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Sample records for a-helix peptide fragment

  1. A Helix-Stabilizing Linker Improves Subcutaneous Bioavailability of a Helical Peptide Independent of Linker Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Stabilized peptides address several limitations to peptide-based imaging agents and therapeutics such as poor stability and low affinity due to conformational flexibility. There is also active research in developing these compounds for intracellular drug targeting, and significant efforts have been invested to determine the effects of helix stabilization on intracellular delivery. However, much less is known about the impact on other pharmacokinetic parameters such as plasma clearance and bioavailability. We investigated the effect of different fluorescent helix-stabilizing linkers with varying lipophilicity on subcutaneous (SC) bioavailability using the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor ligand exendin as a model system. The stabilized peptides showed significantly higher protease resistance and increased bioavailability independent of linker hydrophilicity, and all subcutaneously delivered conjugates were able to successfully target the islets of Langerhans with high specificity. The lipophilic peptide variants had slower absorption and plasma clearance than their respective hydrophilic conjugates, and the absolute bioavailability was also lower likely due to the longer residence times in the skin. The ease and efficiency of double-click helix stabilization chemistries is a useful tool for increasing the bioavailability of peptide therapeutics, many of which suffer from rapid in vivo protease degradation. Helix stabilization using linkers of varying lipophilicity can further control SC absorption and clearance rates to customize plasma pharmacokinetics. PMID:27327034

  2. Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 1C NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Database (Web, free access)   The purpose of the library is to provide peptide reference data for laboratories employing mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods for protein analysis. Mass spectral libraries identify these compounds in a more sensitive and robust manner than alternative methods. These databases are freely available for testing and development of new applications.

  3. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  5. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing proline. The proline effect.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alex G; Young, Alex B

    2005-09-01

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation reactions of a variety of deprotonated peptides containing proline have been studied in detail using MS(2) and MS(3) experiments, deuterium labelling and accurate mass measurements when necessary. The [M--H--CO(2)](-) (a(2)) ion derived from H-Pro-Xxx-OH dipeptides shows an unusual fragmentation involving loss of C(2)H(4); this fragmentation reaction is not observed for larger peptides. The primary fragmentation reactions of deprotonated tripeptides with an N-terminal proline are formation of a(3) and y(1) ions. When proline is in the central position of tripeptides, a(3), y(2) and y(1) ions are the primary fragmentation products of [M--H](-), while when the proline is in the C-terminal position, a(3)and y(1) ions are the major primary products. In the latter case, the a(3) ion fragments primarily to the ''b(2) ion; further evidence is presented that the ''b(2) ions have a deprotonated oxazolone structure. Larger deprotonated peptides having at least two amino acid residues N-terminal to proline show a distinct preference for cleavage of the amide bond N-terminal to proline to form, mainly, the appropriate y ion. This proline effect is compared and contrasted with the similar proline effect observed in the fragmentation of protonated peptides containing proline.

  6. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; ...

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  7. NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Databass

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Databass (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  8. Pronase E-Based Generation of Fluorescent Peptide Fragments: Tracking Intracellular Peptide Fate in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Emilie R; Dobes, Nicholas C; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2015-08-04

    The ability to track intracellular peptide proteolysis at the single cell level is of growing interest, particularly as short peptide sequences continue to play important roles as biosensors, therapeutics, and endogenous participants in antigen processing and intracellular signaling. We describe a rapid and inexpensive methodology to generate fluorescent peptide fragments from a parent sequence with diverse chemical properties, including aliphatic, nonpolar, basic, acidic, and non-native amino acids. Four peptide sequences with existing biochemical applications were fragmented using incubation with Pronase E and/or formic acid, and in each case a complete set of fluorescent fragments was generated for use as proteolysis standards in chemical cytometry. Fragment formation and identity was monitored with capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to confirm the presence of all sequences and yield fragmentation profiles across Pronase E concentrations which can readily be used by others. As a pilot study, Pronase E-generated standards from an Abl kinase sensor and an ovalbumin antigenic peptide were then employed to identify proteolysis products arising from the metabolism of these sequences in single cells. The Abl kinase sensor fragmented at 4.2 ± 4.8 zmol μM(-1) s(-1) and the majority of cells possessed similar fragment identities. In contrast, an ovalbumin epitope peptide was degraded at 8.9 ± 0.1 zmol μM(-1) s(-1), but with differential fragment formation between individual cells. Overall, Pronase E-generated peptide standards were a rapid and efficient method to identify proteolysis products from cells.

  9. In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic Peptides in Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.

    2013-02-01

    Partially tryptic peptides are often identified in shotgun proteomics using trypsin as the proteolytic enzyme; however, it has been controversial regarding the sources of such partially tryptic peptides. Herein we investigate the impact of in-source fragmentation on shotgun proteomics using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a peptide retain the same elution time with its parent fully tryptic peptide, the partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation can be distinguished from the other partially tryptic peptides by plotting the observed retention times against themore » computationally predicted retention times. Most partially tryptic in-source fragmentation artifacts were misaligned from the linear distribution of fully tryptic peptides. The impact of in-source fragmentation on peptide identifications was clearly significant in a less complex sample such as a standard protein digest, where ~60 % of unique peptides were observed as partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation. In mouse brain or mouse plasma samples, in-source fragmentation contributed to 1-3 % of all identified peptides. The other major source of partially tryptic peptides in complex biological samples is presumably proteolytic processing by endogenous proteases in the samples. By filtering out the in-source fragmentation artifacts from the identified partially tryptic or non-tryptic peptides, it is possible to directly survey in-vivo proteolytic processing in biological samples such as blood plasma.« less

  10. Anticancer properties of peptide fragments of hair proteins.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, Sergiusz; Matalinska, Joanna; Kurzepa, Katarzyna; Bochynska, Marta; Biernacka, Marzena; Samluk, Anna; Dudek, Dorota; Skurzak, Henryk; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of hair and fur covering mammalian skin is to provide mechanical and thermal protection for the body. The proteins that constitute hair are extremely resistant to degradation by environmental factors. However, even durable materials can be slowly broken down by mechanical stresses, biodegradation mediated by endogenous enzymes in the skin or host microbes. We hypothesised that the biodegradation products of hair may possess bioprotective properties, which supplement their physical protective properties. Although evolutionary processes have led to a reduction in the amount of hair on the human body, it is possible that the bioprotective properties of hair biodegradation products have persisted. The human skin is exposed to various environmental carcinogenic factors. Therefore, we hypothesised that the potential bioprotective mechanisms of hair degradation products affect melanoma growth. We used pepsin to partially digest hair enzymatically, and this process produced a water-soluble lysate containing a mixture of peptides, including fragments of keratin and keratin-associated proteins. We found out that the mixtures of soluble peptides obtained from human hair inhibited the proliferation of human melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the hair-derived peptide mixtures also inhibited the proliferation of B lymphoma cells and urinary bladder cancer cells. Normal human cells varied in their susceptibility to the effects of the lysate; the hair-derived peptide mixtures modulated the proliferation of normal human fibroblasts but did not inhibit the proliferation of human mesenchymal cells derived from umbilical cord stromal cells. These results suggest that hair-derived peptides may represent a new class of anti-proliferative factors derived from basically structural proteins. Identification of active regulatory compounds and recognition of the mechanism of their action might pave the way to elaboration of new anticancer drugs.

  11. The impact of amidination on peptide fragmentation and identification in shotgun proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sujun; Dabir, Aditi; Misal, Santosh A.; Tang, Haixu; Radivojac, Predrag; Reilly, James P.

    2018-01-01

    Peptide amidination labeling using S-methyl thioacetimidate (SMTA) is investigated in an attempt to increase the number and types of peptides that can be detected in a bottom-up proteomics experiment. This derivatization method affects the basicity of lysine residues, and is shown here to significantly impact the idiosyncracies of peptide fragmentation and peptide detectability. The unique and highly reproducible fragmentation properties of SMTA-labeled peptides, such as the strong propensity for forming b1 fragment ions, can be further exploited to modify the scoring of peptide-spectrum pairs and improve peptide identification. To this end, we have developed a supervised post-processing algorithm to exploit these characteristics of peptides labeled by SMTA. Our experiments show that, although the overall number of identifications are similar, the SMTA modification enabled the detection of 16-26% peptides not previously observed in comparable CID/HCD tandem mass spectrometry experiments without SMTA labeling. PMID:27615690

  12. Iterative Nonproteinogenic Residue Incorporation Yields α/β-Peptides with a Helix-Loop-Helix Tertiary Structure and High Affinity for VEGF.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Gellman, Samuel H

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition of specific protein-protein interactions is attractive for a range of therapeutic applications, but the large and irregularly shaped contact surfaces involved in many such interactions make it challenging to design synthetic antagonists. Here, we describe the development of backbone-modified peptides containing both α- and β-amino acid residues (α/β-peptides) that target the receptor-binding surface of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is based on the Z-domain, which adopts a three-helix bundle tertiary structure. We show how a two-helix "mini-Z-domain" can be modified to contain β and other nonproteinogenic residues while retaining the target-binding epitope by using iterative unnatural residue incorporation. The resulting α/β-peptides are less susceptible to proteolysis than is their parent α-peptide, and some of these α/β-peptides match the full-length Z-domain in terms of affinity for receptor-recognition surfaces on the VEGF homodimer. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Oxidized Prenyl Peptides by CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawal, Ruchika P.; Shahinuzzaman, A. D. A.; Chowdhury, Saiful M.

    2017-04-01

    Farnesylation and geranylgeranylation are the two types of prenyl modification of proteins. Prenylated peptides are highly hydrophobic and their abundances in biological samples are low. In this report, we studied the oxidized prenylated peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and identified them by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry. Modified prenyl peptides were generated utilizing strong and low strength oxidizing agents to selectively oxidize and epoxidize cysteine sulfur and prenyl side chain. We selected three peptides with prenyl motifs and synthesized their prenylated versions. The detailed characteristic fragmentations of oxidized and epoxidized farnesylated and geranylgeranylated peptides were studied side by side with two popular fragmentation techniques. CID and ETD mass spectrometry clearly distinguished the modified version of these peptides. ETD mass spectrometry provided sequence information of the highly labile modified prenyl peptides and showed different characteristic fragmentations compared with CID. A detailed fragmentation of modified geranylgeranylated peptides was compared by CID and ETD mass spectrometry for the first time.

  14. Synthesis and antiviral activity of PB1 component of the influenza A RNA polymerase peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Matusevich, O V; Egorov, V V; Gluzdikov, I A; Titov, M I; Zarubaev, V V; Shtro, A A; Slita, A V; Dukov, M I; Shurygina, A-P S; Smirnova, T D; Kudryavtsev, I V; Vasin, A V; Kiselev, O I

    2015-01-01

    This study is devoted to the antiviral activity of peptide fragments from the PB1 protein - a component of the influenza A RNA polymerase. The antiviral activity of the peptides synthesized was studied in MDCK cell cultures against the pandemic influenza strain A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) pdm09. We found that peptide fragments 6-13, 6-14, 26-30, 395-400, and 531-540 of the PB1 protein were capable of suppressing viral replication in cell culture. Terminal modifications i.e. N-acetylation and C-amidation increased the antiviral properties of the peptides significantly. Peptide PB1 (6-14) with both termini modified showed maximum antiviral activity, its inhibitory activity manifesting itself during the early stages of viral replication. It was also shown that the fluorescent-labeled analog of this peptide was able to penetrate into the cell. The broad range of virus-inhibiting activity of PB1 (6-14) peptide was confirmed using a panel of influenza A viruses of H1, H3 and H5 subtypes including those resistant to oseltamivir, the leading drug in anti-influenza therapy. Thus, short peptide fragments of the PB1 protein could serve as leads for future development of influenza prevention and/or treatment agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of anionic peptide fragments in 1N4R human tau protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Mohammad Ali Nasiri; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Khodarahmi, Reza; Khodadadi, Sirus; Afrasiabi, Ali; Karima, Oveis; Mokhtari, Farzad; Hoveizi, Elham

    2014-06-01

    Cellular protein degradation systems are necessary to avoid the accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins. Deficiency in these systems might cause to partial degradation of misfolded proteins and generation of amyloidogenic fragments. Protein misfolding is believed to be the primary cause of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we investigate effect of two anionic peptide fragments including, an acidic fragment of human Aβ (Aβ1-11) and a phosphorylated fragment of β-Casein (Tetraphosphopeptide), on tau protein aggregation. According to our results, these peptide fragments, induced tau fibrillization in vitro. In sum, we suggest that structural and conformational characters of inducer are as important as charge distribution on anionic inducer molecules however more experiments would be need to exactly confirm this suggestion.

  16. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohammad A; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system.

  17. Identification of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Sequences Important for Induction of Lymphocyte Proliferation by Using Synthetic Peptide Fragments of the Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Sequences STO=T Important for induction of lymphocyte proliferatio WPP8, WPPM,by using synthetic peptide fragments of the...Lymphocyte Proliferation by Using Synthetic Peptide Fragments of the Toxin MARTI JETT.I* ROGER NEILL,’ CHRISTOPHER WELCH,’ THOMAS BOYLE,’ EDWARD BERNTON...fragment of SEC (41) and for an amino- ment of endotoxic shock (42), induction of immunosuppres- terminal synthetic peptide of SEA (36). Another study

  18. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Andrew J; Shelley, Jacob T; Walton, Courtney L; Williams, Kelsey L; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-10-01

    Modern "-omics" ( e.g. , proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc. ) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents ( e.g. , 70 mA), electrospray-like spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.

  19. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Walton, Courtney L.

    2016-06-27

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here in this paper, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-likemore » spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.« less

  20. Fragmentation reactions of protonated peptides containing glutamine or glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alex G

    2003-02-01

    A variety of protonated dipeptides and tripeptides containing glutamic acid or glutamine were prepared by electrospray ionization or by fast atom bombardment ionization and their fragmentation pathways elucidated using metastable ion studies, energy-resolved mass spectrometry and triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(3)) experiments. Additional mechanistic information was obtained by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium. Protonated H-Gln-Gly-OH fragments by loss of NH(3) and loss of H(2)O in metastable ion fragmentation; under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions loss of H-Gly-OH + CO from the [MH - NH(3)](+) ion forms the base peak C(4)H(6)NO(+) (m/z 84). Protonated dipeptides with an alpha-linkage, H-Glu-Xxx-OH, are characterized by elimination of H(2)O and by elimination of H-Xxx-OH plus CO to form the glutamic acid immonium ion of m/z 102. By contrast, protonated dipeptides with a gamma-linkage, H-Glu(Xxx-OH)-OH, do not show elimination of H(2)O or formation of m/z 102 but rather show elimination of NH(3), particularly in metastable ion fragmentation, and elimination of H-Xxx-OH to form m/z 130. Both the alpha- and gamma-dipeptides show formation of [H-Xxx-OH]H(+), with this reaction channel increasing in importance as the proton affinity (PA) of H-Xxx-OH increases. The characteristic loss of H(2)O and formation of m/z 102 are observed for the protonated alpha-tripeptide H-Glu-Gly-Phe-OH whereas the protonated gamma-tripeptide H-Glu(Gly-Gly-OH)-OH shows loss of NH(3) and formation of m/z 130 as observed for dipeptides with the gamma-linkage. Both tripeptides show abundant formation of the y(2)'' ion under CID conditions, presumably because a stable anhydride neutral structure can be formed. Under metastable ion conditions protonated dipeptides of structure H-Xxx-Glu-OH show abundant elimination of H(2)O whereas those of structure H-Xxx-Gln-OH show abundant elimination of NH(3). The importance of these reaction channels is much reduced under CID

  1. Gas-phase Structure and Fragmentation Pathways of Singly Protonated Peptides with N-terminal Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Csonka, István P.; Suhai, Sándor; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Paizs, Béla

    2010-01-01

    The gas-phase structures and fragmentation pathways of the singly protonated peptide arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) are investigated by means of collision-induced-dissociation (CID) and detailed molecular mechanics and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that despite the ionizing proton being strongly sequestered at the guanidine group, protonated RGD can easily be fragmented on charge directed fragmentation pathways. This is due to facile mobilization of the C-terminal or aspartic acid COOH protons thereby generating salt-bridge (SB) stabilized structures. These SB intermediates can directly fragment to generate b2 ions or facilely rearrange to form anhydrides from which both b2 and b2+H2O fragments can be formed. The salt-bridge stabilized and anhydride transition structures (TSs) necessary to form b2 and b2+H2O are much lower in energy than their traditional charge solvated counterparts. These mechanisms provide compelling evidence of the role of SB and anhydride structures in protonated peptide fragmentation which complements and supports our recent findings for tryptic systems (Bythell, B. J.; Suhai, S.; Somogyi, A.; Paizs, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 14057–14065.). In addition to these findings we also report on the mechanisms for the formation of the b1 ion, neutral loss (H2O, NH3, guanidine) fragment ions and the d3 ion. PMID:20973555

  2. Fragmentation behavior of metal-coded affinity tag (MeCAT)-labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Stefan; Beck, Sebastian; Ahrends, Robert; Scheler, Christian; Linscheid, Michael W

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative proteomics has become an important method in modern life sciences. Besides protein identification, the aspect of quantification is of rapidly increasing relevance. MeCAT (metal-coded affinity tagging) is able to provide a tool that enables relative as well as absolute quantification. For structural elucidation, knowledge on the fragmentation behavior of MeCAT-modified peptides is highly beneficial. Therefore, the fragmentation behavior of MeCAT-labeled peptides under collision induced dissociation (CID), electron capture dissociation (ECD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) conditions was studied. Application of CID and ECD allowed a straight-forward sequence elucidation of MeCAT-labeled peptides. During IRMPD all MeCAT-labeled peptides form characteristic fragments resulting from the fragmentational cleavage of the tagging group, thus, providing a screening method for the identification of labeled compounds. Furthermore, occurring side reactions during the labeling process were investigated. By-products were structurally characterized and reaction conditions were optimized in order to prevent the formation of these. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Unusual fragmentation of β-linked peptides by ExD tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sargaeva, Nadezda P.; Lin, Cheng; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Ion-electron reaction based fragmentation methods (ExD) in tandem mass spectrometry (MS), such as Electron Capture Dissociation (ECD) and Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) represent a powerful tool for biological analysis ExD methods have been used to differentiate the presence of the isoaspartate (isoAsp) from the aspartate (Asp) in peptides and proteins. IsoAsp is a β3-type amino acid that has an additional methylene group in the backbone, forming a Cα-Cβ bond within the polypeptide chain. Cleavage of this bond provides specific fragments that allow differentiation of the isomers. The presence of a Cα-Cβ bond within the backbone is unique to β-amino acids, suggesting a similar application of ExD toward the analysis of peptides containing other β-type amino acids. In the current study, ECD and ETD analysis of several β-amino acid containing peptides was performed. It was found that N-Cβ and Cα-Cβ bond cleavages were rare, providing few c and z• type fragments, which was attributed to the instability of the Cβ radical. Instead, the electron capture resulted primarily in the formation of a• and y fragments, representing an alternative fragmentation pathway, likely initiated by the electron capture at a backbone amide nitrogen protonation site within the beta amino acid residues. PMID:21472566

  4. Fidelity of the DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Scaffolding of Peptide Fragments on Nucleic Acid Polymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Hili, Ryan

    2017-02-15

    We describe the development and analysis of the T4 DNA ligase-catalyzed DNA templated polymerization of pentanucleotides modified with peptide fragments toward the generation of ssDNA-scaffolded peptides. A high-throughput duplex DNA sequencing method was developed to facilitate the determination of fidelity for various codon sets and library sizes used during the polymerization process. With this process, we identified several codon sets that enable the efficient and sequence-specific incorporation of peptide fragments along a ssDNA template at fidelities up to 99% and with low sequence bias. These findings mark a significant advance in generating evolvable biomimetic polymers and should find ready application to the in vitro selection of molecular recognition.

  5. Peptide fragments induce a more rapid immune response than intact proteins in earthworms.

    PubMed

    Hanusová, R; Tucková, L; Halada, P; Bezouska, K; Bilej, M

    1999-01-01

    The effect of in vivo proteolytic processing of protein antigen was studied in Eisenia foetida earthworms. Parenteral administration of the protein antigen induces elevated levels of an antigen-binding protein (ABP) which recognizes the protein used for stimulation. When the protein antigen is administered simultaneously with nontoxic serine proteinase inhibitor, ABP levels remain close to background. On the other hand, the in vivo adaptive response of earthworms to peptide fragments obtained by coelomic fluid digestion of the foreign antigen occurs even in the presence of proteinase inhibitor and, moreover, is significantly faster as compared to the response to intact antigen. These findings confirm the role of proteolytic processing in earthworms. MALDI mass spectrometric analysis of the fragments after coelomic fluid digestion has revealed the presence of the peptide fragments with molecular weights in the mass range 700-1100 Da.

  6. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V., E-mail: aleksandra.zabuga@epfl.ch; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    2014-10-21

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels inmore » the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.« less

  7. Identification of pro-opiomelanocortin and secretion of its peptide fragments in bovine adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Tennov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.D.; Kizim, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation to show that biosynthesis of POMC, its proteolytic processing, an secretion of the peptide products of that processing take place in the bovine adrenals. Rabbit antisera against endorphins were obtained and used for radioimmunoassay of peptides. I 125-labeled peptides were obtained by the chloramine method and purified from free I 125 on Sephadex G-10 (0.7 x 5 cm, centrifugation for 10 min at 1500 g). To detect secretion of peptide fragments of POMC in the adrenals experiments were undertaken to determine the beta-endorphin content in perfusates obtained during retrograde perfusion of themore » bovine adrenals. It was found that immunoreactive compounds, indistinguishable in their immunochemical properties from beta-endorphin, are present in the perfusates, just as in the tissue extracts.« less

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB}more » infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.« less

  9. Negative Ion Fragmentation of Cysteic Acid Containing Peptides: Cysteic Acid as a Fixed Negative Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brad J.; Barlow, Christopher K.; Kmiec, Kevin L.; Russell, William K.; Russell, David H.

    2011-09-01

    We present here a study of the collision induced dissociation (CID) of deprotonated cysteic acid containing peptides produced by MALDI. The effect of cysteic acid (Cox) position is interrogated by considering the positional isomers, CoxLVINVLSQG, LVINVLSQGCox, and LVINVCoxLSQG. Although considerable variation between the CID spectra is observed, the mechanistic picture that emerges involves charge retention at the deprotonated cysteic acid side chain. Fragmentation occurs in the proximity of the cysteic acid group by charge directed mechanisms as well as remote from this group to form ions, which may be rationalized by charge remote mechanisms. Additionally, the formation of the SO{3/-•} ion is observed in all cases. Fragmentation of CoxLVINVLSQCox provides both N- and C-terminal, y and b ions, respectively indicating that the negative charge may be retained at either of the cysteic acids; however, there is some evidence that charge retention at the C-terminal cysteic acid may be preferred. Fragmentation of tryptic type peptides containing a C-terminal arginine or lysine residue is considered through comparison of three peptides CoxLVINKLSQG, CoxLVINVLSQK, and CoxLVINVLSQR. Lastly, we rationalize the formation of b n-1 + H2O and a n-1 ions through a mechanism involving rearrangement of the C-terminal residue to form a mixed anhydride intermediate.

  10. Proton Mobility in b2 Ion Formation and Fragmentation Reactions of Histidine-Containing Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Carissa R.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Harrison, Alex G.; Bythell, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed energy-resolved study of the fragmentation reactions of protonated histidine-containing peptides and their b2 ions has been undertaken. Density functional theory calculations were utilized to predict how the fragmentation reactions occur so that we might discern why the mass spectra demonstrated particular energy dependencies. We compare our results to the current literature and to synthetic b2 ion standards. We show that the position of the His residue does affect the identity of the subsequent b2 ion (diketopiperazine versus oxazolone versus lactam) and that energy-resolved CID can distinguish these isomeric products based on their fragmentation energetics. The histidine side chain facilitates every major transformation except trans-cis isomerization of the first amide bond, a necessary prerequisite to diketopiperazine b2 ion formation. Despite this lack of catalyzation, trans-cis isomerization is predicted to be facile. Concomitantly, the subsequent amide bond cleavage reaction is rate-limiting.

  11. A short synthetic peptide fragment of human C2ORF40 has therapeutic potential in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyang; Zhang, Pengju; Jiang, Anli; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2017-06-27

    C2ORF40 encodes a secreted protein which is cleaved to generate soluble peptides by proteolytic processing and this process is believed to be necessary for C2ORF40 to exert cell type specific biological activity. Here, we reported a short mimic peptide of human C2ORF40 acts potential therapeutic efficacy in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We synthesized a short peptide of human C2ORF40, named C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment and assessed its biological function on cancer cell growth, migration and tumorigenesis. Cell growth assay showed that C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly suppressed cell proliferation of breast and lung cancer cells. Moreover, C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this peptide suppressed tumorigenesis in breast tumor xenograft model. Cell cycle assay indicated that the C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment suppressed the growth of tumor cells through inducing mitotic phase arrest. In conclusion, our results firstly suggested that this short synthetic peptide of human C2ORF40 may be a candidate tumor therapeutic agent.

  12. A short synthetic peptide fragment of human C2ORF40 has therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chaoyang; Zhang, Pengju; Jiang, Anli

    2017-03-30

    C2ORF40 encodes a secreted protein which is cleaved to generate soluble peptides by proteolytic processing and this process is believed to be necessary for C2ORF40 to exert cell type specific biological activity. Here, we reported a short mimic peptide of human C2ORF40 acts potential therapeutic efficacy in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We synthesized a short peptide of human C2ORF40, named C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment and assessed its biological function on cancer cell growth, migration and tumorigenesis. Cell growth assay showed that C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly suppressed cell proliferation of breast and lung cancer cells. Moreover,more » C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this peptide suppressed tumorigenesis in breast tumor xenograft model. Cell cycle assay indicated that the C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment suppressed the growth of tumor cells through inducing mitotic phase arrest. In conclusion, our results firstly suggested that this short synthetic peptide of human C2ORF40 may be a candidate tumor therapeutic agent.« less

  13. Evaluation of low energy CID and ECD fragmentation behavior of mono-oxidized thio-ether bonds in peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Ronald, Robert C.; Bruce, James E.

    2007-01-01

    Thio-ether bonds in the cysteinyl side-chain of peptides, formed with the most commonly used cysteine blocking reagent iodoacetamide, after conversion to sulfoxide, releases a neutral fragment mass in a low energy MS/MS experiment in the gas-phase of the mass spectrometer [Steen et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom. 2001, 12, 228–32.]. In this study, we show that the neutral loss fragments produced from the mono-oxidized thio-ether bonds (sulfoxide) in peptides, formed by alkyl halide or double-bond containing cysteine blocking reagents are different under low energy MS/MS conditions. We have evaluated the low energy fragmentation patterns of mono-oxidized modified peptides with different cysteine blocking reagents, such as iodoacetamide, 3-maleimidopropionic acid, and 4-vinylpyridine using FTICR-MS. We propose that the mechanisms of gas-phase fragmentation of mono-oxidized thio-ether bonds in the side-chain of peptides, formed by iodoacetamide and double-bond containing cysteine blocking reagents, maleimide and vinylpyridine, are different due to the availability of acidic β-hydrogens in these compounds. Moreover, we also investigated the fragmentation characteristics of mono-oxidized thio-ether bonds within the peptide sequence in order to develop novel mass-spectrometry identifiable chemical cross-linkers. This methionine type of oxidized thio-ether bond within the peptide sequence did not show anticipated low energy fragmentation. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) of the side-chain thio-ether-bond containing oxidized peptides was also studied. ECD spectra of the oxidized peptides showed a greater extent of peptide backbone cleavage, as compared to CID spectra. This fragmentation information is critical to researchers for accurate data analysis of this undesired modification in proteomics research, as well as other methods that may utilize sulfoxide derivatives. PMID:17126025

  14. Electron Capture by a Hydrated Gaseous Peptide: Effects of Water on Fragmentation and Molecular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Prell, James S.; O'Brien, Jeremy T.; Holm, Anne I. S.; Leib, Ryan D.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of water on electron capture dissociation products, molecular survival, and recombination energy are investigated for diprotonated Lys-Tyr-Lys solvated by between zero and 25 water molecules. For peptide ions with between 12 and 25 water molecules attached, electron capture results in a narrow distribution of product ions corresponding to primarily the loss of 10-12 water molecules from the reduced precursor. From these data, the recombination energy (RE) is determined to be equal to the energy that is lost by evaporating on average 10.7 water molecules, or 4.3 eV. Because water stabilizes ions, this value is a lower limit to the RE of the unsolvated ion, but it indicates that the majority of the available RE is deposited into internal modes of the peptide ion. Plotting the fragment ion abundances for ions formed from precursors with fewer than 11 water molecules as a function of hydration extent results in an energy resolved breakdown curve from which the appearance energies of the b2+, y2+, z2+•, c2+, and (KYK + H)+ fragment ions formed from this peptide ion can be obtained; these values are 78, 88, 42, 11, and 9 kcal/mol, respectively. The propensity for H atom loss and ammonia loss from the precursor changes dramatically with the extent of hydration, and this change in reactivity can be directly attributed to a “caging” effect by the water molecules. These are the first experimental measurements of the RE and appearance energies of fragment ions due to electron capture dissociation of a multiply charged peptide. This novel ion nanocalorimetry technique can be applied more generally to other exothermic reactions that are not readily accessible to investigation by more conventional thermochemical methods. PMID:18761457

  15. Structural analysis of peptide fragments following the hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin by trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Akten, E Demet; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-05-01

    Peptide bond hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by chymotrypsin and trypsin was investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As a fluorescent cross-linking reagent, N-(1-pyrenyl) maleimide (PM) was attached to BSA, through all free amine groups of arginine, lysine, and/or single free thiol (Cys34). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor fluorescence decays analyzed by exponential series method to obtain the changes in lifetime distributions. After the exposure of synthesized protein substrate PM-BSA to chymotrypsin and trypsin, it is observed that each protease produced a distinct change in the lifetime distribution profile, which was attributed to distinct chemical environments created by short peptide fragments in each hydrolysate. The persistence of excimer emission at longer lifetime regions for chymotrypsin, as opposed to trypsin, suggested the presence of small-scale hydrophobic clusters that might prevent some excimers from being completely quenched. It is most likely that the formation of these clusters is due to hydrophobic end groups of peptide fragments in chymotrypsin hydrolysate. A similar hydrophobic shield was not suggested for trypsin hydrolysis, as the end groups of peptide fragments would be either arginine or lysine. Overall, in case the target protein's 3D structure is known, the structural analysis of possible excimer formation presented here can be used as a tool to explain the differences in activity between two proteases, i.e. the peak's intensity and location in the profile. Furthermore, this structural evaluation might be helpful in obtaining the optimum experimental conditions in order to generate the highest amount of PM-BSA complexes.

  16. Formation and fragmentation of radical peptide anions: insights from vacuum ultra violet spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Canon, Francis; Giuliani, Alexandre; Nahon, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    We have studied the photodissociation of gas-phase deprotonated caerulein anions by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons in the 4.5 to 20 eV range, as provided by the DESIRS beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility SOLEIL (France). Caerulein is a sulphated peptide with three aromatic residues and nine amide bonds. Electron loss is found to be the major relaxation channel at every photon energy. However, an increase in the fragmentation efficiency (neutral losses and peptide backbone cleavages) as a function of the energy is also observed. The oxidized ions, generated by electron photodetachment were further isolated and activated by collision (CID) in a MS(3) scheme. The branching ratios of the different fragments observed by CID as a function of the initial VUV photon energy are found to be independent of the initial photon energy. Thus, there is no memory effect of the initial excitation energy on the fragmentation channels of the oxidized species on the time scale of our tandem MS experiment. We also report photofragment yields as a function of photon energy for doubly deprotonated caerulein ions, for both closed-shell ([M-2H](2-)) non-radical ions and open-shell ([M-3H](2-•)) radical ions. These latter ions are generated by electron photodetachment from [M-3H](3-) precursor ions. The detachment yield increases monotonically with the energy with the appearance of several absorption bands. Spectra for radical and non-radical ions are quite similar in terms of observed bands; however, the VUV fragmentation yield is enhanced by the presence of a radical in caerulein peptides. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  17. Cytotoxicity and the effect of cationic peptide fragments against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Paula Fernanda; Aida, Kelly Limi; Massunari, Loiane; Caiaffa, Karina Sampaio; Percinoto, Célio; Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Abuna, Gabriel Flores; Cilli, Eduardo Maffud; Duque, Cristiane

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and effect of fragments derived from three oral cationic peptides (CP): LL-37, D6-17 and D1-23 against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions. For cytotoxicity analysis, two epithelial cell lines were used. The minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimal bactericidal concentration were determined for the CP fragments and the control (chlorhexidine-CHX) against cariogenic bacteria. The fractional inhibitory concentration was obtained for the combinations of CP fragments on Streptococcus mutans. Biofilm assays were conducted with the best antimicrobial CP fragment against S. mutans. The results indicated that D6-17 was not cytotoxic. D1-23, LL-37 and CHX were not cytotoxic in low concentrations. D1-23 presented the best bactericidal activity against S. mutans, S. mitis and S. salivarius. Combinations of CP fragments did not show a synergic effect. D1-23 presented a higher activity against S. mutans biofilm than CHX. It was concluded that D1-23 showed a substantial effect against cariogenic bacteria and low cytotoxicity.

  18. Amyloid-beta oligomerization is associated with the generation of a typical peptide fragment fingerprint.

    PubMed

    Rudinskiy, Nikita; Fuerer, Christophe; Demurtas, Davide; Zamorano, Sebastian; De Piano, Cyntia; Herrmann, Abigail G; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Oeckl, Patrick; Otto, Markus; Frosch, Matthew P; Moniatte, Marc; Hyman, Bradley T; Schmid, Adrien W

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide oligomerization plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Aβ oligomers are collectively considered an appealing therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the pathologic accumulation of oligomers are unclear, and the exact structural composition of oligomers is being debated. Using targeted and quantitative mass spectrometry, we reveal site-specific Aβ autocleavage during the early phase of aggregation, producing a typical Aβ fragment signature and that truncated Aβ peptides can form stable oligomeric complexes with full-length Aβ peptide. We show that the use of novel anti-Aβ antibodies raised against these truncated Aβ isoforms allows for monitoring and targeting the accumulation of truncated Aβ fragments. Antibody-enabled screening of transgenic models of AD as well as human postmortem brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid revealed that aggregation-associated Aβ cleavage is a highly relevant clinical feature of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control.

    PubMed

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-07-06

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections.

  20. Thermochemical Fragment Energy Method for Biomolecules: Application to a Collagen Model Peptide.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2009-06-09

    Herein, we first review different methodologies that have been proposed for computing the quantum mechanical (QM) energy and other molecular properties of large systems through a linear combination of subsystem (fragment) energies, which can be computed using conventional QM packages. Particularly, we emphasize the similarities among the different methods that can be considered as variants of the multibody expansion technique. Nevertheless, on the basis of thermochemical arguments, we propose yet another variant of the fragment energy methods, which could be useful for, and readily applicable to, biomolecules using either QM or hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics methods. The proposed computational scheme is applied to investigate the stability of a triple-helical collagen model peptide. To better address the actual applicability of the fragment QM method and to properly compare with experimental data, we compute average energies by carrying out single-point fragment QM calculations on structures generated by a classical molecular dynamics simulation. The QM calculations are done using a density functional level of theory combined with an implicit solvent model. Other free-energy terms such as attractive dispersion interactions or thermal contributions are included using molecular mechanics. The importance of correcting both the intermolecular and intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the QM calculations is also discussed in detail. On the basis of the favorable comparison of our fragment-based energies with experimental data and former theoretical results, we conclude that the fragment QM energy strategy could be an interesting addition to the multimethod toolbox for biomolecular simulations in order to investigate those situations (e.g., interactions with metal clusters) that are beyond the range of applicability of common molecular mechanics methods.

  1. The role of the position of the basic residue in the generation and fragmentation of peptide radical cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2006-03-01

    Using simple di- and tripeptides GX, GGX, GXG, XG and XGG, the influence of the position of the basic residue, X (X = R, K and H), on the formation of peptide radical cations (M+) from [CuII(tpy)M]2+ complexes (where tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) was probed. It was found that M+ is formed with greatest abundance when the basic residue is at the C-terminus. For arginine containing peptides, this may be due to further fragmentation of GRG+, RG+ and RGG+ at the MS2 stage. For lysine and histidine containing peptides, when the basic residue is not located at the C-terminus, competing fragmentation pathways that lead to peptide backbone cleavage are more facile than M+ formation. In order to gain some insights into the binding modes of these peptides to [CuII(tpy)]2+, the formation and fragmentation of copper(II) complexes of tripeptides protected as their carboxy methyl/ethyl esters (M-OR', R' = Me/Et) were also probed. The products of the competing fragmentation pathways of [CuII(tpy)M]2+, as well as the formation and fragmentation of [CuII(tpy)(M-OR')]2+, suggest that the unprotected peptides, M, mainly bind as zwitterions to [CuII(tpy)]2+. The fragmentation reactions of the radical cations (M+) were also studied. Radical driven side chain fragmentation reactions of M+ are dependent on both the position of the residue as well as the identity of other residues present in the peptide radical cations. GR and RG, which undergo rearrangement to form a mixed anhydride in their protonated forms, do not undergo the same rearrangement in their radical cation forms.

  2. Rapid phylogenetic and functional classification of short genomic fragments with signature peptides

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Classification is difficult for shotgun metagenomics data from environments such as soils, where the diversity of sequences is high and where reference sequences from close relatives may not exist. Approaches based on sequence-similarity scores must deal with the confounding effects that inheritance and functional pressures exert on the relation between scores and phylogenetic distance, while approaches based on sequence alignment and tree-building are typically limited to a small fraction of gene families. We describe an approach based on finding one or more exact matches between a read and a precomputed set of peptide 10-mers. Results At even the largest phylogenetic distances, thousands of 10-mer peptide exact matches can be found between pairs of bacterial genomes. Genes that share one or more peptide 10-mers typically have high reciprocal BLAST scores. Among a set of 403 representative bacterial genomes, some 20 million 10-mer peptides were found to be shared. We assign each of these peptides as a signature of a particular node in a phylogenetic reference tree based on the RNA polymerase genes. We classify the phylogeny of a genomic fragment (e.g., read) at the most specific node on the reference tree that is consistent with the phylogeny of observed signature peptides it contains. Using both synthetic data from four newly-sequenced soil-bacterium genomes and ten real soil metagenomics data sets, we demonstrate a sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the MEGAN metagenomics analysis package using BLASTX against the NR database. Phylogenetic and functional similarity metrics applied to real metagenomics data indicates a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 400 for distinguishing among environments. Our method assigns ~6.6 Gbp/hr on a single CPU, compared with 25 kbp/hr for methods based on BLASTX against the NR database. Conclusions Classification by exact matching against a precomputed list of signature peptides provides comparable

  3. Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β Peptides: Impact of Fragment Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, T.; Wise-Scira, O.; Coskuner, O.

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease whose physiological characteristics include the accumulation of amyloid-containing deposits in the brain and consequent synapse and neuron loss. Unfortunately, most widely used drugs for the treatment can palliate the outer symptoms but cannot cure the disease itself. Hence, developing a new drug that can cure it. Most recently, the ``early aggregation and monomer'' hypothesis has become popular and a few drugs have been developed based on this hypothesis. Detailed understanding of the amyloid-β peptide structure can better help us to determine more effective treatment strategies; indeed, the structure of Amyloid has been studied extensively employing experimental and theoretical tools. Nevertheless, those studies have employed different fragment sizes of Amyloid and characterized its conformational nature in different media. Thus, the structural properties might be different from each other and provide a reason for the existing debates in the literature. Here, we performed all-atom MD simulations and present the structural and thermodynamic properties of Aβ1-16, Aβ1-28, and Aβ1-42 in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Our studies show that the overall structures, secondary structures, and the calculated thermodynamic properties change with increasing peptide size. In addition, we find that the structural properties of those peptides are different from each other in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  4. Improved functional immobilization of llama single-domain antibody fragments to polystyrene surfaces using small peptides.

    PubMed

    Harmsen, Michiel M; Fijten, Helmi P D

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of different fusion domains on the functional immobilization of three llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) after passive adsorption to polystyrene in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Three VHHs produced without any fusion domain were efficiently adsorbed to polystyrene, which, however, resulted in inefficient antigen binding. Functional VHH immobilization was improved by VHH fusion to a consecutive myc-His6-tag and was even more improved by fusion to the llama antibody long hinge region containing an additional His6-tag (LHc-His6). The partial dimerization of VHH-LHc-His6 fusion proteins through LHc-mediated disulfide-bond formation was not essential for their improved functional immobilization. VHH fusions to specific polystyrene binding peptides, hydrophobins, or other, unrelated VHH domains were less suitable for increasing functional VHH immobilization because of reduced microbial expression levels. Thus, VHH-LHc-His6 fusion proteins are most suited for functional passive adsorption in ELISA.

  5. Conserved Peptide Fragmentation as a Benchmarking Tool for Mass Spectrometers and a Discriminating Feature for Targeted Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Umut H.; Gillet, Ludovic C.; Maiolica, Alessio; Navarro, Pedro; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the similarity of spectra is an important task in various areas of spectroscopy, for example, to identify a compound by comparing sample spectra to those of reference standards. In mass spectrometry based discovery proteomics, spectral comparisons are used to infer the amino acid sequence of peptides. In targeted proteomics by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) or SWATH MS, predetermined sets of fragment ion signals integrated over chromatographic time are used to identify target peptides in complex samples. In both cases, confidence in peptide identification is directly related to the quality of spectral matches. In this study, we used sets of simulated spectra of well-controlled dissimilarity to benchmark different spectral comparison measures and to develop a robust scoring scheme that quantifies the similarity of fragment ion spectra. We applied the normalized spectral contrast angle score to quantify the similarity of spectra to objectively assess fragment ion variability of tandem mass spectrometric datasets, to evaluate portability of peptide fragment ion spectra for targeted mass spectrometry across different types of mass spectrometers and to discriminate target assays from decoys in targeted proteomics. Altogether, this study validates the use of the normalized spectral contrast angle as a sensitive spectral similarity measure for targeted proteomics, and more generally provides a methodology to assess the performance of spectral comparisons and to support the rational selection of the most appropriate similarity measure. The algorithms used in this study are made publicly available as an open source toolset with a graphical user interface. PMID:24623587

  6. The Design and Synthesis of Alanine-Rich α-Helical Peptides Constrained by an S,S-Tetrazine Photochemical Trigger: A Fragment Union Approach

    PubMed Central

    Courter, Joel R.; Abdo, Mohannad; Brown, Stephen P.; Tucker, Matthew J.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    The design and synthesis of alanine-rich α-helical peptides, constrained in a partially unfolded state by incorporation of the S,S-tetrazine phototrigger, has been achieved to permit, upon photochemical release, observation by 2D-IR spectroscopy of the sub-nanosecond conformational dynamics that govern the early steps associated with α-helix formation. Solid-phase peptide synthesis was employed to elaborate the requisite fragments, with full peptide construction via solution–phase fragment condensation. The fragment union tactic was also employed to construct 13C=18O isotopically edited amides to permit direct observation of conformational motion at or near specific peptide bonds. PMID:24359446

  7. Crystal Structures of Peptide Deformylase from Rice Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in Complex with Substrate Peptides, Actinonin, and Fragment Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Ho, Thien-Hoang; Lee, Inho; Tran, Huyen-Thi; Sur, Bookyo; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Cha, Sun-Shin; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2016-10-05

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight on rice; this species is one of the most destructive pathogenic bacteria in rice cultivation worldwide. Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of the N-formyl group from the N-terminus of newly synthesized polypeptides in bacterial cells and is an important target to develop antibacterial agents. We determined crystal structures of Xoo PDF (XoPDF) at up to 1.9 Å resolution, which include apo, two substrate-bound (methionine-alanine or methionine-alanine-serine), an inhibitor-bound (actinonin), and six fragment chemical-bound structures. Six fragment chemical compounds were bound in the substrate-binding pocket. The fragment chemical-bound structures were compared to the natural PDF inhibitor actinonin-bound structure. The fragment chemical molecules will be useful to design an inhibitor specific to XoPDF and a potential pesticide against Xoo.

  8. Structural and antigenic features of the synthetic SF23 peptide corresponding to the receptor binding fragment of diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Khrustaleva, Tatyana Aleksandrovna; Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich; Kolodkina, Valentina Leonidovna; Astapov, Anatoly Archipovich

    2015-02-01

    The SF23 peptide corresponding to the receptor binding fragment of diphtheria toxin (residues 508-530) has been synthesized. This fragment forming a protruding beta hairpin has been chosen because it is the less mutable B-cell epitope. Affine chromatography and ELISA show that antibodies from the sera of persons infected by toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae and those immunized by diphtheria toxoid are able to bind the synthetic SF23 peptide. There are antibodies recognizing the SF23 peptide in the serum of horses hyperimmunized with diphtheria toxoid. Analysis of circular dichroism spectra show formation of beta hairpin by the peptide. Taken together, the results showed that the structure of the less mutable epitope of C. diphtheriae toxin was reproduced by the short SF23 peptide. Since antibodies against that epitope should block its interactions with cellular receptor (heparin-binding epidermal growth factor), the SF23 peptide can be considered as a promising candidate for synthetic vaccine development. Fluorescence quenching studies showed the existence of chloride and phosphate binding sites on the SF23 molecule. Phosphate containing adjuvants (aluminum hydroxyphosphate or aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate) are recommended to increase the SF23 immunogenic properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Conformational Dynamics of Two Natively Unfolded Fragment Peptides: Comparison of the AMBER and CHARMM Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shi, Chuanyin; MacKerell, Alexander D; Shen, Jana

    2015-06-25

    Physics-based force fields are the backbone of molecular dynamics simulations. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the assessment and improvement of commonly used force fields for describing conformational dynamics of folded proteins. However, the accuracy for the unfolded states remains unclear. The latter is however important for detailed studies of protein folding pathways, conformational transitions involving unfolded states, and dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this work, we compare the three commonly used force fields, AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP, and CHARMM36, for modeling the natively unfolded fragment peptides, NTL9(1-22) and NTL9(6-17), using explicit-solvent replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. All three simulations show that NTL9(6-17) is completely unstructured, while NTL9(1-22) transiently samples various β-hairpin states, reminiscent of the first β-hairpin in the structure of the intact NTL9 protein. The radius of gyration of the two peptides is force field independent but likely underestimated due to the current deficiency of additive force fields. Compared to the CHARMM force fields, ff99SB-ILDN gives slightly higher β-sheet propensity and more native-like residual structures for NTL9(1-22), which may be attributed to its known β preference. Surprisingly, only two sequence-local pairs of charged residues make appreciable ionic contacts in the simulations of NTL9(1-22), which are sampled slightly more by the CHARMM force fields. Taken together, these data suggest that the current CHARMM and AMBER force fields are globally in agreement in modeling the unfolded states corresponding to β-sheet in the folded structure, while differing in details such as the native-likeness of the residual structures and interactions.

  10. MMP-7 cleaves amyloid β fragment peptides and copper ion inhibits the degradation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masanari; Matsuura, Kazuki; Nakamura, Rina; Kojima, Aya; Konishi, Motomi; Akizawa, Toshifumi

    2017-10-01

    The extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) is known to be the fundamental cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ1-42, generated by β-secretases from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the main component of neuritic plaque, and the aggregation of this protein is shown to be dependent to an extent on metal ions such as copper and zinc. However, the mechanism by which Cu 2+ affects the physicochemical properties of Aβ1-42 or the central nervous system is still under debate. A recent series of studies have demonstrated that both the soluble-type matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are capable of degrading Aβ peptides. MMP-7, one of the soluble-type matrix metalloproteinases, is expressed in hippocampal tissue; however, less information is available concerning the pathophysiological roles of this enzyme in the process and/or progress of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we examined the degradation activity of MMP-7 against various Aβ1-42's fragment peptides and the effect of Cu 2+ . Although Aβ22-40 was degraded by MMP-7 regardless of Cu 2+ , Cu 2+ inhibited the degradation of Aβ1-19, Aβ11-20, and Aβ11-29 by MMP-7. These results indicate that MMP-7 is capable of degrading Aβ1-42, and that Aβ1-42 acquired resistance against MMP-7 cleavage through Cu 2+ -binding and structure changes. Our results demonstrate that MMP-7 may play an important role in the defensive mechanism against the aggregation of Aβ1-42, which gives rise to the pathology of AD.

  11. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  12. Occurrence of C-Terminal Residue Exclusion in Peptide Fragmentation by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    By screening a data set of 392 synthetic peptides MS/MS spectra, we found that a known C-terminal rearrangement was unexpectedly frequently occurring from monoprotonated molecular ions in both ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry upon low and high energy collision activated dissociations with QqTOF and TOF/TOF mass analyzer configuration, respectively. Any residue localized at the C-terminal carboxylic acid end, even a basic one, was lost, provided that a basic amino acid such arginine and to a lesser extent histidine and lysine was present in the sequence leading to a fragment ion, usually depicted as (bn-1 + H2O) ion, corresponding to a shortened non-scrambled peptide chain. Far from being an epiphenomenon, such a residue exclusion from the peptide chain C-terminal extremity gave a fragment ion that was the base peak of the MS/MS spectrum in certain cases. Within the frame of the mobile proton model, the ionizing proton being sequestered onto the basic amino acid side chain, it is known that the charge directed fragmentation mechanism involved the C-terminal carboxylic acid function forming an anhydride intermediate structure. The same mechanism was also demonstrated from cationized peptides. To confirm such assessment, we have prepared some of the peptides that displayed such C-terminal residue exclusion as a C-terminal backbone amide. As expected in this peptide amide series, the production of truncated chains was completely suppressed. Besides, multiply charged molecular ions of all peptides recorded in ESI mass spectrometry did not undergo such fragmentation validating that any mobile ionizing proton will prevent such a competitive C-terminal backbone rearrangement. Among all well-known nondirect sequence fragment ions issued from non specific loss of neutral molecules (mainly H2O and NH3) and multiple backbone amide ruptures (b-type internal ions), the described C-terminal residue exclusion is highly identifiable giving raise to a single fragment ion in

  13. Study of fragmentation behavior of amadori rearrangement products in lysine-containing peptide model by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Eric D; Wang, Hui; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Juárez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Protein and peptide glycation with reducing sugars through Maillard reaction is recognized as one of the most critical and fundamental reactions in food and in the human body. Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs) are formed at the initial stage of Maillard reaction and then may be converted into intermediate and advanced glycation products. We report here that using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to directly and rapidly characterize fragmentation behavior of ARPs in a Lysine-containing peptide-reducing sugars unambiguously model and identify the modification sites in glycated tri- and tetrapeptides. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) results showthat the sugar moiety was preferentially fragmented, whereby the neutral loss of small molecules, such as 18 Da (-H2O), 36 Da (-2 x H2O), 54 Da (-3 x H2O), 84 Da (-H2O-HCOH) and 162 Da from monosaccharide (glucose) moieties and 18 Da, 36 Da, 216 Da, 246 Da and 324 Da from disaccharide moieties. Among the fragmented ions, (M-84+H)+ of monosaccharides and (M-246+H)+ of disaccharides are relatively stable. Further multi-stage mass spectrometry (MS3) of (M-84+H)+ for tri- and longer peptides displays peptide sequence and glycation sites by providing modified y ions (y*), and/or modified b ions (b*) and even a modified a ion (a*). The study is useful to monitor and characterize PMTs of glycation in complex protein systems based on ESI-MS related techniques.

  14. Characterization of the presumed peptide cross-links in the soluble peptidoglycan fragments synthesized by protoplasts of Streptococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, R S; Shockman, G D

    1975-10-01

    Protoplasts of Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790 were produced with the aid of lysozyme, and the ability of these bodies to synthesize soluble, peptide cross-linked peptidoglycan (PG) fragments was examined. Lysozyme digests of PG isolated using gel filtration from the supernatant medium of protoplasts grown in the presence of [14C]acetate and L-[3H]lysine contained small amounts of PG having KD expected for peptide cross-linked dimers and trimers. Addition of benzyl penicillin (300 mug/ml) to growing protoplast cultures did not affect the net amount of PG fragments synthesized but resulted in inhibition of synthesis of dimer and trimer fractions by 27 and 59%, respectively. Failure of penicillin to completely inhibit the accumulation of the dimer fraction was attributed to the presence of atypical forms of dimer. In fact, the supernatant medium of penicillin-treated cultures did not contain detectable amounts of typical peptide cross-linked dimer. The degree of peptide cross-linkage of protoplast PG was at most only 13% of that found in walls isolated from intact streptococci. The relative amounts of monomers, dimers, and trimers synthesized during early and late stages of protoplast growth was approximately the same. Protoplasts synthesized soluble PG fragments in amounts which were of the same order of magnitude as that expected for insoluble PG produced by an equivalent amount of intact streptococci.

  15. Peptide fragment of thymosin β4 increases hippocampal neurogenesis and facilitates spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Moon, E-Y; Yi, J H; Lee, H E; Park, S J; Ryu, Y-K; Kim, H-C; Lee, S; Ryu, J H

    2015-12-03

    Although several studies have suggested the neuroprotective effect of thymosin β4 (TB4), a major actin-sequestering protein, on the central nervous system, little is understood regarding the action of N-acetyl-serylaspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP), a peptide fragment of TB4 on brain function. Here, we examined neurogenesis-stimulative effect of Ac-SDKP. Intrahippocampal infusion of Ac-SDKP facilitated the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus. Ac-SDKP-treated mouse hippocampus showed an increase in β-catenin stability with reduction of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity. Moreover, inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling blocked Ac-SDKP-facilitated neural proliferation. Subchronic intrahippocampal infusion of Ac-SDKP also increased spatial memory. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Ac-SDKP functions as a regulator of neural proliferation and indicate that Ac-SDKP may be a therapeutic candidate for diseases characterized by neuronal loss. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photocross-Linked Peptide-Protein Complexes Analysis: A Comparative Study of CID and ETD Fragmentation Modes.

    PubMed

    Clavier, Séverine; Bolbach, Gérard; Sachon, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are among the keys to organizing cellular processes in space and time. One of the only direct ways to identify such interactions in their cellular environment is to covalently bond the interacting partners to fix the interaction. Photocross-linking in living cells is thus a very promising technique. The feasibility of in cellulo photocross-linking reactions has been shown and mass spectrometry is a tool of choice to analyze photocross-linked proteins. However, the interpretation of the MS and MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked peptides remains one of the most important bottlenecks of the method and still limits its potential for large-scale applications (interactomics). Fundamental studies are still necessary to understand and characterize the fragmentation behavior of photocross-linked peptides. Here, we report the successful identification of the interaction sites in a well-characterized model of in vitro interaction between a protein and a peptide. We describe in detail the fragmentation pattern of these photocross-linked species in order to identify trends that could be generalized. In particular, we compare CID and ETD fragmentation modes (and HCD in a lesser extent), demonstrating the complementarity of both methods and the advantage of ETD for the analysis of photocross-linked species. The information should help further development of dedicated software to properly score MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked species.

  17. Photocross-Linked Peptide-Protein Complexes Analysis: A Comparative Study of CID and ETD Fragmentation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavier, Séverine; Bolbach, Gérard; Sachon, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are among the keys to organizing cellular processes in space and time. One of the only direct ways to identify such interactions in their cellular environment is to covalently bond the interacting partners to fix the interaction. Photocross-linking in living cells is thus a very promising technique. The feasibility of in cellulo photocross-linking reactions has been shown and mass spectrometry is a tool of choice to analyze photocross-linked proteins. However, the interpretation of the MS and MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked peptides remains one of the most important bottlenecks of the method and still limits its potential for large-scale applications (interactomics). Fundamental studies are still necessary to understand and characterize the fragmentation behavior of photocross-linked peptides. Here, we report the successful identification of the interaction sites in a well-characterized model of in vitro interaction between a protein and a peptide. We describe in detail the fragmentation pattern of these photocross-linked species in order to identify trends that could be generalized. In particular, we compare CID and ETD fragmentation modes (and HCD in a lesser extent), demonstrating the complementarity of both methods and the advantage of ETD for the analysis of photocross-linked species. The information should help further development of dedicated software to properly score MS/MS spectra of photocross-linked species.

  18. Peptide fragments of Hsp70 modulate its chaperone activity and sensitize tumor cells to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sverchinsky, Dmitry V; Lazarev, Vladimir F; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Guzhova, Irina V; Margulis, Boris A

    2017-12-01

    Most Hsp70 chaperone inhibitors exert anti-cancer effects; however, their high cytotoxicity proposed the use of peptide fragments of the chaperone as safer modulators of its activity and as complements to customary drugs. One such peptide, ICit-2, was found to inhibit substrate-binding and refolding activities of the chaperone. Using various approaches, we established that ICit-2 binds Hsp70, which may explain its inhibitory action. ICit-2 penetrates A-431 cancer cells and, in combination with doxorubicin (Dox), enhances the cytotoxicity and growth inhibitory effect of the drug. Similarly, using the B16 mouse melanoma model, we found that ICit-2 inhibits the rate of tumor growth by 48% compared to Dox alone, confirming that the peptide can be employed to sensitize resistant tumors to cytostatic medicines. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Coordination of copper(II) ions by the 11-20 and 11-28 fragments of human and mouse beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa; Ruta-Dolejsz, Monika; Wiśniewska, Kornelia; Lankiewicz, Leszek

    2002-09-30

    A potentiometric and spectroscopic (UV-vis, CD and EPR) study of Cu(II) binding to the (11-20), (11-28), (Ac-11-20H) and (Ac-11-28) fragments of human (H) and mouse (M) beta-amyloid peptide was carried out. The values of the protonation constants of the two lysine side chain amino groups for the (11-28) and (Ac-11-28) fragments of beta-amyloid peptide differ noticeably suggesting considerable interactions between the two residues. The N-terminal amino acid sequence Xaa-Yaa-His for the (11-20H) and (11-28H) fragments determines the coordination ability of the fragments studied to copper(II) ions. Addition of the (17-20) and (17-28) sequences to the (11-16) fragment of human and mouse beta-amyloid peptide does not change the coordination mode, and the stabilities of the complexes formed are comparable to those of the (11-16) peptide, although 1N complexes of the (11-28) fragments are stabilized by about one order of magnitude compared to those of the (11-16) peptides. The (Ac-11-28) peptides form complexes with the same coordination mode as those for the (Ac-11-16) fragments. The stability of the complexes for the (Ac-11-28H) fragment is one or two orders of magnitude higher compared to those of the (Ac-11-16H) fragment. This stabilization may result from structural organization of a peptide in copper(II) complexes.

  1. A doppel alpha-helix peptide fragment mimics the copper(II) interactions with the whole protein.

    PubMed

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Campagna, Tiziana; Campitiello, Maria Anna; Raiola, Luca; Isernia, Carla; Hansson, Orjan; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    The doppel protein (Dpl) is the first homologue of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to be discovered; it is overexpressed in transgenic mice that lack the prion gene, resulting in neurotoxicity. The whole prion protein is able to inhibit Dpl neurotoxicity, and its N-terminal domain is the determinant part of the protein function. This region represents the main copper(II) binding site of PrP(C). Dpl is able to bind at least one copper ion, and the specific metal-binding site has been identified as the histidine residue at the beginning of the third helical region. However, a reliable characterization of copper(II) coordination features has not been reported. In a previous paper, we studied the copper(II) interaction with a peptide that encompasses only the loop region potentially involved in metal binding. Nevertheless, we did not find a complete match between the EPR spectroscopic parameters of the copper(II) complexes formed with the synthesized peptide and those reported for the copper(II) binding sites of the whole protein. Herein, the synthesis of the human Dpl peptide fragment hDpl(122-139) (Ac-KPDNKLHQQVLWRLVQEL-NH(2)) and its copper(II) complex species are reported. This peptide encompasses the third alpha helix and part of the loop linking the second and the third helix of human doppel protein. The single-point-mutated peptide, hDpl(122-139)D124N, in which aspartate 124 replaces an asparagine residue, was also synthesized. This peptide was used to highlight the role of the carboxylate group on both the conformation preference of the Dpl fragment and its copper(II) coordination features. NMR spectroscopic measurements show that the hDpl(122-139) peptide fragment is in the prevailing alpha-helix conformation. It is localized within the 127-137 amino acid residue region that represents a reliable conformational mimic of the related protein domain. A comparison with the single-point-mutated hDpl(122-139)D124N reveals the significant role played by the aspartic

  2. Interaction of the core fragments of the LL-37 host defense peptide with actin

    PubMed Central

    Sol, Asaf; Wang, Guangshun; Blotnick, Edna; Golla, Radha; Muhlrad, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides are effector molecules of the innate immunity that possess antimicrobial and health-promoting properties. Due to their potential therapeutic activities, host defense peptides are being explored as alternatives for antibiotics. The human LL-37 and its shorter, cost-effective, bactericidal core peptide derivates have been suggested for their therapeutic potential. Bacteria evade host defense peptides by proteolytic inactivation. Actin released from necrotized cells and abundant in infected sites was shown to bind and protect LL-37 from microbial proteolytic degradation, and to enable the peptide’s antimicrobial action despite the presence of the proteases. Here, we characterized the interactions of the 10–13 residues long LL-37 core peptides with actin. We show that the LL-37 core peptides associate with actin with a lower affinity than that of LL-37. Their association with actin, which is very ionic strength sensitive, is mainly based on electrostatic interactions. Likewise, the antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli of the minimal antimicrobial peptide KR-12 but not FK-13 nor LL-37 is also very sensitive to salts. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of the FK-13 core peptide is protected by actin against the tested bacterial proteases in a similar manner to that of LL-37, supporting its potential for therapeutic use. PMID:26726303

  3. Serum and urine analysis of the aminoterminal procollagen peptide type III by radioimmunoassay with antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Rohde, H; Langer, I; Krieg, T; Timpl, R

    1983-09-01

    A radioimmunoassay based on antibody Fab fragments was developed for the aminoterminal peptide Col 1-3 of bovine type III procollagen. This assay does not distinguish the intact aminopropeptide Col 1-3 from its globular fragment Col 1. Parallel inhibition profiles were observed with human serum and urine allowing the simultaneous quantitative determination of intact and fragmented antigens in these samples. Most of the material has a size similar to that of fragment Col 1 indicating that the aminopropeptide is degraded under physiologic conditions. The concentration of aminopeptide in normal sera was in the range 15-63 ng/ml. Daily excretion was found to be in the range 30-110 micrograms. More than 50% of patients with alcoholic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis showed elevated serum levels of aminopropeptide by the Fab assay. Elevated concentrations were detected more frequently with an antibody radioimmunoassay which measures mainly the intact form of the aminopropeptide. It is suggested that analysis of patients material by both assays could improve their diagnostic application.

  4. A Helix Replacement Mechanism Directs Metavinculin Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Yogesha, S.D.

    2010-10-11

    Cells require distinct adhesion complexes to form contacts with their neighbors or the extracellular matrix, and vinculin links these complexes to the actin cytoskeleton. Metavinculin, an isoform of vinculin that harbors a unique 68-residue insert in its tail domain, has distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties and plays essential roles in muscle development and homeostasis. Moreover, patients with sporadic or familial mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert invariably develop fatal cardiomyopathies. Here we report the high resolution crystal structure of the metavinculin tail domain, as well as the crystal structures of full-length human native metavinculin (1,134 residues) and of the full-lengthmore » cardiomyopathy-associated {Delta}Leu954 metavinculin deletion mutant. These structures reveal that an {alpha}-helix (H1{prime}) and extended coil of the metavinculin insert replace {alpha}-helix H1 and its preceding extended coil found in the N-terminal region of the vinculin tail domain to form a new five-helix bundle tail domain. Further, biochemical analyses demonstrate that this helix replacement directs the distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties of metavinculin. Finally, the cardiomyopathy associated {Delta}Leu954 and Arg975Trp metavinculin mutants reside on the replaced extended coil and the H1{prime} {alpha}-helix, respectively. Thus, a helix replacement mechanism directs metavinculin's unique functions.« less

  5. The identification of disulfides in ricin D using proteolytic cleavage followed by negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Brinkworth, Craig S; Bowie, John H

    2015-01-30

    To use negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D, to provide sequence information; in particular, to identify disulfide position and connectivity. Negative-ion fragmentations of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D was studied using a Waters QTOF2 mass spectrometer operating in MS and MS(2) modes. Twenty-three peptides were obtained following high-performance liquid chromatography and studied by negative-ion mass spectrometry covering 73% of the amino-acid residues of ricin D. Five disulfide-containing peptides were identified, three intermolecular and two intramolecular disulfide-containing peptides. The [M-H](-) anions of the intermolecular disulfides undergo facile cleavage of the disulfide units to produce fragment peptides. In negative-ion collision-induced dissociation (CID) these source-formed anions undergo backbone cleavages, which provide sequencing information. The two intramolecular disulfides were converted proteolytically into intermolecular disulfides, which were identified as outlined above. The positions of the five disulfide groups in ricin D may be determined by characteristic negative-ion cleavage of the disulfide groups, while sequence information may be determined using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of the resulting cleaved peptides. Negative-ion mass spectrometry can also be used to provide partial sequencing information for other peptides (i.e. those not containing Cys) using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of these peptides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Structural analysis of a functional DIAP1 fragment bound to grim and hid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Cocina, A E; Chai, J; Hay, B A; Shi, Y

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in Drosophila, with the second BIR domain (BIR2) playing an important role. Three proteins, Hid, Grim, and Reaper, promote apoptosis, in part by binding to DIAP1 through their conserved N-terminal sequences. The crystal structures of DIAP1-BIR2 by itself and in complex with the N-terminal peptides from Hid and Grim reveal that these peptides bind a surface groove on DIAP1, with the first four amino acids mimicking the binding of the Smac tetrapeptide to XIAP. The next 3 residues also contribute to binding through hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, peptide binding induces the formation of an additional alpha helix in DIAP1. Our study reveals the structural conservation and diversity necessary for the binding of IAPs by the Drosophila Hid/Grim/Reaper and the mammalian Smac proteins.

  7. Ligand Discovery for a Peptide-Binding GPCR by Structure-Based Screening of Fragment- and Lead-Like Chemical Libraries.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anirudh; Heine, Philipp; Rudling, Axel; Plückthun, Andreas; Kummer, Lutz; Carlsson, Jens

    2017-03-17

    Peptide-recognizing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are promising therapeutic targets but often resist drug discovery efforts. Determination of crystal structures for peptide-binding GPCRs has provided opportunities to explore structure-based methods in lead development. Molecular docking screens of two chemical libraries, containing either fragment- or lead-like compounds, against a neurotensin receptor 1 crystal structure allowed for a comparison between different drug development strategies for peptide-binding GPCRs. A total of 2.3 million molecules were screened computationally, and 25 fragments and 27 leads that were top-ranked in each library were selected for experimental evaluation. Of these, eight fragments and five leads were confirmed as ligands by surface plasmon resonance. The hit rate for the fragment screen (32%) was thus higher than for the lead-like library (19%), but the affinities of the fragments were ∼100-fold lower. Both screens returned unique scaffolds and demonstrated that a crystal structure of a stabilized peptide-binding GPCR can guide the discovery of small-molecule agonists. The complementary advantages of exploring fragment- and lead-like chemical space suggest that these strategies should be applied synergistically in structure-based screens against challenging GPCR targets.

  8. Enhancement of charge remote fragmentation in protonated peptides by high-energy CID MALDI-TOF-MS using "cold" matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimson, E.; Truong, O.; Richter, W. J.; Waterfield, M. D.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1997-12-01

    Delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (DE-MALDI-TOF-MS) is employed to evaluate its potential for peptide sequencing using both post-source decay (PSD) and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). This work provides evidence that complete amino-acid sequences may be obtained employing a dual approach including PSD of [M + H]+ ions using a "hot" matrix ([alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, CHCA), followed by high-energy CID using "cold" matrices (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, DHB; 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone/di-ammonium hydrogen citrate, DHAP/DAHC). This strategy ensures that PSD results in a rich variety of product ions derived from charge-driven processes that provide gross structural information. High-energy CID (20 keV collision energy range) of low internal energy [M + H]+ ions is then employed to reveal complementary side-chain detail (i.e. Leu/Ile distinction) in a manner highly selective for charge remote fragmentation (CRF), because PSD is largely reduced. As expected from the known behaviour of protonated peptides at 10 keV collision energies, charge fixation at basic sites required for CRF is more pronounced in CID than in PSD. We have obtained spectra for a synthetic peptide that approximate the results and performance of MALDI high-energy CID obtained on sector-based instrumentation (EBE-oa-TOF).

  9. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  10. Identification and characterization of peptide fragments for the direct and site-specific immobilization of functional proteins onto the surface of silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Ootsuka, Takeru; Asada, Masashi; Yoshizuka, Saori; Chiyama, Masateru; Sakane, Masayasu; Fida, Hasan M D; Sawada, Kazuaki; Okumura, Koichi; Kishimoto, Michimasa

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we successfully identified peptide fragments that have a strong affinity toward the surface of a silicon nitride (SiN) substrate. An E. coli soluble protein, which was preferentially adsorbed onto the surface of a SiN substrate was isolated by 2D electrophoresis, and it was identified as "elongation factor Tu (ELN)" via the peptide MS fingerprinting method. A recombinant ELN that was originally cloned and produced, also maintained its adsorptive ability to a SiN substrate, by comparison with BSA that was used as a control protein. The peptide fragments derived from the recombinant ELN were prepared via 3 types of proteases with different recognition properties (trypsin, chymotrypsin and V8 protease). The peptide mixture was applied to the surface of a SiN substrate, and then, the SiN-binding peptide candidates were isolated and identified. The amino acid sequences of the peptide candidates were genetically fused with the C-terminal region of glutathione S-transferase as a model protein, and the adsorption properties of mutant-type GSTs on the surface of a SiN substrate were directly monitored using a reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS) sensor system. Consequently, among the 8 candidates identified, the genetic fusion of TP14, V821 and CT22 peptides resulted in a significant enhancement of GST adsorption to the surface of the SiN substrate, while the adsorption of a wild-type GST was hardly detectable by RIfS sensor. These peptide fragments were located at the C-terminal region in the aminoacid sequence of recombinant ELN. Interestingly, the sequence with the shortest and strongest SiN-binding peptide, TP14 (GYRPQFYFR), was also found in that of V821 (GGRHTPFFKGYRPQFYFRTTDVTGTIE). The TP14 peptide might be the smallest unit of SiN-binding peptide, and a clarification of the amino acid contribution in TP14 peptide will be the next subject. Three-fold higher enzymatic activities were detected from the SiN substrate immobilized with GST-TP14

  11. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptides in an amyloid-β hexamer with three-fold symmetry: Ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Tomioka, Shogo; Kadoya, Ryushi; Shimamura, Kanako; Okamoto, Akisumi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates in brain contributes to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent structural analysis for the tissue obtained from AD patients revealed that Aβ aggregates have a single structure with three-fold symmetry. To explain why this structure possesses significant stability, we here investigated the specific interactions between Aβ peptides in the aggregate, using ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. The results indicate that the interactions between the Aβ peptides of the stacked Aβ pair are stronger than those between the Aβ peptides of the trimer with three-fold symmetry and that the charged amino-acids are important.

  12. Mass spectral characterization of organophosphate-labeled, tyrosine-containing peptides: characteristic mass fragments and a new binding motif for organophosphates.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, Lawrence M; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Li, Bin; Nachon, Florian; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2010-05-15

    We have identified organophosphorus agent (OP)-tyrosine adducts on 12 different proteins labeled with six different OP. Labeling was achieved by treating pure proteins with up to 40-fold molar excess of OP at pH 8-8.6. OP-treated proteins were digested with trypsin, and peptides were separated by HPLC. Fragmentation patterns for 100 OP-peptides labeled on tyrosine were determined in the mass spectrometer. The goals of the present work were (1) to determine the common features of the OP-reactive tyrosines, and (2) to describe non-sequence MSMS fragments characteristic of OP-tyrosine peptides. Characteristic ions at 272 and 244 amu for tyrosine-OP immonium ions were nearly always present in the MSMS spectrum of peptides labeled on tyrosine by chlorpyrifos-oxon. Characteristic fragments also appeared from the parent ions that had been labeled with diisopropylfluorophosphate (216 amu), sarin (214 amu), soman (214 amu) or FP-biotin (227, 312, 329, 691 and 708 amu). In contrast to OP-reactive serines, which lie in the consensus sequence GXSXG, the OP-reactive tyrosines have no consensus sequence. Their common feature is the presence of nearby positively charged residues that activate the phenolic hydroxyl group. The significance of these findings is the recognition of a new binding motif for OP to proteins that have no active site serine. Modified peptides are difficult to find when the OP bears no radiolabel and no tag. The characteristic MSMS fragment ions are valuable because they are identifiers for OP-tyrosine, independent of the peptide. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The neurotoxic prion peptide fragment PrP(106-126) is a chemotactic agonist for the G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor-like 1.

    PubMed

    Le, Y; Yazawa, H; Gong, W; Yu, Z; Ferrans, V J; Murphy, P M; Wang, J M

    2001-02-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible and fatal neurodegenerative disorders which involve infiltration and activation of mononuclear phagocytes at the brain lesions. A 20-aa acid fragment of the human cellular prion protein, PrP(106-126), was reported to mimic the biological activity of the pathologic isoform of prion and activates mononuclear phagocytes. The cell surface receptor(s) mediating the activity of PrP(106-126) is unknown. In this study, we show that PrP(106-126) is chemotactic for human monocytes through the use of a G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), which has been reported to interact with a diverse array of exogenous or endogenous ligands. Upon stimulation by PrP(106-126), FPRL1 underwent a rapid internalization and, furthermore, PrP(106-126) enhanced monocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin. Thus, FPRL1 may act as a "pattern recognition" receptor that interacts with multiple pathologic agents and may be involved in the proinflammatory process of prion diseases.

  14. Structural Analysis of a Peptide Fragment of Transmembrane Transporter Protein Bilitranslocase

    PubMed Central

    Župerl, Špela; Sikorska, Emilia; Zhukov, Igor; Solmajer, Tom; Novič, Marjana

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of genomic and post-genomic approaches is rapidly altering the number of identified human influx carriers. A transmembrane protein bilitranslocase (TCDB 2.A.65) has long attracted attention because of its function as an organic anion carrier. It has also been identified as a potential membrane transporter for cellular uptake of several drugs and due to its implication in drug uptake, it is extremely important to advance the knowledge about its structure. However, at present, only the primary structure of bilitranslocase is known. In our work, transmembrane subunits of bilitranslocase were predicted by a previously developed chemometrics model and the stability of these polypeptide chains were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Furthermore, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles were used as a model of cell membrane and herein we present a high-resolution 3D structure of an 18 amino acid residues long peptide corresponding to the third transmembrane part of bilitranslocase obtained by use of multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. It has been experimentally confirmed that one of the transmembrane segments of bilitranslocase has alpha helical structure with hydrophilic amino acid residues oriented towards one side, thus capable of forming a channel in the membrane. PMID:22745694

  15. From Peptide Fragments to Whole Protein: Copper(II) Load and Coordination Features of IAPP.

    PubMed

    Magrì, Antonio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Tabbì, Giovanni; La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2017-12-19

    The copper-binding features of rat islet amyloid polypeptide (r-IAPP) are herein disclosed through the determination of the stability constants and spectroscopic properties of its copper complex species. To mimic the metal binding sites of the human IAPP (h-IAPP), a soluble, single-point mutated variant of r-IAPP, having a histidine residue in place of Arg18, was synthesized, that is, r-IAPP(1-37; R18H). The peptide IAPP(1-8) was also characterized to have deeper insight into the N-terminus copper(II)-binding features of r-IAPP as well as of its mutated form. A combined experimental (thermodynamic and spectroscopic) and computational approach allowed us to assess the metal loading and the coordination features of the whole IAPP. At physiological pH, the N-terminal amino group is the Cu 2+ main binding site both of entire r-IAPP and of its mutated form that mimics h-IAPP. The histidine residue present in this mutated polypeptide accounts for the second Cu 2+ binding. We can speculate that the copper driven toxicity of h-IAPP in comparison to that of r-IAPP can be attributed to the different metal loading and the presence of a second metal anchoring site, the His 18 , whose role is usually invoked in the process of h-IAPP aggregation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. ACE-Inhibitory and Antioxidant Activities of Peptide Fragments Obtained from Tomato Processing By-Products Fermented Using Bacillus subtilis: Effect of Amino Acid Composition and Peptides Molecular Mass Distribution.

    PubMed

    Moayedi, Ali; Mora, Leticia; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Hashemi, Maryam; Safari, Mohammad; Toldrá, Fidel

    2017-01-01

    The effects of amino acid composition and peptide molecular mass on ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of protein fragments obtained from tomato waste fermented using Bacillus subtilis were evaluated. The addition of B. subtilis increased the relative amounts of aromatic and positively-charged amino acids which have been described to influence the biological activities of peptide fragments. IC 50 values of hydrolysates for ACE-inhibitory and 2, 2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activities were found to be 1.5 and 8.2 mg/mL, respectively. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) pattern of the hydrolysate indicated the breakdown of parent proteins to smaller peptides with molecular weights mainly below 1400 Da. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the highest ACE-inhibitory activity was due to peptides showing molecular mass range 500-800 Da, while the most active antioxidant peptides were found to be mainly at the two different peptide weight ranges 500-800 Da and 1200-1500 Da.

  17. Fragmentation of doubly-protonated peptide ion populations labeled by H/D exchange with CD3OD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kristin A.; Kuppannan, Krishna; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2006-03-01

    Doubly-protonated bradykinin (RPPGFSPFR) and an angiotensin III analogue (RVYIFPF) were subjected to hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with CD3OD in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. A bimodal distribution of deuterium incorporation was present for bradykinin after H/D exchange for 90 s at a CD3OD pressure of 4 × 10-7 Torr, indicating the existence of at least two distinct populations. Bradykinin ion populations corresponding to 0-2 and 5-11 deuteriums (i.e., D0, D1, D2, D5, D6, D7, D8, D9, D10, and D11) were each monoisotopically selected and fragmented via sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) collision-induced dissociation (CID). The D0-D2 ion populations, which correspond to the slower exchanging population, consistently require lower SORI amplitude to achieve a similar precursor ion survival yield as the faster-reacting (D5-D11) populations. These results demonstrate that conformation/protonation motif has an effect on fragmentation efficiency for bradykinin. Also, the partitioning of the deuterium atoms into fragment ions suggests that the C-terminal arginine residue exchanges more rapidly than the N-terminal arginine. Total deuterium incorporation in the b1/y8 and b2/y7 ion pairs matches very closely the theoretical values for all ion populations studied, indicating that the ions of a complementary pair are likely formed during the same fragmentation event, or that no scrambling occurs upon SORI. Deuterium incorporation into the y1/a8 pseudo-ion pair does not closely match the expected theoretical values. The other peptide, doubly-protonated RVYIFPF, has a trimodal distribution of deuterium incorporation upon H/D exchange with CD3OD at a pressure of 1 × 10-7 Torr for 600 s, indicating at least three distinct ion populations. After 90 s of H/D exchange where at least two distinct populations are detected, the D0-D7 ion populations were monoisotopically selected and fragmented via SORI-CID over a range of SORI

  18. Novel cysteine tags for the sequencing of non-tryptic disulfide peptides of anurans: ESI-MS study of fragmentation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Samgina, Tatyana Y; Vorontsov, Egor A; Gorshkov, Vladimir A; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Nifant'ev, Ilya E; Kanawati, Basem; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Zubarev, Roman A; Lebedev, Albert T

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometry faces considerable difficulties in de novo sequencing of long non-tryptic peptides with S-S bonds. Long disulfide-containing peptides brevinins 1E and 2Ec from frog Rana ridibunda were reduced and alkylated with nine novel and three known derivatizing agents. Eight of the novel reagents are maleimide derivatives. Modified samples were subjected to MS/MS studies on FT-ICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers using CAD/HCD or ECD/ETD techniques. Procedures, fragmentation patterns, and sequence coverage for two peptides modified with 12 tags are described. ECD/ETD and CAD fragmentation revealed complementary sequence information. Higher-energy collisionally activated dissociation (HCD) sufficiently enhanced y-ions formation for brevinin 1E, but not for brevinin 2Ec. Some novel tags [N-benzylmaleimide, N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)maleimide] along with known N-phenylmaleimide and iodoacetic acid showed high total sequence coverage taking into account combined ETD and HCD fragmentation. Moreover, modification of long (34 residues) brevinin 2Ec with N-benzylmaleimide or N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)maleimide yielded high sequence coverage and full C-terminal sequence determination with ECD alone. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  19. Characterizing the Range of Extracellular Protein Post-Translational Modifications in a Cellulose-Degrading Bacteria Using a Multiple Proteolyic Digestion/Peptide Fragmentation Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dykstra, Andrew B; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are known to play a significant role in many biological functions. The focus of this study is to characterize the post-translational modifications of the cellulosome protein complex used by the bacterium Clostridium thermocellum to better understand how this protein machine is tuned for enzymatic cellulose solubilization. To enhance comprehensive characterization, the extracellular cellulosome proteins were analyzed using multiple proteolytic digests (trypsin, Lys-C, Glu-C) and multiple fragmentation techniques (collisionally-activated dissociation, electron transfer dissociation, decision tree). As expected, peptide and protein identifications were increased by utilizing alternate proteases and fragmentation methods, in addition to the increase in protein sequencemore » coverage. The complementarity of these experiments also allowed for a global exploration of PTMs associated with the cellulosome based upon a set of defined PTMs that included methylation, oxidation, acetylation, phosphorylation, and signal peptide cleavage. In these experiments, 85 modified peptides corresponding to 28 cellulosome proteins were identified. Many of these modifications were located in active cellulolytic or structural domains of the cellulosome proteins, suggesting a level of possible regulatory control of protein function in various cellulotyic conditions. The use of multiple enzymes and fragmentation technologies allowed for independent verification of PTMs in different experiments, thus leading to increased confidence in PTM identifications.« less

  20. Complex interplay between the length and composition of the huntingtin-derived peptides modulates the intracellular behavior of the N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Michał; Gawliński, Paweł; Bąk, Daniel; Matysiak, Agata; Bal, Jerzy

    2015-05-01

    Diverse subcellular localizations of the huntingtin-containing inclusion bodies are frequently suspected of reflecting crucial divisions between different cellular pathways contributing to the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease. Here, we use a panel of different N-terminal huntingtin fragments overexpressed in transfected neuronal and non-neuronal cells to demonstrate that it is the length of the N-terminal huntingtin fragments rather than a presence of any specific amino acid sequences that determines the ratio between the nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Importantly, the length of those fragments does also seem to strongly influence the folding of the aggregating huntingtin species, as indicated by the apparent differences in their accessibility for different antibodies directed against particular subdomains within the N-terminal part of huntingtin, although these differences do not correlate with the peptides' ability to efficiently aggregate within the cell nucleus. Furthermore, the relatively long huntingtin fragment containing 588 amino acids of the reference sequence shows intracellular behavior that is substantially different from that exhibited by its shorter counterparts (containing either 171, 120, 89 or 64 amino acids), as this rarely aggregating peptide is not only accumulating in cytoplasmic inclusions of slightly different morphology but is also most strongly affected by the FLAG-tagging procedure that unexpectedly induces (or enhances) autophagy-related processes. Together, our results reveal a significant heterogeneity of the huntingtin accumulation patterns that are observed at the cellular level. These patterns are not only strongly dependent on both the length and the amino acid composition of the N-terminal huntingtin peptides but also seem to engage different cellular mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, including the non-proteasomal degradation of potentially toxic huntingtin forms. Copyright

  1. Fragment-based discovery of a new family of non-peptidic small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Colliandre, Lionel; Ahnou, Nazim; Nevers, Quentin; Gelin, Muriel; Bessin, Yannick; Brillet, Rozenn; Cala, Olivier; Douguet, Dominique; Bourguet, William; Krimm, Isabelle; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Guichou, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIase) that catalyse the interconversion of the peptide bond at proline residues. Several cyclophilins play a pivotal role in the life cycle of a number of viruses. The existing cyclophilin inhibitors, all derived from cyclosporine A or sanglifehrin A, have disadvantages, including their size, potential for side effects unrelated to cyclophilin inhibition and drug–drug interactions, unclear antiviral spectrum and manufacturing issues. Here we use a fragment-based drug discovery approach using nucleic magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and structure-based compound optimization to generate a new family of non-peptidic, small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent in vitro PPIase inhibitory activity and antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus and coronaviruses. This family of compounds has the potential for broad-spectrum, high-barrier-to-resistance treatment of viral infections. PMID:27652979

  2. Interaction of copper(II) with the prion peptide fragment HuPrP(76-114) encompassing four histidyl residues within and outside the octarepeat domain.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Osz, Katalin; Nagy, Zoltán; Sanna, Daniele; Micera, Giovanni; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarell, Enrico

    2009-05-04

    Complex formation processes between the 39-mer residue peptide fragment of human prion protein, HuPrP(76-114), and copper(II) ions have been studied by potentiometric, UV-vis, circular dichroism (CD), electron paramagnetic resonance, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry methods. This peptide consists of 39 amino acid residues and contains two histidines (His77 and His85) belonging to the octarepeat domain and two histidines (His96 and His111) outside this domain. It was found that HuPrP(76-114) is able to bind 4 equiv of metal ions and all histidyl residues are independent, except nonequivalent metal binding sites in the oligonuclear species. Imidazole nitrogen donor atoms are the primary and exclusive metal binding sites below pH 5.5 in the form of various macrochelates. The macrochelation slightly suppresses, but cannot prevent, the deprotonation and metal ion coordination of amide functions, resulting in the formation of (N(im),N(-)), (N(im),N(-),N(-)), and (N(im),N(-),N(-),N(-))-coordinated copper(II) complexes in the pH range from 5.5 to 9. CD spectroscopy results gave clear evidence for the differences in the metal binding affinity of the histidyl sites according to the following order: His111 > His96 > His77 approximately His85. Among the oligonuclear complexes, the formation of di- and tetranuclear species seems to be favored over the trinuclear ones, at pH values beyond the physiological ones. This phenomenon was not observed in the complex formation reactions of HuPrP(84-114), a peptide fragment containing only one histidyl residue from the octarepeat. As a consequence, the data support the existence of cooperativity in the metal binding ability of this peptide probably due to the presence of two octarepeat sequences of the dimeric octarepeat domain of HuPrP(76-114) at basic pH values.

  3. Kinetics of the competitive reactions of isomerization and peptide bond cleavage at l-α- and d-β-aspartyl residues in an αA-crystallin fragment.

    PubMed

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    d-β-aspartyl (Asp) residue has been found in a living body such as aged lens crystallin, although l-α-amino acids are constituents in natural proteins. Isomerization from l-α- to d-β-Asp probably modulates structures to affect biochemical reactions. At Asp residue, isomerization and peptide bond cleavage compete with each other. To gain insight into how fast each reaction proceeds, the analysis requires the consideration of both pathways simultaneously and independently. No information has been provided, however, about these competitive processes because each reaction has been studied separately. The contribution of Asp isomers to the respective pathways has still been veiled. In this work, the two competitive reactions, isomerization and spontaneous peptide bond cleavage at Asp residue, were simultaneously observed and compared in an αA-crystallin fragment, S 51 LFRTVLD 58 SG 60 containing l-α- and d-β-Asp58 isomers. The kinetics showed that the formation of l- and d-succinimide (Suc) intermediate, as a first step of isomerization, was comparable at l-α- and d-β-Asp. Although l-Suc was converted to l-β-Asp, d-Suc was liable to return to the original d-β-Asp, the reverse reaction marked enough to consider d-β-Asp as apparently stable. d-β-Asp was also resistant to the peptide bond cleavage. Such apparent less reactivity is probably the reason for gradual and abnormal accumulation of d-β-Asp in a living body under physiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Protection efficacy of the Brucella abortus ghost vaccine candidate lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36) in murine models.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ae Jeong; Moon, Ja Young; Kim, Won Kyong; Kim, Suk; Hur, Jin

    2016-11-01

    Brucella abortus cells were lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36). Next, the protection efficacy of the lysed fragment as a vaccine candidate was evaluated. Group A mice were immunized with sterile PBS, group B mice were intraperitoneally (ip) immunized with 3 × 10 8 colony-forming units (CFUs) of B. abortus strain RB51, group C mice were immunized ip with 3 × 10 8 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate, and group D mice were orally immunized with 3 × 10 9 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific serum IgG titers were considerably higher in groups C and D than in group A. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were significantly higher in groups B-D than in group A. After an ip challenge with B. abortus 544, only group C mice showed a significant level of protection as compared to group A. Overall, these results show that ip immunization with a vaccine candidate lysed by GI24 can effectively protect mice from systemic infection with virulent B. abortus.

  5. Influence of temperature and crown ether complex formation on the charge partitioning between z and c fragments formed after electron capture by small peptide dications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlerding, Anneli; Jensen, Camilla S.; Wyer, Jean A.; Holm, Anne I. S.; Jørgensen, Palle; Kadhane, Umesh; Larsen, Mikkel K.; Panja, Subhasis; Poully, Jean Christophe; Worm, Esben S.; Zettergren, Henning; Hvelplund, Preben; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2009-04-01

    Electron capture by peptide dications results in N-C[alpha] bond cleavage to give c+ and z or c and z+ fragments. In this work we have investigated how crown ether (18-crown-6 = CE) complex formation and a change in the internal energy affect the charge division between the z and c fragments. Both complex formation and a high temperature have the effect of breaking internal ionic hydrogen bonds. The crown ether complex also lowers the probability of internal proton transfer between the two fragments, and reduces the recombination energy of the charged group it targets. The systems under study were doubly protonated di- and tripeptides, [AK+2H]2+, [AR+2H]2+, [KK+2H]2+ and [GHK+2H]2+ (A = alanine, K = lysine, R = arginine, G = glycine and H = histidine). For crown ether complexes the formation of z+ ions was always preferred over c+ ions. In the case of [GHK+2H]2+, the bare ion dissociated into z2+ + c1 and z1 + c2+ from cleavage of the first and second N-C[alpha] bond, respectively, whereas z1+ fragment ions had higher yield than c2+ for [GHK+2H]2+(CE). The internal energy of the ions was changed by storing them in a 22-pole ion trap in which they were equilibrated to a temperature between -60 and 90 °C in collisions with helium gas. The average internal energy increased by about 0.4 eV from the lowest to the highest temperature for the dipeptides and 0.6 eV for the tripeptide. More fragmentation occurred at the higher temperature, as observed by an increase in the formation of b+ and y+ ions after breakage of the peptide bond of vibrationally hot even-electron cations and from secondary reactions of z+ radical cations within the time window of the experiment. However, the z+ to c+ partitioning was not found to depend significantly on temperature in the measured range. In addition the decay of [GHK+H]+/[GHK+2H]+ and [AK+H]+ formed after electron capture by [GHK+2H]2+ and [AK+2H]2+ was found to occur on a microsecond to millisecond timescale. The data are well

  6. Application of higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) to the fragmentation of new DOTA-based labels and N-termini DOTA-labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    El-Khatib, A H; He, Y; Esteban-Fernández, D; Linscheid, M W

    2017-08-01

    1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) derivatives are applied in quantitative proteomics owing to their ability to react with different functional groups, to harbor lanthanoides and hence their compatibility with molecular and elemental mass spectrometry. The new DOTA derivatives, namely Ln-MeCAT-Click and Ln-DOTA-Dimedone, allow efficient thiol labeling and targeting sulfenation as an important post-translational modification, respectively. Quantitative applications require the investigation of fragmentation behavior of these reagents. Therefore, the fragmentation behavior of Ln-MeCAT-Click and Ln-DOTA-Dimedone was studied using collision-induced dissociation (CID), infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD) using different energy levels, and the efficiency of reporter ion production was estimated. The efficiency of characteristic fragment formation was in the order IRMPD > HCD (normal energy level) > CID. On the other hand, the application of HCD at high energy levels (HCD@HE; NCE > 250%) resulted in a significant increase in reporter ion production (33-54%). This new strategy was successfully applied to generate label-specific reporter ions for DOTA amino labeling at the N-termini and in a quantitative fashion for the estimation of amino:thiol ratio in peptides. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effect of Basic Residue on the Kinetics of Peptide Fragmentation Examined Using Surface-Induced Dissociation Combined with Resonant Ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-11-30

    In this work, resonant ejection coupled with surface-induced dissociation (SID) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer is used to examine fragmentation kinetics of two singly protonated hexapeptides, RYGGFL and KYGGFL, containing the basic arginine residue and less basic lysine residue at the N-terminus. The kinetics of individual reaction channels at different collision energies are probed by applying a short ejection pulse (1 ms) in resonance with the cyclotron frequency of a selected fragment ion and varying the delay time between ion-surface collision and resonant ejection while keeping total reaction delay time constant. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of themore » experimental data provides accurate threshold energies and activation entropies of individual reaction channels. Substitution of arginine with less basic lysine has a pronounced effect on the observed fragmentation kinetics of several pathways, including the b2 ion formation, but has little or no effect on formation of the b5+H2O fragment ion. The combination of resonant ejection SID, time- and collision energy-resolved SID, and RRKM modeling of both types of experimental data provides a detailed mechanistic understanding of the primary dissociation pathways of complex gaseous ions.« less

  8. Gamma-atrial natriuretic polypeptide (gamma ANP)-derived peptides in human plasma: cosecretion of N-terminal gamma ANP fragment and alpha ANP.

    PubMed

    Itoh, H; Nakao, K; Sugawara, A; Saito, Y; Mukoyama, M; Morii, N; Yamada, T; Shiono, S; Arai, H; Hosoda, K

    1988-09-01

    Using RIAs for the N- and C-terminal fragments of the human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) precursor gamma ANP, that is gamma ANP-(1-25), and alpha ANP [gamma ANP-(99-126)], we studied the secretion of gamma ANP-derived peptides from the heart in normal subjects and patients with heart disease, chronic renal failure, and cirrhosis. We detected gamma ANP-(1-25)-like immunoreactivity (-LI) in plasma from normal subjects (n = 17) in considerable amounts [mean, 510 +/- 62 (+/- SE) pg/mL (174 +/- 21 pmol/L)]; the mean plasma alpha ANP-LI level at the same time in these subjects was 32.8 +/- 4.4 pg/mL (10.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/L). Gel permeation chromatographic analysis of plasma samples from normal subjects and patients with heart disease and chronic renal failure revealed two major components; one was alpha ANP, and the other was the 10K N-terminal gamma ANP fragment (N-peptide) resulting from the removal of alpha ANP (3K) from gamma ANP (13K). In addition, gamma ANP (13K), which possessed both gamma ANP-(1-25)-LI and alpha ANP-LI, and beta ANP, an antiparallel dimer of alpha ANP, were detected in some patients as minor components. A significant positive correlation between plasma levels of the N-terminal gamma ANP fragment and alpha ANP (P less than 0.01) and almost equal step-ups in the coronary sinus plasma levels of the N-terminal gamma ANP fragment and alpha ANP suggest that they are cosecreted in equimolar amounts. The high molar ratio of plasma gamma ANP-(1-25)-LI to alpha ANP-LI (17.4 +/- 1.4) in normal subjects and the significantly higher ratio in patients with chronic renal failure (36.9 +/- 7.1; P less than 0.01) suggest the slower clearance of the N-terminal gamma ANP fragment than alpha ANP and a role for the kidney in its degradation. Since the molar ratio of plasma gamma ANP-(1-25)-LI to alpha ANP-LI in patients with cirrhosis (20.7 +/- 2.7) was similar to that in normal subjects, it is unlikely that the N-terminal gamma ANP fragment is metabolized by

  9. A Fragment of the LG3 Peptide of Endorepellin Is Present in the Urine of Physically Active Mining Workers: A Potential Marker of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tony J.; Sampson, Dayle L.; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L.; Carter, Shea L.; Leavesley, David I.; Parker, Anthony W.; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival. PMID:22457785

  10. Fusogenic Alzheimer’s peptide fragment Aβ (29–42) in interaction with lipid bilayers: Secondary structure, dynamics, and specific interaction with phosphatidyl ethanolamine polar heads as revealed by solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ravault, Stéphanie; Soubias, Olivier; Saurel, Olivier; Thomas, Annick; Brasseur, Robert; Milon, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the native Alzheimer’s peptide C-terminal fragment Aβ (29–42), and two mutants (G33A and G37A) with neutral lipid bilayers made of POPC and POPE in a 9:1 molar ratio was investigated by solid-state NMR. This fragment and the lipid composition were selected because they represent the minimum requirement for the fusogenic activity of the Alzheimer’s peptide. The chemical shifts of alanine methyl isotropic carbon were determined by MAS NMR, and they clearly demonstrated that the major form of the peptide equilibrated in membrane is not in a helical conformation. 2H NMR, performed with acyl chain deuterated POPC, demonstrated that there is no perturbation of the acyl chain’s dynamics and of the lipid phase transition temperature. 2H NMR, performed with alanine methyl-deuterated peptide demonstrated that the peptide itself has a limited mobility below and above the lipid phase transition temperature (molecular order parameter equal to 0.94). MAS 31P NMR revealed a specific interaction with POPE polar head as seen by the enhancement of POPE phosphorus nuclei T2 relaxation. All these results are in favor of a β-sheet oligomeric association of the peptide at the bilayer interface, preferentially recruiting phosphatidyl ethanolamine polar heads. PMID:15840826

  11. Astrocytes with previous chronic exposure to amyloid β-peptide fragment 1-40 suppress excitatory synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Oyabu, Kohei; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Eto, Kei; Adaniya, Yuna; Kubota, Kaori; Watanabe, Takuya; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Nabekura, Junichi; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2017-12-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death are responsible for cognitive and behavioral deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well known that such neurological abnormalities are preceded by long-term exposure of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and/or hyperphosphorylated tau prior. In addition to the neurological deficit, astrocytes as a major glial cell type in the brain, significantly participate in the neuropathogenic mechanisms underlying synaptic modulation. Although astrocytes play a significant key role in modulating synaptic transmission, little is known on whether astrocyte dysfunction caused by such long-term Aβ exposure affects synapse formation and function. Here, we show that synapse formation and synaptic transmission are attenuated in hippocampal-naïve neurons co-cultured with astrocytes that have previously experienced chronic Aβ 1-40 exposure. In this abnormal astrocytic condition, hippocampal neurons exhibit decrements of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) and miniature EPSC frequency. Furthermore, size of readily releasable synaptic pools and number of excitatory synapses were also significantly decreased. Contrary to these negative effects, release probability at individual synapses was significantly increased in the same astrocytic condition. Taken together, our data indicate that lower synaptic transmission caused by astrocytes previously, and chronically, exposed to Aβ1-40 is attributable to a small number of synapses with higher release probability. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Gliadin Fragments and a Specific Gliadin 33-mer Peptide Close KATP Channels and Induce Insulin Secretion in INS-1E Cells and Rat Islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Morten; Calloe, Kirstine; Haupt-Jorgensen, Martin; Larsen, Jesper; Schmitt, Nicole; Josefsen, Knud; Buschard, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    In non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, diabetes incidence is reduced by a gluten-free diet. Gluten peptides, such as the compound gliadin, can cross the intestinal barrier and may directly affect pancreatic beta cells. We investigated the effects of enzymatically-digested gliadin in NOD mice, INS-1E cells and rat islets. Six injections of gliadin digest in 6-week-old NOD mice did not affect diabetes development, but increased weight gain (20% increase by day 100). In INS-1E cells, incubation with gliadin digest induced a dose-dependent increase in insulin secretion, up to 2.5-fold after 24 hours. A similar effect was observed in isolated rat islets (1.6-fold increase). In INS-1E cells, diazoxide reduced the stimulatory effect of gliadin digest. Additionally, gliadin digest was shown to decrease current through KATP-channels. A specific gliadin 33-mer had a similar effect, both on current and insulin secretion. Finally, INS-1E incubation with gliadin digest potentiated palmitate-induced insulin secretion by 13% compared to controls. Our data suggest that gliadin fragments may contribute to the beta-cell hyperactivity observed prior to the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23785500

  13. Simultaneous Glycan-Peptide Characterization Using Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography and Parallel Fragmentation by CID, Higher Energy Collisional Dissociation, and Electron Transfer Dissociation MS Applied to the N-Linked Glycoproteome of Campylobacter jejuni*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nichollas E.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Connolly, Angela M.; Paulech, Jana; Edwards, Alistair V. G.; Crossett, Ben; Falconer, Linda; Kolarich, Daniel; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Højrup, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H.; Larsen, Martin R.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a gastrointestinal pathogen that is able to modify membrane and periplasmic proteins by the N-linked addition of a 7-residue glycan at the strict attachment motif (D/E)XNX(S/T). Strategies for a comprehensive analysis of the targets of glycosylation, however, are hampered by the resistance of the glycan-peptide bond to enzymatic digestion or β-elimination and have previously concentrated on soluble glycoproteins compatible with lectin affinity and gel-based approaches. We developed strategies for enriching C. jejuni HB93-13 glycopeptides using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography and examined novel fragmentation, including collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher energy collisional (C-trap) dissociation (HCD) as well as CID/electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. CID/HCD enabled the identification of glycan structure and peptide backbone, allowing glycopeptide identification, whereas CID/ETD enabled the elucidation of glycosylation sites by maintaining the glycan-peptide linkage. A total of 130 glycopeptides, representing 75 glycosylation sites, were identified from LC-MS/MS using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to CID/HCD and CID/ETD. CID/HCD provided the majority of the identifications (73 sites) compared with ETD (26 sites). We also examined soluble glycoproteins by soybean agglutinin affinity and two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified a further six glycosylation sites. This study more than doubles the number of confirmed N-linked glycosylation sites in C. jejuni and is the first to utilize HCD fragmentation for glycopeptide identification with intact glycan. We also show that hydrophobic integral membrane proteins are significant targets of glycosylation in this organism. Our data demonstrate that peptide-centric approaches coupled to novel mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques may be suitable for application to eukaryotic glycoproteins for simultaneous

  14. The Midregional Fragment of Pro-A–Type Natriuretic Peptide, Blood Pressure, and Mortality in a Prospective Cohort Study of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes (ZODIAC-25)

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Kornelis J.J.; Landman, Gijs W.D.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H.; Struck, Joachim; Navis, Gerjan J.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evidence that midregional fragment of pro-A–type natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) is a marker of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the capabilities of MR-proANP in predicting mortality. We also investigated whether MR-proANP influences the relationship between blood pressure and mortality in old age. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 1998, 1,143 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes participated in the ZODIAC study. Because blood was drawn for 867 patients (76%) and confounders were missing for 19 patients, the final study sample comprised 848 patients. After a follow-up time of 10 years, we used Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the relationship between MR-proANP and (cardiovascular) mortality. Harrell C statistic was used to compare models with and without MR-proANP. The regression analyses were repeated without MR-proANP for patients aged older than 75 years. RESULTS Median MR-proANP in the total study sample was 75 pmol/L (interquartile range, 48–124 pmol/L). During follow-up, 354 (42%) out of 848 patients had died, of whom 152 (43%) deaths were attributable to cardiovascular factors. MR-proANP was independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, irrespective of age. During old age, there was a significant inverse relationship between blood pressure and mortality. This relationship did not change after adjustment for MR-proANP. CONCLUSIONS MR-proANP is independently associated with mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. MR-proANP did not influence the inverse relationship between blood pressure and mortality in elderly patients. PMID:23230100

  15. The midregional fragment of pro-A-type natriuretic peptide, blood pressure, and mortality in a prospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes (ZODIAC-25).

    PubMed

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Landman, Gijs W D; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H; Struck, Joachim; Navis, Gerjan J; Bakker, Stephan J L; Houweling, Sebastiaan T; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J G

    2013-05-01

    Evidence that midregional fragment of pro-A-type natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) is a marker of mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the capabilities of MR-proANP in predicting mortality. We also investigated whether MR-proANP influences the relationship between blood pressure and mortality in old age. In 1998, 1,143 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes participated in the ZODIAC study. Because blood was drawn for 867 patients (76%) and confounders were missing for 19 patients, the final study sample comprised 848 patients. After a follow-up time of 10 years, we used Cox proportional hazard models to evaluate the relationship between MR-proANP and (cardiovascular) mortality. Harrell C statistic was used to compare models with and without MR-proANP. The regression analyses were repeated without MR-proANP for patients aged older than 75 years. Median MR-proANP in the total study sample was 75 pmol/L (interquartile range, 48-124 pmol/L). During follow-up, 354 (42%) out of 848 patients had died, of whom 152 (43%) deaths were attributable to cardiovascular factors. MR-proANP was independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, irrespective of age. During old age, there was a significant inverse relationship between blood pressure and mortality. This relationship did not change after adjustment for MR-proANP. MR-proANP is independently associated with mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. MR-proANP did not influence the inverse relationship between blood pressure and mortality in elderly patients.

  16. [Determination of brain natriuretic peptide levels and its N-terminal fragment for the evaluation of renal replacement therapies efficiency in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Tabak'ian, E A; Zaruba, A Iu; Rogoza, A N; Ataullakhanova, D M; Kukharchuk, V V

    2010-01-01

    to compare the capabilities of identifying different types of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) for the evaluation of renal replacement therapy modalities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure (CHF). Patients (31 men and 9 women) aged 30 to 82 years with functional class II-IV CHF in its decompensation phase were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups. A study group received medical therapy for CHF, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists, verospirone, beta-adrenoblockers, digoxin, loop diuretics (furosemide, diuver, in the doses not exceeding those taken before admission) in combination with renal replacement therapy: slow continuous ultrafiltration (SCUF) or continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVHF). A control group had only medical therapy for CHF (intravenous furosemide in the doses doubling those used before admission, i.e., > or =80 mg/day required for an adequate response to the drug--daily urine volume >1 liter). The patients from the study and control groups received furosemide < or =40 mg/day or torsemide < or =20 mg/day after a course of SCUF or CVVHF sessions or intravenous furosemide. There were 4 examination stages [control study points (CSP)]: (1) before study; (2) after CHF compensation achievement (a day before hospital discharge); (3) following 90 days; (4) following 180 days. The plasma concentration of active BNP was measured by enzyme immunoassay; that of the N-terminal fragment of BNP (NT-proBNP) was estimated on an analyzer. There were direct correlations between the content of BNP and that of NT-proBNP) in all CSPs in the patients from both groups. The study group showed a significantly greater weight loss, which was accompanied by a more pronounced reduction in systolic pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary venous hypertension, hydrothorax elimination, decreased liver size, lower plasma aldosterone concentration, decreased heart size, and higher left ventricular

  17. Spatial structure of oligopeptide PAP(248-261), the N-terminal fragment of the HIV enhancer prostatic acid phosphatase peptide PAP(248-286), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is an enzyme that facilitates infection of cells by HIV. Its peptide fragment PAP(248-286) forms amyloid fibrils known as SEVI, which enhance attachment of the virus by viral adhesion to the host cell prior to receptor-specific binding via reducing the electrostatic repulsion between the membranes of the virus and the target cell. The secondary structure of PAP(248-286) in aqueous and SDS solutions can be divided into an N-terminal disordered region, an α-helical central part and an α/310-helical C-terminal region (Nanga et al., 2009). In this work, we used NMR spectroscopy to study the spatial structure of the isolated N-terminal fragment of PAP(248-286), PAP(248-261) (GIHKQKEKSRLQGG), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions. Formation of a PAP(248-261)-SDS complex was confirmed by chemical shift alterations in the 1H NMR spectra of the peptide, as well as by the signs and values of Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE). In addition, the PAP(248-261) peptide does not form any specified secondary structure in either aqueous or SDS solutions.

  18. The Preferred Substrates for Transglutaminase 2 in a Complex Wheat Gluten Digest Are Peptide Fragments Harboring Celiac Disease T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Holm, Anders; Koehler, Christian J.; Thiede, Bernd; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Fleckenstein, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2). In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. Methods A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. Results We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. Conclusion TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease. PMID:21124911

  19. Effects of amyloid β-peptide fragment 31-35 on the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration of hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Li, Jian-Guo; Chen, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Ce

    2014-05-07

    The present study characterizes the effects of Aβ31-35, a short active fragment of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), upon the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i) of freshly dissociated pyramidal cells from rat CA1 hippocampus by using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and single cell Ca²⁺ imaging techniques. The results show that: (1) in the presence of voltage- and ATP-gated K⁺ channel blockers application of 5.0 μM Aβ31-35 significantly diminished transient outward K⁺ current amplitudes at clamped voltages between 0 and 45mV; (2) under the same conditions [Ca²⁺]i was minimally affected by 5.0 μM but significantly increased by 12.5 μM and 25 μM Aβ31-35; and (3) when 25 μM of a larger fragment of the amyloid β-peptide, Aβ25-35, was applied, the results were similar to those obtained with the same concentration of Aβ31-35. These results indicate that Aβ31-35 is likely to be the shortest active fragment of the full Aβ sequence, and can be as effectively as the full-length Aβ peptide in suppressing BK-channel mediated K⁺ currents and significantly elevating [Ca²⁺]i in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  1. Structure of peptide fragments of a cross-linked complex of [Lys(Abz){sup 26}]neurotoxin II from Naja naja oxiana with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, Yu.N.; Machold, J.; Franke, P.

    1994-09-10

    After irradiation of a complex of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) with iodinated [Lys(Abz){sup 26}]neurotoxin II, the labeled {delta}-subunit of AChR was isolated, and it was cleaved with the aid of LysC endoproteinase, the hydrolysate being separated by rfHPLC. In a mass-spectrometric analysis of the radioactive fraction, the peptide of the {delta}-subunit (M{sub r} 2593) was detected. By purification of the radioactive rfHPLC fraction with the aid of electrophoresis in tricine gel, three radioactive bands were obtained (M {approximately} 16, 10, and 8 kDa). Edman degradation gave for all of them the sequence of a fragment of the {delta}-subunit beginningmore » from Phe{sup 148}. On further cleavage of the radioactive fraction within the gel by the action of AspN proteinase, followed by rfHPLC, the radioactive peak was eluted under conditions close to those for the elution of the single radioactive peptide 30-44 obtained by the successive cleavage of the [{sup 125}I] neurotoxin II by LysC/AspN proteinases. This result shows the presence of the corresponding neurotoxin fragment in the sample in which the above-mentioned sequence of the receptor was detected. Since no sequences of the neurotoxin were detected in the radioactive products of the cross-linkages in model experiments at the picomolar level, neurotoxin II and its fragments were investigated by Edman degradation at the picomole level and so was the influence of the p-azidobenzyl group and its photoactivation on the degradation. On the whole, the sequencing of neurotoxin II and its fragments containing photolabeled and iodinated residues took place with extremely low initial yields; a further fall in the yields was observed on the degradation of irradiated Lys{sup 26}-peptides. The results obtained explain the difficulties in the detection of the sequences of the neurotoxin in cross-linkage products available in amounts of only 10-20 pmole.« less

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of the peptide recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment of human immunoglobulin G: the energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M; Bouzida, Djamal; Gehlhaar, Daniel K; Rejto, Paul A; Freer, Stephan T; Rose, Peter W

    2002-08-15

    Monte Carlo simulations of molecular recognition at the consensus binding site of the constant fragment (Fc) of human immunoglobulin G (Ig) protein have been performed to analyze structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding for the 13-residue cyclic peptide DCAWHLGELVWCT. The energy landscape analysis of a hot spot at the intermolecular interface using alanine scanning and equilibrium-simulated tempering dynamics with the simplified, knowledge-based energy function has enabled the role of the protein hot spot residues in providing the thermodynamic stability of the native structure to be determined. We have found that hydrophobic interactions between the peptide and the Met-252, Ile-253, His-433, and His-435 protein residues are critical to guarantee the thermodynamic stability of the crystallographic binding mode of the complex. Binding free energy calculations, using a molecular mechanics force field and a solvation energy model, combined with alanine scanning have been conducted to determine the energetic contribution of the protein hot spot residues in binding affinity. The conserved Asn-434, Ser-254, and Tyr-436 protein residues contribute significantly to the binding affinity of the peptide-protein complex, serving as an energetic hot spot at the intermolecular interface. The results suggest that evolutionary conserved hot spot protein residues at the intermolecular interface may be partitioned in fulfilling thermodynamic stability of the native binding mode and contributing to the binding affinity of the complex. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Forest Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters

    2007-01-01

    What Is Forest Fragmentation,and Why Is It Important? Forest fragmentation refers to a loss of forest and the division of the remaining forest into smaller blocks. Fragmentation is of concern primarily because of its impact on the conservation of biological diversity. Forest fragmentation can affect the amount and quality of habitat for many wildlife species (Fahrig...

  4. [An improved method of preparing protein and peptide probes in mass spectrometry with ionization of division fragments by californium-252 (TOF-PDMS)].

    PubMed

    Chivanov, V D; Zubarev, R A; Aksenov, S A; Bordunova, O G; Eremenko, V I; Kabanets, V M; Tatarinova, V I; Mishnev, A K; Kuraev, V V; Knysh, A N; Eremenko, I A

    1996-08-01

    The addition of organic acids (picric, oxalic, citric, or tartaric) to peptide and protein samples was found to significantly increase the yield of their quasi-molecular ions (QMI) in time-of-flight 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The yield of the ions depended on the pKa of the acid added.

  5. Dissociation Channel Dependence on Peptide Size Observed in Electron Capture Dissociation of Tryptic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Rest, Guillaume; Hui, Renjie; Frison, Gilles; Chamot-Rooke, Julia

    2011-09-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) of a series of five residue peptides led to the observation that these small peptides did not lead to the formation of the usual c/ z ECD fragments, but to a, b, y, and w fragments. In order to determine how general this behavior is for small sized peptides, the effect of peptide size on ECD fragments using a complete set of ECD spectra from the SwedECD spectra database was examined. Analysis of the database shows that b and w fragments are favored for small peptide sizes and that average fragment size shows a linear relationship to parent peptide size for most fragment types. From these data, it appears that most of the w fragments are not secondary fragments of the major z ions, in sharp contrast with the proposed mechanism leading to these ions. These data also show that c fragment distributions depend strongly on the nature of C-terminal residue basic site: arginine leads to loss of short neutral fragments, whereas lysine leads to loss of longer neutral fragments. It also appears that b ions might be produced by two different mechanisms depending on the parent peptide size. A model for the fragmentation pathways in competition is proposed. These relationships between average fragment size and parent peptide size could be further exploited also for CID fragment spectra and could be included in fragmentation prediction algorithms.

  6. The C-terminal fragment of parathyroid hormone-related peptide promotes bone formation in diabetic mice with low-turnover osteopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, D; Fernández-de-Castro, L; Portal-Núñez, S; López-Herradón, A; Dapía, S; Gómez-Barrena, E; Esbrit, P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Current data suggest that parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) domains other than the N-terminal PTH-like domain contribute to its role as an endogenous bone anabolic factor. PTHrP-107-139 inhibits bone resorption, a fact which has precluded an unequivocal demonstration of its possible anabolic action in vivo. We thus sought to characterize the osteogenic effects of this peptide using a mouse model of diabetic low-turnover osteopaenia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PTHrP-107-139 was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, with or without bone marrow ablation, for 13 days. Osteopaenia was confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography analysis. Histological analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded bone tissue sections by haematoxylin/eosin and Masson's staining, and tartrate-resistent acid phosphatase immunohistochemistry. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in normal and/or high glucose (HG) medium. Osteogenic and adipogenic markers were assessed by real-time PCR, and PTHrP and the PTH1 receptor protein expression by Western blot analysis. KEY RESULTS PTHrP-107-139 reversed the alterations in bone structure and osteoblast function, and also promoted bone healing after marrow ablation without affecting the number of osteoclast-like cells in diabetic mice. This peptide also reversed the high-glucose-induced changes in osteogenic differentiation in both bone marrow stromal cells and the more differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings demonstrate that PTHrP-107-139 promotes bone formation in diabetic mice. This mouse model and in vitro cell cultures allowed us to identify various anabolic effects of this peptide in this scenario. PMID:21175568

  7. Speckle noise suppression using a helix-free ferroelectric liquid crystal cell

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A L; Andreeva, T B; Kompanets, I N

    2014-12-31

    We have studied the method for suppressing speckle noise in patterns produced by a laser based on a fast-response electro-optical cell with a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) in which helicoid is absent, i.e., compensated for. The character of smectic layer deformation in an electric field is considered along with the mechanism of spatially inhomogeneous phase modulation of a laser beam passing through the cell which is accompanied by the destruction of phase relations in the beam. Advantages of a helix-free FLC cell are pointed out as compared to helical crystal cells studied previously. (liquid crystal devices)

  8. Amyloid β-peptide oligomers stimulate RyR-mediated Ca2+ release inducing mitochondrial fragmentation in hippocampal neurons and prevent RyR-mediated dendritic spine remodeling produced by BDNF.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andrea C; Adasme, Tatiana; SanMartín, Carol; Sebollela, Adriano; Hetz, Claudio; Carrasco, M Angélica; Ferreira, Sergio T; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2011-04-01

    Soluble amyloid β-peptide oligomers (AβOs), increasingly recognized as causative agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), disrupt neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis and synaptic function. Here, we report that AβOs at sublethal concentrations generate prolonged Ca(2+) signals in primary hippocampal neurons; incubation in Ca(2+)-free solutions, inhibition of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), or preincubation with N-acetyl-l-cysteine abolished these signals. AβOs decreased (6 h) RyR2 and RyR3 mRNA and RyR2 protein, and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation after 24 h. NMDAR inhibition abolished the RyR2 decrease, whereas RyR inhibition prevented significantly the RyR2 protein decrease and mitochondrial fragmentation induced by AβOs. Incubation with AβOs (6 h) eliminated the RyR2 increase induced by brain-derived nerve factor (BDNF) and the dendritic spine remodeling induced within minutes by BDNF or the RyR agonist caffeine. Addition of BDNF to neurons incubated with AβOs for 24 h, which had RyR2 similar to and slightly higher RyR3 protein content than those of controls, induced dendritic spine growth but at slower rates than in controls. These combined effects of sublethal AβOs concentrations (which include redox-sensitive stimulation of RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, decreased RyR2 protein expression, mitochondrial fragmentation, and prevention of RyR-mediated spine remodeling) may contribute to impairing the synaptic plasticity in AD.

  9. The prognostic value of pre-operative and post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodseth, Reitze N; Biccard, Bruce M; Le Manach, Yannick; Sessler, Daniel I; Lurati Buse, Giovana A; Thabane, Lehana; Schutt, Robert C; Bolliger, Daniel; Cagini, Lucio; Cardinale, Daniela; Chong, Carol P W; Chu, Rong; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Di Somma, Salvatore; Fahrner, René; Lim, Wen Kwang; Mahla, Elisabeth; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Puma, Francesco; Pyun, Wook B; Radović, Milan; Rajagopalan, Sriram; Suttie, Stuart; Vanniyasingam, Thuvaraha; van Gaal, William J; Waliszek, Marek; Devereaux, P J

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this study was to determine whether measuring post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides (NPs) (i.e., B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal fragment of proBNP [NT-proBNP]) enhances risk stratification in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, in whom a pre-operative NP has been measured. Pre-operative NP concentrations are powerful independent predictors of perioperative cardiovascular complications, but recent studies have reported that elevated post-operative NP concentrations are independently associated with these complications. It is not clear whether there is value in measuring post-operative NP when a pre-operative measurement has been done. We conducted a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis to determine whether the addition of post-operative NP levels enhanced the prediction of the composite of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 and ≥180 days after surgery. Eighteen eligible studies provided individual patient data (n = 2,179). Adding post-operative NP to a risk prediction model containing pre-operative NP improved model fit and risk classification at both 30 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,280 to 1,204; net reclassification index: 20%; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,320 to 1,300; net reclassification index: 11%; p = 0.003). Elevated post-operative NP was the strongest independent predictor of the primary outcome at 30 days (odds ratio: 3.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.2 to 6.2; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 2.7; p < 0.001) after surgery. Additional post-operative NP measurement enhanced risk stratification for the composite outcomes of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 days and ≥180 days after noncardiac surgery compared with a pre-operative NP measurement alone. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology

  10. Catechol oxidase-like oxidation chemistry of the 1-20 and 1-16 fragments of Alzheimer's disease-related beta-amyloid peptide: their structure-activity correlation and the fate of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Tay, William M; Ming, Li-June

    2005-04-29

    The Cu2+ complexes of the 1-16 and the 1-20 fragments of the Alzheimer's disease-related beta-amyloid peptide (CuAbeta) show significant oxidative activities toward a catechol-like substrate trihydroxylbenzene and plasmid DNA cleavage. The latter reflects possible oxidative stress to biological macromolecules, yielding supporting data to the pathological role of these soluble Abeta fragments. The former exhibits enzyme-like kinetics and is dependent on [H2O2], exhibiting k(cat) of 0.066 s-1 (6000-fold higher than the reaction without CuAbeta) and k(cat)/Km of 37.2 m-1s-1 under saturating [H2O2] of approximately 0.24%. This kinetic profile is consistent with metal-centered redox chemistry for the action of CuAbeta. A mechanism is proposed by the use of the catalytic cycle of dinuclear catechol oxidase as a working model. Trihydroxylbenzene is also oxidized by CuAbeta aerobically without H2O2, affording rate constants of 6.50x10(-3) s-1 and 3.25 m-1s-1. This activity is also consistent with catechol oxidase action in the absence of H2O2, wherein the substrate binds and reduces the Cu2+ center first, followed by O2 binding to afford the mu-eta2:eta2-peroxo intermediate, which oxidizes a second substrate to complete the catalytic cycle. A tetragonally distorted octahedral metal coordination sphere with three coordinated His side chains and some specific H-bonding interactions is concluded from the electronic spectrum of CuAbeta, hyperfine-shifted 1H NMR spectrum of CoAbeta, and molecular mechanics calculations. The results presented here are expected to add further insight into the chemistry of metallo-Abeta, which may assist better understanding of the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Generation of the beta-amyloid peptide and the amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment gamma are potentiated by FE65L1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang; Tesco, Giuseppina; Jeong, William J; Lindsley, Loren; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Eckman, Christopher B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2003-12-19

    Members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65, FE65L1, and FE65L2, bind the C-terminal region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of FE65 and FE65L1 was previously reported to increase the levels of alpha-secretase-derived APP (APPs alpha). Increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation was also observed in cells showing the FE65-dependent increase in APPs alpha. To understand the mechanism for the observed increase in both A beta and APPs alpha given that alpha-secretase cleavage of a single APP molecule precludes A beta generation, we examined the effects of FE65L1 overexpression on APP C-terminal fragments (APP CTFs). Our data show that FE65L1 potentiates gamma-secretase processing of APP CTFs, including the amyloidogenic CTF C99, accounting for the ability of FE65L1 to increase generation of APP C-terminal domain and A beta 40. The FE65L1 modulation of these processing events requires binding of FE65L1 to APP and APP CTFs and is not because of a direct effect on gamma-secretase activity, because Notch intracellular domain generation is not altered by FE65L1. Furthermore, enhanced APP CTF processing can be detected in early endosome vesicles but not in endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi membranes, suggesting that the effects of FE65L1 occur at or near the plasma membrane. Finally, although FE65L1 increases APP C-terminal domain production, it does not mediate the APP-dependent transcriptional activation observed with FE65.

  12. A monodisperse transmembrane α-helical peptide barrel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Niitsu, Ai; Kong, Lingbing; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Woolfson, Derek N.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-05-01

    The fabrication of monodisperse transmembrane barrels formed from short synthetic peptides has not been demonstrated previously. This is in part because of the complexity of the interactions between peptides and lipids within the hydrophobic environment of a membrane. Here we report the formation of a transmembrane pore through the self-assembly of 35 amino acid α-helical peptides. The design of the peptides is based on the C-terminal D4 domain of the Escherichia coli polysaccharide transporter Wza. By using single-channel current recording, we define discrete assembly intermediates and show that the pore is most probably a helix barrel that contains eight D4 peptides arranged in parallel. We also show that the peptide pore is functional and capable of conducting ions and binding blockers. Such α-helix barrels engineered from peptides could find applications in nanopore technologies such as single-molecule sensing and nucleic-acid sequencing.

  13. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  14. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  15. Chameleon fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signaturemore » which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.« less

  16. Tityus serrulatus venom peptidomics: assessing venom peptide diversity.

    PubMed

    Rates, Breno; Ferraz, Karla K F; Borges, Márcia H; Richardson, Michael; De Lima, Maria Elena; Pimenta, Adriano M C

    2008-10-01

    MALDI-TOF-TOF and de novo sequencing were employed to assess the Tityus serrulatus venom peptide diversity. Previous works has shown the cornucopia of molecular masses, ranging from 800 to 3000Da, present in the venom from this and other scorpions species. This work reports the identification/sequencing of several of these peptides. The majority of the peptides found were fragments of larger venom toxins. For instance, 28 peptides could be identified as fragments from Pape proteins, 10 peptides corresponded to N-terminal fragments of the TsK beta (scorpine-like) toxin and fragments of potassium channel toxins (other than the k-beta) were sequenced as well. N-terminal fragments from the T. serrulatus hypotensins-I and II and a novel hypotensin-like peptide could also be found. This work also reports the sequencing of novel peptides without sequence similarities to other known molecules.

  17. An exhaustive survey of regular peptide conformations using a new metric for backbone handedness ( h )

    DOE PAGES

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2017-05-16

    The Ramachandran plot is important to structural biology as it describes a peptide backbone in the context of its dominant degrees of freedom—the backbone dihedral anglesφandψ(Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan & Sasisekharan, 1963). Since its introduction, the Ramachandran plot has been a crucial tool to characterize protein backbone features. However, the conformation or twist of a backbone as a function ofφandψhas not been completely described for bothcisandtransbackbones. Additionally, little intuitive understanding is available about a peptide’s conformation simply from knowing theφandψvalues of a peptide (e.g., is the regular peptide defined byφ = ψ =  - 100°  left-handed or right-handed?). This report provides a new metric for backbone handednessmore » (h) based on interpreting a peptide backbone as a helix with axial displacementdand angular displacementθ, both of which are derived from a peptide backbone’s internal coordinates, especially dihedral anglesφ,ψandω. In particular,hequals sin(θ)d/d|, with range [-1, 1] and negative (or positive) values indicating left(or right)-handedness. The metrichis used to characterize the handedness of every region of the Ramachandran plot for bothcis(ω = 0°) and trans (ω = 180°) backbones, which provides the first exhaustive survey of twist handedness in Ramachandran (φ,ψ) space. These maps fill in the ‘dead space’ within the Ramachandran plot, which are regions that are not commonly accessed by structured proteins, but which may be accessible to intrinsically disordered proteins, short peptide fragments, and protein mimics such as peptoids. Finally, building on the work of (Zacharias & Knapp, 2013), this report presents a new plot based ondandθthat serves as a universal and intuitive alternative to the Ramachandran plot. The universality arises from the fact that the co-inhabitants of such a plot include every possible peptide backbone includingcisandtransbackbones. The intuitiveness

  18. Aβ-oligomer uptake and the resulting inflammatory response in adult human astrocytes are precluded by an anti-Aβ single chain variable fragment in combination with an apoE mimetic peptide.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Mulder, Sandra D; Herrebout, Maaike A C; Baayen, Johannes C; Villegas, Sandra; Veerhuis, Robert

    2018-04-03

    An imbalance between production and clearance of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) initiates the pathological process in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ-specific antibodies seemed promising as therapeutic option in AD mouse models. In patients, however, vascular side-effects and Aβ-antibody complex-induced microglial and/or perivascular macrophage inflammatory responses were encountered. To prevent inflammatory reactions, we designed a single chain variable fragment (scFv-h3D6), based on monoclonal antibody bapineuzumab (mAb-h3D6), but lacking the Fc region. ScFv-h3D6 reduced Aβ-oligomer burden and prevented AD-associated behavioral and cellular changes in 3xTg-AD mice. As scFv-h3D6 lacks the Fc-tail, it cannot enhance Fc-receptor mediated Aβ clearance by microglia and probably exerts its beneficial effects in 3xTg-AD mice through other mechanisms. ScFv-h3D6 restored the increased apoE and apoJ levels in 3xTg-AD brains back to normal. ApoE and apoJ influence cholesterol transport, Aβ aggregation and clearance, and their genetic variants are risk factors for sporadic AD. Astrocytes are constitutive scavengers of soluble Aβ from the CNS. We previously found apoE and apoJ to inhibit Aβ uptake by adult human astrocytes, in vitro, and thus to potentially protect astrocytes from Aβ cytotoxicity. In the present study, scFv-h3D6 and mAb-h3D6 inhibited Aβ-oligomer uptake by adult human astrocytes. ApoE- and apoJ- mimetic peptides (MP) affected Aβ uptake as well as Aβ-induced cytokine release similar to intact apoE and apoJ, without interfering with the strong inhibitory effects of scFv-h3D6 on Aβ-oligomer uptake. These results suggest that combining Aβ-specific scFv and apoE-MP, that inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytokine release by astrocytes, could offer advantages over currently used therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 14C-labeling of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; Trinca, M L; Camera, M

    1988-06-13

    Two methods are described for the labeling of synthetic peptides using iodo[14C]acetic acid. The first procedure may be employed when the synthetic fragment contains a cysteine with a free sulfhydryl group. Alternatively, a commercial amino-protected cysteine may be carboxymethylated using radioactive iodoacetic acid. This derivative can be added to the growing peptide chain in the manual or automatic solid-phase synthesis of the fragment.

  20. Immunotherapy with peptides.

    PubMed

    Moldaver, D; Larché, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy is clinically effective and disease modifying. It has a duration of effect that exceeds the treatment period and prevents both the progression of allergic rhinitis to asthma and the acquisition of new allergic sensitizations. However, immunotherapy is associated with a high frequency of adverse events related to the allergenicity of vaccines. Allergenicity is conferred by the presence of intact B-cell epitopes that crosslink allergen-specific IgE on effector cells. The use of linear peptide sequences representing fragments of the native allergen is one approach to reduce allergenicity. Preclinical models of peptide immunotherapy have demonstrated efficacy in both autoimmunity and allergy. Translation of this technology into the clinic has gained momentum in recent years based on encouraging results from early clinical trials. To date, efforts have focused on two major allergens, but vaccines to a broader range of molecules are currently in clinical development. Mechanistically, peptide immunotherapy appears to work through the induction of adaptive, allergen-specific regulatory T cells that secrete the immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10. There is also evidence that peptide immunotherapy targeting allergen-specific T cells can indirectly modulate allergen-specific B-cell responses. Peptide immunotherapy may provide a safe and efficacious alternative to conventional subcutaneous and/or sublingual approaches using native allergen preparations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly.

    PubMed

    Kontaxis, Georg

    2012-06-01

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  2. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections.

  3. Bioactive Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H.; Lee, Byong H.

    2017-01-01

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development. PMID:28445415

  4. Towards the design of anti-amyloid short peptide helices.

    PubMed

    Roterman, Irena; Banach, Mateusz; Konieczny, Leszek

    2018-01-01

    A set of short peptide sequences susceptible to fibrillar aggregation produces sequneces capable of arresting elongation of amyloid fibrils. The "stop" signals are short helices customized for each individual target. Such a helix should exhibit high amphiphilicity, with differing conditions present on each side (one side should be highly hydrophilic to enable water to interact with the aggregate, while the other side must retain a local distribution of hydrophobicity which matches that of the terminal portion of the fibril). The emergence and elongation of fibrillary forms resulting from linear propagation of local hydrophobicity peaks is shown using the fuzzy oil drop model.

  5. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Rivera, Corban G.; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Tamiz, Amir P.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques. PMID:21470139

  6. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  7. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT – H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT – H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, resulting in similar electrochemical properties of these metal ions both in the peptide environment and in water. PMID:23283726

  8. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  9. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-16

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  10. Surface-Confined Aqueous Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (SCARAFT) Polymerization Method for Preparation of Coated Capillary Leads to over 10 000 Peptides Identified from 25 ng HeLa Digest by Using Capillary Zone Electrophoresis-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Peuchen, Elizabeth H; Dovichi, Norman J

    2017-06-20

    A surface-confined aqueous reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SCARAFT) polymerization method was developed to coat capillaries for use in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). SCARAFT polymerization primarily takes place on the inner surface of the capillary instead of in solution, which greatly improves the homogeneity of the coating. Capillaries treated with this coating produced an electroosmotic mobility of 2.8 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 cm 2 ·V -1 ·s -1 (N = 3), which is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial linear polyacrylamide (LPA)-coated capillaries. Coated capillaries were evaluated for bottom-up proteomic analysis using CZE. The very low electroosmotic mobility results in a 200 min separation and improved single-shot analysis. An average of 977 protein groups and 5605 unique peptides were identified from 50 ng of an E. coli digest, and 2158 protein groups and 10 005 peptides were identified from 25 ng of a HeLa digest using single-shot analysis with a SCARAFT-acrylamide capillary coupled to a Q Exactive HF mass spectrometer. The coating is stable. A single capillary was used for over 200 h (8.4 days) of continuous operation. RSD in migration time was between 2 and 3% for selected ion electropherograms (SIEs) generated for six ions; median theoretical plate counts ranged from 240 000 to 600 000 for these SIEs. Various types of coatings could be prepared by simply changing the functional vinyl monomers in the polymerization mixture. Positively charged coatings using direct attachment and formation of a block copolymer were prepared and demonstrated for the separation of mixtures of intact proteins.

  11. Profile of sequential determinants in tissue polypeptide antigen BrCN:B fragment.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; Camera, M; Trinca, M L; Castelli, M

    1989-02-15

    A synthetic approach has been applied to determine the profile of sequential determinants of one immunodominant region of Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (TPA). Five overlapping peptides, covering 30 of the 32 amino acid residues of this fragment, were chemically synthesized, and their antibody-binding activities for rabbit anti-TPA antibodies determined by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbant assays. Anti-TPA reacted with two overlapping fragments at the COOH-terminal end of the fragment, but not with peptides that include Arg 15 considered as essential for the antigenicity of the whole fragment. This might suggest that this critical residue is involved in the formation of a complex conformational determinant.

  12. Protocol for fragment hopping.

    PubMed

    Teuscher, Kevin B; Ji, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Fragment hopping is a fragment-based approach to designing biologically active small molecules. The key of this approach is the determination of the minimal pharmacophoric elements in the three-dimensional space. Based on the derived minimal pharmacophoric elements, new fragments with different chemotypes can be generated and positioned to the active site of the target protein. Herein, we detail a protocol for performing fragment hopping. This approach can not only explore a wide chemical space to produce new ligands with novel scaffolds but also characterize and utilize the delicate differences in the active sites between isofunctional proteins to produce new ligands with high target selectivity/specificity.

  13. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  14. A 35 amino acid fragment of leptin inhibits feeding in the rat.

    PubMed

    Samson, W K; Murphy, T C; Robison, D; Vargas, T; Tau, E; Chang, J K

    1996-11-01

    Peptide fragments of the larger 167 amino acid obesity gene related peptide (OBGRP), leptin, were tested for their ability to inhibit feeding in the rat. The C-terminal fragment, OBGRP 116-167 exerted only minimal inhibition of feeding when administered into the lateral cerebroventricle. No alteration in feeding was observed following administration of OBGRP 57-92. We hypothesized that the satiety effects of leptin reside in the N-terminal region of the peptide sequence. Significant, dose-related, and reversible inhibition of food intake was observed following central administration of the 35 amino acid fragment OBGRP 22-56. These results suggest that a small, readily synthesized fragment of the 167 amino acid peptide leptin may exert physiologically relevant satiety effects in brain revealing an endocrine feedback mechanism by which the adipocyte may modulate hypothalamic function.

  15. Research progress in structure-activity relationship of bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jianmei

    2015-02-01

    Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments that have positive impact on health. They are important sources of new biomedicine, energy and high-performance materials. The beneficial effects of bioactive peptides are due to their antioxidant, antihypertensive, anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory activities. The structure-activity relationship of bioactive peptides plays a significant role in the development of innovative and unconventional synthetic polymeric counterparts. It provides the basis of the stereospecific synthesis, transformation, and development of bioactive peptide products. This review covers the progress of studies in the structure-activity relationship of some bioactive peptides including antioxidant peptides, angiotensin-I-converting enzyme-inhibitory peptides, and anticarcinogenic peptides in the past decade.

  16. Crosstalk Between Bioactive Peptide and Intestinal Barrier in Gut Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming

    2015-01-01

    The bioactive peptides are protein fragments which have a positive impact on the intestinal homeostasis. Intestinal homeostasis depends on the diverse functions of intestinal barrier including the microbiological, physical, chemical and immunological barriers. Defects in intestinal barrier function are associated with intestinal diseases. In this review, we will present current knowledge of the crosstalk between bioactive peptides and intestinal barrier during gut homeostasis.

  17. Preparation and utilization of fluorescent synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; Sezzi, M L; Romano, T F; Evangelista, M; Nista, A

    1990-06-20

    In this study, several methods for controlled labelling of synthetic peptides by the use of fluorescent compounds (fluorescein isothiocyanate and dimethylaminonaphthalene sulfonyl chloride) were investigated. The first reagent yielded monofluoresceinated, active compounds only when the peptides lacked lysine residues. Monolabelling of peptides in solution with dimethylaminonaphthalenesulphonyl chloride was hindered by the broad reactivity of the reagent, but was achieved by reacting the fluorochrome on protected resin-bound peptides in solid-phase synthesis. The remarkable stability of the linkage allowed the cleavage of the peptide from the resin and deprotection of side-chain functions without hydrolysis of the labelled group. The binding of antipeptide antibodies to the labelled fragments was then estimated using different techniques.

  18. Biochemical properties of regulatory peptides derived from milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Meisel, H

    1997-01-01

    Biologically active peptides derived from milk proteins are inactive within the sequence of the precursor proteins but can be released by enzymatic proteolysis. Based on structure-activity studies, peptides with a defined bioactivity show common structural features. Moreover, many milk protein-derived peptides reveal multifunctional bioactivities. Bioactive peptide fragments originating from milk proteins should be taken into account as potential modulators of various regulatory processes in the body. Opioid peptides are opioid receptor ligands with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides can exert an antihypertensive effect. Immunomodulating casein peptides have been found to stimulate the proliferation of human lymphocytes and the phagocytic activities of macrophages. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to kill sensitive microorganisms. Antithrombotic peptides inhibit the fibrinogen binding to a specific receptor region on the platelet surface and also inhibit aggregation of platelets. Casein phosphopeptides can form soluble organophosphate salts and may function as carriers for different minerals, especially calcium. In relation to their mode of action, bioactive peptides may reach target sites (e.g., receptors, enzymes) at the luminal side of the intestinal tract or after absorption, in peripheral organs. The physiological significance of bioactive peptides as exogenous regulatory substances is not yet fully understood. Nevertheless, several bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins have been shown to exert beneficial physiological effects. Milk-derived peptides were already produced on an industrial scale and as a consequence these peptides have been considered for application both as dietary supplements in "functional foods" and as drugs.

  19. Novel peptides from adrenomedullary chromaffin vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sigafoos, J; Chestnut, W G; Merrill, B M; Taylor, L C; Diliberto, E J; Viveros, O H

    1993-01-01

    The adrenal medulla chromaffin vesicle (CV) contains, on a weight basis, as much soluble protein and peptide as catecholamine. The bulk of the protein is accounted for by chromogranins (Cgr) A, B and C. Additionally, a large variety of neuropeptides and their precursor proteins have been found recently within these vesicles. Nevertheless, fractionation of CV lysates indicates the presence of many more peptides than previously reported. In the hope of finding novel bioactive peptides, we initiated a systematic isolation and characterisation of CV peptides. Bovine CV pellets were prepared by sucrose gradient centrifugation and immediately boiled in water to avoid degradation of native proteins and peptides. The water lysates were fractionated through a battery of reversed-phase and ion-exchange high-performance chromatographic steps. We fully or partially characterised a substantial number of novel peptides derived from CgrA and CgrB. A tetradecapeptide and a 13 kDa extended peptide were derived from the bovine homologue of rat secretogranin III. Peptides corresponding to C-terminal fragments of 7B2 and proteoglycan II were also found. Additionally, several sequences had no known precursors. Of the sequences derived from known precursors some corresponded to fragments bracketed by pairs of basic amino acids, but others were preceded or followed by single basic residues or by unusual putative cleavage sites. Some of these peptides were postranslationally modified (pyroglutamylation, glycosylation, phosphorylation, amidation). A significant degree of structural conservation of some of these peptides across species suggests that they may exert biological effects when cosecreted with catecholamines during splanchnic stimulation. PMID:8300415

  20. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  1. MaRaCluster: A Fragment Rarity Metric for Clustering Fragment Spectra in Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; Käll, Lukas

    2016-03-04

    Shotgun proteomics experiments generate large amounts of fragment spectra as primary data, normally with high redundancy between and within experiments. Here, we have devised a clustering technique to identify fragment spectra stemming from the same species of peptide. This is a powerful alternative method to traditional search engines for analyzing spectra, specifically useful for larger scale mass spectrometry studies. As an aid in this process, we propose a distance calculation relying on the rarity of experimental fragment peaks, following the intuition that peaks shared by only a few spectra offer more evidence than peaks shared by a large number of spectra. We used this distance calculation and a complete-linkage scheme to cluster data from a recent large-scale mass spectrometry-based study. The clusterings produced by our method have up to 40% more identified peptides for their consensus spectra compared to those produced by the previous state-of-the-art method. We see that our method would advance the construction of spectral libraries as well as serve as a tool for mining large sets of fragment spectra. The source code and Ubuntu binary packages are available at https://github.com/statisticalbiotechnology/maracluster (under an Apache 2.0 license).

  2. Virtual screening of a milk peptide database for the identification of food-derived antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufang; Eichler, Jutta; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Milk provides a wide range of bioactive substances, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins. Our study aimed to identify novel antimicrobial peptides naturally present in milk. The components of an endogenous bovine milk peptide database were virtually screened for charge, amphipathy, and predicted secondary structure. Thus, 23 of 248 screened peptides were identified as candidates for antimicrobial effects. After commercial synthesis, their antimicrobial activities were determined against Escherichia coli NEB5α, E. coli ATCC25922, and Bacillus subtilis ATCC6051. In the tested concentration range (<2 mM), bacteriostatic activity of 14 peptides was detected including nine peptides inhibiting both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most effective fragment was TKLTEEEKNRLNFLKKISQRYQKFΑLPQYLK corresponding to αS2 -casein151-181 , with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.0 μM against B. subtilis ATCC6051, and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16.2 μM against both E. coli strains. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed conformational changes of most active peptides in a membrane-mimic environment, transitioning from an unordered to α-helical structure. Screening of food peptide databases by prediction tools is an efficient method to identify novel antimicrobial food-derived peptides. Milk-derived antimicrobial peptides may have potential use as functional food ingredients and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of anti-infective milk effects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Neuropeptides: metabolism to bioactive fragments and the pharmacology of their receptors.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Mathias

    2015-05-01

    The proteolytic processing of neuropeptides has an important regulatory function and the peptide fragments resulting from the enzymatic degradation often exert essential physiological roles. The proteolytic processing generates, not only biologically inactive fragments, but also bioactive fragments that modulate or even counteract the response of their parent peptides. Frequently, these peptide fragments interact with receptors that are not recognized by the parent peptides. This review discusses tachykinins, opioid peptides, angiotensins, bradykinins, and neuropeptide Y that are present in the central nervous system and their processing to bioactive degradation products. These well-known neuropeptide systems have been selected since they provide illustrative examples that proteolytic degradation of parent peptides can lead to bioactive metabolites with different biological activities as compared to their parent peptides. For example, substance P, dynorphin A, angiotensin I and II, bradykinin, and neuropeptide Y are all degraded to bioactive fragments with pharmacological profiles that differ considerably from those of the parent peptides. The review discusses a selection of the large number of drug-like molecules that act as agonists or antagonists at receptors of neuropeptides. It focuses in particular on the efforts to identify selective drug-like agonists and antagonists mimicking the effects of the endogenous peptide fragments formed. As exemplified in this review, many common neuropeptides are degraded to a variety of smaller fragments but many of the fragments generated have not yet been examined in detail with regard to their potential biological activities. Since these bioactive fragments contain a small number of amino acid residues, they provide an ideal starting point for the development of drug-like substances with ability to mimic the effects of the degradation products. Thus, these substances could provide a rich source of new pharmaceuticals

  4. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  5. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf; Key, Brian P.; Garcia, Daniel B.

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  6. From a Helix to a Small Cycle: Metadynamics-Inspired αvβ6 Integrin Selective Ligands.

    PubMed

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Tomassi, Stefano; Di Maro, Salvatore; Reichart, Florian; Notni, Johannes; Dangi, Abha; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Brancaccio, Diego; Merlino, Francesco; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Novellino, Ettore; Kessler, Horst; Marinelli, Luciana

    2018-04-16

    The RGD-recognizing αvβ6 integrin has only recently emerged as a major target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Thus, the development of selective, low molecular weight ligands of this receptor is still of great demand. Here, a metadynamics-driven design strategy allowed us to successfully convert a helical nonapeptide into a cyclic pentapeptide (6) showing remarkable potency and αvβ6 specificity. NMR and docking studies elucidated the reasons for the high affinity and selectivity of this compound, setting the ground for the rational design of new αvβ6-specific small sized peptides or even peptidomimetics. In vivo PET imaging studies demonstrated the potential use of 6 for medical applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The Association of Five-Year Changes in the Levels of N-Terminal Fragment of the Prohormone Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) with Subsequent Heart Failure and Death in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: The Heart and Soul Study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Judson, Gregory; Christenson, Robert H; DeFilippi, Christopher; Wu, Alan H B; Whooley, Mary A

    The N-terminal fragment of the prohormone brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a powerful predictor of adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, little is known regarding the prognostic significance of longitudinal changes in NT-proBNP levels. We evaluated the ability of 5-year changes in NT-proBNP levels to predict subsequent heart failure (HF) hospitalization or cardiovascular (CV) death in 635 participants with stable CAD enrolled in the Heart and Soul Study. The median (IQR) 5-year change in NT-proBNP was 50 pg/mL (-5 to +222). During an average of 4.0 ± 1.4 years follow-up (i.e., 9 years from the baseline measurement), there were 67 events. Participants with 5-year changes in the highest quartile (≥ 223 pg/mL increase in NT-proBNP) had an almost 4-fold greater risk of subsequent HF or CV death than those in the lowest quartile of ≤-5 pg/mL (HR 3.8; 95% CI 2.0-7.3; p < 0.001). This association remained strong after adjustment for demographic variables, comorbidities, left ventricular mass index, systolic and diastolic function, and baseline and follow-up NT-proBNP levels (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-13.4; p = 0.01). Changes in NT-proBNP levels at 5 years predict subsequent HF or CV death in patients with stable CAD, independent of other prognostic markers, including baseline and follow-up NT-proBNP levels. A stable NT-proBNP level predicts a low risk of subsequent events. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Templated native chemical ligation: peptide chemistry beyond protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Olalla; Seitz, Oliver

    2014-02-01

    Native chemical ligation (NCL) is a powerful method for the convergent synthesis of proteins and peptides. In its original format, NCL between a peptide containing a C-terminal thioester and another peptide offering an N-terminal cysteine has been used to enable protein synthesis of unprotected peptide fragments. However, the applications of NCL extend beyond the scope of protein synthesis. For instance, NCL can be put under the control of template molecules. In such a scenario, NCL enables the design of conditional reaction systems in which, peptide bond formation occurs only when a specific third party molecule is present. In this review, we will show how templates can be used to control the reactivity and chemoselectivity of NCL reactions. We highlight peptide and nucleic-acid-templated NCL reactions and discuss potential applications in nucleic acid diagnosis, origin-of-life studies and gene-expression-specific therapies. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Sequence-Defined Scaffolding of Peptides on Nucleic Acid Polymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Watkins, Christopher P; Hili, Ryan

    2015-09-02

    We have developed a method for the T4 DNA ligase-catalyzed DNA-templated polymerization of 5'-phosphorylated pentanucleotides containing peptide fragments. The polymerization proceeds sequence-specifically to generate DNA-scaffolded peptides in excellent yields. The method has been shown to tolerate peptides ranging from two to eight amino acids in length with a wide variety of functionality. We validated the capabilities of this system in a mock selection for the enrichment of a His-tagged DNA-scaffolded peptide phenotype from a library, which exhibited a 190-fold enrichment after one round of selection. This strategy demonstrates a promising new approach to allowing the generation and in vitro selection of high-affinity reagents based upon single-stranded DNA scaffolding of peptide fragments.

  10. PFR peptide, one of the antimicrobial peptides identified from the derivatives of lactoferrin, induces necrosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Shi, Yue; Zhou, Han-Wei; Chen, Qi; Wei, Bu-Yun; Wang, Xi; Yang, Tian-Xin; Chinn, Y. Eugene; Kang, Jian; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    LF11-322 (PFWRIRIRR-NH2) (PFR peptide), a nine amino acid-residue peptide fragment derived from human lactoferricin, possesses potent cytotoxicity against bacteria. We report here the discovery and characterization of its antitumor activity in leukemia cells. PFR peptide inhibited the proliferation of MEL and HL-60 leukemia cells by inducing cell death in the absence of the classical features of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, Annexin V staining, Caspase activation and increase of abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins. Instead, necrotic cell death as evidenced by increasing intracellular PI staining and LDH release, inducing membrane disruption and up-regulating intracellular calcium level, was observed following PFR peptide treatment. In addition to necrotic cell death, PFR peptide also induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, PFR peptide exhibited favorable antitumor activity and tolerability in vivo. These findings thus provide a new clue of antimicrobial peptides as a potential novel therapy for leukemia. PMID:26860588

  11. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  12. Maize EMBRYO SAC family peptides interact differentially with pollen tubes and fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Woriedh, Mayada; Merkl, Rainer; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    EMBRYO SAC1-4 (ES1-4) peptides belong to the defensin subgroup of cysteine-rich peptides known to mediate pollen tube burst in Zea mays (maize). ES1-4 are reported here to also be capable of inhibiting germination and growth of the maize fungal pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Ustilago maydis at higher concentrations. Dividing the peptides into smaller pieces showed that a 15-amino-acid peptide located in a highly variable loop region lacking similarity to other defensins or defensin-like peptides binds to maize pollen tube surfaces, causing swelling prior to burst. This peptide fragment and a second conserved neighbouring fragment showed suppression of fungal germination and growth. The two peptides caused swelling of fungal cells, production of reactive oxygen species, and finally the formation of big vacuoles prior to burst at high peptide concentration. Furthermore, peptide fragments were found to bind differently to fungal cells. In necrotrophic F. graminearum, a peptide fragment named ES-d bound only at cell surfaces whereas the peptide ES-c bound at cell surfaces and also accumulated inside cells. Conversely, in biotrophic U. maydis, both peptide fragments accumulated inside cells, but, if applied at higher concentration, ES-c but not ES-d accumulated mainly in vacuoles. Mapping of peptide interaction sites identified amino acids differing in pollen tube burst and fungal response reactions. In summary, these findings indicate that residues targeting pollen tube burst in maize are specific to the ES family, while residues targeting fungal growth are conserved within defensins and defensin-like peptides. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Maize EMBRYO SAC family peptides interact differentially with pollen tubes and fungal cells

    PubMed Central

    Woriedh, Mayada; Merkl, Rainer; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    EMBRYO SAC1-4 (ES1-4) peptides belong to the defensin subgroup of cysteine-rich peptides known to mediate pollen tube burst in Zea mays (maize). ES1-4 are reported here to also be capable of inhibiting germination and growth of the maize fungal pathogens Fusarium graminearum and Ustilago maydis at higher concentrations. Dividing the peptides into smaller pieces showed that a 15-amino-acid peptide located in a highly variable loop region lacking similarity to other defensins or defensin-like peptides binds to maize pollen tube surfaces, causing swelling prior to burst. This peptide fragment and a second conserved neighbouring fragment showed suppression of fungal germination and growth. The two peptides caused swelling of fungal cells, production of reactive oxygen species, and finally the formation of big vacuoles prior to burst at high peptide concentration. Furthermore, peptide fragments were found to bind differently to fungal cells. In necrotrophic F. graminearum, a peptide fragment named ES-d bound only at cell surfaces whereas the peptide ES-c bound at cell surfaces and also accumulated inside cells. Conversely, in biotrophic U. maydis, both peptide fragments accumulated inside cells, but, if applied at higher concentration, ES-c but not ES-d accumulated mainly in vacuoles. Mapping of peptide interaction sites identified amino acids differing in pollen tube burst and fungal response reactions. In summary, these findings indicate that residues targeting pollen tube burst in maize are specific to the ES family, while residues targeting fungal growth are conserved within defensins and defensin-like peptides. PMID:26071527

  14. Water-Floating Giant Nanosheets from Helical Peptide Pentamers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehun; Choe, Ik Rang; Kim, Nak-Kyoon; Kim, Won-Je; Jang, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Nam, Ki Tae

    2016-09-27

    One of the important challenges in the development of protein-mimetic materials is understanding the sequence-specific assembly behavior and dynamic folding change. Conventional strategies for constructing two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures from peptides have been limited to using β-sheet forming sequences as building blocks due to their natural tendency to form sheet-like aggregations. We have identified a peptide sequence (YFCFY) that can form dimers via a disulfide bridge, fold into a helix, and assemble into macroscopic flat sheets at the air/water interface. Due to the large driving force for 2D assembly and high elastic modulus of the resulting sheet, the peptide assembly induces flattening of the initially round water droplet. Additionally, we found that stabilization of the helix by dimerization is a key determinant for maintaining macroscopic flatness over a few tens of centimeters even with a uniform thickness of <10 nm. Furthermore, the ability to transfer the sheets from a water droplet to another substrate allows for multiple stacking of 2D peptide nanostructures, suggesting possible applications in biomimetic catalysis, biosensors, and 2D related electronic devices.

  15. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  16. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Treesearch

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  17. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  18. Radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Han Bin; Moon, Bongjin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of novel tandem mass spectrometry approaches utilizing radical-driven peptide gas-phase fragmentation chemistry have been developed. These approaches show a peptide fragmentation pattern quite different from that of collision-induced dissociation (CID). The peptide fragmentation features of these approaches share some in common with electron capture dissociation (ECD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) without the use of sophisticated equipment such as a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. For example, Siu and coworkers showed that CID of transition metal (ligand)-peptide ternary complexes led to the formation of peptide radical ions through dissociative electron transfer (Chu et al., 2000. J Phys Chem B 104:3393-3397). The subsequent collisional activation of the generated radical ions resulted in a number of characteristic product ions, including a, c, x, z-type fragments and notable side-chain losses. Another example is the free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) approach, in which Porter et al. and Beauchamp et al. independently introduced a free radical initiator to the primary amine group of the lysine side chain or N-terminus of peptides (Masterson et al., 2004. J Am Chem Soc 126:720-721; Hodyss et al., 2005 J Am Chem Soc 127: 12436-12437). Photodetachment of gaseous multiply charged peptide anions (Joly et al., 2008. J Am Chem Soc 130:13832-13833) and UV photodissociation of photolabile radical precursors including a C-I bond (Ly & Julian, 2008. J Am Chem Soc 130:351-358; Ly & Julian, 2009. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 20:1148-1158) also provide another route to generate radical ions. In this review, we provide a brief summary of recent results obtained through the radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation tandem mass spectrometry approach. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Expression profiling of breast cancer cells by differential peptide display.

    PubMed

    Tammen, Harald; Kreipe, Hans; Hess, Rüdiger; Kellmann, Markus; Lehmann, Ulrich; Pich, Andreas; Lamping, Norbert; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Zucht, Hans-Dieter; Lilischkis, Richard

    2003-05-01

    Expression profiling of RNAs or proteins has become a promising means to investigate the heterogeneity of histopathologically defined classes of cancer. Peptides, representing degradation as well as processing products of proteins offer an even closer insight into cell physiology. Peptides are related to the turnover of cellular proteins and are capable to reflect disease-related changes in homoeostasis of the human body. Furthermore, peptides derived from tumor cells are potentially useful markers in the early detection of cancer. In this study, we introduced a method called differential peptide display (DPD) for separating, detecting, and identifying native peptides derived from whole cell extracts. This method is a highly standardized procedure, combining the power of reversed-phase chromatography with mass spectrometry. This technology is suitable to analyze cell lines, various tissue types and human body fluids. Peptide-based profiling of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed complex peptide patterns comprising of up to 2300 peptides. Most of these peptides were common to both cell lines whereas about 8% differed in their abundance. Several of the differentially expressed peptides were identified as fragments of known proteins such as intermediate filament proteins, thymosins or Cathepsin D. Comparing cell lines with native tumors, overlapping peptide patterns were found between HMEC and a phylloides tumor (CP) on the one hand and MCF-7 cells and tissue from a invasive ductal carcinoma (DC) on the other hand.

  20. Effect of flanking residues on the conformational sampling of the internal fusion peptide from Ebola virus

    PubMed Central

    Jaskierny, Adam J.; Panahi, Afra; Feig, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Fusion peptides mediate viral and host cell membrane fusion during viral entry. The monomeric form of the internal fusion peptide from Ebola virus was studied in membrane bilayer and water environments with computer simulations using replica exchange sampling and an implicit solvent description of the environment. Wild type Ebola fusion peptide, the W8A mutant form, and an extended construct with flanking residues were examined. It was found that the monomeric form of wild type Ebola fusion peptide adopts coil-helix-coil structure with a short helix from residue 8 to 11 mostly sampling orientations parallel to the membrane surface. W8A mutation disrupts the helicity in the N-terminal region of the peptide, and leads to a preference for slightly oblique orientation relative to the membrane surface. The addition of flanking residues also alters the fusion peptide conformation with either a helix-break-helix structure or extended N and C-termini and reduced membrane insertion. In water, the fusion peptide is found to adopt structures with low helicity. PMID:21246633

  1. Synthesis of peptide-immunogens corresponding to amino acid sequences from human histocompatibility class II membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, F; Cappelletti, S; Francescato, P; Chersi, A

    1990-03-01

    Six peptides with amino acid sequences of human histocompatibility Class II membrane glycoproteins were synthesized by conventional solution methods. Five peptides were prepared by stepwise procedures from the carboxyterminus. The sixth was synthesized by fragment condensation (5 + 10 coupling). Antibodies to synthetic peptides were then used to locate exposed and buried regions in the membrane glycoproteins.

  2. Sequencing Lys-N Proteolytic Peptides by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated.

  3. Synthetic Fragment of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Prevents Memory Loss and Protects Brain Neurons in Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice.

    PubMed

    Volpina, Olga M; Samokhin, Alexandr N; Koroev, Dmitriy O; Nesterova, Inna V; Volkova, Tatyana D; Medvinskaya, Natalia I; Nekrasov, Pavel V; Tatarnikova, Olga G; Kamynina, Anna V; Balasanyants, Samson M; Voronina, Tamara A; Kulikov, Alexey M; Bobkova, Natalia V

    2018-01-01

    Activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an essential role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is known that the soluble isoform of the receptor binds to ligands and prevents negative effects of the receptor activation. We proposed that peptide fragments from RAGE prevent negative effects of the receptor activation during AD neurodegeneration. We have synthesized peptide fragments from surface-exposed regions of RAGE. Peptides were intranasally administrated into olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice, which developed some characteristics similar to AD neurodegeneration. We have found that only insertion of fragment (60-76) prevents the memory of OBX mice. Immunization of OBX mice with peptides showed that again only (60-76) peptide protected the memory of animals. Both intranasal insertion and immunization decreased the amyloid-β (Aβ) level in the brain. Activity of shortened fragments of (60-76) peptide was tested and showed only the (60-70) peptide is responsible for manifestation of activity. Intranasal administration of (60-76) peptide shows most protective effect on morpho-functional characteristics of neurons in the cortex and hippocampal areas. Using Flu-(60-76) peptide, we revealed its penetration in the brain of OBX mice as well as colocalization of Flu-labeled peptide with Aβ in the brain regions in transgenic mice. Flu-(60-76) peptide complex with trimer of Aβ was detected by SDS-PAGE. These data indicate that Aβ can be one of the molecular target of (60-70) peptide. These findings provide a new peptide molecule for design of anti-AD drug and for investigation of RAGE activation ways in progression of AD neurodegeneration.

  4. Modulation of Protein Fragmentation Through Carbamylation of Primary Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Sylvester M.; Holden, Dustin D.; Fellers, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2017-08-01

    We evaluate the impact of carbamylation of the primary amines of the side-chains of Lys and the N-termini on the fragmentation of intact protein ions and the chromatographic properties of a mixture of E. coli ribosomal proteins. The fragmentation patterns of the six unmodified and carbamylated proteins obtained by higher energy collision dissociation (HCD) and ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) were compared. Carbamylation significantly reduced the total number of protons retained by the protein owing to the conversion of basic primary amines to non-basic carbamates. Carbamylation caused a significant negative impact on fragmentation of the protein by HCD (i.e., reduced sequence coverage and fewer diagnostic fragment ions) consistent with the mobile proton model, which correlates peptide fragmentation with charge distribution and the opportunity for charge-directed pathways. In addition, fragmentation was enhanced near the N- and C-termini upon HCD of carbamylated proteins. For LCMS/MS analysis of E. coli ribosomal proteins, the retention times increased by 16 min on average upon carbamylation, an outcome attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the proteins after carbamylation. As noted for both the six model proteins and the ribosomal proteins, carbamylation had relatively little impact on the distribution or types of fragment ions product by UVPD, supporting the proposition that the mechanism of UVPD for intact proteins does not reflect the mobile proton model.

  5. Subcloning of DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Struhl, K

    2001-05-01

    The essence of recombinant DNA technology is the joining of two or more separate segments of DNA to generate a single DNA molecule that is capable of autonomous replication in a given host. The simplest constructions of hybrid DNA molecules involve the cloning of insert sequences into plasmid or bacteriophage cloning vectors. The insert sequences can derive from essentially any organism, and they may be isolated directly from the genome, from mRNA, or from previously cloned DNA segments (in which case, the procedure is termed subcloning). Alternatively, insert DNAs can be created directly by DNA synthesis. This unit provides protocols for the subcloning of DNA fragments and ligation of DNA fragments in gels.

  6. Ecosystem extent and fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Roger; Hansen, Matt

    2017-01-01

    One of the candidate essential biodiversity variable (EBV) groups described in the seminal paper by Pereira et al. (2014) concerns Ecosystem Structure. This EBV group is distinguished from another EBV group which encompasses aspects of Ecosystem Function. While the Ecosystem Function EBV treats ecosystem processes like nutrient cycling, primary production, trophic interactions, etc., the Ecosystem Structure EBV relates to the set of biophysical properties of ecosystems that create biophysical environmental context, confer biophysical structure, and occur geographically. The Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation EBV is one of the EBVs in the Ecosystem Structure EBV group.Ecosystems are understood to exist at multiple scales, from very large areas (macro-ecosystems) like the Arctic tundra, for example, to something as small as a tree in an Amazonian rain forest. As such, ecosystems occupy space and therefore can be mapped across any geography of interest, whether that area of interest be a site, a nation, a region, a continent, or the planet. One of the most obvious and seemingly straightforward EBVs is Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation. Ecosystem extent refers to the location and geographic distribution of ecosystems across landscapes or in the oceans, while ecosystem fragmentation refers to the spatial pattern and connectivity of ecosystem occurrences on the landscape.

  7. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  8. Functionality of lactic acid bacteria peptidase activities in the hydrolysis of gliadin-like fragments.

    PubMed

    Gerez, C L; Font de Valdez, G; Rollán, G C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the role of the peptidase activities from sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the degradation of alpha-gliadin fragments. Different proline-containing substrates were hydrolysed by LAB indicating pro-specific peptidase activities. Lactobacillus plantarum CRL 775 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CRL 792 displayed the highest tri- and di-peptidase activities, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum strains hydrolysed more than 60%alpha-gliadin fragments corresponding to the 31-43 and 62-75 amino acids in the protein after 2 h. None of the LAB strains alone could hydrolyse 57-89 alpha-gliadin peptide; however, the combination of L. plantarum CRL 775 and P. pentosaceus CRL 792 led to hydrolysis (57%) of this peptide in 8 h. The capacity of LAB strains to degrade alpha-gliadin fragments was not correlated to individual peptidase activities. Several strains separately degraded the 31-43 and 62-75 alpha-gliadin fragments, while the 57-89 peptide degradation was associated with the combination of peptidase profiles from pooled LAB strains. This is the first report on the peptide hydrolase system of sourdough pediococci and its ability to reduce alpha-gliadin fragments. This study contributes to a better knowledge of sourdough LAB proteolytic system and its role in the degradation of proline-rich alpha-gliadin peptides involved in celiac disease.

  9. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  10. Selective Deletion of the Internal Lysine Residue from the Peptide Sequence by Collisional Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shibdas; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2012-11-01

    The gas-phase peptide ion fragmentation chemistry is always the center of attraction in proteomics to analyze the amino acid sequence of peptides and proteins. In this work, we describe the formation of an anomalous fragment ion, which corresponds to the selective deletion of the internal lysine residue from a series of lysine containing peptides upon collisional activation in the ion trap. We detected several water-loss fragment ions and the maximum number of water molecules lost from a particular fragment ion was equal to the number of lysine residues in that fragment. As a consequence of this water-loss phenomenon, internal lysine residues were found to be deleted from the peptide ion. The N,N-dimethylation of all the amine functional groups of the peptide stopped the internal lysine deletion reaction, but selective N-terminal α-amino acetylation had no effect on this process indicating involvement of the side chains of the lysine residues. The detailed mechanism of the lysine deletion was investigated by multistage CID of the modified and unmodified peptides, by isotope labeling and by energy resolved CID studies. The results suggest that the lysine deletion might occur through a unimolecular multistep mechanism involving a seven-membered cyclic imine intermediate formed by the loss of water from a lysine residue in the protonated peptide. This intermediate subsequently undergoes degradation reaction to deplete the interior imine ring from the peptide backbone leading to the deletion of an internal lysine residue.

  11. Rondonin an antifungal peptide from spider (Acanthoscurria rondoniae) haemolymph

    PubMed Central

    Riciluca, K.C.T.; Sayegh, R.S.R.; Melo, R.L.; Silva, P.I.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities were detected in the haemolymph of the spider Acanthoscurrria rondoniae. A novel antifungal peptide, rondonin, was purified by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Rondonin has an amino acid sequence of IIIQYEGHKH and a molecular mass of 1236.776 Da. This peptide has identity to a C-terminal fragment of the “d” subunit of haemocyanin from the spiders Eurypelma californicum and Acanthoscurria gomesiana. A synthetic peptide mimicking rondonin had identical characteristics to those of the isolated material, confirming its sequence. The synthetic peptide was active only against fungus. These data led us to conclude that the antifungal activity detected in the plasma of these spiders is the result of enzymatic processing of a protein that delivers oxygen in the haemolymph of many chelicerate. Several studies have suggested that haemocyanins are involved in the arthropod immune system, and the activity of this haemocyanin fragment reinforces this idea. PMID:24371568

  12. Nonstatistical fragmentation of large molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Zettergren, H.; Adoui, L.; Alexander, J. D.; BÄ`rziĆš, U.; Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Haag, N.; Huber, B. A.; Hvelplund, P.; Johansson, A.; Johansson, H. A. B.; Kulyk, K.; Rosén, S.; Rousseau, P.; Støchkel, K.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental evidence for the dominance of prompt single-atom knockout in fragmenting collisions between large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and He atoms at center-of-mass energies close to 100 eV. Such nonstatistical processes are shown to give highly reactive fragments. We argue that nonstatistical fragmentation is dominant for any sufficiently large molecular system under similar conditions.

  13. The anti-cancer peptide, PNC-27, induces tumor cell lysis as the intact peptide.

    PubMed

    Sookraj, Kelley A; Bowne, Wilbur B; Adler, Victor; Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ehsan; Michl, Josef; Pincus, Matthew R

    2010-07-01

    PNC-27, a peptide that contains an HDM-2-binding domain from p53 attached to a membrane-penetrating peptide on its carboxyl terminal end, is cytotoxic to cancer, but not normal, cells. It forms transmembrane pores in the cancer cell membrane. Our purpose is to determine if the whole peptide or critical fragments induce pore formation in cancer cells. We have prepared PNC-27 with a green fluorescent label on its amino terminus and a red fluorescent label on its carboxyl terminus and treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells and untransformed MCF-10-2A breast epithelial cells with this double-labeled peptide to determine if combined yellow fluorescence occurs in the membrane of the cancer cells during cancer cell killing. At 30 min, there is significant combined punctate yellow fluorescence, indicative of intact peptide, in the cell membrane of cancer cells that increases during cancer cell lysis. MCF-10-2A cells show initial (30 min) uniform combined yellow membrane fluorescence that subsequently disappears. Unlike the cancer cells, these untransformed cells remain viable. PNC-27 induces cancer cell membrane lysis by acting as the whole peptide, not fragments. The punctate yellow fluorescence is due to interaction of PNC-27 with intramembrane targets of MCF-7 cells that do not exist in the membrane of the untransformed cell line. This interaction increases the lifetime of PNC-27. Absence of these targets in the membranes of the untransformed MCF-10-2A cells results in initial uniform fluorescence of the double-labeled peptide in their membranes after which the peptide is degraded.

  14. Purification of novel peptide antibiotics from human milk.

    PubMed

    Liepke, C; Zucht, H D; Forssmann, W G; Ständker, L

    2001-03-10

    A strategy was established for the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides from human milk. For the generation of bioactive peptides human milk was acidified and proteolyzed with pepsin simulating the digest in infants stomachs. Separation of proteins and resulting fragments was performed by means of reversed-phase chromatography detecting the antimicrobial activity of each fraction using a sensitive radial diffusion assay. In order to avoid the purification of the known abundant antimicrobial milk protein lysozyme, it was identified in HPLC fractions by its enzymatic activity and by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). On condition that lysozyme was not detectable and antibacterial activity of HPLC fractions was caused by a peptide, which was confirmed by proteolytic cleavage leading to a loss of activity, further purification was performed by consecutive chromatographic steps guided by the antibacterial assay. Using this strategy, an as yet unknown casein fragment exhibiting antimicrobial activity was purified in addition to antimicrobial lactoferrin fragments. The new antimicrobial peptide resembles a proteolytic fragment of human casein-K (residues 63-117) and inhibits the growth of gram-positive, gram-negative bacteria, and yeasts. Our results confirm that antimicrobially-active peptides are liberated from human milk proteins during proteolytic hydrolysis and may play an important role in the host defense system of the newborn.

  15. Fragmentation of positronium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starrett, C.; McAlinden, Mary T.; Walters, H. R. J.

    2005-07-01

    The impulse approximation is used to calculate cross sections for fragmentation of Ps(1s) in collision with He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Triple, double, single, and total cross sections are evaluated. Reasonably good agreement is found with the measurements of Armitage [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 173402 (2002)] on Ps(1s)+He(1S1) scattering. These absolute measurements comprise the total Ps ionization cross section and the cross section differential with respect to the longitudinal energy of the ejected positron. Characteristics of free electron and free positron scattering are explored in the double and triple differential cross sections for Ps(1s)+Xe scattering.

  16. Tube Fragmentation of Multiple Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, T. F.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Vogler, T. J.

    2006-07-01

    In the current study we are developing an experimental fracture material property test method specific to dynamic fragmentation. This test method allows the study of fracture fragmentation in a reproducible laboratory environment under well-controlled loading conditions. Motion and fragmentation of the specimen are diagnosed using framing camera, VISAR and soft recovery methods. Fragmentation properties of several steels, nitinol, tungsten alloy, copper, aluminum, and titanium have been obtained to date. The values for fragmentation toughness, and failure threshold will be reported, as well as effects in these values as the material strain-rate is varied through changes in wall thickness and impact conditions.

  17. Statistical Characterization of the Charge State and Residue Dependence of Low Energy CID Peptide Dissociation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M.; Tseng, George C.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2013-01-01

    Data mining was performed on 28,330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pair-wise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly-charged Arg- and Lys- ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially-mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton(s) and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton(s). When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions and/or y ions depends on the location of the proton holder(s). Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially-mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and should be useful in algorithm development that employs improved models to predict fragment ion

  18. Mapping the tandem mass spectrometric characteristics of citrulline containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Steckel, Arnold; Uray, Katalin; Turiák, Lilla; Gömöry, Ágnes; Drahos, László; Hudecz, Ferenc; Schlosser, Gitta

    2018-03-25

    Protein citrullination (deimination) is a post-translational modification of proteins converting arginine(s) to citrulline(s). "Overcitrullination" could be associated with severe pathological conditions. Mass spectrometric analysis of modified proteins is hindered by several problems. A comprehensive study of fragmentation of deiminated peptides is not yet available. In this paper we have made an attempt to describe the characteristics of these processes, based on the studies of epitope model oligopeptides derived from clinically relevant proteins. Solution of purified model peptides containing either one or two citrulline residues as well as their native variants were injected directly to the electrospray source of a high accuracy and resolution quadrupole-time of flight instrument and were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry using low-energy collision induced dissociation. Loss of isocyanic acid from citrulline residues is a preferred fragmentation route for deiminated peptides, which yields ornithine residues in the sequence. However, simultaneous detection of both the isocyanic acid loss and sequence fragments is often compromised. A preferential cleavage site was observed between citrulline and any other following amino acids yielding intensive complementary b and y type ions. Also, citrulline positioned at the C-termini displays a preferential cleavage N-terminal to this residue yielding characteristic y 1 ions. These phenomena are described here for the first time and are referred to as the "citrulline effect". We found that the citrulline effect is very pronounced and could be used as a complementary tool for the confirmation of modification sites in addition to losses of isocyanic acids from the protonated molecules or from fragment ions. Low collision energy applied to peptide ions having partially mobile protons reveal the site of modification by generating specific and intensive fragments of the sequence. On the other hand, fragmenting parent ions

  19. Characterization of Disulfide-Linked Peptides Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Automated Data Analysis Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan; McGuinness, Kenneth N.; Crespo, Alejandro; Zhong, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is critical for maintaining structure stability and function of many peptides and proteins. Mass spectrometry has become an important tool for the elucidation of molecular connectivity. However, the interpretation of the tandem mass spectral data of disulfide-linked peptides has been a major challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools. Developing proper data analysis software is essential to quickly characterize disulfide-linked peptides. A thorough and in-depth understanding of how disulfide-linked peptides fragment in mass spectrometer is a key in developing software to interpret the tandem mass spectra of these peptides. Two model peptides with inter- and intra-chain disulfide linkages were used to study fragmentation behavior in both collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron-based dissociation (ExD) experiments. Fragments generated from CAD and ExD can be categorized into three major types, which result from different S-S and C-S bond cleavage patterns. DiSulFinder is a computer algorithm that was newly developed based on the fragmentation observed in these peptides. The software is vendor neutral and capable of quickly and accurately identifying a variety of fragments generated from disulfide-linked peptides. DiSulFinder identifies peptide backbone fragments with S-S and C-S bond cleavages and, more importantly, can also identify fragments with the S-S bond still intact to aid disulfide linkage determination. With the assistance of this software, more comprehensive disulfide connectivity characterization can be achieved. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Chemical synthesis of biologically active monoglycosylated GM2-activator protein analogue using N-sulfanylethylanilide peptide.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohei; Shigenaga, Akira; Kitakaze, Keisuke; Sakamoto, Ken; Tsuji, Daisuke; Itoh, Kohji; Otaka, Akira

    2013-07-22

    Going to SEA(lide): Total chemical synthesis of a 162-residue glycoprotein analogue of the monoglycosylated human GM2-activator protein (GM2AP) was achieved. Key steps were the use of N-sulfanylethylanilide (SEAlide) peptides in the kinetic chemical ligation synthesis of a large peptide fragment, and a convergent native chemical ligation for final fragment assembly. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigation of c ions formed by N-terminally charged peptides upon collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Liu, Jinrong; Cao, Jungang; Wang, Huixin; Guan, Xinshu; Wei, Zhonglin; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-11-01

    Peptide fragments such as b and y sequence ions generated upon low-energy collision-induced dissociation have been routinely used for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification. The underlying formation mechanisms have been studied extensively and described within the literature. As a result, the 'mobile proton model' and 'pathways in competition model' have been built to interpret a majority of peptide fragmentation behavior. However, unusual peptide fragments which involve unfamiliar fragmentation pathways or various rearrangement reactions occasionally appear in MS/MS spectra, resulting in confused MS/MS interpretations. In this work, a series of unfamiliar c ions are detected in MS/MS spectra of the model peptides having an N-terminal Arg or deuterohemin group upon low-energy collision-induced dissociation process. Both the protonated Arg and deuterohemin group play an important role in retention of a positive charge at the N-terminus that is remote from the cleavage sites. According to previous reports and our studies involving amino acid substitutions and hydrogen-deuterium exchange, we propose a McLafferty-type rearrangement via charge-remote fragmentation as the potential mechanism to explain the formation of c ions from precursor peptide ions or unconventional b ions. Density functional theory calculations are also employed in order to elucidate the proposed fragmentation mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Prevention of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats with peptide 68-88 of guinea pig myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Chou, F C; Chou, C H; Fritz, R B; Kibler, R F

    1980-04-01

    The highly encephalitogenic guinea pig peptide 68-88 has been used to develop an effective and reproducible model of protection in the Lewis rat. Doses as low as 0.1 nmol of peptide protected 70% of rats when injected intraperitoneally six and four weeks prior to challenge with 0.05 nmol of the peptide in complete Freund's adjuvant. Fragments derived from guinea pig peptide 68-88 by selective enzyme cleavage were then tested for their capacity to provide protection in this model system. These fragments had previously been well characterized both biochemically and immunologically. The protection provided by each fragment closely paralleled its capacity to induce disease. This suggests that the region of peptide 68-88 required for protection is similar to that needed for induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and the other T-cell functions of the peptide. B-cells did not appear to participate; peptide 68-85, which has no capacity to produce antibody against peptide 68-88, gave full protection, while peptide 79-88, which contains the major B-cell determinant of the peptide, afforded no protection. Rat peptide 68-88 did not protect against challenge with the guinea pig peptide, demonstrating a critical role for serine 79. These studies support the concept that nonencephalitogenic agents do not protect against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis at doses comparable to those of encephalitogenic agents.

  3. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4-7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map-model pairs.

  4. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix

    PubMed Central

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4–7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map–model pairs. PMID:27936925

  5. Purification and sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments from ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Omnaas, J.

    1982-12-01

    As a part of the goal to determine the total sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the cyanogen bromide fragments were fractionated and sequenced (or partially sequenced). Twelve of the anticipated 14 peptides were obtained in highly purified form. The other two peptides were located, respectively, within a tryptophanyl cleavage product (which overlapped with four CNBr fragments) and within an active-site peptide characterized earlier (which overlapped with three CNBr fragments). These overlaps coupled with amino and carboxyl terminal sequence information of the intact subunit and the availability of the sequence of the corresponding enzyme from higher plants permitted alignment ofmore » all fragments. Eight CNBr peptides were sequenced completely; four of the CNBr peptides consisted of more than 80 residues and were only partially sequenced as permitted by direct Edman degradation. Of the approximate 475 residues per subunit, 339 were placed in sequence. The lack of extensive conservation of primary structure between R. rubrum and higher plant carboxylases permits the tentative identifications of those regions likely to be functionally important.« less

  6. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; ...

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD,more » and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.« less

  7. Tank fragmentation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daye, C. J.; Cooksey, D.; Walters, R. J.; Auble, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic study of a simulated tank fragmentation test was made. Sixteen disks and four spheres were ejected from a test article mounted in a vertical orientation 110 ft above a target installed on the test chamber floor. The test was performed at a chamber pressure of 25 microns. Velocities at impingement on the target ranged from 88 to 120 ft/sec; corresponding ejection velocities at the exit plane of the ejector assembly ranged from 29 to 87 ft/sec. Tumble axes of the disks were expected to be all in the north-south direction; the majority of those measured were, while some were skewed from this direction, the maximum observed being 90 deg. A typical measured tumble rate was 2.4 turns/sec. The dispersion pattern measured on the target was reasonably regular, and measured approximately 16 ft east-to-west by 11 ft north-to-south.

  8. Specificity of rabbit antibodies elicited by related synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; Houghten, R A; Chillemi, F; Zito, R; Centis, D

    1986-01-01

    Three 17-residue peptides, presenting from 65% to 70% sequence homology, and one endecapeptide, with no apparent homology with the first three, were chemically synthesized and investigated in their ability to elicit rabbit antipeptide antibodies. The complex cross reactivities of the antisera were investigated by testing the binding of the antibodies to the intact peptides, to their enzymatic fragments, and by the use of specific immunoadsorbents. Antipeptide antibodies may or may not crossreact with related "parent" peptides, this depending upon number, distribution, and localization of amino acid differences in low or high antigenicity regions of the immunogen. Related peptides may elicit antibodies that crossreact almost completely, and therefore not specific for one or the other "parent" peptide. Those antibodies may therefore be of little use for the selective recognition of closely related structures.

  9. Fragmentation Reactions of Methionine-Containing Protonated Octapeptides and Fragment Ions Therefrom: An Energy-Resolved Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.

    2013-10-01

    The fragmentation reactions of the MH+ ions as well as the b7, a7, and a7* ions derived therefrom have been studied in detail for the octapeptides MAAAAAAA, AAMAAAAA, AAAAMAAA, and AAAAAAMA. Ionization was by electrospray using a QqToF mass spectrometer, which allowed a study of the evolution of the fragmentation channels as a function of the collision energy. Not surprisingly, the product ion mass spectra for the b7 ions are independent of the original precursor sequence, indicating macrocyclization and reopening to the same mixture of protonated oxazolones prior to fragmentation. The results show that this sequence scrambling results in a distinct preference to place the Met residue in the C-terminal position of the protonated oxazolones. The a7 and a7* ions also produce product ion mass spectra independent of the original peptide sequence. The results for the a7 ions indicate that fragmentation occurs primarily from an amide structure analogous to that observed for a4 ions (Bythell et al. in J Am Chem Soc 132:14766-14779, 2010). Clearly, the rearrangement reaction they have proposed applies equally well to an ions as large as a7. The major fragmentation modes of the MH+ ions at low collision energies produce b7, b6, and b5 ions. As the collision energy is increased further fragmentation of these primary products produces, in part, non-direct sequence ions, which become prominent at lower m/z values, particularly for the peptides with the Met residue near the N-terminus.

  10. Free energy calculations of short peptide chains using Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpusenka, Vadzim; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2008-10-01

    We performed a computational study of monomer peptides composed of methionine, alanine, leucine, glutamate, lysine (all amino acids with a helix-forming propensities); and proline, glycine tyrosine, serine, arginine (which all have poor helix-forming propensities). The free energy landscapes as a function of the handedness and radius of gyration have been calculated using the recently introduced Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) method, combined with replica exchange, multiple walkers, and post-processing Umbrella Correction (UC). Minima that correspond to some of the left- and right-handed 310-, α- and π-helixes were identified by secondary structure assignment methods (DSSP, Stride). The resulting free energy surface (FES) and the subsequent steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation results are in agreement with the empirical evidence of preferred secondary structures for the peptide chains considered.

  11. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Chelsea L; Wright, Patience M; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  12. Degradation of a signal peptide by protease IV and oligopeptidase A.

    PubMed Central

    Novak, P; Dev, I K

    1988-01-01

    The degradation of the prolipoprotein signal peptide in vitro by membranes, cytoplasmic fraction, and two purified major signal peptide peptidases from Escherichia coli was followed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The cytoplasmic fraction hydrolyzed the signal peptide completely into amino acids. In contrast, many peptide fragments accumulated as final products during the cleavage by a membrane fraction. Most of the peptides were similar to the peptides formed during the cleavage of the signal peptide by the purified membrane-bound signal peptide peptidase, protease IV. Peptide fragments generated during the cleavage of the signal peptide by protease IV and a cytoplasmic enzyme, oligopeptidase A, were identified from their amino acid compositions, their retention times during RPLC, and knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the signal peptide. Both enzymes were endopeptidases, as neither dipeptides nor free amino acids were formed during the cleavage reactions. Protease IV cleaved the signal peptide predominantly in the hydrophobic segment (residues 7 to 14). Protease IV required substrates with hydrophobic amino acids at the primary and the adjacent substrate-binding sites, with a minimum of three amino acids on either side of the scissile bond. Oligopeptidase A cleaved peptides (minimally five residues) that had either alanine or glycine at the P'1 (primary binding site) or at the P1 (preceding P'1) site of the substrate. These results support the hypothesis that protease IV is the major signal peptide peptidase in membranes that initiates the degradation of the signal peptide by making endoproteolytic cuts; oligopeptidase A and other cytoplasmic enzymes further degrade the partially degraded portions of the signal peptide that may be diffused or transported back into the cytoplasm from the membranes. PMID:3053642

  13. Support Vector Machine Classification of Probability Models and Peptide Features for Improved Peptide Identification from Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-12-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field offering a new perspective to biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a popular experimental approach because it allows global protein characterization of a sample in a high-throughput manner. The identification of a protein is based on the spectral signature of fragments of the constituent proteins, i.e., peptides. This peptide identification is typically performed with a computational database search algorithm; however, these database search algorithms return a large number of false positive identifications. We present a new scoring algorithm that uses a SVM to integrate database scoring metrics with peptide physiochemical properties, resulting in anmore » improved ability to separate true from false peptide identification from MS. The Peptide Identification Classifier SVM (PICS) score using only five variables is significantly more accurate than the single best database metric, quantified as the area under a Receive Operating Characteristic curve of ~0.94 versus ~0.90.« less

  14. Tuning Mesenchymal Stem Cell Response onto Titanium-Niobium-Hafnium Alloy by Recombinant Fibronectin Fragments.

    PubMed

    Herranz-Diez, C; Mas-Moruno, C; Neubauer, S; Kessler, H; Gil, F J; Pegueroles, M; Manero, J M; Guillem-Marti, J

    2016-02-03

    Since metallic biomaterials used for bone replacement possess low bioactivity, the use of cell adhesive moieties is a common strategy to improve cellular response onto these surfaces. In recent years, the use of recombinant proteins has emerged as an alternative to native proteins and short peptides owing to the fact that they retain the biological potency of native proteins, while improving their stability. In the present study, we investigated the biological effect of two different recombinant fragments of fibronectin, spanning the 8-10th and 12-14th type III repeats, covalently attached to a new TiNbHf alloy using APTES silanization. The fragments were studied separately and mixed at different concentrations and compared to a linear RGD, a cyclic RGD and the full-length fibronectin protein. Cell culture studies using rat mesenchymal stem cells demonstrated that low to medium concentrations (30% and 50%) of type III 8-10th fragment mixed with type III 12-14th fragment stimulated cell spreading and proliferation compared to RGD peptides and the fragments separately. On the other hand, type III 12-14th fragment alone or mixed at low volume percentages ≤50% with type III 8-10th fragment increased alkaline phosphatase levels compared to the other molecules. These results are significant for the understanding of the role of fibronectin recombinant fragments in cell responses and thus to design bioactive coatings for biomedical applications.

  15. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  17. The preparation of protected fragments of lysozyme for semisynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, A R; Offord, R E

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports the development of methods for preparing tryptic fragments of hen's-egg lysozyme in an appropriate state of protection for use in the chemical synthesis of modified polypeptides. 1. We describe the cleavage of the disulphide bridges of the enzyme and the simulatneous protection of the liberated thiol groups by S-sulphonation. Lysozyme resisted the usual conditions for this reaction. We have confirmed the stability of the S-sulphonyl group to the conditions met in peptide synthesis. 2. We describe the reversible protection of the amino groups of the enzyme by reaction with various anhydrides of 1,2-dicarboxylic acids. We conclude that 2-methylmaleic anhydride and exo-cis-3,6-endoxo-delta4-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride are unsuitable for our purpose but that maleic anhydride can, in spite of certain drawbacks, be used. 3. We describe the tryptic cleavage of the thiol- and amino-protected protein and the separation of the fragments. 4. We describe the reversible protection of the carboxylic acid groups (including the specific deprotection of the alpha-carboxyl group), the imidazolyl group and the aloph-amino groups of the fragments. Several alternative groups have been evaluated for most of these purposes. The side-chain amides did not present any serious problem of libility, 5. We describe experiments on the stability of the side chain of tryptophan, both protected by formylation and unprotected, to the acid conditions needed for the deprotection of the other functional groups in the peptide. We conclude that protection of tryptophan is unnecessary. We suggest that most of the methods described are of general application in peptide semisynthesis by fragment condensation. An Appendix is included to which points 6-ll appertain... PMID:1008811

  18. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E.

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Host-defense and trefoil factor family peptides in skin secretions of the Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis Loumont, 1983 led to the identification and characterization of 15 host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin (two peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; three peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; three peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; two peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; five peptides) families. In addition, caerulein and three peptides with structural similarity to the trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides, xP2 and xP4 from Xenopus laevis were also present in the secretions. Consistent with data from comparisons of the nucleotides sequence of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the primary structures of the peptides suggest a close phylogenetic relationship between X. boumbaensis and the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei. As the three species occupy disjunct ranges within Cameroon, it is suggested that they diverged from a common ancestor by allopatric speciation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The mobile proton in polyalanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Kohtani, Motoya; Schneider, Jean E; Jones, Thaddeus C; Jarrold, Martin F

    2004-12-29

    Ion mobility measurements have been performed for protonated polyalanine peptides (A10 + H+, A15 + H+, A20 + H+, A25 + H+, and A15NH2 + H+) as a function of temperature using a new high-temperature drift tube. Peaks due to helices and globules were found at room temperature for all peptides, except for A10 + H+ (where only the globule is present). As the temperature is increased, the helix and globule peaks broaden and merge to give a single narrow peak. This indicates that the two conformations interconvert rapidly at elevated temperatures. The positions of the merged peaks show that A15 + H+ and A15NH2 + H+ spend most of their time as globules when heated, while A20 + H+ and A25 + H+ spend most of their time as helices. The helix/globule transitions are almost certainly accompanied by intramolecular proton transfer, and so, these results suggest that the proton becomes mobile (able to migrate freely along the backbone) at around 450 K. The peptides dissociate as the temperature is increased further to give predominantly the bn(+), b(n-1)(+), b(n-2)(+), ... series of fragment ions. There is a correlation between the ease of fragmentation and the time spent in the helical conformation for the An + H+ peptides. Helix formation promotes dissociation because it pools the proton at the C-terminus where it is required for dissociation to give the observed products. In addition to the helix and globule, an antiparallel helical dimer is observed for the larger peptides. The dimer can be collisionally dissociated by injection into the drift tube at elevated kinetic energies.

  1. Protein Fragments: Functional and Structural Roles of Their Coevolution Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Linda; Carbone, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Small protein fragments, and not just residues, can be used as basic building blocks to reconstruct networks of coevolved amino acids in proteins. Fragments often enter in physical contact one with the other and play a major biological role in the protein. The nature of these interactions might be multiple and spans beyond binding specificity, allosteric regulation and folding constraints. Indeed, coevolving fragments are indicators of important information explaining folding intermediates, peptide assembly, key mutations with known roles in genetic diseases, distinguished subfamily-dependent motifs and differentiated evolutionary pressures on protein regions. Coevolution analysis detects networks of fragments interaction and highlights a high order organization of fragments demonstrating the importance of studying at a deeper level this structure. We demonstrate that it can be applied to protein families that are highly conserved or represented by few sequences, enlarging in this manner, the class of proteins where coevolution analysis can be performed and making large-scale coevolution studies a feasible goal. PMID:23139761

  2. Ribosomal synthesis and folding of peptide-helical aromatic foldamer hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Joseph M.; Kwon, Sunbum; Dawson, Simon J.; Mandal, Pradeep K.; Suga, Hiroaki; Huc, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Translation, the mRNA-templated synthesis of peptides by the ribosome, can be manipulated to incorporate variants of the 20 cognate amino acids. Such approaches for expanding the range of chemical entities that can be produced by the ribosome may accelerate the discovery of molecules that can perform functions for which poorly folded, short peptidic sequences are ill suited. Here, we show that the ribosome tolerates some artificial helical aromatic oligomers, so-called foldamers. Using a flexible tRNA-acylation ribozyme—flexizyme—foldamers were attached to tRNA, and the resulting acylated tRNAs were delivered to the ribosome to initiate the synthesis of non-cyclic and cyclic foldamer-peptide hybrid molecules. Passing through the ribosome exit tunnel requires the foldamers to unfold. Yet foldamers encode sufficient folding information to influence the peptide structure once translation is completed. We also show that in cyclic hybrids, the foldamer portion can fold into a helix and force the peptide segment to adopt a constrained and stretched conformation.

  3. How to lose a kink and gain a helix: pH independent conformational changes of the fusion domains from influenza hemagglutinin in heterogeneous lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunbum; Michaud-Agrawal, Naveen; Johnston, Jennifer M; Woolf, Thomas B

    2008-07-01

    We have simulated two conformations of the fusion domain of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) within explicit water, salt, and heterogeneous lipid bilayers composed of POPC:POPG (4:1). Each conformation has seven different starting points in which the initial peptide structure is the same for each conformation, but the location across the membrane normal and lipid arrangement around the peptide are varied, giving a combined total simulation time of 140 ns. For the HA5 conformation (primary structure from recent NMR spectroscopy at pH = 5), the peptide exhibits a stable and less kinked structure in the lipid bilayer compared to that from the NMR studies. The relative fusogenic behavior of the different conformations has been investigated by calculation of the relative free energy of insertion into the hydrophobic region of lipid bilayer as a function of the depth of immersion. For the HA7 conformations (primary structure from recent NMR spectroscopy at pH = 7.4), while the N-terminal helix preserves its initial structure, the flexible C-terminal chain produces a transient helical motif inside the lipid bilayer. This conformational change is pH-independent, and is closely related to the peptide insertion into the lipid bilayer. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Statistical characterization of the charge state and residue dependence of low-energy CID peptide dissociation patterns.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M; Tseng, George C; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2005-09-15

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from singly charged peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s) in multiply protonated peptides. Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and may be useful in algorithm development that employs

  5. Fragment screening and HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Joseph D; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target.

  6. Development of novel lipid-peptide hybrid compounds with antibacterial activity from natural cationic antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun-Sik; Kim, Seunghee; Cho, Hyeongjin; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2004-03-08

    Seven depsipeptides were synthesized by appending seven amino acids (Lys, Leu, Val, Phe, Ser, Gln, and Pro) at the N-terminus of the active fragment [TE-(33-43)], respectively corresponding to the C-terminal beta sheet domain of tenecin 1, an antibacterial protein and their activities were measured against Staphylococcus aureus. Considering the relationship between the activity and the characteristic of amino acid at the N-terminal of the peptide, novel derivatives were designed and synthesized from TE-(33-43) by introduction of fatty acids at the N-terminal. In this process, we synthesized novel lipid-peptide hybrid compounds with a potent antibacterial activity and more improved bioavailabilities. We characterized the important structural parameters of the lipid-peptide hybrid compounds for the antibacterial activities.

  7. Computational identification of antigen-binding antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Burkovitz, Anat; Leiderman, Olga; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Byk, Gerardo; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-03-01

    Determining which parts of the Ab are essential for Ag recognition and binding is crucial for understanding B cell-mediated immunity. Identification of fragments of Abs that maintain specificity to the Ag will also allow for the development of improved Ab-based therapy and diagnostics. In this article, we show that structural analysis of Ab-Ag complexes reveals which fragments of the Ab may bind the Ag on their own. In particular, it is possible to predict whether a given CDR is likely to bind the Ag as a peptide by analyzing the energetic contribution of each CDR to Ag binding and by assessing to what extent the interaction between that CDR and the Ag depends on other CDRs. To demonstrate this, we analyzed five Ab-Ag complexes and predicted for each of them which of the CDRs may bind the Ag on its own as a peptide. We then show that these predictions are in agreement with our experimental analysis and with previously published experimental results. These findings promote our understanding of the modular nature of Ab-Ag interactions and lay the foundation for the rational design of active CDR-derived peptides.

  8. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  9. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  10. LESSONS IN DE NOVO PEPTIDE SEQUENCING BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein mixtures isolated from all kinds of living organisms. The raw data in these studies are MS/MS spectra, usually of peptides produced by proteolytic digestion of a protein. These spectra are “translated” into peptide sequences, normally with the help of various search engines. Data acquisition and interpretation have both been automated, and most researchers look only at the summary of the identifications without ever viewing the underlying raw data used for assignments. Automated analysis of data is essential due to the volume produced. However, being familiar with the finer intricacies of peptide fragmentation processes, and experiencing the difficulties of manual data interpretation allow a researcher to be able to more critically evaluate key results, particularly because there are many known rules of peptide fragmentation that are not incorporated into search engine scoring. Since the most commonly used MS/MS activation method is collision-induced dissociation (CID), in this article we present a brief review of the history of peptide CID analysis. Next, we provide a detailed tutorial on how to determine peptide sequences from CID data. Although the focus of the tutorial is de novo sequencing, the lessons learned and resources supplied are useful for data interpretation in general. PMID:25667941

  11. Peptides and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ulapane, Kavisha R; Kopec, Brian M; Moral, Mario E G; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2017-01-01

    Peptides have been used as drugs to treat various health conditions, and they are also being developed as diagnostic agents. Due to their receptor selectivity, peptides have recently been utilized for drug delivery to target drug molecules to specific types of cells (i.e. cancer cells, immune cells) to lower the side effects of the drugs. In this case, the drug is conjugated to the carrier peptide for directing the drug to the target cells (e.g. cancer cells) with higher expression of a specific receptor that recognizes the carrier peptide. As a result, the drug is directed to the target diseased cells without affecting the normal cells. Peptides are also being developed for improving drug delivery through the intestinal mucosa barrier (IMB) and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These peptides were derived from intercellular junction proteins such as occludins, claudins, and cadherins and improve drug delivery through the IMB and BBB via the paracellular pathways. It is hypothesized that the peptides modulate protein-protein interactions in the intercellular junctions of the IMB and BBB to increase the porosity of paracellular pathways of the barriers. These modulator peptides have been shown to enhance brain delivery of small molecules and medium-sized peptides as well as a large protein such as 65 kDa albumin. In the future, this method has the potential to improve oral and brain delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic peptides and proteins.

  12. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Cullin3 - BTB Interface: A Novel Target for Stapled Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3–BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the “stapling” with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49–68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300–600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3. PMID:25848797

  14. Rapid sensitive analysis of cysteine rich peptide venom components.

    PubMed

    Ueberheide, Beatrix M; Fenyö, David; Alewood, Paul F; Chait, Brian T

    2009-04-28

    Disulfide-rich peptide venoms from animals such as snakes, spiders, scorpions, and certain marine snails represent one of nature's great diversity libraries of bioactive molecules. The various species of marine cone shells have alone been estimated to produce >50,000 distinct peptide venoms. These peptides have stimulated considerable interest because of their ability to potently alter the function of specific ion channels. To date, only a small fraction of this immense resource has been characterized because of the difficulty in elucidating their primary structures, which range in size between 10 and 80 aa, include up to 5 disulfide bonds, and can contain extensive posttranslational modifications. The extraordinary complexity of crude venoms and the lack of DNA databases for many of the organisms of interest present major analytical challenges. Here, we describe a strategy that uses mass spectrometry for the elucidation of the mature peptide toxin components of crude venom samples. Key to this strategy is our use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD), a mass spectrometric fragmentation technique that can produce sequence information across the entire peptide backbone. However, because ETD only yields comprehensive sequence coverage when the charge state of the precursor peptide ion is sufficiently high and the m/z ratio is low, we combined ETD with a targeted chemical derivatization strategy to increase the charge state of cysteine-containing peptide toxins. Using this strategy, we obtained full sequences for 31 peptide toxins, using just 7% of the crude venom from the venom gland of a single cone snail (Conus textile).

  15. Using Data Independent Acquisition (DIA) to Model High-responding Peptides for Targeted Proteomics Experiments*

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Brian C.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Bollinger, James G.; Stergachis, Andrew B.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry is an essential tool for detecting quantitative changes in low abundant proteins throughout the proteome. Although selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is the preferred method for quantifying peptides in complex samples, the process of designing SRM assays is laborious. Peptides have widely varying signal responses dictated by sequence-specific physiochemical properties; one major challenge is in selecting representative peptides to target as a proxy for protein abundance. Here we present PREGO, a software tool that predicts high-responding peptides for SRM experiments. PREGO predicts peptide responses with an artificial neural network trained using 11 minimally redundant, maximally relevant properties. Crucial to its success, PREGO is trained using fragment ion intensities of equimolar synthetic peptides extracted from data independent acquisition experiments. Because of similarities in instrumentation and the nature of data collection, relative peptide responses from data independent acquisition experiments are a suitable substitute for SRM experiments because they both make quantitative measurements from integrated fragment ion chromatograms. Using an SRM experiment containing 12,973 peptides from 724 synthetic proteins, PREGO exhibits a 40–85% improvement over previously published approaches at selecting high-responding peptides. These results also represent a dramatic improvement over the rules-based peptide selection approaches commonly used in the literature. PMID:26100116

  16. Neutral loss fragmentation pattern based screening for arginine-rich natural products in Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sebastian W; Sachs, Christian C; Kegler, Carsten; Nollmann, Friederike I; Karas, Michael; Bode, Helge B

    2012-08-21

    Although sharing a certain degree of structural uniformity, natural product classes exhibit variable functionalities such as different amino acid or acyl residues. During collision induced dissociation, some natural products exhibit a conserved fragmentation pattern close to the precursor ion. The observed fragments result from a shared set of neutral losses, creating a unique fragmentation pattern, which can be used as a fingerprint for members of these natural product classes. The culture supernatants of 69 strains of the entomopathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus were analyzed by MALDI-MS(2), and a database comprising MS(2) data from each strain was established. This database was scanned for concordant fragmentation patterns of different compounds using a customized software, focusing on relative mass differences of the fragment ions to their precursor ion. A novel group of related natural products comprising 25 different arginine-rich peptides from 16 different strains was identified due to its characteristic neutral loss fragmentation pattern, and the structures of eight compounds were elucidated. Two biosynthesis gene clusters encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases were identified, emphasizing the possibility to identify a group of structurally and biosynthetically related natural products based on their neutral loss fragmentation pattern.

  17. The Role of Food Peptides in Lipid Metabolism during Dyslipidemia and Associated Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Rouvinen-Watt, Kirsti

    2015-04-24

    Animal and human clinical studies have demonstrated the ability of dietary food proteins to modulate endogenous lipid levels during abnormal lipid metabolism (dyslipidemia). Considering the susceptibility of proteins to gastric proteolytic activities, the hypolipidemic functions of proteins are possibly due, in part, to their peptide fragments. Food-derived peptides may directly modulate abnormal lipid metabolism in cell cultures and animal models of dyslipidemia. The peptides are thought to act by perturbing intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol and enterohepatic bile acid circulation, and by inhibiting lipogenic enzymatic activities and gene expression in hepatocytes and adipocytes. Recent evidence indicates that the hypolipidemic activities of some peptides are due to activation of hepatic lipogenic transcription factors. However, detailed molecular mechanisms and structural requirements of peptides for these activities are yet to be elucidated. As hypolipidemic peptides can be released during enzymatic food processing, future studies can explore the prospects of combating metabolic syndrome and associated complications using peptide-rich functional food and nutraceutical products.

  18. [Structure of tryptic fragments of a neurotoxin from black widow spider venom].

    PubMed

    Volkova, T M; Galkina, T G; Kudelin, A B; Grishin, E V

    1991-04-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of a neurotoxin from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus (alpha-latrotoxin) was determined. Latrotoxin was subjected to the tryptic cleavage and total or partial amino acid sequences of 25 peptides were established. In total the tryptic fragments contained 252 amino acid residues. Essential structural information on cloning of the latrotoxin structural gene was obtained.

  19. Antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of its synthetic fragments.

    PubMed

    Belguesmia, Y; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Baudy-Floc'h, M; Le Blay, G; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J-M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of their chemically synthesized fragments. Enterococcus durans A5-11 is a lactic acid bacteria strain isolated from traditional Mongolian airag cheese. This strain inhibits the growth of several fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Penicillium roqueforti and Debaryomyces hansenii. It produces two bacteriocins: durancin A5-11a and durancin A5-11b, which have similar antimicrobial properties. The whole durancins A5-11a and A5-11b, as well as their N- and C-terminal fragments were synthesized, and their antifungal properties were studied. C-terminal fragments of both durancins showed stronger antifungal activities than other tested peptides. Treatment of D. hansenii LMSA2.11.003 strain with 2 mmol l(-1) of the synthetic peptides led to the loss of the membrane integrity and to several changes in the ultra-structure of the yeast cells. Chemically synthesized durancins and their synthetic fragments showed different antimicrobial properties from each other. N-terminal peptides show activities against both bacterial and fungal strains tested. C-terminal peptides have specific activities against tested fungal strain and do not show antibacterial activity. However, the C-terminal fragment enhances the activity of the N-terminal fragment in the whole bacteriocins against bacteria. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Surface peptide mapping of protein I and protein III of four strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, R.C.

    1982-08-01

    Whole cells and isolated outer membranes (OMs) of four strains of gonococci were surface radioiodinated with either lactoperoxidase or Iodogen (Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, Ill.). These preparations were solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surface-radioiodinated protein I (PI) and PIII bands were excised from the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and digested with alpha-chymotrypsin, and the resultant /sup 125/I-peptide fragments were resolved by high-voltage electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography (i.e., surface peptide mapping). Radioemitting peptidic fragments were visualized by autoradiography. Results demonstrated that the PI molecule of each gonococcal strain studied had uniquemore » iodinatable peptides exposed on the surface of whole cells and OMs, whereas PIIIs appeared to have the same portion of the molecule exposed on the surface of bacteria or OMs, regardless of the gonococcal strain from which they were isolated. Many more radiolabeled peptides were seen in surface peptide maps of PIs from radiolabeled OMs than in those from radioiodinated whole cells, whereas different peptidic fragments were seen in the surface peptide maps of PIIIs from radiolabeled OMs than were seen in those from radiolabeled whole cells. These data suggest that PI may contribute strain-specific antigenic determinants and PIII may contribute cross-reactive determinants and that the surface exposure of PI and PIII is different in isolated OMs than in the OM of intact gonococci.« less

  1. Peptide quantification using 8-plex isobaric tags and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Phanstiel, Doug; Unwin, Richard; McAlister, Graeme C; Coon, Joshua J

    2009-02-15

    Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) allow for simultaneous relative quantification of peptides from up to eight different samples. Typically peptides labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ tags are pooled and fragmented using beam-type collision activated dissociation (CAD) which, in addition to cleaving the peptide backbone bonds, cleaves the tag to produce reporter ions. The relative intensities of the reporters are directly proportional to the relative abundances of each peptide in the solution phase. Recently, studies using the 4-plex iTRAQ tagging reagent demonstrated that electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of 4-plex iTRAQ labeled peptides cleaves at the N-C alpha bond in the tag and allows for up to three channels of quantification. In this paper we investigate the ETD fragmentation patterns of peptides labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ tags. We demonstrate that upon ETD, peptides labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ tags fragment to produce unique reporter ions that allow for five channels of quantification. ETD-MS/MS of these labeled peptides also produces a peak at 322 m/z which, upon resonant excitation (CAD), gives rise to all eight iTRAQ reporter ions and allows for eight channels of quantification. Comparison of this method to beam-type CAD quantification shows a good correlation (y = 0.91x + 0.01, R(2) = 0.9383).

  2. Charm Fragmentation Fractions and the Charm Fragmentation Function

    SciTech Connect

    Rurikova, Zuzana

    2005-10-06

    The fragmentation of a charm quark to charmed hadrons in deep-inelastic scattering has been studied using the H1 detector at HERA.The visible cross sections for inclusive D+, D0, D{sub s}{sup +} and D*+ meson production were determined making use of the secondary vertex displacement measured by the central silicon detector of H1 and fragmentation fractions and fragmentation ratios were extracted.To investigate the fraction of the charm quark's momentum transferred to a charmed hadron, the differential cross section of D*-meson has been measured as a function of two scaling observables.The parameters of the Peterson and Kartvelishvili fragmentation functions, as implemented inmore » a model with leading-order matrix elements, parton showers, string fragmentation and particle decays, were extracted from a fit to the measured distributions. The fits, using both observables, lead to the following ranges for the fragmentation parameters: 0.014 < {epsilon} < 0.036 (Peterson) and 4 < {alpha} < 6.8 (Kartvelishvili)« less

  3. Statistical Characterization of the Charge State and Residue Dependence of Low-Energy CID Peptide Dissociation Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M.; Tseng, George C.

    2005-09-01

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides,more » a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s). Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and should be useful in algorithm development that employs improved models to predict fragment ion

  4. Non-disulfide-bridged peptides from Tityus serrulatus venom: Evidence for proline-free ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Peigneur, Steve; Vriens, Kim; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno Philippe Angelo; Júnior, Ronaldo Bragança Martins; Arruda, Eurico; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Tytgat, Jan; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2016-08-01

    The present study purifies two T. serrulatus non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs), named venom peptides 7.2 (RLRSKG) and 8 (KIWRS) and details their synthesis and biological activity, comparing to the synthetic venom peptide 7.1 (RLRSKGKK), previously identified. The synthetic replicate peptides were subjected to a range of biological assays: hemolytic, antifungal, antiviral, electrophysiological, immunological and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activities. All venom peptides neither showed to be cytolytic nor demonstrated significant antifungal or antiviral activities. Interestingly, peptides were able to modulate macrophages' responses, increasing IL-6 production. The three venom peptides also demonstrated potential to inhibit ACE in the following order: 7.2>7.1>8. The ACE inhibition activity was unexpected, since peptides that display this function are usually proline-rich peptides. In attempt to understand the origin of such small peptides, we discovered that the isolated peptides 7.2 and 8 are fragments of the same molecule, named Pape peptide precursor. Furthermore, the study discusses that Pape fragments could be originated from a post-splitting mechanism resulting from metalloserrulases and other proteinases cleavage, which can be seen as a clever mechanism used by the scorpion to enlarge its repertoire of venom components. Scorpion venom remains as an interesting source of bioactive proteins and this study advances our knowledge about three NDBPs and their biological activities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  6. Calculus fragmentation in laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Welch, A J; Kang, H W; Lee, H; Teichman, J M H

    2004-03-01

    The intracorporeal treatment of urinary calculi with lasers is presented, which describes laser-calculus interactions associated with lithotripsy. Reliable fragmentation of calculi with diverse compositions and minimal collateral tissue damage are primarily contingent upon laser parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, and pulse energy) and physical properties of calculi (optical, mechanical, and chemical). The pulse duration governs the dominant mechanism in calculi fragmentation, which is either photothermal or photoacoustical/photomechanical. Lasers with long pulse durations (i.e. > tens of micros) induce a temperature rise in the laser-affected zone with minimal acoustic waves; material is removed by means of vaporization, melting, mechanical stress, and/or chemical decomposition. Short-pulsed laser ablation (i.e. < 10 micros), on the other hand, produces shock waves, and the resultant mechanical energy fragments calculi. Work continues throughout the world to evaluate the feasibility of advanced lasers in lithotripsy and to optimize laser parameters and light delivery systems pertinent to efficient fragmentation of calculi.

  7. The Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptide 19-2.5 Interacts with Heparanase and Heparan Sulfate in Murine and Human Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; De Santis, Rebecca; Koczera, Patrick; Simons, Nadine; Haase, Hajo; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains from their proteoglycans. Thereby, heparanase liberates highly potent circulating heparan sulfate-fragments (HS-fragments) and triggers the fatal and excessive inflammatory response in sepsis. As a potential anti-inflammatory agent for sepsis therapy, peptide 19-2.5 belongs to the class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; however, its activity is not restricted to Gram-negative bacterial infection. We hypothesized that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase and/or HS, thereby reducing the levels of circulating HS-fragments in murine and human sepsis. Our data indicate that the treatment of septic mice with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals lowers levels of plasma heparanase and circulating HS-fragments and reduces heparanase activity. Additionally, mRNA levels of heparanase in heart, liver, lung, kidney and spleen are downregulated in septic mice treated with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals. In humans, plasma heparanase level and activity are elevated in septic shock. The ex vivo addition of peptide 19-2.5 to plasma of septic shock patients decreases heparanase activity but not heparanase level. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed a strong exothermic reaction between peptide 19-2.5 and heparanase and HS-fragments. However, a saturation character has been identified only in the peptide 19-2.5 and HS interaction. In conclusion, the findings of our current study indicate that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase, which is elevated in murine and human sepsis and consecutively attenuates the generation of circulating HS-fragments in systemic inflammation. Thus, peptide 19-2.5 seems to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis.

  8. Controlled Dynamic Fragmentation of Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-14

    National en Calcul des Structures , Giens, France, Vol. 2, pp. 145-151, 2009 S. Levy, J.F Molinari, "Describing the dynamique response of a ceramic...method applied to fragmentation of heterogeneous materials", proceedings 9e Colloque National en Calcul des Structures , Giens, France, Vol. 2, pp. 145...The originality of the present simulations lies in the capability of dealing with fragmentation of large and heterogeneous structures . The

  9. De novo peptide sequencing by deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Zhang, Xianglilan; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    De novo peptide sequencing from tandem MS data is the key technology in proteomics for the characterization of proteins, especially for new sequences, such as mAbs. In this study, we propose a deep neural network model, DeepNovo, for de novo peptide sequencing. DeepNovo architecture combines recent advances in convolutional neural networks and recurrent neural networks to learn features of tandem mass spectra, fragment ions, and sequence patterns of peptides. The networks are further integrated with local dynamic programming to solve the complex optimization task of de novo sequencing. We evaluated the method on a wide variety of species and found that DeepNovo considerably outperformed state of the art methods, achieving 7.7–22.9% higher accuracy at the amino acid level and 38.1–64.0% higher accuracy at the peptide level. We further used DeepNovo to automatically reconstruct the complete sequences of antibody light and heavy chains of mouse, achieving 97.5–100% coverage and 97.2–99.5% accuracy, without assisting databases. Moreover, DeepNovo is retrainable to adapt to any sources of data and provides a complete end-to-end training and prediction solution to the de novo sequencing problem. Not only does our study extend the deep learning revolution to a new field, but it also shows an innovative approach in solving optimization problems by using deep learning and dynamic programming. PMID:28720701

  10. Fragment occupations in partition Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rougang; Nafziger, Jonathan; Wasserman, Adam

    2012-06-07

    The exact ground-state energy and density of a molecule can in principle be obtained via Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT), a method for calculating molecular properties from Kohn-Sham calculations on isolated fragments. For a given choice of fragmentation, unique fragment densities are found by requiring that the sum of fragment energies be minimized subject to the constraint that the fragment densities sum to the correct molecular ground-state density. We investigate two interrelated aspects of PDFT: the connections between fragment densities obtained via different choices of fragmentation, for which we find "near-additivity", and the nature of their corresponding fragment occupations. Whereas near-integer occupations arise for very large inter-fragment separations, strictly integer occupations appear for small inter-fragment separations. Cases where the fragment chemical potentials cannot be equalized lead to fragment occupations that lock into integers.

  11. Robust Object Tracking Using Valid Fragments Selection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Li, Bo; Tian, Peng; Luo, Gang

    Local features are widely used in visual tracking to improve robustness in cases of partial occlusion, deformation and rotation. This paper proposes a local fragment-based object tracking algorithm. Unlike many existing fragment-based algorithms that allocate the weights to each fragment, this method firstly defines discrimination and uniqueness for local fragment, and builds an automatic pre-selection of useful fragments for tracking. Then, a Harris-SIFT filter is used to choose the current valid fragments, excluding occluded or highly deformed fragments. Based on those valid fragments, fragment-based color histogram provides a structured and effective description for the object. Finally, the object is tracked using a valid fragment template combining the displacement constraint and similarity of each valid fragment. The object template is updated by fusing feature similarity and valid fragments, which is scale-adaptive and robust to partial occlusion. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is accurate and robust in challenging scenarios.

  12. AGH is a new hemoglobin alpha-chain fragment with antinociceptive activity.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Natalia M; Toniolo, Elaine F; Castro, Leandro M; Russo, Lilian C; Rioli, Vanessa; Ferro, Emer S; Dale, Camila S

    2013-10-01

    Limited proteolysis of certain proteins leads to the release of endogenous bioactive peptides. Hemoglobin-derived peptides such as hemorphins and hemopressins are examples of intracellular protein-derived peptides that have antinociceptive effects by modulating G-protein coupled receptors activities. In the present study, a previously characterized substrate capture assay that uses a catalytically inactive form of the thimet oligopeptidase was combined with isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry in order to identify new bioactive peptides. Indeed, we have identified the peptide AGHLDDLPGALSAL (AGH), a fragment of the hemoglobin alpha-chain, which specifically bind to the inactive thimet oligopeptidase in the substrate capture assay. Previous peptidomics studies have identified the AGH as well as many other natural peptides derived from hemoglobin alpha-chain containing this sequence, further suggesting that AGH is a natural endogenous peptide. Pharmacological assays suggest that AGH inhibits peripheral inflammatory hyperalgesic responses through indirect activation of mu opioid receptors, without having a central nervous system activity. Therefore, we have successfully used the substrate capture assay to identify a new endogenous bioactive peptide derived from hemoglobin alpha-chain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of atomic force microscopy to protein anatomy:. Imaging of supramolecular structures of self-assemblies formed from synthetic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata-Seki, T.; Masai, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Yanagawa, H.

    This paper reports morphological studies of structures of self-assemblies from synthetic peptide fragments with the use of atomic force microscope (AFM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Two systems of synthetic peptides have been examined: one is peptides from barnase (a ribonuclease) and the other is those from tau protein (Alzheimer's disease-related protein). The AFM observation was carried out by using a commercially available AFM operated in the tapping mode in air. The general appearance in shape and size of the peptide assemblies in AFM images was essentially similar to that in TEM images, except that the AFM images provide us with fruitful three-dimensional information about the assemblies. For assemblies from barnase peptides, possible formation processes of the supramolecular structures from the corresponding peptide fragment have been proposed on the basis of the AFM images.

  14. RGD-independent cell adhesion to the carboxy-terminal heparin-binding fragment of fibronectin involves heparin-dependent and -independent activities

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components such as fibronectin has a complex basis, involving multiple determinants on the molecule that react with discrete cell surface macromolecules. Our previous results have demonstrated that normal and transformed cells adhere and spread on a 33-kD heparin binding fragment that originates from the carboxy-terminal end of particular isoforms (A-chains) of human fibronectin. This fragment promotes melanoma adhesion and spreading in an arginyl-glycyl-aspartyl-serine (RGDS) independent manner, suggesting that cell adhesion to this region of fibronectin is independent of the typical RGD/integrin-mediated binding. Two synthetic peptides from this region of fibronectin were recently identified that bound [3H]heparin in a solid-phase assay and promoted the adhesion and spreading of melanoma cells (McCarthy, J. B., M. K. Chelberg, D. J. Mickelson, and L. T. Furcht. 1988. Biochemistry. 27:1380-1388). The current studies further define the cell adhesion and heparin binding properties of one of these synthetic peptides. This peptide, termed peptide I, has the sequence YEKPGSP-PREVVPRPRPGV and represents residues 1906-1924 of human plasma fibronectin. In addition to promoting RGD-independent melanoma adhesion and spreading in a concentration-dependent manner, this peptide significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the 33-kD fragment or intact fibronectin. Polyclonal antibodies generated against peptide I also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the peptide, to the 33-kD fragment, but had minimal effect on melanoma adhesion to fibronectin. Anti-peptide I antibodies also partially inhibited [3H]heparin binding to fibronectin, suggesting that peptide I represents a major heparin binding domain on the intact molecule. The cell adhesion activity of another peptide from the 33-kD fragment, termed CS1 (Humphries, M. J., A. Komoriya, S. K. Akiyama, K. Olden, and K. M. Yamada. 1987. J. Biol. Chem., 262:6886-6892) was contrasted with

  15. Strengthened insectivory in a temperate fragmented forest.

    PubMed

    González-Gómez, Paulina L; Estades, Cristián F; Simonetti, Javier A

    2006-05-01

    Habitat fragmentation modifies ecological patterns and processes through changes in species richness and abundance. In the coastal Maulino forest, central Chile, both species richness and abundance of insectivorous birds increases in forest fragments compared to continuous forest. Through a field experiment, we examined larvae predation in fragmented forests. Higher richness and abundance of birds foraging at forest fragments translated into more insect larvae preyed upon in forest fragments than in continuous forest. The assessed level of insectivory in forest fragments agrees with lower herbivory levels in forest fragments. This pattern strongly suggests the strengthening of food interactions web in forest fragments of coastal Maulino forest.

  16. A combined effective fragment potential-fragment molecular orbital method. I. The energy expression and initial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takeshi; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Kitaura, Kazuo; Gordon, Mark S.

    2009-07-01

    The effective fragment potential (EFP) method, a model potential for treating solvent effects and other intermolecular interactions, is interfaced with an electronic structure method, the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, that is able to retain high accuracy for ab initio calculations on large molecular systems. The accuracy of the total energies in this novel combined FMO/EFP method is assessed by comparisons with the conventional quantum mechanics (QM)/EFP method. The test cases are water clusters, a peptide, and a dianionic protein (treated with full QM and FMO) combined with water clusters (treated with EFP) at the RHF, B3LYP, and MP2 levels of theory. The basis sets employed range from minimal to augmented double zeta plus polarization. The energy differences between FMO/EFP and the conventional QM/EFP methods are within "chemical accuracy" (1 kcal/mol≈4 kJ/mol).

  17. Anti-metatype peptides, a molecular tool with high sensitivity and specificity to monitor small ligands.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Junko; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimizu, Kentaro; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2009-05-01

    To develop a new immunological detection system of gibberellins (GAs), a class of phytohormones, peptides that interact with an antibody against GA4 in a GA4-dependent manner, were screened from phage display random peptide libraries. The biopanning procedure yielded peptides designated as anti-metatype peptides (AM-peps), which showed specific binding to the complex of the antibody and its ligand GA4; that is, the antibody could not be replaced with the other anti-GA4 antibody, and GA4 could not be replaced with GA1, another ligand of the antibody. Together with computational analyses such as analysis of structural propensity of the AM-peps and docking simulation of the AM-peps and the 8/E9-GA4 complex, it was suggested that AM-peps formed a helix in their central region and interacted with a part of the 8/E9-GA4 complex located in close proximity to the GA4 molecule. Based on the property of AM-peps to make a ternary complex with antibody and its ligand, a noncompetitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system corresponding to sandwich ELISA was developed to detect GA4. GA4 as low as 30 pg, which could not be achieved by conventional competitive ELISA, could be detected by the new system, demonstrating the feasibility of this system.

  18. Peptide profile of Coalho cheese: A contribution for Protected Designation of Origin (PDO).

    PubMed

    Fontenele, Maria A; Bastos, Maria do S R; Dos Santos, Karina M O; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; do Egito, Antonio S

    2017-03-15

    Coalho cheese of Ceará and the Jaguaribe region of Brazil has been studied to determine its peptide profile. Peptides generated by the action of peptidases upon cheese proteins were separated by reverse-phase HPLC to give 28 fractions. Peptide sequencing after MS/MS fragmentation enabled the identification of 116 different peptides; 74 of them originated from β-casein, 4 from βA2-casein, 4 from βA3-casein, 25 from αS1-casein, 5 from αS2-casein, and 4 from κ-casein. Phosphorylated peptides were identified, one from αS1-casein and 17 from β-casein. Other reports on the bioactivity of casein-derived peptides have shown that the β-casein peptide (193-209) exhibits immunomodulatory, antimicrobial and antihypertensive activity. The peptides β-casein (58-72), β-casein (193-202), αs1-casein (85-91), αs1-casein (1-9), as well as αs2-casein (189-197) have antihypertensive activity. The fragment αS1-casein (1-23) is an immunomodulatory and antimicrobial peptide. These results can be a marker to determine the authenticity of this Brazilian cheese. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Peptide targeting of platinum anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ndinguri, Margaret W; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P; Aggarwal, Sita; Hammer, Robert P

    2009-10-21

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker, and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is nontoxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water-soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that the malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to that of carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to that of the untargeted carboplatin, indicating selective activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy, and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis.

  20. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  1. Selective 'in synthesis' labelling of peptides by fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; di Modugno, F; Rosanò, L

    1997-07-19

    A new method is described for producing fluorescently-tagged peptides containing specific internal derivatives of lysyl residues. The technique employs the base-labile Boc-Lys(Fmoc)-COOH derivative with base-catalyzed removal of the Fmoc protecting group during peptide synthesis and subsequent fluorescent derivatization of the deprotected epsilon-amino group of lysine. By this technique, other lysine residues and the alpha-amino group of the fragment remain unmodified, which could have some value in studies where it might be required to tag a single individual lysine residue within the peptide, but not the amino terminus. In spite of the fact that poly-substituted peptides are badly soluble and might seldom find a practical application, this technique also allows the introduction of different fluorochromes at different lysyl residues within the peptide, thus obtaining double fluorescence. The method, fast and easy, requires a limited number of manual operations during the automatic synthesis of peptides. Although peptide synthesizers provided with an oscillating glass reactor are more suitable for the manual interventions described, this technique might be also adapted to the newer instruments utilizing continuous-flow columns.

  2. Natriuretic peptides in assessment of left-ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mair, J; Friedl, W; Thomas, S; Puschendorf, B

    1999-01-01

    The heart secrets two different natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), which have potent vasorelaxant, diuretic, and natriuretic actions. They are main tools in the body's defense against volume overload and hypertension. The natriuretic peptides (NP) are synthetized as prohormones. The C-terminal endocrinological active peptides and their N-terminal prohormone fragments are found in plasma. The NP system is maximally activated in ventricular dysfunction. However, NP:s are also increased in patients with renal failure or pulmonary hypertension, and increases may be found in arterial hypertension or liver cirrhosis. Among all NP and prohormone fragments currently BNP is the most promising candidate analyte for routine diagnosis. BNP is also superior to other neurohormones for diagnosis of left-ventricular dysfunction (LVD) or estimating prognosis in LVD or during the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. For primary care physicians BNP measurement is useful to decide which patient with suspected heart failure warrants further investigation, particularly when assessment of left ventricular function is not readily available. BNP has an excellent negative predictive value particularly in high risk patients. For the cardiologists the NP:s are helpful for monitoring therapy and disease course in LVD patients and for estimating prognosis in LVD and myocardial infarction patients. There is now sufficient evidence to encourage physicians to gain experience with NP as a supplement in the diagnosis of patients suspected of having heart failure. An increase in BNP is serious enough to warrant follow-up examinations.

  3. Fast alignment of fragmentation trees

    PubMed Central

    Hufsky, Franziska; Dührkop, Kai; Rasche, Florian; Chimani, Markus; Böcker, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Mass spectrometry allows sensitive, automated and high-throughput analysis of small molecules such as metabolites. One major bottleneck in metabolomics is the identification of ‘unknown’ small molecules not in any database. Recently, fragmentation tree alignments have been introduced for the automated comparison of the fragmentation patterns of small molecules. Fragmentation pattern similarities are strongly correlated with the chemical similarity of the molecules, and allow us to cluster compounds based solely on their fragmentation patterns. Results: Aligning fragmentation trees is computationally hard. Nevertheless, we present three exact algorithms for the problem: a dynamic programming (DP) algorithm, a sparse variant of the DP, and an Integer Linear Program (ILP). Evaluation of our methods on three different datasets showed that thousands of alignments can be computed in a matter of minutes using DP, even for ‘challenging’ instances. Running times of the sparse DP were an order of magnitude better than for the classical DP. The ILP was clearly outperformed by both DP approaches. We also found that for both DP algorithms, computing the 1% slowest alignments required as much time as computing the 99% fastest. Contact: sebastian.boecker@uni-jena.de PMID:22689771

  4. Oxygen radical-mediated oxidation reactions of an alanine peptide motif - density functional theory and transition state theory study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxygen-base (O-base) oxidation in protein backbone is important in the protein backbone fragmentation due to the attack from reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, an alanine peptide was used model system to investigate this O-base oxidation by employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations combining with continuum solvent model. Detailed reaction steps were analyzed along with their reaction rate constants. Results Most of the O-base oxidation reactions for this alanine peptide are exothermic except for the bond-breakage of the Cα-N bond to form hydroperoxy alanine radical. Among the reactions investigated in this study, the activated energy of OH α-H abstraction is the lowest one, while the generation of alkylperoxy peptide radical must overcome the highest energy barrier. The aqueous situation facilitates the oxidation reactions to generate hydroxyl alanine peptide derivatives except for the fragmentations of alkoxyl alanine peptide radical. The Cα-Cβ bond of the alkoxyl alanine peptide radical is more labile than the peptide bond. Conclusion the rate-determining step of oxidation in protein backbone is the generation of hydroperoxy peptide radical via the reaction of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2. The stabilities of alkylperoxy peptide radical and complex of alkylperoxy peptide radical with HO2 are crucial in this O-base oxidation reaction. PMID:22524792

  5. Specific binding of antigenic peptides to separate alpha and beta chains of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenhäusler, B; Dornmair, K; McConnell, H M

    1990-01-01

    Class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex bind antigenic peptides and present them to T-helper cells. Class II molecules are heterodimers consisting of one alpha and one beta chain. Here we report that each isolated alpha and beta chain binds antigenic peptides and that this binding is specific. The specificity of peptide binding was investigated by employing the murine major histocompatibility complex haplotypes I-Ad and I-Ek and fluorescence-labeled peptides of chicken ovalbumin and pigeon cytochrome c, respectively, which are known to be specific for these haplotypes. The major histocompatibility complex molecules were incubated with these peptides and subjected to SDS/PAGE under nondenaturing conditions. The gels were then scanned for the fluorescent peptides and, after silver staining, for proteins. We found that the fluorescence-labeled peptide fragment of ovalbumin bound preferentially to the isolated alpha and beta chains of I-Ad, whereas the fluorescence-labeled peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c bound preferentially to the isolated alpha and beta chains of I-Ek. The alpha and beta chains of each haplotype bound their specific peptides about equally well, suggesting comparable affinities. Our results indicate that in vivo the kinetic pathway for the formation of antigenic peptide complexes with the alpha/beta heterodimers may involve the initial formation of complexes of the alpha and/or beta chains with the specific antigenic peptides. Images PMID:2153295

  6. Peptide structural analysis using continuous Ar cluster and C60 ion beams.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Fletcher, John S; Sheraz Rabbani, Sadia; Kawashima, Tomoko; Berrueta Razo, Irma; Henderson, Alex; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2013-08-01

    A novel application of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) with continuous Ar cluster beams to peptide analysis was investigated. In order to evaluate peptide structures, it is necessary to detect fragment ions related to multiple neighbouring amino acid residues. It is, however, difficult to detect these using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi cluster beams. Recently, C60 and Ar cluster ion beams have been introduced to ToF-SIMS as primary ion beams and are expected to generate larger secondary ions than conventional ones. In this study, two sets of model peptides have been studied: (des-Tyr)-Leu-enkephalin and (des-Tyr)-Met-enkephalin (molecular weights are approximately 400 Da), and [Asn(1) Val(5)]-angiotensin II and [Val(5)]-angiotensin I (molecular weights are approximately 1,000 Da) in order to evaluate the usefulness of the large cluster ion beams for peptide structural analysis. As a result, by using the Ar cluster beams, peptide molecular ions and large fragment ions, which are not easily detected using conventional ToF-SIMS primary ion beams such as Bi3 (+), are clearly detected. Since the large fragment ions indicating amino acid sequences of the peptides are detected by the large cluster beams, it is suggested that the Ar cluster and C60 ion beams are useful for peptide structural analysis.

  7. Short peptide amyloid organization: stabilities and conformations of the islet amyloid peptide NFGAIL.

    PubMed

    Zanuy, David; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-03-01

    Experimentally, short peptides have been shown to form amyloids similar to those of their parent proteins. Consequently, they present useful systems for studies of amyloid conformation. Here we simulate extensively the NFGAIL peptide, derived from the human islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 22-27). We simulate different possible strand/sheet organizations, from dimers to nonamers. Our simulations indicate that the most stable conformation is an antiparallel strand orientation within the sheets and parallel between sheets. Consistent with the alanine mutagenesis, we find that the driving force is the hydrophobic effect. Whereas the NFGAIL forms stable oligomers, the NAGAIL oligomer is unstable, and disintegrates very quickly after the beginning of the simulation. The simulations further identify a minimal seed size. Combined with our previous simulations of the prion-derived AGAAAAGA peptide, AAAAAAAA, and the Alzheimer Abeta fragments 16-22, 24-36, 16-35, and 10-35, and the solid-state NMR data for Abeta fragments 16-22, 10-35, and 1-40, some insight into the length and the sequence matching effects may be obtained.

  8. Short Peptide Amyloid Organization: Stabilities and Conformations of the Islet Amyloid Peptide NFGAIL

    PubMed Central

    Zanuy, David; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    Experimentally, short peptides have been shown to form amyloids similar to those of their parent proteins. Consequently, they present useful systems for studies of amyloid conformation. Here we simulate extensively the NFGAIL peptide, derived from the human islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 22–27). We simulate different possible strand/sheet organizations, from dimers to nonamers. Our simulations indicate that the most stable conformation is an antiparallel strand orientation within the sheets and parallel between sheets. Consistent with the alanine mutagenesis, we find that the driving force is the hydrophobic effect. Whereas the NFGAIL forms stable oligomers, the NAGAIL oligomer is unstable, and disintegrates very quickly after the beginning of the simulation. The simulations further identify a minimal seed size. Combined with our previous simulations of the prion-derived AGAAAAGA peptide, AAAAAAAA, and the Alzheimer Aβ fragments 16–22, 24–36, 16–35, and 10–35, and the solid-state NMR data for Aβ fragments 16–22, 10–35, and 1–40, some insight into the length and the sequence matching effects may be obtained. PMID:12609890

  9. The multifaceted nature of amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic fragments: friends and foes.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Hoang S; Chiang, Karen; Koo, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has occupied a central position in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology, in large part due to the seminal role of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment derived from APP. Although the contribution of Aβ to AD pathogenesis is accepted by many in the research community, recent studies have unveiled a more complicated picture of APP's involvement in neurodegeneration in that other APP-derived fragments have been shown to exert pathological influences on neuronal function. However, not all APP-derived peptides are neurotoxic, and some even harbor neuroprotective effects. In this review, we will explore this complex picture by first discussing the pleiotropic effects of the major APP-derived peptides cleaved by multiple proteases, including soluble APP peptides (sAPPα, sAPPβ), various C- and N-terminal fragments, p3, and APP intracellular domain fragments. In addition, we will highlight two interesting sequences within APP that likely contribute to this duality in APP function. First, it has been found that caspase-mediated cleavage of APP in the cytosolic region may release a cytotoxic peptide, C31, which plays a role in synapse loss and neuronal death. Second, recent studies have implicated the -YENPTY- motif in the cytoplasmic region as a domain that modulates several APP activities through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the first tyrosine residue. Thus, this review summarizes the current understanding of various APP proteolytic products and the interplay among them to gain deeper insights into the possible mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and AD pathophysiology.

  10. Delivery of gene-expressing fragments using quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Hanada, Sanshiro; Fujioka, Kouki; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), have potential to be applied to molecular biology and bioimaging, since some nanocrystals emit higher and longer lasting fluorescence than conventional organic probes do. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced the gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/geneconstruct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as 1) the reading direction of gene fragments, 2) the quantity of gene fragments attached on the surface of QD-constructs, 3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of QD/gene-constructs, and 4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene fragments. Using this QD/geneconstruct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs was disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes. These results suggest that inappropriate treatment and disposal of QDs may still have risks to the environmental pollution including human health under certain conditions. Here we propose the further research for the immune and physiological responses in not only immune cells but also other cells, in order to clear the effect of all other nanoscale products as well as nanocrystal

  11. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  12. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  13. Multiple Peptide Resistance Factor (MprF)-mediated Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Peptides Coincides with a Modulated Peptide Interaction with Artificial Membranes Comprising Lysyl-Phosphatidylglycerol*

    PubMed Central

    Andrä, Jörg; Goldmann, Torsten; Ernst, Christoph M.; Peschel, Andreas; Gutsmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Modification of the membrane lipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) of Staphylococcus aureus by enzymatic transfer of a l-lysine residue leading to lysyl-PG converts the net charge of PG from −1 to +1 and is thought to confer resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Lysyl-PG synthesis and translocation to the outer leaflet of the bacterial membrane are achieved by the membrane protein MprF. Consequently, mutants lacking a functional mprF gene are in particular vulnerable to the action of AMPs. Hence, we aim at elucidating whether and to which extent lysyl-PG modulates membrane binding, insertion, and permeabilization by various AMPs. Lysyl-PG was incorporated into artificial lipid bilayers, mimicking the cytoplasmic membrane of S. aureus. Moreover, we determined the activity of the peptides against a clinical isolate of S. aureus strain SA113 and two mutants lacking a functional mprF gene and visualized peptide-induced ultrastructural changes of bacteria by transmission electron microscopy. The studied peptides were: (i) NK-2, an α-helical fragment of mammalian NK-lysin, (ii) arenicin-1, a lugworm β-sheet peptide, and (iii) bee venom melittin. Biophysical data obtained by FRET spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrical measurements with planar lipid bilayers were correlated with the biological activities of the peptides. They strongly support the hypothesis that peptide-membrane interactions are a prerequisite for eradication of S. aureus. However, degree and mode of modulation of membrane properties such as fluidity, capacitance, and conductivity were unique for each of the peptides. Altogether, our data support and underline the significance of lysyl-PG for S. aureus resistance to AMPs. PMID:21474443

  14. Protein quantification by isotope dilution mass spectrometry of proteolytic fragments: cleavage rate and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Arsene, Cristian G; Ohlendorf, Rüdiger; Burkitt, William; Pritchard, Caroline; Henrion, André; O'Connor, Gavin; Bunk, David M; Güttler, Bernd

    2008-06-01

    The practice of quantifying proteins by peptide fragments from enzymatic proteolysis (digestion) was assessed regarding accuracy, reliability, and uncertainty of the results attainable. Purified recombinant growth hormone (rhGH, 22 kDa isoform) was used as a model analyte. Two tryptic peptides from hGH, T6 and T12, were chosen to determine the amount of the protein in the original sample. Reference solutions of T6 and T12 (isotopically labeled forms), value assigned by quantitative amino acid analysis (AAA) after complete hydrolysis, were used as internal standards. The accuracy of protein quantification by fragments T6 and T12 was evaluated by comparison of peptide results to those obtained for the same rhGH sample by AAA. The rate of cleavage (and thus the experimental protocol used) turned out to be crucial to the quality of results in protein quantification using enzymatic fragments. Applying a protocol customarily found in (qualitative) bottom-up proteomics gave results significantly higher than the target value from AAA (+11% with T6 and +6% with T12). In contrast, using a modified protocol optimized for fast and complete hydrolysis, results were unbiased within the limits of uncertainty, while the time needed for completion of proteolysis was considerably reduced (30 min as compared to 1080-1200 min). The method assessed highlighted three important criteria deemed necessary for successful protein quantification using proteolysis-based mass spectrometry methods. These are the following: the requirement for both the selected peptides and labeled internal standard to be stable throughout digestion; the correct purity assignment to the selected peptide standards; the proof of equimolar release of the selected peptides. The combined (overall) uncertainty for protein quantification was established by combination of estimates obtained for individual components and found to be U = 4% for this example. This uncertainty is of the same order as that typically

  15. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.

    2015-12-28

    We have studied the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4, and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insight into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. The photodissociation yields appear tomore » be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending on both the types of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.« less

  16. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.

    2015-12-29

    We have studied the VUV photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4 and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insights into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. Furthermore, the photodissociation yields appear to bemore » very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending both on the type of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.« less

  17. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  18. Identification of a novel ACE-inhibitory peptide from casein and evaluation of the inhibitory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tu, Maolin; Wang, Cong; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Ruyi; Liu, Hanxiong; Lu, Weihong; Jiang, Lianzhou; Du, Ming

    2018-08-01

    Various bioactive peptides are continuously being identified from casein hydrolysates. In this work, a novel angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory (ACEI) peptide, NMAINPSKENLCSTFCK, derived from the α s2 -casein fragment residues 25-41, was screened and identified by UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS from tryptic casein hydrolysate. The IC 50 value of the peptide, determined by an HPLC method, was 129.07 μM. The Lineweaver-Burk plot showed that this peptide acted as a mixed-type inhibitor against ACE, which might be attributed to the peptide being susceptible to degradation by ACE, indicating that the mixed-type inhibition could partly be a result of newly generated peptide fragments. The physicochemical characteristics and the secondary structure were evaluated by circular dichroism analysis and online prediction software (Expasy, PepDraw, and ProtParam) to identify the basic characteristics of this peptide. Moreover, molecular docking was simulated by Discovery Studio 2017 R2 software to provide the potential mechanisms underlying the ACEI activity of the peptides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Customized Peptide Biomaterial Synthesis via an Environment-Reliant Auto-Programmer Stigmergic Approach.

    PubMed

    Badhe, Ravindra V; Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; Marimuthu, Thashree; du Toit, Lisa C; Bijukumar, Divya; Chejara, Dharmesh R; Mabrouk, Mostafa; Pillay, Viness

    2018-04-16

    Stigmergy, a form of self-organization, was employed here to engineer a self-organizing peptide capable of forming a nano- or micro-structure and that can potentially be used in various drug delivery and biomedical applications. These self-assembling peptides exhibit several desirable qualities for drug delivery, tissue engineering, cosmetics, antibiotics, food science, and biomedical surface engineering. In this study, peptide biomaterial synthesis was carried out using an environment-reliant auto-programmer stigmergic approach. A model protein, α-gliadin (31, 36, and 38 kD), was forced to attain a primary structure with free –SH groups and broken down enzymatically into smaller fragments using chymotrypsin. This breakdown was carried out at different environment conditions (37 and 50 °C), and the fragments were allowed to self-organize at these temperatures. The new peptides so formed diverged according to the environmental conditions. Interestingly, two peptides (with molecular weights of 13.8 and 11.8 kD) were isolated when the reaction temperature was maintained at 50 °C, while four peptides with molecular weights of 54, 51, 13.8, and 12.8 kD were obtained when the reaction was conducted at 37 °C. Thus, at a higher temperature (50 °C), the peptides formed, compared to the original protein, had lower molecular weights, whereas, at a lower temperature (37 °C), two peptides had higher molecular weights and two had lower molecular weights.

  20. Dynamics of Protonated Peptide Ion Collisions with Organic Surfaces: Consonance of Simulation and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pratihar, Subha; Barnes, George L.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-08-18

    In this Perspective mass spectrometry experiments and chemical dynamics simulations are described which have explored the atomistic dynamics of protonated peptide ions, peptide-H+, colliding with organic surfaces. These studies have investigated surface-induced dissociation (SID) for which peptide-H+ fragments upon collision with the surface, peptide-H+ physisorption on the surface, soft landing (SL), and peptide-H+ reaction with the surface, reactive landing (RL). The simulations include QM+MM and QM/MM direct dynamics. For collisions with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces there is quite good agreement between experiment and simulation in the efficiency of energy transfer to the peptide-H+ ion’s internal degrees of freedom. Both themore » experiments and simulations show two mechanisms for peptide-H+ fragmentation, i.e. shattering and statistical, RRKM dynamics. Mechanisms for SL are probed in simulations of collisions of protonated dialanine with a perfluorinated SAM surface. RL has been studied experimentally for a number of peptide-H+ + surface systems, and qualitative agreement between simulation and experiment is found for two similar systems.« less

  1. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-07

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  2. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H.; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids.

  3. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS 3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    PubMed

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  6. Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  7. Annotating and Interpreting Linear and Cyclic Peptide Tandem Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides often possess pronounced bioactivity, and thus, they are often interesting hit compounds in natural product-based drug discovery programs. Their mass spectrometric characterization is difficult due to the predominant occurrence of non-proteinogenic monomers and, especially in the case of cyclic peptides, the complex fragmentation patterns observed. This makes nonribosomal peptide tandem mass spectra annotation challenging and time-consuming. To meet this challenge, software tools for this task have been developed. In this chapter, the workflow for using the software mMass for the annotation of experimentally obtained peptide tandem mass spectra is described. mMass is freely available (http://www.mmass.org), open-source, and the most advanced and user-friendly software tool for this purpose. The software enables the analyst to concisely annotate and interpret tandem mass spectra of linear and cyclic peptides. Thus, it is highly useful for accelerating the structure confirmation and elucidation of cyclic as well as linear peptides and depsipeptides.

  8. Tautomerization and Dissociation of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoyan; Song, Tao; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K

    2018-01-01

    Radical-mediated dissociations of peptide radical cations have intriguing unimolecular gas phase chemistry, with cleavages of almost every bond of the peptide backbone and amino acid side chains in a competitive and apparently "stochastic" manner. Challenges of unraveling mechanistic details are related to complex tautomerizations prior to dissociations. Recent conjunctions of experimental and theoretical investigations have revealed the existence of non-interconvertible isobaric tautomers with a variety of radical-site-specific initial structures, generated from dissociative electron transfer of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes. Their reactivity is influenced by the tautomerization barriers, perturbing the nature, location, or number of radical and charge site(s), which also determine the energetics and dynamics of the subsequent radical-mediated dissociatons. The competitive radical- and charge-induced dissociations are extremely dependent on charge density. Charge sequesting can reduce the charge densities on the peptide backbone and hence enhance the flexibility of structural rearrangement. Analysing the structures of precursors, intermediates and products has led to the discovery of many novel radical migration prior to peptide backbone and/or side chain fragmentations. Upon these successes, scientists will be able to build peptide cationic analogues/tautomers having a variety of well-defined radical sites. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fragmentation and reactivity in collisions of protonated diglycine with chemically modified perfluorinated alkylthiolate-self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Yang Li; Hase, William L.

    2011-03-07

    Direct dynamics simulations are reported for quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) trajectories of N-protonated diglycine (gly{sub 2}-H{sup +}) colliding with chemically modified perfluorinated octanethiolate self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. The RM1 semiempirical theory is used for the QM component of the trajectories. RM1 activation and reaction energies were compared with those determined from higher-level ab initio theories. Two chemical modifications are considered in which a head group (-COCl or -CHO) is substituted on the terminal carbon of a single chain of the SAM. These surfaces are designated as the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM, respectively. Fragmentation, peptide reaction with the SAM, and covalentmore » linkage of the peptide or its fragments with the SAM surface are observed. Peptide fragmentation via concerted CH{sub 2}-CO bond breakage is the dominant pathway for both surfaces. HCl formation is the dominant species produced by reaction with the COCl-SAM, while for the CHO-SAM a concerted H-atom transfer from the CHO-SAM to the peptide combined with either a H-atom or radical transfer from the peptide to the surface to form singlet reaction products is the dominant pathway. A strong collision energy dependence is found for the probability of peptide fragmentation, its reactivity, and linkage with the SAM. Surface deposition, i.e., covalent linkage between the surface and the peptide, is compared to recent experimental observations of such bonding by Laskin and co-workers [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 1512 (2008)]. Qualitative differences in reactivity are seen between the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM showing that chemical identity is important for surface reactivity. The probability of reactive surface deposition, which is most closely analogous to experimental observables, peaks at a value of around 20% for a collision energy of 50 eV.« less

  10. Suppression of peptide ion dissociation under electron capture: role of backbone amide hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Wong, P-S Joyce; Chen, Xiangfeng; Deng, Liulin; Wang, Ze; Li, Wan; Wong, Y L Elaine; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2015-10-15

    The electron capture dissociation (ECD) of proteins/peptides is affected by the nature and sequence of amino acid residues. Electron capture/transfer with no dissociation is an intriguing phenomenon that has occasionally been observed. We have previously identified that diarginated peptides enriched with glutamic acid residues were found to show suppression of backbone fragmentation. In this paper, we report the effect of geometrical parameters of a peptide, including chain length, conformation and amide hydrogen, on the suppression of ECD fragmentation using synthetic model peptides. Glycine containing model polypeptides were used to probe the mechanism. Molecular-mechanics was used to obtain the conformation of the precursor ions. The ECD experiments were performed on a Bruker APEX III 4.7 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Significant decreases in the intensities of the fragment ions were observed for the 23-mer polypeptide with only one E residue. This implied that the E:R ratio was no longer the sole determining factor for the occurrence of suppression effects. Results of conformational searches showed that there was a hydrogen-bonding 'ladder' formed in the 23-mer polypeptide, which was not found in the 15-mer peptide. Substituting the normal amino acid residues by the corresponding N-methylated amino acid residues in the model peptide, the suppression effect disappeared. Our results indicate that survival of the intact reduced peptide ion after electron capture depends also on the length of the peptide. The amide hydrogen was critical in forming the resonance structure that suppressed the ECD fragmentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Regulation of Breast Carcinoma Growth and Neovascularization by Novel Peptide Sequences in Thromospondin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    specific mutagenesis, recombinant fragments, and peptide mimetics based on TSP. Peptides from the type I repeats of TSP reproduced the growth inhibitory...to the "Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals," prepared by the Committee on Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute of...Appendix 30 Tables 30 Figure legends 33 Figures 37 4 INTRODUCTION Growth of many solid tumors is strongly dependent on recruitment of neovascularization

  12. Prediction of Antimicrobial Activity of Synthetic Peptides by a Decision Tree Model

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S.; Baranauskas, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools. PMID:23455341

  13. UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions: insights from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Girod, Marion; Sanader, Zeljka; Vojkovic, Marin; Antoine, Rodolphe; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions leads to unusual product ions. In this paper, we report laser-induced dissociation of a series of proline-containing peptides at 213 nm. We observe specific fragmentation pathways corresponding to the formation of (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. This was not observed at 266 nm or for peptides which do not contain proline residues. In order to obtain insights into the fragmentation dynamics at 213 nm, a small peptide (RPK for arginine-proline-lysine) was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations of absorption spectra and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (MD) were made. Second and third excited singlet states, S(2) and S(3), lie close to 213 nm. Non-adiabatic MD simulation starting from S(2) and S(3) shows that these transitions are followed by C-C and C-N bond activation close to the proline residue. After this first relaxation step, consecutive rearrangements and proton transfers are required to produce unusual (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. These fragmentation mechanisms were confirmed by H/D exchange experiments.

  14. UV Photodissociation of Proline-containing Peptide Ions: Insights from Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Marion; Sanader, Zeljka; Vojkovic, Marin; Antoine, Rodolphe; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions leads to unusual product ions. In this paper, we report laser-induced dissociation of a series of proline-containing peptides at 213 nm. We observe specific fragmentation pathways corresponding to the formation of (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. This was not observed at 266 nm or for peptides which do not contain proline residues. In order to obtain insights into the fragmentation dynamics at 213 nm, a small peptide (RPK for arginine-proline-lysine) was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations of absorption spectra and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (MD) were made. Second and third excited singlet states, S2 and S3, lie close to 213 nm. Non-adiabatic MD simulation starting from S2 and S3 shows that these transitions are followed by C-C and C-N bond activation close to the proline residue. After this first relaxation step, consecutive rearrangements and proton transfers are required to produce unusual (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. These fragmentation mechanisms were confirmed by H/D exchange experiments.

  15. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Electrostatically Embedded Molecular Tailoring Approach and Validation for Peptides.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Wang, Bo; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-03-12

    We add higher-order electronic polarization effects to the molecular tailoring approach (MTA) by embedding each fragment in background charges as in combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods; the resulting method considered here is called electrostatically embedded MTA (EE-MTA). We compare EE-MTA to MTA for a test peptide, Ace-(Ala)20-NMe, and we find that including background charges (embedding charges) greatly improves the performance. The fragmentation is performed on the basis of amino acids as monomers, and several sizes of fragment are tested. The fragments are capped with either hydrogen cap atoms or tuned fluorine cap atoms. The effective core potential of the tuned fluorine cap atom is optimized so as to reproduce the proton affinity for seven types of tetrapeptide, and the proton affinity calculated with the tuned cap atom shows a lower mean unsigned error than that obtained by using a hydrogen cap atom. In the application to the test peptide, these generically tuned cap atoms show better performance compared with the hydrogen cap atom for both the electronic energy and the energy difference between an α helix and a β sheet (in the latter case, 1.0% vs 2.7% when averaged over three sizes of fragments and two locations for cut bonds). Also, we compared the accuracy of several charge redistribution schemes, and we find that the results are not particularly sensitive to these choices for the Ace-(Ala)20-NMe peptide. We also illustrate the dependence on the choice of charge model for the embedding charges, including both fixed embedding charges and embedding charges that depend on conformation.

  18. An EThcD-Based Method for Discrimination of Leucine and Isoleucine Residues in Tryptic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Kovalyov, Sergey V.; Samgina, Tatiana Yu.; Lebedev, Albert T.

    2017-08-01

    An EThcD-based approach for the reliable discrimination of isomeric leucine and isoleucine residues in peptide de novo sequencing procedure has been proposed. A multistage fragmentation of peptide ions was performed with Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer in electrospray ionization mode. At the first stage, z-ions were produced by ETD or ETcaD fragmentation of doubly or triply charged peptide precursor ions. These primary ions were further fragmented by HCD with broad-band ion isolation, and the resulting w-ions showed different mass for leucine and isoleucine residues. The procedure did not require manual isolation of specific z-ions prior to HCD stage. Forty-three tryptic peptides (3 to 27 residues) obtained by trypsinolysis of human serum albumin (HSA) and gp188 protein were analyzed. To demonstrate a proper solution for radical site migration problem, three non-tryptic peptides were also analyzed. A total of 93 leucine and isoleucine residues were considered and 83 of them were correctly identified. The developed approach can be a reasonable substitution for additional Edman degradation procedure, which is still used in peptide sequencing for leucine and isoleucine discrimination.

  19. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  20. Fragmentation of percolation cluster perimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, Jean-Marc; Bradley, R. Mark

    1996-05-01

    We introduce a model for the fragmentation of porous random solids under the action of an external agent. In our model, the solid is represented by a bond percolation cluster on the square lattice and bonds are removed only at the external perimeter (or `hull') of the cluster. This model is shown to be related to the self-avoiding walk on the Manhattan lattice and to the disconnection events at a diffusion front. These correspondences are used to predict the leading and the first correction-to-scaling exponents for several quantities defined for hull fragmentation. Our numerical results support these predictions. In addition, the algorithm used to construct the perimeters reveals itself to be a very efficient tool for detecting subtle correlations in the pseudo-random number generator used. We present a quantitative test of two generators which supports recent results reported in more systematic studies.

  1. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit, E-mail: drvarinderjit@gmail.com

    2016-05-06

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping At{sub otal} fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of {sup 197}Au+{sup 27}Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleonmore » shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).« less

  2. Spectroscopy of protonated peptides assisted by infrared multiple photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Monia; Lorenz, Ulrich J; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2009-02-05

    We report here a new technique for spectroscopic studies of protonated, gas-phase biomolecules and demonstrate its utility by measuring highly resolved electronic and infrared spectra of peptides of up to 17 amino acids. After UV excitation of an aromatic chromophore of a protonated peptide, a CO(2) laser further excites the molecules, increasing their vibrational energy and hence their dissociation rate, allowing detection of the UV excitation by monitoring the resulting photofragments. We show that addition of the CO(2) laser excitation increases the fragmentation yield on the time scale of our experiments by as much as 2 orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the sensitivity of UV photofragment spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that this approach can be applied in an IR-UV double-resonance scheme, allowing measurement of conformer-specific infrared spectra of protonated peptides.

  3. Bacterial enzymes effectively digest Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Yuliya Vasilyevna; Shagimardanova, Elena Ilyasovna; Margulis, Anna Borisovna; Toymentseva, Anna Aleksandrovna; Balaban, Nelly Pavlovna; Rudakova, Nataliya Leonidovna; Rizvanov, Albert Anatolyevich; Sharipova, Margarita Rashidovna; Palotás, András

    2014-09-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid peptides play key roles in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and recent evidence suggests that microbial particles, among others, can facilitate their polymerization. Bacterial enzymes, however, have been proved to be beneficial in degrading pathological fibrillar structures in clinical settings, such as strepto-kinases in resolving blood-clots. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of bacterial substances to effectively hydrolyze β-amyloid peptides. Degrading products of several proteinases from Bacillus pumilus were evaluated using MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, and their toxicity was assessed in vitro using cell-culture assays and morphological studies. These enzymes have proved to be non-toxic and were demonstrated to cleave through the functional domains of β-amyloid peptide. By yielding inactive fragments, proteinases of Bacillus pumilus may be used as candidate anti-amyloid agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Linear Peptides in Intracellular Applications.

    PubMed

    Zuconelli, Cristiane R; Brock, Roland; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W

    2017-01-01

    To this point, efforts to develop therapeutic peptides for intracellular applications were guided by the perception that unmodified linear peptides are highly unstable and therefore structural modifications are required to reduce proteolytic breakdown. Largely, this concept is a consequence of the fact that most research on intracellular peptides hitherto has focused on peptide degradation in the context of antigen processing, rather than on peptide stability. Interestingly, inside cells, endogenous peptides lacking any chemical modifications to enhance stability escape degradation to the point that they may even modulate intracellular signaling pathways. In addition, many unmodified synthetic peptides designed to interfere with intracellular signaling, following introduction into cells, have the expected activity demonstrating that biologically relevant concentrations can be reached. This review provides an overview of results and techniques relating to the exploration and application of linear, unmodified peptides. After an introduction to intracellular peptide turnover, the review mentions examples for synthetic peptides as modulators of intracellular signaling, introduces endogenous peptides with bioactivity, techniques to measure peptide stability, and peptide delivery. Future experiments should elucidate the rules needed to predict promising peptide candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Fragmentation: Is the message clear?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bissonette, J.A.; Storch, Ilse

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly discuss some of the fundamental problems arising from the inherent complexity of larger-scale ecological systems. We examine the tenuous assumption of a direct correspondence between ecological data and theory, we comment on a recent report that evaluated the efficacy of fragmentation experiments, and we briefly assess its implications for ecological research and conservation practice on the landscape scale. Copyright ?? 2002 by the author(s). Published here under licence by The Resilience Alliance.

  6. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  7. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and ∼95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify >300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases. PMID:19949699

  8. N-terminal enrichment: developing a protocol to detect specific proteolytic fragments.

    PubMed

    Schepmoes, Athena A; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D

    2009-12-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a "bottom-up" strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.(1) We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and approximately 95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.(2) In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify >300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  10. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stepwise identification of potent antimicrobial peptides from human genome.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Yan, Yuxian; Liu, Hongqi; Lv, Qi

    2013-07-01

    The increasing incidence of hospital acquired infections caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens has led to an increase in morbidity and mortality, finding alternative antibiotics unaffected by resistance mechanisms is fundamentally important for treating this problem. Naturally occurring proteins usually carry short peptide fragments that exhibit noticeable biological activity against a wide variety of microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and protozoa. Traditional discovery of such antimicrobially active fragments (i.e. antimicrobial peptides, AMPs) from protein repertoire is either random or led by chance. Here, we report the use of a rational protocol that combines in silico prediction and in vitro assay to identify potential AMPs with high activity and low toxicity from the entire human genome. In the procedure, a three-step inference strategy is first proposed to perform genome-wide analysis to infer AMPs in a high-throughput manner. By employing this strategy we are able to screen more than one million peptide candidates generated from various human proteins, from which we identify four highly promising samples, and subsequently their antibacterial activity on five strains as well as cytotoxicity on human myoblasts are tested experimentally. As a consequence, two high-activity, low-toxicity peptides are discovered, which could be used as the structural basis to further develop new antibiotics. In addition, from 1491 known AMPs we also derive a quantitative measure called antibacterial propensity index (API) for 20 naturally occurring amino acids, which shows a significant allometric correlation with the theoretical minimal inhibitory concentration of putative peptides against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This study may provide a proof-of-concept paradigm for the genome-wide discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides by using a combination of in silico and in vitro analyses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fragmentation during primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    Understanding the physics of the very first stars in the universe, the so-called Population III (or Pop III) stars, is crucial in determining how the universe evolved into what we observe today. In the standard model of Pop III star formation, the baryonic matter, mainly atomic hydrogen, collapses gravitationally into small Dark Matter (DM) minihalos. However, so far there is little understanding on how the thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of the primordial gas depend on the initial configuration of the minihalos (for example, rotation of the unstable clumps inside minihalos, turbulence, formation of molecular hydrogen and cosmic variance of the minihalos). We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. Unlike some earlier cosmological calculations, the implementation of sink particles allows us to follow the evolution of the accretion disk that builds up in the centre of each minihalo and fragments. We find that the fragmentation behavior depends on the adopted choice of three-body H2 formation rate coefficient. The increasing cooling rate during rapid conversion of the atomic to molecular hydrogen is offset by the heating due to gas contraction. We propose that the H2 cooling, the heating due to H2 formation and compressional heating together set a density and temperature structure in the disk that favors fragmentation. We also find that the cloud's initial degree of rotation has a significant effect on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the collapsing gas. Clouds with higher rotation exhibit spiral-arm-like structures that become gravitationally unstable to fragmentation on several scales. These type of clouds tend to fragment more and have lower accretion rates compared to their slowly rotating counterparts. In addition, we find that the distribution of specific angular

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria.

  14. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of cardiac natriuretic peptide determination on the diagnosis and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mair, J; Hammerer-Lercher, A; Puschendorf, B

    2001-07-01

    The long-predicted endocrine function of the heart has been proven by the discovery of atrial natriuretic peptide (atrial natriuretic factor, A-type natriuretic peptide; ANP) 20 years ago. This subsequently led to the description of a whole family of structurally similar but genetically distinct peptides, the natriuretic peptide family, which contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis. These looped peptides promote natriuresis and diuresis, act as vasodilators, and exert antimitogenic effects on cardiovascular tissues. Two members, ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (B-type natriuretic peptide; BNP) are secreted by the heart mainly in response to myocardial stretch induced by volume load. The natriuretic peptides are synthesized as preprohormones. The C-terminal endocrinological active peptides (ANP, BNP) and their N-terminal prohormone fragments are found in plasma. The natriuretic peptide system is activated to its highest degree in ventricular dysfunction. However, natriuretic peptides are increased in all patients with edematous disorders which lead to an increase in atrial tension or central blood volume, such as renal failure or ascitic liver cirrhosis. It could be demonstrated that in chronic heart failure patients and during the subacute phase of myocardial infarction, of all tested neurohormones, the cardiac natriuretic peptides were best markers to identify heart failure and the most powerful predictors of morbidity and mortality. Natriuretic peptides are independent markers for risk assessment. In comparative studies BNP was superior to ANP and its N-terminal prohormone fragments in myocardial infarction as well as in chronic heart failure patients. Less data on N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) is available, but BNP and NT-proBNP appear to be equivalent markers. For primary care physicians natriuretic peptide measurement is useful to decide which patient with suspected heart failure warrants further investigation, particularly when assessment of left

  16. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  17. Evaluating pH-induced gastrointestinal aggregation of Arachis hypogaea 1 fragments as potential components of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Khan, I John; Di, Rong; Patel, Priyesh; Nanda, Vikas

    2013-09-04

    The seed storage glycoprotein Arachis hypogaea (Ara h) 1 is a major allergen found in peanuts. The biochemical resistance of food proteins to protease digestion contributes to their allergenicity. The rapid proteolysis of Ara h 1 under gastric conditions challenges this model. Biophysical and in vitro digestion experiments were carried out to identify how Ara h 1 epitopes might survive digestion, despite their facile degradation. The bicupin core of Ara h 1 can be unfolded at low pH and reversibly folded at higher pH. Additionally, peptide fragments from simulated gastric digestion predominantly form noncovalent aggregates when transferred to base. Disulfide cross-links within these aggregates occur as intermediates in relatively low amounts only at early times and play no role in shielding peptides from degradation. It is proposed that peptide fragments which survive gastric conditions form large aggregates in basic environments such as the small intestine, making epitopes available for triggering an allergic response.

  18. Peptide Vaccine Against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Taborda, Carlos P; Travassos, Luiz R

    2017-01-01

    The chapter reviews methods utilized for the isolation and characterization of a promising immunogen candidate, aiming at a human vaccine against paracoccidioidomycosis. Peptide P10 carries a T-CD4+ epitope and was identified as an internal sequence of the major diagnostic antigen known as gp43 glycoprotein. It successfully treated massive intratracheal infections by virulent Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in combination with chemotherapy.An introduction about the systemic mycosis was found essential to understand the various options that were considered to design prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine protocols using peptide P10.

  19. Robust Object Tracking Using Valid Fragments Selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Tian, Peng; Luo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Local features are widely used in visual tracking to improve robustness in cases of partial occlusion, deformation and rotation. This paper proposes a local fragment-based object tracking algorithm. Unlike many existing fragment-based algorithms that allocate the weights to each fragment, this method firstly defines discrimination and uniqueness for local fragment, and builds an automatic pre-selection of useful fragments for tracking. Then, a Harris-SIFT filter is used to choose the current valid fragments, excluding occluded or highly deformed fragments. Based on those valid fragments, fragment-based color histogram provides a structured and effective description for the object. Finally, the object is tracked using a valid fragment template combining the displacement constraint and similarity of each valid fragment. The object template is updated by fusing feature similarity and valid fragments, which is scale-adaptive and robust to partial occlusion. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is accurate and robust in challenging scenarios. PMID:27430036

  20. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; R. O' Neill; B. Jones; E. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (...

  1. Potential Biomarker Peptides Associated with Acute Alcohol-Induced Reduction of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Marumo, Mikio; Nonaka, Daisuke; Shimomura, Tomoko; Eguchi, Ryoji; Lee, Lyang-Ja; Tanaka, Kenji; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the peptides that are related to acute reduction of blood pressure after alcohol drinking. Venous blood was collected from male healthy volunteers before and after drinking white wine (3 ml/kg weight) containing 13% of ethanol. Peptidome analysis for serum samples was performed using a new target plate, BLOTCHIP®. Alcohol caused significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min. The peptidome analysis showed that the levels of three peptides of m/z 1467, 2380 and 2662 changed significantly after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2662 peptides were identified to be fragments of fibrinogen alpha chain, and the m/z 2380 peptide was identified to be a fragment of complement C4. The intensities of the m/z 2380 and m/z 1467 peptides before drinking were associated with % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min after drinking compared with the levels before drinking, while there were no significant correlations between the intensity of the m/z 2662 peptide and % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2380 peptides are suggested to be markers for acute reduction of blood pressure after drinking alcohol. PMID:26815288

  2. Denoising peptide tandem mass spectra for spectral libraries: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Lam, Henry

    2013-07-05

    With the rapid accumulation of data from shotgun proteomics experiments, it has become feasible to build comprehensive and high-quality spectral libraries of tandem mass spectra of peptides. A spectral library condenses experimental data into a retrievable format and can be used to aid peptide identification by spectral library searching. A key step in spectral library building is spectrum denoising, which is best accomplished by merging multiple replicates of the same peptide ion into a consensus spectrum. However, this approach cannot be applied to "singleton spectra," for which only one observed spectrum is available for the peptide ion. We developed a method, based on a Bayesian classifier, for denoising peptide tandem mass spectra. The classifier accounts for relationships between peaks, and can be trained on the fly from consensus spectra and immediately applied to denoise singleton spectra, without hard-coded knowledge about peptide fragmentation. A linear regression model was also trained to predict the number of useful "signal" peaks in a spectrum, thereby obviating the need for arbitrary thresholds for peak filtering. This Bayesian approach accumulates weak evidence systematically to boost the discrimination power between signal and noise peaks, and produces readily interpretable conditional probabilities that offer valuable insights into peptide fragmentation behaviors. By cross validation, spectra denoised by this method were shown to retain more signal peaks, and have higher spectral similarities to replicates, than those filtered by intensity only.

  3. Current algorithmic solutions for peptide-based proteomics data generation and identification.

    PubMed

    Hoopmann, Michael R; Moritz, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Peptide-based proteomic data sets are ever increasing in size and complexity. These data sets provide computational challenges when attempting to quickly analyze spectra and obtain correct protein identifications. Database search and de novo algorithms must consider high-resolution MS/MS spectra and alternative fragmentation methods. Protein inference is a tricky problem when analyzing large data sets of degenerate peptide identifications. Combining multiple algorithms for improved peptide identification puts significant strain on computational systems when investigating large data sets. This review highlights some of the recent developments in peptide and protein identification algorithms for analyzing shotgun mass spectrometry data when encountering the aforementioned hurdles. Also explored are the roles that analytical pipelines, public spectral libraries, and cloud computing play in the evolution of peptide-based proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antihypertensive peptides from food proteins.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of food proteins where they remain inactive until released by enzymatic hydrolysis. Once released from the parent protein, certain peptides have the ability to modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) because they decrease activities of renin or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the two main enzymes that regulate mammalian blood pressure. These antihypertensive peptides can also enhance the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels within vascular walls and promote vasodilation. The peptides can block the interactions between angiotensin II (vasoconstrictor) and angiotensin receptors, which can contribute to reduced blood pressure. This review focuses on the methods that are involved in antihypertensive peptide production from food sources, including fractionation protocols that are used to enrich bioactive peptide content and enhance peptide activity. It also discusses mechanisms that are believed to be involved in the antihypertensive activity of these peptides.

  5. Ribosomal synthesis of nonstandard peptides.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Suga, Hiroaki

    2008-04-01

    It is well known that standard peptides, which comprise proteinogenic amino acids, can act as specific chemical probes to target proteins with high affinity. Despite this fact, a number of peptide drug leads have been abandoned because of their poor cell permeability and protease instability. On the other hand, nonstandard peptides isolated as natural products often exhibit remarkable pharmaco-behavior and stability in vivo. Although it is likely that numerous nonstandard therapeutic peptides capable of recognizing various targets could have been synthesized, enzymes for nonribosomal peptide syntheses are complex; therefore, it is difficult to engineer such modular enzymes to build nonstandard peptide libraries. Here we describe an emerging technology for the synthesis of nonstandard peptides that employs an integrated system of reconstituted cell-free translation and flexizymes. We summarize the historical background of this technology and discuss its current and future applications to the synthesis of nonstandard peptides and drug discovery.

  6. Characterization of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent by photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bagag, Aïcha; Jault, Jean-Michel; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Le Naour, François

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of membrane proteins is still challenging. The major issue is the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins that necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction and solubilization. The very poor compatibility of mass spectrometry with detergents remains a tremendous obstacle in studies of membrane proteins. Here, we investigated the potential of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for mass spectrometry study of membrane proteins. This work was focused on the tetraspanin CD9 and the multidrug transporter BmrA. A set of peptides from CD9, exhibiting a broad range of hydropathicity, was investigated using APPI as compared to electrospray ionization (ESI). Mass spectrometry experiments revealed that the most hydrophobic peptides were hardly ionized by ESI whereas all peptides, including the highly hydrophobic one that corresponds to the full sequence of the first transmembrane domain of CD9, were easily ionized by APPI. The native protein BmrA purified in the presence of the non-ionic detergent beta-D-dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was digested in-solution using trypsin. The resulting peptides were investigated by flow injection analysis of the mixture followed by mass spectrometry. Upon ESI, only detergent ions were detected and the ionic signals from the peptides were totally suppressed. In contrast, APPI allowed many peptides distributed along the sequence of the protein to be detected. Furthermore, the parent ion corresponding to the first transmembrane domain of the protein BmrA was detected under APPI conditions. Careful examination of the APPI mass spectrum revealed a-, b-, c- and y- fragment ions generated by in-source fragmentation. Those fragment ions allowed unambiguous structural characterization of the transmembrane domain. In conclusion, APPI-MS appears as a versatile method allowing the ionization and fragmentation of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent.

  7. Characterization of Hydrophobic Peptides in the Presence of Detergent by Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bagag, Aïcha; Jault, Jean-Michel; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Le Naour, François

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of membrane proteins is still challenging. The major issue is the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins that necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction and solubilization. The very poor compatibility of mass spectrometry with detergents remains a tremendous obstacle in studies of membrane proteins. Here, we investigated the potential of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for mass spectrometry study of membrane proteins. This work was focused on the tetraspanin CD9 and the multidrug transporter BmrA. A set of peptides from CD9, exhibiting a broad range of hydropathicity, was investigated using APPI as compared to electrospray ionization (ESI). Mass spectrometry experiments revealed that the most hydrophobic peptides were hardly ionized by ESI whereas all peptides, including the highly hydrophobic one that corresponds to the full sequence of the first transmembrane domain of CD9, were easily ionized by APPI. The native protein BmrA purified in the presence of the non-ionic detergent beta-D-dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was digested in-solution using trypsin. The resulting peptides were investigated by flow injection analysis of the mixture followed by mass spectrometry. Upon ESI, only detergent ions were detected and the ionic signals from the peptides were totally suppressed. In contrast, APPI allowed many peptides distributed along the sequence of the protein to be detected. Furthermore, the parent ion corresponding to the first transmembrane domain of the protein BmrA was detected under APPI conditions. Careful examination of the APPI mass spectrum revealed a-, b-, c- and y- fragment ions generated by in-source fragmentation. Those fragment ions allowed unambiguous structural characterization of the transmembrane domain. In conclusion, APPI–MS appears as a versatile method allowing the ionization and fragmentation of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent. PMID:24236085

  8. Site-specific characterization of (D)-amino acid containing peptide epimers by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Lietz, Christopher B; Yu, Qing; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues.

  9. Sequence Elucidation of an Unknown Cyclic Peptide of High Doping Potential by ETD and CID Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fuyu; Uboh, Cornelius E.; Soma, Lawrence R.; Rudy, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    Identification of an unknown substance without any information remains a daunting challenge despite advances in chemistry and mass spectrometry. However, an unknown cyclic peptide in a sample with very limited volume seized at a Pennsylvania racetrack has been successfully identified. The unknown sample was determined by accurate mass measurements to contain a small unknown peptide as the major component. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the unknown peptide revealed the presence of Lys (not Gln, by accurate mass), Phe, and Arg residues, and absence of any y-type product ion. The latter, together with the tryptic digestion results of the unusual deamidation and absence of any tryptic cleavage, suggests a cyclic structure for the peptide. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) of the unknown peptide indicated the presence of Gln (not Lys, by the unusual deamidation), Phe, and Arg residues and their connectivity. After all the results were pieced together, a cyclic tetrapeptide, cyclo[Arg-Lys-N(C6H9)Gln-Phe], is proposed for the unknown peptide. Observations of different amino acid residues from CID and ETD experiments for the peptide were interpreted by a fragmentation pathway proposed, as was preferential CID loss of a Lys residue from the peptide. ETD was used for the first time in sequencing of a cyclic peptide; product ions resulting from ETD of the peptide identified were categorized into two types and named pseudo-b and pseudo-z ions that are important for sequencing of cyclic peptides. The ETD product ions were interpreted by fragmentation pathways proposed. Additionally, multi-stage CID mass spectrometry cannot provide complete sequence information for cyclic peptides containing adjacent Arg and Lys residues. The identified cyclic peptide has not been documented in the literature, its pharmacological effects are unknown, but it might be a "designer" drug with athletic performance-enhancing effects.

  10. Outgassing: Influence on speed of magma fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Dominique; Scheu, Bettina; Mueller, Sebastian P.; Spieler, Oliver; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-03-01

    explosive eruptions remains an outstanding challenge. Knowledge of the controlling parameters and their relative importance is crucial to deepen our understanding of conduit flow dynamics and accurately model the processes involved. This experimental study sheds light on one important parameter—outgassing—and evaluates its influence on magma fragmentation behavior. We perform fragmentation experiments based on the shock tube theory at room temperature on natural pyroclastic material with a connected porosity ranging from 15% to 78%. For each sample series, we determine the initial pressure (P) required to initiate magma fragmentation (fragmentation threshold, Pth). Furthermore, we measure the permeability of each sample for P < Pth and the fragmentation speed for P > Pth. A significant loss of initial pressure, caused by outgassing in samples with permeability ≥1e-12 m2, is observed within the fragmentation time scale (a few milliseconds). The samples are classified into: (a) dome/conduit wall rocks and (b) pumice/scoria. Substantial outgassing during fragmentation leads to higher fragmentation thresholds. Experimental fragmentation speeds are significantly higher than the modeled fragmentation speeds for high-permeability dome/conduit wall rocks, but lower for high-permeability pumices. Experimental fragmentation speeds for low-permeability dome/conduit wall rocks and low-permeability pumice/scoria are as expected. We also find that low-porosity, low-permeability, altered dome/conduit wall rocks fragment at significantly higher speeds than expected. Because fragmentation threshold and fragmentation speed are among the determining parameters for the initiation, sustainment and cessation of an eruption, outgassing should be considered in the modeling of magma fragmentation dynamics.

  11. Long Fragment Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chua, Eng Wee; Maggo, Simran; Kennedy, Martin A

    2017-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an oft-used preparatory technique in amplifying specific DNA regions for downstream analysis. The size of an amplicon was initially limited by errors in nucleotide polymerization and template deterioration during thermal cycling. A variant of PCR, designated long-range PCR, was devised to counter these drawbacks and enable the amplification of large fragments exceeding a few kb. In this chapter we describe a protocol for long-range PCR, which we have adopted to obtain products of 6.6, 7.2, 13, and 20 kb from human genomic DNA samples.

  12. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  13. Structural properties of bioactive peptides with α-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Bester, Megan J; Neitz, Albert W H; Gaspar, Anabella R M

    2018-02-01

    Bioactive peptides are emerging as promising class of drugs that could serve as α-glucosidase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This article identifies structural and physicochemical requirements for the design of therapeutically relevant α-glucosidase inhibitory peptides. So far, a total of 43 fully sequenced α-glucosidase inhibitory peptides have been reported and 13 of them had IC 50 values several folds lower than acarbose. Analysis of the peptides indicates that the most potent peptides are tri- to hexapeptides with amino acids containing a hydroxyl or basic side chain at the N-terminal. The presence of proline within the chain and alanine or methionine at the C-terminal appears to be relevant for high activity. Hydrophobicity and isoelectric points are less important variables for α-glucosidase inhibition whilst a net charge of 0 or +1 was predicted for the highly active peptides. In silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion revealed that the high and moderately active peptides, including the most potent peptide (STYV), were gastrointestinally unstable, except SQSPA. Molecular docking of SQSPA, STYV, and STY (digestion fragment of STYV) with α-glucosidase suggested that their hydrogen bonding interactions and binding energies were comparable with acarbose. The identified criteria will facilitate the design of new peptide-derived α-glucosidase inhibitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Predicting sequences and structures of MHC-binding peptides: a computational combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jun; Treutlein, Herbert R.; Rudy, George B.

    2001-06-01

    Peptides bound to MHC molecules on the surface of cells convey critical information about the cellular milieu to immune system T cells. Predicting which peptides can bind an MHC molecule, and understanding their modes of binding, are important in order to design better diagnostic and therapeutic agents for infectious and autoimmune diseases. Due to the difficulty of obtaining sufficient experimental binding data for each human MHC molecule, computational modeling of MHC peptide-binding properties is necessary. This paper describes a computational combinatorial design approach to the prediction of peptides that bind an MHC molecule of known X-ray crystallographic or NMR-determined structure. The procedure uses chemical fragments as models for amino acid residues and produces a set of sequences for peptides predicted to bind in the MHC peptide-binding groove. The probabilities for specific amino acids occurring at each position of the peptide are calculated based on these sequences, and these probabilities show a good agreement with amino acid distributions derived from a MHC-binding peptide database. The method also enables prediction of the three-dimensional structure of MHC-peptide complexes. Docking, linking, and optimization procedures were performed with the XPLOR program [1].

  15. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Haney, Evan F; Mansour, Sarah C; Hancock, Robert E W

    2017-01-01

    The "golden era" of antibiotic discovery has long passed, but the need for new antibiotics has never been greater due to the emerging threat of antibiotic resistance. This urgency to develop new antibiotics has motivated researchers to find new methods to combat pathogenic microorganisms resulting in a surge of research focused around antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; also termed host defense peptides) and their potential as therapeutics. During the past few decades, more than 2000 AMPs have been identified from a diverse range of organisms (animals, fungi, plants, and bacteria). While these AMPs share a number of common features and a limited number of structural motifs; their sequences, activities, and targets differ considerably. In addition to their antimicrobial effects, AMPs can also exhibit immunomodulatory, anti-biofilm, and anticancer activities. These diverse functions have spurred tremendous interest in research aimed at understanding the activity of AMPs, and various protocols have been described to assess different aspects of AMP function including screening and evaluating the activities of natural and synthetic AMPs, measuring interactions with membranes, optimizing peptide function, and scaling up peptide production. Here, we provide a general overview of AMPs and introduce some of the methodologies that have been used to advance AMP research.

  17. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  18. A novel method for in situ detection of hydrolyzable casein fragments in a cheese matrix by antibody phage display technique and CLSM.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2009-11-11

    A novel method to monitor in situ hydrolyzable casein fragments during cheese ripening by using immunofluorescent labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was developed. Monoclonal single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) were generated by antibody phage display toward three small synthetic peptides of the alpha(s1)-casein sequence. These peptides traverse enzymatic cleavage sites of casein during cheese ripening. The specificity of the generated anti-peptide antibodies was determined by ELISA and Western blot. Finally, an immunofluorescent labeling protocol was successfully developed for the detection of scFvs binding to different alpha(s1)-casein fragments inside a cheese matrix by CLSM. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated immunofluorescent labeling method for in situ analysis of proteolysis phenomena in the cheese matrix. Additionally, this technique offers a high potential to study in situ dynamic spatial changes of target components in complex food systems.

  19. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  20. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  2. NMR-derived model for a peptide-antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zilber, B.; Scherf, T.; Anglister, J.

    1990-10-01

    The TE34 monoclonal antibody against cholera toxin peptide 3 (CTP3; VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA) was sequenced and investigated by two-dimensional transferred NOE difference spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The V{sub H} sequence of TE34, which does not bind cholera toxin, shares remarkable homology to that of TE32 and TE33, which are both anti-CTP3 antibodies that bind the toxin. However, due to a shortened heavy chain CDR3, TE34 assumes a radically different combining site structure. The assignment of the combining site interactions to specific peptide residues was completed by use of AcIDSQRKA, a truncated peptide analogue in which lysine-13 was substituted by arginine, specific deuterationmore » of individual polypeptide chains of the antibody, and a computer model for the Fv fragment of TE34. NMR-derived distance restraints were then applied to the calculated model of the Fv to generate a three-dimensional structure of the TE34/CTP3 complex. The combining site was found to be a very hydrophobic cavity composed of seven aromatic residues. Charged residues are found in the periphery of the combining site. The peptide residues HIDSQKKA form a {beta}-turn inside the combining site. The contact area between the peptide and the TE34 antibody is 388 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, about half of the contact area observed in protein-antibody complexes.« less

  3. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Butenko, Melinka A.; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S.; De Smet, Ive

    2015-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  5. [Plant signaling peptides. Small post-translationally modified peptides].

    PubMed

    Gorzelańczyk, Aneta; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Recent genetic, bioinformatic and biochemical analyses have revealed that many secretory peptides are important components in intercellular signaling that coordinate and specify cellular functions in plants. The signaling peptides discovered in plants thus far can be considered to fall into two broad groups. Peptides from the first group are undergo post-translational modification, such as proline hydroxylation, hydroxyproline arabinosylation or tyrosine sulfation. Peptides from the second group are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). The Cys-rich peptides are larger and they contain 4 to 16 cysteine residues. In parallel with the discovery of plant signal peptides, specific receptors for such peptide signals are identified. So far, the receptors for plant peptides that have been identified are members of the receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and the receptor-like proteins (RLPs) families, and most of them contain leucine-rich repeat (LRR) extracellular domain. The present review presents the recent progress in research on small post-translationally modified signal peptides. Recent findings indicate that these peptides are involved in various aspects of plant growth regulation including meristem organization, primary root development, lateral root initiation, vasculature development, organ abscission, and root nodulation.

  6. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  7. Enhanced Peptide Identification by Electron Transfer Dissociation Using an Improved Mascot Percolator*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James C.; Collins, Mark O.; Yu, Lu; Käll, Lukas; Brosch, Markus; Choudhary, Jyoti S.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide identification using tandem mass spectrometry is a core technology in proteomics. Latest generations of mass spectrometry instruments enable the use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to complement collision induced dissociation (CID) for peptide fragmentation. However, a critical limitation to the use of ETD has been optimal database search software. Percolator is a post-search algorithm, which uses semi-supervised machine learning to improve the rate of peptide spectrum identifications (PSMs) together with providing reliable significance measures. We have previously interfaced the Mascot search engine with Percolator and demonstrated sensitivity and specificity benefits with CID data. Here, we report recent developments in the Mascot Percolator V2.0 software including an improved feature calculator and support for a wider range of ion series. The updated software is applied to the analysis of several CID and ETD fragmented peptide data sets. This version of Mascot Percolator increases the number of CID PSMs by up to 80% and ETD PSMs by up to 60% at a 0.01 q-value (1% false discovery rate) threshold over a standard Mascot search, notably recovering PSMs from high charge state precursor ions. The greatly increased number of PSMs and peptide coverage afforded by Mascot Percolator has enabled a fuller assessment of CID/ETD complementarity to be performed. Using a data set of CID and ETcaD spectral pairs, we find that at a 1% false discovery rate, the overlap in peptide identifications by CID and ETD is 83%, which is significantly higher than that obtained using either stand-alone Mascot (69%) or OMSSA (39%). We conclude that Mascot Percolator is a highly sensitive and accurate post-search algorithm for peptide identification and allows direct comparison of peptide identifications using multiple alternative fragmentation techniques. PMID:22493177

  8. Rapid two-step purification of a recombinant mouse Fab fragment expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wlad, H; Ballagi, A; Bouakaz, L; Gu, Z; Janson, J C

    2001-07-01

    We report a rapid, large-scale process for the purification of a recombinant Fab fragment specific for the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein (Fab57P). The fragment is expressed periplasmically in Escherichia coli. The expression level was optimized in 0.3-L fermentors. The highest levels were obtained using the following conditions: (1) low postinduction temperature (21 degrees C), (2) combined use of two beta-lactam antibiotics (carbenicillin and ampicillin), (3) IPTG concentration 0.1 mM, (4) regulated pH 7.2, (5) 17-h induction time, and (6) conditions that reduce mechanical stress. Optimized large-scale fermentations were done in 15- and 300-L capacity fermentors. The recombinant Fab fragment was purified by two chromatographic steps. After disruption of the bacteria using an APV Gaulin homogenizer, the crude E. coli homogenate was directly applied, without centrifugation, to an SP Sepharose Big Beads column. The recombinant Fab fragment was eluted as a single peak in a sodium chloride gradient. The fragment was further purified by affinity adsorption to a column packed with Epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B to which the antigen peptide NH(2)-CGS YNR GSF SQS SGLV-CONH(2) had been coupled through its N-terminal cysteine. The purified Fab57P fragment showed one band in SDS-PAGE. The overall purification yield was 35%. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs.

  10. Characterization of the major cyanogen bromide fragment of alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Alpha crystallin from the bovine lens has been digested with cyanogen bromide, and the major fragment (CB-1) has been purified using reverse phase HPLC. Characterization of this fragment by Edman degradation and antisera to synthetic peptides indicates that it originates from alpha-A crystallin, but lacks the N-terminal methionine and the last 35 amino acids from the C-terminus of the molecule. The purified CB-1 fragment binds as well as native alpha crystallin to lens membrane, but is unable to self-assemble into the correct size of high molecular weight oligomeric complexes characteristic of the intact alpha-A chain. Together, these results demonstrate that the alpha-A chain is comprised of at least two functional domains, one of which is involved in binding of alpha-A crystallin to lens membrane, and another which is necessary for correct self-assembly of the molecule into high molecular weight oligomers.

  11. Nuclear localisation of the G-actin sequestering peptide thymosin beta4.

    PubMed

    Huff, Thomas; Rosorius, Olaf; Otto, Angela M; Müller, Christian S G; Ballweber, Edda; Hannappel, Ewald; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2004-10-15

    Thymosin beta4 is regarded as the main G-actin sequestering peptide in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. It is also thought to be involved in cellular events like cancerogenesis, apoptosis, angiogenesis, blood coagulation and wound healing. Thymosin beta4 has been previously reported to localise intracellularly to the cytoplasm as detected by immunofluorescence. It can be selectively labelled at two of its glutamine-residues with fluorescent Oregon Green cadaverine using transglutaminase; however, this labelling does not interfere with its interaction with G-actin. Here we show that after microinjection into intact cells, fluorescently labelled thymosin beta4 has a diffuse cytoplasmic and a pronounced nuclear staining. Enzymatic cleavage of fluorescently labelled thymosin beta4 with AsnC-endoproteinase yielded two mono-labelled fragments of the peptide. After microinjection of these fragments, only the larger N-terminal fragment, containing the proposed actin-binding sequence exhibited nuclear localisation, whereas the smaller C-terminal fragment remained confined to the cytoplasm. We further showed that in digitonin permeabilised and extracted cells, fluorescent thymosin beta4 was solely localised within the cytoplasm, whereas it was found concentrated within the cell nuclei after an additional Triton X100 extraction. Therefore, we conclude that thymosin beta4 is specifically translocated into the cell nucleus by an active transport mechanism, requiring an unidentified soluble cytoplasmic factor. Our data furthermore suggest that this peptide may also serve as a G-actin sequestering peptide in the nucleus, although additional nuclear functions cannot be excluded.

  12. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  13. Coumarin tags for analysis of peptides by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS. 2. Alexa Fluor 350 tag for increased peptide and protein Identification by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Pashkova, Anna; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Rejtar, Tomas; Zang, Xin; Giese, Roger; Andreev, Victor; Moskovets, Eugene; Karger, Barry L

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study was the development of N-terminal tags to improve peptide identification using high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Part 1 of the study was focused on the influence of derivatization on the intensities of MALDI-TOF MS signals of peptides. In part 2, various derivatization approaches for the improvement of peptide fragmentation efficiency in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS are explored. We demonstrate that permanent cation tags, while significantly improving signal intensity in the MS mode, lead to severe suppression of MS/MS fragmentation, making these tags unsuitable for high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis. In the present work, it was found that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350, a coumarin tag containing a sulfo group, along with guanidation of epsilon-amino groups of Lys, could enhance unimolecular fragmentation of peptides with the formation of a high-intensity y-ion series, while the peptide intensities in the MS mode were not severely affected. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of tryptic peptides from the SCX fractions of an E. coli lysate revealed improved peptide scores, a doubling of the total number of peptides, and a 30% increase in the number of proteins identified, as a result of labeling. Furthermore, by combining the data from native and labeled samples, confidence in correct identification was increased, as many proteins were identified by different peptides in the native and labeled data sets. Additionally, derivatization was found not to impair chromatographic behavior of peptides. All these factors suggest that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350 is a promising approach to the high-throughput LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of proteomic samples.

  14. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Chu; Lim, Yi Fan; Russo, Erica; Schneider, Petra; Bolliger, Lea; Edenharter, Adriana; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Halin, Cornelia; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-08-24

    The computer-assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides, cell-penetrating peptides, and tumor-homing peptides. Machine-learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence, peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human endothelial cells. The computer-generated sequences featured improved cancer-cell penetration, induced cancer-cell apoptosis, and were enabled a decrease in the cytotoxic concentration of co-administered chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of multidimensional machine-learning methods for rapidly obtaining peptides with the desired cellular activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fragmentation of Ceramics in Rapid Expansion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Spandan; Geubelle, Philippe H.; Rangaswamy, Krishnan

    The study of the fragmentation process goes back to more than a century, motivated primarily by problems related to mining and ore handling (Grady and Kipp, 1985). Various theories have been proposed to predict the fragmentation stress and the fragment size and distribution. But the investigations are generally case specific and relate to only a narrow set of fragmentation processes. A number of theoretical studies of dynamic fragmentation in a rapidly expanding body can be found in the literature. For example, the study summarized in (Grady, 1982) presents a model based on a simple energy balance concept between the surface energy released due to fracture and the kinetic energy of the fragments. Subsequent refinements of the energy balance model have been proposed by (Glenn and Chudnovsky, 1986), which take into account the strain energy of the fragments and specify a threshold stress below which no fragmentation occurs. These models assume that the fracture events are instantaneous and occur simultaneously. Evidently, these assumptions are quite restrictive and these models can not take into account the transient nature of the fragmentation process after the onset of fracture in the material. A more recent model proposed by (Miller et al., 1999) however takes into account this time-dependent nature of the fragmentation event and the distribution of flaws of various strengths in the original material.

  16. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  17. Actin Turnover in Lamellipodial Fragments.

    PubMed

    Raz-Ben Aroush, Dikla; Ofer, Noa; Abu-Shah, Enas; Allard, Jun; Krichevsky, Oleg; Mogilner, Alex; Keren, Kinneret

    2017-10-09

    Actin turnover is the central driving force underlying lamellipodial motility. The molecular components involved are largely known, and their properties have been studied extensively in vitro. However, a comprehensive picture of actin turnover in vivo is still missing. We focus on fragments from fish epithelial keratocytes, which are essentially stand-alone motile lamellipodia. The geometric simplicity of the fragments and the absence of additional actin structures allow us to characterize the spatiotemporal lamellipodial actin organization with unprecedented detail. We use fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and extraction experiments to show that about two-thirds of the lamellipodial actin diffuses in the cytoplasm with nearly uniform density, whereas the rest forms the treadmilling polymer network. Roughly a quarter of the diffusible actin pool is in filamentous form as diffusing oligomers, indicating that severing and debranching are important steps in the disassembly process generating oligomers as intermediates. The remaining diffusible actin concentration is orders of magnitude higher than the in vitro actin monomer concentration required to support the observed polymerization rates, implying that the majority of monomers are transiently kept in a non-polymerizable "reserve" pool. The actin network disassembles and reassembles throughout the lamellipodium within seconds, so the lamellipodial network turnover is local. The diffusible actin transport, on the other hand, is global: actin subunits typically diffuse across the entire lamellipodium before reassembling into the network. This combination of local network turnover and global transport of dissociated subunits through the cytoplasm makes actin transport robust yet rapidly adaptable and amenable to regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-assembly of bioactive peptides, peptide conjugates, and peptide mimetic materials.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Gayle, Charlotte J C; Hamley, Ian W

    2017-07-19

    Molecular self-assembly is a multi-disciplinary field of research, with potential chemical and biological applications. One of the main driving forces of self-assembly is molecular amphiphilicity, which can drive formation of complex and stable nanostructures. Self-assembling peptide and peptide conjugates have attracted great attention due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and biofunctionality. Understanding assembly enables the better design of peptide amphiphiles which may form useful and functional nanostructures. This review covers self-assembly of amphiphilic peptides and peptide mimetic materials, as well as their potential applications.

  19. Fibril protein fragmentation pattern in systemic AL-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Enqvist, Stina; Sletten, Knut; Westermark, Per

    2009-12-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (AL)-amyloidosis was one of the first types of amyloidosis discovered and still little is known about its pathogenic mechanisms. One major obstacle is the very heterogeneous condition; in fact, every patient could be considered to have their own disease since symptoms and outcome vary enormously. The reason for this is not known but intrinsic factors of the immunoglobulin light chain (LC) and the fact that every LC is unique seem to be important. Post-translational modifications such as glycosylation and proteolysis are most certainly involved. By using western blotting, we studied in detail the proteolytic pattern in six patients with AL-amyloidosis of kappa type with the aid of three peptide antisera against two domains in the constant segment and one conserved domain in framework 3 of the variable region. Materials from one to five organs were analysed. The result clearly demonstrates that the fragmentation pattern was similar in amyloid of different organs in one patient but differed greatly between patients. Full-length, N-, and C-terminal fragments were detected with the three antisera. The results strongly support the hypothesis that proteolytic cleavage occurs after fibril formation.

  20. Peptides Released from Foremilk and Hindmilk Proteins by Breast Milk Proteases Are Highly Similar

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Søren D.; Beverly, Robert L.; Dallas, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Human milk contains active proteases that initiate hydrolysis of milk proteins within the mammary gland. Milk expressed at the beginning of feeding is known as foremilk and that at the end of feeding is known as hindmilk. As hindmilk contains higher fat, vitamins A and E, and higher calories than foremilk, feeding only hindmilk initially and reserving foremilk for later are practiced in some neonatal intensive care units. This study investigated the difference in peptide profiles, predicted milk protease activities, and bioactive peptides between foremilk and hindmilk. Bioactive peptides are short fragments of proteins that influence biological processes. Four mothers pumped 10 mL of their foremilk and 10 mL of their hindmilk into iced containers prepared with antiproteases and the samples were immediately frozen. The peptide profile of each sample was analyzed by liquid chromatography nano-electrospray ionization Orbitrap Fusion tandem mass spectrometry. Peptide abundance (sum of ion intensities) and count (number of unique peptide sequences) in each milk sample were determined from this analysis. The specific enzymes that participated in peptide release were predicted based on the amino acids positioned at each cleavage site. Peptide bioactivity was predicted based on homology to a known functional peptide database and two bioactivity prediction algorithms. Hindmilk contained a higher count of peptides than foremilk. The higher number of unique peptide sequences in hindmilk was related to hydrolysis of β-casein, osteopontin, αs1-casein and mucin-1 via plasmin and elastase cleavage, and possible aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activities. Though hindmilk contained a greater number of peptides than foremilk, the overall peptide abundance did not differ and most of the total peptide abundance derived from peptide sequences that were present in both milk types. The presence of higher numbers of predicted bioactive peptides in the hindmilk could indicate

  1. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobial peptides on the basis of alpha helical domain of Tenecin 1, an insect defensin protein, and structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Sun; Cho, Wonmi; Kang, Sun-Hee; Ko, Sung-Sin; Park, Mi-Sun; Cho, Hyeongjin; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2006-04-01

    Tenecin 1, a peptide consisting of 43 amino acids, exhibits a potent bactericidal activity against various Gram-positive bacteria and shares a common structural feature of insect defensin family corresponding to cysteine stabilized alpha/beta motif. Our previous research indicated that an active fragment was successfully extracted from C-terminal beta sheet domain of Tenecin 1, whereas the fragment corresponding to the alpha helical region of the protein had no antibacterial activity. We chose this inactive fragment corresponding to alpha helical region of Tenecin 1 and synthesized derivatives with a different net positive charge by using rational design. Interestingly, we successfully endowed antibacterial activity as well as antifungal activity to the inactive alpha helical fragment by single or double amino acid replacement(s) without an increase of hemolytic activity. The leakage of dye from vesicles induced by the active peptides suggested that these peptides act on the membranes of pathogen as a primary mode of action. Structure-activity relationship study of a series of the active derivatives revealed that amphiphilic structure and high net positive charge were prerequisite factors for the activity and that there was a relationship between the antibacterial activity and the isoelectric point of the active peptides. In this work, we showed an efficient method to endow the antibacterial activity as well as antifungal activity to the inactive fragment derived from a cyclic insect defensin protein and suggested a facile method to screen for active fragments from cyclic host defense peptides.

  2. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  3. A biochemical approach for detecting interactions between peptides from the HIV gp120 glycoprotein and a CD4 sequence.

    PubMed

    Chersi, Alberto; Falasca, Giuliana; Malorni, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Peptides selected from the HIV viral protein gp120 bind to a synthetic peptide mimicking sequence 78-89 of the human lymphocyte CD4 molecule, linked to activated Sepharose. The binding of viral fragments to the CD4 peptide-Sepharose beads was ascertained either by aid of a ninhydrin reagent or by fluorescence microscopy. A suitable alignment of these HIV peptides with the CD4 fragment showed that multiple interactions might occur between hydrophobic or charged groups of the two molecules. Although this experiment does not demonstrate that these two amino acid stretches are involved in the primary binding of gp120 to CD4 receptors, the present data suggest that the two sequences might have some kind of interaction during subsequent steps of viral infection.

  4. Preparation and isolation of antibodies to human MHC class II alpha chains by aid of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; Romano, T F; Chillemi, F

    1989-01-01

    Antibodies against HLA Class II alpha chains were prepared by using as immunogens synthetic peptides selected from the HLA-DQ1 alpha chains sequence. Antibodies raised against peptide E2, a 15-residue fragment of the polymorphic first domain, reacted preferentially with cells with the DQ1 phenotype; however, despite the low sequence homology of this fragment with corresponding segments in DQw2 and DQw3 alpha chains, a partial crossreactivity with cells not expressing the DQw1 specificity was detected. Antibodies to peptide H, selected from the monomorphic frame, might be specific for DQ alloantigens, and presumably do not react with DR antigens. The two peptides, in addition, bind anti-Class II antibodies from the serum of a rabbit immunized with human cells, and appear to represent immunogenic linear determinants in the native glycoprotein molecule.

  5. [Designation, solid-phase synthesis and antimicrobial activity of Mytilin derived peptides based on Mytilin-1 from Mytilus coruscus].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Wu, Mei; Zhou, Shiquan; Gao, Peng; Lu, Tao; Wang, Rixin; Shi, Ge; Liao, Zhi

    2010-04-01

    As a key role in mussel defense system, Mytilin is an important antibacterial peptide isolated from the mussel serum. The structural and functional researches on Mytilin showed that the fragment connecting two beta-sheets in a stable beta-hairpin structure was probably required for antimicrobial activity. To elucidate the structural features and the antimicrobial activity of this fragment, we re-designed and synthesized two peptides corresponding to the main mimic structures of Mytilin-1 from Mytilus coruscus, we named these two peptides Mytilin Derived Peptide-1 and Mytilin Derived Peptide-2, respectively. Using a liquid growth inhibition assay, we evaluated their activity towards Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungus. The results showed that both peptides can inhibit the growth of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungus. Besides, these two peptides showed high stability in heat water and human serum. These works laid the foundation for further research on the molecular mechanism of Mytilin and for further exploitation of antibacterial peptides with lower molecular mass and more stable structure.

  6. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  7. The localization of a vitamin K-induced modification in an N-terminal fragment of human prothrombin

    PubMed Central

    Skotland, Tore; Holm, Turid; Østerud, Bjarne; Flengsrud, Ragnar; Prydz, Hans

    1974-01-01

    1. The N-terminal fragment (PF-I) split off from prothrombin during coagulation was purified to homogeneity from human serum. 2. The apparent molecular weight is 27000±2000 in sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, whereas a value of about 19600 is obtained by calculation based on amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. The N-terminal sequence is an Ala-Asx bond. The fragment contains about 16% carbohydrate, binds phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+ and is adsorbed to BaSO4. The pKa of its BaSO4-binding group(s) is 3.1–3.5. 3. By CNBr cleavage of fragment PF-I two peptides (C-1 and C-2) were obtained with molecular weights of about 5900 (C-2) and 12400 (C-1) on the basis of amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. Only the smaller (N-terminal) peptide is adsorbed to BaSO4 and, since the ability of the whole protein to bind to BaSO4 is known to be absent in samples obtained from patients treated with vitamin K antagonists, this peptide probably contains the site of a modification to the structure of the protein which occurs during biosynthesis and depends on vitamin K. This peptide does not contain hexosamine or sialic acid. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:4219283

  8. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  9. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  10. Aortic microcalcification is associated with elastin fragmentation in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Shaynah; Hibender, Stijntje; Ridwan, Yanto; van Roomen, Cindy; Vos, Mariska; van der Made, Ingeborg; van Vliet, Nicole; Franken, Romy; van Riel, Luigi Amjg; Groenink, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara Jm; de Vries, Carlie Jm; Essers, Jeroen; de Waard, Vivian

    2017-11-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder in which aortic rupture is the major cause of death. MFS patients with an aortic diameter below the advised limit for prophylactic surgery (<5 cm) may unexpectedly experience an aortic dissection or rupture, despite yearly monitoring. Hence, there is a clear need for improved prognostic markers to predict such aortic events. We hypothesize that elastin fragments play a causal role in aortic calcification in MFS, and that microcalcification serves as a marker for aortic disease severity. To address this hypothesis, we analysed MFS patient and mouse aortas. MFS patient aortic tissue showed enhanced microcalcification in areas with extensive elastic lamina fragmentation in the media. A causal relationship between medial injury and microcalcification was revealed by studies in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs); elastin peptides were shown to increase the activity of the calcification marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and reduce the expression of the calcification inhibitor matrix GLA protein in human SMCs. In murine Fbn1 C1039G/+ MFS aortic SMCs, Alpl mRNA and activity were upregulated as compared with wild-type SMCs. The elastin peptide-induced ALP activity was prevented by incubation with lactose or a neuraminidase inhibitor, which inhibit the elastin receptor complex, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/2 inhibitor, indicating downstream involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Histological analyses in MFS mice revealed macrocalcification in the aortic root, whereas the ascending aorta contained microcalcification, as identified with the near-infrared fluorescent bisphosphonate probe OsteoSense-800. Significantly, microcalcification correlated strongly with aortic diameter, distensibility, elastin breaks, and phosphorylated ERK1/2. In conclusion, microcalcification co-localizes with aortic elastin degradation in MFS aortas of humans and mice, where elastin

  11. Improved machine learning method for analysis of gas phase chemistry of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Allison; Sun, Shaojun; Kurgan, Lukasz; Ahn, Natalie; Resing, Katheryn; Kafadar, Karen; Cios, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate peptide identification is important to high-throughput proteomics analyses that use mass spectrometry. Search programs compare fragmentation spectra (MS/MS) of peptides from complex digests with theoretically derived spectra from a database of protein sequences. Improved discrimination is achieved with theoretical spectra that are based on simulating gas phase chemistry of the peptides, but the limited understanding of those processes affects the accuracy of predictions from theoretical spectra. Results We employed a robust data mining strategy using new feature annotation functions of MAE software, which revealed under-prediction of the frequency of occurrence in fragmentation of the second peptide bond. We applied methods of exploratory data analysis to pre-process the information in the MS/MS spectra, including data normalization and attribute selection, to reduce the attributes to a smaller, less correlated set for machine learning studies. We then compared our rule building machine learning program, DataSqueezer, with commonly used association rules and decision tree algorithms. All used machine learning algorithms produced similar results that were consistent with expected properties for a second gas phase mechanism at the second peptide bond. Conclusion The results provide compelling evidence that we have identified underlying chemical properties in the data that suggest the existence of an additional gas phase mechanism for the second peptide bond. Thus, the methods described in this study provide a valuable approach for analyses of this kind in the future. PMID:19055745

  12. Host-Defense Peptides with Therapeutic Potential from Skin Secretions of Frogs from the Family Pipidae

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J. Michael; Mechkarska, Milena

    2014-01-01

    Skin secretions from frogs belonging to the genera Xenopus, Silurana, Hymenochirus, and Pseudhymenochirus in the family Pipidae are a rich source of host-defense peptides with varying degrees of antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicities to mammalian cells. Magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF), and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) peptides have been isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from several species of Xenopus and Silurana. Hymenochirins and pseudhymenochirins have been isolated from Hymenochirus boettgeri and Pseudhymenochirus merlini. A major obstacle to the development of these peptides as anti-infective agents is their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes. Analogs of the magainins, CPF peptides and hymenochirin-1B with increased antimicrobial potencies and low cytotoxicities have been developed that are active (MIC < 5 μM) against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite this, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents has not been realized so that alternative clinical applications as anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic, or immunomodulatory drugs are being explored. PMID:24434793

  13. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A; Martin, William F; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Bevins, Charles L; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2013-05-03

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective-released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . The predigestion of milk proteins and the consequent release of antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection.

  14. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A.; Martin, William F.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Bevins, Charles L.; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective—released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The pre-digestion of milk proteins and the consequent release antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection. PMID:23586814

  15. The fragment of complement 3a lacking the primary 9 amino acids induces promoting activity on mouse voluntary running.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Miura, N; Suzuki, M; Akagawa, Y; Kawarada, Y; Kawagoe, M; Sugiyama, T; Shimizu, T; Hishikawa, Y

    1999-09-01

    We have newly found that interleukin-2 (IL-2) increases mouse voluntary running 24 hours, but not 30 minutes, after the injection. We suspected that IL-2 induced a substance increasing the voluntary running for 24 hours after injection. Serum obtained from mice 24 hours after the IL-2 treatment was fractioned with the use of an ion-exchanger and an ultra-filtration method, and the amino acid sequence analysis indicated that the substance purified from the effective fraction was a fragment of mouse complement 3a (C3a) lacking the primary 9 amino acids. The 20 amino acid peptide synthesized according to the fragment showed the activity increasing the voluntary running, but the 20 amino acid peptide synthesized according to the C3a itself did not. The effect of the synthesized peptide was demuted by haloperidol but not by a specific dopamine 2 antagonist (-)sulpiride. The present findings clearly indicate that IL-2 produces the C3a fragment lacking the primary 9 amino acids which directly promotes the voluntary running, and that the effect of the fragment is mediated by an activity of haloperidol on the neurons, except for the dopamine 2 antagonism.

  16. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Evaluation of HCD- and CID-type fragmentation within their respective detection platforms for murine phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Jedrychowski, Mark P; Huttlin, Edward L; Haas, Wilhelm; Sowa, Mathew E; Rad, Ramin; Gygi, Steven P

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation modulates a myriad of biological functions, and its regulation is vital for proper cellular activity. Mass spectrometry is the enabling tool for phosphopeptide analysis, where recent instrumentation advances in both speed and sensitivity in linear ion trap and orbitrap technologies may yield more comprehensive phosphoproteomic analyses in less time. Protein phosphorylation analysis by MS relies on structural information derived through controlled peptide fragmentation. Compared with traditional, ion-trap-based collision-induced dissociation (CID), a more recent type of fragmentation termed HCD (higher energy collisional dissociation) provides beam type CID tandem MS with detection of fragment ions at high resolution in the orbitrap mass analyzer. Here we compared HCD to traditional CID for large-scale phosphorylation analyses of murine brain under three separate experimental conditions. These included a same-precursor analysis where CID and HCD scans were performed back-to-back, separate analyses of a phosphotyrosine peptide immunoprecipitation experiment, and separate whole phosphoproteome analyses. HCD generally provided higher search engine scores with more peptides identified, thus out-performing CID for back-to-back experiments for most metrics tested. However, for phosphotyrosine IPs and in a full phosphoproteome study of mouse brain, the greater acquisition speed of CID-only analyses provided larger data sets. We reconciled our results with those in direct contradiction from Nagaraj N, D'Souza RCJ et al. (J. Proteome Res. 9:6786, 2010). We conclude, for large-scale phosphoproteomics, CID fragmentation with rapid detection in the ion trap still produced substantially richer data sets, but the back-to-back experiments demonstrated the promise of HCD and orbitrap detection for the future.

  18. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H(2)O, NH(3), CH(2)O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H(3)PO(4), whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H](+) and [M + H - H](-) within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  19. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H2O, NH3, CH2O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H3PO4, whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H]+ and [M + H - H]- within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  20. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  1. Structure and function of a potent lipopolysaccharide-binding antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptide.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin; Yang, Juanjuan; He, Xiaoqin; Mo, Guoxiang; Hong, Jing; Yan, Xiuwen; Lin, Donghai; Lai, Ren

    2013-05-09

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play pivotal roles in the innate defense of vertebrates. A novel AMP (cathelicidin-PY) has been identified from the skin secretions of the frog Paa yunnanensis . Cathelicidin-PY has an amino acid sequence of RKCNFLCKLKEKLRTVITSHIDKVLRPQG. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analysis revealed that cathelicidin-PY adopts a tertiary structure with a mostly positively charged surface containing a helix (Thr15-Ser19). It possesses strong antimicrobial activity, low hemolytic activity, low cytotoxicity against RAW 264.7 cells, and strong anti-inflammatory activity. The action of antimicrobial activity of cathelicidin-PY is through the destruction of the cell membrane. Moreover, cathelicidin-PY exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO) and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Cathelicidin-PY inhibits the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inflammatory response pathways induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The NMR titration experiments indicated that cathelicidin-PY can bind to LPS. In conclusion, we have identified a novel potent peptide antibiotic with both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities and laid the groundwork for future research and development.

  2. In-Source Decay and Pseudo-MS3 of Peptide and Protein Ions Using Liquid AP-MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Dilillo, Marialaura; Pellegrini, Davide; Yadav, Avinash; de Graaf, Erik L.; McDonnell, Liam A.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure MALDI on a Q-Exactive instrument was optimized for in-source decay and pseudo-MS3. The dependence of AP-MALDI ISD on the MALDI liquid matrix was investigated for peptides and proteins. The liquid matrices enabled long-life ISD signal, and exhibited high fragment ion yield and signal stability. Extensive a-, b-, c-, y-, and z-type fragment series were observed depending on the matrix used but were most extensive with 2,5-DHB. Complete sequence coverage of small peptide and intact protein-terminus sequence tags were obtained and confirmed using HCD as a pseudo-MS3 method.

  3. Synthetic peptides derived from human antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin accumulate at sites of infections and eradicate (multi-drug resistant) Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Carlo P J M; Bogaards, Sylvia J P; Wulferink, Marty; Velders, Markwin P; Welling, Mick M

    2006-11-01

    The presence and antimicrobial activity of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been widely recognized as an evolutionary preserved part of the innate immune system. Based on evidence in animal models and humans, AMPs are now positioned as novel anti-infective agents. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential antimicrobial activity of ubiquicidin and small synthetic fragments thereof towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), as a high priority target for novel antibiotics. In vitro killing of MRSA by synthetic peptides derived from the alpha-helix or beta-sheet domains of the human cationic peptide ubiquicidin (UBI 1-59), allowed selection of AMPs for possible treatment of MRSA infections. The strongest antibacterial activity was observed for the entire peptide UBI 1-59 and for synthetic fragments comprising amino acids 31-38. The availability, chemical synthesis opportunities, and size of these small peptides, combined with their strong antimicrobial activity towards MRSA make these compounds promising candidates for antimicrobial therapy and detection of infections in man.

  4. Identification of a high molecular weight kininogen fragment as a marker for early gastric cancer by serum proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Hiroshi; Togawa, Akira; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Satoh, Mamoru; Mogushi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Motoi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Takizawa, Hirotaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio

    2011-05-01

    Serum biomarkers currently available for gastric cancers are not sufficiently sensitive and specific. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) to generate comparative peptide profiles of serum samples obtained from gastric cancer patients (n = 81) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 66). Because of initial screening and further validation, we found that the intensities of a 2209 m/z MS peak were increased in the preoperative sera obtained from gastric cancer patients, and we identified this peak, a 2209 Da peptide, as a high molecular weight (HMW) kininogen fragment. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed that the area under the curve (AUC) for the 2209 Da peptide (AUC = 0.715) was greater than those for conventional tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen AUC = 0.593, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 AUC = 0.527) used for the detection of stage I gastric cancers. Inverse correlations were observed between the levels of intact HMW kininogen and the 2209 Da peptide, suggesting that the upregulation of some protease activities is responsible for the overproduction of a kininogen fragment in gastric cancer patients. Serum levels of the 2209 Da peptide identified in this study have a greater diagnostic ability than those of conventional tumor markers used for the early detection of gastric cancer.

  5. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  6. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  7. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  8. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  9. GFP expression by intracellular gene delivery of GFP-coding fragments using nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-12-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive approach to supplement a deficient gene function. Although there has been some success with specific gene delivery using various methods including viral vectors and liposomes, most of these methods have a limited efficiency or also carry a risk for oncogenesis. We herein report that quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLSP) successfully introduced gene-fragments with promoter elements, which promoted the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene in mammalian cells. The expression of eGFP protein was observed when the QD/gene-construct was added to the culture media. The gene-expression efficiency varied depending on multiple factors around QDs, such as (1) the reading direction of the gene-fragments, (2) the quantity of gene-fragments attached on the surface of the QD-constructs, (3) the surface electronic charges varied according to the structure of the QD/gene-constructs, and (4) the particle size of QD/gene complex varied according to the structure and amounts of gene-fragments. Using this QD/gene-construct system, eGFP protein could be detected 28 days after the gene-introduction whereas the fluorescence of QDs had disappeared. This system therefore provides another method for the intracellular delivery of gene-fragments without using either viral vectors or specific liposomes.

  10. Chemical, immunological and biological properties of peptides like vasoactive-intestinal-peptide and peptide-histidine-isoleucinamide extracted from the venom of two lizards (Heloderma horridum and Heloderma suspectum).

    PubMed

    Vandermeers, A; Gourlet, P; Vandermeers-Piret, M C; Cauvin, A; De Neef, P; Rathe, J; Svoboda, M; Robberecht, P; Christophe, J

    1987-04-15

    Having previously isolated helodermin, the major peptide like vasoactive-intestinal-peptide and peptide-histidine-isoleucinamide, from the venom of the lizard Heloderma suspectum, we decided on a systematic exploration of all (VIP-PHI)-like peptides present in the venom of another lizard of the Helodermatidae family: Heloderma horridum. Six (VIP-PHI)-like peptides (PHH1 to 6) were purified to homogeneity from the venom of the lizard H. horridum with PHH3 and PHH4 representing two minor forms. All peptides cross-reacted in radioimmunoassays for helodermin and PHI but not for VIP. They yielded four fragments (T1 to T4) after trypsin digestion. T1, T2 and T3 showed the same retention time by reverse-phase HPLC and the same amino acid composition; the differences were confined to T4, the C-terminal sequence. PHH5 and PHH6 were found to be identical to synthetic helospectins I and II respectively. PHH1 and PHH3 probably resulted from a secondary modification of PHH5, while PHH2 and PHH4 derived from PHH6. Thus, the VIP-like peptides, previously called helospectins, are in fact typical of H. horridum venom. We confirmed that helodermin is the major (VIP-PHI)-like peptide of the venom of H. suspectum and observed its absence in H. horridum venom. Also, we found that positions 8 and 9 of helodermin are occupied by two Glu residues instead of two Gln as previously published. Helospectin-like material was also present in H. suspectum venom but in very small amount. In both venoms all VIP-like peptides were equally potent and efficient when tested for (a) their ability to occupy VIP as well as secretin receptors in rat pancreatic membranes and VIP receptors in rat liver membranes, and (b) the ensuing activation of adenylate cyclase in both membrane preparations.

  11. Waves in fragmented geomaterials with impact attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation of waves in geomaterials, such as seismic waves is usually attributed to energy dissipation due to the presence of viscous fluid and/or viscous cement between the constituents. In fragmented geomaterials such as blocky rock mass there is another possible source of energy dissipation - impacting between the fragments. This can be characterised by the coefficient of restitution, which is the ratio between the rotational velocities after and before the impact. In particular, this manifests itself in the process of mutual rotations of the fragments/blocks, whereby in the process of oscillation different ends of the contacting faces of the fragments are impacting. During the rotational oscillations the energy dissipation is concentrated in the neutral position that is the one in which the relative rotation between two fragments is zero. We show that in a simple system of two fragments this dissipation is equivalent, in a long run, to the presence of viscous damper between the fragments (the Voigt model of visco-elasticity). Generalisation of this concept to the material consisting of many fragments leads to a Voigt model of wave propagation where the attenuation coefficient is proportional to the logarithm of restitution coefficient. The waves in such a medium show slight dispersion caused by damping and strong dependence of the attenuation on the wave frequency.

  12. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  13. Fungal fragments as indoor air biocontaminants.

    PubMed

    Górny, Rafał L; Reponen, Tiina; Willeke, Klaus; Schmechel, Detlef; Robine, Enric; Boissier, Marjorie; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2002-07-01

    The aerosolization process of fungal propagules of three species (Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Cladosporium cladosporioides) was studied by using a newly designed and constructed aerosolization chamber. We discovered that fungal fragments are aerosolized simultaneously with spores from contaminated agar and ceiling tile surfaces. Concentration measurements with an optical particle counter showed that the fragments are released in higher numbers (up to 320 times) than the spores. The release of fungal propagules varied depending on the fungal species, the air velocity above the contaminated surface, and the texture and vibration of the contaminated material. In contrast to spores, the release of fragments from smooth surfaces was not affected by air velocity, indicating a different release mechanism. Correlation analysis showed that the number of released fragments cannot be predicted on the basis of the number of spores. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with monoclonal antibodies produced against Aspergillus and Penicillium fungal species showed that fragments and spores share common antigens, which not only confirmed the fungal origin of the fragments but also established their potential biological relevance. The considerable immunological reactivity, the high number, and the small particle size of the fungal fragments may contribute to human health effects that have been detected in buildings with mold problems but had no scientific explanation until now. This study suggests that future fungal spore investigations in buildings with mold problems should include the quantitation of fungal fragments.

  14. Generation and characterization of peptide-specific, MHC-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and helper T cell lines from unprimed T cells under microculture conditions.

    PubMed

    Sambhara, S R; Upadhya, A G; Miller, R G

    1990-06-12

    We describe a microculture system for the generation of CTL and T helper cells against peptides. Tryptic digest and cyanogen bromide fragments of chicken ovalbumin and synthetic peptides of ovalbumin (323-339) and influenza virus (NP 365-380) were used to generate CTL and T helper lines from unprimed T cells. These lines were both peptide-specific and MHC-restricted. The relative ease of generating peptide-specific, MHC-restricted CTL and helper T cell lines with as few as 10(6) unprimed lymphocytes can be an efficient method of detecting potential immunogenic determinants of an antigen.

  15. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Treesearch

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  16. "Potential health benefits of lunasin: a multifaceted soy-derived bioactive peptide".

    PubMed

    Lule, Vaibhao Kisanrao; Garg, Sheenam; Pophaly, Sarang Dilip; Hitesh; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Bioactive peptides are small protein fragments derived from enzymatic hydrolysis of food proteins, fermentation with proteolytic starter cultures, and gastrointestinal digestion. These peptides have positive impacts on a number of physiological functions in living beings. Lunasin, a soy-derived bioactive peptide, is one of the most promising among them. Lunasin encoded within 2S albumin (GM2S-1) gene, identified as a novel peptide extracted from soybean seed. It is composed of 43 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 5.5 kDa. Extensive scientific studies have shown that lunasin possesses inherent antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anticancerous properties and could also play a vital role in regulating of cholesterol biosynthesis in the body. Its high bioavailability and heat stable nature allow its potential use as dietary supplement. The present review summarizes some of the potential health and therapeutic benefits of lunasin reported hitherto. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Library Design-Facilitated High-Throughput Sequencing of Synthetic Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Gates, Zachary P; Zhang, Chi; Quartararo, Anthony J; Halloran, Kathryn H; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2017-11-13

    A methodology to achieve high-throughput de novo sequencing of synthetic peptide mixtures is reported. The approach leverages shotgun nanoliquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry-based de novo sequencing of library mixtures (up to 2000 peptides) as well as automated data analysis protocols to filter away incorrect assignments, noise, and synthetic side-products. For increasing the confidence in the sequencing results, mass spectrometry-friendly library designs were developed that enabled unambiguous decoding of up to 600 peptide sequences per hour while maintaining greater than 85% sequence identification rates in most cases. The reliability of the reported decoding strategy was additionally confirmed by matching fragmentation spectra for select authentic peptides identified from library sequencing samples. The methods reported here are directly applicable to screening techniques that yield mixtures of active compounds, including particle sorting of one-bead one-compound libraries and affinity enrichment of synthetic library mixtures performed in solution.

  18. A dynamic programming approach to de novo peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, T; Kao, M Y; Tepel, M; Rush, J; Church, G M

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry fragments a large number of molecules of the same peptide sequence into charged molecules of prefix and suffix peptide subsequences and then measures mass/charge ratios of these ions. The de novo peptide sequencing problem is to reconstruct the peptide sequence from a given tandem mass spectral data of k ions. By implicitly transforming the spectral data into an NC-spectrum graph G (V, E) where /V/ = 2k + 2, we can solve this problem in O(/V//E/) time and O(/V/2) space using dynamic programming. For an ideal noise-free spectrum with only b- and y-ions, we improve the algorithm to O(/V/ + /E/) time and O(/V/) space. Our approach can be further used to discover a modified amino acid in O(/V//E/) time. The algorithms have been implemented and tested on experimental data.

  19. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  20. The Metalloprotease Neprilysin Degrades and Inactivates Apelin Peptides.

    PubMed

    McKinnie, Shaun M K; Fischer, Conrad; Tran, Kelvin M H; Wang, Wang; Mosquera, Fabricio; Oudit, Gavin Y; Vederas, John C

    2016-08-17

    The apelinergic system is a mammalian peptide hormone network with key physiological roles. Apelin isoforms and analogues are believed to be promising therapeutics for cardiovascular disease. Despite extensive studies on apelin-13 degradation patterns, only one protease, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), had been implicated in its physiological regulation. Through use of a peptide-based fluorescent probe, we identified the metalloprotease neprilysin (NEP, a target for Entresto used in treatment of heart failure) as an enzyme that cleaves apelin isoforms. In vitro NEP proteolysis generated fragments that lacked the ability to bind to the apelin receptor, thereby making NEP the first protease to fully inactivate apelin. The involvement of NEP in the apelinergic system contributes to the understanding of its role in cardiovascular physiology. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Specificities of rabbit antisera to multiple antigen (MAP) peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, A; di Modugno, F; Falasca, G

    1995-01-01

    Two multiple antigen peptides consisting of 6 and 7 aminoa cid residues, respectively, plus a 12-residue fragment, used as a control, all linked to a polylysine core, were used as immunogens in rabbits in order to obtain an immune response. Rabbit antisera against such polymers were then tested in ELISA against a panel of antigens in order to analyze the specificities of the resulting antibodies. The responses were different for all three immunogens, being partially or totally directed, for two of the three compounds, including the 12-residue control MAP peptide, against the polylysyl core, which is considered as non immunogenic. The third MAP polymer was practically unable to elicit an immune response.

  2. Mapping the human proteome for non-redundant peptide islands.

    PubMed

    Capone, G; De Marinis, A; Simone, S; Kusalik, A; Kanduc, D

    2008-06-01

    We describe immune-proteome structures using libraries of protein fragments that define a structural immunological alphabet. We propose and validate such an alphabet as i) composed of letters of five consecutive amino acids, pentapeptide units being sufficient minimal antigenic determinants in a protein, and ii) characterized by low-similarity to human proteins, so representing structures unknown to the host and potentially able to evoke an immune response. In this context, we have thoroughly sifted through the entire human proteome searching for non-redundant protein motifs. Here, for the first time, a complete sequence redundancy dissection of the human proteome has been conducted. The non-redundant peptide islands in the human proteome have been quantified and catalogued according to the amino acid length. The library of uniquely occurring n-peptide sequences that was obtained is characterized by a logarithmic decrease of the number of non-redundant peptides as a function of the peptide length. This library represents a highly specific catalogue of molecular protein signatures, the possible use of which in cancer/autoimmunity research is discussed, with a major focus on non-redundant dodecamer sequences.

  3. Novor: Real-Time Peptide de Novo Sequencing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data.

  4. Novor: real-time peptide de novo sequencing software.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Helokinestatin-7 peptides from the venoms of Heloderma lizards.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chengbang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Yuxin; Zhou, Mei; Lowe, Gemma; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yingqi; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Helokinestatins 1-6 constitute a family of bradykinin antagonist peptides originally isolated from the venoms of the Gila Monster, Heloderma suspectum and the Mexican beaded lizard, Heloderma horridum. Here we report the identification, isolation and preliminary pharmacological characterization of two novel tridecapeptides, named helokinestatin-7S (FDDDSTELILEPR - 1550 Da) and helokinestatin-7H (FDDDSRKLILEPR - 1604 Da), whose primary structures were predicted from cDNAs cloned from venom libraries of respective Heloderma lizards. Computed molecular masses of putative helokinestatin-7 peptides were used as tools to locate these peptides in archived LC/MS fractions from respective venoms and sequences were confirmed by MS/MS fragmentation. A synthetic replicate of helokinestatin-7H was found to antagonize the relaxation effect of bradykinin on rat arterial smooth muscle but to have no measurable effects alone. In contrast, synthetic helokinestatin-7S was found to directly contract this preparation. Studies on related natural peptides with subtle differences in primary structure can provide the tools for structure/activity studies in pharmacological investigations directed toward unraveling the molecular basis of venom toxicity and for the evaluation of potential therapeutic leads. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. C-Peptide Prevents Hippocampal Apoptosis in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen-guo; Zhang, Weixian

    2002-01-01

    To explore mechanisms underlying central nervous system (CNS) complications in diabetes, we examined hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and loss, and the effect of C-peptide replacement in type 1 diabetic BB/W rats. Apoptosis was demonstrated after 8 months of diabetes, by DNA fragmentation, increased number of apoptotic cells, and an elevated ratio of Bax/Bcl-xL, accompanied by reduced neuronal density in the hippocampus. No apoptotic activity was detected and neuronal density was unchanged in 2-month diabetic hippocampus, whereas insulin-like growth factor (IGF) activities were impaired. In type 1 diabetic BB/W rats replaced with C-peptide, no TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)- positive cells were shown and DNA laddering was not evident in hippocampus at either 2 or 8 months. C-peptide administration prevented the preceding perturbation of IGF expression and reduced the elevated ratio of Bax/Bcl-xL. Our data suggest that type 1 diabetes causes a duration-dependent programmed cell death of the hippocampus, which is partially prevented by C-peptide. PMID:12546277

  7. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  8. [Conformational analysis of tachykinins. III. C-terminal fragment Asx-Xaa-Phe-Yaa-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2].

    PubMed

    Avanov, A Ia

    1991-07-01

    Theoretical conformational analysis of C-terminal fragments of tachykinin peptides with a common amino acid sequence Asx-Xaa-Phe-Yaa-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2 suggested the conformational states to be independent of the nature of Xaa and Yaa residues. It is shown that among plausible spatial forms of the C-terminal fragments an alpha-helix with the hydrophobic coat consisted of identically oriented side chains is energetically the most stable structure. The preference of this conformation for tachykinins functioning is discussed.

  9. Chemical determination of the m1 Moloney sarcoma virus pP60gag gene order: evidence for unique peptides in the carboxy terminus of the polyprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Oskarsson, M K; Elder, J H; Gautsch, J W; Lerner, R A; Vande Woude, G F

    1978-01-01

    The gene order of the ml Moloney sarcoma virus (mlMSV) specific pP60gag (P60) was determined by direct chemical analysis of the polyprotein. P60 was cleaved with cyanogen bromide (CNBr) into eight partial and complete fragments ranging in mass from 10,000 daltons to 58,000 daltons. Peptide maps of these fragments were compared to maps of p15, p12, and three CNBr fragments of p30. The polarity of p15 and p12 in a CNBr fragment of P60 was determined by carboxypeptidase A digestion; likewise the CNBr fragments of p30 were ordered by aminopeptidase digestion. The linear arrangement of P60 CNBr fragments gave the gene order of NH2-p15-p12-p30-COOH. The m3 isolate of MSV expresses a P70 gag polyprotein. Peptide maps of 48,000-dalton CNBr fragments of m3 P70 and ml P60 were similar and suggested that both polyproteins were similar through the NH2-terminal two-thirds of p30. However, the presence of peptides unique to the 10,500-dalton COOH-terminal fragment of m1MSV p30 and not present in the p30 of either m3MSV or Moloney leukemia virus suggested that the gag gene deletion in the m1 isolate begins in the p30 reading frame. Images PMID:216995

  10. Engineered killer mimotopes: new synthetic peptides for antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Salati, A; Arseni, S; Ravanetti, L; Frazzi, R; Polonelli, L

    2004-07-01

    This review deals with a novel approach to produce synthetic antibiotic peptides (killer mimotopes), similar to those described for the conversion of epitopes into peptide mimotopes, allowing their use as surrogate vaccines. Synthetic peptides pertaining to the complementary determining regions (CDRs) of a recombinant antiidiotypic antibody (PaKTscFv), which mimic the wide spectrum of microbicidal activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala (PaKT), have proven to act as structural or functional mimotopes of PaKT. This activity appeared to be mediated by interaction with specific cell wall killer toxin receptors (KTRs), mainly constituted by beta glucans. Killer mimotopes have shown in vitro an impressive microbicidal activity against Candida albicans. They were adopted as a model of PaKT- and PaKTscFv-susceptible microorganisms. Optimization through alanine scanning led to the generation of an engineered decapeptide (KP) of a CDR-L1 pertaining antibody fragment with an enhanced in vitro microbicidal activity. It had a potent therapeutic effect against experimental vaginal and systemic candidiasis in normal and immunodeficient mice caused by flucanozole susceptible and resistant yeast isolates. KP exerted a microbicidal activity in vitro against multidrug-resistant eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogenic microorganisms, which was neutralized by interaction with laminarin (beta 1,3-glucan). To our knowledge, KP represents the prototype of an engineered peptide fragment derived from a microbicidal recombinant antiidiotypic antibody. It is capable of exerting antimicrobial activity in vitro and a therapeutic effect in vivo presumably acting through interaction with the beta glucan KTR component in the cell walls of pathogenic microorganisms.

  11. Photolytic determination of charge state for large proteins and fragments in an ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Yana A; Julian, Ryan R

    2015-02-28

    One of the major shortcomings of linear ion trap mass spectrometers is poor resolution. Failure to resolve isotopic peaks makes charge state determination for large proteins very difficult, hindering the ability to perform top-down proteomics. Peptides, proteins and corresponding fragments modified with para-iodobenzoate were trapped and irradiated with 266 nm light from an Nd:YAG laser. Loss of iodine due to photodissociation was then used to assign charge states by measuring the corresponding m/z shifts. Initial experiments on small peptides illustrate the feasibility of the method. Further studies performed on larger proteins in higher charge states yielded similar results, revealing that fragment ions over a significant mass range either remain in or are quickly cooled to the laser overlap region of the ion trap. Rapid charge state assignment for both whole molecules and collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragments can be obtained by photoactivation of chromophores with labile carbon-iodine bonds. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  13. Can Two-Dimensional IR-ECD Mass Spectrometry Improve Peptide de Novo Sequencing?

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Lynch, Alice M; Morgan, Tomos E; Wootton, Christopher A; Lam, Yuko P Y; Chiron, Lionel; Barrow, Mark P; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B

    2018-03-06

    Two-dimensional mass spectrometry (2D MS) correlates precursor and fragment ions without ion isolation in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR MS) for tandem mass spectrometry. Infrared activated electron capture dissociation (IR-ECD), using a hollow cathode configuration, generally yields more information for peptide sequencing in tandem mass spectrometry than ECD (electron capture dissociation) alone. The effects of the fragmentation zone on the 2D mass spectrum are investigated as well as the structural information that can be derived from it. The enhanced structural information gathered from the 2D mass spectrum is discussed in terms of how de novo peptide sequencing can be performed with increased confidence. 2D IR-ECD MS is shown to sequence peptides, to distinguish between leucine and isoleucine residues through the production of w ions as well as between C-terminal ( b/ c) and N-terminal ( y/ z) fragments through the use of higher harmonics, and to assign and locate peptide modifications.

  14. Structural investigation of naturally occurring peptides by electron capture dissociation and AMBER force field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polfer, Nick C.; Haselmann, Kim F.; Langridge-Smith, Pat R. R.; Barran, Perdita E.

    We present a detailed analysis of the relative yields in dissociation products of doubly protonated polypeptide cations obtained via electron capture dissociation (ECD). These experimental studies are complemented by molecular dynamics force field modelling, using the AMBER force field, to correlate with putative gas-phase conformations for these peptides. It is shown that the highest gas-phase basicity amino acid residue (i.e. arginine) is included in all the charged fragments. This is of particular use in determining the primary structure tryptic digest peptides, which will ordinarily posses a high basicity C-terminal residue (i.e. arginine or lysine). Further, these results suggest that the relative ECD dissociation pattern is related to the secondary structure of the peptide. In particular, the ECD fragmentation pattern in gonadatropin releasing hormone (GnRH) variants appears to depend on whether a β-turn or an extended α-helical structure is formed. In the peptide bradykinin, modelling suggests that the C-terminal arginine engages in much more extended solvation of the backbone than the N-terminal arginine. This strongly correlates with the observed dominance of c over z fragments. This work forms the first attempt at a systematic qualitative correlation of the low-energy structures of modelled gas-phase polypeptides, and their corresponding ECD dissociation pattern.

  15. Ultraviolet, Infrared, and High-Low Energy Photodissociation of Post-Translationally Modified Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Girod, Marion

    2018-02-01

    Mass spectrometry-based methods have made significant progress in characterizing post-translational modifications in peptides and proteins; however, certain aspects regarding fragmentation methods must still be improved. A good technique is expected to provide excellent sequence information, locate PTM sites, and retain the labile PTM groups. To address these issues, we investigate 10.6 μm IRMPD, 213 nm UVPD, and combined UV and IR photodissociation, known as HiLoPD (high-low photodissociation), for phospho-, sulfo-, and glyco-peptide cations. IRMPD shows excellent backbone fragmentation and produces equal numbers of N- and C-terminal ions. The results reveal that 213 nm UVPD and HiLoPD methods can provide diverse backbone fragmentation producing a/x, b/y, and c/z ions with excellent sequence coverage, locate PTM sites, and offer reasonable retention efficiency for phospho- and glyco-peptides. Excellent sequence coverage is achieved for sulfo-peptides and the position of the SO3 group can be pinpointed; however, widespread SO3 losses are detected irrespective of the methods used herein. Based on the overall performance achieved, we believe that 213 nm UVPD and HiLoPD can serve as alternative options to collision activation and electron transfer dissociations for phospho- and glyco-proteomics.

  16. Ranking Fragment Ions Based on Outlier Detection for Improved Label-Free Quantification in Data-Independent Acquisition LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Aivett; Zhang, Ying; Varesio, Emmanuel; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Lisacek, Frédérique; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition LC-MS/MS techniques complement supervised methods for peptide quantification. However, due to the wide precursor isolation windows, these techniques are prone to interference at the fragment ion level, which in turn is detrimental for accurate quantification. The “non-outlier fragment ion” (NOFI) ranking algorithm has been developed to assign low priority to fragment ions affected by interference. By using the optimal subset of high priority fragment ions these interfered fragment ions are effectively excluded from quantification. NOFI represents each fragment ion as a vector of four dimensions related to chromatographic and MS fragmentation attributes and applies multivariate outlier detection techniques. Benchmarking conducted on a well-defined quantitative dataset (i.e. the SWATH Gold Standard), indicates that NOFI on average is able to accurately quantify 11-25% more peptides than the commonly used Top-N library intensity ranking method. The sum of the area of the Top3-5 NOFIs produces similar coefficients of variation as compared to the library intensity method but with more accurate quantification results. On a biologically relevant human dendritic cell digest dataset, NOFI properly assigns low priority ranks to 85% of annotated interferences, resulting in sensitivity values between 0.92 and 0.80 against 0.76 for the Spectronaut interference detection algorithm. PMID:26412574

  17. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E., E-mail: annette.langkilde@sund.ku.dk; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-raymore » crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.« less

  18. Detection of peptides with intact phosphate groups using MALDI TOF/TOF and comparison with the ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Kameshwari, D B; Gayathri, P; Nagaraj, R

    2018-04-01

    A wide variety of post-translational modifications such as oxidation, phosphorylation, glycosylation, methylation, and acetylation play critical roles in cellular functions. Detection of post-translational modifications in proteins is important to understand their crucial roles in cellular functions. Identifying each modification requires special attention in mass spectral acquisition and analysis. Here, we report a mass spectral method for the detection of multiple phosphorylations in peptides by analyzing their products after fragmentation. Synthetic peptides were used to identify these modifications by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) TOF/TOF. Peptides with serine, threonine, and tyrosine were used with mono- to tetra-phosphorylation sites in different combinations to get insights into their fragmentation and identify the location of these sites. The y-ion series were observed without the loss of phosphate groups and were thus very useful in determining the localization and sequence of the phosphate residues. Acetylation of the peptides was found to be useful in detecting the b1-ion and helped in identifying the N-terminus. When a mixture of the phosphorylated peptides (from mouse protein sequences) were analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a Velos Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer and the data subjected to analysis by Sequest using the mouse database, the peptides were identified along with the parent proteins. A comparison of MALDI TOF/TOF spectra with ESI MS/MS helped in eliminating falsely discovered peptides using the database search.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    PubMed

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  20. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  1. Filamentary fragmentation in a turbulent medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hubber, D. A.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations investigating the evolution and fragmentation of filaments that are accreting from a turbulent medium. We show that the presence of turbulence and the resulting inhomogeneities in the accretion flow play a significant role in the fragmentation process. Filaments that experience a weakly turbulent accretion flow fragment in a two-tier hierarchical fashion, similar to the fragmentation pattern seen in the Orion Integral Shaped Filament. Increasing the energy in the turbulent velocity field results in more sub-structure within the filaments, and one sees a shift from gravity-dominated fragmentation to turbulence-dominated fragmentation. The sub-structure formed in the filaments is elongated and roughly parallel to the longitudinal axis of the filament, similar to the fibres seen in observations of Taurus, and suggests that the fray and fragment scenario is a possible mechanism for the production of fibres. We show that the formation of these fibre-like structures is linked to the vorticity of the velocity field inside the filament and the filament's accretion from an inhomogeneous medium. Moreover, we find that accretion is able to drive and sustain roughly sonic levels of turbulence inside the filaments, but is not able to prevent radial collapse once the filaments become supercritical. However, the supercritical filaments that contain fibre-like structures do not collapse radially, suggesting that fibrous filaments may not necessarily become radially unstable once they reach the critical line-density.

  2. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  3. Dual Fragment Impact of PBX Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskins, Peter; Briggs, Richard; Leeming, David; White, Nathan; Cheese, Philip; DE&S MoD UK Team; Ordnance Test Solutions Ltd Team

    2017-06-01

    Fragment impact can pose a significant hazard to many systems containing explosives or propellants. Testing for this threat is most commonly carried out using a single fragment. However, it can be argued that an initial fragment strike (or strikes) could sensitise the energetic material to subsequent impacts, which may then lead to a more violent reaction than would have been predicted based upon single fragment studies. To explore this potential hazard we have developed the capability to launch 2 fragments from the same gun at a range of velocities, and achieve impacts on an acceptor charge with good control over the spatial and temporal separation of the strikes. In this paper we will describe in detail the experimental techniques we have used, both to achieve the dual fragment launch and observe the acceptor charge response. In addition, we will describe the results obtained against PBX filled explosive targets; discuss the mechanisms controlling the target response and their significance for vulnerability assessment. Results of these tests have clearly indicated the potential for detonation upon the second strike, at velocities well below those needed for shock initiation by a single fragment.

  4. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  5. On disciplinary fragmentation and scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called "schools of thought". We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model's implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science.

  6. Effects of Chemical Structure on Hydrolysis Pathways of Small Peptides in Coastal Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Reyna, N. E.; Hamdan, L. J.; Liu, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering peptide hydrolysis pathways is key to understanding the mechanism of peptide hydrolysis, in particular the types of extracellular enzymes that are active in seawater. From the hydrolyzed fragments of small peptides, one can estimate the role of amino-, carboxy-, and endopeptidases in a quantitative way. In this study, we incubated several small peptides with different amino acid compositions, alanine-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (AVFA), phenylalanine-alanine-serine-tryptophan-glycine-alanine (FASWGA), VFA, SWGA, VVFA, arginine-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (RVFA), SVFA, aspartic acid-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (DVFA), trialanine (AAA), and AVF in two coastal seawaters (ship channel seawater in the western Gulf of Mexico and Sta. C6 seawater in the northern Gulf of Mexico). In both seawaters, aminopeptidases played a more dominant role (22-67%) in hydrolyzing peptides with hydrophobic amino acid at the N-terminus, such as AVFA, VVFA, VFA, and AAA, or with basic amino acid at the N-terminus (RVFA), as compared to those with N-terminal polar amino acid (SVFA, SWGA) or acidic amino acid (DVFA) (0-24%). This result indicates that amino acid composition in a peptide structure affects how the peptide is hydrolyzed. We also found that peptides in the C6 seawater were hydrolyzed dominantly by aminopeptidases (10-59%), while those in the ship channel seawater also by endo- or carboxypeptidases (9-69%). This pattern suggests that peptide hydrolysis pathways depend on specific environment conditions, such as bacterial community structure, that can lead to variations in abundances or activities among amino-, carboxy- and endopeptidases. Overall, the results provide insights into the effects of chemical structure and seawater environment on peptide hydrolysis pathways.

  7. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  8. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  9. Fragmentation in the branching coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck): growth, survivorship, and reproduction of colonies and fragments.

    PubMed

    Lirman

    2000-08-23

    Acropora palmata, a branching coral abundant on shallow reef environments throughout the Caribbean, is susceptible to physical disturbance caused by storms. Accordingly, the survivorship and propagation of this species are tied to its capability to recover after fragmentation. Fragments of A. palmata comprised 40% of ramets within populations that had experienced recent storms. While the survivorship of A. palmata fragments was not directly related to the size of fragments, removal of fragments from areas where they settled was influenced by size. Survivorship of fragments was also affected by type of substratum; the greatest mortality (58% loss within the first month) was observed on sand, whereas fragments placed on top of live colonies of A. palmata fused to the underlying tissue and did not experience any losses. Fragments created by Hurricane Andrew on a Florida reef in August 1992 began developing new growth (proto-branches) 7 months after the storm. The number of proto-branches on fragments was dependent on size, but growth was not affected by the size of fragments. Growth-rates of proto-branches increased exponentially with time (1.7 cm year(-1) for 1993-1994, 2.7 cm year(-1) for 1994-1995, 4.2 cm year(-1) for 1995-1996, and 6.5 cm year(-1) for 1996-1997), taking over 4 years for proto-branches to achieve rates comparable to those of adult colonies on the same reef (6.9 cm year(-1)). In addition to the initial mortality and reduced growth-rates, fragmentation resulted in a loss of reproductive potential. Neither colonies that experienced severe fragmentation nor fragments contained gametes until 4 years after the initial damage. Although A. palmata may survive periodic fragmentation, the long-term effects of this process will depend ultimately on the balance between the benefits and costs of this process.

  10. Detection of small bioactive peptides from Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Pampanin, Daniela M; Larssen, Eivind; Provan, Fiona; Sivertsvik, Morten; Ruoff, Peter; Sydnes, Magne O

    2012-04-01

    Recent research has shown that fish residual materials contain a range of components with interesting biological activity. Therefore, there is a great potential in the marine bioprocess industry to utilize these by-products as starting material for generating more valuable products. The aim of the present study was to search for bioactive peptides (in particular small natural bioactive peptides with molecular weight lower than 10 kDa) in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus L.) by-products such as skin and more general residual materials. By such means a range of peptides with claimed interesting biological activities was found. Herein the activity of the detected bioactive peptides and strategies for isolating peptide fragments containing the bioactive motif is discussed. Identification of bioactive peptides in crude peptide/protein sources (skin and residual materials) was performed directly using a combination of mass spectrometry (Orbitrap), bioinformatics and database search. This method was a good angle of approach in order to map the potential in new species and species that have been very little studied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Modified peptide antagonists of interleukin 5 exhibit extended in vivo persistence but restricted species specificity.

    PubMed

    Uings, I J; Balasubramanian, P; McLoughlin, P G; Yin, Q; Dash, L; Beresford, A; Kearney, S; Barrett, R W; McKinnon, M; England, B P

    2001-07-07

    AF18748 is disulphide-linked homodimeric peptide with 19 amino acids in each chain that antagonises the action of the eosinophil-specific cytokine, interleukin 5 (IL-5). We have generated a set of N-terminally truncated peptides derived from AF18748 and demonstrated that the first five amino acids of the peptide do not contribute to receptor binding activity. The shortened peptide blocked IL-5-dependent adhesion of eosinophils with an IC(50)of 350 pM, and had no effect on stimulation by IL-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha or fMet-Leu-Phe. The peptides were rapidly broken down in mouse plasma through cleavage of a single chain of the dimer. However, this breakdown did not correlate with loss of biological activity, indicating that the asymmetric peptide fragment retains full receptor binding capacity. The activity of AF18748 disappeared rapidly from the blood following intravenous injection into mice. Coupling of polyethylene glycol to the N-terminus of AF18748 resulted in a moderate loss in biological potency (IC(50)30 nM), but the resulting conjugate persisted in the circulation for more than 8 h after injection. Despite its high potency at the human IL-5 receptor, AF18748 was unable to antagonise the activity of IL-5 on murine B13 cells, or on canine eosinophils, indicating that the peptide is highly specific for the human IL-5 receptor. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Health-promoting properties of bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins in infant food: a review.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Dassios, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Milk proteins have attracted extensive interest in terms of their bioavailability following ingestion. Enzymatic digestion of dairy products generates numerous peptides with various biological activities. Both human milk and infant formulas based on cow's milk are potential sources of bioactive peptides. This review aims to present current knowledge on the formation and fate of bioactive peptides from milk feeds intended for infants. Emphasis is placed on the source of the bioactive peptides with the nutritional impact of human milk and cow milk-based formulas on infant health being critically discussed from that perspective. Furthermore, the effect of processing and in vitro or in vivo digestion on the release and availability of peptides with bioactive sequences is evaluated. Considerable differences with respect to bioavailability and metabolic effects between the biologically active fragments generated following ingestion of human milk and infant formulas are documented. Peptides from milk protein of bovine origin could be a valuable supplement to human milk as multiple health-promoting properties are attributed to peptide fractions identified in standard cow milk-based infant formulas.

  13. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  14. Simulation of collisional fragmentation with explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    For practical reasons, experimental studies of collisional fragmentation must at times rely on explosives to fragment a target body. For example, Housen et al., described experiments in which spheres were fragmented in a pressurized atmosphere. Explosives were used because impacts could not be performed in the pressure chamber. Explosives can also be used to study targets much larger than those which can be disrupted by conventional light-gas guns, thereby allowing size- and rate-effects to be investigated. The purpose of this study is to determine the charge burial depth required to simulate various aspects of collisions.

  15. Nonpolar interactions between trans-membrane helical EGF peptide and phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and cholesterol. Molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Róg, Tomasz; Murzyn, Krzysztof; Karttunen, Mikko; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta

    2008-04-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of four lipid bilayers with inserted trans-membrane helical fragment of epithelial growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGF peptide) was performed. The lipid bilayers differ in their lipid composition and consist of (i) unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine, POPC), (ii) POPC and 20 mol% of cholesterol (Chol), (iii) sphingomyelin (SM) and 20 mol% of Chol, and (iv) SM and 50 mol% of Chol. Only 1 out of 26 residues in the EGF-peptide sequence is polar (Thr). The hydrophobic thickness of each bilayer is different but shorter than the length of the peptide and so, due to hydrophobic mismatch, the inserted peptide is tilted in each bilayer. Additionally, in the POPC bilayer, which is the thinnest, the peptide loses its helical structure in a short three-amino acid fragment. This facilitates bending of the peptide and burying all hydrophobic amino acids inside the membrane core (Figure 1(b)). Bilayer lipid composition affects interactions between the peptide and lipids in the membrane core. Chol increases packing of atoms relative to the peptide side chains, and thus increases van der Waals interactions. On average, the packing around the peptide is higher in SM-based bilayers than POPC-based bilayers but for certain amino acids, packing depends on their position relative to the bilayer center. In the bilayer center, packing is higher in POPC-based bilayers, while in regions closer to the interface packing is higher in SM-based bilayers. In general, amino acids with larger side chains interact strongly with lipids, and thus the peptide sequence is important for the pattern of interactions at different membrane depths. This pattern closely resembles the shape of recently published lateral pressure profiles [Ollila et alJ. Struct. Biol. DOI:10.1016/j.jsb.2007.01.012].

  16. Andromeda: a peptide search engine integrated into the MaxQuant environment.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jürgen; Neuhauser, Nadin; Michalski, Annette; Scheltema, Richard A; Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    A key step in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is the identification of peptides in sequence databases by their fragmentation spectra. Here we describe Andromeda, a novel peptide search engine using a probabilistic scoring model. On proteome data, Andromeda performs as well as Mascot, a widely used commercial search engine, as judged by sensitivity and specificity analysis based on target decoy searches. Furthermore, it can handle data with arbitrarily high fragment mass accuracy, is able to assign and score complex patterns of post-translational modifications, such as highly phosphorylated peptides, and accommodates extremely large databases. The algorithms of Andromeda are provided. Andromeda can function independently or as an integrated search engine of the widely used MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and both are freely available at www.maxquant.org. The combination enables analysis of large data sets in a simple analysis workflow on a desktop computer. For searching individual spectra Andromeda is also accessible via a web server. We demonstrate the flexibility of the system by implementing the capability to identify cofragmented peptides, significantly improving the total number of identified peptides.

  17. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R; Sasmal, Dibyendu K; Huang, Jun; Tirrell, Matthew V; LaBelle, James L

    2017-09-20

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein-protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  18. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R.

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are twomore » major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.« less

  19. Asparagine Peptide Lyases

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil David; Barrett, Alan John; Bateman, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The terms “proteolytic enzyme” and “peptidase” have been treated as synonymous, and all proteolytic enzymes have been considered to be hydrolases (EC 3.4). However, the recent discovery of proteins that cleave themselves at asparagine residues indicates that not all peptide bond cleavage occurs by hydrolysis. These self-cleaving proteins include the Tsh protein precursor of Escherichia coli, in which the large C-terminal propeptide acts as an autotransporter; certain viral coat proteins; and proteins containing inteins. Proteolysis is the action of an amidine lyase (EC 4.3.2). These proteolytic enzymes are also the first in which the nucleophile is an asparagine, defining the seventh proteolytic catalytic type and the first to be discovered since 2004. We have assembled ten families based on sequence similarity in which cleavage is thought to be catalyzed by an asparagine. PMID:21832066

  20. [Biologically active fragment of the differentiation factor from HL-60 cell line. Identification and properties].

    PubMed

    Kostanian, I A; Astapova, M V; Navolotskaia, E V; Lepikhova, T N; Dranitsyna, S M; Telegin, G B; Rodionov, I L; Baĭdakova, L K; Zolotarev, Iu A; Molotkovskaia, I M; Lipkin, V M

    2000-07-01

    Six-membered peptide fragment TGENHR (HLDF-6) was identified in the HL-60 cell culture of human promyelocyte leukemia treated with retinoic acid when studying the differentiation factor HLDF of this cell line. HLDF-6 retains the ability of the full-size factor to induce the differentiation and arrest the proliferation of the starting HL-60 cells. It was shown that the synthetic peptide HLDF-6 has no specific receptors on the surface of the HL-60 cells but can affect the binding of interleukin IL-1 beta, a cytokine involved in proliferation, to the cell surface. It was found on a model of transplantable NSO myeloma that HLDF-6 has an antitumor activity.

  1. Elucidating the sequence of intact bioactive peptides by using electron capture dissociation and hot electron capture dissociation in a linear radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Satake, Hiroyuki; Manri, Naomi; Kaneko, Akihito; Hirabayashi, Atsumu; Hasegawa, Hideki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Baba, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Katsuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) is useful tool for sequencing of peptides and proteins with post-translational modifications. To increase the sequence coverage for peptides and proteins, it is important to develop ECD device with high fragmentation efficiency. Sequence analysis of intact undigested bioactive peptides (3000-5000 Da) was performed by use of electron capture dissociation (rf-ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a linear radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap that was coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We applied rf-ECD, hot rf-ECD (rf-ECD with high electron energy), and CID for intact bioactive peptide ions of various charge states and evaluated the sequence coverage of their fragment spectra. Hot rf-ECD produced a higher number of c- and z-type fragment ions of modified peptide ions as electron energy increased in lower charged peptide ions, and sequence coverage greater than 80% was obtained compared with the CID case (40-80%). The result indicates that intact bioactive modified peptides (Ghrelin, ANP) were correctly identified by use of hot rf-ECD. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Apex peptide elution chain selection: a new strategy for selecting precursors in 2D-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF experiments on complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Tejas; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wiederhold, Elena; Breitling, Rainer; Poolman, Bert; Permentier, Hjalmar P

    2010-11-05

    LC-MALDI provides an often overlooked opportunity to exploit the separation between LC-MS and MS/MS stages of a 2D-LC-MS-based proteomics experiment, that is, by making a smarter selection for precursor fragmentation. Apex Peptide Elution Chain Selection (APECS) is a simple and powerful method for intensity-based peptide selection in a complex sample separated by 2D-LC, using a MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument. It removes the peptide redundancy present in the adjacent first-dimension (typically strong cation exchange, SCX) fractions by constructing peptide elution profiles that link the precursor ions of the same peptide across SCX fractions. Subsequently, the precursor ion most likely to fragment successfully in a given profile is selected for fragmentation analysis, selecting on precursor intensity and absence of adjacent ions that may cofragment. To make the method independent of experiment-specific tolerance criteria, we introduce the concept of the branching factor, which measures the likelihood of false clustering of precursor ions based on past experiments. By validation with a complex proteome sample of Arabidopsis thaliana, APECS identified an equivalent number of peptides as a conventional data-dependent acquisition method but with a 35% smaller work load. Consequently, reduced sample depletion allowed further selection of lower signal-to-noise ratio precursor ions, leading to a larger number of identified unique peptides.

  3. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies.

  4. Enzyme cleavable nanoparticles from peptide based triblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Adrian V.; Kotman, Niklas; Andrieu, Julien; Mailänder, Volker; Weiss, Clemens K.; Landfester, Katharina

    2013-05-01

    A solid-phase synthesis based approach towards protease cleavable polystyrene-peptide-polystyrene triblock copolymers and their formulation to nanoparticulate systems is presented. These nanoparticles are suitable for the optical detection of an enzyme and have the potential for application as a drug delivery system. Two different peptide sequences, one cleaved by trypsin (GFF), the other by hepsin (RQLRVVGG), a protease overexpressed in early stages of prostate cancer, are used as the central part of the triblock. For optical detection a fluorophore-quencher pair is introduced around the cleavage sequence. The solid phase synthesis is conduced such that two identical sequences are synthesized from one branching point. Eventually, carboxy-terminated polystyrene is introduced into the peptide synthesizer and coupled to the amino-termini of the branched sequence. Upon cleavage, a fragment is released from the triblock copolymer, which has the potential for use in drug delivery applications. Conducting the whole synthesis on a solid phase in the peptide synthesizer avoids solubility issues and post-synthetic purification steps. Due to the hydrophobic PS-chains, the copolymer can easily be formulated to form nanoparticles using a nanoprecipitation process. Incubation of the nanoparticles with the respective enzymes leads to a significant increase of the fluorescence from the incorporated fluorophore, thereby indicating cleavage of the peptide sequence and decomposition of the particles.A solid-phase synthesis based approach towards protease cleavable polystyrene-peptide-polystyrene triblock copolymers and their formulation to nanoparticulate systems is presented. These nanoparticles are suitable for the optical detection of an enzyme and have the potential for application as a drug delivery system. Two different peptide sequences, one cleaved by trypsin (GFF), the other by hepsin (RQLRVVGG), a protease overexpressed in early stages of prostate cancer, are used as the

  5. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. L.; Gabbard, J. R.; Devere, G. T.; Johnson, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The causes of on-orbit fragmentations are varied and may be intentional or accidental. The cause of many fragmentations remains unknown. While a few cases are currently under investigation as on-orbit collision candidates, man is directly responsible for the vast majority of artificial debris polluting the near-Earth space environment. It should be emphasized that the number of fragments listed with each event in this document represent only those debris officially cataloged by NORAD. Each known on-orbit satellite fragementation is described within this document in module format. Also listed are pertinent characteristics of each fragmentation event. Comments regarding the nature of the satellite and additional details of the events are given.

  6. Gravitational Fragmentation of the Carina Flare Supershell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, Richard

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell in the13CO line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify ˜ 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  7. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  8. Purification and identification of endogenous antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory peptides from donkey milk by multidimensional liquid chromatography and nanoHPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Donkey milk is a valuable product for the food industry due to its nutraceutical, nutritional, and functional properties. In this work, the endogenous peptides from donkey milk were investigated for their antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities, combining a two-dimensional peptide fractionation strategy with high-resolution mass spectrometry, bioinformatics analysis, and in vitro assays. After extraction, the endogenous peptides were fractionated twice, first by polymeric reversed phase and then by hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Fractions were screened for the investigated bioactivities and only the most active ones were finally analyzed by nanoRP-HPLC-MS/MS; this approach allowed to reduce the total number of possible bioactive sequences. Results were further mined by in silico analysis using PeptideRanker, BioPep, and PepBank, which provided a bioactivity score to the identified peptides and matched sequences to known bioactive peptides, in order to select candidates for chemical synthesis. Thus, five peptides were prepared and then compared to the natural occurring ones, checking their retention times and fragmentation patterns in donkey milk alone and in spiked donkey milk samples. Pure peptide standards were finally in vitro tested for the specific bioactivity. In this way, two novel endogenous antioxidant peptides, namely EWFTFLKEAGQGAKDMWR and GQGAKDMWR, and two ACE-inhibitory peptides, namely REWFTFLK and MPFLKSPIVPF, were successfully validated from donkey milk. Graphical Abstract Analytical workflow for purification and identification of bioactive peptides from donkey milk sample.

  9. Recent extensions to native chemical ligation for the chemical synthesis of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Malins, Lara R; Payne, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Native chemical ligation continues to play a pivotal role in the synthesis of increasingly complex peptide and protein targets twenty years after its initial report. This opinion article will highlight a number of recent, powerful extensions of the technology that have expanded the scope of the reaction, accelerated ligation rates, enabled chemoselective post-ligation modifications, and streamlined the ligation of multiple peptide fragments. These advances have facilitated the synthesis of a number of impressive protein targets to date and hold great promise for the continued application of native chemical ligation for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of thioester peptides for the incorporation of thioamides into proteins by native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    Batjargal, Solongo; Huang, Yun; Wang, Yanxin J; Petersson, E James

    2014-02-01

    Thioamides can be used as photoswitches, as reporters of local environment, as inhibitors of enzymes, and as fluorescence quenchers. We have recently demonstrated the incorporation of thioamides into polypeptides and proteins using native chemical ligation (NCL). In this protocol, we describe procedures for the synthesis of a thioamide precursor and an NCL-ready thioamide-containing peptide using Dawson's N-acyl-benzimidazolinone (Nbz) process. We include a description of the synthesis by NCL of a thioamide-labeled fragment of the neuronal protein α-synuclein. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Increased resistance of peptides to serum proteases by modification of their amino groups.

    PubMed

    Galati, Rossella; Verdina, Alessandra; Falasca, Giuliana; Chersi, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    The ability of synthetic protein fragments to survive the degradative action of aminopeptidases and serum proteolytic enzymes can be remarkably enhanced by slight modifications at their N-terminal alpha-amino group. This can be achieved by addition of beta-alanine or amino acids of the D-configuration, amino acids which are seldom found in a living organism. These modifications do scarcely modify the chemical and physical properties of the peptides, and should be preferred, especially for in vivo tests, to drastic alterations of peptides as produced by dinitrophenylation or dansylation of the amino groups.

  12. Analysis of isotopic labeling in peptide fragments by tandem mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cellular phenotype is the consequence of dynamic metabolic events that occur in a spacially dependent fashion. This spatial and temporal complexity presents challenges for investigating primary metabolism and improved methods to probe biochemical events such as amino acid biosynthesis may be nee...

  13. Combinatorial Approach to the Isolation of Human Antibody Fragments and Peptides to Breast Carcinomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    stages. It is not certain exactly when malignancy begins, however " invasive " breast carcinoma with metastatic potential occurs when epithelial cells...invade the surrounding stroma (2). Invasive breast carcinoma may be preceded by noninvasive ductal or lobular hyperplasia or carcinoma. Preinvasive...lesions as well as invasive breast tumors can often be detected by Mammography. Mammography has not been as reliable for the detection of these lesions

  14. Charmed Hadrons from Fragmentation and B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Jens Sören

    The fragmentation functions of D0, D±, Ds±, D*o, D*± and Λ c± at √ {s}˜=10.6 GeV are measured with a data set of 102.7 fb-1. Fragmentation model parametrizations (Peterson, Kartvelishvili, Collins-Spiller, Lund, and Bowler models) are compared to the data. The data at high x≃1 indicate a contribution of non-perturbative QCD processes.

  15. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Buckalew, B.; Barker, E.; Abercromby, K.; Seitzer, P.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-09-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6 m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9 m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  16. Fragmentation of Care in Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Debra B; Dahlquist, Irma; Jarosch, Christina; Lindau, Stacy T

    2016-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women who experience fragmented care may undergo unnecessary delays to diagnosis and treatment. Based on ectopic pregnancy cases observed in clinical practice that raised our concern about fragmentation of care, we designed an exploratory study to describe the number, characteristics, and outcomes of fragmented care among patients with ectopic pregnancy at one urban academic hospital. Chart review with descriptive statistics. Fragmented care was defined as a patient being evaluated at an outside facility for possible ectopic pregnancy and transferred, referred, or discharged before receiving care at the study institution. Of 191 women seen for possible or definite ectopic pregnancy during the study period, 42 (22 %) met the study definition of fragmented care. The study was under-powered to observe statistically significant differences across groups, but we found concerning, non-significant trends: patients with fragmented care were more likely to be Medicaid recipients (65.9 vs. 58.8 %) and to experience a complication (23.8 vs. 18.1 %) compared to those with non-fragmented care. Most patients (n = 37) received no identifiable treatment prior to transfer and arrived to the study hospital with no communication to the receiving hospital from the outside provider (n = 34). Nine patients (21 %) presented with ruptured ectopic pregnancies. The fragmentation we observed in our study may contribute to previously identified socio-economic disparities in ectopic pregnancy outcomes. If future research confirms these findings, health information exchanges and regional coordination of care may be important strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

  17. Factors Controlling the Fragmentation Behavior of Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Mueller, S.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2006-12-01

    Five volcanoes of explosive eruptive behavior from the Ring of Fire were selected to investigate the processes responsible for their degree of explosivity and eruptive style. These volcanoes are Colima, (Mexico), St. Augustine (USA), Bezymianny (Russia), Krakatau and Kelut (Indonesia). In an attempt to better understand the processes controlling fragmentation at these volcanoes, we performed shock-tube experiments with natural samples from these volcanoes at overpressures between 4 and 35 MPa at room temperature. Both fragmentation threshold and speed of fragmentation were determined. Previous studies have already shown that porosity is a first order parameter in eruption models and our recent results support this statement. However, it is clear that other factors such as permeability need to be considered to explain variations observed in fragmentation behavior. Colima sample series of 24 % porosity require overpressures of over 11 MPa to fragment, whereas other Colima sample series of 15 % porosity require overpressures of only 8 MPa to fragment. Permeability measurements confirmed a permeability of about one order of magnitude higher for the samples of 24 % porosity. However, this information alone does not necessarily provide an explanation for the large scatter seen in the fragmentation speed data within one sample series. Experimental data will be supported by textural microscopic analyses in order to provide more constraints on the dominant factors responsible for the scatter in fragmentation behavior. Explaining this scatter will help to shed light on the respective eruptive behavior of the investigated volcanoes and thus help to understand why, at the first glance, very "similar" volcanic systems may react in very different ways. This work is part of the BMBF project SUNDAARC, which aims to quantify the potential risk of selected highly-explosive volcanoes by combining field and laboratory investigations.

  18. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  19. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  20. Fragmentation of Continental United States Forests

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; Robert V. O' Neill; K. Bruce Jones; Elizabeth R. Smith; John W. Coulston; Timothy G. Wade; Jonathan H. Smith

    2002-01-01

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m (0.09 ha pixel-1) land- cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indexes measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes including 2.25, 7.29, 65.61, 590.49, and 5314.41 ha....

  1. Letter: Electron-capture dissociation and collision-induced dissociation fragmentation of the supermetallized complexes of Substance P with potassium, cesium and silver.

    PubMed

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Zherebker, Alexander; Kononikhin, Alexey; Indeykina, Maria; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We report the investigation of the collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-capture dissociation (ECD) product fragmentations of the supermetallized complexes of Substance P and several monovalent metals. The supermetallization is the phenomenon of the formation of the complex ion peptide-metals in the gas phase when the peptide accepts an unexpectedly large number of metals. We have obtained and investigated complexes with the incorporation of up to four cesium (Cs), up to five potassium (K) and up to six silver (Ag) atoms. The current research reveals crucial changes in the complex behavior in the cases of different metals. It was observed that in CID spectra of complexes with Cs and K is dominated by the peak corresponding to the loss of metal cation while ECD gives a rich fragmentation. In the case of complexes with Ag, the loss of Ag(+) occurs in ECD while the CID shows a good fragmentation.

  2. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  3. Homodimerization Protects the Amyloid Precursor Protein C99 Fragment from Cleavage by γ-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Edith; Julius, Ayse; Steiner, Harald; Langosch, Dieter

    2015-10-13

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a single-span integral membrane protein whose C-terminal fragment C99 is cleaved within the transmembrane helix by γ-secretase. Cleavage produces various Aβ peptides that are linked to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. The transmembrane helix is known to homodimerize in a sequence-specific manner, and considerable controversy about whether the homodimeric form of C99 is cleaved by γ-secretase exists. Here, we generated various covalent C99 homodimers via cross-linking at engineered cysteine residues. None of the homodimers was cleaved in vitro by purified γ-secretase, strongly suggesting that homodimerization protects C99 from cleavage.

  4. Sleep fragmentation and ventilatory responsiveness to hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, H; Thornton, A T; Sharp, D; Antic, R; McEvoy, R D

    1991-11-01

    It has been postulated that sleep disruption may change ventilatory chemoresponsiveness to hypercapnia and hypoxia and thereby contribute to the development of respiratory failure in some patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) or with other respiratory disorders. Some studies have demonstrated a reduction in ventilatory chemoresponsiveness in normal subjects after one night of total sleep deprivation. However, sleep fragmentation rather than total sleep deprivation is usual in patients. In this study, therefore, we measured hypercapnic ventilatory responsiveness (HCVR) and spirometry in 13 healthy male subjects (18 to 30 yr of age) after two consecutive nights of severe sleep fragmentation (arousal to an auditory stimulus after each minute of sleep) and compared the results with those obtained in the same subjects after normal sleep. Sleep fragmentation and normal sleep were separated by a week, and the order of intervention was randomized from patient to patient. No significant differences were observed in the slope or position of the HCVR curve after sleep fragmentation or in forced expiratory volumes. Although it is possible that a more prolonged period of sleep fragmentation than that used in this study may have an effect on HCVR, the results suggest that sleep fragmentation is an unlikely cause of progressive respiratory failure in patients with OSAS or with other respiratory disorders.

  5. Fragmentation of metal particles during heterogeneous explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Donahue, L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-03-01

    Heterogeneous explosives contain a mixture of standard explosive material and reactive metal particles. The inclusion of metal particles alters the energy density and energy release timescales involved in the blast event. Available experimental evidence indicates that metal particles may be damaged or fragmented during heterogeneous blast, altering the distribution of particle sizes from their initial state. This paper discusses adaptation and application of fragmentation theory and physical models for particle damage during condensed matter detonation, aerodynamic breakup of molten particles, and particle impact fragmentation with nearby structures. The shock compression and impact fragmentation models are based on the energy methods for dynamic fragmentation by Grady and Kipp, while aerodynamic breakup is treated according to Weber number stability criteria for droplets. These particle fragmentation models are validated against fundamental test cases from the literature. The models are then applied to heterogeneous blast scenarios including free field and wall reflection in a semi-confined urban street. Comparison with experimental records of pressure shows good agreement despite challenges inherent in the complexity of heterogeneous blast measurement and multiphase simulation.

  6. Electroweak fragmentation functions for dark matter annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasonza, Leila Ali; Krämer, Michael; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94025

    2015-02-18

    Electroweak corrections can play a crucial role in dark matter annihilation. The emission of gauge bosons, in particular, leads to a secondary flux consisting of all Standard Model particles, and may be described by electroweak fragmentation functions. To assess the quality of the fragmentation function approximation to electroweak radiation in dark matter annihilation, we have calculated the flux of secondary particles from gauge-boson emission in models with Majorana fermion and vector dark matter, respectively. For both models, we have compared cross sections and energy spectra of positrons and antiprotons after propagation through the galactic halo in the fragmentation function approximationmore » and in the full calculation. Fragmentation functions fail to describe the particle fluxes in the case of Majorana fermion annihilation into light fermions: the helicity suppression of the lowest-order cross section in such models cannot be lifted by the leading logarithmic contributions included in the fragmentation function approach. However, for other classes of models like vector dark matter, where the lowest-order cross section is not suppressed, electroweak fragmentation functions provide a simple, model-independent and accurate description of secondary particle fluxes.« less

  7. Microstructural characterization of pipe bomb fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Otto, E-mail: gregory@egr.uri.edu; Oxley, Jimmie; Smith, James

    2010-03-15

    Recovered pipe bomb fragments, exploded under controlled conditions, have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and microhardness. Specifically, this paper examines the microstructural changes in plain carbon-steel fragments collected after the controlled explosion of galvanized, schedule 40, continuously welded, steel pipes filled with various smokeless powders. A number of microstructural changes were observed in the recovered pipe fragments: deformation of the soft alpha-ferrite grains, deformation of pearlite colonies, twin formation, bands of distorted pearlite colonies, slip bands, and cross-slip bands. These microstructural changes were correlated with the relative energy of the smokeless powder fillers. The energy of themore » smokeless powder was reflected in a reduction in thickness of the pipe fragments (due to plastic strain prior to fracture) and an increase in microhardness. Moreover, within fragments from a single pipe, there was a radial variation in microhardness, with the microhardness at the outer wall being greater than that at the inner wall. These findings were consistent with the premise that, with the high energy fillers, extensive plastic deformation and wall thinning occurred prior to pipe fracture. Ultimately, the information collected from this investigation will be used to develop a database, where the fragment microstructure and microhardness will be correlated with type of explosive filler and bomb design. Some analyses, specifically wall thinning and microhardness, may aid in field characterization of explosive devices.« less

  8. Impact fragmentation of polyurethane and polypropylene cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Daisuke; Preechasupanya, Worrayut; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    The impact fragmentation of a bulk polyurethane elastomer (PU) and polypropylene (PP) cylinder have been investigated using a Cu plate projectile launched by a propellant gun at a velocity of 0.53-1.4 km/s. A projectile drills into a PU sample and forms a cavity in the sample. A small number of tiny fragments are formed. When the projectile smashes in at 1.4 km/s, the PU cylinder bursts and PU fragments form. On the other hand, a brittle fracture occurs on the PP cylinder. The mass of fragments from the PU sample generated at a lower impact velocity is distributed in the lognormal form, whereas the mass of fragments from the PU sample generated by a 1.4 km/s impact follows a power-law distribution. The fragment mass distribution of the PP sample generated at a lower impact velocity obeys the power-law form, whereas that generated at a higher impact velocity follows the lognormal form.

  9. Heparin promotes fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of amyloidogenic apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, Shiho; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Sakashita, Naomi; Otaka, Akira; Akaji, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are known to be associated with extracellular amyloid deposits of various amyloidogenic proteins. In this study, we found that the glycosaminoglycan heparin greatly accelerates the elongation step in fibril formation by the N-terminal 1-83 fragment of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), especially in the amyloidogenic W50R variant. Using fragment peptides, we demonstrate that heparin significantly promotes β-transition and fibril formation of the highly amyloidogenic region spanning residues 44-65 and colocalizes with fibrils formed by the W50R variant. These results suggest the possible role of glycosaminoglycans in fibril formation by amyloidogenic apoA-I variants. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    PubMed

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  11. Shuttle data book: SRM fragment velocity model. Presented to the SRB Fragment Model Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the velocity of fragments generated by the range safety destruction (RSD) or random failure of a Space Transportation System (STS) Solid Rocket Motor (SRM). The specific requirement was to provide a fragment model for use in those Galileo and Ulysses RTG safety analyses concerned with possible fragment impact on the spacecraft radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS). Good agreement was obtained between predictions and observations for fragment velocity, velocity distributions, azimuths, and rotation rates. Based on this agreement with the entire data base, the model was used to predict the probable fragment environments which would occur in the event of an STS-SRM RSD or randon failure at 10, 74, 84 and 110 seconds. The results of these predictions are the basis of the fragment environments presented in the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116). The information presented here is in viewgraph form.

  12. Atypical Signaling and Functional Desensitization Response of MAS Receptor to Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C.; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1–7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1–7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data

  13. Atypical signaling and functional desensitization response of MAS receptor to peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1-7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1-7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data suggest

  14. Mechanical stabilization of proteolytically degradable polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogels through peptide interaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Ju; Khan, Zara; Lu, Xi; Perera, T Hiran; Wilems, Thomas S; Ravivarapu, Krishna T; Smith Callahan, Laura A

    2018-04-15

    Balancing enhancement of neurite extension against loss of matrix support in synthetic hydrogels containing proteolytically degradable and bioactive signaling peptides to optimize tissue formation is difficult. Using a systematic approach, polyethylene glycol hydrogels containing concurrent continuous concentration gradients of the laminin derived bioactive signaling peptide, Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val (IKVAV), and collagen derived matrix metalloprotease degradable peptide, GPQGIWGQ, were fabricated and characterized. During proteolytic degradation of the concentration gradient hydrogels, the IKVAV and IWGQ cleavage fragment from GPQGIWGQ were found to interact and stabilize the bulk Young's Modulus of the hydrogel. Further testing of discrete samples containing GPQGIWGQ or its cleavage fragments, GPQG and IWGQ, indicates hydrophobic interactions between the peptides are not necessary for mechanical stabilization of the hydrogel, but changes in the concentration ratio between the peptides tethered in the hydrogel and salts and ions in the swelling solution can affect the stabilization. Encapsulation of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells did not reduce the mechanical properties of the hydrogel over a 14 day neural differentiation culture period, and IKVAV was found to maintain concentration dependent effects on neurite extension and mRNA gene expression of neural cytoskeletal markers, similar to previous studies. As a result, this work has significant implications for the analysis of biological studies in matrices, as the material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel may be unexpectedly temporally changing during culture due to interactions between peptide signaling elements, underscoring the need for greater matrix characterization during the degradation and cell culture. Greater emulation of the native extracellular matrix is necessary for tissue formation. To achieve this, matrices are becoming more complex, often including multiple

  15. Profiles of VGF Peptides in the Rat Brain and Their Modulations after Phencyclidine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noli, Barbara; Sanna, Fabrizio; Brancia, Carla; D’Amato, Filomena; Manconi, Barbara; Vincenzoni, Federica; Messana, Irene; Melis, Maria R.; Argiolas, Antonio; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Cocco, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    From the VGF precursor protein originate several low molecular weight peptides, whose distribution in the brain and blood circulation is not entirely known. Among the VGF peptides, those containing the N-terminus portion were altered in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) and hypothalamus of schizophrenia patients. “Hence, we aimed to better investigate the involvement of the VGF peptides in schizophrenia by studying their localization in the brain regions relevant for the disease, and revealing their possible modulations in response to certain neuronal alterations occurring in schizophrenia”. We produced antibodies against different VGF peptides encompassing the N-terminus, but also C-terminus-, TLQP-, GGGE- peptide sequences, and the so named NERP-3 and -4. These antibodies were used to carry out specific ELISA and immunolocalization studies while mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was also performed to recognize the intact brain VGF fragments. We used a schizophrenia rat model, in which alterations in the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response occurred after PCP treatment. In normal rats, all the VGF peptides studied were distributed in the brain areas examined including hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, accumbens and amygdaloid nuclei and also in the plasma. By liquid chromatography-high resolution mass, we identified different intact VGF peptide fragments, including those encompassing the N-terminus and the NERPs. PCP treatment caused behavioral changes that closely mimic schizophrenia, estimated by us as a disruption of PPI of the acoustic startle response. The PCP treatment also induced selective changes in the VGF peptide levels within certain brain areas. Indeed, an increase in VGF C-terminus and TLQP peptides was revealed in the prefrontal cortex (p < 0.01) where they were localized within parvoalbumin and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) containing neurons, respectively. Conversely, in the nucleus accumbens, PCP treatment produced a

  16. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter; Hansen, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides.

  17. Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragment Modeling: Modifications to the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouge, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests on test satellites are performed by members of the orbital debris scientific community in order to understand and typify the on-orbit collision breakup process. By analysis of these test satellite fragments, the fragment size and mass distributions are derived and incorporated into various orbital debris models. These same fragments are currently being put to new use using emerging technologies. Digital models of these fragments are created using a laser scanner. A group of computer programs referred to as the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve code uses these digital representations in a multitude of ways that describe, measure, and model on-orbit fragments and fragment behavior. The Dynamic Rotation subroutine generates all of the possible reflected intensities from a scanned fragment as if it were observed to rotate dynamically while in orbit about the Earth. This calls an additional subroutine that graphically displays the intensities and the resulting frequency of those intensities as a range of solar phase angles in a Probability Density Function plot. This document reports the additions and modifications to the subset of the Fragment Rotation Analysis and Lightcurve concerned with the Dynamic Rotation and Probability Density Function plotting subroutines.

  18. Genome duplications within the Xenopodinae do not increase the multiplicity of antimicrobial peptides in Silurana paratropicalis and Xenopus andrei skin secretions.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Eman, Ahmed; Coquet, Laurent; Jérôme, Leprince; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; King, Jay D; Takada, Koji; Conlon, J Michael

    2011-06-01

    A putative genome duplication event within the Silurana lineage has given rise to the tetraploid frog S. paratropicalis and a second polyploidization within the Xenopus lineage has produced the octoploid frog X. andrei. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of S. paratropicalis and X. andrei led to identification of multiple peptides with growth-inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Structural characterization demonstrated that the S. paratropicalis components comprised three peptides belonging to the caerulein-precursor fragment family (CPF-SP1, -SP2 and -SP3), two peptides from the xenopsin-precursor fragment family (XPF-SP1 and -SP2), and one peptide orthologous to peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa-SP1). The CPF peptides showed potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The X. andrei components comprised two peptides from the magainin family, (magainin-AN1 and -AN2), two from the XPF family (XPF-AN1 and -AN2), two from the PGLa family(PGLa-AN1 and -AN2), and one caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF-AN1).The primary structures of these peptides indicate a close phylogenetic relationship between X. andrei and the octoploid frog X. amieti. Under the same experimental conditions, seven orthologous antimicrobial peptides were previously isolated from the diploid frog S. tropicalis, nine from the tetraploid frog X. borealis, and five from the tetraploid frog X. clivii. The data indicate, therefore, that nonfunctionalization (gene deletion) has been the most common fate of duplicated antimicrobial peptide genes following polyploidization events in the Silurana and Xenopus lineages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combinatorial Approach for Large-scale Identification of Linked Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G.; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Bourne, Philip E.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  20. Hexafluoroisopropanol induces self-assembly of β-amyloid peptides into highly ordered nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pachahara, Sanjai Kumar; Chaudhary, Nitin; Subbalakshmi, Chilukuri; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2012-04-01

    Deposition of insoluble fibrillar aggregates of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Apart from forming fibrils, these peptides also exist as soluble aggregates. Fibrillar and a variety of nonfibrillar aggregates of Aβ have also been obtained in vitro. Hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) has been widely used to dissolve Aβ and other amyloidogenic peptides. In this study, we show that the dissolution of Aβ40, 42, and 43 in HFIP followed by drying results in highly ordered aggregates. Although α-helical conformation is observed, it is not stable for prolonged periods. Drying after prolonged incubation of Aβ40, 42, and 43 peptides in HFIP leads to structural transition from α-helical to β-conformation. The peptides form short fibrous aggregates that further assemble giving rise to highly ordered ring-like structures. Aβ16-22, a highly amyloidogenic peptide stretch from Aβ, also formed very similar rings when dissolved in HFIP and dried. HFIP could not induce α-helical conformation in Aβ16-22, and rings were obtained from freshly dissolved peptide. The rings formed by Aβ40, 42, 43, and Aβ16-22 are composed of the peptides in β-conformation and cause enhancement in thioflavin T fluorescence, suggesting that the molecular architecture of these structures is amyloid-like. Our results clearly indicate that dissolution of Aβ40, 42 and 43 and the amyloidogenic fragment Aβ16-22 in HFIP results in the formation of annular amyloid-like structures. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Meteorite Falls and the Fragmentation of Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momeni, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the fragmentation of objects entering the atmosphere and why some produce more fragments than others, I have searched the Meteoritical Society database for meteorites greater than 20 kilograms that fell in the USA, China, and India. I also studied the video and film records of 21 fireballs that produced meteorites. A spreadsheet was prepared that noted smell, fireball, explosion, whistling, rumbling, the number of fragments, light, and impact sounds. Falls with large numbers of fragments were examined to look for common traits. These were: the Norton County aubrite, explosion and a flare greater than 100 fragments; the Forest City H5 chondrite explosion, a flare, a dust trail, 505 specimens; the Richardton H5 chondrite explosion and light, 71 specimens; the Juancheng H5 chondrite explosion, a rumbling, a flare, a dust trail,1000 specimens; the Tagish Lake C2 chondrite explosion, flare, dust trail, 500 specimens. I conclude that fragmentation is governed by the following: (1) Bigger meteors undergo more stress which results in more specimens; (2) Harder meteorites also require more force to break them up which will cause greater fragmentation; (3) Force and pressure are directly proportional during falls. General observations made were; (1) Meteorites produce fireballs sooner due to high friction; (2) Meteors tend to explode as well because of high stress; (3) Softer meteorites tend to cause dust trails; (4) Some falls produce light as they fall at high velocity. I am grateful to NASA Ames for this opportunity and Derek Sears, Katie Bryson, and Dan Ostrowski for discussions.

  2. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauer, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Since the first serious satellite fragmentation occurred in Jun. 1961, and instantaneously increased the total Earth satellite population by more than 400 percent, the issue of space operations within the finite region of space around the Earth has been the subject of increasing interest and concern. The prolific satellite fragmentations of the 1970's and the marked increase in the number of fragmentations in the 1980's served to widen international research into the characteristics and consequences of such events. Plans for large, manned space stations in the next decade and beyond demand a better understanding of the hazards of the dynamic Earth satellite population. The contribution of satellite fragmentations to the growth of the Earth satellite population is complex and varied. The majority of detectable fragmentation debris have already fallen out of orbit, and the effects of 40 percent of all fragmentations have completely disappeared. In this volume, satellite fragmentations are categorized by their assessed nature and to a lesser degree by their effect on the near-Earth space environment. A satellite breakup is the usually destructive disassociation of an orbital payload, rocket body, or structure, often with a wide range of ejecta velocities. A satellite breakup may be accidental or the result of intentional actions, e.g., due to a propulsion system malfunction or a space weapons test, respectively. An anomalous event is the unplanned separation, usually at low velocity, of one or more detectable objects from a satellite which remains essentially intact. Anomalous events can be caused by material deterioration of items such as thermal blankets, protective shields, or solar panels. As a general rule, a satellite breakup will produce considerably more debris, both trackable and non-trackable, than an anomalous event. From one perspective, satellite breakups may be viewed as a measure of the effects of man's activity on the environment, while anomalous

  3. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  4. Food-derived immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mata-Haro, Verónica; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2016-08-01