding. In fact, in vitro findings indicated that the human PrP (huPrP) possesses nucleic acid binding and annealing activities, similarly to nucleic acid chaperone proteins that play essential roles in cellular DNA and RNA metabolism. Here, we show that a peptide, representing the N-terminal domain of huPrP, facilitates nucleic acid annealing by two parallel pathways nucleated through the stem termini. We also show that PrP of human or ovine origin facilitates DNA strand exchange, ribozyme-directed cleavage of an RNA template and RNA trans-splicing in a manner similar to the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1. In an attempt to characterize inhibitors of PrP-chaperoning in vitro we discovered that the thioaptamer 5′-GACACAAGCCGA-3′ was extensively inhibiting the PrP chaperoning activities. At the same time a recently characterized methylated oligoribonucleotide inhibiting the chaperoning activity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein was poorly impairing the PrP chaperoning activities. PMID:21737432

  9. Analysis of nucleic acid chaperoning by the prion protein and its inhibition by oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Cécile; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Sharma, Kamal Kant; Gabus, Caroline; Marc, Daniel; Mély, Yves; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2011-10-01

    Prion diseases are unique neurodegenerative illnesses associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the aggregated misfolded scrapie isoform, named PrP(Sc). Recent studies on the physiological role of PrP(C) revealed that this protein has probably multiple functions, notably in cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction, and in assisting nucleic acid folding. In fact, in vitro findings indicated that the human PrP (huPrP) possesses nucleic acid binding and annealing activities, similarly to nucleic acid chaperone proteins that play essential roles in cellular DNA and RNA metabolism. Here, we show that a peptide, representing the N-terminal domain of huPrP, facilitates nucleic acid annealing by two parallel pathways nucleated through the stem termini. We also show that PrP of human or ovine origin facilitates DNA strand exchange, ribozyme-directed cleavage of an RNA template and RNA trans-splicing in a manner similar to the nucleocapsid protein of HIV-1. In an attempt to characterize inhibitors of PrP-chaperoning in vitro we discovered that the thioaptamer 5'-GACACAAGCCGA-3' was extensively inhibiting the PrP chaperoning activities. At the same time a recently characterized methylated oligoribonucleotide inhibiting the chaperoning activity of the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein was poorly impairing the PrP chaperoning activities.

  10. The HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat has potent nucleic acid chaperoning activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuciak, Monika; Gabus, Caroline; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Semrad, Katharina; Storchak, Roman; Chaloin, Olivier; Muller, Sylviane; Mély, Yves; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-06-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a primate lentivirus that causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In addition to the virion structural proteins and enzyme precursors, that are Gag, Env and Pol, HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably a small nuclear transcriptional activator named Tat. The Tat protein is absolutely required for virus replication since it controls proviral DNA transcription to generate the full-length viral mRNA. Tat can also regulate mRNA capping and splicing and was recently found to interfere with the cellular mi- and siRNA machinery. Because of its extensive interplay with nucleic acids, and its basic and disordered nature we speculated that Tat had nucleic acid-chaperoning properties. This prompted us to examine in vitro the nucleic acid-chaperoning activities of Tat and Tat peptides made by chemical synthesis. Here we report that Tat has potent nucleic acid-chaperoning activities according to the standard DNA annealing, DNA and RNA strand exchange, RNA ribozyme cleavage and trans-splicing assays. The active Tat(44-61) peptide identified here corresponds to the smallest known sequence with DNA/RNA chaperoning properties.

  11. The HIV-1 transcriptional activator Tat has potent nucleic acid chaperoning activities in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kuciak, Monika; Gabus, Caroline; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Semrad, Katharina; Storchak, Roman; Chaloin, Olivier; Muller, Sylviane; Mély, Yves; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a primate lentivirus that causes the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In addition to the virion structural proteins and enzyme precursors, that are Gag, Env and Pol, HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably a small nuclear transcriptional activator named Tat. The Tat protein is absolutely required for virus replication since it controls proviral DNA transcription to generate the full-length viral mRNA. Tat can also regulate mRNA capping and splicing and was recently found to interfere with the cellular mi- and siRNA machinery. Because of its extensive interplay with nucleic acids, and its basic and disordered nature we speculated that Tat had nucleic acid-chaperoning properties. This prompted us to examine in vitro the nucleic acid-chaperoning activities of Tat and Tat peptides made by chemical synthesis. Here we report that Tat has potent nucleic acid-chaperoning activities according to the standard DNA annealing, DNA and RNA strand exchange, RNA ribozyme cleavage and trans-splicing assays. The active Tat(44–61) peptide identified here corresponds to the smallest known sequence with DNA/RNA chaperoning properties. PMID:18442994

  12. Introductory Course Based on a Single Problem: Learning Nucleic Acid Biochemistry from AIDS Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Neena

    2004-01-01

    In departure from the standard approach of using several problems to cover specific topics in a class, I use a single problem to cover the contents of the entire semester-equivalent biochemistry classes. I have developed a problem-based service-learning (PBSL) problem on HIV/AIDS to cover nucleic acid concepts that are typically taught in the…

  13. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of the ORF1 Protein from the Mouse LINE-1 Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sandra L.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2001-01-01

    Non-LTR retrotransposons such as L1 elements are major components of the mammalian genome, but their mechanism of replication is incompletely understood. Like retroviruses and LTR-containing retrotransposons, non-LTR retrotransposons replicate by reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate. The details of cDNA priming and integration, however, differ between these two classes. In retroviruses, the nucleocapsid (NC) protein has been shown to assist reverse transcription by acting as a “nucleic acid chaperone,” promoting the formation of the most stable duplexes between nucleic acid molecules. A protein-coding region with an NC-like sequence is present in most non-LTR retrotransposons, but no such sequence is evident in mammalian L1 elements or other members of its class. Here we investigated the ORF1 protein from mouse L1 and found that it does in fact display nucleic acid chaperone activities in vitro. L1 ORF1p (i) promoted annealing of complementary DNA strands, (ii) facilitated strand exchange to form the most stable hybrids in competitive displacement assays, and (iii) facilitated melting of an imperfect duplex but stabilized perfect duplexes. These findings suggest a role for L1 ORF1p in mediating nucleic acid strand transfer steps during L1 reverse transcription. PMID:11134335

  14. Development and evaluation of a calibrator material for nucleic acid-based assays for diagnosing aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Lyon, G Marshall; Abdul-Ali, Deborah; Loeffler, Juergen; White, P Lewis; Wickes, Brian; Herrera, Monica L; Alexander, Barbara D; Baden, Lindsey R; Clancy, Cornelius; Denning, David; Nguyen, M Hong; Sugrue, Michele; Wheat, L Joseph; Wingard, John R; Donnelly, J Peter; Barnes, Rosemary; Patterson, Thomas F; Caliendo, Angela M

    2013-07-01

    Twelve laboratories evaluated candidate material for an Aspergillus DNA calibrator. The DNA material was quantified using limiting-dilution analysis; the mean concentration was determined to be 1.73 × 10(10) units/ml. The calibrator can be used to standardize aspergillosis diagnostic assays which detect and/or quantify nucleic acid.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Calibrator Material for Nucleic Acid-Based Assays for Diagnosing Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Ali, Deborah; Loeffler, Juergen; White, P. Lewis; Wickes, Brian; Herrera, Monica L.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Clancy, Cornelius; Denning, David; Nguyen, M. Hong; Sugrue, Michele; Wheat, L. Joseph; Wingard, John R.; Donnelly, J. Peter; Barnes, Rosemary; Patterson, Thomas F.; Caliendo, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Twelve laboratories evaluated candidate material for an Aspergillus DNA calibrator. The DNA material was quantified using limiting-dilution analysis; the mean concentration was determined to be 1.73 × 1010 units/ml. The calibrator can be used to standardize aspergillosis diagnostic assays which detect and/or quantify nucleic acid. PMID:23616459

  16. Optical nano-biosensing interface via nucleic acid amplification strategy: construction and application.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2018-03-21

    Modern optical detection technology plays a critical role in current clinical detection due to its high sensitivity and accuracy. However, higher requirements such as extremely high detection sensitivity have been put forward due to the clinical needs for the early finding and diagnosing of malignant tumors which are significant for tumor therapy. The technology of isothermal amplification with nucleic acids opens up avenues for meeting this requirement. Recent reports have shown that a nucleic acid amplification-assisted modern optical sensing interface has achieved satisfactory sensitivity and accuracy, high speed and specificity. Compared with isothermal amplification technology designed to work completely in a solution system, solid biosensing interfaces demonstrated better performances in stability and sensitivity due to their ease of separation from the reaction mixture and the better signal transduction on these optical nano-biosensing interfaces. Also the flexibility and designability during the construction of these nano-biosensing interfaces provided a promising research topic for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer diseases. In this review, we describe the construction of the burgeoning number of optical nano-biosensing interfaces assisted by a nucleic acid amplification strategy, and provide insightful views on: (1) approaches to the smart fabrication of an optical nano-biosensing interface, (2) biosensing mechanisms via the nucleic acid amplification method, (3) the newest strategies and future perspectives.

  17. Nucleic acid probes as a diagnostic method for tick-borne hemoparasites of veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J V; Buening, G M

    1995-03-01

    An increased number of articles on the use of nucleic acid-based hybridization techniques for diagnostic purposes have been recently published. This article reviews nucleic acid-based hybridization as an assay to detect hemoparasite infections of economic relevance in veterinary medicine. By using recombinant DNA techniques, selected clones containing inserts of Anaplasma, Babesia, Cowdria or Theileria genomic DNA sequences have been obtained, and they are now available to be utilized as specific, highly sensitive DNA or RNA probes to detect the presence of the hemoparasite DNA in an infected animal. Either in an isotopic or non-isotopic detection system, probes have allowed scientists to test for--originally in samples collected from experimentally infected animals and later in samples collected in the field--the presence of hemoparasites during the prepatent, patent, convalescent, and chronic periods of the infection in the host. Nucleic acid probes have given researchers the opportunity to carry out genomic analysis of parasite DNA to differentiate hemoparasite species and to identify genetically distinct populations among and within isolates, strains and clonal populations. Prevalence of parasite infection in the tick vector can now be accomplished more specifically with the nucleic acid probes. Lately, with the advent of the polymerase chain reaction technique, small numbers of hemoparasites can be positively identified in the vertebrate host and tick vector. These techniques can be used to assess the veterinary epidemiological situation in a particular geographical region for the planning of control measures.

  18. Non-Viral Nucleic Acid Delivery Strategies to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Tan, James-Kevin Y.; Sellers, Drew L.; Pham, Binhan; Pun, Suzie H.; Horner, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    With an increased prevalence and understanding of central nervous system (CNS) injuries and neurological disorders, nucleic acid therapies are gaining promise as a way to regenerate lost neurons or halt disease progression. While more viral vectors have been used clinically as tools for gene delivery, non-viral vectors are gaining interest due to lower safety concerns and the ability to deliver all types of nucleic acids. Nevertheless, there are still a number of barriers to nucleic acid delivery. In this focused review, we explore the in vivo challenges hindering non-viral nucleic acid delivery to the CNS and the strategies and vehicles used to overcome them. Advantages and disadvantages of different routes of administration including: systemic injection, cerebrospinal fluid injection, intraparenchymal injection and peripheral administration are discussed. Non-viral vehicles and treatment strategies that have overcome delivery barriers and demonstrated in vivo gene transfer to the CNS are presented. These approaches can be used as guidelines in developing synthetic gene delivery vectors for CNS applications and will ultimately bring non-viral vectors closer to clinical application. PMID:27847462

  19. Isothermal Amplification Methods for the Detection of Nucleic Acids in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zanoli, Laura Maria; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic tools for biomolecular detection need to fulfill specific requirements in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and high-throughput in order to widen their applicability and to minimize the cost of the assay. The nucleic acid amplification is a key step in DNA detection assays. It contributes to improving the assay sensitivity by enabling the detection of a limited number of target molecules. The use of microfluidic devices to miniaturize amplification protocols reduces the required sample volume and the analysis times and offers new possibilities for the process automation and integration in one single device. The vast majority of miniaturized systems for nucleic acid analysis exploit the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification method, which requires repeated cycles of three or two temperature-dependent steps during the amplification of the nucleic acid target sequence. In contrast, low temperature isothermal amplification methods have no need for thermal cycling thus requiring simplified microfluidic device features. Here, the use of miniaturized analysis systems using isothermal amplification reactions for the nucleic acid amplification will be discussed. PMID:25587397

  20. Synergistic Combination of Unquenching and Plasmonic Fluorescence Enhancement in Fluorogenic Nucleic Acid Hybridization Probes.

    PubMed

    Vietz, Carolin; Lalkens, Birka; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-10-11

    Fluorogenic nucleic acid hybridization probes are widely used for detecting and quantifying nucleic acids. The achieved sensitivity strongly depends on the contrast between a quenched closed form and an unquenched opened form with liberated fluorescence. So far, this contrast was improved by improving the quenching efficiency of the closed form. In this study, we modularly combine these probes with optical antennas used for plasmonic fluorescence enhancement and study the effect of the nanophotonic structure on the fluorescence of the quenched and the opened form. As quenched fluorescent dyes are usually enhanced more by fluorescence enhancement, a detrimental reduction of the contrast between closed and opened form was anticipated. In contrast, we could achieve a surprising increase of the contrast with full additivity of quenching of the dark form and fluorescence enhancement of the bright form. Using single-molecule experiments, we demonstrate that the additivity of the two mechanisms depends on the perfect quenching in the quenched form, and we delineate the rules for new nucleic acid probes for enhanced contrast and absolute brightness. Fluorogenic hybridization probes optimized not only for quenching but also for the brightness of the open form might find application in nucleic acid assays with PCR avoiding detection schemes.

  1. 78 FR 36698 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... specimens from class III (premarket approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also issuing the draft special controls guideline entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guideline: Nucleic Acid-Based In... regulatory controls needed to provide reasonable assurance of their safety and effectiveness. The three...

  2. Visual detection of nucleic acids based on Mie scattering and the magnetophoretic effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zichen; Chen, Shan; Ho, John Kin Lim; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2015-12-07

    Visual detection of nucleic acid biomarkers is a simple and convenient approach to point-of-care applications. However, issues of sensitivity and the handling of complex bio-fluids have posed challenges. Here we report on a visual method detecting nucleic acids using Mie scattering of polystyrene microparticles and the magnetophoretic effect. Magnetic microparticles (MMPs) and polystyrene microparticles (PMPs) were surface-functionalised with oligonucleotide probes, which can hybridise with target oligonucleotides in juxtaposition and lead to the formation of MMPs-targets-PMPs sandwich structures. Using an externally applied magnetic field, the magnetophoretic effect attracts the sandwich structure to the sidewall, which reduces the suspended PMPs and leads to a change in the light transmission via the Mie scattering. Based on the high extinction coefficient of the Mie scattering (∼3 orders of magnitude greater than that of the commonly used gold nanoparticles), our results showed the limit of detection to be 4 pM using a UV-Vis spectrometer or 10 pM by direct visual inspection. Meanwhile, we also demonstrated that this method is compatible with multiplex assays and detection in complex bio-fluids, such as whole blood or a pool of nucleic acids, without purification in advance. With a simplified operation procedure, low instrumentation requirement, high sensitivity and compatibility with complex bio-fluids, this method provides an ideal solution for visual detection of nucleic acids in resource-limited settings.

  3. Extracellular nucleic acids of the marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum and recombinant RNA production technology using bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Umekage, So

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular nucleic acids of high molecular weight are detected ubiquitously in seawater. Recent studies have indicated that these nucleic acids are, at least in part, derived from active production by some bacteria. The marine bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum is one of those bacteria. Rhodovulumsulfidophilum is a non-sulfur phototrophic marine bacterium that is known to form structured communities of cells called flocs, and to produce extracellular nucleic acids in culture media. Recently, it has been revealed that this bacterium produces gene transfer agent-like particles and that this particle production may be related to the extracellular nucleic acid production mechanism. This review provides a summary of recent physiological and genetic studies of these phenomena and also introduces a new method for extracellular production of artificial and biologically functional RNAs using this bacterium. In addition, artificial RNA production using Escherichia coli, which is related to this topic, will also be described. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Column for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Haim; Liu, Changchun; Killawala, Chitvan; Sadik, Mohamed; Mauk, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in many medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assessing disease progression, effectiveness of drug therapy, and emergence of drug-resistance. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires sophisticated and expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low resource settings. We describe a simple, low-cost, reactiondiffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. We model the process with the Fisher Kolmogoroff Petrovskii Piscounoff (FKPP) Equation and compare theoretical predictions with experimental observations. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at the point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. C.L. was supported by NIH/NIAID K25AI099160; M.S. was supported by the Pennsylvania Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority; C.K. and H.B. were funded, in part, by NIH/NIAID 1R41AI104418-01A1.

  5. Rapid Nucleic Acid Extraction and Purification Using a Miniature Ultrasonic Technique

    DOE PAGES

    Branch, Darren W.; Vreeland, Erika C.; McClain, Jamie L.; ...

    2017-07-21

    Miniature ultrasonic lysis for biological sample preparation is a promising technique for efficient and rapid extraction of nucleic acids and proteins from a wide variety of biological sources. Acoustic methods achieve rapid, unbiased, and efficacious disruption of cellular membranes while avoiding the use of harsh chemicals and enzymes, which interfere with detection assays. In this work, a miniature acoustic nucleic acid extraction system is presented. Using a miniature bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array based on 36° Y-cut lithium niobate, acoustic waves were coupled into disposable laminate-based microfluidic cartridges. To verify the lysing effectiveness, the amount of liberated ATP andmore » the cell viability were measured and compared to untreated samples. The relationship between input power, energy dose, flow-rate, and lysing efficiency were determined. DNA was purified on-chip using three approaches implemented in the cartridges: a silica-based sol-gel silica-bead filled microchannel, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, and Nafion-coated electrodes. Using E. coli, the lysing dose defined as ATP released per joule was 2.2× greater, releasing 6.1× more ATP for the miniature BAW array compared to a bench-top acoustic lysis system. An electric field-based nucleic acid purification approach using Nafion films yielded an extraction efficiency of 69.2% in 10 min for 50 µL samples.« less

  6. Photocrosslinking and Photodamage in Protein-Nucleic Acid Systems Resulting from UV and IR Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, John Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Photocrosslinking of protein-nucleic acid complexes with low intensity UV has frequently been used to study biological systems. We have investigated the photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems using nanosecond UV pulses from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser system, low-intensity continuous UV from a typical germicidal lamp, and high-intensity mid -IR pulses from the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser. Quantum yields for UV-induced nucleic acid damage from laser pulses and the germicidal lamp were found to be nearly equivalent. We have demonstrated the general applicability of the laser to this technique by successfully crosslinking hnRNP protein to RNA, yeast TATA-binding protein to dsDNA, and gene 32 protein to ssDNA with UV laser pulses. Our results indicate that UV-crosslinking has an intrinsic specificity for nucleic acid sites containing thymidine (or uridine), forcing a distinction between preferred binding sites and favorable crosslinking sites. We have found in each system that protein and nucleic acid photodamage competes with crosslinking, limits the yield, and may interfere with subsequent analysis. The distribution of photoproducts in the gene 32 protein-ssDNA system was investigated as a function of the total dose of UV radiation and the intensity of UV laser pulses. It was found that laser pulses providing up to 50 photons per nucleic acid base induce a linear response from the system; the absolute and relative yields of photoproducts depend only on the total dose of UV and not on the rate of delivery. At higher intensities, the yield of crosslinks per incident photon was reduced. A single pulse at the optimum intensity (about 100-200 photons per nucleic acid base) induced roughly 80% of the maximum attainable yield of crosslinks in this system. The early results of our search for photochemistry induced by Free Electron Laser pulses indicate the potential to induce a unique photoreaction in the gene 32 protein -ssDNA system. The yield is apparently

  7. Development of nucleic acid vaccines: use of self-amplifying RNA in lipid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia; del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    Self-amplifying RNA or RNA replicon is a form of nucleic acid-based vaccine derived from either positive-strand or negative-strand RNA viruses. The gene sequences encoding structural proteins in these RNA viruses are replaced by mRNA encoding antigens of interest as well as by RNA polymerase for replication and transcription. This kind of vaccine has been successfully assayed with many different antigens as vaccines candidates, and has been shown to be potent in several animal species, including mice, nonhuman primates, and humans. A key challenge to realizing the broad potential of self-amplifying vaccines is the need for safe and effective delivery methods. Ideally, an RNA nanocarrier should provide protection from blood nucleases and extended blood circulation, which ultimately would increase the possibility of reaching the target tissue. The delivery system must then be internalized by the target cell and, upon receptor-mediated endocytosis, must be able to escape from the endosomal compartment into the cell cytoplasm, where the RNA machinery is located, while avoiding degradation by lysosomal enzymes. Further, delivery systems for systemic administration ought to be well tolerated upon administration. They should be safe, enabling the multiadministration treatment modalities required for improved clinical outcomes and, from a developmental point of view, production of large batches with reproducible specifications is also desirable. In this review, the concept of self-amplifying RNA vaccines and the most promising lipid-based delivery systems are discussed. PMID:24748793

  8. The Prebiotic Synthesis of Ethylenediamine Monoacetic Acid, The Repeating Unit of Peptide Nucleic Acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kevin E.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1992-01-01

    The polymerization of ribonucleic acids or their precursors constitutes an important event in prebiotic chemistry. The various problems using ribonucleotides to make RNA suggest that there may have been a precursor. An attractive possibility are the peptide nucleic acids (PNA). PNAs are nucleotide analogs that make use of a polymer of ethylenediamine monoacetic acid (EDMA or 2-amninoethyl glycine) with the bases attached by an acetic acid. EDMA is an especially attractive alternative to the ribose phosphate or deoxyribose phosphate backbone because it contains no chiral centers and is potentially prebiotic, but there is no reported prebiotic synthesis. We have synthesized both EDMA and ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) from the prebiotic compounds ethylenediamine, formaldehyde, and hydrogen cyanide. The yields of EDMA range from 11 to 79% along with some sEDDA and uEDDA. These reactions work with concentrations of 10(exp -1)M and as low as 10(exp -4)M, and the reaction is likely to be effective at even lower concentrations. Ethylenediamine is a likely prebiotic compound, but it has not yet been demonstrated, although compounds such as ethanolamine and cysteamine have been proven to be prebiotic. Under neutral pH and heating at l00 C, EDMA is converted to the lactam, monoketopiperazine (MKP). The cyclization occurs and has an approximate ratio of MKP/EDMA = 3 at equilibrium. We have measured the solubilities of EDMA center dot H20 as 6.4 m, EDMA center dot HCl center dot H20 as 13.7 m, and EDMA center dot 2HCl center dot H20 as 3.4 m. These syntheses together with the high solubility of EDMA suggest that EDMA would concentrate in drying lagoons and might efficiently form polymers. Given the instability of ribose and the poor polymerizability of nucleotides, the prebiotic presence of EDMA and the possibility of its polymerization raises the possibility that PNAs are the progenitors of present day nucleic acids. A pre-RNA world may have existed in which PNAs or

  9. Differential display detects host nucleic acid motifs altered in scrapie-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Harris, Alyson

    2009-09-25

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) including scrapie have been attributed to an infectious protein or prion. Infectivity is allied to conversion of the endogenous nucleic-acid-binding protein PrP to an infectious modified form known as PrP(sc). The protein-only theory does not easily explain the enigmatic properties of the agent including strain variation. It was previously suggested that a short nucleic acid, perhaps host-encoded, might contribute to the pathoetiology of the TSEs. No candidate host molecules that might explain transmission of strain differences have yet been put forward. Differential display is a robust technique for detecting nucleic acid differences between two populations. We applied this technique to total nucleic acid preparations from scrapie-infected and control brain. Independent RNA preparations from eight normal and eight scrapie-infected (strain 263K) hamster brains were randomly amplified and visualized in parallel. Though the nucleic acid patterns were generally identical in scrapie-infected versus control brain, some rare bands were differentially displayed. Molecular species consistently overrepresented (or underrepresented) in all eight infected brain samples versus all eight controls were excised from the display, sequenced, and assembled into contigs. Only seven ros contigs (RNAs over- or underrepresented in scrapie) emerged, representing <4 kb from the transcriptome. All contained highly stable regions of secondary structure. The most abundant scrapie-only ros sequence was homologous to a repetitive transposable element (LINE; long interspersed nuclear element). Other ros sequences identified cellular RNA 7SL, clathrin heavy chain, visinin-like protein-1, and three highly specific subregions of ribosomal RNA (ros1-3). The ribosomal ros sequences accurately corresponded to LINE; retrotransposon insertion sites in ribosomal DNA (p<0.01). These differential motifs implicate specific host RNAs in the pathoetiology

  10. Lab-on-a-chip nucleic-acid analysis towards point-of-care applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparthy, Varun Lingaiah

    Recent infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola in 2013, highlight the need for fast and accurate diagnostic tools to combat the global spread of the disease. Detection and identification of the disease-causing viruses and bacteria at the genetic level is required for accurate diagnosis of the disease. Nucleic acid analysis systems have shown promise in identifying diseases such as HIV, anthrax, and Ebola in the past. Conventional nucleic acid analysis systems are still time consuming, and are not suitable for point-ofcare applications. Miniaturized nucleic acid systems has shown great promise for rapid analysis, but they have not been commercialized due to several factors such as footprint, complexity, portability, and power consumption. This dissertation presents the development of technologies and methods for a labon-a-chip nucleic acid analysis towards point-of-care applications. An oscillatory-flow PCR methodology in a thermal gradient is developed which provides real-time analysis of nucleic-acid samples. Oscillating flow PCR was performed in the microfluidic device under thermal gradient in 40 minutes. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was achieved in the system without an additional heating element for incubation to perform reverse transcription step. A novel method is developed for the simultaneous pattering and bonding of all-glass microfluidic devices in a microwave oven. Glass microfluidic devices were fabricated in less than 4 minutes. Towards an integrated system for the detection of amplified products, a thermal sensing method is studied for the optimization of the sensor output. Calorimetric sensing method is characterized to identify design considerations and optimal parameters such as placement of the sensor, steady state response, and flow velocity for improved performance. An understanding of these developed technologies and methods will facilitate the development of lab-on-a-chip systems for point-of-care analysis.

  11. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2010-08-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid-based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids.

  12. Label-free direct surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of nucleic acids (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrini, Luca; Morla-Folch, Judit; Gisbert-Quilis, Patricia; Xie, Hainan; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Recently, plasmonic-based biosensing has experienced an unprecedented level of attention, with a particular focus on the nucleic acid detection, offering efficient solutions to engineer simple, fast, highly sensitive sensing platforms while overcoming important limitations of PCR and microarray techniques. In the broad field of plasmonics, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has arisen as a powerful analytical tool for detection and structural characterization of biomolecules. Today applications of SERS to nucleic acid analysis largely rely on indirect strategies, which have been demonstrated very effective for pure sensing purposes but completely dismiss the exquisite structural information provided by the direct acquisition of the biomolecular vibrational fingerprint. Contrarily, direct label-free SERS of nucleic acid shows an outstanding potential in terms of chemical-specific information which, however, remained largely unexpressed mainly because of the inherent poor spectral reproducibility and/or limited sensitivity. To address these limitations, we developed a fast and affordable high-throughput screening direct SERS method for gaining detailed genomic information on nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and for the characterization and quantitative recognition of DNA interactions with exogenous agents. The simple strategy relies on the electrostatic adhesion of DNA/RNA onto positively-charged silver colloids that promotes the nanoparticle aggregation into stable clusters yielding intense and reproducible SERS spectra at picogram level (i.e. the analysis can be performed without the necessity of amplification steps thus providing realistic direct information of the nucleic acid in its native state). We anticipate this method to gain a vast impact and set of applications in different fields, including medical diagnostics, genomic screening, drug discovery, forensic science and even molecular electronics.

  13. RNA:DNA Ratio and Other Nucleic Acid Derived Indices in Marine Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Chícharo, Maria Alexandra; Chícharo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Some of most used indicators in marine ecology are nucleic acid-derived indices. They can be divided by target levels in three groups: 1) at the organism level as ecophysiologic indicators, indicators such as RNA:DNA ratios, DNA:dry weight and RNA:protein, 2) at the population level, indicators such as growth rate, starvation incidence or fisheries impact indicators, and 3) at the community level, indicators such as trophic interactions, exergy indices and prey identification. The nucleic acids derived indices, especially RNA:DNA ratio, have been applied with success as indicators of nutritional condition, well been and growth in marine organisms. They are also useful as indicators of natural or anthropogenic impacts in marine population and communities, such as upwelling or dredge fisheries, respectively. They can help in understanding important issues of marine ecology such as trophic interactions in marine environment, fish and invertebrate recruitment failure and biodiversity changes, without laborious work of counting, measuring and identification of small marine organisms. Besides the objective of integrate nucleic acid derived indices across levels of organization, the paper will also include a general characterization of most used nucleic acid derived indices in marine ecology and also advantages and limitations of them. We can conclude that using indicators, such RNA:DNA ratios and other nucleic acids derived indices concomitantly with organism and ecosystems measures of responses to climate change (distribution, abundance, activity, metabolic rate, survival) will allow for the development of more rigorous and realistic predictions of the effects of anthropogenic climate change on marine systems. PMID:19325815

  14. Cell-free fetal nucleic acid testing: a review of the technology and its applications.

    PubMed

    Sayres, Lauren C; Cho, Mildred K

    2011-07-01

    Cell-free fetal nucleic acids circulating in the blood of pregnant women afford the opportunity for early, noninvasive prenatal genetic testing. The predominance of admixed maternal genetic material in circulation demands innovative means for identification and analysis of cell-free fetal DNA and RNA. Techniques using polymerase chain reaction, mass spectrometry, and sequencing have been developed for the purposes of detecting fetal-specific sequences, such as paternally inherited or de novo mutations, or determining allelic balance or chromosome dosage. Clinical applications of these methods include fetal sex determination and blood group typing, which are currently available commercially although not offered routinely in the United States. Other uses of cell-free fetal DNA and RNA being explored are the detection of single-gene disorders, chromosomal abnormalities, and inheritance of parental polymorphisms across the whole fetal genome. The concentration of cell-free fetal DNA may also provide predictive capabilities for pregnancy-associated complications. The roles that cell-free fetal nucleic acid testing assume in the existing framework of prenatal screening and invasive diagnostic testing will depend on factors such as costs, clinical validity and utility, and perceived benefit-risk ratios for different applications. As cell-free fetal DNA and RNA testing continues to be developed and translated, significant ethical, legal, and social questions will arise that will need to be addressed by those with a stake in the use of this technology. Obstetricians & Gynecologists and Family Physicians Learning Objectives: After participating in this activity, physicians should be better able to evaluate techniques and tools for analyzing cell-free fetal nucleic acids, assess clinical applications of prenatal testing, using cell-free fetal nucleic acids and barriers to implementation, and distinguish between relevant clinical features of cell-free fetal nucleic acid

  15. Detection of nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Camborde, Laurent; Jauneau, Alain; Brière, Christian; Deslandes, Laurent; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2017-09-01

    DNA-binding proteins (DNA-BPs) and RNA-binding proteins (RNA-BPs) have critical roles in living cells in all kingdoms of life. Various experimental approaches exist for the study of nucleic acid-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo, but the detection of such interactions at the subcellular level remains challenging. Here we describe how to detect nucleic acid-protein interactions in plant leaves by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) approach coupled to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Proteins of interest (POI) are tagged with a GFP and transiently expressed in plant cells to serve as donor fluorophore. After sample fixation and cell wall permeabilization, leaves are treated with Sytox Orange, a nucleic acid dye that can function as a FRET acceptor. Upon close association of the GFP-tagged POI with Sytox-Orange-stained nucleic acids, a substantial decrease of the GFP lifetime due to FRET between the donor and the acceptor can be monitored. Treatment with RNase before FRET-FLIM measurements allows determination of whether the POI associates with DNA and/or RNA. A step-by-step protocol is provided for sample preparation, data acquisition and analysis. We describe how to calibrate the equipment and include a tutorial explaining the use of the FLIM software. To illustrate our approach, we provide experimental procedures to detect the interaction between plant DNA and two proteins (the AeCRN13 effector from the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches and the AtWRKY22 defensive transcription factor from Arabidopsis). This protocol allows the detection of protein-nucleic acid interactions in plant cells and can be completed in <2 d.

  16. [Study on construction and immune protective effect of recombinant nucleic acid vaccine of Toxoplasma gondii].

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Kuan

    2012-04-01

    To construct the polyvalent recombinant nucleic acid vaccine of Toxoplasma gondii and measure its protective immune effect. The gene of heat shock protein (HSP70) was amplified by PCR and inserted into the recombinant plasmid of pcDNA3-ROP2-p30 to construct recombinant polyvalent nucleic vaccine (pcDNA3-ROP2-p30-Hsp70). BALB/c mice were immunized with the constructed recombinant nucleic vaccine. CD4+ and CD8+ in the splenic lymphocytes and the lymphocytes in anticoagulant whole blood, the immune indices such as antibodies (IgG, IgM and IgA) and IFN-gamma, TNF, IL-2, IL-4, IL-12 in serum and splenic lymphocytes culture medium were detected, along with the challenge experiment. The protective immune responses that caused by the vaccine was measured by detecting the changes of immune indices of mice and the challenge experiment. 916 bp fragment of HSP70 gene was amplified by PCR. The recombinant polyvalent nucleic vaccine pcDNA3-ROP2-p30-HSP70 that included the whole open reading frame sequence of HSP gene was successfully constructed. The immunization results also showed this polyvalent nucleic vaccine could induce strong cellular and humoral responses by the detection of higher antibody titer in the experimental mice group, the increasing proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ cells with significant deviations among the groups (F(CD4+) = 45.00, F(CD8+) = 15.01, all P < 0.01) and the apparent up-regulated levels of several cytokines IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IL-12 in serum and cultural supernatant of spleen cells, with more striking effect in serum. As a result of the challenge experiment, the immunized mice showed a longer survival time. The recombinant nucleic acid vaccine pcDNA3-ROP2-p30-HSP70 possesses a strong immunogenicity and is able to induce an immune protection.

  17. An integrated, self-contained microfluidic cassette for isolation, amplification, and detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dafeng; Mauk, Michael; Qiu, Xianbo; Liu, Changchun; Kim, Jitae; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Ongagna, Serge; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A self-contained, integrated, disposable, sample-to-answer, polycarbonate microfluidic cassette for nucleic acid—based detection of pathogens at the point of care was designed, constructed, and tested. The cassette comprises on-chip sample lysis, nucleic acid isolation, enzymatic amplification (polymerase chain reaction and, when needed, reverse transcription), amplicon labeling, and detection. On-chip pouches and valves facilitate fluid flow control. All the liquids and dry reagents needed for the various reactions are pre-stored in the cassette. The liquid reagents are stored in flexible pouches formed on the chip surface. Dry (RT-)PCR reagents are pre-stored in the thermal cycling, reaction chamber. The process operations include sample introduction; lysis of cells and viruses; solid-phase extraction, concentration, and purification of nucleic acids from the lysate; elution of the nucleic acids into a thermal cycling chamber and mixing with pre-stored (RT-)PCR dry reagents; thermal cycling; and detection. The PCR amplicons are labeled with digoxigenin and biotin and transmitted onto a lateral flow strip, where the target analytes bind to a test line consisting of immobilized avidin-D. The immobilized nucleic acids are labeled with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The operation of the cassette is automatically controlled by an analyzer that provides pouch and valve actuation with electrical motors and heating for the thermal cycling. The functionality of the device is demonstrated by detecting the presence of bacterial B.Cereus, viral armored RNA HIV, and HIV I virus in saliva samples. The cassette and actuator described here can be used to detect other diseases as well as the presence of bacterial and viral pathogens in the water supply and other fluids. PMID:20401537

  18. The relationship between odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and microbial nucleic acid bases in rumen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyuan; Hao, Xiaoyan; Li, Yang; Luo, Guobin; Zhang, Yonggen; Xin, Hangshu

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aims to identify the relationship between odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFAs) and microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen, and to establish a model to accurately predict microbial protein flow by using OBCFA. Methods To develop the regression equations, data on the rumen contents of individual cows were obtained from 2 feeding experiments. In the first experiment, 3 rumen-fistulated dry dairy cows arranged in a 3×3 Latin square were fed diets of differing forage to concentration ratios (F:C). The second experiment consisted of 9 lactating Holstein dairy cows of similar body weights at the same stage of pregnancy. For each lactation stage, 3 cows with similar milk production were selected. The rumen contents were sampled at 4 time points of every two hours after morning feeding 6 h, and then to analyse the concentrations of OBCFA and microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen samples. Results The ruminal bacteria nucleic acid bases were significantly influenced by feeding diets of differing forge to concentration ratios and lactation stages of dairy cows (p<0.05). The concentrations of OBCFAs, especially odd-chain fatty acids and C15:0 isomers, strongly correlated with the microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen (p<0.05). The equations of ruminal microbial nucleic acid bases established by ruminal OBCFAs contents showed a good predictive capacity, as indicated by reasonably low standard errors and high R-squared values. Conclusion This finding suggests that the rumen OBCFA composition could be used as an internal marker of rumen microbial matter. PMID:28728386

  19. The relationship between odd- and branched-chain fatty acids and microbial nucleic acid bases in rumen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keyuan; Hao, Xiaoyan; Li, Yang; Luo, Guobin; Zhang, Yonggen; Xin, Hangshu

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to identify the relationship between odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (OBCFAs) and microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen, and to establish a model to accurately predict microbial protein flow by using OBCFA. To develop the regression equations, data on the rumen contents of individual cows were obtained from 2 feeding experiments. In the first experiment, 3 rumen-fistulated dry dairy cows arranged in a 3×3 Latin square were fed diets of differing forage to concentration ratios (F:C). The second experiment consisted of 9 lactating Holstein dairy cows of similar body weights at the same stage of pregnancy. For each lactation stage, 3 cows with similar milk production were selected. The rumen contents were sampled at 4 time points of every two hours after morning feeding 6 h, and then to analyse the concentrations of OBCFA and microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen samples. The ruminal bacteria nucleic acid bases were significantly influenced by feeding diets of differing forge to concentration ratios and lactation stages of dairy cows (p<0.05). The concentrations of OBCFAs, especially odd-chain fatty acids and C15:0 isomers, strongly correlated with the microbial nucleic acid bases in the rumen (p<0.05). The equations of ruminal microbial nucleic acid bases established by ruminal OBCFAs contents showed a good predictive capacity, as indicated by reasonably low standard errors and high R-squared values. This finding suggests that the rumen OBCFA composition could be used as an internal marker of rumen microbial matter.

  20. A model for protocellular coordination of nucleic acid and protein syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The proteinoid model for the coordination of protein synthesis with nucleic acid coding within the evolving protocell is discussed. Evidence for the self-ordering of amino acid chains, which would enhance the catalytic activity of a lysine-rich proteinoid, is presented, along with that for the preferential formation of microparticles, particularly proteinoid microparticles, in various solutions. Demonstrations of the catalytic activity of lysine-rich proteinoids in the synthesis of peptide and internucleotide bonds are pointed out. The view of evolution as a two stage sequence in which the geological synthesis of peptides evolved to the protocellular synthesis of peptides and oligonucleotides is discussed, and contrasted with the alternative view, in accord with the central dogma, that nucleic acids arose first then governed the production of proteins and protocells.

  1. Adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids on cellulose magnetic beads using a three-dimensional printed microfluidic chip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Deraney, Rachel N.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    While advances in genomics have enabled sensitive and highly parallel detection of nucleic acid targets, the isolation and extraction of the nucleic acids remain a critical bottleneck in the workflow. We present here a simple 3D printed microfluidic chip that allows for the vortex and centrifugation free extraction of nucleic acids. This novel microfluidic chip utilizes the presence of a water and oil interface to filter out the lysate contaminants. The pure nucleic acids, while bound on cellulose particles, are magnetically moved across the oil layer. We demonstrated efficient and rapid extraction of spiked Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 18 plasmids in specimen transport medium, in under 15 min. An overall extraction efficiency of 61% is observed across a range of HPV plasmid concentrations (5 × 101 to 5 × 106 copies/100 μl). The magnetic, interfacial, and viscous drag forces inside the microgeometries of the chip are modeled. We have also developed a kinetics model for the adsorption of nucleic acids on cellulose functionalized superparamagnetic beads. We also clarify here the role of carrier nucleic acids in the adsorption and isolation of nucleic acids. Based on the various mechanistic insights detailed here, customized microfluidic devices can be designed to meet the range of current and emerging point of care diagnostics needs. PMID:26734116

  2. Macro-/Nano- Materials Based Ultrasensitive Lateral Flow Nucleic Acid Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takalkar, Sunitha

    Ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids plays a very important role in the field of molecular diagnosis for the detection of various diseases. Lateral flow biosensors (LFB) are convenient, easy-to-use, patient friendly forms of detection methods offering rapid and convenient clinical testing in close proximity to the patients thus drawing a lot of attention in different areas of research over the years. In comparison with the traditional immunoassays, the nucleic acid based lateral flow biosensors (NABLFB) has several advantages in terms of stability and interference capabilities. NABLFB utilizes nucleic acid probes as the bio-recognition element. The target analyte typically is the oligonucleotide like the DNA, mRNA, miRNA which are among the nucleic acid secretions by the tumor cells when it comes to detection of cancer. Traditionally gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been used as labels for conjugating with the detection probes for the qualitative and semi quantitative analysis, the application of GNP-based LFB is limited by its low sensitivity. This dissertation describes the use of different nanomaterials and advanced detection technologies to enhance the sensitivities of the LFB based methods. Silica Nanorods decorated with GNP were synthesized and employed as labels for ultrasensitive detection of miRNA on the LFB. Owing to the biocompatibility and convenience in surface modification of SiNRs, they acted as good carriers to load numerous GNPs. The sensitivity of the GNP-SiNR-based LFSB was enhanced six times compared to the previous GNP-based LFSB. A fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN) was first used as a tag to develop a lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor for ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of nucleic acid samples. Under optimal conditions, the FCN-based LFNAB was capable of detecting minimum 0.4 fM target DNA without complex operations and additional signal amplification. The carbon nanotube was used as a label and carrier of numerous enzyme

  3. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    This work examines smart material properties of rational self-assembly and molecular recognition found in nano-biosystems. Exploiting the sequence and structural information encoded within nucleic acids and proteins will permit programmed synthesis of nanomaterials and help create molecular machines that may carry out new roles involving chemical catalysis and bioenergy. Responsive to different ionic environments thru self-reorgnization, nucleic acids (NA) are nature's signature smart material; organisms such as viruses and bacteria use features of NAs to react to their environment and orchestrate their lifecycle. Furthermore, nucleic acid systems (both RNA and DNA) are currently exploited as scaffolds; recent applications have been showcased to build bioelectronics and biotemplated nanostructures via directed assembly of multidimensional nanoelectronic devices 1. Since the most stable and rudimentary structure of nucleic acids is the helical duplex, these were modeled in order to examine the influence of the microenvironment, sequence, and cation-dependent perturbations of their canonical forms. Due to their negatively charged phosphate backbone, NA's rely on counterions to overcome the inherent repulsive forces that arise from the assembly of two complementary strands. As a realistic model system, we chose the HIV-TAR helix (PDB ID: 397D) to study specific sequence motifs on cation sequestration. At physiologically relevant concentrations of sodium and potassium ions, we observed sequence based effects where purine stretches were adept in retaining high residency cations. The transitional space between adenine and guanosine nucleotides (ApG step) in a sequence proved the most favorable. This work was the first to directly show these subtle interactions of sequence based cationic sequestration and may be useful for controlling metallization of nucleic acids in conductive nanowires. Extending the study further, we explored the degree to which the structure of NA

  4. Nonenzymatic synthesis of RNA and DNA oligomers on hexitol nucleic acid templates: the importance of the A structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Politis, P. K.; Van Aerschot, A.; Busson, R.; Herdewijn, P.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Dolan, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Hexitol nucleic acid (HNA) is an analogue of DNA containing the standard nucleoside bases, but with a phosphorylated 1,5-anhydrohexitol backbone. HNA oligomers form duplexes having the nucleic acid A structure with complementary DNA or RNA oligomers. The HNA decacytidylate oligomer is an efficient template for the oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of guanosine or deoxyguanosine. Comparison of the oligomerization efficiencies on HNA, RNA, and DNA decacytidylate templates under various conditions suggests strongly that only nucleic acid double helices with the A structure support efficient template-directed synthesis when 5'-phosphoroimidazolides of nucleosides are used as substrates.

  5. Method and apparatus for purifying nucleic acids and performing polymerase chain reaction assays using an immiscible fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Light, Yooli Kim; Piccini, Matthew Ernest

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, systems, and methods for purifying nucleic acids to conduct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. In one example, a method includes generating complexes of silica beads and nucleic acids in a lysis buffer, transporting the complexes through an immiscible fluid to remove interfering compounds from the complexes, further transporting the complexes into a density medium containing components required for PCR where the nucleic acids disassociate from the silica beads, and thermocycling the contents of the density medium to achieve PCR. Signal may be detected from labeling agents in the components required formore » PCR.« less

  6. [MEASUREMENT OF HISTONES AND CIRCULATING EXTRACELLULAR NUCLEIC ACIDS IN PATIENTS' WITH COMPLICATED FORMS OF PEPTIC ULCER].

    PubMed

    Yerznkyan, G; Kultanov, B; Shakeev, K; Tatina, Ye

    2017-04-01

    We studied 135 people (24 people, apparently healthy, 39 uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease, 42 people with complex forms peptic ulcer, 30 and after the treatment of complicated forms of peptic ulcer disease, both sexes (18-45 y.). In all patients, the diagnosis was confirmed fibrogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Determination of histones and acid soluble fraction (ASF), RNA, DNA, in blood was performed by the method of L. Markusheva. Studies have led to the conclusion that the change in the blood concentration of extracellular nucleic acids in patients with uncomplicated disease and complex shapes can be caused by oxidative stress products and can be a signal for elimination of nucleic acids from cells. We have registered various dynamics of the studied parameters histones in the blood of patients with various forms of peptic ulcer disease, which reflects the degree of metabolic abnormalities that occur in the body, associated with changes in the structure of the nucleus. According to the results of our research in the study of the role of extracellular nucleic acids, histones to assess the extent of violations of metabolic processes at a peptic ulcer, complicated and uncomplicated form, the obtained results can be used as predictors of complications of a stomach ulcer.

  7. MagnetofectionTM platform: from magnetic nanoparticles to novel nucleic acid therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christian; Vlaskou, Dialechti; Schillinger, Ulrike; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Nucleic acid delivery to cells to make them produce a desired protein or to shut down the expression of endogenous genes opens unique possibilities for research and therapy. During the last decade, to realize the potential of this approach, nanomagnetic methods for delivering and targeting nucleic acids have been developed, methods which are often referred to as Magnetofection. Our research group at the Institute of Experimental Oncology and Therapy Research, located at the University Hospital Klinikum rechts der Isar in the center of Munich, Germany, develops new magnetic nanomaterials and, their formulations with gene-delivery vectors and technologies to allow localized and efficient gene delivery in vitro and in vivo for a variety of research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  8. The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy for 3D Analysis of Nucleic Acid Hybridization on Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dubrovin, E V; Presnova, G V; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M; Grigorenko, V G; Yaminsky, I V

    2015-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are considered today to be one of the most efficient methods of gene diagnostics. The capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize the three-dimensional morphology of single molecules on a surface allows one to use it as an effective tool for the 3D analysis of a microarray for the detection of nucleic acids. The high resolution of AFM offers ways to decrease the detection threshold of target DNA and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, we suggest an approach to the evaluation of the results of hybridization of gold nanoparticle-labeled nucleic acids on silicon microarrays based on an AFM analysis of the surface both in air and in liquid which takes into account of their three-dimensional structure. We suggest a quantitative measure of the hybridization results which is based on the fraction of the surface area occupied by the nanoparticles.

  9. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  10. Visualization of nucleic acids with synthetic exciton-controlled fluorescent oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan Ohtan; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Engineered probes to adapt new photochemical properties upon recognition of target nucleic acids offer powerful tools to DNA and RNA visualization technologies. Herein, we describe a rapid and effective visualization method of nucleic acids in both fixed and living cells with hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. These probes are efficiently quenched in an aqueous environment due to the homodimeric, excitonic interactions between fluorophores but become highly fluorescent upon hybridization to DNA or RNA with complementary sequences. The fast hybridization kinetics and quick fluorescence activation of the new probes allow applications to simplify the conventional fluorescent in situ hybridization protocols and reduce the amount of time to process the samples. Furthermore, hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission of the probes allows monitoring dynamic behaviors of RNA in living cells.

  11. Broad-Spectrum Molecular Detection of Fungal Nucleic Acids by PCR-Based Amplification Techniques.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Stefan; Lion, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections has dramatically increased. Infections caused by hitherto rare and emerging fungal pathogens are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. These observations render the coverage of a broad range of clinically relevant fungal pathogens highly important. The so-called panfungal or, perhaps more correctly, broad-range nucleic acid amplification techniques do not only facilitate sensitive detection of all clinically relevant fungal species but are also rapid and can be applied to analyses of any patient specimens. They have therefore become valuable diagnostic tools for sensitive screening of patients at risk of invasive fungal infections. This chapter summarizes the currently available molecular technologies employed in testing of a wide range of fungal pathogens, and provides a detailed workflow for patient screening by broad-spectrum nucleic acid amplification techniques.

  12. Fluorescence energy transfer as a probe for nucleic acid structures and sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Mergny, J L; Boutorine, A S; Garestier, T; Belloc, F; Rougée, M; Bulychev, N V; Koshkin, A A; Bourson, J; Lebedev, A V; Valeur, B

    1994-01-01

    The primary or secondary structure of single-stranded nucleic acids has been investigated with fluorescent oligonucleotides, i.e., oligonucleotides covalently linked to a fluorescent dye. Five different chromophores were used: 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-amino-acridine, coumarin 500, fluorescein, rhodamine and ethidium. The chemical synthesis of derivatized oligonucleotides is described. Hybridization of two fluorescent oligonucleotides to adjacent nucleic acid sequences led to fluorescence excitation energy transfer between the donor and the acceptor dyes. This phenomenon was used to probe primary and secondary structures of DNA fragments and the orientation of oligodeoxynucleotides synthesized with the alpha-anomers of nucleoside units. Fluorescence energy transfer can be used to reveal the formation of hairpin structures and the translocation of genes between two chromosomes. PMID:8152922

  13. Biosensors for liquid biopsy: circulating nucleic acids to diagnose and treat cancer.

    PubMed

    Bellassai, Noemi; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    The detection of cancer biomarkers freely circulating in blood offers new opportunities for cancer early diagnosis, patient follow-up, and therapy efficacy assessment based on liquid biopsy. In particular, circulating cell-free nucleic acids released from tumor cells have recently attracted great attention also because they become detectable in blood before the appearance of other circulating biomarkers, such as circulating tumor cells. The detection of circulating nucleic acids poses several technical challenges that arise from their low concentration and relatively small size. Here, possibilities offered by innovative biosensing approaches for the detection of circulating DNA in peripheral blood and blood-derived products such as plasma and serum blood are discussed. Different transduction principles are used to detect circulating DNAs and great advantages are derived from the combined use of nanostructured materials.

  14. Isothermal amplification detection of nucleic acids by a double-nicked beacon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Zhou, Meiling; Pan, Mei; Zhong, Guilin; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-03-01

    Isothermal and rapid amplification detection of nucleic acids is an important technology in environmental monitoring, foodborne pathogen detection, and point-of-care clinical diagnostics. Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal signal amplification for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) detection. The ssDNA target could be used as an initiator, coupled with a double-nicked molecular beacon, to originate amplification cycles, achieving cascade signal amplification. In addition, the method showed good specificity and strong anti-jamming capability. Overall, it is a one-pot and isothermal strand displacement amplification method without the requirement of a stepwise procedure, which greatly simplifies the experimental procedure and decreases the probability of contamination of samples. With its advantages, the method would be very useful to detect nucleic acids in point-of-care or field use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiplexed and portable nucleic acid detection platform with Cas13, Cas12a, and Csm6

    PubMed Central

    Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Kellner, Max J.; Joung, Julia; Collins, James J.; Zhang, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Rapid detection of nucleic acids is integral for clinical diagnostics and biotechnological applications. We recently developed a platform termed SHERLOCK (Specific High Sensitivity Enzymatic Reporter UnLOCKing) that combines isothermal pre-amplification with Cas13 to detect single molecules of RNA or DNA. Through characterization of CRISPR enzymology and application development, we report here four advances integrated into SHERLOCKv2: 1) 4-channel single reaction multiplexing using orthogonal CRISPR enzymes; 2) quantitative measurement of input down to 2 aM; 3) 3.5-fold increase in signal sensitivity by combining Cas13 with Csm6, an auxilary CRISPR-associated enzyme; and 4) lateral flow read-out. SHERLOCKv2 can detect Dengue or Zika virus ssRNA as well as mutations in patient liquid biopsy samples via lateral flow, highlighting its potential as a multiplexable, portable, rapid, and quantitative detection platform of nucleic acids. PMID:29449508

  16. Design of nucleic acid strands with long low-barrier folding pathways.

    PubMed

    Condon, Anne; Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Maňuch, Ján

    2017-01-01

    A major goal of natural computing is to design biomolecules, such as nucleic acid sequences, that can be used to perform computations. We design sequences of nucleic acids that are "guaranteed" to have long folding pathways relative to their length. This particular sequences with high probability follow low-barrier folding pathways that visit a large number of distinct structures. Long folding pathways are interesting, because they demonstrate that natural computing can potentially support long and complex computations. Formally, we provide the first scalable designs of molecules whose low-barrier folding pathways, with respect to a simple, stacked pair energy model, grow superlinearly with the molecule length, but for which all significantly shorter alternative folding pathways have an energy barrier that is [Formula: see text] times that of the low-barrier pathway for any [Formula: see text] and a sufficiently long sequence.

  17. Improved Force Fields for Peptide Nucleic Acids with Optimized Backbone Torsion Parameters.

    PubMed

    Jasiński, Maciej; Feig, Michael; Trylska, Joanna

    2018-06-06

    Peptide nucleic acids are promising nucleic acid analogs for antisense therapies as they can form stable duplex and triplex structures with DNA and RNA. Computational studies of PNA-containing duplexes and triplexes are an important component for guiding their design, yet existing force fields have not been well validated and parametrized with modern computational capabilities. We present updated CHARMM and Amber force fields for PNA that greatly improve the stability of simulated PNA-containing duplexes and triplexes in comparison with experimental structures and allow such systems to be studied on microsecond time scales. The force field modifications focus on reparametrized PNA backbone torsion angles to match high-level quantum mechanics reference energies for a model compound. The microsecond simulations of PNA-PNA, PNA-DNA, PNA-RNA, and PNA-DNA-PNA complexes also allowed a comprehensive analysis of hydration and ion interactions with such systems.

  18. The practical and pedagogical advantages of an ambigraphic nucleic acid notation.

    PubMed

    Rozak, David A

    2006-01-01

    The universally applied IUPAC notation for nucleic acids was adopted primarily to facilitate the mental association of G, A, T, C, and the related ambiguity characters with the bases they represent. However it is possible to create a notation that offers greater support for the basic manipulations and analyses to which genetic sequences frequently are subjected. By designing a nucleic acid notation around ambigrams, it is possible to simplify the frequently applied process of reverse complementation and aid the visualization of palindromes. The ambigraphic notation presented here also uses common orthographic features such as stems and loops to highlight guanine and cytosine rich regions, support the derivation of ambiguity characters, and aid educators in teaching the fundamentals of molecular genetics.

  19. Variation, differential reproduction and oscillation: the evolution of nucleic acid hybridization.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Díaz, Edna

    2013-01-01

    This paper builds upon Hans-Jörg Rheinberger ideas on the oscillation and intercalation of epistemic things and technical objects in experimental systems, to give a fine-grained analysis of what here is called the problems of "adaptation" between our material and cognitive tools and the phenomena of the material world. To do so, it relies on the case-study of the evolution of nucleic acid hybridization and the stabilization of satellite DNA.

  20. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  1. Does Cation Size Affect Occupancy and Electrostatic Screening of the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatics are central to all aspects of nucleic acid behavior, including their folding, condensation, and binding to other molecules, and the energetics of these processes are profoundly influenced by the ion atmosphere that surrounds nucleic acids. Given the highly complex and dynamic nature of the ion atmosphere, understanding its properties and effects will require synergy between computational modeling and experiment. Prior computational models and experiments suggest that cation occupancy in the ion atmosphere depends on the size of the cation. However, the computational models have not been independently tested, and the experimentally observed effects were small. Here, we evaluate a computational model of ion size effects by experimentally testing a blind prediction made from that model, and we present additional experimental results that extend our understanding of the ion atmosphere. Giambasu et al. developed and implemented a three-dimensional reference interaction site (3D-RISM) model for monovalent cations surrounding DNA and RNA helices, and this model predicts that Na+ would outcompete Cs+ by 1.8–2.1-fold; i.e., with Cs+ in 2-fold excess of Na+ the ion atmosphere would contain an equal number of each cation (Nucleic Acids Res.2015, 43, 8405). However, our ion counting experiments indicate that there is no significant preference for Na+ over Cs+. There is an ∼25% preferential occupancy of Li+ over larger cations in the ion atmosphere but, counter to general expectations from existing models, no size dependence for the other alkali metal ions. Further, we followed the folding of the P4–P6 RNA and showed that differences in folding with different alkali metal ions observed at high concentration arise from cation–anion interactions and not cation size effects. Overall, our results provide a critical test of a computational prediction, fundamental information about ion atmosphere properties, and parameters that will aid in the development of

  2. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  3. Nucleic Acid Aptamers: An Emerging Tool for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ti-Hsuan; Zhang, Tiantian; Luo, Hua; Yen, Tony M.; Chen, Ping-Wei; Han, Yuanyuan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Detection of small molecules or proteins of living cells provides an exceptional opportunity to study genetic variations and functions, cellular behaviors, and various diseases including cancer and microbial infections. Our aim in this review is to give an overview of selected research activities related to nucleic acid-based aptamer techniques that have been reported in the past two decades. Limitations of aptamers and possible approaches to overcome these limitations are also discussed. PMID:26153774

  4. Ebselen inhibits hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase binding to nucleic acid and prevents viral replication.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Weiner, Warren S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simpson, Denise S; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Marvin, Rachel K; Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Isailovic, Dragan; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2014-10-17

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 μM ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 μM, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure-activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines.

  5. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  6. Nucleic Acid Homologies Among Oxidase-Negative Moraxella Species

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John L.; Anderson, Robert S.; Ordal, Erling J.

    1970-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base composition and DNA homologies of more than 40 strains of oxidase-negative Moraxella species were determined. These bacteria have also been identified as belonging to the Mima-Herellea-Acinetobacter group and the Bacterium anitratum group, as well as to several other genera including Achromobacter and Alcaligenes. The DNA base content of these strains ranged from 40 to 46% guanine plus cytosine. DNA–DNA competition experiments distinguished five groups whose members were determined by showing 50% or more homology to one of the reference strains: B. anitratum type B5W, Achromobacter haemolyticus var. haemolyticus, Alcaligenes haemolysans, Achromobacter metalcaligenes, and Moraxella lwoffi. A sixth group comprised those strains showing less than 50% homology to any of the reference strains. Negligible homology was found between strains of oxidase-negative and oxidase-positive Moraxella species in DNA–DNA competition experiments. However, evidence of a distant relationship between the two groups was obtained in competition experiments by using ribosomal ribonucleic acid. PMID:5413826

  7. Nucleic acid stains as indicators of Giardia muris viability following cyst inactivation.

    PubMed

    Taghi-Kilani, R; Gyürék, L L; Millard, P J; Finch, G R; Belosevic, M

    1996-06-01

    A reliable viability assay for Giardia is required for the development of disinfection process design criteria and pathogen monitoring by water treatment utilities. Surveys of single-staining nucleic acid dyes (stain dead parasites only), and double-staining vital dye kits from Molecular Probes (stain live and dead parasites) were conducted to assess the viability of untreated, heat-killed, and chemically inactivated Giardia muris cysts. Nucleic acid staining results were compared to those of in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Nucleic acid stain, designated as SYTO-9, was considered the best among the single-staining dyes for its ability to stain dead cysts brightly and its relatively slow decay rate of visible light emission following DNA binding. SYTO-9 staining was correlated to animal infectivity. A Live/Dead BacLight was found to be the better of 2 double-staining viability kits tested. Logarithmic survival ratios based on SYTO-9 and Live/Dead BacLight were compared to excystation and infectivity results for G. muris cysts exposed to ozone or free chlorine. The results indicate that SYTO-9 and Live/Dead BacLight staining is stable following treatment of cysts with chemical disinfectants.

  8. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  9. Colorimetric Nucleic Acid Detection on Paper Microchip Using Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification and Crystal Violet Dye.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sharmili; Mohd-Naim, Noor Faizah; Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2017-11-22

    Nucleic acid detection is of paramount importance in monitoring of microbial pathogens in food safety and infectious disease diagnostic applications. To address these challenges, a rapid, cost-effective label-free technique for nucleic acid detection with minimal instrumentations is highly desired. Here, we present paper microchip to detect and quantify nucleic acid using colorimetric sensing modality. The extracted DNA from food samples of meat as well as microbial pathogens was amplified utilizing loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). LAMP amplicon was then detected and quantified on a paper microchip fabricated in a cellulose paper and a small wax chamber utilizing crystal violet dye. The affinity of crystal violet dye toward dsDNA and positive signal were identified by changing the color from colorless to purple. Using this method, detection of Sus scrofa (porcine) and Bacillus subtilis (bacteria) DNA was possible at concentrations as low as 1 pg/μL (3.43 × 10 -1 copies/μL) and 10 pg/μL (2.2 × 10 3 copies/μL), respectively. This strategy can be adapted for detection of other DNA samples, with potential for development of a new breed of simple and inexpensive paper microchip at the point-of-need.

  10. A new class of homogeneous nucleic acid probes based on specific displacement hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingge; Luan, Guoyan; Guo, Qiuping; Liang, Jixuan

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new class of probes for homogeneous nucleic acid detection based on the proposed displacement hybridization. Our probes consist of two complementary oligodeoxyribonucleotides of different length labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher in close proximity in the duplex. The probes on their own are quenched, but they become fluorescent upon displacement hybridization with the target. These probes display complete discrimination between a perfectly matched target and single nucleotide mismatch targets. A comparison of double-stranded probes with corresponding linear probes confirms that the presence of the complementary strand significantly enhances their specificity. Using four such probes labeled with different color fluorophores, each designed to recognize a different target, we have demonstrated that multiple targets can be distinguished in the same solution, even if they differ from one another by as little as a single nucleotide. Double-stranded probes were used in real-time nucleic acid amplifications as either probes or as primers. In addition to its extreme specificity and flexibility, the new class of probes is simple to design and synthesize, has low cost and high sensitivity and is accessible to a wide range of labels. This class of probes should find applications in a variety of areas wherever high specificity of nucleic acid hybridization is relevant. PMID:11788731

  11. Design of polymer motifs for nucleic acid recognition and assembly stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhun

    This dissertation describes the synthesis and assembly of bio-functional polymers and the applications of these polymers to drug encapsulation, delivery, and multivalent biomimetic macromolecular recognition between synthetic polymer and nucleic acids. The main content is divided into three parts: (1) polyacidic domains as strongly stabilizing design elements for aqueous phase polyacrylate diblock assembly; (2) small molecule/polymer recognition triggered macromolecular assembly and drug encapsulation; (3) trizaine derivatized polymer as a novel class of "bifacial polymer nucleic acid" (bPoNA) and applications of bPoNA to nanoparticle loading of DNA/RNA, silencing delivery as well as control of aptamer function. Through the studies in part (1) and part (2), it was demonstrated that well-designed polymer motifs are not only able to enhance assemblies driven by non-specific hydrophobic effect, but are also able to direct assemblies based on specific recognitions. In part (3) of this dissertation, this concept was further extended by the design of polyacrylate polymers that are capable of discrete and robust hybridization with nucleic acids. This surprising finding demonstrated both fundamental and practical applications. Overall, these studies provided insights into the rational design elements for improving the bio-functions of synthetic polymers, and significantly expanded the scope of biological applications in which polymers synthesized via controlled radical polymerization may play a role.

  12. The 2015 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and molecular biology database collection.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Michael Y; Rigden, Daniel J; Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue contains 172 papers that include descriptions of 56 new molecular biology databases, and updates on 115 databases whose descriptions have been previously published in NAR or other journals. Following the classification that has been introduced last year in order to simplify navigation of the entire issue, these articles are divided into eight subject categories. This year's highlights include RNAcentral, an international community portal to various databases on noncoding RNA; ValidatorDB, a validation database for protein structures and their ligands; SASBDB, a primary repository for small-angle scattering data of various macromolecular complexes; MoonProt, a database of 'moonlighting' proteins, and two new databases of protein-protein and other macromolecular complexes, ComPPI and the Complex Portal. This issue also includes an unusually high number of cancer-related databases and other databases dedicated to genomic basics of disease and potential drugs and drug targets. The size of NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/a/, remained approximately the same, following the addition of 74 new resources and removal of 77 obsolete web sites. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research web site (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. New Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids by Optical Methods.

    PubMed

    Westergaard Mulberg, Mads; Taskova, Maria; Thomsen, Rasmus P; Okholm, Anders H; Kjems, Jørgen; Astakhova, Kira

    2017-08-17

    For decades the detection of nucleic acids and their interactions at low abundances has been a challenging task that has thus far been solved by enzymatic target amplification. In this work we aimed at developing efficient tools for amplification-free nucleic acid detection, which resulted in the synthesis of new fluorescent nanoparticles. Here, the fluorescent nanoparticles were made by simple and inexpensive radical emulsion polymerization of butyl acrylate in the presence of fluorescent dyes and additional functionalization reagents. This provided ultra-bright macrofluorophores of 9-84 nm mean diameter, modified with additional alkyne and amino groups for bioconjugation. By using click and NHS chemistries, the new nanoparticles were attached to target-specific DNA probes that were used in fluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy. Overall, these fluorescent nanoparticles and their oligonucleotide derivatives have higher photostability, brighter fluorescence and hence dramatically lower limits of target detection than the individual organic dyes. These properties make them useful in approaches directed towards ultrasensitive detection of nucleic acids, in particular for imaging and in vitro diagnostics of DNA. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Comparison of commercial systems for extraction of nucleic acids from DNA/RNA respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Genyan; Erdman, Dean E; Kodani, Maja; Kools, John; Bowen, Michael D; Fields, Barry S

    2011-01-01

    This study compared six automated nucleic acid extraction systems and one manual kit for their ability to recover nucleic acids from human nasal wash specimens spiked with five respiratory pathogens, representing Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenes), Gram-negative bacteria (Legionella pneumophila), DNA viruses (adenovirus), segmented RNA viruses (human influenza virus A), and non-segmented RNA viruses (respiratory syncytial virus). The robots and kit evaluated represent major commercially available methods that are capable of simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from respiratory specimens, and included platforms based on magnetic-bead technology (KingFisher mL, Biorobot EZ1, easyMAG, KingFisher Flex, and MagNA Pure Compact) or glass fiber filter technology (Biorobot MDX and the manual kit Allprep). All methods yielded extracts free of cross-contamination and RT-PCR inhibition. All automated systems recovered L. pneumophila and adenovirus DNA equivalently. However, the MagNA Pure protocol demonstrated more than 4-fold higher DNA recovery from the S. pyogenes than other methods. The KingFisher mL and easyMAG protocols provided 1- to 3-log wider linearity and extracted 3- to 4-fold more RNA from the human influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus. These findings suggest that systems differed in nucleic acid recovery, reproducibility, and linearity in a pathogen specific manner. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Microfluidic Preparation of Polymer-Nucleic Acid Nanocomplexes Improves Nonviral Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigsby, Christopher L.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chao; Engbersen, Johan F. J.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-11-01

    As the designs of polymer systems used to deliver nucleic acids continue to evolve, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the basic bulk manufacturing techniques of the past will be insufficient to produce polymer-nucleic acid nanocomplexes that possess the uniformity, stability, and potency required for their successful clinical translation and widespread commercialization. Traditional bulk-prepared products are often physicochemically heterogeneous and may vary significantly from one batch to the next. Here we show that preparation of bioreducible nanocomplexes with an emulsion-based droplet microfluidic system produces significantly improved nanoparticles that are up to fifty percent smaller, more uniform, and are less prone to aggregation. The intracellular integrity of nanocomplexes prepared with this microfluidic method is significantly prolonged, as detected using a high-throughput flow cytometric quantum dot Förster resonance energy transfer nanosensor system. These physical attributes conspire to consistently enhance the delivery of both plasmid DNA and messenger RNA payloads in stem cells, primary cells, and human cell lines. Innovation in processing is necessary to move the field toward the broader clinical implementation of safe and effective nonviral nucleic acid therapeutics, and preparation with droplet microfluidics represents a step forward in addressing the critical barrier of robust and reproducible nanocomplex production.

  16. Rapid amplification/detection of nucleic acid targets utilizing a HDA/thin film biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jenison, Robert; Jaeckel, Heidi; Klonoski, Joshua; Latorra, David; Wiens, Jacinta

    2014-08-07

    Thin film biosensors exploit a flat, optically coated silicon-based surface whereupon formation of nucleic acid hybrids are enzymatically transduced in a molecular thin film that can be detected by the unaided human eye under white light. While the limit of sensitivity for detection of nucleic acid targets is at sub-attomole levels (60 000 copies) many clinical specimens containing bacterial pathogens have much lower levels of analyte present. Herein, we describe a platform, termed HDA/thin film biosensor, which performs helicase-dependant nucleic acid amplification on a thin film biosensor surface to improve the limit of sensitivity to 10 copies of the mecA gene present in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus. As double-stranded DNA is unwound by helicase it was either bound by solution-phase DNA primers to be copied by DNA polymerase or hybridized to surface immobilized probe on the thin film biosensor surface to be detected. Herein, we show that amplification reactions on the thin film biosensor are equivalent to in standard thin wall tubes, with detection at the limit of sensitivity of the assay occurring after 30 minutes of incubation time. Further we validate the approach by detecting the presence of the mecA gene in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from positive blood culture aliquots with high specificity (signal/noise ratio of 105).

  17. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests.

    PubMed

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline; Lindegren, Gunnel; Stoltz, Malin Lundahl; Salata, Cristiano; Kran, Anne-Marte Bakken; Dudman, Susanne Gjeruldsen; Mirazimi, Ali; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2016-10-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using the QIAamp viral RNA minikit. We present an easy and convenient method for bedside inactivation using available blood collection vacuum tubes and reagents. We propose to use this simple method for fast, safe, and easy bedside inactivation of Ebola virus for safe transport and routine nucleic acid detection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. The fragile X mental retardation protein has nucleic acid chaperone properties

    PubMed Central

    Gabus, Caroline; Mazroui, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Khandjian, Edouard W.; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation resulting from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP contains two K-homology (KH) domains and one RGG box that are landmarks characteristic of RNA-binding proteins. In agreement with this, FMRP associates with messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) within actively translating ribosomes, and is thought to regulate translation of target mRNAs, including its own transcript. To investigate whether FMRP might chaperone nucleic acid folding and hybridization, we analysed the annealing and strand exchange activities of DNA oligonucleotides and the enhancement of ribozyme-directed RNA substrate cleavage by FMRP and deleted variants relative to canonical nucleic acid chaperones, such as the cellular YB-1/p50 protein and the retroviral nucleocapsid protein HIV-1 NCp7. FMRP was found to possess all the properties of a potent nucleic acid chaperone, requiring the KH motifs and RGG box for optimal activity. These findings suggest that FMRP may regulate translation by acting on RNA–RNA interactions and thus on the structural status of mRNAs. PMID:15096575

  19. The fragile X mental retardation protein has nucleic acid chaperone properties.

    PubMed

    Gabus, Caroline; Mazroui, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Khandjian, Edouard W; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation resulting from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP contains two K-homology (KH) domains and one RGG box that are landmarks characteristic of RNA-binding proteins. In agreement with this, FMRP associates with messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) within actively translating ribosomes, and is thought to regulate translation of target mRNAs, including its own transcript. To investigate whether FMRP might chaperone nucleic acid folding and hybridization, we analysed the annealing and strand exchange activities of DNA oligonucleotides and the enhancement of ribozyme-directed RNA substrate cleavage by FMRP and deleted variants relative to canonical nucleic acid chaperones, such as the cellular YB-1/p50 protein and the retroviral nucleocapsid protein HIV-1 NCp7. FMRP was found to possess all the properties of a potent nucleic acid chaperone, requiring the KH motifs and RGG box for optimal activity. These findings suggest that FMRP may regulate translation by acting on RNA-RNA interactions and thus on the structural status of mRNAs.

  20. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S; Qin, Peter Z

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve "correct" all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of femtosecond laser and continuous wave UV sources for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Fecko, Christopher J; Munson, Katherine M; Saunders, Abbie; Sun, Guangxing; Begley, Tadhg P; Lis, John T; Webb, Watt W

    2007-01-01

    Crosslinking proteins to the nucleic acids they bind affords stable access to otherwise transient regulatory interactions. Photochemical crosslinking provides an attractive alternative to formaldehyde-based protocols, but irradiation with conventional UV sources typically yields inadequate product amounts. Crosslinking with pulsed UV lasers has been heralded as a revolutionary technique to increase photochemical yield, but this method had only been tested on a few protein-nucleic acid complexes. To test the generality of the yield enhancement, we have investigated the benefits of using approximately 150 fs UV pulses to crosslink TATA-binding protein, glucocorticoid receptor and heat shock factor to oligonucleotides in vitro. For these proteins, we find that the quantum yields (and saturating yields) for forming crosslinks using the high-peak intensity femtosecond laser do not improve on those obtained with low-intensity continuous wave (CW) UV sources. The photodamage to the oligonucleotides and proteins also has comparable quantum yields. Measurements of the photochemical reaction yields of several small molecules selected to model the crosslinking reactions also exhibit nearly linear dependences on UV intensity instead of the previously predicted quadratic dependence. Unfortunately, these results disprove earlier assertions that femtosecond pulsed laser sources provide significant advantages over CW radiation for protein-nucleic acid crosslinking.

  2. BIGNASim: a NoSQL database structure and analysis portal for nucleic acids simulation data.

    PubMed

    Hospital, Adam; Andrio, Pau; Cugnasco, Cesare; Codo, Laia; Becerra, Yolanda; Dans, Pablo D; Battistini, Federica; Torres, Jordi; Goñi, Ramón; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep Ll

    2016-01-04

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is, just behind genomics, the bioinformatics tool that generates the largest amounts of data, and that is using the largest amount of CPU time in supercomputing centres. MD trajectories are obtained after months of calculations, analysed in situ, and in practice forgotten. Several projects to generate stable trajectory databases have been developed for proteins, but no equivalence exists in the nucleic acids world. We present here a novel database system to store MD trajectories and analyses of nucleic acids. The initial data set available consists mainly of the benchmark of the new molecular dynamics force-field, parmBSC1. It contains 156 simulations, with over 120 μs of total simulation time. A deposition protocol is available to accept the submission of new trajectory data. The database is based on the combination of two NoSQL engines, Cassandra for storing trajectories and MongoDB to store analysis results and simulation metadata. The analyses available include backbone geometries, helical analysis, NMR observables and a variety of mechanical analyses. Individual trajectories and combined meta-trajectories can be downloaded from the portal. The system is accessible through http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/. Supplementary Material is also available on-line at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/BIGNASim/SuppMaterial/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Nucleic acid-based diagnostics for infectious diseases in public health affairs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Vatcher, Greg; Yue, Xin; Dong, Yan; Li, Mao Hua; Tam, Patrick H K; Tsang, Parker Y L; Wong, April K Y; Hui, Michael H K; Yang, Bin; Tang, Hao; Lau, Lok-Ting

    2012-06-01

    Infectious diseases, mostly caused by bacteria and viruses but also a result of fungal and parasitic infection, have been one of the most important public health concerns throughout human history. The first step in combating these pathogens is to get a timely and accurate diagnosis at an affordable cost. Many kinds of diagnostics have been developed, such as pathogen culture, biochemical tests and serological tests, to help detect and fight against the causative agents of diseases. However, these diagnostic tests are generally unsatisfactory because they are not particularly sensitive and specific and are unable to deliver speedy results. Nucleic acid-based diagnostics, detecting pathogens through the identification of their genomic sequences, have shown promise to overcome the above limitations and become more widely adopted in clinical tests. Here we review some of the most popular nucleic acid-based diagnostics and focus on their adaptability and applicability to routine clinical usage. We also compare and contrast the characteristics of different types of nucleic acid-based diagnostics.

  4. Maximizing the electromagnetic and chemical resonances of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lindsay M; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-08-26

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has previously been performed with nucleic acids, the measured intensities for each nucleic acid have varied significantly depending on the SERS substrate and excitation wavelength. We have demonstrated that the charge-transfer (CT) mechanism, also known as the chemical enhancement of SERS, is responsible for the discrepancies previously reported in literature. The electronic states of cytosine and guanine attached to silver atoms are computationally calculated and experimentally measured to be in the visible range, which leads to a resonance Raman effect at the corresponding maximum wavelengths. The resulting SERS measurements are in good agreement with the simulated values, in which cytosine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 532 nm and guanine-silver shows stronger enhancement at 785 nm. An atomic layer of aluminum oxide is deposited on substrates to prevent charge-transfer, and corresponding measurements show weaker Raman signals caused by the suppression of the chemical resonance. These findings suggest the optimal SERS signal can be achieved by tuning the excitation wavelength to match both the electromagnetic and chemical resonances, paving the way for future single molecule detection of nucleic acids other than adenine.

  5. An Integrated Spin-Labeling/Computational-Modeling Approach for Mapping Global Structures of Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Tangprasertchai, Narin S.; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ding, Yuan; Tham, Kenneth; Rohs, Remo; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    The technique of site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) provides unique information on biomolecules by monitoring the behavior of a stable radical tag (i.e., spin label) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this chapter, we describe an approach in which SDSL is integrated with computational modeling to map conformations of nucleic acids. This approach builds upon a SDSL tool kit previously developed and validated, which includes three components: (i) a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe, designated as R5, which can be efficiently attached at defined sites within arbitrary nucleic acid sequences; (ii) inter-R5 distances in the nanometer range, measured via pulsed EPR; and (iii) an efficient program, called NASNOX, that computes inter-R5 distances on given nucleic acid structures. Following a general framework of data mining, our approach uses multiple sets of measured inter-R5 distances to retrieve “correct” all-atom models from a large ensemble of models. The pool of models can be generated independently without relying on the inter-R5 distances, thus allowing a large degree of flexibility in integrating the SDSL-measured distances with a modeling approach best suited for the specific system under investigation. As such, the integrative experimental/computational approach described here represents a hybrid method for determining all-atom models based on experimentally-derived distance measurements. PMID:26477260

  6. Spectroscopic Study of the Binding of Netropsin and Hoechst 33258 to Nucleic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardevanyan, P. O.; Parsadanyan, M. A.; Antonyan, A. P.; Sahakyan, V. G.

    2018-05-01

    The interaction of groove binding compounds — peptide antibiotic (polyamide) netropsin and fluorescent dye (bisbenzimidazole) Hoechst 33258 — with the double-stranded DNA and synthetic double-stranded polynucleotide poly(rA)-poly(rU) has been studied by spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of these ligand complexes with nucleic acids have been obtained. Spectral changes at the complexation of individual ligands with the mentioned nucleic acids reveal the similarity of binding of each of these ligands with both DNA and RNA. Based on the spectroscopic measurements, the binding parameters of netropsin and Hoechst 33258 binding to DNA and poly(rA)-poly(rU) - K and n, as well as the thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔG, and ΔH have been determined. It was found that the binding of Hoechst 33258 to both nucleic acids is accompanied by a positive change in enthalpy, while in the case of netropsin the change in enthalpy is negative. Moreover, the contribution of entropy to the formation of the complexes is more pronounced in the case of Hoechst 33258.

  7. An instrument for automated purification of nucleic acids from contaminated forensic samples

    PubMed Central

    Broemeling, David J; Pel, Joel; Gunn, Dylan C; Mai, Laura; Thompson, Jason D; Poon, Hiron; Marziali, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Forensic crime scene sample analysis, by its nature, often deals with samples in which there are low amounts of nucleic acids, on substrates that often lead to inhibition of subsequent enzymatic reactions such as PCR amplification for STR profiling. Common substrates include denim from blue jeans, which yields indigo dye as a PCR inhibitor, and soil, which yields humic substances as inhibitors. These inhibitors frequently co-extract with nucleic acids in standard column or bead-based preps, leading to frequent failure of STR profiling. We present a novel instrument for DNA purification of forensic samples that is capable of highly effective concentration of nucleic acids from soil particulates, fabric, and other complex samples including solid components. The novel concentration process, known as SCODA, is inherently selective for long charged polymers such as DNA, and therefore is able to effectively reject known contaminants. We present an automated sample preparation instrument based on this process, and preliminary results based on mock forensic samples. PMID:18438455

  8. Magneto-mechanical detection of nucleic acids and telomerase activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Yossi; Patolsky, Fernando; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Willner, Itamar

    2004-02-04

    The ultra-sensitive magneto-mechanical detection of DNA, single-base-mismatches in nucleic acids, and the assay of telomerase activity are accomplished by monitoring the magnetically induced deflection of a cantilever functionalized with magnetic beads associated with the biosensing interface. The analyzed M13phi DNA hybridized with the nucleic acid-functionalized magnetic beads is replicated in the presence of dNTPs that include biotin-labeled dUTP. The resulting beads are attached to an avidin-coated cantilever, and the modified cantilever is deflected by an external magnetic field. Similarly, telomerization of nucleic acid-modified magnetic beads in the presence of dNTPs, biotin-labeled dUTP, and telomerase from cancer cell extracts and the subsequent association of the magnetic beads to the cantilever surface results in the lever deflection by an external magnetic field. M13phi DNA is sensed with a sensitivity limit of 7.1 x 10(-20) M by the magneto-mechanical detection method.

  9. A Large-Scale Assessment of Nucleic Acids Binding Site Prediction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Computational prediction of nucleic acid binding sites in proteins are necessary to disentangle functional mechanisms in most biological processes and to explore the binding mechanisms. Several strategies have been proposed, but the state-of-the-art approaches display a great diversity in i) the definition of nucleic acid binding sites; ii) the training and test datasets; iii) the algorithmic methods for the prediction strategies; iv) the performance measures and v) the distribution and availability of the prediction programs. Here we report a large-scale assessment of 19 web servers and 3 stand-alone programs on 41 datasets including more than 5000 proteins derived from 3D structures of protein-nucleic acid complexes. Well-defined binary assessment criteria (specificity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy…) are applied. We found that i) the tools have been greatly improved over the years; ii) some of the approaches suffer from theoretical defects and there is still room for sorting out the essential mechanisms of binding; iii) RNA binding and DNA binding appear to follow similar driving forces and iv) dataset bias may exist in some methods. PMID:26681179

  10. The origin and early evolution of nucleic acid polymerases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Cappello, R.; Valverde, V.; Llaca, V.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that vestiges of the ancestral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involved in the replication of RNA genomes of Archean cells are present in the eubacterial RNA-polymerase beta-prime subunit and its homologues is discussed. It is shown that, in the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from three cellular lineages, a very conserved sequence of eight amino acids, also found in a small RNA-binding site previously described for the E. coli polynucleotide phosphorylase and the S1 ribosomal protein, is present. The optimal conditions for the replicase activity of the avian-myeloblastosis-virus reverse transcriptase are presented. The evolutionary significance of the in vitro modifications of substrate and template specificities of RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases is discussed.

  11. Solution Preserves Nucleic Acids in Body-Fluid Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    A solution has been formulated to preserve deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) in specimens of blood, saliva, and other bodily fluids. Specimens of this type are collected for diagnostic molecular pathology, which is becoming the method of choice for diagnosis of many diseases. The solution makes it possible to store such specimens at room temperature, without risk of decomposition, for subsequent analysis in a laboratory that could be remote from the sampling location. Thus, the solution could be a means to bring the benefits of diagnostic molecular pathology to geographic regions where refrigeration equipment and diagnostic laboratories are not available. The table lists the ingredients of the solution. The functions of the ingredients are the following: EDTA chelates divalent cations that are necessary cofactors for nuclease activity. In so doing, it functionally removes these cations and thereby retards the action of nucleases. EDTA also stabilizes the DNA helix. Tris serves as a buffering agent, which is needed because minor contaminants in an unbuffered solution can exert pronounced effects on pH and thereby cause spontaneous degradation of DNA. SDS is an ionic detergent that inhibits ribonuclease activity. SDS has been used in some lysis buffers and as a storage buffer for RNA after purification. The use of the solution is straightforward. For example, a sample of saliva is collected by placing a cotton roll around in the subject's mouth until it becomes saturated, then the cotton is placed in a collection tube. Next, 1.5 mL of the solution are injected directly into the cotton and the tube is capped for storage at room temperature. The effectiveness of the solution has been demonstrated in tests on specimens of saliva containing herpes simplex virus. In the tests, the viral DNA, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction, was detected even after storage for 120 days.

  12. On-Chip, Amplification-Free Quantification of Nucleic Acid for Point-of-Care Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Tony Minghung

    This dissertation demonstrates three physical device concepts to overcome limitations in point-of-care quantification of nucleic acids. Enabling sensitive, high throughput nucleic acid quantification on a chip, outside of hospital and centralized laboratory setting, is crucial for improving pathogen detection and cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Among existing platforms, microarray have the advantages of being amplification free, low instrument cost, and high throughput, but are generally less sensitive compared to sequencing and PCR assays. To bridge this performance gap, this dissertation presents theoretical and experimental progress to develop a platform nucleic acid quantification technology that is drastically more sensitive than current microarrays while compatible with microarray architecture. The first device concept explores on-chip nucleic acid enrichment by natural evaporation of nucleic acid solution droplet. Using a micro-patterned super-hydrophobic black silicon array device, evaporative enrichment is coupled with nano-liter droplet self-assembly workflow to produce a 50 aM concentration sensitivity, 6 orders of dynamic range, and rapid hybridization time at under 5 minutes. The second device concept focuses on improving target copy number sensitivity, instead of concentration sensitivity. A comprehensive microarray physical model taking into account of molecular transport, electrostatic intermolecular interactions, and reaction kinetics is considered to guide device optimization. Device pattern size and target copy number are optimized based on model prediction to achieve maximal hybridization efficiency. At a 100-mum pattern size, a quantum leap in detection limit of 570 copies is achieved using black silicon array device with self-assembled pico-liter droplet workflow. Despite its merits, evaporative enrichment on black silicon device suffers from coffee-ring effect at 100-mum pattern size, and thus not compatible with clinical patient samples. The

  13. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  14. A multi-model approach to nucleic acid-based drug development.

    PubMed

    Gautherot, Isabelle; Sodoyer, Regís

    2004-01-01

    With the advent of functional genomics and the shift of interest towards sequence-based therapeutics, the past decades have witnessed intense research efforts on nucleic acid-mediated gene regulation technologies. Today, RNA interference is emerging as a groundbreaking discovery, holding promise for development of genetic modulators of unprecedented potency. Twenty-five years after the discovery of antisense RNA and ribozymes, gene control therapeutics are still facing developmental difficulties, with only one US FDA-approved antisense drug currently available in the clinic. Limited predictability of target site selection models is recognized as one major stumbling block that is shared by all of the so-called complementary technologies, slowing the progress towards a commercial product. Currently employed in vitro systems for target site selection include RNAse H-based mapping, antisense oligonucleotide microarrays, and functional screening approaches using libraries of catalysts with randomized target-binding arms to identify optimal ribozyme/DNAzyme cleavage sites. Individually, each strategy has its drawbacks from a drug development perspective. Utilization of message-modulating sequences as therapeutic agents requires that their action on a given target transcript meets criteria of potency and selectivity in the natural physiological environment. In addition to sequence-dependent characteristics, other factors will influence annealing reactions and duplex stability, as well as nucleic acid-mediated catalysis. Parallel consideration of physiological selection systems thus appears essential for screening for nucleic acid compounds proposed for therapeutic applications. Cellular message-targeting studies face issues relating to efficient nucleic acid delivery and appropriate analysis of response. For reliability and simplicity, prokaryotic systems can provide a rapid and cost-effective means of studying message targeting under pseudo-cellular conditions, but such

  15. A full-coordinate model of the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its interaction with a nucleic acid substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlik, R. F.; Meyer, D. J.; Shibata, M.; Roskwitalski, R.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a full-coordinate model of residues 1-319 of the polymerase domain of HIV-I reverse transcriptase. This model was constructed from the x-ray crystallographic structure of Jacobo-Molina et al. (Jacobo-Molina et al., P.N.A.S. USA 90, 6320-6324 (1993)) which is currently available to the degree of C-coordinates. The backbone and side-chain atoms were constructed using the MAXSPROUT suite of programs (L. Holm and C. Sander, J. Mol. Biol. 218, 183-194 (1991)) and refined through molecular modeling. A seven base pair A-form dsDNA was positioned in the nucleic acid binding cleft to represent the template-primer complex. The orientation of the template-primer complex in the nucleic acid binding cleft was guided by the positions of phosphorus atoms in the crystal structure.

  16. A novel automated device for rapid nucleic acid extraction utilizing a zigzag motion of magnetic silica beads.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Uehara, Masayuki; Honda, Takayuki; Saito, Yasunori

    2016-02-04

    We report a novel automated device for nucleic acid extraction, which consists of a mechanical control system and a disposable cassette. The cassette is composed of a bottle, a capillary tube, and a chamber. After sample injection in the bottle, the sample is lysed, and nucleic acids are adsorbed on the surface of magnetic silica beads. These magnetic beads are transported and are vibrated through the washing reagents in the capillary tube under the control of the mechanical control system, and thus, the nucleic acid is purified without centrifugation. The purified nucleic acid is automatically extracted in 3 min for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The nucleic acid extraction is dependent on the transport speed and the vibration frequency of the magnetic beads, and optimizing these two parameters provided better PCR efficiency than the conventional manual procedure. There was no difference between the detection limits of our novel device and that of the conventional manual procedure. We have already developed the droplet-PCR machine, which can amplify and detect specific nucleic acids rapidly and automatically. Connecting the droplet-PCR machine to our novel automated extraction device enables PCR analysis within 15 min, and this system can be made available as a point-of-care testing in clinics as well as general hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Magnetic Nanoparticle Based Nucleic Acid Isolation and Purification Instrument for DNA Extraction of Escherichia Coli O157: H7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yahui; Lin, Jianhan; Jiang, Qin; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shengjun; Li, Li

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument using Escherichia coli O157:H7 as the model. The instrument was developed with magnetic nanoparticles for efficiently capturing nucleic acids and an intelligent mechanical unit for automatically performing the whole nucleic acid extraction process. A commercial DNA extraction kit from Huier Nano Company was used as reference. Nucleic acids in 1 ml of E. coli O157: H7 at a concentration of 5 x 10(8) CFU/mL were extracted by using this instrument and the kit in parallel and then detected by an ultraviolet spectrophotometer to obtain A260 values and A260/A280 values for the determination of the extracted DNA's quantity and purity, respectively. The A260 values for the instrument and the kit were 0.78 and 0.61, respectively, and the A260/A280 values were 1.98 and 1.93. The coefficient of variations of these parallel tests ranged from 10.5% to 16.7%. The results indicated that this nucleic acid isolation and purification instrument could extract a comparable level of nucleic acid within 50 min compared to the commercial DNA extraction kit.

  18. A Theoretical Mechanism of Szilard Engine Function in Nucleic Acids and the Implications for Quantum Coherence in Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Mihelic, F.

    2010-12-22

    Nucleic acids theoretically possess a Szilard engine function that can convert the energy associated with the Shannon entropy of molecules for which they have coded recognition, into the useful work of geometric reconfiguration of the nucleic acid molecule. This function is logically reversible because its mechanism is literally and physically constructed out of the information necessary to reduce the Shannon entropy of such molecules, which means that this information exists on both sides of the theoretical engine, and because information is retained in the geometric degrees of freedom of the nucleic acid molecule, a quantum gate is formed through whichmore » multi-state nucleic acid qubits can interact. Entangled biophotons emitted as a consequence of symmetry breaking nucleic acid Szilard engine (NASE) function can be used to coordinate relative positioning of different nucleic acid locations, both within and between cells, thus providing the potential for quantum coherence of an entire biological system. Theoretical implications of understanding biological systems as such 'quantum adaptive systems' include the potential for multi-agent based quantum computing, and a better understanding of systemic pathologies such as cancer, as being related to a loss of systemic quantum coherence.« less

  19. A Theoretical Mechanism of Szilard Engine Function in Nucleic Acids and the Implications for Quantum Coherence in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthew Mihelic, F.

    2010-12-01

    Nucleic acids theoretically possess a Szilard engine function that can convert the energy associated with the Shannon entropy of molecules for which they have coded recognition, into the useful work of geometric reconfiguration of the nucleic acid molecule. This function is logically reversible because its mechanism is literally and physically constructed out of the information necessary to reduce the Shannon entropy of such molecules, which means that this information exists on both sides of the theoretical engine, and because information is retained in the geometric degrees of freedom of the nucleic acid molecule, a quantum gate is formed through which multi-state nucleic acid qubits can interact. Entangled biophotons emitted as a consequence of symmetry breaking nucleic acid Szilard engine (NASE) function can be used to coordinate relative positioning of different nucleic acid locations, both within and between cells, thus providing the potential for quantum coherence of an entire biological system. Theoretical implications of understanding biological systems as such "quantum adaptive systems" include the potential for multi-agent based quantum computing, and a better understanding of systemic pathologies such as cancer, as being related to a loss of systemic quantum coherence.

  20. Nucleic and Amino Acid Sequences Support Structure-Based Viral Classification

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert M.; Ravantti, Janne J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral capsids ensure viral genome integrity by protecting the enclosed nucleic acids. Interactions between the genome and capsid and between individual capsid proteins (i.e., capsid architecture) are intimate and are expected to be characterized by strong evolutionary conservation. For this reason, a capsid structure-based viral classification has been proposed as a way to bring order to the viral universe. The seeming lack of sufficient sequence similarity to reproduce this classification has made it difficult to reject structural convergence as the basis for the classification. We reinvestigate whether the structure-based classification for viral coat proteins making icosahedral virus capsids is in fact supported by previously undetected sequence similarity. Since codon choices can influence nascent protein folding cotranslationally, we searched for both amino acid and nucleotide sequence similarity. To demonstrate the sensitivity of the approach, we identify a candidate gene for the pandoravirus capsid protein. We show that the structure-based classification is strongly supported by amino acid and also nucleotide sequence similarities, suggesting that the similarities are due to common descent. The correspondence between structure-based and sequence-based analyses of the same proteins shown here allow them to be used in future analyses of the relationship between linear sequence information and macromolecular function, as well as between linear sequence and protein folds. IMPORTANCE Viral capsids protect nucleic acid genomes, which in turn encode capsid proteins. This tight coupling of protein shell and nucleic acids, together with strong functional constraints on capsid protein folding and architecture, leads to the hypothesis that capsid protein-coding nucleotide sequences may retain signatures of ancient viral evolution. We have been able to show that this is indeed the case, using the major capsid proteins of viruses forming icosahedral capsids