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Sample records for a-helix peptide fragment

  1. A Helix-Stabilizing Linker Improves Subcutaneous Bioavailability of a Helical Peptide Independent of Linker Lipophilicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Stabilized peptides address several limitations to peptide-based imaging agents and therapeutics such as poor stability and low affinity due to conformational flexibility. There is also active research in developing these compounds for intracellular drug targeting, and significant efforts have been invested to determine the effects of helix stabilization on intracellular delivery. However, much less is known about the impact on other pharmacokinetic parameters such as plasma clearance and bioavailability. We investigated the effect of different fluorescent helix-stabilizing linkers with varying lipophilicity on subcutaneous (SC) bioavailability using the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor ligand exendin as a model system. The stabilized peptides showed significantly higher protease resistance and increased bioavailability independent of linker hydrophilicity, and all subcutaneously delivered conjugates were able to successfully target the islets of Langerhans with high specificity. The lipophilic peptide variants had slower absorption and plasma clearance than their respective hydrophilic conjugates, and the absolute bioavailability was also lower likely due to the longer residence times in the skin. The ease and efficiency of double-click helix stabilization chemistries is a useful tool for increasing the bioavailability of peptide therapeutics, many of which suffer from rapid in vivo protease degradation. Helix stabilization using linkers of varying lipophilicity can further control SC absorption and clearance rates to customize plasma pharmacokinetics. PMID:27327034

  2. A Helix-Stabilizing Linker Improves Subcutaneous Bioavailability of a Helical Peptide Independent of Linker Lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-07-20

    Stabilized peptides address several limitations to peptide-based imaging agents and therapeutics such as poor stability and low affinity due to conformational flexibility. There is also active research in developing these compounds for intracellular drug targeting, and significant efforts have been invested to determine the effects of helix stabilization on intracellular delivery. However, much less is known about the impact on other pharmacokinetic parameters such as plasma clearance and bioavailability. We investigated the effect of different fluorescent helix-stabilizing linkers with varying lipophilicity on subcutaneous (sc) bioavailability using the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor ligand exendin as a model system. The stabilized peptides showed significantly higher protease resistance and increased bioavailability independent of linker hydrophilicity, and all subcutaneously delivered conjugates were able to successfully target the islets of Langerhans with high specificity. The lipophilic peptide variants had slower absorption and plasma clearance than their respective hydrophilic conjugates, and the absolute bioavailability was also lower likely due to the longer residence times in the skin. Their ease and efficiency make double-click helix stabilization chemistries a useful tool for increasing the bioavailability of peptide therapeutics, many of which suffer from rapid in vivo protease degradation. Helix stabilization using linkers of varying lipophilicity can further control sc absorption and clearance rates to customize plasma pharmacokinetics.

  3. Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 1C NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Database (Web, free access)   The purpose of the library is to provide peptide reference data for laboratories employing mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods for protein analysis. Mass spectral libraries identify these compounds in a more sensitive and robust manner than alternative methods. These databases are freely available for testing and development of new applications.

  4. Predicting intensity ranks of peptide fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ari M

    2009-05-01

    Accurate modeling of peptide fragmentation is necessary for the development of robust scoring functions for peptide-spectrum matches, which are the cornerstone of MS/MS-based identification algorithms. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is a complex process that can involve several competing chemical pathways, which makes it difficult to develop generative probabilistic models that describe it accurately. However, the vast amounts of MS/MS data being generated now make it possible to use data-driven machine learning methods to develop discriminative ranking-based models that predict the intensity ranks of a peptide's fragment ions. We use simple sequence-based features that get combined by a boosting algorithm into models that make peak rank predictions with high accuracy. In an accompanying manuscript, we demonstrate how these prediction models are used to significantly improve the performance of peptide identification algorithms. The models can also be useful in the design of optimal multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions, in cases where there is insufficient experimental data to guide the peak selection process. The prediction algorithm can also be run independently through PepNovo+, which is available for download from http://bix.ucsd.edu/Software/PepNovo.html.

  5. Predicting Intensity Ranks of Peptide Fragment Ions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ari M.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of peptide fragmentation is necessary for the development of robust scoring functions for peptide-spectrum matches, which are the cornerstone of MS/MS-based identification algorithms. Unfortunately, peptide fragmentation is a complex process that can involve several competing chemical pathways, which makes it difficult to develop generative probabilistic models that describe it accurately. However, the vast amounts of MS/MS data being generated now make it possible to use data-driven machine learning methods to develop discriminative ranking-based models that predict the intensity ranks of a peptide's fragment ions. We use simple sequence-based features that get combined by a boosting algorithm in to models that make peak rank predictions with high accuracy. In an accompanying manuscript, we demonstrate how these prediction models are used to significantly improve the performance of peptide identification algorithms. The models can also be useful in the design of optimal MRM transitions, in cases where there is insufficient experimental data to guide the peak selection process. The prediction algorithm can also be run independently through PepNovo+, which is available for download from http://bix.ucsd.edu/Software/PepNovo.html. PMID:19256476

  6. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Peptide Fragmentation Induced by Radicals at Atmospheric Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Laiko, Victor V.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.

    2009-01-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essentially atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to ECD/ETD, along with the y-/b- fragments that are specific to CAD. In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source. PMID:19034885

  8. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; ...

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  9. NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Databass

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Libraries of Peptide Fragmentation Mass Spectra Databass (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  10. Possible role of region 152–156 in the structural duality of a peptide fragment from sheep prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Megy, Simon; Bertho, Gildas; Kozin, Sergey A.; Debey, Pascale; Hui Bon Hoa, Gaston; Girault, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the nonpathogenic “cellular” prion isoform into a pathogenic “scrapie” protease-resistant isoform is a fundamental event in the onset of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). During this pathogenic conversion, helix H1 and its two flanking loops of the normal prion protein are thought to undergo a conformational transition into a β-like structure. A peptide spanning helix H1 and β-strand S2 (residues 142–166 in human numbering) was studied by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. This peptide in aqueous solution, in contrast to many prion fragments studied earlier (1) is highly soluble and (2) does not aggregate until the millimolar concentration range, and (3) exhibits an intrinsic propensity to a β-hairpin-like conformation at neutral pH. We found that this peptide can also fold into a helix H1 conformation when dissolved in a TFE/PB mixture. The structures of the peptide calculated by MD showed solvent-dependent internal stabilizing forces of the structures and evidenced a higher mobility of the residues following the end of helix H1. These data suggest that the molecular rearrangement of this peptide in region 152–156, particularly in position 155, could be associated with the pathogenic conversion of the prion protein. PMID:15537751

  11. Peptide Fragmentation by Corona Discharge Induced Electrochemical Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John R.; Hess, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental studies have greatly improved our understanding of electrospray, including the underlying electrochemical reactions. Generally regarded as disadvantageous, we have recently shown that corona discharge (CD) can be used as an effective method to create a radical cation species [M]+•, thus optimizing the electrochemical reactions that occur on the surface of the stainless steel (SS) electrospray capillary tip. This technique is known as CD initiated electrochemical ionization (CD-ECI). Here, we report on the fundamental studies using CD-ECI to induce analytically useful in-source fragmentation of a range of molecules that complex transition metals. Compounds that have been selectively fragmented using CD-ECI include enolate forming phenylglycine containing peptides, glycopeptides, nucleosides and phosphopeptides. Collision induced dissociation (CID) or other activation techniques were not necessary for CD-ECI fragmentation. A four step mechanism was proposed: 1. Complexation using either Fe in the SS capillary tip material or Cu(II) as an offline complexation reagent; 2. Electrochemical oxidation of the complexed metal and thus formation of a radical cation (e.g.; Fe - e− → Fe +•); 3. Radical fragmentation of the complexed compound. 4. Electrospray ionization of the fragmented neutrals. Fragmentation patterns resembling b- and y-type ions were observed and allowed the localization of the phosphorylation sites. PMID:20869880

  12. In-Source Fragmentation and the Sources of Partially Tryptic Peptides in Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.

    2013-02-01

    Partially tryptic peptides are often identified in shotgun proteomics using trypsin as the proteolytic enzyme; however, it has been controversial regarding the sources of such partially tryptic peptides. Herein we investigate the impact of in-source fragmentation on shotgun proteomics using three biological samples, including a standard protein mixture, a mouse brain tissue homogenate, and a mouse plasma sample. Since the in-source fragments of a peptide retain the same elution time with its parent fully tryptic peptide, the partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation can be distinguished from the other partially tryptic peptides by plotting the observed retention times against themore » computationally predicted retention times. Most partially tryptic in-source fragmentation artifacts were misaligned from the linear distribution of fully tryptic peptides. The impact of in-source fragmentation on peptide identifications was clearly significant in a less complex sample such as a standard protein digest, where ~60 % of unique peptides were observed as partially tryptic peptides from in-source fragmentation. In mouse brain or mouse plasma samples, in-source fragmentation contributed to 1-3 % of all identified peptides. The other major source of partially tryptic peptides in complex biological samples is presumably proteolytic processing by endogenous proteases in the samples. By filtering out the in-source fragmentation artifacts from the identified partially tryptic or non-tryptic peptides, it is possible to directly survey in-vivo proteolytic processing in biological samples such as blood plasma.« less

  13. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with short peptide fragments from class IIa bacteriocins as recognition elements.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Sarfuddin; Jiang, Keren; Stiles, Michael; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-03-09

    We employed a direct peptide-bacteria binding assay to screen peptide fragments for high and specific binding to Listeria monocytogenes. Peptides were screened from a peptide array library synthesized on cellulose membrane. Twenty four peptide fragments (each a 14-mer) were derived from three potent anti-listerial peptides, Leucocin A, Pediocin PA1, and Curvacin A, that belong to class IIa bacteriocins. Fragment Leu10 (GEAFSAGVHRLANG), derived from the C-terminal region of Leucocin A, displayed the highest binding among all of the library fragments toward several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including L. monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus. The specific binding of Leu10 to L. monocytogenes was further validated using microcantilever (MCL) experiments. Microcantilevers coated with gold were functionalized with peptides by chemical conjugation using a cysteamine linker to yield a peptide density of ∼4.8×10(-3) μmol/cm2 for different peptide fragments. Leu10 (14-mer) functionalized MCL was able to detect Listeria with same sensitivity as that of Leucocin A (37-mer) functionalized MCL, validating the use of short peptide fragments in bacterial detection platforms. Fragment Leu10 folded into a helical conformation in solution, like that of native Leucocin A, suggesting that both Leu10 and Leucocin A may employ a similar mechanism for binding target bacteria. The results show that peptide-conjugated microcantilevers can function as highly sensitive platforms for Listeria detection and hold potential to be developed as biosensors for pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Proteolytic fragmentation and peptide mapping of human carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin.

    PubMed

    Rose, M C; Kaufman, B; Martin, B M

    1989-05-15

    Human tracheobronchial mucin was isolated from lung mucosal gel by chromatography on Sepharose 4B in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents, and its thiol residues were carboxyamidomethylated with iodo[1(-14)C]acetamide. The 14C-carboxyamido-methylated mucin was purified by chromatography on Sepharose 2B. No low molecular weight components were detected by molecular sieve chromatography or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents or by analytical density centrifugation in CsCl/guanidinium chloride. After digestion of the purified 14C-mucin with trypsin-L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, three fractions (TR-1, TR-2, and TR-3) were observed by chromatography on Sepharose 4B. TR-1, a 260-kDa mucin glycopeptide fragment, contained all of the neutral hexose and blood group activity and 20% of the radioactivity in the undigested mucin. TR-1 was refractory to a second incubation with trypsin but could be digested by papain or Pronase to a smaller mucin glycopeptide fraction, as judged by the slight decrease in apparent molecular weight on Sepharose CL-4B. These mucin glycopeptides contained approximately 50% of the radioactivity in the TR-1 fraction, indicating that the glycosylated domains of carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin contained thiol residues. The remainder of the radioactivity from papain or Pronase digests of TR-1 eluted, like the TR-3 fractions, in the salt fraction on Sepharose CL-4B. Peptide mapping of the nonglycosylated TR-3 fraction by TLC and high voltage electrophoresis yielded six principal and several less intensely stained ninhydrin reactive components, with the radiolabel concentrated in one of the latter peptides. Peptide purification of the TR-3 fraction by high pressure liquid chromatography on a C18 reverse phase column demonstrated the presence of four major peptides, with TR-3A being the dominant component. The TR-3D peptide contained S

  15. A+-Helix of Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Is a Cell-penetrating Peptide That Mediates Cell Membrane Permeation of PCI*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hanjiang; Wahlmüller, Felix Christof; Sarg, Bettina; Furtmüller, Margareta; Geiger, Margarethe

    2015-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin with broad protease reactivity. It binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids that can modulate its inhibitory activity. PCI can penetrate through cellular membranes via binding to phosphatidylethanolamine. The exact mechanism of PCI internalization and the intracellular role of the serpin are not well understood. Here we showed that testisin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored serine protease, cleaved human PCI and mouse PCI (mPCI) at their reactive sites as well as at sites close to their N terminus. This cleavage was observed not only with testisin in solution but also with cell membrane-anchored testisin on U937 cells. The cleavage close to the N terminus released peptides rich in basic amino acids. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the released peptides of human PCI (His1–Arg11) and mPCI (Arg1–Ala18) functioned as cell-penetrating peptides. Because intact mPCI but not testisin-cleaved mPCI was internalized by Jurkat T cells, a truncated mPCI mimicking testisin-cleaved mPCI was created. The truncated mPCI lacking 18 amino acids at the N terminus was not taken up by Jurkat T cells. Therefore our model suggests that testisin or other proteases could regulate the internalization of PCI by removing its N terminus. This may represent one of the mechanisms regulating the intracellular functions of PCI. PMID:25488662

  16. Determinants of Curvature-Sensing Behavior for MARCKS-Fragment Peptides.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Armando J; White, Ormacinda R; Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-05-10

    It is increasingly recognized that membrane curvature plays an important role in various cellular activities such as signaling and trafficking, as well as key issues involving health and disease development. Thus, curvature-sensing peptides are essential to the study and detection of highly curved bilayer structures. The effector domain of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS-ED) has been demonstrated to have curvature-sensing ability. Research of the MARCKS-ED has further revealed that its Lys and Phe residues play an essential role in how MARCKS-ED detects and binds to curved bilayers. MARCKS-ED has the added property of being a lower-molecular-weight curvature sensor, which offers advantages in production. With that in mind, this work investigates peptide-sequence-related factors that influence curvature sensing and explores whether peptide fragments of even shorter length can function as curvature sensors. Using both experimental and computational methods, we studied the curvature-sensing capabilities of seven fragments of MARCKS-ED. Two of the longer fragments were designed from approximately the two halves of the full-length peptide whereas the five shorter fragments were taken from the central stretch of MARCKS-ED. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that the fragments that remain bound to the bilayer exhibit interactions with the bilayer similar to that of the full-length MARCKS-ED peptide. Fluorescence enhancement and anisotropy assays, meanwhile, reveal that five of the MARCKS fragments possess the ability to sense membrane curvature. Based on the sequences of the curvature-sensing fragments, it appears that the ability to sense curvature involves a balance between the numbers of positively charged residues and hydrophobic anchoring residues. Together, these findings help crystallize our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the curvature-sensing behaviors of peptides, which will prove useful in the

  17. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Walton, Courtney L.

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here in this paper, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-likemore » spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.« less

  18. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Shelley, Jacob T.; Walton, Courtney L.; ...

    2016-06-27

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here in this paper, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-likemore » spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma.« less

  19. Unusual Fragmentation of Pro-Ser/Thr-Containing Peptides Detected in Collision-Induced Dissociation Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Trinidad, Jonathan C.

    2012-04-01

    During collision-induced dissociation (CID)-, phosphoserine- and phosphothreonine-containing peptides frequently undergo neutral loss of phosphoric acid. Subsequent amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the site of phosphorylation results in a y ion with a mass 18 Da lower than the corresponding unmodified y fragment. We report here that when the phosphoserine or phosphothreonine is directly preceded by a proline, an unusual fragment with a mass 10 Da higher than the corresponding unmodified y ion is frequently observed. Accurate mass measurements are consistent with elimination of the phosphoric acid followed by fragmentation between the α carbon and the carbonyl group of the proline residue. We propose a cyclic oxazoline structure for this fragment. Our observation may be explained by the charge-directed SN2 neighboring group participation reaction proposed for the phosphoric acid elimination by Palumbo et al. [Palumbo, A. M., Tepe, J. J., Reid, G. E. Mechanistic Insights into the Multistage Gas-Phase Fragmentation Behavior of Phosphoserine- and Phosphothreonine-Containing Peptides. J. Protein Res. 7(2), 771-779 (2008)]. Considering such specific fragment ions for confirmation purposes after regular database searches may boost the confidence of peptide identifications as well as phosphorylation site assignments.

  20. Peptide fragments of a beta-defensin derivative with potent bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Natalie L; De Cecco, Martin; Taylor, Karen; Stanton, Chloe; Kilanowski, Fiona; Kalapothakis, Jason; Seo, Emily; Uhrin, Dusan; Campopiano, Dominic; Govan, John; Macmillan, Derek; Barran, Perdita; Dorin, Julia R

    2010-05-01

    Beta-defensins are known to be both antimicrobial and able to chemoattract various immune cells. Although the sequences of paralogous genes are not highly conserved, the core defensin structure is retained. Defb14-1C(V) has bactericidal activity similar to that of its parent peptide (murine beta-defensin Defb14) despite all but one of the canonical six cysteines being replaced with alanines. The 23-amino-acid N-terminal half of Defb14-1C(V) is a potent antimicrobial while the C-terminal half is not. Here, we use a library of peptide derivatives to demonstrate that the antimicrobial activity can be localized to a particular region. Overlapping fragments of the N-terminal region were tested for their ability to kill Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrate that the most N-terminal fragments (amino acids 1 to 10 and 6 to 17) are potent antimicrobials against Gram-negative bacteria whereas fragments based on sequence more C terminal than amino acid 13 have very poor activity against both Gram-positive and -negative types. We further test a series of N-terminal deletion peptides in both their monomeric and dimeric forms. We find that bactericidal activity is lost against both Gram types as the deletion region increases, with the point at which this occurs varying between bacterial strains. The dimeric form of the peptides is more resistant to the peptide deletions, but this is not due just to increased charge. Our results indicate that the primary sequence, together with structure, is essential in the bactericidal action of this beta-defensin derivative peptide and importantly identifies a short fragment from the peptide that is a potent bactericide.

  1. Peptide Fragments of a β-Defensin Derivative with Potent Bactericidal Activity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Natalie L.; De Cecco, Martin; Taylor, Karen; Stanton, Chloe; Kilanowski, Fiona; Kalapothakis, Jason; Seo, Emily; Uhrin, Dusan; Campopiano, Dominic; Govan, John; Macmillan, Derek; Barran, Perdita; Dorin, Julia R.

    2010-01-01

    β-Defensins are known to be both antimicrobial and able to chemoattract various immune cells. Although the sequences of paralogous genes are not highly conserved, the core defensin structure is retained. Defb14-1CV has bactericidal activity similar to that of its parent peptide (murine β-defensin Defb14) despite all but one of the canonical six cysteines being replaced with alanines. The 23-amino-acid N-terminal half of Defb14-1CV is a potent antimicrobial while the C-terminal half is not. Here, we use a library of peptide derivatives to demonstrate that the antimicrobial activity can be localized to a particular region. Overlapping fragments of the N-terminal region were tested for their ability to kill Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We demonstrate that the most N-terminal fragments (amino acids 1 to 10 and 6 to 17) are potent antimicrobials against Gram-negative bacteria whereas fragments based on sequence more C terminal than amino acid 13 have very poor activity against both Gram-positive and -negative types. We further test a series of N-terminal deletion peptides in both their monomeric and dimeric forms. We find that bactericidal activity is lost against both Gram types as the deletion region increases, with the point at which this occurs varying between bacterial strains. The dimeric form of the peptides is more resistant to the peptide deletions, but this is not due just to increased charge. Our results indicate that the primary sequence, together with structure, is essential in the bactericidal action of this β-defensin derivative peptide and importantly identifies a short fragment from the peptide that is a potent bactericide. PMID:20176896

  2. Selective collision-induced fragmentation of ortho-hydroxybenzyl-aminated lysyl-containing tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Simon, E S; Papoulias, P G; Andrews, P C

    2013-07-30

    In protein studies that employ tandem mass spectrometry the manipulation of protonated peptide fragmentation through exclusive dissociation pathways may be preferred in some applications over the comprehensive amide backbone fragmentation that is typically observed. In this study, we characterized the selective cleavage of the side-chain Cζ-Nε bond of peptides with ortho-hydroxybenzyl-aminated lysine residues. Internal lysyl residues of representative peptides were derivatized via reductive amination with ortho-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The modified peptides were analyzed using collision-induced dissociation (CID) on an Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometer. Theoretical calculations using computational methods (density functional theory) were performed to investigate the potential dissociation mechanisms for the Cζ-Nε bond of the derivatized lysyl residue resulting in the formation of the observed product ions. Tandem mass spectra of the derivatized peptide ions exhibit product peaks corresponding to selective cleavage of the side-chain Cζ-Nε bond that links the derivative to lysine. The ortho-hydroxybenzyl derivative is released either as a neutral moiety [C7H6O1] or as a carbocation [C7H7O1](+) through competing pathways (retro-Michael versus Carbocation Elimination (CCE), respectively). The calculated transition state activation barriers indicate that the retro-Michael pathway is kinetically favored over CCE and both are favored over amide cleavage. The application of ortho-hydroxybenzyl amination is a promising peptide derivatization scheme for promoting selective dissociation pathways in the tandem mass spectrometry of protonated peptides. This can be implemented in the rational development of peptide reactive reagents for applications that may benefit from selective fragmentation paths (including crosslinking or MRM reagents). Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Amyloid-β peptide structure in aqueous solution varies with fragment size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise-Scira, Olivia; Xu, Liang; Kitahara, Taizo; Perry, George; Coskuner, Orkid

    2011-11-01

    Various fragment sizes of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide have been utilized to mimic the properties of the full-length Aβ peptide in solution. Among these smaller fragments, Aβ16 and Aβ28 have been investigated extensively. In this work, we report the structural and thermodynamic properties of the Aβ16, Aβ28, and Aβ42 peptides in an aqueous solution environment. We performed replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic calculations for investigating the conformational free energies, secondary and tertiary structures of the Aβ16, Aβ28, and Aβ42 peptides. The results show that the thermodynamic properties vary from each other for these peptides. Furthermore, the secondary structures in the Asp1-Lys16 and Asp1-Lys28 regions of Aβ42 cannot be completely captured by the Aβ16 and Aβ28 fragments. For example, the β-sheet structures in the N-terminal region of Aβ16 and Aβ28 are either not present or the abundance is significantly decreased in Aβ42. The α-helix and β-sheet abundances in Aβ28 and Aβ42 show trends - to some extent - with the potential of mean forces but no such trend could be obtained for Aβ16. Interestingly, Arg5 forms salt bridges with large abundances in all three peptides. The formation of a salt bridge between Asp23-Lys28 is more preferred over the Glu22-Lys28 salt bridge in Aβ28 but this trend is vice versa for Aβ42. This study shows that the Asp1-Lys16 and Asp1-Lys28 regions of the full length Aβ42 peptide cannot be completely mimicked by studying the Aβ16 and Aβ28 peptides.

  4. Gas-phase structure and fragmentation pathways of singly protonated peptides with N-terminal arginine.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Csonka, István P; Suhai, Sándor; Barofsky, Douglas F; Paizs, Béla

    2010-11-25

    The gas-phase structures and fragmentation pathways of the singly protonated peptide arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) are investigated by means of collision-induced-dissociation (CID) and detailed molecular mechanics and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that despite the ionizing proton being strongly sequestered at the guanidine group, protonated RGD can easily be fragmented on charge directed fragmentation pathways. This is due to facile mobilization of the C-terminal or aspartic acid COOH protons thereby generating salt-bridge (SB) stabilized structures. These SB intermediates can directly fragment to generate b(2) ions or facilely rearrange to form anhydrides from which both b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O fragments can be formed. The salt-bridge stabilized and anhydride transition structures (TSs) necessary to form b(2) and b(2)+H(2)O are much lower in energy than their traditional charge solvated counterparts. These mechanisms provide compelling evidence of the role of SB and anhydride structures in protonated peptide fragmentation which complements and supports our recent findings for tryptic systems (Bythell, B. J.; Suhai, S.; Somogyi, A.; Paizs, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 14057-14065.). In addition to these findings we also report on the mechanisms for the formation of the b(1) ion, neutral loss (H(2)O, NH(3), guanidine) fragment ions, and the d(3) ion.

  5. Fragmentation of alpha-Radical Cations of Arginine-Containing Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Ng, Dominic C.

    2010-04-01

    Fragmentation pathways of peptide radical cations, M+, with well-defined initial location of the radical site were explored using collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Peptide radical cations were produced by gas-phase fragmentation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes [salen = N,N´-ethylenebis (salicylideneaminato)]. Subsequent hydrogen abstraction from the -carbon of the side chain followed by Ca-C bond cleavage results in the loss of a neutral side chain and formation of an a-radical cation with the radical site localized on the a-carbon of the backbone. Similar CID spectra dominated by radical-driven dissociation products were obtained for a number of a-radicals when the basic arginine side chain wasmore » present in the sequence. In contrast, proton-driven fragmentation dominates CID spectra of a-radicals produced via the loss of the arginine side chain. Our results suggest that in most cases radical migration precedes fragmentation of large peptide radical cations.« less

  6. Energetics and Dynamics of Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides: Fragmentation of Angiotensin Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo

    2011-12-01

    We present a first study of the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of deprotonated peptides using time- and collision-energy resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. SID of four model peptides: RVYIHPF, HVYIHPF, DRVYIHPF, and DHVYIHPF was studied using a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) configured for studying ion-surface collisions. Energy and entropy effects for the overall decomposition of the precursor ion were deduced by modeling the time- and collision energy-resolved survival curves using an RRKM based approach developed in our laboratory. The results were compared to the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of the correspondingmore » protonated species. We demonstrate that acidic peptides are less stable in the negative mode because of the low threshold associated with the kinetically hindered loss of H2O from [M-H]- ions. Comparison between the two basic peptides indicates that the lower stability of the [M-H]- ion of RVYIHPF as compared to HVYIHPF towards fragmentation is attributed to the differences in fragmentation mechanisms. Specifically, threshold energy associated with losses of NH3 and NHCNH from RVYIHPF is lower than the barrier for backbone fragmentation that dominates gas-phase decomposition of HVYIHPF. The results provide a first quantitative comparison between the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of [M+H]+ and [M-H]- ions of acidic and basic peptides.« less

  7. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V., E-mail: aleksandra.zabuga@epfl.ch; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels inmore » the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.« less

  8. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues.

  9. Distinguishing Aspartic and Isoaspartic Acids in Peptides by Several Mass Spectrometric Fragmentation Methods.

    PubMed

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P

    2016-12-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post-source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H 2 O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c • +57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Distinguishing aspartic and isoaspartic acids in peptides by several mass spectrometric fragmentation methods

    PubMed Central

    DeGraan-Weber, Nick; Zhang, Jun; Reilly, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Six ion fragmentation techniques that can distinguish aspartic acid from its isomer, isoaspartic acid, were compared. MALDI post source decay (PSD), MALDI 157 nm photodissociation, TMPP charge tagging in PSD and photodissociation, ESI collision-induced dissociation (CID), electron transfer dissociation (ETD), and free-radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) with CID were applied to peptides containing either aspartic or isoaspartic acid. Diagnostic ions, such as the y-46 and b+H2O, are present in PSD, photodissociation, and charge tagging. c•+57 and z-57 ions are observed in ETD and FRIPS experiments. For some molecules, aspartic and isoaspartic acid yield ion fragments with significantly different intensities. ETD and charge tagging appear to be most effective at distinguishing these residues. PMID:27613306

  11. Piracetam inhibits the lipid-destabilising effect of the amyloid peptide Abeta C-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Lins, Laurence; Bensliman, Mariam; Thomas, Annick; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Peuvot, Jacques; Schanck, André; Brasseur, Robert

    2003-01-10

    Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is a 40/42-residue proteolytic fragment of a precursor protein (APP), implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis that interactions between Abeta aggregates and neuronal membranes play an important role in toxicity has gained some acceptance. Previously, we showed that the C-terminal domain (e.g. amino acids 29-42) of Abeta induces membrane permeabilisation and fusion, an effect which is related to the appearance of non-bilayer structures. Conformational studies showed that this peptide has properties similar to those of the fusion peptide of viral proteins i.e. a tilted penetration into membranes. Since piracetam interacts with lipids and has beneficial effects on several symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, we investigated in model membranes the ability of piracetam to hinder the destabilising effect of the Abeta 29-42 peptide. Using fluorescence studies and 31P and 2H NMR spectroscopy, we have shown that piracetam was able to significantly decrease the fusogenic and destabilising effect of Abeta 29-42, in a concentration-dependent manner. While the peptide induced lipid disorganisation and subsequent negative curvature at the membrane-water interface, the conformational analysis showed that piracetam, when preincubated with lipids, coats the phospholipid headgroups. Calculations suggest that this prevents appearance of the peptide-induced curvature. In addition, insertion of molecules with an inverted cone shape, like piracetam, into the outer membrane leaflet should make the formation of such structures energetically less favourable and therefore decrease the likelihood of membrane fusion.

  12. A short synthetic peptide fragment of human C2ORF40 has therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chaoyang; Zhang, Pengju; Jiang, Anli

    C2ORF40 encodes a secreted protein which is cleaved to generate soluble peptides by proteolytic processing and this process is believed to be necessary for C2ORF40 to exert cell type specific biological activity. Here, we reported a short mimic peptide of human C2ORF40 acts potential therapeutic efficacy in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We synthesized a short peptide of human C2ORF40, named C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment and assessed its biological function on cancer cell growth, migration and tumorigenesis. Cell growth assay showed that C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly suppressed cell proliferation of breast and lung cancer cells. Moreover,more » C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this peptide suppressed tumorigenesis in breast tumor xenograft model. Cell cycle assay indicated that the C2ORF40 mimic peptide fragment suppressed the growth of tumor cells through inducing mitotic phase arrest. In conclusion, our results firstly suggested that this short synthetic peptide of human C2ORF40 may be a candidate tumor therapeutic agent.« less

  13. Effect of the Basic Residue on the Energetics, Dynamics and Mechanisms of Gas- Phase Fragmentation of Protonated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Song, Tao

    2010-11-17

    The effect of the basic residue on the energetics, dynamics and mechanisms of backbone fragmentation of protonated peptides was investigated. Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of singly protonated peptides with the N-terminal arginine residue and their analogs, in which arginine is replaced with less basic lysine and histidine residues was examined using in a specially configured Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). SID experiments demonstrated very different kinetics of formation of several primary product ions of peptides with and without arginine residue. The energetics and dynamics of these pathways were determined from the RRKM modelingmore » of the experimental data. Comparison between the kinetics and energetics of fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides and the corresponding methyl ester derivatives provides important information on the effect of dissociation pathways involving salt bridge (SB) intermediates on the observed fragmentation behavior. It is found that because pathways involving SB intermediates are characterized by low threshold energies, they efficiently compete with classical oxazolone pathways of arginine-containing peptides on a long timescale of the FT-ICR instrument. In contrast, fragmentation of histidine- and lysine-containing peptides is largely determined by classical oxazolone pathways. Because SB pathways are characterized by negative activation entropies, fragmentation of arginine-containing peptides is kinetically hindered and observed at higher collision energies as compared to their lysine- and histidine-containing analogs.« less

  14. Cytotoxicity and the effect of cationic peptide fragments against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Paula Fernanda; Aida, Kelly Limi; Massunari, Loiane; Caiaffa, Karina Sampaio; Percinoto, Célio; Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Abuna, Gabriel Flores; Cilli, Eduardo Maffud; Duque, Cristiane

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and effect of fragments derived from three oral cationic peptides (CP): LL-37, D6-17 and D1-23 against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions. For cytotoxicity analysis, two epithelial cell lines were used. The minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimal bactericidal concentration were determined for the CP fragments and the control (chlorhexidine-CHX) against cariogenic bacteria. The fractional inhibitory concentration was obtained for the combinations of CP fragments on Streptococcus mutans. Biofilm assays were conducted with the best antimicrobial CP fragment against S. mutans. The results indicated that D6-17 was not cytotoxic. D1-23, LL-37 and CHX were not cytotoxic in low concentrations. D1-23 presented the best bactericidal activity against S. mutans, S. mitis and S. salivarius. Combinations of CP fragments did not show a synergic effect. D1-23 presented a higher activity against S. mutans biofilm than CHX. It was concluded that D1-23 showed a substantial effect against cariogenic bacteria and low cytotoxicity.

  15. Design of peptide mimetics to block pro-inflammatory functions of HA fragments.

    PubMed

    Hauser-Kawaguchi, Alexandra; Luyt, Leonard G; Turley, Eva

    2018-01-31

    Hyaluronan is a simple extracellular matrix polysaccharide that actively regulates inflammation in tissue repair and disease processes. The native HA polymer, which is large (>500 kDa), contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis. In remodeling and diseased tissues, polymer size is strikingly polydisperse, ranging from <10 kDa to >500 kDa. In a diseased or stressed tissue context, both smaller HA fragments and high molecular weight HA polymers can acquire pro-inflammatory functions, which result in the activation of multiple receptors, triggering pro-inflammatory signaling to diverse stimuli. Peptide mimics that bind and scavenge HA fragments have been developed, which show efficacy in animal models of inflammation. These studies indicate both that HA fragments are key to driving inflammation and that scavenging these is a viable therapeutic approach to blunting inflammation in disease processes. This mini-review summarizes the peptide-based methods that have been reported to date for blocking HA signaling events as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control.

    PubMed

    Datta, Aritreyee; Ghosh, Anirban; Airoldi, Cristina; Sperandeo, Paola; Mroue, Kamal H; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Kundu, Pallob; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-07-06

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the environment and to human health. Here, we report de novo design and antimicrobial studies of VG16, a 16-residue active fragment of Dengue virus fusion peptide. Our results reveal that VG16KRKP, a non-toxic and non-hemolytic analogue of VG16, shows significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative E. coli and plant pathogens X. oryzae and X. campestris, as well as against human fungal pathogens C. albicans and C. grubii. VG16KRKP is also capable of inhibiting bacterial disease progression in plants. The solution-NMR structure of VG16KRKP in lipopolysaccharide features a folded conformation with a centrally located turn-type structure stabilized by aromatic-aromatic packing interactions with extended N- and C-termini. The de novo design of VG16KRKP provides valuable insights into the development of more potent antibacterial and antiendotoxic peptides for the treatment of human and plant infections.

  17. Virtual Screening of Peptide and Peptidomimetic Fragments Targeted to Inhibit Bacterial Dithiol Oxidase DsbA.

    PubMed

    Duprez, Wilko; Bachu, Prabhakar; Stoermer, Martin J; Tay, Stephanie; McMahon, Róisín M; Fairlie, David P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial drugs with novel scaffolds and new mechanisms of action are desperately needed to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. The periplasmic oxidative folding system in Gram-negative bacteria represents a possible target for anti-virulence antibacterials. By targeting virulence rather than viability, development of resistance and side effects (through killing host native microbiota) might be minimized. Here, we undertook the design of peptidomimetic inhibitors targeting the interaction between the two key enzymes of oxidative folding, DsbA and DsbB, with the ultimate goal of preventing virulence factor assembly. Structures of DsbB--or peptides--complexed with DsbA revealed key interactions with the DsbA active site cysteine, and with a hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site. The present work aimed to discover peptidomimetics that target the hydrophobic groove to generate non-covalent DsbA inhibitors. The previously reported structure of a Proteus mirabilis DsbA active site cysteine mutant, in a non-covalent complex with the heptapeptide PWATCDS, was used as an in silico template for virtual screening of a peptidomimetic fragment library. The highest scoring fragment compound and nine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for DsbA binding and inhibition. These experiments discovered peptidomimetic fragments with inhibitory activity at millimolar concentrations. Although only weakly potent relative to larger covalent peptide inhibitors that interact through the active site cysteine, these fragments offer new opportunities as templates to build non-covalent inhibitors. The results suggest that non-covalent peptidomimetics may need to interact with sites beyond the hydrophobic groove in order to produce potent DsbA inhibitors.

  18. [Peptide fragments of chemokine domain of fractalkine: effect on human monocyte migration].

    PubMed

    Kukhtina, N B; Aref'eva, T I; Ruleva, N Iu; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Bespalova, Zh D; Krasnikova, T L

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis to the area of tissue damage is mediated by chemokines. According to the primary structure, chemokines are divided into four families, fractalkine (CX3CL1) is the only one member of CX3C family and the only membrane-bound chemokine. Fractalkine molecule includes the extracellular N-terminal chemokine domain, mucin-like rod, the transmembrane and the intracellular domains. In membrane-bound state fractalkine has the properties of an adhesion molecule. Chemokine domain of fractalkine (CDF) is released from cell membrane by proteolysis, and this soluble form acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes expressing fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. Fractalkine is involved in development of a number of pathological processes caused by inflammation, and therefore a search for fractalkine inhibitors is very important. For this purpose we identified several antigenic determinants--the fragments of CDF, and the following peptides were synthesized--P41-52 H-Leu-Glu-Thr-Arg-Gln-His-Arg-Leu-Phe-Cys-Ala-Asp-NH2, P53-60 H-Pro-Lys-Glu-Gln-Trp-Val-Lys-Asp-NH2 and P60-71 H-Asp-Ala-Met-Gln-His-Leu-Asp-Arg-Gln-Ala-Ala-Ala-NH2. The peptide effects on adhesion and migration of human peripheral blood monocytes expressing fractalkine receptors were investigated. In the presence of CDF and P41-52 we observed the increased adhesion and migration of monocytes compared with spontaneous values. Peptides P53-60 and P60-71 significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion and migration stimulated by CDF. Since the chemotactic activity of chemokines was shown to be dependent on their binding to glycosaminoglycans of the cell surface and extracellular matrix, the effect ofpeptides on the interaction of CDF with heparin was analyzed by ELISA. Peptide P41-52 competed with CDF for heparin binding, while peptides P53-60 and P60-71 had no significant activity.

  19. Renal targeted delivery of triptolide by conjugation to the fragment peptide of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Wu, Xiao-juan; Mo, Jingxin; Wang, Yan-li; Xu, Chao-qun; Lim, Lee Yong

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that peptide fragments (PFs) of the human serum albumin could be developed as potential renal targeting carriers, in particular, the peptide fragment, PF-A299-585 (A299-585 representing the amino acid sequence of the human serum albumin). In this paper, we conjugated triptolide (TP), the anti-inflammatory Chinese traditional medicine, to PF-A299-585 via a succinic acid spacer to give TPS-PF-A299-585 (TP loading 2.2% w/w). Compared with the free TP, TPS-PF-A299-585 exhibited comparable anti-inflammatory activity in the lipopolysaccharide stimulated MDCK cells, but was significantly less cytotoxic than the free drug. Accumulation of TPS-PF-A299-585 in the MDCK cells in vitro and in rodent kidneys in vivo was demonstrated using FITC-labeled TPS-PF-A299-585. Renal targeting was confirmed in vivo in a membranous nephropathic (MN) rodent model, where optical imaging and analyses of biochemical markers were combined to show that TPS-PF-A299-585 was capable of alleviating the characteristic symptoms of MN. The collective data affirm PF-A299-585 to be a useful carrier for targeting TP to the kidney. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β Peptides: Impact of Fragment Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, T.; Wise-Scira, O.; Coskuner, O.

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease whose physiological characteristics include the accumulation of amyloid-containing deposits in the brain and consequent synapse and neuron loss. Unfortunately, most widely used drugs for the treatment can palliate the outer symptoms but cannot cure the disease itself. Hence, developing a new drug that can cure it. Most recently, the ``early aggregation and monomer'' hypothesis has become popular and a few drugs have been developed based on this hypothesis. Detailed understanding of the amyloid-β peptide structure can better help us to determine more effective treatment strategies; indeed, the structure of Amyloid has been studied extensively employing experimental and theoretical tools. Nevertheless, those studies have employed different fragment sizes of Amyloid and characterized its conformational nature in different media. Thus, the structural properties might be different from each other and provide a reason for the existing debates in the literature. Here, we performed all-atom MD simulations and present the structural and thermodynamic properties of Aβ1-16, Aβ1-28, and Aβ1-42 in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Our studies show that the overall structures, secondary structures, and the calculated thermodynamic properties change with increasing peptide size. In addition, we find that the structural properties of those peptides are different from each other in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  1. Fragmentation of neutral amino acids and small peptides by intense, femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Martin J; Kelly, Orla; Calvert, Christopher R; King, Raymond B; Belshaw, Louise; Kelly, Thomas J; Costello, John T; Timson, David J; Bryan, William A; Kierspel, Thomas; Turcu, I C Edmond; Cacho, Cephise M; Springate, Emma; Williams, Ian D; Greenwood, Jason B

    2013-09-01

    High power femtosecond laser pulses have unique properties that could lead to their application as ionization or activation sources in mass spectrometry. By concentrating many photons into pulse lengths approaching the timescales associated with atomic motion, very strong electric field strengths are generated, which can efficiently ionize and fragment molecules without the need for resonant absorption. However, the complex interaction between these pulses and biomolecular species is not well understood. To address this issue, we have studied the interaction of intense, femtosecond pulses with a number of amino acids and small peptides. Unlike previous studies, we have used neutral forms of these molecular targets, which allowed us to investigate dissociation of radical cations without the spectra being complicated by the action of mobile protons. We found fragmentation was dominated by fast, radical-initiated dissociation close to the charge site generated by the initial ionization or from subsequent ultrafast migration of this charge. Fragments with lower yields, which are useful for structural determinations, were also observed and attributed to radical migration caused by hydrogen atom transfer within the molecule.

  2. High-Affinity Recombinant Antibody Fragments (Fabs) Can Be Applied in Peptide Enrichment Immuno-MRM Assays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-affinity antibodies binding to linear peptides in solution are a prerequisite for performing immuno-MRM, an emerging technology for protein quantitation with high precision and specificity using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment coupled to stable isotope dilution and targeted mass spectrometry. Recombinant antibodies can be generated from appropriate libraries in high-throughput in an automated laboratory and thus may offer advantages over conventional monoclonal antibodies. However, recombinant antibodies are typically obtained as fragments (Fab or scFv) expressed from E. coli, and it is not known whether these antibody formats are compatible with the established protocols and whether the affinities necessary for immunocapture of small linear peptides can be achieved with this technology. Hence, we performed a feasibility study to ask: (a) whether it is feasible to isolate high-affinity Fabs to small linear antigens and (b) whether it is feasible to incorporate antibody fragments into robust, quantitative immuno-MRM assays. We describe successful isolation of high-affinity Fab fragments against short (tryptic) peptides from a human combinatorial Fab library. We analytically characterize three immuno-MRM assays using recombinant Fabs, full-length IgGs constructed from these Fabs, or traditional monoclonals. We show that the antibody fragments show similar performance compared with traditional mouse- or rabbit-derived monoclonal antibodies. The data establish feasibility of isolating and incorporating high-affinity Fabs into peptide immuno-MRM assays. PMID:24568200

  3. High-affinity recombinant antibody fragments (Fabs) can be applied in peptide enrichment immuno-MRM assays.

    PubMed

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Lei; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Harth, Stefan; Knappik, Achim; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2014-04-04

    High-affinity antibodies binding to linear peptides in solution are a prerequisite for performing immuno-MRM, an emerging technology for protein quantitation with high precision and specificity using peptide immunoaffinity enrichment coupled to stable isotope dilution and targeted mass spectrometry. Recombinant antibodies can be generated from appropriate libraries in high-throughput in an automated laboratory and thus may offer advantages over conventional monoclonal antibodies. However, recombinant antibodies are typically obtained as fragments (Fab or scFv) expressed from E. coli, and it is not known whether these antibody formats are compatible with the established protocols and whether the affinities necessary for immunocapture of small linear peptides can be achieved with this technology. Hence, we performed a feasibility study to ask: (a) whether it is feasible to isolate high-affinity Fabs to small linear antigens and (b) whether it is feasible to incorporate antibody fragments into robust, quantitative immuno-MRM assays. We describe successful isolation of high-affinity Fab fragments against short (tryptic) peptides from a human combinatorial Fab library. We analytically characterize three immuno-MRM assays using recombinant Fabs, full-length IgGs constructed from these Fabs, or traditional monoclonals. We show that the antibody fragments show similar performance compared with traditional mouse- or rabbit-derived monoclonal antibodies. The data establish feasibility of isolating and incorporating high-affinity Fabs into peptide immuno-MRM assays.

  4. Structure and further fragmentation of significant [a3 + Na - H]+ ions from sodium-cationized peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huixin; Wang, Bing; Wei, Zhonglin; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    A good understanding of gas-phase fragmentation chemistry of peptides is important for accurate protein identification. Additional product ions obtained by sodiated peptides can provide useful sequence information supplementary to protonated peptides and improve protein identification. In this work, we first demonstrate that the sodiated a3 ions are abundant in the tandem mass spectra of sodium-cationized peptides although observations of a3 ions have rarely been reported in protonated peptides. Quantum chemical calculations combined with tandem mass spectrometry are used to investigate this phenomenon by using a model tetrapeptide GGAG. Our results reveal that the most stable [a3 + Na - H](+) ion is present as a bidentate linear structure in which the sodium cation coordinates to the two backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms. Due to structural inflexibility, further fragmentation of the [a3 + Na - H](+) ion needs to overcome several relatively high energetic barriers to form [b2 + Na - H](+) ion with a diketopiperazine structure. As a result, low abundance of [b2 + Na - H](+) ion is detected at relatively high collision energy. In addition, our computational data also indicate that the common oxazolone pathway to generate [b2 + Na - H](+) from the [a3 + Na - H](+) ion is unlikely. The present work provides a mechanistic insight into how a sodium ion affects the fragmentation behaviors of peptides. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Pharmacologic study of C-terminal fragments of frog skin calcitonin gene-related peptide.

    PubMed

    Ladram, Ali; Besné, Isabelle; Breton, Lionel; de Lacharrière, Olivier; Nicolas, Pierre; Amiche, Mohamed

    2008-07-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide from the skin of the frog Phyllomedusa bicolor (pbCGRP) is a 37-residue neuropeptide that differs from human alpha CGRP (halphaCGRP) at 16 positions. The affinities of the C-terminal fragments of pbCGRP and halphaCGRP were evaluated in SK-N-MC cells: pbCGRP(8-37) (K(i)=0.2nM) and pbCGRP(27-37) (K(i)=95nM) were, respectively, 3 times and 20 times more potent than the human fragments halphaCGRP(8-37) and halphaCGRP(27-37). Their antagonistic potencies were measured in SK-N-MC and Col 29 cells, and the rat vas deferens. pbCGRP(8-37) inhibited the halphaCGRP-stimulated production of cAMP by SK-N-MC and Col 29 cells 3 to 4 times more strongly than halphaCGRP(8-37). Thus pbCGRP(8-37) is the most potent CGRP-1 competitive antagonist of all the natural sequences reported to date. pbCGRP(27-37) was also as potent as [D(31), A(34), F(35)] halphaCGRP(27-37), a prototypic antagonist analog derived from structure-activity relationship studies of halphaCGRP(8-37).

  6. Isolation and characterization of the CNBr peptides from the proteolytically derived N-terminal fragment of ovine opsin.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, M; Findlay, J B

    1983-01-01

    Ovine rhodopsin may be cleaved in situ by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase into two membrane-bound fragments designated V8-L (27 000 mol.wt.) and V8-S (12 000 mol.wt.). After purification of the proteolysed complex by affinity chromatography in detergent using concanavalin A immobilized on Sepharose 4B, the two polypeptide fragments may be separated by gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex LH-60. Digestion of the N-terminal-derived V8-L fragment with CNBr in 70% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid resulted in a peptide mixture that could be fractionated by procedures involving gel-permeation chromatography in organic and aqueous solvents and the use of differential solubility. The complete or partial sequences of all ten peptides are reported. PMID:6224479

  7. Solution structures, dynamics, and ice growth inhibitory activity of peptide fragments derived from an antarctic yeast protein.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Hussinien H; Kar, Rajiv K; Asmawi, Azren A; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A; Murad, Abdul Munir A; Mahadi, Nor M; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A; Salleh, Abu B; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities.

  8. Solution Structures, Dynamics, and Ice Growth Inhibitory Activity of Peptide Fragments Derived from an Antarctic Yeast Protein

    PubMed Central

    Asmawi, Azren A.; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin A.; Murad, Abdul Munir A.; Mahadi, Nor M.; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha A.; Salleh, Abu B.; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Tejo, Bimo A.; Bhunia, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Exotic functions of antifreeze proteins (AFP) and antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGP) have recently been attracted with much interest to develop them as commercial products. AFPs and AFGPs inhibit ice crystal growth by lowering the water freezing point without changing the water melting point. Our group isolated the Antarctic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica that expresses antifreeze protein to assist it in its survival mechanism at sub-zero temperatures. The protein is unique and novel, indicated by its low sequence homology compared to those of other AFPs. We explore the structure-function relationship of G. antarctica AFP using various approaches ranging from protein structure prediction, peptide design and antifreeze activity assays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and molecular dynamics simulation. The predicted secondary structure of G. antarctica AFP shows several α-helices, assumed to be responsible for its antifreeze activity. We designed several peptide fragments derived from the amino acid sequences of α-helical regions of the parent AFP and they also showed substantial antifreeze activities, below that of the original AFP. The relationship between peptide structure and activity was explored by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR results show that the antifreeze activity of the peptides correlates with their helicity and geometrical straightforwardness. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation also suggests that the activity of the designed peptides can be explained in terms of the structural rigidity/flexibility, i.e., the most active peptide demonstrates higher structural stability, lower flexibility than that of the other peptides with lower activities, and of lower rigidity. This report represents the first detailed report of downsizing a yeast AFP into its peptide fragments with measurable antifreeze activities. PMID:23209600

  9. Occurrence of C-Terminal Residue Exclusion in Peptide Fragmentation by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    By screening a data set of 392 synthetic peptides MS/MS spectra, we found that a known C-terminal rearrangement was unexpectedly frequently occurring from monoprotonated molecular ions in both ESI and MALDI tandem mass spectrometry upon low and high energy collision activated dissociations with QqTOF and TOF/TOF mass analyzer configuration, respectively. Any residue localized at the C-terminal carboxylic acid end, even a basic one, was lost, provided that a basic amino acid such arginine and to a lesser extent histidine and lysine was present in the sequence leading to a fragment ion, usually depicted as (bn-1 + H2O) ion, corresponding to a shortened non-scrambled peptide chain. Far from being an epiphenomenon, such a residue exclusion from the peptide chain C-terminal extremity gave a fragment ion that was the base peak of the MS/MS spectrum in certain cases. Within the frame of the mobile proton model, the ionizing proton being sequestered onto the basic amino acid side chain, it is known that the charge directed fragmentation mechanism involved the C-terminal carboxylic acid function forming an anhydride intermediate structure. The same mechanism was also demonstrated from cationized peptides. To confirm such assessment, we have prepared some of the peptides that displayed such C-terminal residue exclusion as a C-terminal backbone amide. As expected in this peptide amide series, the production of truncated chains was completely suppressed. Besides, multiply charged molecular ions of all peptides recorded in ESI mass spectrometry did not undergo such fragmentation validating that any mobile ionizing proton will prevent such a competitive C-terminal backbone rearrangement. Among all well-known nondirect sequence fragment ions issued from non specific loss of neutral molecules (mainly H2O and NH3) and multiple backbone amide ruptures (b-type internal ions), the described C-terminal residue exclusion is highly identifiable giving raise to a single fragment ion in

  10. Analysis of Different Fragmentation Strategies on a Variety of Large Peptides: Implementation of a Low Level of Theory in Fragment-Based Methods Can Be a Crucial Factor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-05-12

    We have investigated the performance of two classes of fragmentation methods developed in our group (Molecules-in-Molecules (MIM) and Many-Overlapping-Body (MOB) expansion), to reproduce the unfragmented MP2 energies on a test set composed of 10 small to large biomolecules. They have also been assessed to recover the relative energies of different motifs of the acetyl(ala)18NH2 system. Performance of different bond-cutting environments and the use of Hartree-Fock and different density functionals (as a low level of theory) in conjunction with the fragmentation strategies have been analyzed. Our investigation shows that while a low level of theory (for recovering long-range interactions) may not be necessary for small peptides, it provides a very effective strategy to accurately reproduce the total and relative energies of larger peptides such as the different motifs of the acetyl(ala)18NH2 system. Employing M06-2X as the low level of theory, the calculated mean total energy deviation (maximum deviation) in the total MP2 energies for the 10 molecules in the test set at MIM(d=3.5Å), MIM(η=9), and MOB(d=5Å) are 1.16 (2.31), 0.72 (1.87), and 0.43 (2.02) kcal/mol, respectively. The excellent performance suggests that such fragment-based methods should be of general use for the computation of accurate energies of large biomolecular systems.

  11. A 17-kDa Fragment of Lactoferrin Associates With the Termination of Inflammation and Peptides Within Promote Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lutaty, Aviv; Soboh, Soaad; Schif-Zuck, Sagie; Zeituni-Timor, Orly; Rostoker, Ran; Podolska, Malgorzata J.; Schauer, Christine; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E.; Ariel, Amiram

    2018-01-01

    During the resolution of inflammation, macrophages engulf apoptotic polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) and can accumulate large numbers of their corpses. Here, we report that resolution phase macrophages acquire the neutrophil-derived glycoprotein lactoferrin (Lf) and fragments thereof in vivo and ex vivo. During the onset and resolving phases of inflammation in murine peritonitis and bovine mastitis, Lf fragments of 15 and 17 kDa occurred in various body fluids, and the murine fragmentation, accumulation, and release were mediated initially by neutrophils and later by efferocytic macrophages. The 17-kDa fragment contained two bioactive tripeptides, FKD and FKE that promoted resolution phase macrophage conversion to a pro-resolving phenotype. This resulted in a reduction in peritoneal macrophage numbers and an increase in the CD11blow subset of these cells. Moreover, FKE, but not FKD, peptides enhanced efferocytosis of apoptotic PMN, reduced TNFα and interleukin (IL)-6, and increased IL-10 secretion by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages ex vivo. In addition, FKE promoted neutrophil-mediated resolution at high concentrations (100 µM) by enhancing the formation of cytokine-scavenging aggregated NETs (tophi) at a low cellular density. Thus, PMN Lf is processed, acquired, and “recycled” by neutrophils and macrophages during inflammation resolution to generate fragments and peptides with paramount pro-resolving activities. PMID:29643857

  12. Inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of OGTI and HV-BBI peptides, fragments and analogs derived from amphibian skin.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Łukajtis, Rafał; Łęgowska, Anna; Karna, Natalia; Pikuła, Michał; Wysocka, Magdalena; Maliszewska, Irena; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Lesner, Adam; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2012-06-01

    A series of linear and cyclic fragments and analogs of two peptides (OGTI and HV-BBI) isolated from skin secretions of frogs were synthesized by the solid-phase method. Their inhibitory activity against several serine proteinases: bovine β-trypsin, bovine α-chymotypsin, human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G from human neutrophils, was investigated together with evaluation of their antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive species isolated from patients (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus sp., Streptococcus sp.). The cytotoxicity of the selected peptides toward an immortal human skin fibroblast cell line was also determined. Three peptides: HV-BBI, its truncated fragment HV-BBI(3-18) and its analog [Phe(8)]HV-BBI can be considered as bifunctional compounds with inhibitory as well as antibacterial properties. OGTI, although it did not display trypsin inhibitory activity as previously reported in the literature, exerted antimicrobial activity toward S. epidermidis. In addition, under our experimental conditions, this peptide did not show cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptide docking of HIV-1 p24 with single chain fragment variable (scFv) by CDOCKER algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Hana Atiqah Abdul; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    In search for the important residues that might have involve in the binding interaction between the p24 caspid protein of HIV-1 fragment (MET68 - PRO90) with the single chain fragment variable (scFv) of FAB23.5, modern computational chemistry approach has been conducted and applied. The p24 fragment was initially taken out from the 1AFV protein molecule consisting of both light (VL) and heavy (VH) chains of FAB23.5 as well as the HIV-1 caspid protein. From there, the p24 (antigen) fragment was made to dock back into the protein pocket receptor (antibody) by using the CDOCKER algorithm to conduct the molecular docking process. The score calculated from the CDOCKER gave 15 possible docked poses with various docked ligand's positions, the interaction energy as well as the binding energy. The best docked pose that imitates the original antigen's position was determined and further processed to the In Situ minimization to obtain the residues interaction energy as well as to observe the hydrogen bonds interaction in the protein-peptide complex. Based on the results demonstrated, the specific residues in the complex that have shown immense lower interaction energies in the 5Å vicinity region from the peptide are from the heavy chain (VH:TYR105) and light chain (VL: ASN31, TYR32, and GLU97). Those residues play vital roles in the binding mechanism of Antibody-Antigen (Ab-Ag) complex of p24 with FAB23.5.

  14. Fragmentations of [M-H]- anions of peptides containing Ser sulfate. A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Bowie, John H

    2013-11-15

    To determine the negative-ion cleavages from [M-H](-) ions of Ser sulfate-containing peptides using experiment and theory in concert. Fragmentations were explored using a Waters QTOF2 mass spectrometer in negative-ion electrospray mode, together with calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. Peptides used in this study were: GS(SO3H)(OH) 1 GS(SO3H)(OCH3) 1a GAVS(SO3H)(OH) 2 GAVS(SO3H)(OCH3) 2a GLS(SO3H)(GVA(OH) 3 GLS(SO3H)GDA(OH) 4 GLS(SO3H)GS(SO3H)A(OH) 5. Previously, it has been shown that a peptide containing a Tyr sulfate group shows [(M-H)(-) -SO3] as the base peak. Only a small peak was observed corresponding to HOSO3(-) (formed following rearrangement of the sulfate). A Ser sulfate-containing peptide, in contrast, shows pronounced peaks due to cleavage product anions [(M-H)(-)-SO3] and HOSO3(-). Theoretical calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory suggest that rearrangement of a Ser sulfate to give C-terminal CO2SO3H is energetically unfavourable in comparison with fragmentation of the intact Ser sulfate to yield [(M-H)(-)-SO3] and HOSO3(-). [(M-H)(-)-H2SO4] anions are not observed in the spectra of peptides containing Ser sulfate, presumably because HOSO3(-) is a relatively weak gas-phase base (ΔGacid = 1265 kJ mol(-1)). Experimental and theoretical data suggest that [(M-H)(-)-SO3] and HOSO3(-) product anions (from a peptide with a C-terminal Ser sulfate) are formed from the serine sulfate anion accompanied by specific proton transfer. CID MS/MS/MS data for an [(M-H)(-)-SO3] ion of an underivatised sulfate-containing peptide will normally allow the determination of the amino acid sequence of that peptide. The one case we have studied where that is not the case is GLS(SO3H)GDA(OH), where the peptide contains Ser sulfate and Asp, where the diagnostic Asp cleavages are competitive with the Ser sulfate cleavages. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Fundamental study of hydrogen-attachment-induced peptide fragmentation occurring in the gas phase and during the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization process.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Takahashi, Hidenori; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2018-05-09

    Mass spectrometry with hydrogen-radical-mediated fragmentation techniques has been used for the sequencing of proteins/peptides. The two methods, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) and hydrogen attachment/abstraction dissociation (HAD) are known as hydrogen-radical-mediated fragmentation techniques. MALDI-ISD occurs during laser induced desorption processes, whereas HAD utilizes the association of hydrogen with peptide ions in the gas phase. In this study, the general mechanisms of MALDI-ISD and HAD of peptides were investigated. We demonstrated the fragmentation of four model peptides and investigated the fragment formation pathways using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The current experimental and computational joint study indicated that MALDI-ISD and HAD produce aminoketyl radical intermediates, which immediately undergo radical-induced cleavage at the N-Cα bond located on the C-terminal side of the radical site, leading to the c'/z˙ fragment pair. In the case of MALDI-ISD, the z˙ fragments undergo a subsequent reaction with the matrix to give z' and matrix adducts of the z fragments. In contrast, the c' and z˙ fragments react with hydrogen atoms during the HAD processes, and various fragment species, such as c˙, c', z˙ and z', were observed in the HAD-MS/MS mass spectra.

  16. Positive and negative ion mode comparison for the determination of DNA/peptide noncovalent binding sites through the formation of "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Bessem; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Alves, Sandra

    2018-02-01

    Gas-phase fragmentation of single strand DNA-peptide noncovalent complexes is investigated in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes.Collision-induced dissociation experiments, performed on the positively charged noncovalent complex precursor ions, have confirmed the trend previously observed in negative ion mode, i.e. a high stability of noncovalent complexes containing very basic peptidic residues (i.e. R > K) and acidic nucleotide units (i.e. Thy units), certainly incoming from the existence of salt bridge interactions. Independent of the ion polarity, stable noncovalent complex precursor ions were found to dissociate preferentially through covalent bond cleavages of the partners without disrupting noncovalent interactions. The resulting DNA fragment ions were found to be still noncovalently linked to the peptides. Additionally, the losses of an internal nucleic fragment producing "three-body" noncovalent fragment ions were also observed in both ion polarities, demonstrating the spectacular salt bridge interaction stability. The identical fragmentation patterns (regardless of the relative fragment ion abundances) observed in both polarities have shown a common location of salt bridge interaction certainly preserved from solution. Nonetheless, most abundant noncovalent fragment ions (and particularly three-body ones) are observed from positively charged noncovalent complexes. Therefore, we assume that, independent of the preexisting salt bridge interaction and zwitterion structures, multiple covalent bond cleavages from single-stranded DNA/peptide complexes rely on an excess of positive charges in both electrospray ionization ion polarities.

  17. Mechanisms of bacterial membrane permeabilization by crotalicidin (Ctn) and its fragment Ctn(15-34), antimicrobial peptides from rattlesnake venom.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Peinado, Clara; Dias, Susana Almeida; Domingues, Marco M; Benfield, Aurélie H; Freire, João Miguel; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Gaspar, Diana; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Craik, David J; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David

    2018-02-02

    Crotalicidin (Ctn), a cathelicidin-related peptide from the venom of a South American rattlesnake, possesses potent antimicrobial, antitumor, and antifungal properties. Previously, we have shown that its C-terminal fragment, Ctn(15-34), retains the antimicrobial and antitumor activities but is less toxic to healthy cells and has improved serum stability. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of action of Ctn and Ctn(15-34) against Gram-negative bacteria. Both peptides were bactericidal, killing ∼90% of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells within 90-120 and 5-30 min, respectively. Studies of ζ potential at the bacterial cell membrane suggested that both peptides accumulate at and neutralize negative charges on the bacterial surface. Flow cytometry experiments confirmed that both peptides permeabilize the bacterial cell membrane but suggested slightly different mechanisms of action. Ctn(15-34) permeabilized the membrane immediately upon addition to the cells, whereas Ctn had a lag phase before inducing membrane damage and exhibited more complex cell-killing activity, probably because of two different modes of membrane permeabilization. Using surface plasmon resonance and leakage assays with model vesicles, we confirmed that Ctn(15-34) binds to and disrupts lipid membranes and also observed that Ctn(15-34) has a preference for vesicles that mimic bacterial or tumor cell membranes. Atomic force microscopy visualized the effect of these peptides on bacterial cells, and confocal microscopy confirmed their localization on the bacterial surface. Our studies shed light onto the antimicrobial mechanisms of Ctn and Ctn(15-34), suggesting Ctn(15-34) as a promising lead for development as an antibacterial/antitumor agent. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The identification of disulfides in ricin D using proteolytic cleavage followed by negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the peptide fragments.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Brinkworth, Craig S; Bowie, John H

    2015-01-30

    To use negative-ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D, to provide sequence information; in particular, to identify disulfide position and connectivity. Negative-ion fragmentations of peptides from the tryptic digest of ricin D was studied using a Waters QTOF2 mass spectrometer operating in MS and MS(2) modes. Twenty-three peptides were obtained following high-performance liquid chromatography and studied by negative-ion mass spectrometry covering 73% of the amino-acid residues of ricin D. Five disulfide-containing peptides were identified, three intermolecular and two intramolecular disulfide-containing peptides. The [M-H](-) anions of the intermolecular disulfides undergo facile cleavage of the disulfide units to produce fragment peptides. In negative-ion collision-induced dissociation (CID) these source-formed anions undergo backbone cleavages, which provide sequencing information. The two intramolecular disulfides were converted proteolytically into intermolecular disulfides, which were identified as outlined above. The positions of the five disulfide groups in ricin D may be determined by characteristic negative-ion cleavage of the disulfide groups, while sequence information may be determined using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of the resulting cleaved peptides. Negative-ion mass spectrometry can also be used to provide partial sequencing information for other peptides (i.e. those not containing Cys) using the standard negative-ion backbone cleavages of these peptides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Structural analysis of a functional DIAP1 fragment bound to grim and hid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Cocina, A E; Chai, J; Hay, B A; Shi, Y

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in Drosophila, with the second BIR domain (BIR2) playing an important role. Three proteins, Hid, Grim, and Reaper, promote apoptosis, in part by binding to DIAP1 through their conserved N-terminal sequences. The crystal structures of DIAP1-BIR2 by itself and in complex with the N-terminal peptides from Hid and Grim reveal that these peptides bind a surface groove on DIAP1, with the first four amino acids mimicking the binding of the Smac tetrapeptide to XIAP. The next 3 residues also contribute to binding through hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, peptide binding induces the formation of an additional alpha helix in DIAP1. Our study reveals the structural conservation and diversity necessary for the binding of IAPs by the Drosophila Hid/Grim/Reaper and the mammalian Smac proteins.

  20. Release of skeletal muscle peptide fragments identifies individual proteins degraded during insulin deprivation in type 1 diabetic humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew M.; Dasari, Surendra; Karakelides, Helen; Bergen, H. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Insulin regulates skeletal muscle protein degradation, but the types of proteins being degraded in vivo remain to be determined due to methodological limitations. We present a method to assess the types of skeletal muscle proteins that are degraded by extracting their degradation products as low-molecular weight (LMW) peptides from muscle samples. High-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify the original intact proteins that generated the LMW peptides, which we validated in rodents and then applied to humans. We deprived insulin from insulin-treated streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic mice for 6 and 96 h and for 8 h in type 1 diabetic humans (T1D) for comparison with insulin-treated conditions. Protein degradation was measured using activation of autophagy and proteasome pathways, stable isotope tracers, and LMW approaches. In mice, insulin deprivation activated proteasome pathways and autophagy in muscle homogenates and isolated mitochondria. Reproducibility analysis of LMW extracts revealed that ∼80% of proteins were detected consistently. As expected, insulin deprivation increased whole body protein turnover in T1D. Individual protein degradation increased with insulin deprivation, including those involved in mitochondrial function, proteome homeostasis, nDNA support, and contractile/cytoskeleton. Individual mitochondrial proteins that generated more LMW fragment with insulin deprivation included ATP synthase subunit-γ (+0.5-fold, P = 0.007) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6 (+0.305-fold, P = 0.03). In conclusion, identifying LMW peptide fragments offers an approach to determine the degradation of individual proteins. Insulin deprivation increases degradation of select proteins and provides insight into the regulatory role of insulin in maintaining proteome homeostasis, especially of mitochondria. PMID:27436610

  1. Release of skeletal muscle peptide fragments identifies individual proteins degraded during insulin deprivation in type 1 diabetic humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew M; Dasari, Surendra; Karakelides, Helen; Bergen, H Robert; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2016-09-01

    Insulin regulates skeletal muscle protein degradation, but the types of proteins being degraded in vivo remain to be determined due to methodological limitations. We present a method to assess the types of skeletal muscle proteins that are degraded by extracting their degradation products as low-molecular weight (LMW) peptides from muscle samples. High-resolution mass spectrometry was used to identify the original intact proteins that generated the LMW peptides, which we validated in rodents and then applied to humans. We deprived insulin from insulin-treated streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic mice for 6 and 96 h and for 8 h in type 1 diabetic humans (T1D) for comparison with insulin-treated conditions. Protein degradation was measured using activation of autophagy and proteasome pathways, stable isotope tracers, and LMW approaches. In mice, insulin deprivation activated proteasome pathways and autophagy in muscle homogenates and isolated mitochondria. Reproducibility analysis of LMW extracts revealed that ∼80% of proteins were detected consistently. As expected, insulin deprivation increased whole body protein turnover in T1D. Individual protein degradation increased with insulin deprivation, including those involved in mitochondrial function, proteome homeostasis, nDNA support, and contractile/cytoskeleton. Individual mitochondrial proteins that generated more LMW fragment with insulin deprivation included ATP synthase subunit-γ (+0.5-fold, P = 0.007) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6 (+0.305-fold, P = 0.03). In conclusion, identifying LMW peptide fragments offers an approach to determine the degradation of individual proteins. Insulin deprivation increases degradation of select proteins and provides insight into the regulatory role of insulin in maintaining proteome homeostasis, especially of mitochondria. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  3. Characterization of melanocortin NDP-MSH agonist peptide fragments at the mouse central and peripheral melanocortin receptors.

    PubMed

    Haskell-Luevano, C; Holder, J R; Monck, E K; Bauzo, R M

    2001-06-21

    The central melanocortin receptors, melanocortin-4 (MC4R) and melanocortin-3 (MC3R), are involved in the regulation of satiety and energy homeostasis. The MC4R in particular has become a pharmaceutical industry drug target due to its direct involvement in the regulation of food intake and its potential therapeutic application for the treatment of obesity-related diseases. The melanocortin receptors are stimulated by the native ligand, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). The potent and enzymatically stable analogue NDP-MSH (Ac-Ser-Tyr-Ser-Nle-Glu-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys-Pro-Val-NH(2)) is a lead peptide for the identification of melanocortin amino acids important for receptor molecular recognition and stimulation. We have synthesized nine peptide fragments of NDP-MSH, deleting N- and C-terminal amino acids to determine the "minimally active" sequence of NDP-MSH. Additionally, five peptides were synthesized to study stereochemical inversion at the Phe 7 and Trp 9 positions in attempts to increase tetra- and tripeptide potencies. These peptide analogues were pharmacologically characterized at the mouse melanocortin MC1, MC3, MC4, and MC5 receptors. This study has identified the Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH(2) tetrapeptide as possessing 10 nM agonist activity at the brain MC4R. The tripeptide Ac-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH(2) possessed micromolar agonist activities at the MC1R, MC4R, and MC5R but only slight stimulatory activity was observed at the MC3R (at up to 100 microM concentration). This study has also examined to importance of both N- and C-terminal NDP-MSH amino acids at the different melanocortin receptors, providing information for drug design and identification of putative ligand-receptor interactions.

  4. Opposite Electron-Transfer Dissociation and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation Fragmentation Characteristics of Proteolytic K/R(X)n and (X)nK/R Peptides Provide Benefits for Peptide Sequencing in Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Giansanti, Piero; Scheltema, Richard A; van den Toorn, Henk; Overall, Christopher M; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Heck, Albert J R

    2017-02-03

    A key step in shotgun proteomics is the digestion of proteins into peptides amenable for mass spectrometry. Tryptic peptides can be readily sequenced and identified by collision-induced dissociation (CID) or higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) because the fragmentation rules are well-understood. Here, we investigate LysargiNase, a perfect trypsin mirror protease, because it cleaves equally specific at arginine and lysine residues, albeit at the N-terminal end. LysargiNase peptides are therefore practically tryptic-like in length and sequence except that following ESI, the two protons are now both positioned at the N-terminus. Here, we compare side-by-side the chromatographic separation properties, gas-phase fragmentation characteristics, and (phospho)proteome sequence coverage of tryptic (i.e., (X) n K/R) and LysargiNase (i.e., K/R(X) n ) peptides using primarily electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and, for comparison, HCD. We find that tryptic and LysargiNase peptides fragment nearly as mirror images. For LysargiNase predominantly N-terminal peptide ions (c-ions (ETD) and b-ions (HCD)) are formed, whereas for trypsin, C-terminal fragment ions dominate (z-ions (ETD) and y-ions (HCD)) in a homologous mixture of complementary ions. Especially during ETD, LysargiNase peptides fragment into low-complexity but information-rich sequence ladders. Trypsin and LysargiNase chart distinct parts of the proteome, and therefore, the combined use of these enzymes will benefit a more in-depth and reliable analysis of (phospho)proteomes.

  5. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Santini, Simona; Coppari, Emilia; Bucciantini, Monica; Di Agostino, Silvia; Yamada, Tohru; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53.

  6. Interaction of an anticancer peptide fragment of azurin with p53 and its isolated domains studied by atomic force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Santini, Simona; Coppari, Emilia; Bucciantini, Monica; Di Agostino, Silvia; Yamada, Tohru; Beattie, Craig W; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    p28 is a 28-amino acid peptide fragment of the cupredoxin azurin derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa that preferentially penetrates cancerous cells and arrests their proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Its antitumor activity reportedly arises from post-translational stabilization of the tumor suppressor p53 normally downregulated by the binding of several ubiquitin ligases. This would require p28 to specifically bind to p53 to inhibit specific ligases from initiating proteosome-mediated degradation. In this study, atomic force spectroscopy, a nanotechnological approach, was used to investigate the interaction of p28 with full-length p53 and its isolated domains at the single molecule level. Analysis of the unbinding forces and the dissociation rate constant suggest that p28 forms a stable complex with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibiting the binding of ubiquitin ligases other than Mdm2 to reduce proteasomal degradation of p53. PMID:22162658

  7. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptides in an amyloid-β hexamer with three-fold symmetry: Ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Tomioka, Shogo; Kadoya, Ryushi; Shimamura, Kanako; Okamoto, Akisumi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates in brain contributes to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent structural analysis for the tissue obtained from AD patients revealed that Aβ aggregates have a single structure with three-fold symmetry. To explain why this structure possesses significant stability, we here investigated the specific interactions between Aβ peptides in the aggregate, using ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. The results indicate that the interactions between the Aβ peptides of the stacked Aβ pair are stronger than those between the Aβ peptides of the trimer with three-fold symmetry and that the charged amino-acids are important.

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering studies on bombesin, its selected fragments and related peptides adsorbed at the silver colloidal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podstawka-Proniewicz, Edyta; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Kim, Younkyoo; Xu, Yizhuang; Proniewicz, Leonard M.

    2011-07-01

    SERS studies presented in this work on BN8-14, [ D-Phe 6,β-Ala11,Phe13,Nle14]BN6-14, [ D-Tyr 6, β-Ala11,Phe13,Nle14]BN6-14, BN and its modified analogues, as well as NMB, NMC, and PG-L show that these molecules at pH 8.3 bind to a colloidal silver surface mainly through Trp 8 and Met 14 residues. Trp 8 adsorbs at the surface almost perpendicularly. Met 14 appears on the surface mainly as a P C-G conformer. His 12, as is evident from the spectra, practically does not take part in the adsorption process. Substitution of L-leucine at the 13 position of amino acid sequence with L-phenylalanine does not change substantially the pattern of the adsorption mechanism; however, substitution of phenylalanine at the 12 position (instead of L-histidine) causes changes in the SERS spectra that show that Phe 12 takes parallel orientation to the surface upon adsorption of [ D-Phe 12]BN, while in the case of [Tyr4, D-Phe 12]BN this residue is perpendicular to the surface and influences the orientation of the bound Trp 8. On the other hand, substitution of Asn with Tyr in the 6 position in nonapeptide fragment causes changes in the adsorption mechanism. In this case, the discussed fragment binds to the silver colloidal surface by Tyr 6, Trp 8, and Met 14. The SERS spectrum of NMC is very similar to that of BN; although it differs by the binding orientation of the amide bond towards the surface. Appearance of Phe 13 in NMB and PG-L causes that this residue competes successfully with Trp 8 forcing it to take tilted orientation. As seen from the enhancement of the characteristic Phe vibrations this moiety in NMB and PG-L adsorbs on the silver surface in a tilted fashion. This arrangements cause that the 8-14 peptide chain in all these studied compounds takes almost a parallel orientation to the surface while the 1-5 fragment of the peptide chain is removed from the silver surface vicinity.

  9. Membrane-Active Epithelial Keratin 6A Fragments (KAMPs) Are Unique Human Antimicrobial Peptides with a Non-αβ Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Judy T. Y.; Wang, Guangshun; Tam, Yu Tong; Tam, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a pressing global health problem that threatens millions of lives each year. Natural antimicrobial peptides and their synthetic derivatives, including peptoids and peptidomimetics, are promising candidates as novel antibiotics. Recently, the C-terminal glycine-rich fragments of human epithelial keratin 6A were found to have bactericidal and cytoprotective activities. Here, we used an improved 2-dimensional NMR method coupled with a new protocol for structural refinement by low temperature simulated annealing to characterize the solution structure of these kerain-derived antimicrobial peptides (KAMPs). Two specific KAMPs in complex with membrane mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles displayed amphipathic conformations with only local bends and turns, and a central 10-residue glycine-rich hydrophobic strip that is central to bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of non-αβ structure for human antimicrobial peptides. Direct observation of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that KAMPs deformed bacterial cell envelopes and induced pore formation. Notably, in competitive binding experiments, KAMPs demonstrated binding affinities to LPS and LTA that did not correlate with their bactericidal activities, suggesting peptide-LPS and peptide-LTA interactions are less important in their mechanisms of action. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of KAMPs-bacterial factor complexes indicated that membrane surface lipoprotein SlyB and intracellular machineries NQR sodium pump and ribosomes are potential molecular targets for the peptides. Results of this study improve our understanding of the bactericidal function of epithelial cytokeratin fragments, and highlight an unexplored class of human antimicrobial peptides, which may serve as non-αβ peptide scaffolds for the design of novel peptide-based antibiotics. PMID:27891122

  10. A 1H NMR method for the analysis of antigen-antibody interactions: binding of a peptide fragment of lysozyme to anti-lysozyme monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ito, W; Nishimura, M; Sakato, N; Fujio, H; Arata, Y

    1987-09-01

    A proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study is reported of the molecular structural basis of antigen-antibody interactions. An immunologically reactive proteolytic fragment corresponding to one of the antigenic regions on hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) was used in combination with a monoclonal antibody that recognizes this site. Using spin diffusion, we prepared an antibody in which the magnetization of the antigen binding site was saturated by non-specific nuclear Overhauser effect. Under these conditions the effect of the saturation of the antibody was observed to spread over the peptide fragment through the antigen binding site. On the basis of the results obtained for the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effect, we discuss how the peptide fragment interacts with the antibody. The side chains of aromatic residues, Trp, Tyr, and His, and of ionic residues, especially Arg, Lys, and Glu, are suggested to be important in the antigen-antibody interaction.

  11. Mutations in the C-terminal fragment of DnaK affecting peptide binding.

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, W F; Zhao, X; Zhu, X; Hendrickson, W A; Gragerov, A; Gottesman, M E

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli DnaK acts as a molecular chaperone through its ATP-regulated binding and release of polypeptide substrates. Overexpressing a C-terminal fragment (CTF) of DnaK (Gly-384 to Lys-638) containing the polypeptide substrate binding domain is lethal in wild-type E. coli. This dominant-negative phenotype may result from the nonproductive binding of CTF to cellular polypeptide targets of DnaK. Mutations affecting DnaK substrate binding were identified by selecting noncytotoxic CTF mutants followed by in vitro screening. The clustering of such mutations in the three-dimensional structure of CTF suggests the model that loops L1,2 and L4,5 form a rigid core structure critical for interactions with substrate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855230

  12. Structural Analysis of a Peptide Fragment of Transmembrane Transporter Protein Bilitranslocase

    PubMed Central

    Župerl, Špela; Sikorska, Emilia; Zhukov, Igor; Solmajer, Tom; Novič, Marjana

    2012-01-01

    Using a combination of genomic and post-genomic approaches is rapidly altering the number of identified human influx carriers. A transmembrane protein bilitranslocase (TCDB 2.A.65) has long attracted attention because of its function as an organic anion carrier. It has also been identified as a potential membrane transporter for cellular uptake of several drugs and due to its implication in drug uptake, it is extremely important to advance the knowledge about its structure. However, at present, only the primary structure of bilitranslocase is known. In our work, transmembrane subunits of bilitranslocase were predicted by a previously developed chemometrics model and the stability of these polypeptide chains were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Furthermore, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles were used as a model of cell membrane and herein we present a high-resolution 3D structure of an 18 amino acid residues long peptide corresponding to the third transmembrane part of bilitranslocase obtained by use of multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. It has been experimentally confirmed that one of the transmembrane segments of bilitranslocase has alpha helical structure with hydrophilic amino acid residues oriented towards one side, thus capable of forming a channel in the membrane. PMID:22745694

  13. Energetics and dynamics of the fragmentation reactions of protonated peptides containing methionine sulfoxide or aspartic acid via energy- and time-resolved surface induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Lioe, Hadi; Laskin, Julia; Reid, Gavin E; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-10-25

    The surface-induced dissociation (SID) of six model peptides containing either methionine sulfoxide or aspartic acid (GAILM(O)GAILR, GAILM(O)GAILK, GAILM(O)GAILA, GAILDGAILR, GAILDGAILK, and GAILDGAILA) have been studied using a specially configured Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). In particular, we have investigated the energetics and dynamics associated with (i) preferential cleavage of the methionine sulfoxide side chain via the loss of CH3SOH (64 Da), and (ii) preferential cleavage of the amide bond C-terminal to aspartic acid. The role of proton mobility in these selective bond cleavage reactions was examined by changing the C-terminal residue of the peptide from arginine (nonmobile proton conditions) to lysine (partially mobile proton conditions) to alanine (mobile proton conditions). Time- and energy-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) reveal that selective cleavages due to the methionine sulfoxide and aspartic acid residues are characterized by slow fragmentation kinetics. RRKM modeling of the experimental data suggests that the slow kinetics is associated with large negative entropy effects and these may be due to the presence of rearrangements prior to fragmentation. It was found that the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor (A) for peptide fragmentations occurring via selective bond cleavages are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than nonselective peptide fragmentation reactions, while the dissociation threshold (E0) is relatively invariant. This means that selective bond cleavage is kinetically disfavored compared to nonselective amide bond cleavage. It was also found that the energetics and dynamics for the preferential loss of CH3SOH from peptide ions containing methionine sulfoxide are very similar to selective C-terminal amide bond cleavage at the aspartic acid residue. These results suggest that while preferential cleavage can compete with amide bond cleavage energetically, dynamically, these processes

  14. The competition of charge remote and charge directed fragmentation mechanisms in quaternary ammonium salt derivatized peptides--an isotopic exchange study.

    PubMed

    Cydzik, Marzena; Rudowska, Magdalena; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2011-12-01

    Derivatization of peptides as quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) is a promising method for sensitive detection by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (Cydzik et al. J. Pept. Sci. 2011, 17, 445-453). The peptides derivatized by QAS at their N-termini undergo fragmentation according to the two competing mechanisms - charge remote (ChR) and charge directed (ChD). The absence of mobile proton in the quaternary salt ion results in ChR dissociation of a peptide bond. However, Hofmann elimination of quaternary salt creates an ion with one mobile proton leading to the ChD fragmentation. The experiments on the quaternary ammonium salts with deuterated N-alkyl groups or amide NH bonds revealed that QAS derivatized peptides dissociate according to the mixed ChR-ChD mechanism. The isotopic labeling allows differentiation of fragments formed according to ChR and ChD mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com

  15. Gas-phase fragmentation of peptides by MALDI in-source decay with limited amide hydrogen (1H/2H) scrambling.

    PubMed

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper D; Roepstorff, Peter; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2008-08-15

    To achieve a fundamental understanding of the function of proteins and protein complexes at the molecular level, it is crucial to obtain a detailed knowledge about their dynamic and structural properties. The kinetics of backbone amide hydrogen exchange is intimately linked to the structural dynamics of the protein, and in recent years, the monitoring of the isotopic exchange of these hydrogens by mass spectrometry has become a recognized method. At present, the resolution of this method is, however, limited and single-residue resolution is typically only obtained for a few residues in a protein. It would therefore be desirable if gas-phase fragmentation could be used to localize incorporated deuterons as this would ultimately lead to single-residue resolution. A central obstacle for this approach is, however, the occurrence of intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens upon activation of the gaseous protein (i.e., hydrogen scrambling). Here we investigate the occurrence of scrambling in selectively labeled peptides upon fragmentation by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI ISD). We have utilized peptides with a unique regioselective deuterium incorporation that allows us to accurately determine the extent of scrambling upon fragmentation. Our results show that the level of scrambling upon MALDI ISD is so low that the solution deuteration pattern is readily apparent in the gas-phase fragment ions. These results suggest that MALDI ISD may prove useful for hydrogen exchange studies of purified peptides and small proteins.

  16. Fragmentations of [M-H]- anions of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate. Does the sulfate group rearrange? A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Bowie, John H

    2013-05-30

    To investigate the fragmentations in the negative-ion electrospray mass spectra of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate. Possible fragmentation mechanisms were explored using a Waters QTOF2 tandem mass spectrometer in concert with calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The major negative ion formed in the ESI-MS of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate is [(M-H)-SO3](-) and this process normally yields the base peak of the spectrum. The basic backbone cleavages of [(M-H)-SO3](-) allowed the sequence of the peptide to be determined. Rearrangement reactions involving the formation of HOSO3(-) and [(M-H)-H2SO4](-) yielded minor peaks with relative abundances ≤ 10% and ≤ 2%, respectively. The mass spectra of the [M-H](-) and [(M-H)-SO3](-) anions of peptides containing tyrosine sulfate allowed the position of the tyrosine sulfate group to be determined, together with the amino acid sequence of the peptide. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Alterations in brain Protein Kinase A activity and reversal of morphine tolerance by two fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor peptide (PKI).

    PubMed

    Dalton, George D; Smith, Forrest L; Smith, Paul A; Dewey, William L

    2005-04-01

    Two peptide fragments of native Protein Kinase A inhibitor (PKI), PKI-(6-22)-amide and PKI-(Myr-14-22)-amide, significantly reversed low-level morphine antinociceptive tolerance in mice. The inhibition of Protein Kinase A (PKA) activity by both peptide fragments was then measured in specific brain regions (thalamus, periaqueductal gray (PAG), and medulla) and in lumbar spinal cord (LSC), which in previous studies have been shown to play a role in morphine-induced analgesia. In drug naive animals, cytosolic PKA activity was greater than particulate PKA activity in each region, while cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were greater in thalamus and PAG compared to medulla and LSC. The addition of both peptides to homogenates from each region completely abolished cytosolic and particulate PKA activities in vitro. Following injection into the lateral ventricle of the brain of drug naive mice and morphine-tolerant mice, both peptides inhibited PKA activity in the cytosolic, but not the particulate fraction of LSC. In addition, cytosolic and particulate PKA activities were inhibited by both peptides in thalamus. These results demonstrate that the inhibition of PKA reverses morphine tolerance. Moreover, the inhibition of PKA activity in specific brain regions and LSC from morphine-tolerant mice by PKI analogs administered i.c.v. is evidence that PKA plays a role in morphine tolerance.

  18. Proline-induced kink in a helix arises primarily from dihedral angle energy: a molecular dynamics simulation on alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shu-Fang; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    1999-03-01

    To investigate the cause of the kink in a helix induced by proline, a restrained molecular dynamics simulation was performed on alamethicin (Alm), a channel-forming peptide. Results on the linear and kinked helices indicated that the kinked form has lower energy than the linear one and the difference can be attributed largely to the dihedral angle term. The argument is strengthened by calculated results on the peptide in which proline 14 was substituted by alanine. The kinked and linear forms had virtually the same total and dihedral angle energies for the alanine analog. Possible implications for Alm voltage-gating are discussed.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of a human prothrombin fragment-2-derived peptide, NSA9, in EOC2 microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Soung Soo

    2008-04-11

    Pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), and several cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, and IL-6) are responsible for central nervous system (CNS) injuries that include ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, and neural death. Inhibition of these pro-inflammatory mediators would be an effective therapy to reduce the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of a human prothrombin fragment-2-derived peptide, NSA9 (NSAVQLVEN), on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated brain microglia. NSA9 significantly inhibited the release of NO, PGE{sub 2}, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore,more » NSA9 reduced the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 mRNA and protein, which control the production of NO and PGE{sub 2}, respectively. Moreover, NSA9 suppressed the LPS-induced nuclear translocation and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). These results suggest that NSA9 strongly inhibits the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia through the modulation of NF-{kappa}B activity.« less

  20. Conformational changes in fragments D and double-D from human fibrin(ogen) upon binding the peptide ligand Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide.

    PubMed

    Everse, S J; Spraggon, G; Veerapandian, L; Doolittle, R F

    1999-03-09

    The structure of fragment double-D from human fibrin has been solved in the presence and absence of the peptide ligands that simulate the two knobs exposed by the removal of fibrinopeptides A and B, respectively. All told, six crystal structures have been determined, three of which are reported here for the first time: namely, fragments D and double-D with the peptide GHRPam alone and double-D in the absence of any peptide ligand. Comparison of the structures has revealed a series of conformational changes that are brought about by the various knob-hole interactions. Of greatest interest is a moveable "flap" of two negatively charged amino acids (Glubeta397 and Aspbeta398) whose side chains are pinned back to the coiled coil with a calcium atom bridge until GHRPam occupies the beta-chain pocket. Additionally, in the absence of the peptide ligand GPRPam, GHRPam binds to the gamma-chain pocket, a new calcium-binding site being formed concomitantly.

  1. N-terminal fragment of probrain natriuretic peptide is associated with diabetes microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Kumiko; Nakadaira, Ikue; Suzuki, Jun; Gonai, Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Circulating levels of N-terminal fragment of probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are established as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with diabetes, as well as in the general population. We sought to examine the possibility of NT-proBNP as a biomarker of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. In total, 277 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were consecutively enrolled as a hospital cohort. Two hundred and seventeen of these patients (132 males; mean age, 63.4 years) were designated as cases with any of the diabetic complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, ischemic heart disease, strokes, peripheral artery disease), and 60 (42 males; mean age, 54.1 years) were set as controls without clinical evidence of diabetic complications. Diabetic complications were evaluated by medical record and routine laboratory examinations. NT-proBNP was measured and investigated with regard to the associations with diabetic complications. Mean NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients with any of the diabetic complications (59 versus 33 pg/mL; P<0.0001). In logistic regression analysis, NT-proBNP levels >79 pg/mL, which was the highest tertile, were independently associated with a 5.04 fold increased risk of all complications (P<0.0051) compared to the lowest tertile (NT-proBNP levels <31 pg/mL). Odd ratios of cardiovascular disease and nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy were 9.33, 6.23, 6.6 and 13.78 respectively, in patients with NT-proBNP values in the highest tertile (>79 pg/mL), independently of age, sex, duration of diabetes or other risk factors, such as body mass index or hemoglobin A1c. In addition, NT-proBNP levels were associated with surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, such as brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (r=0.449, P<0.0001) and left ventricular hypertrophy (r=0.212, P<0.001). In this hospital-based cohort of type 2 diabetes, the NT-proBNP levels were associated with systemic

  2. Fragment-based discovery of a new family of non-peptidic small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Colliandre, Lionel; Ahnou, Nazim; Nevers, Quentin; Gelin, Muriel; Bessin, Yannick; Brillet, Rozenn; Cala, Olivier; Douguet, Dominique; Bourguet, William; Krimm, Isabelle; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Guichou, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIase) that catalyse the interconversion of the peptide bond at proline residues. Several cyclophilins play a pivotal role in the life cycle of a number of viruses. The existing cyclophilin inhibitors, all derived from cyclosporine A or sanglifehrin A, have disadvantages, including their size, potential for side effects unrelated to cyclophilin inhibition and drug–drug interactions, unclear antiviral spectrum and manufacturing issues. Here we use a fragment-based drug discovery approach using nucleic magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and structure-based compound optimization to generate a new family of non-peptidic, small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent in vitro PPIase inhibitory activity and antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus and coronaviruses. This family of compounds has the potential for broad-spectrum, high-barrier-to-resistance treatment of viral infections. PMID:27652979

  3. Probing peptide fragment ion structures by combining sustained off-resonance collision-induced dissociation and gas-phase H/D exchange (SORI-HDX) in Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instruments.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Arpád

    2008-12-01

    The usefulness of gas-phase H/D exchange is demonstrated to probe heterogeneous fragment and parent ion populations. Singly and multiply protonated peptides/proteins were fragmented by using sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID). The fragments and the surviving precursor ions then all undergo H/D exchange in the gas-phase with either D(2)O or CD(3)OD under the same experimental conditions. Usually, 10 to 60 s of reaction time is adequate to monitor characteristic differences in the H/D exchange kinetic rates. These differences are then correlated to isomeric ion structures. The SORI-HDX method can be used to rapidly test fragment ion structures and provides useful insights into peptide fragmentation mechanisms.

  4. Monitoring β-arrestin recruitment via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation: purification of peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for mammalian bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Seitaro; Takeda, Norifumi; Toko, Haruhiro; Takimoto, Eiki; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Komuro, Issei; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cognate ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a starting point for understanding novel regulatory mechanisms. Although GPCR ligands have typically been evaluated through the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, recent studies have shown that GPCRs signal not only through G proteins but also through β-arrestins. As such, monitoring β-arrestin signaling instead of G protein signaling will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands, including β-arrestin-biased agonists. Here, we developed a cell-based assay for monitoring ligand-dependent GPCR-β-arrestin interaction via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation. Inter alia, β-lactamase is a superior reporter enzyme because of its cell-permeable fluorescent substrate. This substrate makes the assay non-destructive and compatible with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). In a reporter cell, complementary fragments of β-lactamase (α and ω) were fused to β-arrestin 2 and GPCR, respectively. Ligand stimulation initiated the interaction of these chimeric proteins (β-arrestin-α and GPCR-ω), and this inducible interaction was measured through reconstituted β-lactamase activity. Utilizing this system, we screened various mammalian tissue extracts for agonistic activities on human bombesin receptor subtype 3 (hBRS3). We purified peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for hBRS3, which was also found to be an agonist for the other two mammalian bombesin receptors such as gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). Successful purification of peptide E has validated the robustness of this assay. We conclude that our newly developed system will facilitate the discovery of GPCR ligands.

  5. Can collision-induced negative-ion fragmentations of [M-H](-) anions be used to identify phosphorylation sites in peptides?

    PubMed

    Tran, T T Nha; Wang, Tianfang; Hack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Peter; Bowie, John H

    2011-12-15

    A joint experimental and theoretical investigation of the fragmentation behaviour of energised [M-H](-) anions from selected phosphorylated peptides has confirmed some of the most complex rearrangement processes yet to be reported for peptide negative ions. In particular: pSer and pThr (like pTyr) may transfer phosphate groups to C-terminal carboxyl anions and to the carboxyl anion side chains of Asp and Glu, and characteristic nucleophilic/cleavage reactions accompany or follow these rearrangements. pTyr may transfer phosphate to the side chains of Ser and Thr. The reverse reaction, namely transfer of a phosphate group from pSer or pThr to Tyr, is energetically unfavourable in comparison. pSer can transfer phosphate to a non-phosphorylated Ser. The non-rearranged [M-H](-) species yields more abundant product anions than its rearranged counterpart. If a peptide containing any or all of Ser, Thr and Tyr is not completely phosphorylated, negative-ion cleavages can determine the number of phosphated residues, and normally the positions of Ser, Thr and Tyr, but not which specific residues are phosphorylated. This is in accord with comments made earlier by Lehmann and coworkers. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The antigen-binding fragment of human gamma immunoglobulin prevents amyloid β-peptide folding into β-sheet to form oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Guivernau, Biuse; Bonet, Jaume; Puig, Marta; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palomer, Ernest; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Altafaj, Xavier; Tajes, Marta; Puig-Pijoan, Albert; Vicente, Rubén; Oliva, Baldomero; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) plays a leading role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) physiopathology. Even though monomeric forms of Aβ are harmless to cells, Aβ can aggregate into β-sheet oligomers and fibrils, which are both neurotoxic. Therefore, one of the main therapeutic approaches to cure or delay AD onset and progression is targeting Aβ aggregation. In the present study, we show that a pool of human gamma immunoglobulins (IgG) protected cortical neurons from the challenge with Aβ oligomers, as assayed by MTT reduction, caspase-3 activation and cytoskeleton integrity. In addition, we report the inhibitory effect of IgG on Aβ aggregation, as shown by Thioflavin T assay, size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy. Similar results were obtained with Palivizumab, a human anti-sincitial virus antibody. In order to dissect the important domains, we cleaved the pool of human IgG with papain to obtain Fab and Fc fragments. Using these cleaved fragments, we functionally identified Fab as the immunoglobulin fragment inhibiting Aβ aggregation, a result that was further confirmed by an in silico structural model. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools show a highly conserved structure able to bind amyloid in the Fab region. Overall, our data strongly support the inhibitory effect of human IgG on Aβ aggregation and its neuroprotective role. PMID:28467807

  7. Application of higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) to the fragmentation of new DOTA-based labels and N-termini DOTA-labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    El-Khatib, A H; He, Y; Esteban-Fernández, D; Linscheid, M W

    2017-08-01

    1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) derivatives are applied in quantitative proteomics owing to their ability to react with different functional groups, to harbor lanthanoides and hence their compatibility with molecular and elemental mass spectrometry. The new DOTA derivatives, namely Ln-MeCAT-Click and Ln-DOTA-Dimedone, allow efficient thiol labeling and targeting sulfenation as an important post-translational modification, respectively. Quantitative applications require the investigation of fragmentation behavior of these reagents. Therefore, the fragmentation behavior of Ln-MeCAT-Click and Ln-DOTA-Dimedone was studied using collision-induced dissociation (CID), infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and higher-energy collision dissociation (HCD) using different energy levels, and the efficiency of reporter ion production was estimated. The efficiency of characteristic fragment formation was in the order IRMPD > HCD (normal energy level) > CID. On the other hand, the application of HCD at high energy levels (HCD@HE; NCE > 250%) resulted in a significant increase in reporter ion production (33-54%). This new strategy was successfully applied to generate label-specific reporter ions for DOTA amino labeling at the N-termini and in a quantitative fashion for the estimation of amino:thiol ratio in peptides. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Atmospheric-pressure ionization and fragmentation of peptides by solution-cathode glow discharge† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02032a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Walton, Courtney L.; Williams, Kelsey L.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Modern “-omics” (e.g., proteomics, glycomics, metabolomics, etc.) analyses rely heavily on electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry to determine the structural identity of target species. Unfortunately, these methods are limited to specialized mass spectrometry instrumentation. Here, a novel approach is described that enables ionization and controlled, tunable fragmentation of peptides at atmospheric pressure. In the new source, a direct-current plasma is sustained between a tapered metal rod and a flowing sample-containing solution. As the liquid stream contacts the electrical discharge, peptides from the solution are volatilized, ionized, and fragmented. At high discharge currents (e.g., 70 mA), electrospray-like spectra are observed, dominated by singly and doubly protonated molecular ions. At lower currents (35 mA), many peptides exhibit extensive fragmentation, with a-, b-, c-, x-, and y-type ion series present as well as complex fragments, such as d-type ions, not previously observed with atmospheric-pressure dissociation. Though the mechanism of fragmentation is currently unclear, observations indicate it could result from the interaction of peptides with gas-phase radicals or ultraviolet radiation generated within the plasma. PMID:28451101

  9. A Fragment of the LG3 Peptide of Endorepellin Is Present in the Urine of Physically Active Mining Workers: A Potential Marker of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tony J.; Sampson, Dayle L.; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L.; Carter, Shea L.; Leavesley, David I.; Parker, Anthony W.; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival. PMID:22457785

  10. CMX-8933, a peptide fragment of the glycoprotein ependymin, promotes activation of AP-1 transcription factor in mouse neuroblastoma and rat cortical cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Shashoua, V E; Adams, D; Boyer-Boiteau, A

    2001-10-19

    An 8-amino acid peptide fragment (CMX-8933) of Ependymin, a glycoprotein component of the extracellular fluid and cerebrospinal fluid of goldfish brain, was synthesized and tested for its capacity to activate AP-1 transcription factor in cell cultures. Dose-response and time-course studies of AP-1's binding to DNA were carried out in neuroblastoma (NB2a/dl) and primary rat brain cortical cultures using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). A 13-14-fold increase in AP-1's DNA binding was obtained when NB2a cells were incubated for 4 h with 6-10 microg/ml CMX-8933. Primary rat brain cortical cultures were much more sensitive to the effects of CMX-8933 than transformed (NB2a) cultures; here a 26.7+/-5.2-fold increase in binding was observed following a 3-h treatment with as little as 10 ng/ml peptide. These findings are consistent with an activation of this transcription factor, a characteristic that has been previously correlated with functional aspects of full-sized neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor and brain-derived nerve growth factor) in neuronal differentiation and regeneration. Such data suggest a role for Ependymin in transcriptional control.

  11. A fragment of the LG3 peptide of endorepellin is present in the urine of physically active mining workers: a potential marker of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Parker, Tony J; Sampson, Dayle L; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L; Carter, Shea L; Leavesley, David I; Parker, Anthony W; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival.

  12. Peptide Fragments of Odin-Sam1: Conformational Analysis and Interaction Studies with EphA2-Sam.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Flavia A; Di Natale, Concetta; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L; Marasco, Daniela; Pedone, Emilia M; Saviano, Michele; Leone, Marilisa

    2015-07-27

    Odin is a protein belonging to the ANKS family, and has two tandem Sam domains. The first, Odin-Sam1, binds to the Sam domain of the EphA2 receptor (EphA2-Sam); this interaction could be crucial for the regulation of receptor endocytosis and might have an impact on cancer. Odin-Sam1 associates with EphA2-Sam by adopting a "mid-loop/end-helix" model. In this study three peptide sequences, encompassing the mid-loop interacting portion of Odin-Sam1 and its C-terminal α5 helix, were designed. Their conformational properties were analyzed by CD and NMR. In addition, their abilities to interact with EphA2-Sam were investigated by SPR studies. The peptides adopt a predominantly disordered state in aqueous buffer, but a higher helical content is evident in the presence of the cosolvent trifluoroethanol. Dissociation constants towards EphA2-Sam were in the high micromolar range. The structural findings suggest further routes for the design of potential anti-cancer therapeutics as inhibitors of EphA2-Sam heterotypic interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Enhanced Conformational Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solvated Peptides: Fragment-Based Local Elevation Umbrella Sampling.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Halvor S; Daura, Xavier; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2010-09-14

    A new method, fragment-based local elevation umbrella sampling (FB-LEUS), is proposed to enhance the conformational sampling in explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of solvated polymers. The method is derived from the local elevation umbrella sampling (LEUS) method [ Hansen and Hünenberger , J. Comput. Chem. 2010 , 31 , 1 - 23 ], which combines the local elevation (LE) conformational searching and the umbrella sampling (US) conformational sampling approaches into a single scheme. In LEUS, an initial (relatively short) LE build-up (searching) phase is used to construct an optimized (grid-based) biasing potential within a subspace of conformationally relevant degrees of freedom, which is then frozen and used in a (comparatively longer) US sampling phase. This combination dramatically enhances the sampling power of MD simulations but, due to computational and memory costs, is only applicable to relevant subspaces of low dimensionalities. As an attempt to expand the scope of the LEUS approach to solvated polymers with more than a few relevant degrees of freedom, the FB-LEUS scheme involves an US sampling phase that relies on a superposition of low-dimensionality biasing potentials optimized using LEUS at the fragment level. The feasibility of this approach is tested using polyalanine (poly-Ala) and polyvaline (poly-Val) oligopeptides. Two-dimensional biasing potentials are preoptimized at the monopeptide level, and subsequently applied to all dihedral-angle pairs within oligopeptides of 4,  6,  8, or 10 residues. Two types of fragment-based biasing potentials are distinguished: (i) the basin-filling (BF) potentials act so as to "fill" free-energy basins up to a prescribed free-energy level above the global minimum; (ii) the valley-digging (VD) potentials act so as to "dig" valleys between the (four) free-energy minima of the two-dimensional maps, preserving barriers (relative to linearly interpolated free-energy changes) of a prescribed magnitude

  14. hTERT peptide fragment GV1001 demonstrates radioprotective and antifibrotic effects through suppression of TGF‑β signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Kim, Sangjae; Shon, Won-Jun; Kim, Reuben H; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K

    2018-06-01

    GV1001 is a 16‑amino acid peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein (616‑626; EARPALLTSRLRFIPK), which lies within the reverse transcriptase domain. Originally developed as an anticancer vaccine, GV1001 demonstrates diverse cellular effects, including anti‑inflammatory, tumor suppressive and antiviral effects. In the present study, the radioprotective and antifibrotic effects of GV1001 were demonstrated through suppressing transforming growth factor‑β (TGF‑β) signaling. Proliferating human keratinocytes underwent premature senescence upon exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), however, treatment of cells with GV1001 allowed the cells to proliferate and showed a reduction in senescent phenotype. GV1001 treatment notably increased the levels of Grainyhead‑like 2 and phosphorylated (p‑)Akt (Ser473), and reduced the activation of p53 and the level of p21/WAF1 in irradiated keratinocytes. It also markedly suppressed the level of TGF‑β signaling molecules, including p‑small mothers against decapentaplegic (Smad)2/3 and Smad4, and TGF‑β target genes, including zinc finger E‑box binding homeobox 1, fibronectin, N‑cadharin and Snail, in irradiated keratinocytes. Furthermore, GV1001 suppressed TGF‑β signaling in primary human fibroblasts and inhibited myofibroblast differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that GV1001 suppressed the binding of Smad2 on the promoter regions of collagen type III α1 chain (Col3a1) and Col1a1. In a dermal fibrosis model in vivo, GV1001 treatment notably reduced the thickness of fibrotic lesions and the synthesis of Col3a1. These data indicated that GV1001 ameliorated the IR‑induced senescence phenotype and tissue fibrosis by inhibiting TGF‑β signaling and may have therapeutic effects on radiation‑induced tissue damage.

  15. Ultra High Resolution Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer (Orbitrap Elite) Facilitates Top Down LC MS/MS and Versatile Peptide Fragmentation Modes*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Annette; Damoc, Eugen; Lange, Oliver; Denisov, Eduard; Nolting, Dirk; Müller, Mathias; Viner, Rosa; Schwartz, Jae; Remes, Philip; Belford, Michael; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Cox, Juergen; Horning, Stevan; Mann, Matthias; Makarov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Although only a few years old, the combination of a linear ion trap with an Orbitrap analyzer has become one of the standard mass spectrometers to characterize proteins and proteomes. Here we describe a novel version of this instrument family, the Orbitrap Elite, which is improved in three main areas. The ion transfer optics has an ion path that blocks the line of sight to achieve more robust operation. The tandem MS acquisition speed of the dual cell linear ion trap now exceeds 12 Hz. Most importantly, the resolving power of the Orbitrap analyzer has been increased twofold for the same transient length by employing a compact, high-field Orbitrap analyzer that almost doubles the observed frequencies. An enhanced Fourier Transform algorithm—incorporating phase information—further doubles the resolving power to 240,000 at m/z 400 for a 768 ms transient. For top-down experiments, we combine a survey scan with a selected ion monitoring scan of the charge state of the protein to be fragmented and with several HCD microscans. Despite the 120,000 resolving power for SIM and HCD scans, the total cycle time is within several seconds and therefore suitable for liquid chromatography tandem MS. For bottom-up proteomics, we combined survey scans at 240,000 resolving power with data-dependent collision-induced dissociation of the 20 most abundant precursors in a total cycle time of 2.5 s—increasing protein identifications in complex mixtures by about 30%. The speed of the Orbitrap Elite furthermore allows scan modes in which complementary dissociation mechanisms are routinely obtained of all fragmented peptides. PMID:22159718

  16. Simultaneous Glycan-Peptide Characterization Using Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography and Parallel Fragmentation by CID, Higher Energy Collisional Dissociation, and Electron Transfer Dissociation MS Applied to the N-Linked Glycoproteome of Campylobacter jejuni*

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nichollas E.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Connolly, Angela M.; Paulech, Jana; Edwards, Alistair V. G.; Crossett, Ben; Falconer, Linda; Kolarich, Daniel; Djordjevic, Steven P.; Højrup, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H.; Larsen, Martin R.; Cordwell, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a gastrointestinal pathogen that is able to modify membrane and periplasmic proteins by the N-linked addition of a 7-residue glycan at the strict attachment motif (D/E)XNX(S/T). Strategies for a comprehensive analysis of the targets of glycosylation, however, are hampered by the resistance of the glycan-peptide bond to enzymatic digestion or β-elimination and have previously concentrated on soluble glycoproteins compatible with lectin affinity and gel-based approaches. We developed strategies for enriching C. jejuni HB93-13 glycopeptides using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography and examined novel fragmentation, including collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher energy collisional (C-trap) dissociation (HCD) as well as CID/electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. CID/HCD enabled the identification of glycan structure and peptide backbone, allowing glycopeptide identification, whereas CID/ETD enabled the elucidation of glycosylation sites by maintaining the glycan-peptide linkage. A total of 130 glycopeptides, representing 75 glycosylation sites, were identified from LC-MS/MS using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to CID/HCD and CID/ETD. CID/HCD provided the majority of the identifications (73 sites) compared with ETD (26 sites). We also examined soluble glycoproteins by soybean agglutinin affinity and two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified a further six glycosylation sites. This study more than doubles the number of confirmed N-linked glycosylation sites in C. jejuni and is the first to utilize HCD fragmentation for glycopeptide identification with intact glycan. We also show that hydrophobic integral membrane proteins are significant targets of glycosylation in this organism. Our data demonstrate that peptide-centric approaches coupled to novel mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques may be suitable for application to eukaryotic glycoproteins for simultaneous

  17. Simultaneous glycan-peptide characterization using hydrophilic interaction chromatography and parallel fragmentation by CID, higher energy collisional dissociation, and electron transfer dissociation MS applied to the N-linked glycoproteome of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Parker, Benjamin L; Connolly, Angela M; Paulech, Jana; Edwards, Alistair V G; Crossett, Ben; Falconer, Linda; Kolarich, Daniel; Djordjevic, Steven P; Højrup, Peter; Packer, Nicolle H; Larsen, Martin R; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2011-02-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a gastrointestinal pathogen that is able to modify membrane and periplasmic proteins by the N-linked addition of a 7-residue glycan at the strict attachment motif (D/E)XNX(S/T). Strategies for a comprehensive analysis of the targets of glycosylation, however, are hampered by the resistance of the glycan-peptide bond to enzymatic digestion or β-elimination and have previously concentrated on soluble glycoproteins compatible with lectin affinity and gel-based approaches. We developed strategies for enriching C. jejuni HB93-13 glycopeptides using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography and examined novel fragmentation, including collision-induced dissociation (CID) and higher energy collisional (C-trap) dissociation (HCD) as well as CID/electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. CID/HCD enabled the identification of glycan structure and peptide backbone, allowing glycopeptide identification, whereas CID/ETD enabled the elucidation of glycosylation sites by maintaining the glycan-peptide linkage. A total of 130 glycopeptides, representing 75 glycosylation sites, were identified from LC-MS/MS using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to CID/HCD and CID/ETD. CID/HCD provided the majority of the identifications (73 sites) compared with ETD (26 sites). We also examined soluble glycoproteins by soybean agglutinin affinity and two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified a further six glycosylation sites. This study more than doubles the number of confirmed N-linked glycosylation sites in C. jejuni and is the first to utilize HCD fragmentation for glycopeptide identification with intact glycan. We also show that hydrophobic integral membrane proteins are significant targets of glycosylation in this organism. Our data demonstrate that peptide-centric approaches coupled to novel mass spectrometric fragmentation techniques may be suitable for application to eukaryotic glycoproteins for simultaneous

  18. Association of cardiac and renal function with extreme N-terminal fragment pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hua; Huo, Guoliang; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Ye, Ping; Cao, Jian; Bai, Yongyi; Wang, Fan; Hu, Yixin

    2012-07-26

    The data are inconsistent regarding whether extreme N-terminal fragment pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT pro-BNP) levels are associated with impaired renal function. Furthermore, the relationship between extreme NT pro-BNP levels and cardiac and renal function in elderly patients has not been reported. The aim of the present study was to examine a hypothesis that extreme NT pro-BNP levels may be associated with impaired cardiac and renal function in elderly patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of demographic, clinical, and echocardiographic features on 152 consecutive elderly patients aged more than 80 years old (average age, 83.65 ± 3.58 years) with NT pro-BNP levels ≥ 3000 pg/ml. The participants were divided into two categories according to their NT pro-BNP levels: (1) 3000-10000 pg/mL and (2) >10000 pg /mL. The number of patients with impaired renal function (P = 0.019) and the mortality (P < 0.001) in the period of inpatient was higher in the group with NT pro-BNP > 10000 pg /mL. The levels of serum creatinine and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) in the group of NT pro-BNP > 10000 pg / mL were higher than those in the group of NT pro-BNP = 3000-10000 pg/mL (P = 0.001 and P = 0.023, respectively). Furthermore, no significant difference in the distribution by NYHA class in different NT pro-BNP levels was observed. Multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated that with NT pro-BNP levels as the dependent variable, NT pro-BNP levels were positively correlated with CK-MB (β = 0.182, P = 0.024) and creatinine levels (β = 0.281, P = 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve of NT pro-BNP levels and clinical diagnosis of impaired renal function was 0.596 and reached significant difference (95%CI:0.503-0.688, P = 0.044). These data suggest that the extreme elevation of NT pro-BNP levels (≥3000 pg/ml) is mainly determined by impaired renal function in

  19. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  20. The Preferred Substrates for Transglutaminase 2 in a Complex Wheat Gluten Digest Are Peptide Fragments Harboring Celiac Disease T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Holm, Anders; Koehler, Christian J.; Thiede, Bernd; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Fleckenstein, Burkhard

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut that is induced by dietary exposure to gluten proteins. CD4+ T cells of the intestinal lesion recognize gluten peptides in the context of HLA-DQ2.5 or HLA-DQ8 and the gluten derived peptides become better T-cell antigens after deamidation catalyzed by the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2). In this study we aimed to identify the preferred peptide substrates of TG2 in a heterogeneous proteolytic digest of whole wheat gluten. Methods A method was established to enrich for preferred TG2 substrates in a complex gluten peptide mixture by tagging with 5-biotinamido-pentylamine. Tagged peptides were isolated and then identified by nano-liquid chromatography online-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, database searching and final manual data validation. Results We identified 31 different peptides as preferred substrates of TG2. Strikingly, the majority of these peptides were harboring known gluten T-cell epitopes. Five TG2 peptide substrates that were predicted to bind to HLA-DQ2.5 did not contain previously characterized sequences of T-cell epitopes. Two of these peptides elicited T-cell responses when tested for recognition by intestinal T-cell lines of celiac disease patients, and thus they contain novel candidate T-cell epitopes. We also found that the intact 9mer core sequences of the respective epitopes were not present in all peptide substrates. Interestingly, those epitopes that were represented by intact forms were frequently recognized by T cells in celiac disease patients, whereas those that were present in truncated versions were infrequently recognized. Conclusion TG2 as well as gastrointestinal proteolysis play important roles in the selection of gluten T-cell epitopes in celiac disease. PMID:21124911

  1. Specific labeling of the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin: determination of the amino acid composition of a labeled peptide fragment isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein.

    PubMed

    Tabachnick, M; Perret, V

    1987-08-01

    [125I] Thyroxine has been covalently bound to the thyroxine binding site in thyroxine-binding globulin by reaction with the bifunctional reagent, 1,5-difluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. An average of 0.47 mol of [125I] thyroxine was incorporated per mol protein; nonspecific binding amounted to 8%. A labeled peptide fragment was isolated from a proteolytic digest of the derivatized protein by HPLC and its amino acid composition was determined. Comparison with the amino acid sequence of thyroxine-binding globulin indicated partial correspondence of the labeled peptide with two possible regions in the protein. These regions also coincide with part of the barrel structure present in the closely homologous protein, alpha 1-antitrypsin.

  2. Forest Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters

    2007-01-01

    What Is Forest Fragmentation,and Why Is It Important? Forest fragmentation refers to a loss of forest and the division of the remaining forest into smaller blocks. Fragmentation is of concern primarily because of its impact on the conservation of biological diversity. Forest fragmentation can affect the amount and quality of habitat for many wildlife species (Fahrig...

  3. The C-terminal fragment of parathyroid hormone-related peptide promotes bone formation in diabetic mice with low-turnover osteopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, D; Fernández-de-Castro, L; Portal-Núñez, S; López-Herradón, A; Dapía, S; Gómez-Barrena, E; Esbrit, P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Current data suggest that parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) domains other than the N-terminal PTH-like domain contribute to its role as an endogenous bone anabolic factor. PTHrP-107-139 inhibits bone resorption, a fact which has precluded an unequivocal demonstration of its possible anabolic action in vivo. We thus sought to characterize the osteogenic effects of this peptide using a mouse model of diabetic low-turnover osteopaenia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PTHrP-107-139 was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, with or without bone marrow ablation, for 13 days. Osteopaenia was confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography analysis. Histological analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded bone tissue sections by haematoxylin/eosin and Masson's staining, and tartrate-resistent acid phosphatase immunohistochemistry. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in normal and/or high glucose (HG) medium. Osteogenic and adipogenic markers were assessed by real-time PCR, and PTHrP and the PTH1 receptor protein expression by Western blot analysis. KEY RESULTS PTHrP-107-139 reversed the alterations in bone structure and osteoblast function, and also promoted bone healing after marrow ablation without affecting the number of osteoclast-like cells in diabetic mice. This peptide also reversed the high-glucose-induced changes in osteogenic differentiation in both bone marrow stromal cells and the more differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings demonstrate that PTHrP-107-139 promotes bone formation in diabetic mice. This mouse model and in vitro cell cultures allowed us to identify various anabolic effects of this peptide in this scenario. PMID:21175568

  4. The prognostic value of pre-operative and post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodseth, Reitze N; Biccard, Bruce M; Le Manach, Yannick; Sessler, Daniel I; Lurati Buse, Giovana A; Thabane, Lehana; Schutt, Robert C; Bolliger, Daniel; Cagini, Lucio; Cardinale, Daniela; Chong, Carol P W; Chu, Rong; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Di Somma, Salvatore; Fahrner, René; Lim, Wen Kwang; Mahla, Elisabeth; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Puma, Francesco; Pyun, Wook B; Radović, Milan; Rajagopalan, Sriram; Suttie, Stuart; Vanniyasingam, Thuvaraha; van Gaal, William J; Waliszek, Marek; Devereaux, P J

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this study was to determine whether measuring post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides (NPs) (i.e., B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal fragment of proBNP [NT-proBNP]) enhances risk stratification in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, in whom a pre-operative NP has been measured. Pre-operative NP concentrations are powerful independent predictors of perioperative cardiovascular complications, but recent studies have reported that elevated post-operative NP concentrations are independently associated with these complications. It is not clear whether there is value in measuring post-operative NP when a pre-operative measurement has been done. We conducted a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis to determine whether the addition of post-operative NP levels enhanced the prediction of the composite of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 and ≥180 days after surgery. Eighteen eligible studies provided individual patient data (n = 2,179). Adding post-operative NP to a risk prediction model containing pre-operative NP improved model fit and risk classification at both 30 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,280 to 1,204; net reclassification index: 20%; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,320 to 1,300; net reclassification index: 11%; p = 0.003). Elevated post-operative NP was the strongest independent predictor of the primary outcome at 30 days (odds ratio: 3.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.2 to 6.2; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 2.7; p < 0.001) after surgery. Additional post-operative NP measurement enhanced risk stratification for the composite outcomes of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 days and ≥180 days after noncardiac surgery compared with a pre-operative NP measurement alone. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology

  5. Magneto-chiral anisotropy of the free electron on a helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstić, V.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.

    2002-09-01

    The free electron on a helix as a simple model of a molecular chiral conductor is considered. In the presence of a static magnetic field parallel to the helix axis, it is found that both ballistic and diffusive electrical transport along the helix show a conductivity that depends linearly on the current and the magnetic field and on the handedness of the helix. These results agree qualitatively with the recently experimentally observed electrical magneto-chiral anisotropy in carbon nanotubes [V. Krstić, S. Roth, M. Burghard, K. Kern, G.L.J.A. Rikken, Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Stuttgart, Germany; Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory, MPI-CNRS, Grenoble, France; Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Pulsés, CNRS/INSA/UPS, UMS 5462, Toulouse, France].

  6. Investigation of the effects of electron plasma frequency on the operation of a helix TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksuz, Lutfi; Haytural, Necati; Uygun, Emre; Bozduman, Ferhat; Yesiltepe, Hakan; Gulec, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The oscillations of electrons are an important subject for the design procedure of linear beam tubes such as klystrons and TWTs. These oscillation frequencies may be affected by the finite region of the tube if the plasma wavelength of the electrons are larger than the bounding region of the device, leading to a reduced plasma frequency which further leads to an increase in wavelength. Following the Pierce's theory on traveling wave tubes, it is seen that the reduced plasma frequency takes place in space charge terms which also include the Pierce's gain parameter C. In this study the effects of plasma frequency on the operation of a helix TWT are investigated using CST Particle Studio. This project is supported by TUBITAK with project number: 1140075.

  7. Biliverdin Reductase: More than a Namesake – The Reductase, Its Peptide Fragments, and Biliverdin Regulate Activity of the Three Classes of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin. D.

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity. PMID:22419908

  8. Biliverdin reductase: more than a namesake - the reductase, its Peptide fragments, and biliverdin regulate activity of the three classes of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Peter E M; Tudor, Cicerone; Maines, Mahin D

    2012-01-01

    The expanse of human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) functions in the cells is arguably unmatched by any single protein. hBVR is a Ser/Thr/Tyr-kinase, a scaffold protein, a transcription factor, and an intracellular transporter of gene regulators. hBVR is an upstream activator of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway and of protein kinase C (PKC) kinases in the two major arms of the pathway. In addition, it is the sole means for generating the antioxidant bilirubin-IXα. hBVR is essential for activation of ERK1/2 kinases by upstream MAPKK-MEK and by PKCδ, as well as the nuclear import and export of ERK1/2. Small fragments of hBVR are potent activators and inhibitors of the ERK kinases and PKCs: as such, they suggest the potential application of BVR-based technology in therapeutic settings. Presently, we have reviewed the function of hBVR in cell signaling with an emphasis on regulation of PKCδ activity.

  9. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  10. Assessment of local friction in protein folding dynamics using a helix cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Beatrice N; Jo, Hyunil; Culik, Robert M; DeGrado, William F; Gai, Feng

    2013-11-27

    Internal friction arising from local steric hindrance and/or the excluded volume effect plays an important role in controlling not only the dynamics of protein folding but also conformational transitions occurring within the native state potential well. However, experimental assessment of such local friction is difficult because it does not manifest itself as an independent experimental observable. Herein, we demonstrate, using the miniprotein trp-cage as a testbed, that it is possible to selectively increase the local mass density in a protein and hence the magnitude of local friction, thus making its effect directly measurable via folding kinetic studies. Specifically, we show that when a helix cross-linker, m-xylene, is placed near the most congested region of the trp-cage it leads to a significant decrease in both the folding rate (by a factor of 3.8) and unfolding rate (by a factor of 2.5 at 35 °C) but has little effect on protein stability. Thus, these results, in conjunction with those obtained with another cross-linked trp-cage and two uncross-linked variants, demonstrate the feasibility of using a nonperturbing cross-linker to help quantify the effect of internal friction. In addition, we estimate that a m-xylene cross-linker could lead to an increase in the roughness of the folding energy landscape by as much as 0.4-1.0k(B)T.

  11. Backbone resonance assignments of complexes of human voltage-dependent sodium channel NaV1.2 IQ motif peptide bound to apo calmodulin and to the C-domain fragment of apo calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Mahling, Ryan; Kilpatrick, Adina M; Shea, Madeline A

    2017-10-01

    Human voltage-gated sodium channel Na V 1.2 has a single pore-forming α-subunit and two transmembrane β-subunits. Expressed primarily in the brain, Na V 1.2 is critical for initiation and propagation of action potentials. Milliseconds after the pore opens, sodium influx is terminated by inactivation processes mediated by regulatory proteins including calmodulin (CaM). Both calcium-free (apo) CaM and calcium-saturated CaM bind tightly to an IQ motif in the C-terminal tail of the α-subunit. Our thermodynamic studies and solution structure (2KXW) of a C-domain fragment of apo 13 C, 15 N- CaM (CaM C ) bound to an unlabeled peptide with the sequence of rat Na V 1.2 IQ motif showed that apo CaM C (a) was necessary and sufficient for binding, and (b) bound more favorably than calcium-saturated CaM C . However, we could not monitor the Na V 1.2 residues directly, and no structure of full-length CaM (including the N-domain of CaM (CaM N )) was determined. To distinguish contributions of CaM N and CaM C , we used solution NMR spectroscopy to assign the backbone resonances of a complex containing a 13 C, 15 N-labeled peptide with the sequence of human Na V 1.2 IQ motif (Na V 1.2 IQp ) bound to apo 13 C, 15 N-CaM or apo 13 C, 15 N-CaM C . Comparing the assignments of apo CaM in complex with Na V 1.2 IQp to those of free apo CaM showed that residues within CaM C were significantly perturbed, while residues within CaM N were essentially unchanged. The chemical shifts of residues in Na V 1.2 IQp and in the C-domain of CaM were nearly identical regardless of whether CaM N was covalently linked to CaM C . This suggests that CaM N does not influence apo CaM binding to Na V 1.2 IQp .

  12. Magma Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  13. Chameleon fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Upadhye, Amol, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: aupadhye@anl.gov

    2014-02-01

    A scalar field dark energy candidate could couple to ordinary matter and photons, enabling its detection in laboratory experiments. Here we study the quantum properties of the chameleon field, one such dark energy candidate, in an ''afterglow'' experiment designed to produce, trap, and detect chameleon particles. In particular, we investigate the possible fragmentation of a beam of chameleon particles into multiple particle states due to the highly non-linear interaction terms in the chameleon Lagrangian. Fragmentation could weaken the constraints of an afterglow experiment by reducing the energy of the regenerated photons, but this energy reduction also provides a unique signaturemore » which could be detected by a properly-designed experiment. We show that constraints from the CHASE experiment are essentially unaffected by fragmentation for φ{sup 4} and 1/φ potentials, but are weakened for steeper potentials, and we discuss possible future afterglow experiments.« less

  14. An exhaustive survey of regular peptide conformations using a new metric for backbone handedness ( h )

    DOE PAGES

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2017-05-16

    The Ramachandran plot is important to structural biology as it describes a peptide backbone in the context of its dominant degrees of freedom—the backbone dihedral anglesφandψ(Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan & Sasisekharan, 1963). Since its introduction, the Ramachandran plot has been a crucial tool to characterize protein backbone features. However, the conformation or twist of a backbone as a function ofφandψhas not been completely described for bothcisandtransbackbones. Additionally, little intuitive understanding is available about a peptide’s conformation simply from knowing theφandψvalues of a peptide (e.g., is the regular peptide defined byφ = ψ =  - 100°  left-handed or right-handed?). This report provides a new metric for backbone handednessmore » (h) based on interpreting a peptide backbone as a helix with axial displacementdand angular displacementθ, both of which are derived from a peptide backbone’s internal coordinates, especially dihedral anglesφ,ψandω. In particular,hequals sin(θ)d/d|, with range [-1, 1] and negative (or positive) values indicating left(or right)-handedness. The metrichis used to characterize the handedness of every region of the Ramachandran plot for bothcis(ω = 0°) and trans (ω = 180°) backbones, which provides the first exhaustive survey of twist handedness in Ramachandran (φ,ψ) space. These maps fill in the ‘dead space’ within the Ramachandran plot, which are regions that are not commonly accessed by structured proteins, but which may be accessible to intrinsically disordered proteins, short peptide fragments, and protein mimics such as peptoids. Finally, building on the work of (Zacharias & Knapp, 2013), this report presents a new plot based ondandθthat serves as a universal and intuitive alternative to the Ramachandran plot. The universality arises from the fact that the co-inhabitants of such a plot include every possible peptide backbone includingcisandtransbackbones. The intuitiveness

  15. An exhaustive survey of regular peptide conformations using a new metric for backbone handedness ( h )

    SciTech Connect

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    The Ramachandran plot is important to structural biology as it describes a peptide backbone in the context of its dominant degrees of freedom—the backbone dihedral anglesφandψ(Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan & Sasisekharan, 1963). Since its introduction, the Ramachandran plot has been a crucial tool to characterize protein backbone features. However, the conformation or twist of a backbone as a function ofφandψhas not been completely described for bothcisandtransbackbones. Additionally, little intuitive understanding is available about a peptide’s conformation simply from knowing theφandψvalues of a peptide (e.g., is the regular peptide defined byφ = ψ =  - 100°  left-handed or right-handed?). This report provides a new metric for backbone handednessmore » (h) based on interpreting a peptide backbone as a helix with axial displacementdand angular displacementθ, both of which are derived from a peptide backbone’s internal coordinates, especially dihedral anglesφ,ψandω. In particular,hequals sin(θ)d/d|, with range [-1, 1] and negative (or positive) values indicating left(or right)-handedness. The metrichis used to characterize the handedness of every region of the Ramachandran plot for bothcis(ω = 0°) and trans (ω = 180°) backbones, which provides the first exhaustive survey of twist handedness in Ramachandran (φ,ψ) space. These maps fill in the ‘dead space’ within the Ramachandran plot, which are regions that are not commonly accessed by structured proteins, but which may be accessible to intrinsically disordered proteins, short peptide fragments, and protein mimics such as peptoids. Finally, building on the work of (Zacharias & Knapp, 2013), this report presents a new plot based ondandθthat serves as a universal and intuitive alternative to the Ramachandran plot. The universality arises from the fact that the co-inhabitants of such a plot include every possible peptide backbone includingcisandtransbackbones. The intuitiveness

  16. An exhaustive survey of regular peptide conformations using a new metric for backbone handedness (h)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The Ramachandran plot is important to structural biology as it describes a peptide backbone in the context of its dominant degrees of freedom—the backbone dihedral angles φ and ψ (Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan & Sasisekharan, 1963). Since its introduction, the Ramachandran plot has been a crucial tool to characterize protein backbone features. However, the conformation or twist of a backbone as a function of φ and ψ has not been completely described for both cis and trans backbones. Additionally, little intuitive understanding is available about a peptide’s conformation simply from knowing the φ and ψ values of a peptide (e.g., is the regular peptide defined by φ = ψ =  − 100°  left-handed or right-handed?). This report provides a new metric for backbone handedness (h) based on interpreting a peptide backbone as a helix with axial displacement d and angular displacement θ, both of which are derived from a peptide backbone’s internal coordinates, especially dihedral angles φ, ψ and ω. In particular, h equals sin(θ)d∕|d|, with range [−1, 1] and negative (or positive) values indicating left(or right)-handedness. The metric h is used to characterize the handedness of every region of the Ramachandran plot for both cis (ω = 0°) and trans (ω = 180°) backbones, which provides the first exhaustive survey of twist handedness in Ramachandran (φ, ψ) space. These maps fill in the ‘dead space’ within the Ramachandran plot, which are regions that are not commonly accessed by structured proteins, but which may be accessible to intrinsically disordered proteins, short peptide fragments, and protein mimics such as peptoids. Finally, building on the work of (Zacharias & Knapp, 2013), this report presents a new plot based on d and θ that serves as a universal and intuitive alternative to the Ramachandran plot. The universality arises from the fact that the co-inhabitants of such a plot include every possible peptide backbone including cis

  17. Aβ-oligomer uptake and the resulting inflammatory response in adult human astrocytes are precluded by an anti-Aβ single chain variable fragment in combination with an apoE mimetic peptide.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Gaya, Laia; Mulder, Sandra D; Herrebout, Maaike A C; Baayen, Johannes C; Villegas, Sandra; Veerhuis, Robert

    2018-06-01

    An imbalance between production and clearance of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) initiates the pathological process in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ-specific antibodies seemed promising as therapeutic option in AD mouse models. In patients, however, vascular side-effects and Aβ-antibody complex-induced microglial and/or perivascular macrophage inflammatory responses were encountered. To prevent inflammatory reactions, we designed a single chain variable fragment (scFv-h3D6), based on monoclonal antibody bapineuzumab (mAb-h3D6), but lacking the Fc region. ScFv-h3D6 reduced Aβ-oligomer burden and prevented AD-associated behavioral and cellular changes in 3xTg-AD mice. As scFv-h3D6 lacks the Fc-tail, it cannot enhance Fc-receptor mediated Aβ clearance by microglia and probably exerts its beneficial effects in 3xTg-AD mice through other mechanisms. ScFv-h3D6 restored the increased apoE and apoJ levels in 3xTg-AD brains back to normal. ApoE and apoJ influence cholesterol transport, Aβ aggregation and clearance, and their genetic variants are risk factors for sporadic AD. Astrocytes are constitutive scavengers of soluble Aβ from the CNS. We previously found apoE and apoJ to inhibit Aβ uptake by adult human astrocytes, in vitro, and thus to potentially protect astrocytes from Aβ cytotoxicity. In the present study, scFv-h3D6 and mAb-h3D6 inhibited Aβ-oligomer uptake by adult human astrocytes. ApoE- and apoJ- mimetic peptides (MP) affected Aβ uptake as well as Aβ-induced cytokine release similar to intact apoE and apoJ, without interfering with the strong inhibitory effects of scFv-h3D6 on Aβ-oligomer uptake. These results suggest that combining Aβ-specific scFv and apoE-MP, that inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytokine release by astrocytes, could offer advantages over currently used therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristic fragment size distributions in dynamic fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fenghua; Molinari, Jean-François; Ramesh, K. T.

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fragmentation of a dynamically expanding ring (Mott's problem) is studied numerically to obtain the fragment signatures under different strain rates. An empirical formula is proposed to calculate an average fragment size. Rayleigh distribution is found to describe the statistical properties of the fragment populations.

  19. Structures of endothiapepsin-fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library.

    PubMed

    Huschmann, Franziska U; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein-ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin-fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity.

  20. Structures of endothiapepsin–fragment complexes from crystallographic fragment screening using a novel, diverse and affordable 96-compound fragment library

    PubMed Central

    Huschmann, Franziska U.; Linnik, Janina; Sparta, Karine; Ühlein, Monika; Wang, Xiaojie; Metz, Alexander; Schiebel, Johannes; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Weiss, Manfred S.; Mueller, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic screening of the binding of small organic compounds (termed fragments) to proteins is increasingly important for medicinal chemistry-oriented drug discovery. To enable such experiments in a widespread manner, an affordable 96-compound library has been assembled for fragment screening in both academia and industry. The library is selected from already existing protein–ligand structures and is characterized by a broad ligand diversity, including buffer ingredients, carbohydrates, nucleotides, amino acids, peptide-like fragments and various drug-like organic compounds. When applied to the model protease endothiapepsin in a crystallographic screening experiment, a hit rate of nearly 10% was obtained. In comparison to other fragment libraries and considering that no pre-screening was performed, this hit rate is remarkably high. This demonstrates the general suitability of the selected compounds for an initial fragment-screening campaign. The library composition, experimental considerations and time requirements for a complete crystallographic fragment-screening campaign are discussed as well as the nine fully refined obtained endothiapepsin–fragment structures. While most of the fragments bind close to the catalytic centre of endothiapepsin in poses that have been observed previously, two fragments address new sites on the protein surface. ITC measurements show that the fragments bind to endothiapepsin with millimolar affinity. PMID:27139825

  1. Fe(+) chemical ionization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Speir, J P; Gorman, G S; Amster, I J

    1993-02-01

    Laser-desorbed peptide neutral molecules were allowed to react with Fe(+) in a Fourier transform mass spectrometer, using the technique of laser desorption/chemical ionization. The Fe(+) ions are formed by laser ablation of a steel target, as well as by dissociative charge-exchange ionization of ferrocene with Ne(+). Prior to reaction with laser-desorbed peptide molecules, Fe(+) ions undergo 20-100 thermalizin collisions with xenon to reduce the population of excited-state metal ion species. The Fe(+) ions that have not experienced thermalizing collisions undergo charge exchange with peptide molecules. Iron ions that undergo thermalizing collisions before they are allowed to react with peptides are found to undergo charge exchange and to form adduct species [M + Fe(+)] and fragment ions that result from the loss of small, stable molecules, such as H2O, CO, and CO2, from the metal ion-peptide complex.

  2. Application of plug-plug technique to ACE experiments for discovery of peptides binding to a larger target protein: a model study of calmodulin-binding fragments selected from a digested mixture of reduced BSA.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuki; Nakato, Mamiko; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Wada, Shinji; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hirota, Hiroshi; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    To discover peptide ligands that bind to a target protein with a higher molecular mass, a concise screening methodology has been established, by applying a "plug-plug" technique to ACE experiments. Exploratory experiments using three mixed peptides, mastoparan-X, β-endorphin, and oxytocin, as candidates for calmodulin-binding ligands, revealed that the technique not only reduces the consumption of the protein sample, but also increases the flexibility of the experimental conditions, by allowing the use of MS detection in the ACE experiments. With the plug-plug technique, the ACE-MS screening methodology successfully selected calmodulin-binding peptides from a random library with diverse constituents, such as protease digests of BSA. Three peptides with Kd values between 8-147 μM for calmodulin were obtained from a Glu-C endoprotease digest of reduced BSA, although the digest showed more than 70 peaks in its ACE-MS electropherogram. The method established here will be quite useful for the screening of peptide ligands, which have only low affinities due to their flexible chain structures but could potentially provide primary information for designing inhibitors against the target protein. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Bromine isotopic signature facilitates de novo sequencing of peptides in free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jungjoo; Kwon, Hyuksu; Jang, Inae; Jeon, Aeran; Moon, Jingyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Han, Sang Yun; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2015-02-01

    We recently showed that free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry (FRIPS MS) assisted by the remarkable thermochemical stability of (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) is another attractive radical-driven peptide fragmentation MS tool. Facile homolytic cleavage of the bond between the benzylic carbon and the oxygen of the TEMPO moiety in o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide and the high reactivity of the benzylic radical species generated in •Bz-C(O)-peptide are key elements leading to extensive radical-driven peptide backbone fragmentation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the incorporation of bromine into the benzene ring, i.e. o-TEMPO-Bz(Br)-C(O)-peptide, allows unambiguous distinction of the N-terminal peptide fragments from the C-terminal fragments through the unique bromine doublet isotopic signature. Furthermore, bromine substitution does not alter the overall radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation pathways of o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide. From a practical perspective, the presence of the bromine isotopic signature in the N-terminal peptide fragments in TEMPO-assisted FRIPS MS represents a useful and cost-effective opportunity for de novo peptide sequencing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Modification Site Localization in Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    There are a large number of search engines designed to take mass spectrometry fragmentation spectra and match them to peptides from proteins in a database. These peptides could be unmodified, but they could also bear modifications that were added biologically or during sample preparation. As a measure of reliability for the peptide identification, software normally calculates how likely a given quality of match could have been achieved at random, most commonly through the use of target-decoy database searching (Elias and Gygi, Nat Methods 4(3): 207-214, 2007). Matching the correct peptide but with the wrong modification localization is not a random match, so results with this error will normally still be assessed as reliable identifications by the search engine. Hence, an extra step is required to determine site localization reliability, and the software approaches to measure this are the subject of this part of the chapter.

  5. Ammonium sulfate and MALDI in-source decay: a winning combination for sequencing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Delvolve, Alice; Woods, Amina S.

    2009-01-01

    In previous papers we highlighted the role of ammonium sulfate in increasing peptide fragmentation by in source decay (ISD). The current work systematically investigated effects of MALDI extraction delay, peptide amino acid composition, matrix and ammonium sulfate concentration on peptides ISD fragmentation. The data confirmed that ammonium sulfate increased peptides signal to noise ratio as well as their in source fragmentation resulting in complete sequence coverage regardless of the amino acid composition. This method is easy, inexpensive and generates the peptides sequence instantly. PMID:19877641

  6. A helix-breaking mutation in the epithelial Ca2+ channel TRPV5 leads to reduced Ca2+-dependent inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Pil; Nair, Anil V.; Grimm, Christian; van Zeeland, Femke; Heller, Stefan; Bindels, René J.M.; Hoenderop, Joost G.J.

    2013-01-01

    TRPV5, a member of transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of ion channels, plays a crucial role in epithelial calcium transport in the kidney. This channel has a high selectivity for Ca2+ and is tightly regulated by intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Recently it was shown that the molecular basis of deafness in varitint-waddler mouse is the result of hair cell death caused by the constitutive activity of transient receptor potential mucolipin 3 (TRPML3) channel carrying a helix breaking mutation, A419P, at the intracellular proximity of the fifth transmembrane domain (TM5). This mutation significantly elevates intracellular Ca2+ concentration and causes rapid cell death. Here we show that substituting the equivalent location in TRPV5, the M490, to proline significantly modulates Ca2+-dependent inactivation of TRPV5. The single channel conductance, time constant of inactivation (τ) and half maximal inhibition constant (IC50) of TRPV5(M490P) were increased compared to TRPV5(WT). Moreover TRPV5(M490P) showed lower Ca2+ permeability. Out of different point mutations created to characterize the importance of M490 in Ca2+-dependent inactivation, only TRPV5(M490P)-expressing cells showed apoptosis and extremely altered Ca2+-dependent inactivation. In conclusion, the TRPV5 channel is susceptible for helix breaking mutations and the proximal intracellular region of TM5 of this channel plays an important role in Ca2+-dependent inactivation. PMID:21035851

  7. Natriuretic peptides: Diagnostic and therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Ghosh, Sujoy; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2011-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are hormones which are mainly secreted from heart and have important natriuretic and kaliuretic properties. There are four different groups NPs identified till date [atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, a D-type natriuretic peptide (DNP)], each with its own characteristic functions. The N-terminal part of the prohormone of BNP, NT-proBNP, is secreted alongside BNP and has been documented to have important diagnostic value in heart failure. NPs or their fragments have been subjected to scientific observation for their diagnostic value and this has yielded important epidemiological data for interpretation. However, little progress has been made in harnessing the therapeutic potential of these cardiac hormones. PMID:22145138

  8. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  9. Chemical methods for peptide and protein production.

    PubMed

    Chandrudu, Saranya; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2013-04-12

    Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  10. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Selectable fragmentation warhead

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, Courtney S.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Montoya, Nelson I.; Stahl, David B.

    1993-01-01

    A selectable fragmentation warhead capable of producing a predetermined number of fragments from a metal plate, and accelerating the fragments toward a target. A first explosive located adjacent to the plate is detonated at selected number of points by laser-driven slapper detonators. In one embodiment, a smoother-disk and a second explosive, located adjacent to the first explosive, serve to increase acceleration of the fragments toward a target. The ability to produce a selected number of fragments allows for effective destruction of a chosen target.

  12. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  13. Peptide folding and aggregation studied using a simplified atomic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbäck, Anders

    2005-05-01

    Using an atomic model with a simplified sequence-based potential, the folding properties of several different peptides are studied. Both α-helical (Trp cage, Fs) and β-sheet (GB1p, GB1m2, GB1m3, Betanova, LLM) peptides are considered. The model is able to fold these different peptides for one and the same choice of parameters, and the melting behaviour of the peptides (folded population against temperature) is in very good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, using the same model with unchanged parameters, the aggregation behaviour of a fibril-forming fragment of the Alzheimer's A β peptide is studied, with very promising results.

  14. Folding of a helix is critically stabilized by polarization of backbone hydrogen bonds: study in explicit water.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li L; Gao, Ya; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Qing G; Tang, Bo; Zhang, John Z H

    2012-03-15

    Multiple single-trajectory molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at room temperature (300 K) in explicit water was carried out to study the folding dynamics of an α-helix (PDB 2I9M ) using a polarized charge scheme that includes electronic polarization of backbone hydrogen bonds. Starting from an extended conformation, the 17-residue peptide was successfully folded into the native structure (α-helix) between 80 and 130 ns with a root-mean-square deviation of ~1.0 Å. Analysis of the time-dependent trajectories revealed that helix formation of the peptide started at the terminals and progressed toward the center of the peptide. For comparison, MD trajectories generated under various versions of standard AMBER force fields failed to show any significant or stable helix formation in our simulation. Our result shows clear evidence that the electronic polarization of backbone hydrogen bonds energetically stabilizes the helix formation and is critical to the stable folding of the short helix structure. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  15. 28-mer Fragment Derived from Enterocin CRL35 Displays an Unexpected Bactericidal Effect on Listeria Cells.

    PubMed

    Masias, Emilse; Sanches, Paulo R S; Dupuy, Fernando G; Acuna, Leonardo; Bellomio, Augusto; Cilli, Eduardo; Saavedra, Lucila; Minahk, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Two shorter peptides derived from enterocin CRL35, a 43-mer bacteriocin, were synthesized i.e. the N-terminal fragment spanning from residues 1 to 15, and a 28-mer fragment that represents the C-terminal of enterocin CRL35, the residues 16 to 43. The separate peptides showed no activity when combined. On one hand, the 28-mer peptide displayed an unpredicted antimicrobial activity. On the other, 15- mer peptide had no consistent anti-Listeria effect. The dissociation constants calculated from experimental data indicated that all peptides could bind at similar extent to the sensitive cells. However, transmembrane electrical potential was not dissipated to the same level by the different peptides; whereas the full-length and the C-terminal 28-mer fragment induced almost full dissipation, 15-mer fragment produced only a slow and incomplete effect. Furthermore, a different interaction of each peptide with membranes was demonstrated based on studies carried out with liposomes, which led us to conclude that activity was related to structure rather than to net positive charges. These results open up the possibility of designing new peptides based on the 28-mer fragment with enhanced activity, which would represent a promising approach for combating Listeria and other pathogens.

  16. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-16

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  17. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  18. Novel peptides from adrenomedullary chromaffin vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Sigafoos, J; Chestnut, W G; Merrill, B M; Taylor, L C; Diliberto, E J; Viveros, O H

    1993-01-01

    The adrenal medulla chromaffin vesicle (CV) contains, on a weight basis, as much soluble protein and peptide as catecholamine. The bulk of the protein is accounted for by chromogranins (Cgr) A, B and C. Additionally, a large variety of neuropeptides and their precursor proteins have been found recently within these vesicles. Nevertheless, fractionation of CV lysates indicates the presence of many more peptides than previously reported. In the hope of finding novel bioactive peptides, we initiated a systematic isolation and characterisation of CV peptides. Bovine CV pellets were prepared by sucrose gradient centrifugation and immediately boiled in water to avoid degradation of native proteins and peptides. The water lysates were fractionated through a battery of reversed-phase and ion-exchange high-performance chromatographic steps. We fully or partially characterised a substantial number of novel peptides derived from CgrA and CgrB. A tetradecapeptide and a 13 kDa extended peptide were derived from the bovine homologue of rat secretogranin III. Peptides corresponding to C-terminal fragments of 7B2 and proteoglycan II were also found. Additionally, several sequences had no known precursors. Of the sequences derived from known precursors some corresponded to fragments bracketed by pairs of basic amino acids, but others were preceded or followed by single basic residues or by unusual putative cleavage sites. Some of these peptides were postranslationally modified (pyroglutamylation, glycosylation, phosphorylation, amidation). A significant degree of structural conservation of some of these peptides across species suggests that they may exert biological effects when cosecreted with catecholamines during splanchnic stimulation. PMID:8300415

  19. Virtual screening of a milk peptide database for the identification of food-derived antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufang; Eichler, Jutta; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2015-11-01

    Milk provides a wide range of bioactive substances, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins. Our study aimed to identify novel antimicrobial peptides naturally present in milk. The components of an endogenous bovine milk peptide database were virtually screened for charge, amphipathy, and predicted secondary structure. Thus, 23 of 248 screened peptides were identified as candidates for antimicrobial effects. After commercial synthesis, their antimicrobial activities were determined against Escherichia coli NEB5α, E. coli ATCC25922, and Bacillus subtilis ATCC6051. In the tested concentration range (<2 mM), bacteriostatic activity of 14 peptides was detected including nine peptides inhibiting both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most effective fragment was TKLTEEEKNRLNFLKKISQRYQKFΑLPQYLK corresponding to αS2 -casein151-181 , with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.0 μM against B. subtilis ATCC6051, and minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16.2 μM against both E. coli strains. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed conformational changes of most active peptides in a membrane-mimic environment, transitioning from an unordered to α-helical structure. Screening of food peptide databases by prediction tools is an efficient method to identify novel antimicrobial food-derived peptides. Milk-derived antimicrobial peptides may have potential use as functional food ingredients and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of anti-infective milk effects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Searching for substructures in fragment spaces.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Volkamer, Andrea; Rarey, Matthias

    2012-12-21

    A common task in drug development is the selection of compounds fulfilling specific structural features from a large data pool. While several methods that iteratively search through such data sets exist, their application is limited compared to the infinite character of molecular space. The introduction of the concept of fragment spaces (FSs), which are composed of molecular fragments and their connection rules, made the representation of large combinatorial data sets feasible. At the same time, search algorithms face the problem of structural features spanning over multiple fragments. Due to the combinatorial nature of FSs, an enumeration of all products is impossible. In order to overcome these time and storage issues, we present a method that is able to find substructures in FSs without explicit product enumeration. This is accomplished by splitting substructures into subsubstructures and mapping them onto fragments with respect to fragment connectivity rules. The method has been evaluated on three different drug discovery scenarios considering the exploration of a molecule class, the elaboration of decoration patterns for a molecular core, and the exhaustive query for peptides in FSs. FSs can be searched in seconds, and found products contain novel compounds not present in the PubChem database which may serve as hints for new lead structures.

  1. Peptide chemistry toolbox - Transforming natural peptides into peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Erak, Miloš; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2018-06-01

    The development of solid phase peptide synthesis has released tremendous opportunities for using synthetic peptides in medicinal applications. In the last decades, peptide therapeutics became an emerging market in pharmaceutical industry. The need for synthetic strategies in order to improve peptidic properties, such as longer half-life, higher bioavailability, increased potency and efficiency is accordingly rising. In this mini-review, we present a toolbox of modifications in peptide chemistry for overcoming the main drawbacks during the transition from natural peptides to peptide therapeutics. Modifications at the level of the peptide backbone, amino acid side chains and higher orders of structures are described. Furthermore, we are discussing the future of peptide therapeutics development and their impact on the pharmaceutical market. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fragments and Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Can teachers contact the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by always-new objectives, criteria, and initiatives? How, more importantly, can learners experience the inner coherence of mathematics while working in a context fragmented by testing, modular curricular, short-term learning objectives, and lessons that…

  3. Fragmentation of an elastica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-03-01

    When a thin rod is submitted to an axial force greater than its critical buckling load it takes the shape of an elastica. As the load further increases, a rod made of a brittle material breaks suddenly. More than two fragments may be formed during this fragmentation. In this work we discuss the sequence of events that lead to the final broken state with two or more fragments. We show that the criterion for breaking is not trivial. In particular, we investigate the effect of the duration of the loading and we show that at a given load the waiting time before breaking is broadly distributed. We discuss the consequences of the time delayed breaking on the distributions of fragment sizes and fragment numbers.

  4. From a Helix to a Small Cycle: Metadynamics-Inspired αvβ6 Integrin Selective Ligands.

    PubMed

    Di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Tomassi, Stefano; Di Maro, Salvatore; Reichart, Florian; Notni, Johannes; Dangi, Abha; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Brancaccio, Diego; Merlino, Francesco; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Novellino, Ettore; Kessler, Horst; Marinelli, Luciana

    2018-04-16

    The RGD-recognizing αvβ6 integrin has only recently emerged as a major target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Thus, the development of selective, low-molecular-weight ligands of this receptor is still in great demand. Here, a metadynamics-driven design strategy allowed us to successfully convert a helical nonapeptide into a cyclic pentapeptide (6) showing remarkable potency and αvβ6 specificity. NMR and docking studies elucidated the reasons for the high affinity and selectivity of this compound, setting the ground for the rational design of new αvβ6-specific small peptides or even peptidomimetics. In vivo PET imaging studies demonstrated the potential use of 6 for medical applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. MaRaCluster: A Fragment Rarity Metric for Clustering Fragment Spectra in Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    The, Matthew; Käll, Lukas

    2016-03-04

    Shotgun proteomics experiments generate large amounts of fragment spectra as primary data, normally with high redundancy between and within experiments. Here, we have devised a clustering technique to identify fragment spectra stemming from the same species of peptide. This is a powerful alternative method to traditional search engines for analyzing spectra, specifically useful for larger scale mass spectrometry studies. As an aid in this process, we propose a distance calculation relying on the rarity of experimental fragment peaks, following the intuition that peaks shared by only a few spectra offer more evidence than peaks shared by a large number of spectra. We used this distance calculation and a complete-linkage scheme to cluster data from a recent large-scale mass spectrometry-based study. The clusterings produced by our method have up to 40% more identified peptides for their consensus spectra compared to those produced by the previous state-of-the-art method. We see that our method would advance the construction of spectral libraries as well as serve as a tool for mining large sets of fragment spectra. The source code and Ubuntu binary packages are available at https://github.com/statisticalbiotechnology/maracluster (under an Apache 2.0 license).

  6. Extracting Both Peptide Sequence and Glycan Structural Information by 157 nm Photodissociation of N-Linked Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangyi; Reilly, James P.

    2009-01-01

    157 nm photodissociation of N-linked glycopeptides was investigated in MALDI tandem time-of-flight (TOF) and linear ion trap mass spectrometers. Singly-charged glycopeptides yielded abundant peptide and glycan fragments. The peptide fragments included a series of x-, y-, v- and w- ions with the glycan remaining intact. These provide information about the peptide sequence and the glycosylation site. In addition to glycosidic fragments, abundant cross-ring glycan fragments that are not observed in low-energy CID were detected. These fragments provide insight into the glycan sequence and linkages. Doubly-charged glycopeptides generated by nanospray in the linear ion trap mass spectrometer also yielded peptide and glycan fragments. However, the former were dominated by low-energy fragments such as b- and y- type ions while glycan was primarily cleaved at glycosidic bonds. PMID:19113943

  7. An enhancer peptide for membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background NP4P is a synthetic peptide derived from a natural, non-antimicrobial peptide fragment (pro-region of nematode cecropin P4) by substitution of all acidic amino acid residues with amides (i.e., Glu → Gln, and Asp → Asn). Results In the presence of NP4P, some membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (ASABF-α, polymyxin B, and nisin) killed microbes at lower concentration (e.g., 10 times lower minimum bactericidal concentration for ASABF-α against Staphylococcus aureus), whereas NP4P itself was not bactericidal and did not interfere with bacterial growth at ≤ 300 μg/mL. In contrast, the activities of antimicrobial agents with a distinct mode of action (indolicidin, ampicillin, kanamycin, and enrofloxacin) were unaffected. Although the membrane-disrupting activity of NP4P was slight or undetectable, ASABF-α permeabilized S. aureus membranes with enhanced efficacy in the presence of NP4P. Conclusions NP4P selectively enhanced the bactericidal activities of membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides by increasing the efficacy of membrane disruption against the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:20152058

  8. Dimensional crossover in fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez, Arezky H.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2000-11-01

    Experiments in which thick clay plates and glass rods are fractured have revealed different behavior of fragment mass distribution function in the small and large fragment regions. In this paper we explain this behavior using non-extensive Tsallis statistics and show how the crossover between the two regions is caused by the change in the fragments’ dimensionality during the fracture process. We obtain a physical criterion for the position of this crossover and an expression for the change in the power-law exponent between the small and large fragment regions. These predictions are in good agreement with the experiments on thick clay plates.

  9. A peptide fragment of ependymin neurotrophic factor uses protein kinase C and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway to activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase and a functional AP-1 containing c-Jun and c-Fos proteins in mouse NB2a cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, David S; Hasson, Brendan; Boyer-Boiteau, Anne; El-Khishin, Adam; Shashoua, Victor E

    2003-05-01

    Ependymin (EPN) is a goldfish brain neurotrophic factor previously shown to function in a variety of cellular events related to long-term memory formation and neuronal regeneration. CMX-8933, an 8-amino-acid synthetic peptide fragment of EPN, was designed for aiding an investigation of the biological properties of this glycoprotein. We reported from previous studies that treatment of mouse neuroblastoma (NB2a) cultures with CMX-8933 promotes activation of transcription factor AP-1, a characteristic previously associated with the following full-length neurotrophic factors: nerve growth factor, neurotropin-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The CMX-8933-activated AP-1 specifically bound an AP-1 consensus probe and appeared to contain c-Jun and c-Fos protein components in antibody supershift experiments. Because AP-1 influences a variety of positive and negative cellular processes, determined in part by its exact protein composition and mechanism of activation, we extended these initial AP-1 observations in the current study to confirm the identity of the CMX-8933-activated c-Jun and c-Fos components. CMX-8933 increases the enzymatic activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), increases the phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun proteins, and increases the cellular titers of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNAs. Furthermore, the AP-1 activated by CMX-8933 is functional, insofar as it transactivates both synthetic and natural AP-1-dependent reporter plasmids. Inhibition studies indicate that activation of the 8933-induced AP-1 occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These data are in agreement with the recently proposed model for the conversion of short- to long-term synaptic plasticity and memory, in which a JNK-activated transcription factor AP-1, containing c-Jun and c-Fos components, functions at the top of a hierarchy of transcription factors known to regulate long-term neural plasticity. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Fragment capture device

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point ofmore » the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.« less

  11. Fragment capture device

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  12. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf; Key, Brian P.; Garcia, Daniel B.

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  13. Structural and pharmacological characteristics of chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin reveal the crucial role of the C-terminal YGGFL and YKKGE motifs in their analgesic properties.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Eric; Courchay, Karine; Rego, Jean-Claude Do; Leprince, Jérôme; Mayer, Catherine; Davoust, Daniel; Costentin, Jean; Vaudry, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Peptide E (a 25-amino acid peptide derived from proenkephalin A) and beta-endorphin (a 31-amino acid peptide derived from proopiomelanocortin) bind with high affinity to opioid receptors and share structural similarities but induce analgesic effects of very different intensity. Indeed, whereas they possess the same N-terminus Met-enkephalin message sequence linked to a helix by a flexible spacer and a C-terminal part in random coil conformation, in contrast with peptide E, beta-endorphin produces a profound analgesia. To determine the key structural elements explaining this very divergent opioid activity, we have compared the structural and pharmacological characteristics of several chimeric peptides derived from peptide E and beta-endorphin. Structures were obtained under the same experimental conditions using circular dichroism, computational estimation of helical content and/or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and NMR-restrained molecular modeling. The hot-plate and writhing tests were used in mice to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the peptides. Our results indicate that neither the length nor the physicochemical profile of the spacer plays a fundamental role in analgesia. On the other hand, while the functional importance of the helix cannot be excluded, the last 5 residues in the C-terminal part seem to be crucial for the expression or absence of the analgesic activity of these peptides. These data raise the question of the true function of peptides E in opioidergic systems. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Photodissociation of Non-Covalent Peptide-Crown Ether Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Kirkovits, Gregory J.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Highly chromogenic 18-crown-6-dipyrrolylquinoxaline coordinates primary amines of peptides, forming non-covalent complexes that can be transferred to the gas phase by electrospray ionization. The appended chromogenic crown ether facilitates efficient energy transfer to the peptide upon ultraviolet irradiation in the gas phase, resulting in diagnostic peptide fragmentation. Collisional activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of these non-covalent complexes results only in their disassembly with the charge retained on either the peptide or crown ether, yielding no sequence ions. Upon UV photon absorption the intermolecular energy transfer is facilitated by the fast activation time scale of UVPD (< 10 ns) and by the collectively strong hydrogen bonding between the crown ether and peptide, thus allowing effective transfer of energy to the peptide moiety prior to disruption of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. PMID:18077179

  15. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  16. Characterization of three peptides derived from prosomatostatin [prosomatostatin-(1-63)-, -(65-76)- and -(79-92)-peptides] in a human pancreatic tumour.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J M; Eriksson, B; Grimelius, L; Oberg, K; Thim, L

    1987-11-15

    By using only reverse-phase h.p.l.c., three fragments of prosomatostatin were isolated from an extract of a human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour that produced somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and gastrin-releasing peptide. The amino acid composition of the peptides indicated that they represented prosomatostatin-(1-63)-peptide, prosomatostain-(65-76)-peptide and prosomatostatin-(79-92)-peptide (somatostatin-14). The identity of prosomatostatin-(1-63)-peptide was confirmed by characterization of the products of digestion with Armillaria mellea (honey fungus) proteinase. Partial micro-sequencing of prosomatostatin-(1-63)-peptide showed that the Gly24-Ala25 bond of preprosomatostatin was the site of cleavage of the signal peptide. Thus human prosomatostatin is a protein of 92 amino acid residues that is proteolytically cleaved in a pancreatic tumour at the site of a dibasic-residue (arginine-lysine) processing site and at a single-monobasic-residue (arginine) processing site.

  17. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  18. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Treesearch

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  19. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  20. Rondonin an antifungal peptide from spider (Acanthoscurria rondoniae) haemolymph

    PubMed Central

    Riciluca, K.C.T.; Sayegh, R.S.R.; Melo, R.L.; Silva, P.I.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial activities were detected in the haemolymph of the spider Acanthoscurrria rondoniae. A novel antifungal peptide, rondonin, was purified by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Rondonin has an amino acid sequence of IIIQYEGHKH and a molecular mass of 1236.776 Da. This peptide has identity to a C-terminal fragment of the “d” subunit of haemocyanin from the spiders Eurypelma californicum and Acanthoscurria gomesiana. A synthetic peptide mimicking rondonin had identical characteristics to those of the isolated material, confirming its sequence. The synthetic peptide was active only against fungus. These data led us to conclude that the antifungal activity detected in the plasma of these spiders is the result of enzymatic processing of a protein that delivers oxygen in the haemolymph of many chelicerate. Several studies have suggested that haemocyanins are involved in the arthropod immune system, and the activity of this haemocyanin fragment reinforces this idea. PMID:24371568

  1. Encrypted Antimicrobial Peptides from Plant Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramada, M H S; Brand, G D; Abrão, F Y; Oliveira, M; Filho, J L Cardozo; Galbieri, R; Gramacho, K P; Prates, M V; Bloch, C

    2017-10-16

    Examples of bioactive peptides derived from internal sequences of proteins are known for decades. The great majority of these findings appear to be fortuitous rather than the result of a deliberate and methodological-based enterprise. In the present work, we describe the identification and the biological activities of novel antimicrobial peptides unveiled as internal fragments of various plant proteins founded on our hypothesis-driven search strategy. All putative encrypted antimicrobial peptides were selected based upon their physicochemical properties that were iteratively selected by an in-house computer program named Kamal. The selected peptides were chemically synthesized and evaluated for their interaction with model membranes. Sixteen of these peptides showed antimicrobial activity against human and/or plant pathogens, some with a wide spectrum of activity presenting similar or superior inhibition efficacy when compared to classical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These original and previously unforeseen molecules constitute a broader and undisputable set of evidences produced by our group that illustrate how the intragenic concept is a workable reality and should be carefully explored not only for microbicidal agents but also for many other biological functions.

  2. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  3. Evidence for the proteolytic processing of dentin matrix protein 1. Identification and characterization of processed fragments and cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunlin; Brunn, Jan C; Cook, Richard G; Orkiszewski, Ralph S; Malone, James P; Veis, Arthur; Butler, William T

    2003-09-05

    Full-length cDNA coding for dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) has been cloned and sequenced, but the corresponding complete protein has not been isolated. In searching for naturally occurring DMP1, we recently discovered that the extracellular matrix of bone contains fragments originating from DMP1. Shortened forms of DMP1, termed 37K and 57K fragments, were treated with alkaline phosphatase and then digested with trypsin. The resultant peptides were purified by a two-dimensional method: size exclusion followed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Purified peptides were sequenced by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, and the sequences compared with the DMP1 sequence predicted from cDNA. Extensive sequencing of tryptic peptides revealed that the 37K fragments originated from the NH2-terminal region, and the 57K fragments were from the COOH-terminal part of DMP1. Phosphate analysis indicated that the 37K fragments contained 12 phosphates, and the 57K fragments had 41. From 37K fragments, two peptides lacked a COOH-terminal lysine or arginine; instead they ended at Phe173 and Ser180 and were thus COOH termini of 37K fragments. Two peptides were from the NH2 termini of 57K fragments, starting at Asp218 and Asp222. These findings indicated that DMP1 is proteolytically cleaved at four bonds, Phe173-Asp174, Ser180-Asp181, Ser217-Asp218, and Gln221-Asp222, forming eight fragments. The uniformity of cleavages at the NH2-terminal peptide bonds of aspartyl residues suggests that a single proteinase is involved. Based on its reported specificity, we hypothesize that these scissions are catalyzed by PHEX protein. We envision that the proteolytic processing of DMP1 plays a crucial role during osteogenesis and dentinogenesis.

  4. Characterization of Disulfide-Linked Peptides Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Automated Data Analysis Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan; McGuinness, Kenneth N.; Crespo, Alejandro; Zhong, Wendy

    2018-05-01

    Disulfide bond formation is critical for maintaining structure stability and function of many peptides and proteins. Mass spectrometry has become an important tool for the elucidation of molecular connectivity. However, the interpretation of the tandem mass spectral data of disulfide-linked peptides has been a major challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools. Developing proper data analysis software is essential to quickly characterize disulfide-linked peptides. A thorough and in-depth understanding of how disulfide-linked peptides fragment in mass spectrometer is a key in developing software to interpret the tandem mass spectra of these peptides. Two model peptides with inter- and intra-chain disulfide linkages were used to study fragmentation behavior in both collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron-based dissociation (ExD) experiments. Fragments generated from CAD and ExD can be categorized into three major types, which result from different S-S and C-S bond cleavage patterns. DiSulFinder is a computer algorithm that was newly developed based on the fragmentation observed in these peptides. The software is vendor neutral and capable of quickly and accurately identifying a variety of fragments generated from disulfide-linked peptides. DiSulFinder identifies peptide backbone fragments with S-S and C-S bond cleavages and, more importantly, can also identify fragments with the S-S bond still intact to aid disulfide linkage determination. With the assistance of this software, more comprehensive disulfide connectivity characterization can be achieved. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Characterization of Disulfide-Linked Peptides Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Automated Data Analysis Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhidan; McGuinness, Kenneth N.; Crespo, Alejandro; Zhong, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is critical for maintaining structure stability and function of many peptides and proteins. Mass spectrometry has become an important tool for the elucidation of molecular connectivity. However, the interpretation of the tandem mass spectral data of disulfide-linked peptides has been a major challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools. Developing proper data analysis software is essential to quickly characterize disulfide-linked peptides. A thorough and in-depth understanding of how disulfide-linked peptides fragment in mass spectrometer is a key in developing software to interpret the tandem mass spectra of these peptides. Two model peptides with inter- and intra-chain disulfide linkages were used to study fragmentation behavior in both collisional-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron-based dissociation (ExD) experiments. Fragments generated from CAD and ExD can be categorized into three major types, which result from different S-S and C-S bond cleavage patterns. DiSulFinder is a computer algorithm that was newly developed based on the fragmentation observed in these peptides. The software is vendor neutral and capable of quickly and accurately identifying a variety of fragments generated from disulfide-linked peptides. DiSulFinder identifies peptide backbone fragments with S-S and C-S bond cleavages and, more importantly, can also identify fragments with the S-S bond still intact to aid disulfide linkage determination. With the assistance of this software, more comprehensive disulfide connectivity characterization can be achieved. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (P<0.05, ANOVA). A seasonal response to chilling was observed in the coral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (P<0.05, ANOVA). However, in the late spring, coral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (P<0.05, ANOVA). When a cryoprotectant (1M dimethyl sulfoxide) was used in concert with chilling it protected the coral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (P<0.05, ANOVA). The zooxanthellae are the most sensitive element in the coral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-function characterization and optimization of a plant-derived antibacterial peptide.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Mougli; Haenni, Marisa; Canarelli, Stéphane; Fisch, Florian; Chodanowski, Pierre; Servis, Catherine; Michielin, Olivier; Freitag, Ruth; Moreillon, Philippe; Mermod, Nicolas

    2005-09-01

    Crushed seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree have been used traditionally as natural flocculants to clarify drinking water. We previously showed that one of the seed peptides mediates both the sedimentation of suspended particles such as bacterial cells and a direct bactericidal activity, raising the possibility that the two activities might be related. In this study, the conformational modeling of the peptide was coupled to a functional analysis of synthetic derivatives. This indicated that partly overlapping structural determinants mediate the sedimentation and antibacterial activities. Sedimentation requires a positively charged, glutamine-rich portion of the peptide that aggregates bacterial cells. The bactericidal activity was localized to a sequence prone to form a helix-loop-helix structural motif. Amino acid substitution showed that the bactericidal activity requires hydrophobic proline residues within the protruding loop. Vital dye staining indicated that treatment with peptides containing this motif results in bacterial membrane damage. Assembly of multiple copies of this structural motif into a branched peptide enhanced antibacterial activity, since low concentrations effectively kill bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyogenes without displaying a toxic effect on human red blood cells. This study thus identifies a synthetic peptide with potent antibacterial activity against specific human pathogens. It also suggests partly distinct molecular mechanisms for each activity. Sedimentation may result from coupled flocculation and coagulation effects, while the bactericidal activity would require bacterial membrane destabilization by a hydrophobic loop.

  8. Structure-Function Characterization and Optimization of a Plant-Derived Antibacterial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Mougli; Haenni, Marisa; Canarelli, Stéphane; Fisch, Florian; Chodanowski, Pierre; Servis, Catherine; Michielin, Olivier; Freitag, Ruth; Moreillon, Philippe; Mermod, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    Crushed seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree have been used traditionally as natural flocculants to clarify drinking water. We previously showed that one of the seed peptides mediates both the sedimentation of suspended particles such as bacterial cells and a direct bactericidal activity, raising the possibility that the two activities might be related. In this study, the conformational modeling of the peptide was coupled to a functional analysis of synthetic derivatives. This indicated that partly overlapping structural determinants mediate the sedimentation and antibacterial activities. Sedimentation requires a positively charged, glutamine-rich portion of the peptide that aggregates bacterial cells. The bactericidal activity was localized to a sequence prone to form a helix-loop-helix structural motif. Amino acid substitution showed that the bactericidal activity requires hydrophobic proline residues within the protruding loop. Vital dye staining indicated that treatment with peptides containing this motif results in bacterial membrane damage. Assembly of multiple copies of this structural motif into a branched peptide enhanced antibacterial activity, since low concentrations effectively kill bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pyogenes without displaying a toxic effect on human red blood cells. This study thus identifies a synthetic peptide with potent antibacterial activity against specific human pathogens. It also suggests partly distinct molecular mechanisms for each activity. Sedimentation may result from coupled flocculation and coagulation effects, while the bactericidal activity would require bacterial membrane destabilization by a hydrophobic loop. PMID:16127062

  9. A Study into the Collision-induced Dissociation (CID) Behavior of Cross-Linked Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Sven H.; Fischer, Lutz; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linking/mass spectrometry resolves protein–protein interactions or protein folds by help of distance constraints. Cross-linkers with specific properties such as isotope-labeled or collision-induced dissociation (CID)-cleavable cross-linkers are in frequent use to simplify the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here, we analyzed the mass spectrometric behavior of 910 unique cross-linked peptides in high-resolution MS1 and MS2 from published data and validate the observation by a ninefold larger set from currently unpublished data to explore if detailed understanding of their fragmentation behavior would allow computational delivery of information that otherwise would be obtained via isotope labels or CID cleavage of cross-linkers. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers reveal cross-linked and linear fragments in fragmentation spectra. We show that fragment mass and charge alone provide this information, alleviating the need for isotope-labeling for this purpose. Isotope-labeled cross-linkers also indicate cross-linker-containing, albeit not specifically cross-linked, peptides in MS1. We observed that acquisition can be guided to better than twofold enrich cross-linked peptides with minimal losses based on peptide mass and charge alone. By help of CID-cleavable cross-linkers, individual spectra with only linear fragments can be recorded for each peptide in a cross-link. We show that cross-linked fragments of ordinary cross-linked peptides can be linearized computationally and that a simplified subspectrum can be extracted that is enriched in information on one of the two linked peptides. This allows identifying candidates for this peptide in a simplified database search as we propose in a search strategy here. We conclude that the specific behavior of cross-linked peptides in mass spectrometers can be exploited to relax the requirements on cross-linkers. PMID:26719564

  10. Fragmentation of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Siva; Kamyabi, Nabiollah

    Tumor cells have to travel through blood capillaries to be able to metastasize and colonize in distant organs. Among the numerous cells that are shed by the primary tumor, very few survive in circulation. In vivo studies have shown that tumor cells can undergo breakup at microcapillary junctions affecting their survival. It is currently unclear what hydrodynamic and biomechanical factors contribute to fragmentation and moreover how different are the breakup dynamics of highly and weakly metastatic cells. In this study, we use microfluidics to investigate flow-induced breakup of prostate and breast cancer cells. We observe several different modes of breakup of cancer cells, which have striking similarities with breakup of viscous drops. We quantify the breakup time and find that highly metastatic cancer cells take longer to breakup than lowly metastatic cells suggesting that tumor cells may dynamically modify their deformability to avoid fragmentation. We also identify the role that cytoskeleton and membrane plays in the breakup process. Our study highlights the important role that tumor cell fragmentation plays in cancer metastasis. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

  11. Ecosystem extent and fragmentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Roger; Hansen, Matt

    2017-01-01

    One of the candidate essential biodiversity variable (EBV) groups described in the seminal paper by Pereira et al. (2014) concerns Ecosystem Structure. This EBV group is distinguished from another EBV group which encompasses aspects of Ecosystem Function. While the Ecosystem Function EBV treats ecosystem processes like nutrient cycling, primary production, trophic interactions, etc., the Ecosystem Structure EBV relates to the set of biophysical properties of ecosystems that create biophysical environmental context, confer biophysical structure, and occur geographically. The Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation EBV is one of the EBVs in the Ecosystem Structure EBV group.Ecosystems are understood to exist at multiple scales, from very large areas (macro-ecosystems) like the Arctic tundra, for example, to something as small as a tree in an Amazonian rain forest. As such, ecosystems occupy space and therefore can be mapped across any geography of interest, whether that area of interest be a site, a nation, a region, a continent, or the planet. One of the most obvious and seemingly straightforward EBVs is Ecosystem Extent and Fragmentation. Ecosystem extent refers to the location and geographic distribution of ecosystems across landscapes or in the oceans, while ecosystem fragmentation refers to the spatial pattern and connectivity of ecosystem occurrences on the landscape.

  12. Peptide de novo sequencing of mixture tandem mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Hotta, Stéphanie Yuki Kolbeck; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The impact of mixture spectra deconvolution on the performance of four popular de novo sequencing programs was tested using artificially constructed mixture spectra as well as experimental proteomics data. Mixture fragmentation spectra are recognized as a limitation in proteomics because they decrease the identification performance using database search engines. De novo sequencing approaches are expected to be even more sensitive to the reduction in mass spectrum quality resulting from peptide precursor co-isolation and thus prone to false identifications. The deconvolution approach matched complementary b-, y-ions to each precursor peptide mass, which allowed the creation of virtual spectra containing sequence specific fragment ions of each co-isolated peptide. Deconvolution processing resulted in equally efficient identification rates but increased the absolute number of correctly sequenced peptides. The improvement was in the range of 20-35% additional peptide identifications for a HeLa lysate sample. Some correct sequences were identified only using unprocessed spectra; however, the number of these was lower than those where improvement was obtained by mass spectral deconvolution. Tight candidate peptide score distribution and high sensitivity to small changes in the mass spectrum introduced by the employed deconvolution method could explain some of the missing peptide identifications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Peptide de novo sequencing of mixture tandem mass spectra

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Stéphanie Yuki Kolbeck; Verano‐Braga, Thiago; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The impact of mixture spectra deconvolution on the performance of four popular de novo sequencing programs was tested using artificially constructed mixture spectra as well as experimental proteomics data. Mixture fragmentation spectra are recognized as a limitation in proteomics because they decrease the identification performance using database search engines. De novo sequencing approaches are expected to be even more sensitive to the reduction in mass spectrum quality resulting from peptide precursor co‐isolation and thus prone to false identifications. The deconvolution approach matched complementary b‐, y‐ions to each precursor peptide mass, which allowed the creation of virtual spectra containing sequence specific fragment ions of each co‐isolated peptide. Deconvolution processing resulted in equally efficient identification rates but increased the absolute number of correctly sequenced peptides. The improvement was in the range of 20–35% additional peptide identifications for a HeLa lysate sample. Some correct sequences were identified only using unprocessed spectra; however, the number of these was lower than those where improvement was obtained by mass spectral deconvolution. Tight candidate peptide score distribution and high sensitivity to small changes in the mass spectrum introduced by the employed deconvolution method could explain some of the missing peptide identifications. PMID:27329701

  14. Peptides of the Constant Region of Antibodies Display Fungicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Ciociola, Tecla; Magliani, Walter; Zanello, Pier Paolo; D'Adda, Tiziana; Galati, Serena; De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Gabrielli, Elena; Pericolini, Eva; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Arruda, Denise C.; Pinto, Marcia R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic peptides with sequences identical to fragments of the constant region of different classes (IgG, IgM, IgA) of antibodies (Fc-peptides) exerted a fungicidal activity in vitro against pathogenic yeasts, such as Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Malassezia furfur, including caspofungin and triazole resistant strains. Alanine-substituted derivatives of fungicidal Fc-peptides, tested to evaluate the critical role of each residue, displayed unaltered, increased or decreased candidacidal activity in vitro. An Fc-peptide, included in all human IgGs, displayed a therapeutic effect against experimental mucosal and systemic candidiasis in mouse models. It is intriguing to hypothesize that some Fc-peptides may influence the antifungal immune response and constitute the basis for devising new antifungal agents. PMID:22470523

  15. Virtual fragment preparation for computational fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Ludington, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) has become an important component of the drug discovery process. The use of fragments can accelerate both the search for a hit molecule and the development of that hit into a lead molecule for clinical testing. In addition to experimental methodologies for FBDD such as NMR and X-ray Crystallography screens, computational techniques are playing an increasingly important role. The success of the computational simulations is due in large part to how the database of virtual fragments is prepared. In order to prepare the fragments appropriately it is necessary to understand how FBDD differs from other approaches and the issues inherent in building up molecules from smaller fragment pieces. The ultimate goal of these calculations is to link two or more simulated fragments into a molecule that has an experimental binding affinity consistent with the additive predicted binding affinities of the virtual fragments. Computationally predicting binding affinities is a complex process, with many opportunities for introducing error. Therefore, care should be taken with the fragment preparation procedure to avoid introducing additional inaccuracies.This chapter is focused on the preparation process used to create a virtual fragment database. Several key issues of fragment preparation which affect the accuracy of binding affinity predictions are discussed. The first issue is the selection of the two-dimensional atomic structure of the virtual fragment. Although the particular usage of the fragment can affect this choice (i.e., whether the fragment will be used for calibration, binding site characterization, hit identification, or lead optimization), general factors such as synthetic accessibility, size, and flexibility are major considerations in selecting the 2D structure. Other aspects of preparing the virtual fragments for simulation are the generation of three-dimensional conformations and the assignment of the associated atomic point charges.

  16. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4-7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map-model pairs.

  17. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix

    PubMed Central

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4–7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map–model pairs. PMID:27936925

  18. Probing Protein Sequences as Sources for Encrypted Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Guilherme D.; Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Tinoco, Maria L. P.; Aragão, Francisco J. L.; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M.; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  19. Peptide Identification by Database Search of Mixture Tandem Mass Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Bourne, Philip E.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    In high-throughput proteomics the development of computational methods and novel experimental strategies often rely on each other. In certain areas, mass spectrometry methods for data acquisition are ahead of computational methods to interpret the resulting tandem mass spectra. Particularly, although there are numerous situations in which a mixture tandem mass spectrum can contain fragment ions from two or more peptides, nearly all database search tools still make the assumption that each tandem mass spectrum comes from one peptide. Common examples include mixture spectra from co-eluting peptides in complex samples, spectra generated from data-independent acquisition methods, and spectra from peptides with complex post-translational modifications. We propose a new database search tool (MixDB) that is able to identify mixture tandem mass spectra from more than one peptide. We show that peptides can be reliably identified with up to 95% accuracy from mixture spectra while considering only a 0.01% of all possible peptide pairs (four orders of magnitude speedup). Comparison with current database search methods indicates that our approach has better or comparable sensitivity and precision at identifying single-peptide spectra while simultaneously being able to identify 38% more peptides from mixture spectra at significantly higher precision. PMID:21862760

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Chelsea L; Wright, Patience M; Cassady, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  3. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  4. Osmolyte effects on helix formation in peptides and the stability of coiled-coils

    PubMed Central

    Celinski, Scott A.; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2002-01-01

    The ability of several naturally occurring substances known as osmolytes to induce helix formation in an alanine-based peptide have been investigated. As predicted by the osmophobic effect hypothesis, the osmolytes studies here do induce helix formation. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is the best structure-inducing osmolytes investigated here, but it is not as effective in promoting helix formation as the common cosolvent trifluoroethanol (TFE). We also provide a semiquantitative study of the ability of TMAO to induce helix formation and urea, which acts as a helix (and protein) denaturant. We find that on a molar basis, these agents are exactly counteractive as structure inducing and unfolding agents. Finally, we extend the investigations to the effects of urea and TMAO on the stability of a dimeric coiled-coil peptide and find identical results. Together these results support the tenets of the osmophobic hypothesis and highlight the importance of the polypeptide backbone in protein folding and stability. PMID:12142459

  5. Free energy calculations of short peptide chains using Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpusenka, Vadzim; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2008-10-01

    We performed a computational study of monomer peptides composed of methionine, alanine, leucine, glutamate, lysine (all amino acids with a helix-forming propensities); and proline, glycine tyrosine, serine, arginine (which all have poor helix-forming propensities). The free energy landscapes as a function of the handedness and radius of gyration have been calculated using the recently introduced Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) method, combined with replica exchange, multiple walkers, and post-processing Umbrella Correction (UC). Minima that correspond to some of the left- and right-handed 310-, α- and π-helixes were identified by secondary structure assignment methods (DSSP, Stride). The resulting free energy surface (FES) and the subsequent steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulation results are in agreement with the empirical evidence of preferred secondary structures for the peptide chains considered.

  6. A Unified Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Approach to Protein-Peptide Docking

    PubMed Central

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are vital for the cell. They mediate, inhibit or serve as structural components in nearly 40% of all macromolecular interactions, and are often associated with diseases, making them interesting leads for protein drug design. In recent years, large-scale technologies have enabled exhaustive studies on the peptide recognition preferences for a number of peptide-binding domain families. Yet, the paucity of data regarding their molecular binding mechanisms together with their inherent flexibility makes the structural prediction of protein-peptide interactions very challenging. This leaves flexible docking as one of the few amenable computational techniques to model these complexes. We present here an ensemble, flexible protein-peptide docking protocol that combines conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Starting from an ensemble of three peptide conformations (extended, a-helix, polyproline-II), flexible docking with HADDOCK generates 79.4% of high quality models for bound/unbound and 69.4% for unbound/unbound docking when tested against the largest protein-peptide complexes benchmark dataset available to date. Conformational selection at the rigid-body docking stage successfully recovers the most relevant conformation for a given protein-peptide complex and the subsequent flexible refinement further improves the interface by up to 4.5 Å interface RMSD. Cluster-based scoring of the models results in a selection of near-native solutions in the top three for ∼75% of the successfully predicted cases. This unified conformational selection and induced fit approach to protein-peptide docking should open the route to the modeling of challenging systems such as disorder-order transitions taking place upon binding, significantly expanding the applicability limit of biomolecular interaction modeling by docking. PMID:23516555

  7. A unified conformational selection and induced fit approach to protein-peptide docking.

    PubMed

    Trellet, Mikael; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2013-01-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are vital for the cell. They mediate, inhibit or serve as structural components in nearly 40% of all macromolecular interactions, and are often associated with diseases, making them interesting leads for protein drug design. In recent years, large-scale technologies have enabled exhaustive studies on the peptide recognition preferences for a number of peptide-binding domain families. Yet, the paucity of data regarding their molecular binding mechanisms together with their inherent flexibility makes the structural prediction of protein-peptide interactions very challenging. This leaves flexible docking as one of the few amenable computational techniques to model these complexes. We present here an ensemble, flexible protein-peptide docking protocol that combines conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Starting from an ensemble of three peptide conformations (extended, a-helix, polyproline-II), flexible docking with HADDOCK generates 79.4% of high quality models for bound/unbound and 69.4% for unbound/unbound docking when tested against the largest protein-peptide complexes benchmark dataset available to date. Conformational selection at the rigid-body docking stage successfully recovers the most relevant conformation for a given protein-peptide complex and the subsequent flexible refinement further improves the interface by up to 4.5 Å interface RMSD. Cluster-based scoring of the models results in a selection of near-native solutions in the top three for ∼75% of the successfully predicted cases. This unified conformational selection and induced fit approach to protein-peptide docking should open the route to the modeling of challenging systems such as disorder-order transitions taking place upon binding, significantly expanding the applicability limit of biomolecular interaction modeling by docking.

  8. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E.

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Characterization of protein N-glycosylation by tandem mass spectrometry using complementary fragmentation techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Ford, Kristina L.; Zeng, Wei; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; ...

    2015-08-28

    The analysis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by proteomics is regarded as a technically challenging undertaking. While in recent years approaches to examine and quantify protein phosphorylation have greatly improved, the analysis of many protein modifications, such as glycosylation, are still regarded as problematic. Limitations in the standard proteomics workflow, such as use of suboptimal peptide fragmentation methods, can significantly prevent the identification of glycopeptides. The current generation of tandem mass spectrometers has made available a variety of fragmentation options, many of which are becoming standard features on these instruments. Lastly, we have used three common fragmentation techniques, namely CID, HCD,more » and ETD, to analyze a glycopeptide and highlight how an integrated fragmentation approach can be used to identify the modified residue and characterize the N-glycan on a peptide.« less

  11. Two-dimensional replica exchange approach for peptide-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Jason; Shell, M. Scott

    2011-02-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) method has emerged as a standard approach for simulating proteins and peptides with rugged underlying free energy landscapes. We describe an extension to the original methodology—here termed umbrella-sampling REMD (UREMD)—that offers specific advantages in simulating peptide-peptide interactions. This method is based on the use of two dimensions in the replica cascade, one in temperature as in conventional REMD, and one in an umbrella sampling coordinate between the center of mass of the two peptides that aids explicit exploration of the complete association-dissociation reaction coordinate. To mitigate the increased number of replicas required, we pursue an approach in which the temperature and umbrella dimensions are linked at only fully associated and dissociated states. Coupled with the reweighting equations, the UREMD method aids accurate calculations of normalized free energy profiles and structural or energetic measures as a function of interpeptide separation distance. We test the approach on two families of peptides: a series of designed tetrapeptides that serve as minimal models for amyloid fibril formation, and a fragment of a classic leucine zipper peptide and its mutant. The results for these systems are compared to those from conventional REMD simulations, and demonstrate good convergence properties, low statistical errors, and, for the leucine zippers, an ability to sample near-native structures.

  12. Peptide-bacteria interactions using engineered surface-immobilized peptides from class IIa bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Norman, Lana; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2013-03-26

    Specificity of the class IIa bacteriocin Leucocin A (LeuA), an antimicrobial peptide active against Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes , is known to be dictated by the C-terminal amphipathic helical region, including the extended hairpin-like structure. However, its specificity when attached to a substrate has not been investigated. Exploiting properties of LeuA, we have synthesized two LeuA derivatives, which span the amphipathic helical region of the wild-type LeuA, consisting of 14- (14AA LeuA, CWGEAFSAGVHRLA) and 24-amino acid residues (24AA LeuA, CSVNWGEAFSAGVHRLANGGNGFW). The peptides were purified to >95% purity, as shown by analytical RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry. By including an N-terminal cysteine group, the tailored peptide fragments were readily immobilized at the gold interfaces. The resulting thickness and molecular orientation, determined by ellipsometry and grazing angle infrared spectroscopy, respectively, indicated that the peptides were covalently immobilized in a random helical orientation. The bacterial specificity of the anchored peptide fragments was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our results showed that the adsorbed 14AA LeuA exhibited no specificity toward the bacterial strains, whereas the surface-immobilized 24AA LeuA displayed significant binding toward Gram-positive bacteria with various binding affinities from one strain to another. The 14AA LeuA did not show binding as this fragment is most likely too short in length for recognition by the membrane-bound receptor on the target bacterial cell membrane. These results support the potential use of class IIa bacteriocins as molecular recognition elements in biosensing platforms.

  13. Fragment-based lead generation: identification of seed fragments by a highly efficient fragment screening technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Lars; Ritscher, Allegra; Müller, Gerhard; Hafenbradl, Doris

    2009-08-01

    For the detection of the precise and unambiguous binding of fragments to a specific binding site on the target protein, we have developed a novel reporter displacement binding assay technology. The application of this technology for the fragment screening as well as the fragment evolution process with a specific modelling based design strategy is demonstrated for inhibitors of the protein kinase p38alpha. In a fragment screening approach seed fragments were identified which were then used to build compounds from the deep-pocket towards the hinge binding area of the protein kinase p38alpha based on a modelling approach. BIRB796 was used as a blueprint for the alignment of the fragments. The fragment evolution of these deep-pocket binding fragments towards the fully optimized inhibitor BIRB796 included the modulation of the residence time as well as the affinity. The goal of our study was to evaluate the robustness and efficiency of our novel fragment screening technology at high fragment concentrations, compare the screening data with biochemical activity data and to demonstrate the evolution of the hit fragments with fast kinetics, into slow kinetic inhibitors in an in silico approach.

  14. Host-defense and trefoil factor family peptides in skin secretions of the Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis Loumont, 1983 led to the identification and characterization of 15 host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin (two peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; three peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; three peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; two peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; five peptides) families. In addition, caerulein and three peptides with structural similarity to the trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides, xP2 and xP4 from Xenopus laevis were also present in the secretions. Consistent with data from comparisons of the nucleotides sequence of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the primary structures of the peptides suggest a close phylogenetic relationship between X. boumbaensis and the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei. As the three species occupy disjunct ranges within Cameroon, it is suggested that they diverged from a common ancestor by allopatric speciation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ribosomal synthesis and folding of peptide-helical aromatic foldamer hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Joseph M.; Kwon, Sunbum; Dawson, Simon J.; Mandal, Pradeep K.; Suga, Hiroaki; Huc, Ivan

    2018-03-01

    Translation, the mRNA-templated synthesis of peptides by the ribosome, can be manipulated to incorporate variants of the 20 cognate amino acids. Such approaches for expanding the range of chemical entities that can be produced by the ribosome may accelerate the discovery of molecules that can perform functions for which poorly folded, short peptidic sequences are ill suited. Here, we show that the ribosome tolerates some artificial helical aromatic oligomers, so-called foldamers. Using a flexible tRNA-acylation ribozyme—flexizyme—foldamers were attached to tRNA, and the resulting acylated tRNAs were delivered to the ribosome to initiate the synthesis of non-cyclic and cyclic foldamer-peptide hybrid molecules. Passing through the ribosome exit tunnel requires the foldamers to unfold. Yet foldamers encode sufficient folding information to influence the peptide structure once translation is completed. We also show that in cyclic hybrids, the foldamer portion can fold into a helix and force the peptide segment to adopt a constrained and stretched conformation.

  16. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  17. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  18. Tank fragmentation test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daye, C. J.; Cooksey, D.; Walters, R. J.; Auble, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A photographic study of a simulated tank fragmentation test was made. Sixteen disks and four spheres were ejected from a test article mounted in a vertical orientation 110 ft above a target installed on the test chamber floor. The test was performed at a chamber pressure of 25 microns. Velocities at impingement on the target ranged from 88 to 120 ft/sec; corresponding ejection velocities at the exit plane of the ejector assembly ranged from 29 to 87 ft/sec. Tumble axes of the disks were expected to be all in the north-south direction; the majority of those measured were, while some were skewed from this direction, the maximum observed being 90 deg. A typical measured tumble rate was 2.4 turns/sec. The dispersion pattern measured on the target was reasonably regular, and measured approximately 16 ft east-to-west by 11 ft north-to-south.

  19. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. The human gastrin precursor. Characterization of phosphorylated forms and fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Varro, A; Desmond, H; Pauwels, S; Gregory, H; Young, J; Dockray, G J

    1988-01-01

    There is a potential phosphorylation site in the C-terminal region of the precursor for the acid-stimulating hormone gastrin, which is immediately adjacent to an important cleavage point. In the present study we have sought to identify, separate, quantify and characterize phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of human progastrin and its fragments. Identification was made by two radioimmunoassays: (a) a novel assay employing an antibody raised to intact human progastrin; and (b) an assay using antibody reacting with the C-terminal tryptic fragment of human progastrin, as well as progastrin itself. Two forms of human progastrin isolated from a gastrinoma were separated by ion-exchange h.p.l.c., and had similar elution positions on reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and on gel filtration. The more acidic peptide contained close to equimolar amounts of phosphate. On trypsinization, peptides were released that co-eluted on ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, and had the immunochemical properties of, naturally occurring C-terminal fragments of progastrin. One of the latter was isolated and shown by Edman degradation after derivatization with ethanethiol to have the sequence Ser (P)-Ala-Glu-Asp-Glu-Asn. Similar peptides occur in antral mucosa resected from ulcer patients. The unphosphorylated forms of progastrin predominated, whereas the phosphorylated forms of the C-terminal fragments were predominant. This distribution could be explained by preferential cleavage of phosphorylated progastrin. We conclude that in human progastrin, Ser-96 can occur in the phosphorylated form; this residue immediately follows a pair of basic residues (Arg-Arg) that are cleaved during synthesis of the biologically active product. PMID:3223964

  1. Electron-Transfer Ion/Ion Reactions of Doubly Protonated Peptides: Effect of Elevated Bath Gas Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Sharon J.; Chrisman, Paul A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) behavior of cations derived from 27 different peptides (22 of which are tryptic peptides) has been studied in a 3D quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Ion/ion reactions between peptide cations and nitrobenzene anions have been examined at both room temperature and in an elevated temperature bath gas environment to form ETD product ions. From the peptides studied, the ETD sequence coverage tends to be inversely related to peptide size. At room temperature, very high sequence coverage (~100%) was observed for small peptides (≤7 amino acids). For medium-sized peptides composed of 8–11 amino acids, the average sequence coverage was 46%. Larger peptides with 14 or more amino acids yielded an average sequence coverage of 23%. Elevated-temperature ETD provided increased sequence coverage over room-temperature experiments for the peptides of greater than 7 residues, giving an average of 67% for medium-sized peptides and 63% for larger peptides. Percent ETD, a measure of the extent of electron transfer, has also been calculated for the peptides and also shows an inverse relation with peptide size. Bath gas temperature does not have a consistent effect on percent ETD, however. For the tryptic peptides, fragmentation is localized at the ends of the peptides suggesting that the distribution of charge within the peptide may play an important role in determining fragmentation sites. A triply protonated peptide has also been studied and shows behavior similar to the doubly charged peptides. These preliminary results suggest that for a given charge state there is a maximum size for which high sequence coverage is obtained and that increasing the bath gas temperature can increase this maximum. PMID:16131079

  2. LESSONS IN DE NOVO PEPTIDE SEQUENCING BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein mixtures isolated from all kinds of living organisms. The raw data in these studies are MS/MS spectra, usually of peptides produced by proteolytic digestion of a protein. These spectra are “translated” into peptide sequences, normally with the help of various search engines. Data acquisition and interpretation have both been automated, and most researchers look only at the summary of the identifications without ever viewing the underlying raw data used for assignments. Automated analysis of data is essential due to the volume produced. However, being familiar with the finer intricacies of peptide fragmentation processes, and experiencing the difficulties of manual data interpretation allow a researcher to be able to more critically evaluate key results, particularly because there are many known rules of peptide fragmentation that are not incorporated into search engine scoring. Since the most commonly used MS/MS activation method is collision-induced dissociation (CID), in this article we present a brief review of the history of peptide CID analysis. Next, we provide a detailed tutorial on how to determine peptide sequences from CID data. Although the focus of the tutorial is de novo sequencing, the lessons learned and resources supplied are useful for data interpretation in general. PMID:25667941

  3. Detection of co-eluted peptides using database search methods

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Kwok, Siwei; Wu, Wells W; Wang, Guanghui; Shen, Rong-Fong; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Background Current experimental techniques, especially those applying liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, have made high-throughput proteomic studies possible. The increase in throughput however also raises concerns on the accuracy of identification or quantification. Most experimental procedures select in a given MS scan only a few relatively most intense parent ions, each to be fragmented (MS2) separately, and most other minor co-eluted peptides that have similar chromatographic retention times are ignored and their information lost. Results We have computationally investigated the possibility of enhancing the information retrieval during a given LC/MS experiment by selecting the two or three most intense parent ions for simultaneous fragmentation. A set of spectra is created via superimposing a number of MS2 spectra, each can be identified by all search methods tested with high confidence, to mimick the spectra of co-eluted peptides. The generated convoluted spectra were used to evaluate the capability of several database search methods – SEQUEST, Mascot, X!Tandem, OMSSA, and RAId_DbS – in identifying true peptides from superimposed spectra of co-eluted peptides. We show that using these simulated spectra, all the database search methods will gain eventually in the number of true peptides identified by using the compound spectra of co-eluted peptides. Open peer review Reviewed by Vlad Petyuk (nominated by Arcady Mushegian), King Jordan and Shamil Sunyaev. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:18597684

  4. Cullin3 - BTB Interface: A Novel Target for Stapled Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3–BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the “stapling” with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49–68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300–600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3. PMID:25848797

  5. Comparison of Urine and Plasma Peptidome Indicates Selectivity in Renal Peptide Handling.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Pedro; Pontillo, Claudia; Pejchinovski, Martin; Siwy, Justyna; Krochmal, Magdalena; Makridakis, Manousos; Carrick, Emma; Klein, Julie; Mullen, William; Jankowski, Joachim; Vlahou, Antonia; Mischak, Harald; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Pape, Lars

    2018-04-03

    Urine is considered to be produced predominantly as a result of plasma filtration in the kidney. However, the origin of the native peptides present in urine has never been investigated in detail. Therefore, the authors aimed to obtain a first insight into the origin of urinary peptides based on a side-by-side comprehensive analysis of the plasma and urine peptidome. Twenty-two matched urine and plasma samples are analyzed for their peptidome using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS; for relative quantification) and CE or LC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (CE- or LC-MS/MS; for peptide identification). The overlap and association of abundance of the different peptides present in these two body fluids are evaluated. The authors are able to identify 561 plasma and 1461 urinary endogenous peptides. Only 90 peptides are detectable in both urine and plasma. No significant correlation is found when comparing the abundance of these common peptides, with the exception of collagen fragments. This observation is also supported when comparing published peptidome data from both plasma and urine. Most of the plasma peptides are not detectable in urine, possibly due to tubular reabsorption. The majority of urinary peptides may in fact originate in the kidney. The notable exception is collagen fragments, which indicates potential selective exclusion of these peptides from tubular reabsorption. Experimental verification of this hypothesis is warranted. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Using Data Independent Acquisition (DIA) to Model High-responding Peptides for Targeted Proteomics Experiments*

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Brian C.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Bollinger, James G.; Stergachis, Andrew B.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry is an essential tool for detecting quantitative changes in low abundant proteins throughout the proteome. Although selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is the preferred method for quantifying peptides in complex samples, the process of designing SRM assays is laborious. Peptides have widely varying signal responses dictated by sequence-specific physiochemical properties; one major challenge is in selecting representative peptides to target as a proxy for protein abundance. Here we present PREGO, a software tool that predicts high-responding peptides for SRM experiments. PREGO predicts peptide responses with an artificial neural network trained using 11 minimally redundant, maximally relevant properties. Crucial to its success, PREGO is trained using fragment ion intensities of equimolar synthetic peptides extracted from data independent acquisition experiments. Because of similarities in instrumentation and the nature of data collection, relative peptide responses from data independent acquisition experiments are a suitable substitute for SRM experiments because they both make quantitative measurements from integrated fragment ion chromatograms. Using an SRM experiment containing 12,973 peptides from 724 synthetic proteins, PREGO exhibits a 40–85% improvement over previously published approaches at selecting high-responding peptides. These results also represent a dramatic improvement over the rules-based peptide selection approaches commonly used in the literature. PMID:26100116

  7. Exploitation of the Ornithine Effect Enhances Characterization of Stapled and Cyclic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Christopher M.; Parker, W. Ryan; Jenner, Zachary B.; Bruns, Kerry A.; Akin, Lucas D.; McGee, William M.; Ciccimaro, Eugene; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-05-01

    A method to facilitate the characterization of stapled or cyclic peptides is reported via an arginine-selective derivatization strategy coupled with MS/MS analysis. Arginine residues are converted to ornithine residues through a deguanidination reaction that installs a highly selectively cleavable site in peptides. Upon activation by CID or UVPD, the ornithine residue cyclizes to promote cleavage of the adjacent amide bond. This Arg-specific process offers a unique strategy for site-selective ring opening of stapled and cyclic peptides. Upon activation of each derivatized peptide, site-specific backbone cleavage at the ornithine residue results in two complementary products: the lactam ring-containing portion of the peptide and the amine-containing portion. The deguanidination process not only provides a specific marker site that initiates fragmentation of the peptide but also offers a means to unlock the staple and differentiate isobaric stapled peptides.

  8. Tandem MS Analysis of Selenamide-Derivatized Peptide Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Chen, Hao

    2011-09-01

    Our previous study showed that selenamide reagents such as ebselen and N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) can be used for selective and rapid derivatization of protein/peptide thiols in high conversion yield. This paper reports the systematic investigation of MS/MS dissociation behaviors of selenamide-derivatized peptide ions upon collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). In the positive ion mode, derivatized peptide ions exhibit tag-dependent CID dissociation pathways. For instance, ebselen-derivatized peptide ions preferentially undergo Se-S bond cleavage upon CID to produce a characteristic fragment ion, the protonated ebselen ( m/z 276), which allows selective identification of thiol peptides from protein digest as well as selective detection of thiol proteins from protein mixture using precursor ion scan (PIS). In contrast, NPSP-derivatized peptide ions retain their phenylselenenyl tags during CID, which is useful in sequencing peptides and locating cysteine residues. In the negative ion CID mode, both types of tags are preferentially lost via the Se-S cleavage, analogous to the S-S bond cleavage during CID of disulfide-containing peptide anions. In consideration of the convenience in preparing selenamide-derivatized peptides and the similarity of Se-S of the tag to the S-S bond, we also examined ETD of the derivatized peptide ions to probe the mechanism for electron-based ion dissociation. Interestingly, facile cleavage of Se-S bond occurs to the peptide ions carrying either protons or alkali metal ions, while backbone cleavage to form c/z ions is severely inhibited. These results are in agreement with the Utah-Washington mechanism proposed for depicting electron-based ion dissociation processes.

  9. Combining Random Gene Fission and Rational Gene Fusion To Discover Near-Infrared Fluorescent Protein Fragments That Report on Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein–protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein–protein interactions within whole animals. PMID:25265085

  10. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  12. Peptides in melanoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Mocellin, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from tumor associated antigens can be utilized to elicit a therapeutically effective immune response against melanoma in experimental models. However, patient vaccination with peptides - although it is often followed by the induction of melanoma- specific T lymphocytes - is rarely associated with tumor response of clinical relevance. In this review I summarize the principles of peptide design as well as the results so far obtained in the clinical setting while treating cutaneous melanoma by means of this active immunotherapy strategy. I also discuss some immunological and methodological issues that might be helpful for the successful development of peptide-based vaccines.

  13. Non-disulfide-bridged peptides from Tityus serrulatus venom: Evidence for proline-free ACE-inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Zoccal, Karina Furlani; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Peigneur, Steve; Vriens, Kim; Thevissen, Karin; Cammue, Bruno Philippe Angelo; Júnior, Ronaldo Bragança Martins; Arruda, Eurico; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Tytgat, Jan; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2016-08-01

    The present study purifies two T. serrulatus non-disulfide-bridged peptides (NDBPs), named venom peptides 7.2 (RLRSKG) and 8 (KIWRS) and details their synthesis and biological activity, comparing to the synthetic venom peptide 7.1 (RLRSKGKK), previously identified. The synthetic replicate peptides were subjected to a range of biological assays: hemolytic, antifungal, antiviral, electrophysiological, immunological and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition activities. All venom peptides neither showed to be cytolytic nor demonstrated significant antifungal or antiviral activities. Interestingly, peptides were able to modulate macrophages' responses, increasing IL-6 production. The three venom peptides also demonstrated potential to inhibit ACE in the following order: 7.2>7.1>8. The ACE inhibition activity was unexpected, since peptides that display this function are usually proline-rich peptides. In attempt to understand the origin of such small peptides, we discovered that the isolated peptides 7.2 and 8 are fragments of the same molecule, named Pape peptide precursor. Furthermore, the study discusses that Pape fragments could be originated from a post-splitting mechanism resulting from metalloserrulases and other proteinases cleavage, which can be seen as a clever mechanism used by the scorpion to enlarge its repertoire of venom components. Scorpion venom remains as an interesting source of bioactive proteins and this study advances our knowledge about three NDBPs and their biological activities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  15. De novo peptide sequencing by deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Zhang, Xianglilan; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    De novo peptide sequencing from tandem MS data is the key technology in proteomics for the characterization of proteins, especially for new sequences, such as mAbs. In this study, we propose a deep neural network model, DeepNovo, for de novo peptide sequencing. DeepNovo architecture combines recent advances in convolutional neural networks and recurrent neural networks to learn features of tandem mass spectra, fragment ions, and sequence patterns of peptides. The networks are further integrated with local dynamic programming to solve the complex optimization task of de novo sequencing. We evaluated the method on a wide variety of species and found that DeepNovo considerably outperformed state of the art methods, achieving 7.7–22.9% higher accuracy at the amino acid level and 38.1–64.0% higher accuracy at the peptide level. We further used DeepNovo to automatically reconstruct the complete sequences of antibody light and heavy chains of mouse, achieving 97.5–100% coverage and 97.2–99.5% accuracy, without assisting databases. Moreover, DeepNovo is retrainable to adapt to any sources of data and provides a complete end-to-end training and prediction solution to the de novo sequencing problem. Not only does our study extend the deep learning revolution to a new field, but it also shows an innovative approach in solving optimization problems by using deep learning and dynamic programming. PMID:28720701

  16. The Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptide 19-2.5 Interacts with Heparanase and Heparan Sulfate in Murine and Human Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; De Santis, Rebecca; Koczera, Patrick; Simons, Nadine; Haase, Hajo; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains from their proteoglycans. Thereby, heparanase liberates highly potent circulating heparan sulfate-fragments (HS-fragments) and triggers the fatal and excessive inflammatory response in sepsis. As a potential anti-inflammatory agent for sepsis therapy, peptide 19-2.5 belongs to the class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides; however, its activity is not restricted to Gram-negative bacterial infection. We hypothesized that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase and/or HS, thereby reducing the levels of circulating HS-fragments in murine and human sepsis. Our data indicate that the treatment of septic mice with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals lowers levels of plasma heparanase and circulating HS-fragments and reduces heparanase activity. Additionally, mRNA levels of heparanase in heart, liver, lung, kidney and spleen are downregulated in septic mice treated with peptide 19-2.5 compared to untreated control animals. In humans, plasma heparanase level and activity are elevated in septic shock. The ex vivo addition of peptide 19-2.5 to plasma of septic shock patients decreases heparanase activity but not heparanase level. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed a strong exothermic reaction between peptide 19-2.5 and heparanase and HS-fragments. However, a saturation character has been identified only in the peptide 19-2.5 and HS interaction. In conclusion, the findings of our current study indicate that peptide 19-2.5 interacts with heparanase, which is elevated in murine and human sepsis and consecutively attenuates the generation of circulating HS-fragments in systemic inflammation. Thus, peptide 19-2.5 seems to be a potential anti-inflammatory agent in sepsis.

  17. Mass spectrometry for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Whitehouse, Andrew J; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2017-11-08

    Fragment-based approaches in chemical biology and drug discovery have been widely adopted worldwide in both academia and industry. Fragment hits tend to interact weakly with their targets, necessitating the use of sensitive biophysical techniques to detect their binding. Common fragment screening techniques include differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and ligand-observed NMR. Validation and characterization of hits is usually performed using a combination of protein-observed NMR, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and X-ray crystallography. In this context, MS is a relatively underutilized technique in fragment screening for drug discovery. MS-based techniques have the advantage of high sensitivity, low sample consumption and being label-free. This review highlights recent examples of the emerging use of MS-based techniques in fragment screening. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Fragment Screening and HIV Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Patel, Disha; Arnold, Eddy

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening has proven to be a powerful alternative to traditional methods for drug discovery. Biophysical methods, such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance, are used to screen a diverse library of small molecule compounds. Although compounds identified via this approach have relatively weak affinity, they provide a good platform for lead development and are highly efficient binders with respect to their size. Fragment screening has been utilized for a wide-range of targets, including HIV-1 proteins. Here, we review the fragment screening studies targeting HIV-1 proteins using X-ray crystallography or surface plasmon resonance. These studies have successfully detected binding of novel fragments to either previously established or new sites on HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. In addition, fragment screening against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been used as a tool to better understand the complex nature of ligand binding to a flexible target. PMID:21972022

  19. Fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Feyfant, Eric; Cross, Jason B; Paris, Kevin; Tsao, Désirée H H

    2011-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD), which is comprised of both fragment screening and the use of fragment hits to design leads, began more than 15 years ago and has been steadily gaining in popularity and utility. Its origin lies on the fact that the coverage of chemical space and the binding efficiency of hits are directly related to the size of the compounds screened. Nevertheless, FBDD still faces challenges, among them developing fragment screening libraries that ensure optimal coverage of chemical space, physical properties and chemical tractability. Fragment screening also requires sensitive assays, often biophysical in nature, to detect weak binders. In this chapter we will introduce the technologies used to address these challenges and outline the experimental advantages that make FBDD one of the most popular new hit-to-lead process.

  20. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  1. Antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of its synthetic fragments.

    PubMed

    Belguesmia, Y; Choiset, Y; Rabesona, H; Baudy-Floc'h, M; Le Blay, G; Haertlé, T; Chobert, J-M

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the antifungal properties of durancins isolated from Enterococcus durans A5-11 and of their chemically synthesized fragments. Enterococcus durans A5-11 is a lactic acid bacteria strain isolated from traditional Mongolian airag cheese. This strain inhibits the growth of several fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Penicillium roqueforti and Debaryomyces hansenii. It produces two bacteriocins: durancin A5-11a and durancin A5-11b, which have similar antimicrobial properties. The whole durancins A5-11a and A5-11b, as well as their N- and C-terminal fragments were synthesized, and their antifungal properties were studied. C-terminal fragments of both durancins showed stronger antifungal activities than other tested peptides. Treatment of D. hansenii LMSA2.11.003 strain with 2 mmol l(-1) of the synthetic peptides led to the loss of the membrane integrity and to several changes in the ultra-structure of the yeast cells. Chemically synthesized durancins and their synthetic fragments showed different antimicrobial properties from each other. N-terminal peptides show activities against both bacterial and fungal strains tested. C-terminal peptides have specific activities against tested fungal strain and do not show antibacterial activity. However, the C-terminal fragment enhances the activity of the N-terminal fragment in the whole bacteriocins against bacteria. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Peptidomic analysis of the extensive array of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of the dodecaploid frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Coquet, Laurent; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Jouenne, Thierry; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Uganda clawed frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis with a karyotype of 2n=108 is one of the very few vertebrates with dodecaploid status. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from this species led to the isolation and structural characterization of 23 host-defense peptides belonging to the following families: magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 6 peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; 3 peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; 8 peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; 3 peptides). In addition, the secretions contained caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, and two peptides that were identified as members of the trefoil factor family (TFF). The data indicate that silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following polyploidization has been appreciable and non-uniform. Consistent with data derived from comparison of nucleotide sequences of mitochrondrial and nuclear genes, cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of the host-defense peptides provide support for an evolutionary scenario in which X. ruwenzoriensis arose from an allopolyploidization event involving an octoploid ancestor of the present-day frogs belonging to the Xenopus amieti species group and a tetraploid ancestor of Xenopus pygmaeus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  4. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    De Brito, Rory C F; Cardoso, Jamille M De O; Reis, Levi E S; Vieira, Joao F; Mathias, Fernando A S; Roatt, Bruno M; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian D O; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Resende, Daniela de M; Reis, Alexandre B

    2018-01-01

    Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  5. Role of the Cationic C-Terminal Segment of Melittin on Membrane Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Alexandre; Fournier, Alain; Lafleur, Michel

    2016-05-05

    The widespread distribution of cationic antimicrobial peptides capable of membrane fragmentation in nature underlines their importance to living organisms. In the present work, we determined the impact of the electrostatic interactions associated with the cationic C-terminal segment of melittin, a 26-amino acid peptide from bee venom (net charge +6), on its binding to model membranes and on the resulting fragmentation. In order to detail the role played by the C-terminal charges, we prepared a melittin analogue for which the four cationic amino acids in positions 21-24 were substituted with the polar residue citrulline, providing a peptide with the same length and amphiphilicity but with a lower net charge (+2). We compared the peptide bilayer affinity and the membrane fragmentation for bilayers prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DPPS) mixtures. It is shown that neutralization of the C-terminal considerably increased melittin affinity for zwitterionic membranes. The unfavorable contribution associated with transferring the cationic C-terminal in a less polar environment was reduced, leaving the hydrophobic interactions, which drive the peptide insertion in bilayers, with limited counterbalancing interactions. The presence of negatively charged lipids (DPPS) in bilayers increased melittin binding by introducing attractive electrostatic interactions, the augmentation being, as expected, greater for native melittin than for its citrullinated analogue. The membrane fragmentation power of the peptide was shown to be controlled by electrostatic interactions and could be modulated by the charge carried by both the membrane and the lytic peptide. The analysis of the lipid composition of the extracted fragments from DPPC/DPPS bilayers revealed no lipid specificity. It is proposed that extended phase separations are more susceptible to lead to the extraction of a lipid species in a specific manner

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  7. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  8. Nature of the Charged-Group Effect on the Stability of the C-Peptide Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Kevin R.; Kim, Peter S.; Brems, David N.; Marqusee, Susan; York, Eunice J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Stewart, John M.; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1985-04-01

    The residues responsible for the pH-dependent stability of the helix formed by the isolated C-peptide (residues 1-13 of ribonuclease A) have been identified by chemical synthesis of analogues and measurement of their helix-forming properties. Each of the residues ionizing between pH 2 and pH 8 has been replaced separately by an uncharged residue. Protonation of Glu-2- is responsible for the sharp decrease in helix stability between pH 5 and pH 2, and deprotonation of His-12+ causes a similar decrease between pH 5 and pH 8. Glu-9- is not needed for helix stability. The results cannot be explained by the Zimm-Bragg model and host-guest data for α -helix formation, which predict that the stability of the C-peptide helix should increase when Glu-2- is protonated or when His-12+ is deprotonated. Moreover, histidine+ is a strong helix-breaker in host-guest studies. In proteins, acidic and basic residues tend to occur at opposite ends of α -helices: acidic residues occur preferentially near the NH2-terminal end and basic residues near the COOH-terminal end. A possible explanation, based on a helix dipole model, has been given [Blagdon, D. E. & Goodman, M. (1975) Biopolymers 14, 241-245]. Our results are consistent with the helix dipole model and they support the suggestion that the distribution of charged residues in protein helices reflects the helix-stabilizing propensity of those residues. Because Glu-9 is not needed for helix stability, a possible Glu-9-\\cdots His-12+ salt bridge does not contribute significantly to helix stability. The role of a possible Glu-2-\\cdots Arg-10+ salt bridge has not yet been evaluated. A charged-group effect on α -helix stability in water has also been observed in a different peptide system [Ihara, S., Ooi, T. & Takahashi, S. (1982) Biopolymers 21, 131-145]: block copolymers containing (Ala)20 and (Glu)20 show partial helix formation at low temperatures, pH 7.5, where the glutamic acid residues are ionized. (Glu)20(Ala)20Phe forms a

  9. New cyclic peptides with osteoblastic proliferative activity from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yun; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2012-03-01

    Two new cyclic peptides, dianthins G-H (1 and 2), together with the known dianthin E (3), were isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Dianthus superbus. The sequences of cyclic peptides 1 and 2 were elucidated as cyclo (-Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Leu(3)-Thr(4)-Leu(5)-Phe(6)-) and cyclo (-Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Val(3)-Thr(4)-Ile(5)-Phe(6)-), on the basis of ESI tandem mass fragmentation analysis, extensive 2D NMR methods and X-ray diffraction. The isolated three compounds all increase proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro using MTT method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure-activity relationships of an antimicrobial peptide plantaricin s from two-peptide class IIb bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Wael; Wang, Liru; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2011-04-14

    Class IIb bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides comprising two different peptides synergistically acting in equal amounts for optimal potency. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time potent (nanomolar) antimicrobial activity of a representative class IIb bacteriocin, plantaricin S (Pls), against four pathogenic gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. The structure-activity relationships for Pls were studied using activity assays, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The two Pls peptides and five Pls derived fragments were synthesized. The CD spectra of the Pls and selected fragments revealed helical conformations in aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The MD simulations showed that when the two Pls peptides are in antiparallel orientation, the helical regions interact and align, mediated by strong attraction between conserved GxxxG/AxxxA motifs. The results strongly correlate with the antimicrobial activity suggesting that helix-helix alignment of the two Pls peptides and interaction between the conserved motifs are crucial for interaction with the target cell membrane.

  11. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of the octoploid frogs Xenopus vestitus and Xenopus wittei (Pipidae): insights into evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Michalak, Katarzyna; Michalak, Pawel; Conlon, J Michael

    2014-09-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides have proved useful in elucidating the evolution history of frogs. Peptidomic analysis was used to compare the diversity of host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid frogs, Xenopus vestitus (Kivu clawed frog) and Xenopus wittei (De Witte's clawed frog) in the family Pipidae. Structural characterization demonstrated that the X. vestitus peptides belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 4 peptides), xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF; 1 peptide), and caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF; 5 peptides) families. The X. wittei peptides comprise magainin (4 peptides), PGLa (1 peptide), XPF (2 peptides), and CPF (7 peptides). In addition, secretions from both species contain caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, but X. wittei secretions contains the novel peptide [R4K]xenopsin. The variability in the numbers of paralogs in each peptide family indicates a selective silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following the polyploidization events. The primary structures of the peptides provide insight into phylogenetic relationships among the octoploid Xenopus frogs. The data support a sister-group relationship between X. vestitus and Xenopus lenduensis, suggestive of bifurcating speciation after allopolyploidization, whereas X. wittei is more closely related to the Xenopus amieti-Xenopus andrei group suggesting a common tetraploid ancestor. Consistent with previous data, the CPF peptides showed the highest growth inhibitory activity against bacteria with CPF-W6 (GIGSLLAKAAKLAAGLV.NH2) combining high antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=4 μM) with relatively low hemolytic activity (LC50=190 μM). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Contact lens materials, mucin fragmentation and relation to symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berry, Monica; Purslow, Chris; Murphy, Paul J; Pult, Heiko

    2012-07-01

    Mucins adhere to contact lenses (CLs), reflecting the renewal of the preocular fluid and enzymatic activity at the ocular surface. In this study, we aimed to analyze mucin fragmentation on materials new to the ocular surface and investigate whether this correlates with wearing comfort. Lenses were obtained from new CL wearers after 2 weeks each of wearing vifilcon A, followed by senofilcon A, and then by vifilcon A lenses. Symptoms were evaluated using the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI). CLs were extracted in a mixture of guanidinium hydrochloride and radioimmunoprecipitation assay buffer. Mucin mobility was analyzed after electrophoresis, Western blotting, and visualization with antibodies against mucin peptide core. Mobilities, normalized to total reactivity in the lane, were compared between visits for each subject and were expressed as shifts. Mucin (MUC)5AC polymers exceeding 260 kDa were observed in agarose gels; NuPAGE resolved polymers from 260 to 3.5 kDa: when large mucins were detected, the smallest fragments were missing. Fragmentation patterns were significantly different between lens types for MUC1 (analysis of variance, P = 0.006) and MUC4 (P < 0.001) but not for MUC5AC or MUC16 (P > 0.293). Mobility shifts of MUC1 and MUC4 were significantly negatively correlated (Pearson, r = -0.908; P = 0.002). For OSDI scores >15, mucin fragmentation was unchanged, whereas for OSDI scores <15, MUC4 and MUC5AC fragments were longer on vifilcon A than on senofilcon lenses (unpaired t test, P = 0.046), irrespective of the direction of change (analysis of variance, P > 0.366). Changes in MUC1 breakdown were significantly negatively correlated to the overall OSDI score (r = -0.891, P = 0.001). In asymptomatic CL wearers, only changes in mucin fragmentation in response to a new material were consistent and fast, irrespective of CL order. Lack of change seems, therefore, to be connected with discomfort during CL wear.

  13. Electron Transfer Dissociation of iTRAQ Labeled Peptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Pappin, Darryl J.; Ross, Philip L; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Triply and doubly charged iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation) labeled peptide cations from a tryptic peptide mixture of bovine carbonic anhydrase II were subjected to electron transfer ion/ion reactions to investigate the effect of charge bearing modifications associated with iTRAQ on the fragmentation pattern. It was noted that electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of triply charged or activated ETD (ETD + supplemental collisional activation of intact electron transfer species) of doubly charged iTRAQ tagged peptide ions yielded extensive sequence information, in analogy with ETD of unmodified peptide ions. That is, addition of the fixed charge iTRAQ tag showed relatively little deleterious effect on the ETD performance of the modified peptides. ETD of the triply charged iTRAQ labeled peptide ions followed by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the product ion at m/z 162 yielded the reporter ion at m/z 116, which is the reporter ion used for quantitation via CID of the same precursor ions. The reporter ion formed via the two-step activation process is expected to provide quantitative information similar to that directly produced from CID. A 103 Da neutral loss species observed in the ETD spectra of all the triply and doubly charged iTRAQ labeled peptide ions is unique to the 116 Da iTRAQ reagent, which implies that this process also has potential for quantitation of peptides/proteins. Therefore, ETD with or without supplemental collisional activation, depending on the precursor ion charge state, has the potential to directly identify and quantify the peptides/proteins simultaneously using existing iTRAQ reagents. PMID:18646790

  14. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; de Souza, Gustavo A; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2016-05-05

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells.

  15. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  16. Dynamics of Protonated Peptide Ion Collisions with Organic Surfaces: Consonance of Simulation and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pratihar, Subha; Barnes, George L.; Laskin, Julia

    In this Perspective mass spectrometry experiments and chemical dynamics simulations are described which have explored the atomistic dynamics of protonated peptide ions, peptide-H+, colliding with organic surfaces. These studies have investigated surface-induced dissociation (SID) for which peptide-H+ fragments upon collision with the surface, peptide-H+ physisorption on the surface, soft landing (SL), and peptide-H+ reaction with the surface, reactive landing (RL). The simulations include QM+MM and QM/MM direct dynamics. For collisions with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces there is quite good agreement between experiment and simulation in the efficiency of energy transfer to the peptide-H+ ion’s internal degrees of freedom. Both themore » experiments and simulations show two mechanisms for peptide-H+ fragmentation, i.e. shattering and statistical, RRKM dynamics. Mechanisms for SL are probed in simulations of collisions of protonated dialanine with a perfluorinated SAM surface. RL has been studied experimentally for a number of peptide-H+ + surface systems, and qualitative agreement between simulation and experiment is found for two similar systems.« less

  17. Peptides derivatized with bicyclic quaternary ammonium ionization tags. Sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Setner, Bartosz; Rudowska, Magdalena; Klem, Ewelina; Cebrat, Marek; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2014-10-01

    Improving the sensitivity of detection and fragmentation of peptides to provide reliable sequencing of peptides is an important goal of mass spectrometric analysis. Peptides derivatized by bicyclic quaternary ammonium ionization tags: 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (ABCO) or 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO), are characterized by an increased detection sensitivity in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and longer retention times on the reverse-phase (RP) chromatography columns. The improvement of the detection limit was observed even for peptides dissolved in 10 mM NaCl. Collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry of quaternary ammonium salts derivatives of peptides showed dominant a- and b-type ions, allowing facile sequencing of peptides. The bicyclic ionization tags are stable in collision-induced dissociation experiments, and the resulted fragmentation pattern is not significantly influenced by either acidic or basic amino acid residues in the peptide sequence. Obtained results indicate the general usefulness of the bicyclic quaternary ammonium ionization tags for ESI-MS/MS sequencing of peptides. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    SciTech Connect

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.

    2015-12-28

    We have studied the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4, and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insight into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. The photodissociation yields appear tomore » be very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending on both the types of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.« less

  19. UV Resonance Raman Elucidation of the Terminal and Internal Peptide Bond Conformations of Crystalline and Solution Oligoglycines.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Sergei V; Asher, Sanford A

    2010-11-30

    Spectroscopic investigations of macromolecules generally attempt to interpret the measured spectra in terms of the summed contributions of the different molecular fragments. This is the basis of the local mode approximation in vibrational spectroscopy. In the case of resonance Raman spectroscopy independent contributions of molecular fragments require both a local mode-like behavior and the uncoupled electronic transitions. Here we show that the deep UV resonance Raman spectra of aqueous solution phase oligoglycines show independent peptide bond molecular fragment contributions indicating that peptide bonds electronic transitions and vibrational modes are uncoupled. We utilize this result to separately determine the conformational distributions of the internal and penultimate peptide bonds of oligoglycines. Our data indicate that in aqueous solution the oligoglycine terminal residues populate conformations similar to those found in crystals (3(1)-helices and β-strands), but with a broader distribution, while the internal peptide bond conformations are centered around the 3(1)-helix Ramachandran angles.

  20. VUV action spectroscopy of protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide in the 6-14 eV range

    DOE PAGES

    Ranković, M. Lj.; Canon, F.; Nahon, L.; ...

    2015-12-29

    We have studied the VUV photodissociation of gas-phase protonated leucine-enkephalin peptide ion in the 5.7 to 14 eV photon energy range by coupling a linear quadrupole ion trap with a synchrotron radiation source. We report VUV activation tandem mass spectra at 6.7, 8.4 and 12.8 eV photon energies and photodissociation yields for a number of selected fragments. The obtained results provide insights into both near VUV radiation damage and electronic properties of a model peptide. We could distinguish several absorption bands and assign them to particular electronic transitions, according to previous theoretical studies. Furthermore, the photodissociation yields appear to bemore » very different for the various observed fragmentation channels, depending both on the type of fragments and their position along the peptide backbone. The present results are discussed in light of recent gas-phase spectroscopic data on peptides.« less

  1. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-07

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  2. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS 3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. BIOPEP database and other programs for processing bioactive peptide sequences.

    PubMed

    Minkiewicz, Piotr; Dziuba, Jerzy; Iwaniak, Anna; Dziuba, Marta; Darewicz, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    This review presents the potential for application of computational tools in peptide science based on a sample BIOPEP database and program as well as other programs and databases available via the World Wide Web. The BIOPEP application contains a database of biologically active peptide sequences and a program enabling construction of profiles of the potential biological activity of protein fragments, calculation of quantitative descriptors as measures of the value of proteins as potential precursors of bioactive peptides, and prediction of bonds susceptible to hydrolysis by endopeptidases in a protein chain. Other bioactive and allergenic peptide sequence databases are also presented. Programs enabling the construction of binary and multiple alignments between peptide sequences, the construction of sequence motifs attributed to a given type of bioactivity, searching for potential precursors of bioactive peptides, and the prediction of sites susceptible to proteolytic cleavage in protein chains are available via the Internet as are other approaches concerning secondary structure prediction and calculation of physicochemical features based on amino acid sequence. Programs for prediction of allergenic and toxic properties have also been developed. This review explores the possibilities of cooperation between various programs.

  4. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper D; Roepstorff, Peter; Ploug, Michael; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2008-12-01

    We have previously shown that peptide amide hydrogens undergo extensive intramolecular migration (i.e., complete hydrogen scrambling) upon collisional activation of protonated peptides (Jørgensen et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 2785-2793). The occurrence of hydrogen scrambling enforces severe limitations on the application of gas-phase fragmentation as a convenient method to obtain information about the site-specific deuterium uptake for proteins and peptides in solution. To investigate whether deprotonated peptides exhibit a lower level of scrambling relative to their protonated counterparts, we have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H/(2)H) have migrated extensively in the anionic peptide, thereby erasing the original regioselective deuteration pattern obtained in solution.

  5. Using Gas-Phase Guest-Host Chemistry to Probe the Structures of b Ions of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, Árpád; Harrison, Alex G.; Paizs, Béla

    2012-12-01

    Middle-sized b n ( n ≥ 5) fragments of protonated peptides undergo selective complex formation with ammonia under experimental conditions typically used to probe hydrogen-deuterium exchange in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Other usual peptide fragments like y, a, a*, etc., and small b n ( n ≤ 4) fragments do not form stable ammonia adducts. We propose that complex formation of b n ions with ammonia is characteristic to macrocyclic isomers of these fragments. Experiments on a protonated cyclic peptide and N-terminal acetylated peptides fully support this hypothesis; the protonated cyclic peptide does form ammonia adducts while linear b n ions of acetylated peptides do not undergo complexation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the proton-bound dimers of all-Ala b 4 , b 5 , and b 7 ions and ammonia indicate that the ionizing proton initially located on the peptide fragment transfers to ammonia upon adduct formation. The ammonium ion is then solvated by N+-H…O H-bonds; this stabilization is much stronger for macrocyclic b n isomers due to the stable cage-like structure formed and entropy effects. The present study demonstrates that gas-phase guest-host chemistry can be used to selectively probe structural features (i.e., macrocyclic or linear) of fragments of protonated peptides. Stable ammonia adducts of b 9 , b 9 -A, and b 9 -2A of A8YA, and b 13 of A20YVFL are observed indicating that even these large b-type ions form macrocyclic structures.

  6. Simultaneous alignment and clustering of peptide data using a Gibbs sampling approach.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Massimo; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Proteins recognizing short peptide fragments play a central role in cellular signaling. As a result of high-throughput technologies, peptide-binding protein specificities can be studied using large peptide libraries at dramatically lower cost and time. Interpretation of such large peptide datasets, however, is a complex task, especially when the data contain multiple receptor binding motifs, and/or the motifs are found at different locations within distinct peptides. The algorithm presented in this article, based on Gibbs sampling, identifies multiple specificities in peptide data by performing two essential tasks simultaneously: alignment and clustering of peptide data. We apply the method to de-convolute binding motifs in a panel of peptide datasets with different degrees of complexity spanning from the simplest case of pre-aligned fixed-length peptides to cases of unaligned peptide datasets of variable length. Example applications described in this article include mixtures of binders to different MHC class I and class II alleles, distinct classes of ligands for SH3 domains and sub-specificities of the HLA-A*02:01 molecule. The Gibbs clustering method is available online as a web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GibbsCluster.

  7. Avian persistence in fragmented rainforest.

    PubMed

    Lens, Luc; Van Dongen, Stefan; Norris, Ken; Githiru, Mwangi; Matthysen, Erik

    2002-11-08

    What factors determine the persistence of species in fragmented habitats? To address this question, we studied the relative impacts of forest deterioration and fragmentation on bird species in 12 rainforest fragments in Kenya, combining 6 years of individual capture-recapture data with measurements of current captures and museum specimens. Species mobility, as estimated from species-specific dispersal rates, and tolerance to habitat deterioration, as estimated from change in fluctuating asymmetry with increasing habitat disturbance, explained 88% of the variation in patch occupancy among eight forest bird species. Occupancy increased with mobility and with tolerance to deterioration, where both variables contributed equally to this relationship. We conclude that individual-level study, such as of dispersal behavior and phenotypic development, can predict patterns of persistence at the species level. More generally, for conservation tactics to stand a high chance of success, they should include action both within sites, to minimize habitat deterioration, and across landscapes, to maximize dispersal.

  8. Toxicity of Biologically Active Peptides and Future Safety Aspects: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2018-02-18

    Peptides are fragments of proteins with significant biological activities. These peptides are encoded in the protein sequence. Initially, such peptides are inactive in their parental form, unless proteolytic enzymes are released. These peptides then exhibit various functions and play a therapeutic role in the body. Besides the therapeutic and physiological activities of peptides, the main purpose of this study was to highlight the safety aspects of peptides. We performed an organized search of available literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline, EMBASE, Reaxys and Scopus databases. All the relevant citations including research and review articles about the toxicity of biologically active peptides were evaluated and gathered in this study. Biological peptides are widely used in the daily routine ranging from food production to the cosmetics industry and also they have a beneficial role in the treatment and prevention of different diseases. These peptides are manufactured by both chemical and biotechnological techniques, which show negligible toxicity, however, some naturally occurring peptides and enzymes may induce high toxicity. Depending upon the demand and expected use in the food or pharmaceutical industry, we need different approaches to acertain the safety of these peptides preferentially through in silico methods. Intestinal wall disruption, erythrocytes and lymphocytes toxicity, free radical production, enzymopathic and immunopathic tissue damage and cytotoxicity due to the consumption of peptides are the main problems in the biological system that lead to various complicated disorders. Therefore, before considering biologically active peptides for food production and for therapeutic purpose, it is first necessary to evaluate the immunogenicity and toxicities of peptides. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions: insights from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Girod, Marion; Sanader, Zeljka; Vojkovic, Marin; Antoine, Rodolphe; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions leads to unusual product ions. In this paper, we report laser-induced dissociation of a series of proline-containing peptides at 213 nm. We observe specific fragmentation pathways corresponding to the formation of (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. This was not observed at 266 nm or for peptides which do not contain proline residues. In order to obtain insights into the fragmentation dynamics at 213 nm, a small peptide (RPK for arginine-proline-lysine) was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations of absorption spectra and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (MD) were made. Second and third excited singlet states, S(2) and S(3), lie close to 213 nm. Non-adiabatic MD simulation starting from S(2) and S(3) shows that these transitions are followed by C-C and C-N bond activation close to the proline residue. After this first relaxation step, consecutive rearrangements and proton transfers are required to produce unusual (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. These fragmentation mechanisms were confirmed by H/D exchange experiments.

  10. UV Photodissociation of Proline-containing Peptide Ions: Insights from Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Marion; Sanader, Zeljka; Vojkovic, Marin; Antoine, Rodolphe; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    UV photodissociation of proline-containing peptide ions leads to unusual product ions. In this paper, we report laser-induced dissociation of a series of proline-containing peptides at 213 nm. We observe specific fragmentation pathways corresponding to the formation of (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. This was not observed at 266 nm or for peptides which do not contain proline residues. In order to obtain insights into the fragmentation dynamics at 213 nm, a small peptide (RPK for arginine-proline-lysine) was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Calculations of absorption spectra and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (MD) were made. Second and third excited singlet states, S2 and S3, lie close to 213 nm. Non-adiabatic MD simulation starting from S2 and S3 shows that these transitions are followed by C-C and C-N bond activation close to the proline residue. After this first relaxation step, consecutive rearrangements and proton transfers are required to produce unusual (y-2), (a + 2) and (b + 2) fragment ions. These fragmentation mechanisms were confirmed by H/D exchange experiments.

  11. Fragmentation of molecular tributyltin chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmekhin, S.; Caló, A.; Kisand, V.; Nõmmiste, E.; Kotilainen, H.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.

    2008-06-01

    Fragmentation of tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) vapour has been studied experimentally by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry at the photon energy range of 9-25 eV of synchrotron radiation, at 21.22 eV of HeI as well as with 500 eV electron beam excitation. Branching ratios of the tributyltin chloride fragments taken with HeI and synchrotron radiation have been presented first time. Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were carried out for TBTCl and the ionization energies obtained were used to predict the dissociation pathways creating the observed ions.

  12. An EThcD-Based Method for Discrimination of Leucine and Isoleucine Residues in Tryptic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Kovalyov, Sergey V.; Samgina, Tatiana Yu.; Lebedev, Albert T.

    2017-08-01

    An EThcD-based approach for the reliable discrimination of isomeric leucine and isoleucine residues in peptide de novo sequencing procedure has been proposed. A multistage fragmentation of peptide ions was performed with Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer in electrospray ionization mode. At the first stage, z-ions were produced by ETD or ETcaD fragmentation of doubly or triply charged peptide precursor ions. These primary ions were further fragmented by HCD with broad-band ion isolation, and the resulting w-ions showed different mass for leucine and isoleucine residues. The procedure did not require manual isolation of specific z-ions prior to HCD stage. Forty-three tryptic peptides (3 to 27 residues) obtained by trypsinolysis of human serum albumin (HSA) and gp188 protein were analyzed. To demonstrate a proper solution for radical site migration problem, three non-tryptic peptides were also analyzed. A total of 93 leucine and isoleucine residues were considered and 83 of them were correctly identified. The developed approach can be a reasonable substitution for additional Edman degradation procedure, which is still used in peptide sequencing for leucine and isoleucine discrimination.

  13. Characterizing Peptide Neutral Losses Induced by Negative Electron-Transfer Dissociation (NETD)

    PubMed Central

    Rumachik, Neil G.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Russell, Jason D.; Bailey, Derek J.; Wenger, Craig D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We implemented negative electron-transfer dissociation (NETD) on a hybrid ion trap/Orbitrap mass spectrometer to conduct ion/ion reactions using peptide anions and radical reagent cations. In addition to sequence-informative ladders of a•- and x-type fragment ions, NETD generated intense neutral loss peaks corresponding to the entire or partial side-chain cleavage from amino acids constituting a given peptide. Thus, a critical step towards the characterization of this recently introduced fragmentation technique is a systematic study of synthetic peptides to identify common neutral losses and preferential fragmentation pathways. Examining 46 synthetic peptides with high mass accuracy and high resolution analysis permitted facile determination of the chemical composition of each neutral loss. We identified 19 unique neutral losses from 14 amino acids and three modified amino acids, and assessed the specificity and sensitivity of each neutral loss using a database of 1542 confidently identified peptides generated from NETD shotgun experiments employing high-pH separations and negative electrospray ionization. As residue-specific neutral losses indicate the presence of certain amino acids, we determined that many neutral losses have potential diagnostic utility. We envision this catalogue of neutral losses being incorporated into database search algorithms to improve peptide identification specificity and to further advance characterization of the acidic proteome. PMID:22290482

  14. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  16. Peptidomic Identification of Cysteine-Rich Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Hemu, Xinya; Serra, Aida; Darwis, Dina A; Cornvik, Tobias; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tam, James P

    2018-01-01

    Plant cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) constitute a majority of plant-derived peptides with high molecular diversity. This protocol describes a rapid and efficient peptidomic approach to identify a whole spectrum of CRPs in a plant extract and decipher their molecular diversity and bioprocessing mechanism. Cyclotides from C. ternatea are used as the model CRPs to demonstrate our methodology. Cyclotides exist naturally in both cyclic and linear forms, although the linear forms (acyclotide) are generally present at much lower concentrations. Both cyclotides and acyclotides require linearization of their backbone prior to fragmentation and sequencing. A novel and practical three-step chemoenzymatic treatment was developed to linearize and distinguish both forms: (1) N-terminal acetylation that pre-labels the acyclotides; (2) conversion of Cys into pseudo-Lys through aziridine-mediated S-alkylation to reduce disulfide bonds and to increase the net charge of peptides; and (3) opening of cyclic backbones by the novel asparaginyl endopeptidase butelase 2 that cleaves at the native bioprocessing site. The treated peptides are subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry using electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and sequences are identified by matching the MS/MS spectra directly with the transcriptomic database.

  17. Dynamic reassembly of peptide RADA16 nanofiber scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Hidenori; Kinoshita, Takatoshi; Zhang, Shuguang

    2005-06-01

    Nanofiber structures of some peptides and proteins as biological materials have been studied extensively, but their molecular mechanism of self-assembly and reassembly still remains unclear. We report here the reassembly of an ionic self-complementary peptide RADARADARADARADA (RADA16-I) that forms a well defined nanofiber scaffold. The 16-residue peptide forms stable -sheet structure and undergoes molecular self-assembly into nanofibers and eventually a scaffold hydrogel consisting of >99.5% water. In this study, the nanofiber scaffold was sonicated into smaller fragments. Circular dichroism, atomic force microscopy, and rheology were used to follow the kinetics of the reassembly. These sonicated fragments not only quickly reassemble into nanofibers that were indistinguishable from the original material, but their reassembly also correlated with the rheological analyses showing an increase of scaffold rigidity as a function of nanofiber length. The disassembly and reassembly processes were repeated four times and, each time, the reassembly reached the original length. We proposed a plausible sliding diffusion model to interpret the reassembly involving complementary nanofiber cohesive ends. This reassembly process is important for fabrication of new scaffolds for 3D cell culture, tissue repair, and regenerative medicine. atomic force microscopy | circular dichroism | dynamic behaviors | ionic self-complementary peptides | nanofiber hydrogels

  18. Destruction of Peptides and Nucleosides in Reactions with Low-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftakhov, M. V.; Shchukin, P. V.

    2018-05-01

    Mass-spectrometry of negative ions is used to study dissociative electron capture by molecules of several nucleosides, simplest di- and tripeptides, and modified dipeptides. Energy domains and efficiencies of dissociative capture are determined for the objects under study, and threshold energies of several fragmentation processes are estimated. It is shown that cytidine and peptides are stable against fragmentation due to simple bond breaking at electron energies ranging from 0 to 1 eV.

  19. Context-Sensitive Markov Models for Peptide Scoring and Identification from Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Himanshu; Wallstrom, Garrick; Wu, Christine C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Peptide and protein identification via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) lies at the heart of proteomic characterization of biological samples. Several algorithms are able to search, score, and assign peptides to large MS/MS datasets. Most popular methods, however, underutilize the intensity information available in the tandem mass spectrum due to the complex nature of the peptide fragmentation process, thus contributing to loss of potential identifications. We present a novel probabilistic scoring algorithm called Context-Sensitive Peptide Identification (CSPI) based on highly flexible Input-Output Hidden Markov Models (IO-HMM) that capture the influence of peptide physicochemical properties on their observed MS/MS spectra. We use several local and global properties of peptides and their fragment ions from literature. Comparison with two popular algorithms, Crux (re-implementation of SEQUEST) and X!Tandem, on multiple datasets of varying complexity, shows that peptide identification scores from our models are able to achieve greater discrimination between true and false peptides, identifying up to ∼25% more peptides at a False Discovery Rate (FDR) of 1%. We evaluated two alternative normalization schemes for fragment ion-intensities, a global rank-based and a local window-based. Our results indicate the importance of appropriate normalization methods for learning superior models. Further, combining our scores with Crux using a state-of-the-art procedure, Percolator, we demonstrate the utility of using scoring features from intensity-based models, identifying ∼4-8 % additional identifications over Percolator at 1% FDR. IO-HMMs offer a scalable and flexible framework with several modeling choices to learn complex patterns embedded in MS/MS data. PMID:23289783

  20. Analysis of the (Trimethylsilyl)propionic Acid-β(12-28) Peptide Binding Equilibrium with NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jayawickrama, D A; Larive, C K

    1999-06-01

    The binding of a small molecule, (trimethylsilyl)propionic acid (TSP), to a 17-residue peptide, β(12-28), is examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. β(12-28) (VHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNK) is a central fragment of the 40-42-residue Alzheimer's-associated Aβ peptide. This peptide has been previously shown to form soluble aggregates in low-pH aqueous solution. The TSP resonance is broadened appreciably in solutions containing relatively high concentrations (∼2 mM) of the peptide. The changes in TSP line width measured by titration of a peptide solution with TSP indicate a 1:1 binding stoichiometry. If the concentrations of both the peptide and TSP are reduced by 1 order of magnitude, the resonances of both species are sharp, suggesting that TSP binds predominately to the aggregated peptide. Nuclear Overhauser effect experiments indicate that the TSP interacts predominately with the side chains of the aliphatic peptide residues Leu(17) and Val(18). Pulsed-field gradient NMR measurements of TSP and peptide diffusion coefficients provide a more quantitative picture of the TSP-peptide binding equilibrium. The measured diffusion coefficients were used to calculate the fractions of the free and bound TSP. These results substantiate the conclusion that the stoichiometry of the TSP-peptide binding equilibrium is essentially 1:1 and further indicate anticooperative behavior in solutions containing an excess of TSP resulting in a dissociation of the peptide aggregates.

  1. Isotopic tracing for calculating the surface density of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing peptide on allogeneic bone.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiao-bin; Hu, Yong-cheng; He, Jin-quan

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of determining the surface density of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides grafted onto allogeneic bone by an isotopic tracing method involving labeling these peptides with (125) I, evaluating the impact of the input concentration of RGD peptides on surface density and establishing the correlation between surface density and their input concentration. A synthetic RGD-containing polypeptide (EPRGDNYR) was labeled with (125) I and its specific radioactivity calculated. Reactive solutions of RGD peptide with radioactive (125) I-RGD as probe with input concentrations of 0.01 mg/mL, 0.10 mg/mL, 0.50 mg/mL, 1.00 mg/mL, 2.00 mg/mL and 4.00 mg/mL were prepared. Using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide as a cross-linking agent, reactions were induced by placing allogeneic bone fragments into reactive solutions of RGD peptide of different input concentrations. On completion of the reactions, the surface densities of RGD peptides grafted onto the allogeneic bone fragments were calculated by evaluating the radioactivity and surface areas of the bone fragments. The impact of input concentration of RGD peptides on surface density was measured and a curve constructed. Measurements by a radiodensity γ-counter showed that the RGD peptides had been labeled successfully with (125) I. The allogeneic bone fragments were radioactive after the reaction, demonstrating that the RGD peptides had been successfully grafted onto their surfaces. It was also found that with increasing input concentration, the surface density increased. It was concluded that the surface density of RGD peptides is quantitatively related to their input concentration. With increasing input concentration, the surface density gradually increases to saturation value. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Investigating the effect of a single glycine to alanine substitution on interactions of antimicrobial peptide latarcin 2a with a lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Idiong, Grace; Won, Amy; Ruscito, Annamaria; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-09-01

    Latarcins are linear, α-helical antimicrobial peptides purified from the venom of the Central Asian spider Lachesana tarabaevi, with lytic activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, erythrocytes, and yeast at micromolar concentrations. In this work, we investigated the role of the hinge in latarcin 2a (ltc2a, GLFGKLIKKFGRKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), which adopts a helix-hinge-helix conformation in membrane-mimicking environments, on peptide-membrane interactions and its potential effect on the selective toxicity of the peptide. A modified latarcin 2a, ltc2aG11A, obtained by replacing the glycine at position 11 with alanine (ltc2aG11A, GLFGKLIKKFARKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), adopts a more rigid structure due to the reduced conformational flexibility. Langmuir monolayer measurements combined with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) indicate that both peptides bind and insert preferentially into anionic compared with zwitterionic phospholipid monolayers. Modified ltc2aG11A was found to be more disruptive of supported phospholipid bilayer modeling mammalian cell membrane. However, no considerable difference in lytic activity of the two peptides toward bacterial membrane was found. Overall the data indicate that decrease in the flexibility of ltc2a induced by the modification in the hinge region is likely to increase the peptide's nonspecific interactions with zwitterionic cell membranes and potentially increase its toxicity against eukaryotic cells.

  3. Fragmentation and reactivity in collisions of protonated diglycine with chemically modified perfluorinated alkylthiolate-self-assembled monolayer surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, George L.; Yang Li; Hase, William L.

    2011-03-07

    Direct dynamics simulations are reported for quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) trajectories of N-protonated diglycine (gly{sub 2}-H{sup +}) colliding with chemically modified perfluorinated octanethiolate self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. The RM1 semiempirical theory is used for the QM component of the trajectories. RM1 activation and reaction energies were compared with those determined from higher-level ab initio theories. Two chemical modifications are considered in which a head group (-COCl or -CHO) is substituted on the terminal carbon of a single chain of the SAM. These surfaces are designated as the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM, respectively. Fragmentation, peptide reaction with the SAM, and covalentmore » linkage of the peptide or its fragments with the SAM surface are observed. Peptide fragmentation via concerted CH{sub 2}-CO bond breakage is the dominant pathway for both surfaces. HCl formation is the dominant species produced by reaction with the COCl-SAM, while for the CHO-SAM a concerted H-atom transfer from the CHO-SAM to the peptide combined with either a H-atom or radical transfer from the peptide to the surface to form singlet reaction products is the dominant pathway. A strong collision energy dependence is found for the probability of peptide fragmentation, its reactivity, and linkage with the SAM. Surface deposition, i.e., covalent linkage between the surface and the peptide, is compared to recent experimental observations of such bonding by Laskin and co-workers [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 1512 (2008)]. Qualitative differences in reactivity are seen between the COCl-SAM and CHO-SAM showing that chemical identity is important for surface reactivity. The probability of reactive surface deposition, which is most closely analogous to experimental observables, peaks at a value of around 20% for a collision energy of 50 eV.« less

  4. Amino acids and peptides. XXXII: A bifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid of fibronectin-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Izuno, Y; Kawasaki, K; Kaneda, Y; Mu, Y; Tsutsumi, Y; Lem, K W; Mayumi, T

    1997-12-18

    An amino acid type poly(ethylene glycol) (aaPPEG) was prepared and its application to a drug carrier was examined. The peptides, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and Glu-Ile-Leu-Asp-Val (EILDV) which were reported as active fragments of Fibronectin (a cell adhesion protein), were conjugated with aaPEG (molecular weight, 10,000). The hybrid, RGD-aaPEG-EILDV, was prepared by a combination of the solid-phase method and the solution method. Antiadhesive activity of the peptides was not lost by its hybrid formation with the large aaPEG molecule. A mixture of RGD (0.43 mmol) and EILDV (0.43 mmol) did not demonstrate an antiadhesive effect, but the hybrid containing 0.43 mmol of each peptide did exhibit this effect.

  5. Developments in SPR Fragment Screening.

    PubMed

    Chavanieu, Alain; Pugnière, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have played an increasing role alongside high-throughput screening in drug discovery for 15 years. The label-free biosensor technology based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is now sensitive and informative enough to serve during primary screens and validation steps. In this review, the authors discuss the role of SPR in fragment screening. After a brief description of the underlying principles of the technique and main device developments, they evaluate the advantages and adaptations of SPR for fragment-based drug discovery. SPR can also be applied to challenging targets such as membrane receptors and enzymes. The high-level of immobilization of the protein target and its stability are key points for a relevant screening that can be optimized using oriented immobilized proteins and regenerable sensors. Furthermore, to decrease the rate of false negatives, a selectivity test may be performed in parallel on the main target bearing the binding site mutated or blocked with a low-off-rate ligand. Fragment-based drug design, integrated in a rational workflow led by SPR, will thus have a predominant role for the next wave of drug discovery which could be greatly enhanced by new improvements in SPR devices.

  6. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  7. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  8. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20525144

  9. Strategies for generating peptide radical cations via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Fisher, Christine M; Bu, Jiexun; Prentice, Boone M; Redwine, James G; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266-nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide, while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/. PMID:20089173

  11. Mechanism of Peptide Binding and Cleavage by the Human Mitochondrial Peptidase Neurolysin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro F; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Pinho, Catarina M; Branca, Rui M M; Kmiec, Beata; Wallin, Cecilia; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Ankarcrona, Maria; Gräslund, Astrid; Lehtiö, Janne; Stenmark, Pål; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2018-02-02

    Proteolysis plays an important role in mitochondrial biogenesis, from the processing of newly imported precursor proteins to the degradation of mitochondrial targeting peptides. Disruption of peptide degradation activity in yeast, plant and mammalian mitochondria is known to have deleterious consequences for organism physiology, highlighting the important role of mitochondrial peptidases. In the present work, we show that the human mitochondrial peptidase neurolysin (hNLN) can degrade mitochondrial presequence peptides as well as other fragments up to 19 amino acids long. The crystal structure of hNLN E475Q in complex with the products of neurotensin cleavage at 2.7Å revealed a closed conformation with an internal cavity that restricts substrate length and highlighted the mechanism of enzyme opening/closing that is necessary for substrate binding and catalytic activity. Analysis of peptide degradation in vitro showed that hNLN cooperates with presequence protease (PreP or PITRM1) in the degradation of long targeting peptides and amyloid-β peptide, Aβ1-40, associated with Alzheimer disease, particularly cleaving the hydrophobic fragment Aβ35-40. These findings suggest that a network of proteases may be required for complete degradation of peptides localized in mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Potential Biomarker Peptides Associated with Acute Alcohol-Induced Reduction of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Marumo, Mikio; Nonaka, Daisuke; Shimomura, Tomoko; Eguchi, Ryoji; Lee, Lyang-Ja; Tanaka, Kenji; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the peptides that are related to acute reduction of blood pressure after alcohol drinking. Venous blood was collected from male healthy volunteers before and after drinking white wine (3 ml/kg weight) containing 13% of ethanol. Peptidome analysis for serum samples was performed using a new target plate, BLOTCHIP®. Alcohol caused significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min. The peptidome analysis showed that the levels of three peptides of m/z 1467, 2380 and 2662 changed significantly after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2662 peptides were identified to be fragments of fibrinogen alpha chain, and the m/z 2380 peptide was identified to be a fragment of complement C4. The intensities of the m/z 2380 and m/z 1467 peptides before drinking were associated with % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min after drinking compared with the levels before drinking, while there were no significant correlations between the intensity of the m/z 2662 peptide and % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2380 peptides are suggested to be markers for acute reduction of blood pressure after drinking alcohol. PMID:26815288

  13. A large synthetic peptide and phosphopeptide reference library for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Marx, Harald; Lemeer, Simone; Schliep, Jan Erik; Matheron, Lucrece; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias; Heck, Albert J R; Kuster, Bernhard

    2013-06-01

    We present a peptide library and data resource of >100,000 synthetic, unmodified peptides and their phosphorylated counterparts with known sequences and phosphorylation sites. Analysis of the library by mass spectrometry yielded a data set that we used to evaluate the merits of different search engines (Mascot and Andromeda) and fragmentation methods (beam-type collision-induced dissociation (HCD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD)) for peptide identification. We also compared the sensitivities and accuracies of phosphorylation-site localization tools (Mascot Delta Score, PTM score and phosphoRS), and we characterized the chromatographic behavior of peptides in the library. We found that HCD identified more peptides and phosphopeptides than did ETD, that phosphopeptides generally eluted later from reversed-phase columns and were easier to identify than unmodified peptides and that current computational tools for proteomics can still be substantially improved. These peptides and spectra will facilitate the development, evaluation and improvement of experimental and computational proteomic strategies, such as separation techniques and the prediction of retention times and fragmentation patterns.

  14. Current algorithmic solutions for peptide-based proteomics data generation and identification.

    PubMed

    Hoopmann, Michael R; Moritz, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Peptide-based proteomic data sets are ever increasing in size and complexity. These data sets provide computational challenges when attempting to quickly analyze spectra and obtain correct protein identifications. Database search and de novo algorithms must consider high-resolution MS/MS spectra and alternative fragmentation methods. Protein inference is a tricky problem when analyzing large data sets of degenerate peptide identifications. Combining multiple algorithms for improved peptide identification puts significant strain on computational systems when investigating large data sets. This review highlights some of the recent developments in peptide and protein identification algorithms for analyzing shotgun mass spectrometry data when encountering the aforementioned hurdles. Also explored are the roles that analytical pipelines, public spectral libraries, and cloud computing play in the evolution of peptide-based proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fragmentation

    Treesearch

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  16. Fragments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Lowery

    Based on experiences growing out of a high school course on visual education, exercise cards are presented which are concerned with the boundaries of experience. They may act as preparation and stimulus for traditional art classes. The activities are divided into groups of enduring activities: mapping, representing; sensory awareness; inner…

  17. Fragments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    This performance autoethnography shows the author's struggle in finding his place, scholarship, voice, and body, into the academic setting. Mixing together memories of his lived experience with sugar cane workers, notes, and leftovers of different fieldworks, plus 6 years of life as grad student at the University of Illinois, the author looks for…

  18. Fluorescence self-quenching assay for the detection of target collagen sequences using a short probe peptide.

    PubMed

    Nian, Linge; Hu, Yue; Fu, Caihong; Song, Chen; Wang, Jie; Xiao, Jianxi

    2018-01-01

    The development of novel assays to detect collagen fragments is of utmost importance for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic decisions in various collagen-related diseases, and one essential question is to discover probe peptides that can specifically recognize target collagen sequences. Herein we have developed the fluorescence self-quenching assay as a convenient tool to screen the capability of a series of fluorescent probe peptides of variable lengths to bind with target collagen peptides. We have revealed that the targeting ability of probe peptides is length-dependent, and have discovered a relatively short probe peptide FAM-G(POG) 8 capable to identify the target peptide. We have further demonstrated that fluorescence self-quenching assay together with this short probe peptide can be applied to specifically detect the desired collagen fragment in complex biological media. Fluorescence self-quenching assay provides a powerful new tool to discover effective peptides for the recognition of collagen biomarkers, and it may have great potential to identify probe peptides for various protein biomarkers involved in pathological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  20. Sequence Elucidation of an Unknown Cyclic Peptide of High Doping Potential by ETD and CID Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fuyu; Uboh, Cornelius E.; Soma, Lawrence R.; Rudy, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    Identification of an unknown substance without any information remains a daunting challenge despite advances in chemistry and mass spectrometry. However, an unknown cyclic peptide in a sample with very limited volume seized at a Pennsylvania racetrack has been successfully identified. The unknown sample was determined by accurate mass measurements to contain a small unknown peptide as the major component. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the unknown peptide revealed the presence of Lys (not Gln, by accurate mass), Phe, and Arg residues, and absence of any y-type product ion. The latter, together with the tryptic digestion results of the unusual deamidation and absence of any tryptic cleavage, suggests a cyclic structure for the peptide. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) of the unknown peptide indicated the presence of Gln (not Lys, by the unusual deamidation), Phe, and Arg residues and their connectivity. After all the results were pieced together, a cyclic tetrapeptide, cyclo[Arg-Lys-N(C6H9)Gln-Phe], is proposed for the unknown peptide. Observations of different amino acid residues from CID and ETD experiments for the peptide were interpreted by a fragmentation pathway proposed, as was preferential CID loss of a Lys residue from the peptide. ETD was used for the first time in sequencing of a cyclic peptide; product ions resulting from ETD of the peptide identified were categorized into two types and named pseudo-b and pseudo-z ions that are important for sequencing of cyclic peptides. The ETD product ions were interpreted by fragmentation pathways proposed. Additionally, multi-stage CID mass spectrometry cannot provide complete sequence information for cyclic peptides containing adjacent Arg and Lys residues. The identified cyclic peptide has not been documented in the literature, its pharmacological effects are unknown, but it might be a "designer" drug with athletic performance-enhancing effects.

  1. Three-residue turns in alpha/beta-peptides and their application in the design of tertiary structures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gangavaram V M; Nagendar, Pendem; Ramakrishna, Kallaganti V S; Chandramouli, Nagula; Choudhary, Madavi; Kunwar, Ajit C

    2008-06-02

    A new three-residue turn was serendipitously discovered in alpha/beta hybrid peptides derived from alternating C-linked carbo-beta-amino acids (beta-Caa) and L-Ala residues. The three-residue beta-alpha-beta turn at the C termini, nucleated by a helix at the N termini, resulted in helix-turn (HT) supersecondary structures in these peptides. The turn in the HT motif is stabilized by two H bonds-CO(i-2)-NH(i), with a seven-membered pseudoring (gamma turn) in the backward direction, and NH(i-2)-CO(i), with a 13-membered pseudoring in the forward direction (i being the last residue)--at the C termini. The study was extended to generalize the new three-residue turn (beta-alpha-beta) by using different alpha- and beta-amino acids. Furthermore, the HT motifs were efficiently converted, by an extension with helical oligomers at the C termini, into peptides with novel helix-turn-helix (HTH) tertiary structures. However, this resulted in the destabilization of the beta-alpha-beta turn with the concomitant nucleation of another three-residue turn, alpha-beta-beta, which is stabilized by 11- and 15-membered bifurcated H bonds. Extensive NMR spectroscopic studies were carried out to delineate the secondary and tertiary structures in these peptides, which are further supported by molecular dynamics (MD) investigations.

  2. Characterization of Hydrophobic Peptides in the Presence of Detergent by Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bagag, Aïcha; Jault, Jean-Michel; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Le Naour, François

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of membrane proteins is still challenging. The major issue is the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins that necessitates the use of detergents for their extraction and solubilization. The very poor compatibility of mass spectrometry with detergents remains a tremendous obstacle in studies of membrane proteins. Here, we investigated the potential of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) for mass spectrometry study of membrane proteins. This work was focused on the tetraspanin CD9 and the multidrug transporter BmrA. A set of peptides from CD9, exhibiting a broad range of hydropathicity, was investigated using APPI as compared to electrospray ionization (ESI). Mass spectrometry experiments revealed that the most hydrophobic peptides were hardly ionized by ESI whereas all peptides, including the highly hydrophobic one that corresponds to the full sequence of the first transmembrane domain of CD9, were easily ionized by APPI. The native protein BmrA purified in the presence of the non-ionic detergent beta-D-dodecyl maltoside (DDM) was digested in-solution using trypsin. The resulting peptides were investigated by flow injection analysis of the mixture followed by mass spectrometry. Upon ESI, only detergent ions were detected and the ionic signals from the peptides were totally suppressed. In contrast, APPI allowed many peptides distributed along the sequence of the protein to be detected. Furthermore, the parent ion corresponding to the first transmembrane domain of the protein BmrA was detected under APPI conditions. Careful examination of the APPI mass spectrum revealed a-, b-, c- and y- fragment ions generated by in-source fragmentation. Those fragment ions allowed unambiguous structural characterization of the transmembrane domain. In conclusion, APPI–MS appears as a versatile method allowing the ionization and fragmentation of hydrophobic peptides in the presence of detergent. PMID:24236085

  3. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  4. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol ... splits apart and forms one molecule of C-peptide and one molecule of insulin . Insulin is the hormone that is vital for the body to use ...

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Introduction.

    PubMed

    Haney, Evan F; Mansour, Sarah C; Hancock, Robert E W

    2017-01-01

    The "golden era" of antibiotic discovery has long passed, but the need for new antibiotics has never been greater due to the emerging threat of antibiotic resistance. This urgency to develop new antibiotics has motivated researchers to find new methods to combat pathogenic microorganisms resulting in a surge of research focused around antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; also termed host defense peptides) and their potential as therapeutics. During the past few decades, more than 2000 AMPs have been identified from a diverse range of organisms (animals, fungi, plants, and bacteria). While these AMPs share a number of common features and a limited number of structural motifs; their sequences, activities, and targets differ considerably. In addition to their antimicrobial effects, AMPs can also exhibit immunomodulatory, anti-biofilm, and anticancer activities. These diverse functions have spurred tremendous interest in research aimed at understanding the activity of AMPs, and various protocols have been described to assess different aspects of AMP function including screening and evaluating the activities of natural and synthetic AMPs, measuring interactions with membranes, optimizing peptide function, and scaling up peptide production. Here, we provide a general overview of AMPs and introduce some of the methodologies that have been used to advance AMP research.

  6. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  7. Effectiveness of CID, HCD, and ETD with FT MS/MS for degradomic-peptidomic analysis: comparison of peptide identification methods

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Purvine, Samuel O.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Ronald, J. Moore; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the effectiveness of CID, HCD, and ETD for LC-FT MS/MS analysis of peptides using a tandem linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. A range of software tools and analysis parameters were employed to explore the use of CID, HCD, and ETD to identify peptides isolated from human blood plasma without the use of specific “enzyme rules”. In the evaluation of an FDR-controlled SEQUEST scoring method, the use of accurate masses for fragments increased the numbers of identified peptides (by ~50%) compared to the use of conventional low accuracy fragment mass information, and CID provided the largest contribution to the identified peptide datasets compared to HCD and ETD. The FDR-controlled Mascot scoring method provided significantly fewer peptide identifications than with SEQUEST (by 1.3–2.3 fold) at the same confidence levels, and CID, HCD, and ETD provided similar contributions to identified peptides. Evaluation of de novo sequencing and the UStags method for more intense fragment ions revealed that HCD afforded more sequence consecutive residues (e.g., ≥7 amino acids) than either CID or ETD. Both the FDR-controlled SEQUEST and Mascot scoring methods provided peptide datasets that were affected by the decoy database and mass tolerances applied (e.g., the identical peptides between the datasets could be limited to ~70%), while the UStags method provided the most consistent peptide datasets (>90% overlap) with extremely low (near zero) numbers of false positive identifications. The m/z ranges in which CID, HCD, and ETD contributed the largest number of peptide identifications were substantially overlapping. This work suggests that the three peptide ion fragmentation methods are complementary, and that maximizing the number of peptide identifications benefits significantly from a careful match with the informatics tools and methods applied. These results also suggest that the decoy strategy may inaccurately estimate identification FDRs. PMID:21678914

  8. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  9. Fragmentation of the Chelyabinsk Fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The most intense bolide since the 1908 Tunguska event occurred in the early morning hours of 15 February 2013 near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk. The impacting asteroid ranged between 17 and 20 m diameter with a mass of about 10,000 tons. Its estimated pre-atmospheric velocity was about 18.6 km/sec at a low angle of 20° from the horizontal. The resulting airburst occurred at an altitude of about 23 km and released an estimated total energy of about 440 kT (1.7 x 1015 J). The blast wave shattered windows on the ground over a wide area and collapsed the roof of a zinc factory. In spite of the size of the initital asteroid, only small fragments (a few kg, so far) have been recovered. The entry of an asteroid into Earth's atmosphere and its aerodynamic fragmentation and deceleration has been modeled by a number of authors over the past few decades. Full-featured numerical simulations are presently limited in their ability to simultaneously incorporate fragmentation, energy coupling between solid fragments and the atmosphere, and thermal radiation, but an approximate treatment of the fragmentation and dispersion of a large entering meteoroid called the 'pancake model' has achieved good fits to other observed events, including the Tunguska explosion, the 1947 Shikote-Alin fall and strewn fields from larger iron meteorite falls, such as the Henbury craters. Simulations using the pancake model can fit the overall observations of the Chelyabinsk event using an 18 m diameter asteroid of density 3000 kg/m3 following the observed trajectory and possessing an initial strength of about 7 MPa, which is relatively high for a stony meteoroid. This suggests that the asteroid was not a strengthless rubble pile, but in fact possessed considerable strength, compared to other stony meteorites of similar type. Aerodynamic breakup begins at an altitude of 31 km and the final airburst occurs at 22 km, releasing about 250 kT at this time. Subsequent to this airburst, large fragments

  10. Workflow Design Using Fragment Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Sébastien; Blay-Fornarino, Mireille; France, Robert

    The Service-Oriented Architecture (Soa) paradigm supports the assembly of atomic services to create applications that implement complex business processes. Assembly can be accomplished by service orchestrations defined by Soa architects. The Adore method allows Soa architects to model complex orchestrations of services by composing models of smaller orchestrations called orchestration fragments. The Adore method can also be used to weave fragments that address new concerns into existing application models. In this paper we illustrate how the Adore method can be used to separate and compose process aspects in a Soa design of the Car Crash Crisis Management System. The paper also includes a discussion of the benefits and limitations of the Adore method.

  11. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  12. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of Fraser's clawed frog Xenopus fraseri (Pipidae): Further insight into the evolutionary history of the Xenopodinae.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nowotny, Norbert; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the tetraploid frog Xenopus fraseri Boulenger, 1905 (Pipidae) led to identification of 13 host-defense peptides. The primary structures of the peptides demonstrate that they belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide, PGLa (4 peptides), and xenopsin-precursor fragment, XPF (2 peptides) families, first identified in Xenopus laevis, together with caerulein precursor fragment-related peptides, CPF-RP (4 peptides), first identified in Silurana tropicalis. In addition, the secretions contain a molecular variant of xenopsin displaying the substitution Arg(4)→Lys compared with X. laevis xenopsin and peptide glycine-tyrosine-amide (PGYa) (GRIIPIYPEFERVFA KKVYPLY.NH2) whose function is unknown. The most potent antimicrobial peptide identified is CPF-RP-F1 (GFGSVLGKALKFGANLL.NH2) with MIC=12.5μM against Staphylococcus aureus and 50μM against Escherichia coli. On the basis of similarities in morphology and advertisement calls, X. fraseri has been placed in a species group that includes the octoploids Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei, and the tetraploid Xenopus pygmaeus. Cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of magainin, PGLa, and CPF-RP peptides support a close evolutionary relationship between X. fraseri, X. amieti and X. andrei but suggest a more distant relationship with X. pygmaeus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  14. Injecting asteroid fragments into resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farinella, Paolo; Gonczi, R.; Froeschle, Christiane; Froeschle, Claude

    1992-01-01

    We have quantitatively modeled the chance insertion of asteroid collisional fragments into the 3:1 and g = g(sub 6) resonances, through which they can achieve Earth-approaching orbits. Although the results depend on some poorly known parameters, they indicate that most meteorites and near-earth asteroids probably come from a small and non-representative sample of asteroids, located in the neighborhood of the two resonances.

  15. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  16. Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mender, Ilgen; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-11-20

    While telomerase is expressed in ~90% of primary human tumors, most somatic tissue cells except transiently proliferating stem-like cells do not have detectable telomerase activity (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Telomeres progressively shorten with each cell division in normal cells, including proliferating stem-like cells, due to the end replication (lagging strand synthesis) problem and other causes such as oxidative damage, therefore all somatic cells have limited cell proliferation capacity (Hayflick limit) (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961; Olovnikov, 1973). The progressive telomere shortening eventually leads to growth arrest in normal cells, which is known as replicative senescence (Shay et al. , 1991). Once telomerase is activated in cancer cells, telomere length is stabilized by the addition of TTAGGG repeats to the end of chromosomes, thus enabling the limitless continuation of cell division (Shay and Wright, 1996; Shay and Wright, 2001). Therefore, the link between aging and cancer can be partially explained by telomere biology. There are many rapid and convenient methods to study telomere biology such as Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF), Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) (Mender and Shay, 2015b) and Telomere dysfunction Induced Foci (TIF) analysis (Mender and Shay, 2015a). In this protocol paper we describe Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis to determine average telomeric length of cells. Telomeric length can be indirectly measured by a technique called Telomere Restriction Fragment analysis (TRF). This technique is a modified Southern blot, which measures the heterogeneous range of telomere lengths in a cell population using the length distribution of the terminal restriction fragments (Harley et al. , 1990; Ouellette et al. , 2000). This method can be used in eukaryotic cells. The description below focuses on the measurement of human cancer cells telomere length. The principle of this method relies on the lack of

  17. Delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and proteins have potent effects on the brain after their peripheral administration, suggesting that they may be good substrates for the development of CNS therapeutics. Major hurdles to such development include their relation to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and poor pharmacokinetics. Some peptides cross the BBB by transendothelial diffusion and others cross in the blood-to-brain direction by saturable transporters. Some regulatory proteins are also transported across the BBB and antibodies can enter the CNS via the extracellular pathways. Glycoproteins and some antibody fragments can be taken up and cross the BBB by mechanisms related to adsorptive endocytosis/transcytosis. Many peptides and proteins are transported out of the CNS by saturable efflux systems and enzymatic activity in the blood, CNS, or BBB are substantial barriers to others. Both influx and efflux transporters are altered by various substances and in disease states. Strategies that manipulate these interactions between the BBB and peptides and proteins provide many opportunities for the development of therapeutics. Such strategies include increasing transendothelial diffusion of small peptides, upregulation of saturable influx transporters with allosteric regulators and other posttranslational means, use of vectors and other Trojan horse strategies, inhibition of efflux transporters including with antisense molecules, and improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters to overcome short half-lives, tissue sequestration, and enzymatic degradation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antihypertensive properties of lactoferricin B-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Giménez, Pedro; Ibáñez, Aida; Salom, Juan B; Marcos, Jose F; López-Díez, Jose Javier; Vallés, Salvador; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma

    2010-06-09

    A set of eight lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-derived peptides was examined for inhibitory effects on angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and ACE-dependent vasoconstriction, and their hypotensive effect in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Peptides were derived from different elongations both at the C-terminal and N-terminal ends of the representative peptide LfcinB(20-25), which is known as the LfcinB antimicrobial core. All of the eight LfcinB-derived peptides showed in vitro inhibitory effects on ACE activity with different IC(50) values. Moreover, seven of them showed ex vivo inhibitory effects on ACE-dependent vasoconstriction. No clear correlation between in vitro and ex vivo inhibitory effects was found. Only LfcinB(20-25) and one of its fragments, F1, generated after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion, showed significant antihypertensive effects in SHR after oral administration. Remarkably, F1 did not show any effect on ACE-dependent vasoconstriction in contrast to the inhibitory effect showed by LfcinB(20-25). In conclusion, two LfcinB-derived peptides lower blood pressure and exhibit potential as orally effective antihypertensive compounds, yet a complete elucidation of the mechanism(s) involved deserves further ongoing research.

  19. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Chain, Benjamin M; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-10-23

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes.

  20. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benjamin M.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes. PMID:18765264

  1. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    PubMed

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  2. Significance of Interactions of Low Molecular Weight Crystallin Fragments in Lens Aging and Cataract Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Udupa, Padmanabha; Murugesan, Raju; Sharma, K. Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of aged and cataract lenses shows the presence of increased amounts of crystallin fragments in the high molecular weight aggregates of water-soluble and water-insoluble fractions. However, the significance of accumulation and interaction of low molecular weight crystallin fragments in aging and cataract development is not clearly understood. In this study, 23 low molecular mass (<3.5-kDa) peptides in the urea-soluble fractions of young, aged, and aged cataract human lenses were identified by mass spectroscopy. Two peptides, αB-(1–18) (MDIAIHHPWIRRPFFPFH) and βA3/A1-(59–74) (SD(N)AYHIERLMSFRPIC), present in aged and cataract lens but not young lens, and a third peptide, γS-(167–178) (SPAVQSFRRIVE) present in all three lens groups were synthesized to study the effects of interaction of these peptides with intact α-, β-, and γ-crystallins and alcohol dehydrogenase, a protein used in aggregation studies. Interaction of αB-(1–18) and βA3/A1-(59–74) peptides increased the scattering of light by β- and γ-crystallin and alcohol dehydrogenase. The ability of α-crystallin subunits to function as molecular chaperones was significantly reduced by interaction with αB-(1–18) and βA3/A1-(59–74) peptides, whereas γS peptide had no effect on chaperone-like activity of α-crystallin. The βA3/A1-(59–74 peptide caused a 5.64-fold increase in αB-crystallin oligomeric mass and partial precipitation. Replacing hydrophobic residues in αB-(1–18) and βA3/A1-(59–74) peptides abolished their ability to induce crystallin aggregation and light scattering. Our study suggests that interaction of crystallin-derived peptides with intact crystallins could be a key event in age-related protein aggregation in lens and cataractogenesis. PMID:18227073

  3. Fragmentation during primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    Understanding the physics of the very first stars in the universe, the so-called Population III (or Pop III) stars, is crucial in determining how the universe evolved into what we observe today. In the standard model of Pop III star formation, the baryonic matter, mainly atomic hydrogen, collapses gravitationally into small Dark Matter (DM) minihalos. However, so far there is little understanding on how the thermal, dynamical and chemical evolution of the primordial gas depend on the initial configuration of the minihalos (for example, rotation of the unstable clumps inside minihalos, turbulence, formation of molecular hydrogen and cosmic variance of the minihalos). We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. Unlike some earlier cosmological calculations, the implementation of sink particles allows us to follow the evolution of the accretion disk that builds up in the centre of each minihalo and fragments. We find that the fragmentation behavior depends on the adopted choice of three-body H2 formation rate coefficient. The increasing cooling rate during rapid conversion of the atomic to molecular hydrogen is offset by the heating due to gas contraction. We propose that the H2 cooling, the heating due to H2 formation and compressional heating together set a density and temperature structure in the disk that favors fragmentation. We also find that the cloud's initial degree of rotation has a significant effect on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the collapsing gas. Clouds with higher rotation exhibit spiral-arm-like structures that become gravitationally unstable to fragmentation on several scales. These type of clouds tend to fragment more and have lower accretion rates compared to their slowly rotating counterparts. In addition, we find that the distribution of specific angular

  4. Electroactive polymer-peptide conjugates for adhesive biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Maione, Silvana; Gil, Ana M; Fabregat, Georgina; Del Valle, Luis J; Triguero, Jordi; Laurent, Adele; Jacquemin, Denis; Estrany, Francesc; Jiménez, Ana I; Zanuy, David; Cativiela, Carlos; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-10-15

    Electroactive polymer-peptide conjugates have been synthesized by combining poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), a polythiophene derivative with outstanding properties, and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-based peptide in which Gly has been replaced by an exotic amino acid bearing a 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene ring in the side chain. The incorporation of the peptide at the ends of preformed PEDOT chains has been corroborated by both FTIR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although the morphology and topology are not influenced by the incorporation of the peptide at the ends of PEDOT chains, this process largely affects other surface properties. Thus, the wettability of the conjugates is considerably higher than that of PEDOT, independently of the synthetic strategy, whereas the surface roughness only increases when the conjugate is obtained using a competing strategy (i.e. growth of the polymer chains against termination by end capping). The electrochemical activity of the conjugates has been found to be higher than that of PEDOT, evidencing the success of the polymer-peptide links designed by chemical similarity. Density functional theory calculations have been used not only to ascertain the conformational preferences of the peptide but also to interpret the electronic transitions detected by UV-vis spectroscopy. Electroactive surfaces prepared using the conjugates displayed the higher bioactivities in terms of cell adhesion, with the relative viabilities being dependent on the roughness, wettability and electrochemical activity of the conjugate. In addition to the influence of the peptide fragment in the initial cell attachment and subsequent cell spreading and survival, the results indicate that PEDOT promotes the exchange of ions at the conjugate-cell interface.

  5. Peptide Signaling in Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Katsir, Leron; Davies, Kelli A.; Bergmann, Dominique C.; Laux, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is integral to the evolution of multicellularity. In plant development, peptide signals relay information coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation. These peptides are often encoded by gene families and bind to corresponding families of receptors. The precise spatiotemporal expression of signals and their cognate receptors underlies developmental patterning, and expressional and biochemical changes over evolutionary time have likely contributed to the refinement and complexity of developmental programs. Here, we discuss two major plant peptide families which have central roles in plant development: the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide family and the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family. We discuss how specialization has enabled the CLE peptides to modulate stem cell differentiation in various tissue types, and how differing activities of EPF peptides precisely regulate the stomatal developmental program, and we examine the contributions of these peptide families to plant development from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:21549958

  6. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  7. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  8. Evaluating Fragment Construction Policies for SDT Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    allocates a fragment and begins translation. Once a termination condition is met, Strata emits any trampolines that are necessary. Trampolines are pieces... trampolines (unless its target previously exists in the fragment cache). Once a CTI’s target instruction becomes available in the fragment cache, the CTI is...linked directly to the destination, avoiding future uses of the trampoline . This mechanism is called Fragment Linking and avoids significant overhead

  9. A Peptidomics Strategy to Elucidate the Proteolytic Pathways that Inactivate Peptide Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Kim, Yun-Gon; Tagore, Debarati M.; Wiwczar, Jessica; Lane, William S.; Danial, Nika N.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis plays a key role in regulating the levels and activity of peptide hormones. Characterization of the proteolytic pathways that cleave peptide hormones is of basic interest and can, in some cases, spur the development of novel therapeutics. The lack, however, of an efficient approach to identify endogenous fragments of peptide hormones has hindered the elucidation of these proteolytic pathways. Here, we apply a mass spectrometry (MS)-based peptidomics approach to characterize the intestinal fragments of peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), a hormone that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Our approach reveals a proteolytic pathway in the intestine that truncates PHI at its C-terminus to produce a PHI fragment that is inactive in a GSIS assay—a result that provides a potential mechanism of PHI regulation in vivo. Differences between these in vivo peptidomics studies and in vitro lysate experiments, which showed N- and C-terminal processing of PHI, underscore the effectiveness of this approach to discover physiologically relevant proteolytic pathways. Moreover, integrating this peptidomics approach with bioassays (i.e. GSIS) provides a general strategy to reveal proteolytic pathways that may regulate the activity of peptide hormones. PMID:21299233

  10. Degradation and Stabilization of Peptide Hormones in Human Blood Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jizu; Warunek, David; Craft, David

    2015-01-01

    Plasma hormone peptides, including GLP-1, GIP, Glucagon, and OXM, possess multiple physiological roles and potential therapeutic and diagnostic utility as biomarkers in the research of metabolic disorders. These peptides are subject to proteolytic degradation causing preanalytical variations. Stabilization for accurate quantitation of these active peptides in ex vivo blood specimens is essential for drug and biomarker development. We investigated the protease-driven instability of these peptides in conventional serum, plasma, anticoagulated whole blood, as well as whole blood and plasma stabilized with protease inhibitors. The peptide was monitored by both time-course Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-to-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI –TOF MS) and Ab-based assay (ELISA or RIA). MS enabled the identification of proteolytic fragments. In non-stabilized blood samples, the results clearly indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) removed the N-terminal two amino acid residues from GLP-1, GIP and OXM(1-37) and not-yet identified peptidase(s) cleave(s) the full-length OXM(1-37) and its fragments. DPP-IV also continued to remove two additional N-terminal residues of processed OXM(3–37) to yield OXM(5–37). Importantly, both DPP-IV and other peptidase(s) activities were inhibited efficiently by the protease inhibitors included in the BD P800* tube. There was preservation of GLP-1, GIP, OXM and glucagon in the P800 plasma samples with half-lives > 96, 96, 72, and 45 hours at room temperature (RT), respectively. In the BD P700* plasma samples, the stabilization of GLP-1 was also achieved with half-life > 96 hours at RT. The stabilization of these variable peptides increased their utility in drug and/or biomarker development. While stability results of GLP-1 obtained with Ab-based assay were consistent with those obtained by MS analysis, the Ab-based results of GIP, Glucagon, and OXM did not reflect the time-dependent degradations revealed by MS

  11. Photodissociation pathways and lifetimes of protonated peptides and their dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Aravind, G.; Klaerke, B.; Rajput, J.

    2012-01-07

    Photodissociation lifetimes and fragment channels of gas-phase, protonated YA{sub n} (n = 1,2) peptides and their dimers were measured with 266 nm photons. The protonated monomers were found to have a fast dissociation channel with an exponential lifetime of {approx}200 ns while the protonated dimers show an additional slow dissociation component with a lifetime of {approx}2 {mu}s. Laser power dependence measurements enabled us to ascribe the fast channel in the monomer and the slow channel in the dimer to a one-photon process, whereas the fast dimer channel is from a two-photon process. The slow (1 photon) dissociation channel in themore » dimer was found to result in cleavage of the H-bonds after energy transfer through these H-bonds. In general, the dissociation of these protonated peptides is non-prompt and the decay time was found to increase with the size of the peptides. Quantum RRKM calculations of the microcanonical rate constants also confirmed a statistical nature of the photodissociation processes in the dipeptide monomers and dimers. The classical RRKM expression gives a rate constant as an analytical function of the number of active vibrational modes in the system, estimated separately on the basis of the equipartition theorem. It demonstrates encouraging results in predicting fragmentation lifetimes of protonated peptides. Finally, we present the first experimental evidence for a photo-induced conversion of tyrosine-containing peptides into monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon along with a formamide molecule both found in space.« less

  12. Fragment and Debris Hazards from Accidental Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-13

    region boundr’ a - fragment weight m - number of fragments with weight PAq . are determined using 9. the ever- age weight of fragments voeithing more than...34 Nineteenth Explosives Safety Seminar, Los Ang. es, CA, Sep 1980. Merz, Hans A., "The Effects of Explosions in Slightly Buried Concrete Structures

  13. Global-scale patterns of forest fragmentation

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; R. O' Neill; B. Jones; E. Smith

    2000-01-01

    We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale) to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale) were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (...

  14. The dehydroalanine effect in the fragmentation of ions derived from polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Alice L.; Peng, Zhou; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of peptides and proteins upon collision-induced dissociation (CID) is highly dependent on sequence and ion type (e.g. protonated, deprotonated, sodiated, odd electron, etc.). Some amino acids, for example aspartic acid and proline, have been found to enhance certain cleavages along the backbone. Here, we show that peptides and proteins containing dehydroalanine, a non-proteinogenic amino acid with an unsaturated side-chain, undergo enhanced cleavage of the N—Cα bond of the dehydroalanine residue to generate c- and z-ions. Because these fragment ion types are not commonly observed upon activation of positively charged even-electron species, they can be used to identify dehydroalanine residues and localize them within the peptide or protein chain. While dehydroalanine can be generated in solution, it can also be generated in the gas phase upon CID of various species. Oxidized S-alkyl cysteine residues generate dehydroalanine upon activation via highly efficient loss of the alkyl sulfenic acid. Asymmetric cleavage of disulfide bonds upon collisional activation of systems with limited proton mobility also generates dehydroalanine. Furthermore, we show that gas-phase ion/ion reactions can be used to facilitate the generation of dehydroalanine residues via, for example, oxidation of S-alkyl cysteine residues and conversion of multiply-protonated peptides to radical cations. In the latter case, loss of radical side-chains to generate dehydroalanine from some amino acids gives rise to the possibility for residue-specific backbone cleavage of polypeptide ions. PMID:27484024

  15. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  17. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  18. Vasonatrin peptide: a unique synthetic natriuretic and vasorelaxing peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, C M; Kim, C H; Miller, V M; Burnett, J C

    1993-01-01

    This study reports the cardiovascular and renal actions of a novel and newly synthesized 27-amino acid peptide termed vasonatrin peptide (VNP). VNP is a chimera of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). This synthetic peptide possesses the 22-amino acid structure of CNP, which is a cardiovascular selective peptide of endothelial origin and is structurally related to ANP. VNP also possesses the five-amino acid COOH terminus of ANP. The current study demonstrates both in vitro and in vivo that VNP possesses the venodilating actions of CNP, the natriuretic actions of ANP, and unique arterial vasodilating actions not associated with either ANP or CNP. Images PMID:8408658

  19. Characterization of the major cyanogen bromide fragment of alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Alpha crystallin from the bovine lens has been digested with cyanogen bromide, and the major fragment (CB-1) has been purified using reverse phase HPLC. Characterization of this fragment by Edman degradation and antisera to synthetic peptides indicates that it originates from alpha-A crystallin, but lacks the N-terminal methionine and the last 35 amino acids from the C-terminus of the molecule. The purified CB-1 fragment binds as well as native alpha crystallin to lens membrane, but is unable to self-assemble into the correct size of high molecular weight oligomeric complexes characteristic of the intact alpha-A chain. Together, these results demonstrate that the alpha-A chain is comprised of at least two functional domains, one of which is involved in binding of alpha-A crystallin to lens membrane, and another which is necessary for correct self-assembly of the molecule into high molecular weight oligomers.

  20. Targeting Ligandable Pockets on Plant Homeodomain (PHD) Zinc Finger Domains by a Fragment-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc fingers are histone reader domains that are often associated with human diseases. Despite this, they constitute a poorly targeted class of readers, suggesting low ligandability. Here, we describe a successful fragment-based campaign targeting PHD fingers from the proteins BAZ2A and BAZ2B as model systems. We validated a pool of in silico fragments both biophysically and structurally and solved the first crystal structures of PHD zinc fingers in complex with fragments bound to an anchoring pocket at the histone binding site. The best-validated hits were found to displace a histone H3 tail peptide in competition assays. This work identifies new chemical scaffolds that provide suitable starting points for future ligand optimization using structure-guided approaches. The demonstrated ligandability of the PHD reader domains could pave the way for the development of chemical probes to drug this family of epigenetic readers. PMID:29529862

  1. Targeting Ligandable Pockets on Plant Homeodomain (PHD) Zinc Finger Domains by a Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Amato, Anastasia; Lucas, Xavier; Bortoluzzi, Alessio; Wright, David; Ciulli, Alessio

    2018-04-20

    Plant homeodomain (PHD) zinc fingers are histone reader domains that are often associated with human diseases. Despite this, they constitute a poorly targeted class of readers, suggesting low ligandability. Here, we describe a successful fragment-based campaign targeting PHD fingers from the proteins BAZ2A and BAZ2B as model systems. We validated a pool of in silico fragments both biophysically and structurally and solved the first crystal structures of PHD zinc fingers in complex with fragments bound to an anchoring pocket at the histone binding site. The best-validated hits were found to displace a histone H3 tail peptide in competition assays. This work identifies new chemical scaffolds that provide suitable starting points for future ligand optimization using structure-guided approaches. The demonstrated ligandability of the PHD reader domains could pave the way for the development of chemical probes to drug this family of epigenetic readers.

  2. Models of fragmentation with composite power laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Z.; Rodgers, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    Some models for binary fragmentation are introduced in which a time dependent transition size produces two regions of fragment sizes above and below the transition size. In the first model we assume a fixed rate of fragmentation for the largest fragment and two different rates of fragmentation in the two regions of sizes above and below the transition size. The model is solved exactly in the long time limit to reveal stable time-invariant solutions for the fragment size and mass distributions. These solutions exhibit composite power law behaviours; power laws with two different exponents for fragments in smaller and larger regions. A special case of the model with no fragmentation in the smaller size region is also examined. Another model is also introduced which have three regions of fragment sizes with different rates of fragmentation. The similarities between the stable distributions in our models and composite power law distributions from experimental work on shock fragmentation of long thin glass rods and thick clay plates are discussed.

  3. Identification of ageing-associated naturally occurring peptides in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Bhat, Akshay; Klein, Julie; Jankowski, Vera; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Dakna, Mohammed; Koeck, Thomas; Schanstra, Joost P.; Zürbig, Petra; Rudolph, Karl L.; Schumacher, Björn; Pich, Andreas; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    To assess normal and pathological peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying ageing, urinary peptidomes of 1227 healthy and 10333 diseased individuals between 20 and 86 years of age were investigated. The diseases thereby comprised diabetes mellitus, renal and cardiovascular diseases. Using age as a continuous variable, 116 peptides were identified that significantly (p < 0.05; |ρ|≥0.2) correlated with age in the healthy cohort. The same approach was applied to the diseased cohort. Upon comparison of the peptide patterns of the two cohorts 112 common age-correlated peptides were identified. These 112 peptides predominantly originated from collagen, uromodulin and fibrinogen. While most fibrillar and basement membrane collagen fragments showed a decreased age-related excretion, uromodulin, beta-2-microglobulin and fibrinogen fragments showed an increase. Peptide-based in silico protease analysis was performed and 32 proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins, were predicted to be involved in ageing. Identified peptides, predicted proteases and patient information were combined in a systems biology pathway analysis to identify molecular pathways associated with normal and/or pathological ageing. While perturbations in collagen homeostasis, trafficking of toll-like receptors and endosomal pathways were commonly identified, degradation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins was uniquely identified in pathological ageing. PMID:26431327

  4. Host-Defense Peptides with Therapeutic Potential from Skin Secretions of Frogs from the Family Pipidae

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J. Michael; Mechkarska, Milena

    2014-01-01

    Skin secretions from frogs belonging to the genera Xenopus, Silurana, Hymenochirus, and Pseudhymenochirus in the family Pipidae are a rich source of host-defense peptides with varying degrees of antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicities to mammalian cells. Magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF), and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) peptides have been isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from several species of Xenopus and Silurana. Hymenochirins and pseudhymenochirins have been isolated from Hymenochirus boettgeri and Pseudhymenochirus merlini. A major obstacle to the development of these peptides as anti-infective agents is their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes. Analogs of the magainins, CPF peptides and hymenochirin-1B with increased antimicrobial potencies and low cytotoxicities have been developed that are active (MIC < 5 μM) against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite this, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents has not been realized so that alternative clinical applications as anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic, or immunomodulatory drugs are being explored. PMID:24434793

  5. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A.; Martin, William F.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Bevins, Charles L.; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective—released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The pre-digestion of milk proteins and the consequent release antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection. PMID:23586814

  6. Heavy Ion Fragmentation Experiments at the Bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using the heavy-ion capability of the Bevatron were studied. The purpose was to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Attempts were also made to: (1) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (2) test the applicability of high-energy multi-particle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (3) apply the cross-section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (4) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross sections.

  7. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of a MMP-2 degraded Titin fragment in serum reflects changes in muscle turnover induced by atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Henriksen, K; Karsdal, M A; Armbrecht, G; Belavý, D L; Felsenberg, D; Rittweger, J; Wang, Y; Zheng, Q; Nedergaard, A F

    2014-10-01

    In this study we sought to determine whether a Titin peptide fragment can serve as a clinical biomarker for changes in muscle mass. Mass spectrometry was used to identify Titin fragment in urine. An antibody against this Titin sequence was raised and used to develop a competitive ELISA assay for measurement in serum. Rat tissue extractions in the presence or absence of a series of proteases of interest were used to identify its enzymatic origin. A rat model of dexamethasone (DEX) induced muscle atrophy and a human 56-day bed rest study with and without vibration therapy were used to assess biological and clinical relevance. A technically robust ELISA measuring the Titin fragment was developed against a Titin peptide fragment identified in human urine. The fragment was shown to be produced primarily by MMP-2 cleavage of Titin. In the rat muscle DEX induced atrophy model, Titin-MMP2 fragment was decreased in the beginning of DEX treatment, and then significantly increased later on during DEX administration. In the human bed rest study, the Titin-MMP2 fragment was initially decreased 11.9 (±3.7) % after 1day of bed rest, and then gradually increased ending up at a 16.4 (±4.6) % increase at day 47. We developed a robust ELISA measuring a muscle derived MMP-2 generated Titin degradation fragment in rat and human serum. Importantly, the fragment can be measured in serum and that these levels are related to induction of skeletal muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-aggregation and coaggregation of the p53 core fragment with its aggregation gatekeeper variant.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jiangtao; Qi, Ruxi; Wei, Guanghong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-03-21

    Recent studies suggested that p53 aggregation can lead to loss-of-function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN) and gain-of-function (GoF) effects, with adverse cancer consequences. The p53 aggregation-nucleating (251)ILTIITL(257) fragment is a key segment in wild-type p53 aggregation; however, an I254R mutation can prevent it. It was suggested that self-assembly of wild-type p53 and its cross-interaction with mutants differ from the classical amyloid nucleation-growth mechanism. Here, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, we studied the cross-interactions of this p53 core fragment and its aggregation rescue I254R mutant. We found that the core fragment displays strong aggregation propensity, whereas the gatekeeper I254R mutant tends to be disordered, consistent with experiments. Our cross-interaction results reveal that the wild-type p53 fragment promotes β-sheet formation of the I254R mutant by shifting the disordered mutant peptides into aggregating states. As a result, the system has similar oligomeric structures, inter-peptide interactions and free energy landscape as the wild type fragment does, revealing a prion-like process. We also found that in the cross-interaction system, the wild-type species has higher tendency to interact with the mutant than with itself. This phenomenon illustrates synergistic effects between the p53 (251)ILTIITL(257) fragment and the mutant resembling prion cross-species propagation, cautioning against exploiting it in drug discovery.

  10. Arginine (Di)methylated Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Peptides Are Favorably Presented by HLA-B*07.

    PubMed

    Marino, Fabio; Mommen, Geert P M; Jeko, Anita; Meiring, Hugo D; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Scheltema, Richard A; van Els, Cécile A C M; Heck, Albert J R

    2017-01-06

    Alterations in protein post-translational modification (PTM) are recognized hallmarks of diseases. These modifications potentially provide a unique source of disease-related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-presented peptides that can elicit specific immune responses. While phosphorylated HLA peptides have already received attention, arginine methylated HLA class I peptide presentation has not been characterized in detail. In a human B-cell line we detected 149 HLA class I peptides harboring mono- and/or dimethylated arginine residues by mass spectrometry. A striking preference was observed in the presentation of arginine (di)methylated peptides for HLA-B*07 molecules, likely because the binding motifs of this allele resemble consensus sequences recognized by arginine methyl-transferases. Moreover, HLA-B*07-bound peptides preferentially harbored dimethylated groups at the P3 position, thus consecutively to the proline anchor residue. Such a proline-arginine sequence has been associated with the arginine methyl-transferases CARM1 and PRMT5. Making use of the specific neutral losses in fragmentation spectra, we found most of the peptides to be asymmetrically dimethylated, most likely by CARM1. These data expand our knowledge of the processing and presentation of arginine (di)methylated HLA class I peptides and demonstrate that these types of modified peptides can be presented for recognition by T-cells. HLA class I peptides with mono- and dimethylated arginine residues may therefore offer a novel target for immunotherapy.

  11. Therapeutic peptides for cancer therapy. Part II - cell cycle inhibitory peptides and apoptosis-inducing peptides.

    PubMed

    Raucher, Drazen; Moktan, Shama; Massodi, Iqbal; Bidwell, Gene L

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic peptides have great potential as anticancer agents owing to their ease of rational design and target specificity. However, their utility in vivo is limited by low stability and poor tumor penetration. The authors review the development of peptide inhibitors with potential for cancer therapy. Peptides that arrest the cell cycle by mimicking CDK inhibitors or induce apoptosis directly are discussed. The authors searched Medline for articles concerning the development of therapeutic peptides and their delivery. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation directly using peptides that arrest the cell cycle or induce apoptosis is a promising strategy. Peptides can be designed that interact very specifically with cyclins and/or cyclin-dependent kinases and with members of apoptotic cascades. Use of these peptides is not limited by their design, as a rational approach to peptide design is much less challenging than the design of small molecule inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions. However, the limitations of peptide therapy lie in the poor pharmacokinetic properties of these large, often charged molecules. Therefore, overcoming the drug delivery hurdles could open the door for effective peptide therapy, thus making an entirely new class of molecules useful as anticancer drugs.

  12. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  13. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  14. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  15. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  16. Knowledge-based Fragment Binding Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Grace W.; Altman, Russ B.

    2014-01-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening. PMID:24762971

  17. Knowledge-based fragment binding prediction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Grace W; Altman, Russ B

    2014-04-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening.

  18. Comparative NMR Analysis of an 80-Residue G Protein-Coupled Receptor Fragment in Two Membrane Mimetic Environments

    PubMed Central

    LS, Cohen; B, Arshava; A, Neumoin; JM, Becker; P, Güntert; O, Zerbe; Naider, F

    2011-01-01

    Fragments of integral membrane proteins have been used to study the physical chemical properties of regions of transporters and receptors. Ste2p(G31-T110) is an 80-residue polypeptide which contains a portion of the N-terminal domain, transmembrane domain 1 (TM1), intracellular loop 1, TM2 and part of extracellular loop 2 of the α-factor receptor (Ste2p) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The structure of this peptide was previously determined to form a helical hairpin in lyso-palmitoylphosphatidyl-glycerol micelles (LPPG)[1]. Herein, we perform a systematic comparison of the structure of this protein fragment in micelles and trifluoroethanol(TFE):water in order to understand whether spectra recorded in organic:aqueous medium can facilitate the structure determination in a micellar environment. Using uniformly labeled peptide and peptide selectively protonated on Ile, Val and Leu methyl groups in a perdeuterated background and a broad set of 3D NMR experiments we assigned 89% of the observable atoms. NOEs and chemical shift analysis were used to define the helical regions of the fragment. Together with constraints from paramagnetic spin labeling, NOEs were used to calculate a transiently folded helical hairpin structure for this peptide in TFE:water. Correlation of chemical shifts was insufficient to transfer assignments from TFE:water to LPPG spectra in the absence of further information. PMID:21791199

  19. The localization of a vitamin K-induced modification in an N-terminal fragment of human prothrombin

    PubMed Central

    Skotland, Tore; Holm, Turid; Østerud, Bjarne; Flengsrud, Ragnar; Prydz, Hans

    1974-01-01

    1. The N-terminal fragment (PF-I) split off from prothrombin during coagulation was purified to homogeneity from human serum. 2. The apparent molecular weight is 27000±2000 in sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, whereas a value of about 19600 is obtained by calculation based on amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. The N-terminal sequence is an Ala-Asx bond. The fragment contains about 16% carbohydrate, binds phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+ and is adsorbed to BaSO4. The pKa of its BaSO4-binding group(s) is 3.1–3.5. 3. By CNBr cleavage of fragment PF-I two peptides (C-1 and C-2) were obtained with molecular weights of about 5900 (C-2) and 12400 (C-1) on the basis of amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. Only the smaller (N-terminal) peptide is adsorbed to BaSO4 and, since the ability of the whole protein to bind to BaSO4 is known to be absent in samples obtained from patients treated with vitamin K antagonists, this peptide probably contains the site of a modification to the structure of the protein which occurs during biosynthesis and depends on vitamin K. This peptide does not contain hexosamine or sialic acid. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:4219283

  20. Origin of bombesin-like peptides in human fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, K; de Bock, V; Solomon, S

    1984-02-27

    Four different forms of bombesin-like immunoreactive peaks were detected in extracts of human fetal lung by the use of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Peaks I, II, III and IV, (increasing retention time), were eluted using a 14-38% of acetonitrile gradient containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). Peak II was the major material found in the extract of human fetal lung obtained at 16-20 weeks gestation. None of the four compounds contained in the eluted peaks had the same retention time as amphibian bombesin or porcine gastrin releasing peptide (GRP). On reversed-phase HPLC using two different solvent systems TFA or heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA) as a hydrophobic counter ion, and in gel filtration chromatography, the chromatographic behavior of the main peak (peak II) was the same as that of the carboxyl terminal fragments of GRP, GRP18-27 or GRP19-27. This suggested that the peptide(s) in peak II resembled in composition the carboxy terminal 9 or 10 amino acids of porcine GRP. Following tryptic digestion the material in peak IV was converted to the more polar compound present in peak II. Two other peptide peaks were eluted close to peak II and these were presumed to be a modification of this main peak. One of the possible biosynthetic steps in the formation of bombesin-like peptides in human fetal lung could be a tryptic conversion of a less polar peptide to a more polar form (peak IV to II).

  1. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  2. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  4. Scalable purification of the lantibiotic nisin and isolation of chemical/enzymatic cleavage fragments suitable for semi-synthesis.

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Jack C; Liskamp, Rob M J; Rijkers, Dirk T S

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we describe a scalable purification of the lantibiotic nisin via an extraction/precipitation approach using a biphasic system, which can be carried out up to 40-80 gram scale. This approach results in an at least tenfold enrichment of commercially available preparations of nisin, which usually contain only 2.5% of the desired peptide, to allow further purification by preparative HPLC. As a follow-up study, the enriched nisin sample was digested either by trypsin or chymotrypsin, or treated by CNBr, and these reactions were monitored by LC-MS to identify and characterize the obtained fragments. Two previously unknown cleavage sites have been identified: Asn20-Met21 and Met21-Lys22 for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. Furthermore, a novel and convenient enzymatic approach to isolate the native nisin C-ring [nisin fragment (13-20)] was uncovered. Finally, by means of preparative HPLC, nisin fragments (1-12), (1-20), (22-34), and (22-31) could be isolated and will be used in a semi-synthesis approach to elucidate the role of each fragment in the mode of action of nisin as an antimicrobial peptide. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Peptides Labeled with Pyridinium Salts for Sensitive Detection and Sequencing by Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliczek, Mateusz; Kijewska, Monika; Rudowska, Magdalena; Setner, Bartosz; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2016-11-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of trace amounts of peptides may be problematic due to the insufficient ionization efficiency resulting in limited sensitivity. One of the possible ways to overcome this problem is the application of ionization enhancers. Herein we developed new ionization markers based on 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium salts. Using of inexpensive and commercially available pyrylium salt allows selective derivatization of primary amino groups, especially those sterically unhindered, such as ɛ-amino group of lysine. The 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium modified peptides generate in MS/MS experiments an abundant protonated 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium ion. This fragment is a promising reporter ion for the multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) analysis. In addition, the fixed positive charge of the pyridinium group enhances the ionization efficiency. Other advantages of the proposed ionization enhancers are the simplicity of derivatization of peptides and the possibility of convenient incorporation of isotopic labels into derivatized peptides.

  7. Bacterial Expression and Purification of the Amyloidogenic Peptide PAPf39 for Multidimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Bishop, Anthony C.; French, Kinsley C.; McCallum, Scott A.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    PAPf39 is a 39 residue peptide fragment from human prostatic acidic phosphatase that forms amyloid fibrils in semen. These fibrils have been implicated in facilitating HIV transmission. To enable structural studies of PAPf39 by NMR spectroscopy, efficient methods allowing the production of milligram quantities of isotopically labeled peptide are essential. Here, we report the high-yield expression, as a fusion to ubiquitin at the N-terminus and an intein at the C-terminus, and purification of uniformly labeled 13C- and 15N-labeled PAPf39 peptide. This allows the study of the PAPf39 monomer conformational ensemble by NMR spectroscopy. To this end, we performed the NMR chemical shift assignment of the PAPf39 peptide in the monomeric state at low pH. PMID:23314347

  8. Library Design-Facilitated High-Throughput Sequencing of Synthetic Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Gates, Zachary P; Zhang, Chi; Quartararo, Anthony J; Halloran, Kathryn H; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2017-11-13

    A methodology to achieve high-throughput de novo sequencing of synthetic peptide mixtures is reported. The approach leverages shotgun nanoliquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry-based de novo sequencing of library mixtures (up to 2000 peptides) as well as automated data analysis protocols to filter away incorrect assignments, noise, and synthetic side-products. For increasing the confidence in the sequencing results, mass spectrometry-friendly library designs were developed that enabled unambiguous decoding of up to 600 peptide sequences per hour while maintaining greater than 85% sequence identification rates in most cases. The reliability of the reported decoding strategy was additionally confirmed by matching fragmentation spectra for select authentic peptides identified from library sequencing samples. The methods reported here are directly applicable to screening techniques that yield mixtures of active compounds, including particle sorting of one-bead one-compound libraries and affinity enrichment of synthetic library mixtures performed in solution.

  9. Recombinant production, isotope labeling and purification of ENOD40B: a plant peptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kee; Tonneli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2012-08-01

    The plant peptide hormone ENOD40B was produced in a protein production strain of Escherichia coli harboring an induction controller plasmid (Rosetta(DE3)pLysS) as a His6-tagged ubiquitin fusion protein. The fusion protein product was denatured and refolded as part of the isolation procedure and purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography. The peptide hormone was released from its fusion partner by adding yeast ubiquitin hydrolase (YUH) and subsequently purified by reversed phase chromatography. The purity of the resulting peptide fragment was assayed by MALDITOF mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The final yields of the target peptide were 7.0 mg per liter of LB medium and 3.4 mg per liter of minimal medium.

  10. Circular dichroism study of the carbohydrate-modified opioid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, Štefica; Otvos, Laszlo; Urge, Laszlo; Horvat, Jaroslav; Čudić, Mare; Varga-Defterdarović, Lidija

    1999-09-01

    The conformational preferences of enkephalins and the related glycoconjugates in which free or protected carbohydrate moieties were linked to the opioid peptides through an ether, ester or amide bond were investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy in water, trifluoroethanol and water-trifluoroethanol mixtures. The analysis of the spectra revealed that the conformation of the enkephalin molecule is very sensitive to slight changes in the peptide structure around the C-terminal region. It was found that the type II β-turn structures are populated in N-terminal tetrapeptide enkephalin fragment, while leucine-enkephalin amide feature a type I (III) β-turn structure in solution. Incorporation of the sugar moiety into opioid peptide compound did not significantly influence the overall conformation of the peptide backbone, although minor intensity changes may reflect shifts in the population of the different turn systems. These small structural alterations can be responsible for the receptor-subtype selectivity of the various carbohydrate-modified enkephalin analogs.

  11. GibbsCluster: unsupervised clustering and alignment of peptide sequences.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Massimo; Alvarez, Bruno; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-07-03

    Receptor interactions with short linear peptide fragments (ligands) are at the base of many biological signaling processes. Conserved and information-rich amino acid patterns, commonly called sequence motifs, shape and regulate these interactions. Because of the properties of a receptor-ligand system or of the assay used to interrogate it, experimental data often contain multiple sequence motifs. GibbsCluster is a powerful tool for unsupervised motif discovery because it can simultaneously cluster and align peptide data. The GibbsCluster 2.0 presented here is an improved version incorporating insertion and deletions accounting for variations in motif length in the peptide input. In basic terms, the program takes as input a set of peptide sequences and clusters them into meaningful groups. It returns the optimal number of clusters it identified, together with the sequence alignment and sequence motif characterizing each cluster. Several parameters are available to customize cluster analysis, including adjustable penalties for small clusters and overlapping groups and a trash cluster to remove outliers. As an example application, we used the server to deconvolute multiple specificities in large-scale peptidome data generated by mass spectrometry. The server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GibbsCluster-2.0. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Peptides with morphine-like action in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kosterlitz, H W; Hughes, J

    1977-03-01

    The reasons which led to the search in the brain for substances with morphine-like actions actions are discussed. Two pentapeptides, methionineenkephalin and leucine-enkephalin, were isolated. The amino acid sequence of methionine-enkephalin occurs also in the pituitary prohormone beta-lipotropin, of which longer fragments (endorphins) of up to 31 amino acids exhibit strong morphine-like action. The physiological significance of these short and long opioid peptides is discussed, particularly with regard to their possible roles as neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. With regard to the mechanisms involved in the development of tolerance to and dependence on opiates, the importance of interaction between the endogenous opioid peptides and the exogenous opiate alkaloids is stressed. The possible therapeutic implications are discussed briefly.

  13. New cytotoxic cyclic peptides and dianthramide from Dianthus superbus.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Ching-Chung; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Li, Chien-Ming; Chen, Su-Li; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2004-09-01

    Four new cyclic peptides, dianthins C-F (1-4), and a new dianthramide, 4-methoxydianthramide B (5), were isolated from the MeOH extract of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Dianthus superbus. The sequences of cyclic peptides 1-4 were elucidated as cyclo(Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Phe(3)-Tyr(4)-Val(5)-Ile(6)-), cyclo(Gly(1)-Ser(2)-Leu(3)-Pro(4)-Pro(5)-Ile(6)-Phe(7)-), cyclo(Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Ile(3)-Ser(4)-Phe(5)-Val(6)-), and cyclo(Gly(1)-Pro(2)-Phe(3)-Val(4)-Phe(5)-) on the basis of ESI tandem mass fragmentation analysis, chemical evidence, and extensive 2D NMR methods. The conformation of compound 1 was established as an alpha-helix by CD analysis. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 5 showed cytotoxicities toward the Hep G2 cancer cell line with IC(50) values of 2.37 and 4.08, respectively.

  14. Aortic microcalcification is associated with elastin fragmentation in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wanga, Shaynah; Hibender, Stijntje; Ridwan, Yanto; van Roomen, Cindy; Vos, Mariska; van der Made, Ingeborg; van Vliet, Nicole; Franken, Romy; van Riel, Luigi Amjg; Groenink, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara Jm; de Vries, Carlie Jm; Essers, Jeroen; de Waard, Vivian

    2017-11-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder in which aortic rupture is the major cause of death. MFS patients with an aortic diameter below the advised limit for prophylactic surgery (<5 cm) may unexpectedly experience an aortic dissection or rupture, despite yearly monitoring. Hence, there is a clear need for improved prognostic markers to predict such aortic events. We hypothesize that elastin fragments play a causal role in aortic calcification in MFS, and that microcalcification serves as a marker for aortic disease severity. To address this hypothesis, we analysed MFS patient and mouse aortas. MFS patient aortic tissue showed enhanced microcalcification in areas with extensive elastic lamina fragmentation in the media. A causal relationship between medial injury and microcalcification was revealed by studies in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs); elastin peptides were shown to increase the activity of the calcification marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and reduce the expression of the calcification inhibitor matrix GLA protein in human SMCs. In murine Fbn1 C1039G/+ MFS aortic SMCs, Alpl mRNA and activity were upregulated as compared with wild-type SMCs. The elastin peptide-induced ALP activity was prevented by incubation with lactose or a neuraminidase inhibitor, which inhibit the elastin receptor complex, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/2 inhibitor, indicating downstream involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Histological analyses in MFS mice revealed macrocalcification in the aortic root, whereas the ascending aorta contained microcalcification, as identified with the near-infrared fluorescent bisphosphonate probe OsteoSense-800. Significantly, microcalcification correlated strongly with aortic diameter, distensibility, elastin breaks, and phosphorylated ERK1/2. In conclusion, microcalcification co-localizes with aortic elastin degradation in MFS aortas of humans and mice, where elastin

  15. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  16. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H(2)O, NH(3), CH(2)O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H(3)PO(4), whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H](+) and [M + H - H](-) within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  17. Timeframe Dependent Fragment Ions Observed in In-Source Decay Experiments with β-Casein Using MALDI MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Sadanori; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    The fragment ions observed with time-of-flight (TOF) and quadrupole ion trap (QIT) TOF mass spectrometers (MS) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) experiments of phosphorylated analytes β-casein and its model peptide were compared from the standpoint of the residence timeframe of analyte and fragment ions in the MALDI ion source and QIT cell. The QIT-TOF MS gave fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and b-ions, and further degraded fragments originating from the loss of neutrals such as H2O, NH3, CH2O (from serine), C2H4O (from threonine), and H3PO4, whereas the TOF MS merely showed MALDI source-generated fragment c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions. The fragment ions observed in the QIT-TOF MS could be explained by the injection of the source-generated ions into the QIT cell or a cooperative effect of a little internal energy deposition, a long residence timeframe (140 ms) in the QIT cell, and specific amino acid effects on low-energy CID, whereas the source-generated fragments (c-, z'-, z-ANL, y-, and w-ions) could be a result of prompt radical-initiated fragmentation of hydrogen-abundant radical ions [M + H + H]+ and [M + H - H]- within the 53 ns timeframe, which corresponds to the delayed extraction time. The further degraded fragment b/y-ions produced in the QIT cell were confirmed by positive- and negative-ion low-energy CID experiments performed on the source-generated ions (c-, z'-, and y-ions). The loss of phosphoric acid (98 u) from analyte and fragment ions can be explained by a slow ergodic fragmentation independent of positive and negative charges.

  18. Fragment Size Distribution of Blasted Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jug, Jasmin; Strelec, Stjepan; Gazdek, Mario; Kavur, Boris

    2017-12-01

    Rock mass is a heterogeneous material, and the heterogeneity of rock causes sizes distribution of fragmented rocks in blasting. Prediction of blasted rock mass fragmentation has a significant role in the overall economics of opencast mines. Blasting as primary fragmentation can significantly decrease the cost of loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Blast fragmentation chiefly depends on the specific blast design (geometry of blast holes drilling, the quantity and class of explosive, the blasting form, the timing and partition, etc.) and on the properties of the rock mass (including the uniaxial compressive strength, the rock mass elastic Young modulus, the rock discontinuity characteristics and the rock density). Prediction and processing of blasting results researchers can accomplish by a variety of existing software’s and models, one of them is the Kuz-Ram model, which is possibly the most widely used approach to estimating fragmentation from blasting. This paper shows the estimation of fragmentation using the "SB" program, which was created by the authors. Mentioned program includes the Kuz-Ram model. Models of fragmentation are confirmed and calibrated by comparing the estimated fragmentation with actual post-blast fragmentation from image processing techniques. In this study, the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model has been used for an open-pit limestone quarry in Dalmatia, southern Croatia. The resulting calibrated value of the rock factor enables the quality prognosis of fragmentation in further blasting works, with changed drilling geometry and blast design parameters. It also facilitates simulation in the program to optimize blasting works and get the desired fragmentations of the blasted rock mass.

  19. Design of chimeric peptide ligands to galanin receptors and substance P receptors.

    PubMed

    Langel, U; Land, T; Bartfai, T

    1992-06-01

    Several chimeric peptides were synthesized and found to be high-affinity ligands for both galanin and substance P receptors in membranes from the rat hypothalamus. The peptide galantide, composed of the N-terminal part of galanin and C-terminal part of substance P (SP), galanin-(1-12)-Pro-SP-(5-11) amide, which is the first galanin antagonist to be reported, recognizes two classes of galanin binding sites (KD(1) less than 0.1 nM and KD(2) approximately 6 nM) in the rat hypothalamus, while it appears to bind to a single population of SP receptors (KD approximately 40 nM). The chimeric peptide has higher affinity towards galanin receptors than the endogenous peptide galanin-(1-29) (KD approximately 1 nM) or its N-terminal fragment galanin-(1-13) (KD approximately 1 microM), which constitutes the N-terminus of the chimeric peptide. Galantide has also higher affinity for the SP receptors than the C-terminal SP fragment-(4-11) amide (KD = 0.4 microM), which constitutes its C-terminal portion. Substitution of amino acid residues, which is of importance for recognition of galanin by galanin receptors, such as [Trp2], in the galanin portion of the chimeric peptide or substitution of ([Phe7] or [Met11]-amide) in the SP portion of chimeric peptide both cause significant loss in affinity of the analogs of galantide for both the galanin- and the SP-receptors. These results suggest that the high affinity of the chimeric peptide, galantide, may in part be accounted for by simultaneous recognition/binding to both receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Customized Peptide Biomaterial Synthesis via an Environment-Reliant Auto-Programmer Stigmergic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Bijukumar, Divya; Chejara, Dharmesh R.

    2018-01-01

    Stigmergy, a form of self-organization, was employed here to engineer a self-organizing peptide capable of forming a nano- or micro-structure and that can potentially be used in various drug delivery and biomedical applications. These self-assembling peptides exhibit several desirable qualities for drug delivery, tissue engineering, cosmetics, antibiotics, food science, and biomedical surface engineering. In this study, peptide biomaterial synthesis was carried out using an environment-reliant auto-programmer stigmergic approach. A model protein, α-gliadin (31, 36, and 38 kD), was forced to attain a primary structure with free –SH groups and broken down enzymatically into smaller fragments using chymotrypsin. This breakdown was carried out at different environment conditions (37 and 50 °C), and the fragments were allowed to self-organize at these temperatures. The new peptides so formed diverged according to the environmental conditions. Interestingly, two peptides (with molecular weights of 13.8 and 11.8 kD) were isolated when the reaction temperature was maintained at 50 °C, while four peptides with molecular weights of 54, 51, 13.8, and 12.8 kD were obtained when the reaction was conducted at 37 °C. Thus, at a higher temperature (50 °C), the peptides formed, compared to the original protein, had lower molecular weights, whereas, at a lower temperature (37 °C), two peptides had higher molecular weights and two had lower molecular weights. PMID:29659507

  1. Fragment-based approaches to TB drugs.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Chiara; Chan, Daniel S H; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The rise of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) urgently demands the development of new drug leads to tackle resistant strains. Fragment-based methods have recently emerged at the forefront of pharmaceutical development as a means to generate more effective lead structures, via the identification of fragment molecules that form weak but high quality interactions with the target biomolecule and subsequent fragment optimization. This review highlights a number of novel inhibitors of Mtb targets that have been developed through fragment-based approaches in recent years.

  2. Fragment-based screen against HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Alexander L; Zhang, Qing; Soutter, Holly H; Rosenfeld, Robin; McRee, Duncan E; Olson, Arthur J; Elder, John E; Stout, C David

    2010-03-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 A resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the 'exo site' adjacent to the Gly(16)Gly(17)Gln(18)loop where the amide of Gly(17)is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys(14)and Leu(63). Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the 'outside/top of the flap' via hydrophobic contacts with Trp(42), Pro(44), Met(46), and Lys(55), a hydrogen bond with Val(56), and a salt-bridge with Arg(57). 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target.

  3. Fragment-Based Screen against HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, A. L.; Zhang, Q.; Soutter, H. H.; Rosenfeld, R.; McRee, D. E.; Olson, A. J.; Elder, J. E.; Stout, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 Å resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the ‘exo site’ adjacent to the Gly16Gly17Gln18 loop where the amide of Gly17 is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys14 and Leu63. Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the ‘outside/top of the flap’ via hydrophobic contacts with Trp42, Pro44, Met46, and Lys55, a hydrogen bond with Val56, and a salt-bridge with Arg57. 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target. PMID:20659109

  4. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  5. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Rosetta FlexPepDock ab-initio: simultaneous folding, docking and refinement of peptides onto their receptors.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Barak; London, Nir; Zimmerman, Lior; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2011-04-29

    Flexible peptides that fold upon binding to another protein molecule mediate a large number of regulatory interactions in the living cell and may provide highly specific recognition modules. We present Rosetta FlexPepDock ab-initio, a protocol for simultaneous docking and de-novo folding of peptides, starting from an approximate specification of the peptide binding site. Using the Rosetta fragments library and a coarse-grained structural representation of the peptide and the receptor, FlexPepDock ab-initio samples efficiently and simultaneously the space of possible peptide backbone conformations and rigid-body orientations over the receptor surface of a given binding site. The subsequent all-atom refinement of the coarse-grained models includes full side-chain modeling of both the receptor and the peptide, resulting in high-resolution models in which key side-chain interactions are recapitulated. The protocol was applied to a benchmark in which peptides were modeled over receptors in either their bound backbone conformations or in their free, unbound form. Near-native peptide conformations were identified in 18/26 of the bound cases and 7/14 of the unbound cases. The protocol performs well on peptides from various classes of secondary structures, including coiled peptides with unusual turns and kinks. The results presented here significantly extend the scope of state-of-the-art methods for high-resolution peptide modeling, which can now be applied to a wide variety of peptide-protein interactions where no prior information about the peptide backbone conformation is available, enabling detailed structure-based studies and manipulation of those interactions. © 2011 Raveh et al.

  7. Rosetta FlexPepDock ab-initio: Simultaneous Folding, Docking and Refinement of Peptides onto Their Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Barak; London, Nir; Zimmerman, Lior; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2011-01-01

    Flexible peptides that fold upon binding to another protein molecule mediate a large number of regulatory interactions in the living cell and may provide highly specific recognition modules. We present Rosetta FlexPepDock ab-initio, a protocol for simultaneous docking and de-novo folding of peptides, starting from an approximate specification of the peptide binding site. Using the Rosetta fragments library and a coarse-grained structural representation of the peptide and the receptor, FlexPepDock ab-initio samples efficiently and simultaneously the space of possible peptide backbone conformations and rigid-body orientations over the receptor surface of a given binding site. The subsequent all-atom refinement of the coarse-grained models includes full side-chain modeling of both the receptor and the peptide, resulting in high-resolution models in which key side-chain interactions are recapitulated. The protocol was applied to a benchmark in which peptides were modeled over receptors in either their bound backbone conformations or in their free, unbound form. Near-native peptide conformations were identified in 18/26 of the bound cases and 7/14 of the unbound cases. The protocol performs well on peptides from various classes of secondary structures, including coiled peptides with unusual turns and kinks. The results presented here significantly extend the scope of state-of-the-art methods for high-resolution peptide modeling, which can now be applied to a wide variety of peptide-protein interactions where no prior information about the peptide backbone conformation is available, enabling detailed structure-based studies and manipulation of those interactions. PMID:21572516

  8. Ultraviolet, Infrared, and High-Low Energy Photodissociation of Post-Translationally Modified Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Girod, Marion

    2018-02-01

    Mass spectrometry-based methods have made significant progress in characterizing post-translational modifications in peptides and proteins; however, certain aspects regarding fragmentation methods must still be improved. A good technique is expected to provide excellent sequence information, locate PTM sites, and retain the labile PTM groups. To address these issues, we investigate 10.6 μm IRMPD, 213 nm UVPD, and combined UV and IR photodissociation, known as HiLoPD (high-low photodissociation), for phospho-, sulfo-, and glyco-peptide cations. IRMPD shows excellent backbone fragmentation and produces equal numbers of N- and C-terminal ions. The results reveal that 213 nm UVPD and HiLoPD methods can provide diverse backbone fragmentation producing a/x, b/y, and c/z ions with excellent sequence coverage, locate PTM sites, and offer reasonable retention efficiency for phospho- and glyco-peptides. Excellent sequence coverage is achieved for sulfo-peptides and the position of the SO3 group can be pinpointed; however, widespread SO3 losses are detected irrespective of the methods used herein. Based on the overall performance achieved, we believe that 213 nm UVPD and HiLoPD can serve as alternative options to collision activation and electron transfer dissociations for phospho- and glyco-proteomics.

  9. Phage selection of peptide "microantibodies".

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    A bioactive peptide capable of inhibiting protein-protein interactions has the potential to be a molecular tool for biological studies and a therapeutic by disrupting aberrant interactions involved in diseases. We have developed combinatorial libraries of peptides with helix-loop-helix structure, from which the isolated peptides have the constrained structure to reduce entropy costs in binding, resulting in high binding affinities for target molecules. Previously, we designed a de novo peptide of helix-loop-helix structure that we termed a "microantibody." Using the microantibody as a library scaffold, we have constructed a phage-display library to successfully isolate molecular-targeting peptides against a cytokine receptor (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor), a protein kinase (Aurora-A), and a ganglioside (GM1). Protocols in this article describe a general procedure for the library construction and the library screening.

  10. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  11. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  12. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E., E-mail: annette.langkilde@sund.ku.dk; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-raymore » crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.« less

  13. Enrichment and Analysis of Non-enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Boronate Affinity Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qibin; Tang, Ning; Brock, Jonathan W. C.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ames, Jennifer M.; Baynes, John W.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of peptides and proteins by D-glucose has important implications in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, particularly in the development of diabetic complications. However, no effective high-throughput methods exist for identifying proteins containing this low abundance post-translational modification in bottom-up proteomic studies. In this report, phenylboronate affinity chromatography was used in a two-step enrichment scheme to selectively isolate first glycated proteins and then glycated, tryptic peptides from human serum glycated in vitro. Enriched peptides were subsequently analyzed by alternating electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry. ETD fragmentation mode permitted identification of a significantly higher number of glycated peptides (87.6% of all identified peptides) versus CID mode (17.0% of all identified peptides), when utilizing enrichment on first the protein and then the peptide level. This study illustrates that phenylboronate affinity chromatography coupled with LC-MS/MS and using ETD as the fragmentation mode is an efficient approach for analysis of glycated proteins and may have broad application in studies of diabetes mellitus. PMID:17488106

  14. Large Gliadin Peptides Detected in the Pancreas of NOD and Healthy Mice following Oral Administration

    PubMed Central

    Sidenius, Ulrik; Heegaard, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    Gluten promotes type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and likely also in humans. In NOD mice and in non-diabetes-prone mice, it induces inflammation in the pancreatic lymph nodes, suggesting that gluten can initiate inflammation locally. Further, gliadin fragments stimulate insulin secretion from beta cells directly. We hypothesized that gluten fragments may cross the intestinal barrier to be distributed to organs other than the gut. If present in pancreas, gliadin could interact directly with the immune system and the beta cells to initiate diabetes development. We orally and intravenously administered 33-mer and 19-mer gliadin peptide to NOD, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice and found that the peptides readily crossed the intestinal barrier in all strains. Several degradation products were found in the pancreas by mass spectroscopy. Notably, the exocrine pancreas incorporated large amounts of radioactive label shortly after administration of the peptides. The study demonstrates that, even in normal animals, large gliadin fragments can reach the pancreas. If applicable to humans, the increased gut permeability in prediabetes and type 1 diabetes patients could expose beta cells directly to gliadin fragments. Here they could initiate inflammation and induce beta cell stress and thus contribute to the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27795959

  15. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  16. Creating prebiotic sanctuary: self-assembling supramolecular Peptide structures bind and stabilize RNA.

    PubMed

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known 'blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  17. Effects of Chemical Structure on Hydrolysis Pathways of Small Peptides in Coastal Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Reyna, N. E.; Hamdan, L. J.; Liu, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering peptide hydrolysis pathways is key to understanding the mechanism of peptide hydrolysis, in particular the types of extracellular enzymes that are active in seawater. From the hydrolyzed fragments of small peptides, one can estimate the role of amino-, carboxy-, and endopeptidases in a quantitative way. In this study, we incubated several small peptides with different amino acid compositions, alanine-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (AVFA), phenylalanine-alanine-serine-tryptophan-glycine-alanine (FASWGA), VFA, SWGA, VVFA, arginine-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (RVFA), SVFA, aspartic acid-valine-phenylalanine-alanine (DVFA), trialanine (AAA), and AVF in two coastal seawaters (ship channel seawater in the western Gulf of Mexico and Sta. C6 seawater in the northern Gulf of Mexico). In both seawaters, aminopeptidases played a more dominant role (22-67%) in hydrolyzing peptides with hydrophobic amino acid at the N-terminus, such as AVFA, VVFA, VFA, and AAA, or with basic amino acid at the N-terminus (RVFA), as compared to those with N-terminal polar amino acid (SVFA, SWGA) or acidic amino acid (DVFA) (0-24%). This result indicates that amino acid composition in a peptide structure affects how the peptide is hydrolyzed. We also found that peptides in the C6 seawater were hydrolyzed dominantly by aminopeptidases (10-59%), while those in the ship channel seawater also by endo- or carboxypeptidases (9-69%). This pattern suggests that peptide hydrolysis pathways depend on specific environment conditions, such as bacterial community structure, that can lead to variations in abundances or activities among amino-, carboxy- and endopeptidases. Overall, the results provide insights into the effects of chemical structure and seawater environment on peptide hydrolysis pathways.

  18. Importance of lipopolysaccharide aggregate disruption for the anti-endotoxic effects of heparin cofactor II peptides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Lipid membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) interactions were investigated for a series of amphiphilic and cationic peptides derived from human heparin cofactor II (HCII), using dual polarization interferometry, ellipsometry, circular dichroism (CD), cryoTEM, and z-potential measurements. Antimicrobial effects of these peptides were compared to their ability to disorder bacterial lipid membranes, while their capacity to block endotoxic effects of LPS was correlated to the binding of these peptides to LPS and its lipid A moiety, and to charge, secondary structure, and morphology of peptide/LPS complexes. While the peptide KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR) displayed potent antimicrobial and anti-endotoxic effects, its truncated variants KYE21 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRR) and NLF20 (NLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR) provide some clues on structure-activity relations, since KYE21 retains both the antimicrobial and anti-endotoxic effects of KYE28 (although both attenuated), while NLF20 retains the antimicrobial but only a fraction of the anti-endotoxic effect, hence locating the anti-endotoxic effects of KYE28 to its N-terminus. The antimicrobial effect, on the other hand, is primarily located at the C-terminus of KYE28. While displaying quite different endotoxic effects, these peptides bind to a similar extent to both LPS and lipid A, and also induce comparable LPS scavenging on model eukaryotic membranes. In contrast, fragmentation and densification of LPS aggregates, in turn dependent on the secondary structure in the peptide/LPS aggregates, correlate to the anti-endotoxic effect of these peptides, thus identifying peptide-induced packing transitions in LPS aggregates as key for anti-endotoxic functionality. This aspect therefore needs to be taken into account in the development of novel anti-endotoxic peptide therapeutics. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Peptides reproducibly released by in vivo digestion of beef meat and trout flesh in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bauchart, Caroline; Morzel, Martine; Chambon, Christophe; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Reynès, Christelle; Buffière, Caroline; Rémond, Didier

    2007-12-01

    Characterisation and identification of peptides (800 to 5000 Da) generated by intestinal digestion of fish or meat were performed using MS analyses (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight and nano-liquid chromatography electrospray-ionisation ion trap MS/MS). Four pigs fitted with cannulas at the duodenum and jejunum received a meal exclusively made of cooked Pectoralis profundus beef meat or cooked trout fillets. A protein-free meal, made of free amino acids, starch and fat, was used to identify peptides of endogenous origin. Peptides reproducibly detected in digesta (i.e. from at least three pigs) were evidenced predominantly in the first 3 h after the meal. In the duodenum, most of the fish- and meat-derived peptides were characteristic of a peptic digestion. In the jejunum, the majority of peptides appeared to result from digestion by chymotrypsin and trypsin. Despite slight differences in gastric emptying kinetics and overall peptide production, possibly in relation to food structure and texture, six and four similar peptides were released after ingestion of fish or meat in the duodenum and jejunum. A total of twenty-six different peptides were identified in digesta. All were fragments of major structural (actin, myosin) or sarcoplasmic (creatine kinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and myoglobin) muscle proteins. Peptides were short ( < 2000 Da) and particularly rich in proline residues. Nineteen of them contained bioactive sequences corresponding mainly to an antihypertensive activity. The present work showed that after fish or meat ingestion, among the wide variety of peptides produced by enzymic digestion, some of them can be reproducibly observed in intestinal digesta.

  20. Covalent attachment of TAT peptides and thiolated alkyl molecules on GaAs surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngnam; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2005-07-07

    Four TAT peptide fragments were used to functionalize GaAs surfaces by adsorption from solution. In addition, two well-studied alkylthiols, mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) were utilized as references to understand the structure of the TAT peptide monolayer on GaAs. The different sequences of TAT peptides were employed in recognition experiments where a synthetic RNA sequence was tested to verify the specific interaction with the TAT peptide. The modified GaAs surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS). AFM studies were used to compare the surface roughness before and after functionalization. XPS allowed us to characterize the chemical composition of the GaAs surface and conclude that the monolayers composed of different sequences of peptides have similar surface chemistries. Finally, FT-IRRAS experiments enabled us to deduce that the TAT peptide monolayers have a fairly ordered and densely packed alkyl chain structure. The recognition experiments showed preferred interaction of the RNA sequence toward peptides with high arginine content.

  1. A peptide resource for the analysis of Staphylococcus aureus in host pathogen interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Depke, Maren; Michalik, Stephan; Rabe, Alexander; Surmann, Kristin; Brinkmann, Lars; Jehmlich, Nico; Bernhardt, Jörg; Hecker, Michael; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L.; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which can cause life-threatening disease. Proteome analyses of the bacterium can provide new insights into its pathophysiology and important facets of metabolic adaptation and, thus, aid the recognition of targets for intervention. However, the value of such proteome studies increases with their comprehensiveness. We present an MS–driven, proteome-wide characterization of the strain S. aureus HG001. Combining 144 high precision proteomic data sets, we identified 19 109 peptides from 2088 distinct S. aureus HG001 proteins, which account for 72% of the predicted ORFs. Peptides were further characterized concerning pI, GRAVY, and detectability scores in order to understand the low peptide coverage of 8.7% (19 109 out of 220 245 theoretical peptides). The high quality peptide-centric spectra have been organized into a comprehensive peptide fragmentation library (SpectraST) and used for identification of S. aureus-typic peptides in highly complex host–pathogen interaction experiments, which significantly improved the number of identified S. aureus proteins compared to a MASCOT search. This effort now allows the elucidation of crucial pathophysiological questions in S. aureus-specific host–pathogen interaction studies through comprehensive proteome analysis. The S. aureus-specific spectra resource developed here also represents an important spectral repository for SRM or for data-independent acquisition MS approaches. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000702 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000702). PMID:26224020

  2. Cyclic peptides and their interaction with peptide coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, F.; Tünnemann, R.; Leipert, D.; Stingel, C.; Jung, G.; Hoffmann, V.

    2001-05-01

    Focusing on biochemical and pharmaceutical inhibitor systems the interaction of cyclic peptides with model peptides have been investigated by ATR-FTIR-spectroscopy. Information about the participation of special functional groups e.g. COOH, COO -, NH 3+ or peptide backbone was gathered by observing cyclohexapeptides (c(X 1LX 2LX 3)) which are interacting with covalently coated Si-ATR-crystals ( L-arginine, tripeptide I (aNS), tripeptide II (SNa)). To determine the interaction, further studies about the band sequence (1800-1500 cm -1) for non-adsorbed cyclohexapeptides and for the interaction with the silicon surface (SiOH) were necessary. The spectra of the interacting cyclohexapeptides with the SiOH-groups were treated like reference spectra for the evaluation of the peptide-peptide interaction. Based on these spectra, we can conclude that there is peptide-peptide interaction with the coating and not with the residual OH-groups. Determination of interaction mechanisms was done by spectra which represent adsorbed molecules only. The amount of adsorbed molecules was considerably less than a monolayer. Therefore the intensities of the spectra are about 10 -4 absorbance units. The spectra contain information about both changes of the coating and of the cyclohexapeptide.

  3. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide N-Terminus Fragment Self-Assembly: Effect of Conserved Disulfide Bond on Aggregation Propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilitchev, Alexandre I.; Giammona, Maxwell J.; Do, Thanh D.; Wong, Amy G.; Buratto, Steven K.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    Amyloid formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has long been implicated in the pathogeny of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and failure of islet transplants, but the mechanism of IAPP self-assembly is still unclear. Numerous fragments of hIAPP are capable of self-association into oligomeric aggregates, both amyloid and non-amyloid in structure. The N-terminal region of IAPP contains a conserved disulfide bond between cysteines at position 2 and 7, which is important to hIAPP's in vivo function and may play a role in in vitro aggregation. The importance of the disulfide bond in this region was probed using a combination of ion mobility-based mass spectrometry experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging on the wildtype 1-8 hIAPP fragment, a reduced fragment with no disulfide bond, and a fragment with both cysteines at positions 2 and 7 mutated to serine. The results indicate the wildtype fragment aggregates by a different pathway than either comparison peptide and that the intact disulfide bond may be protective against aggregation due to a reduction of inter-peptide hydrogen bonding.

  4. Ground and Excited-Electronic-State Dissociations of Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Deficient Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglino, Emilie; Lai, Cheuk Kuen; Mu, Xiaoyan; Chu, Ivan K.; Tureček, František

    2016-09-01

    We report a comprehensive study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and near-UV photodissociation (UVPD) of a series of tyrosine-containing peptide cation radicals of the hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient types. Stable, long-lived, hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals, such as [AAAYR + 2H]+● and several of its sequence and homology variants, were generated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide-crown-ether complexes, and their CID-MS3 dissociations were found to be dramatically different from those upon ETD of the respective peptide dications. All of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals contained major (77%-94%) fractions of species having radical chromophores created by ETD that underwent photodissociation at 355 nm. Analysis of the CID and UVPD spectra pointed to arginine guanidinium radicals as the major components of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radical population. Hydrogen-deficient peptide cation radicals were generated by intramolecular electron transfer in CuII(2,2 ':6 ',2 ″-terpyridine) complexes and shown to contain chromophores absorbing at 355 nm and undergoing photodissociation. The CID and UVPD spectra showed major differences in fragmentation for [AAAYR]+● that diminished as the Tyr residue was moved along the peptide chain. UVPD was found to be superior to CID in localizing Cα-radical positions in peptide cation radical intermediates.

  5. Isolation and identification of calcium-chelating peptides from Pacific cod skin gelatin and their binding properties with calcium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenfei; Li, Bafang; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Xue

    2017-12-13

    A calcium-chelating peptide is considered to have the ability to improve calcium absorption. In this study, Pacific cod skin gelatin hydrolysates treated with trypsin for 120 min exhibited higher calcium-chelating activity. Sequential chromatography, involving hydroxyapatite affinity chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, was used for the purification of calcium-chelating peptides. Two novel peptides with the typical characteristics of collagen were sequenced as GDKGESGEAGER and GEKGEGGHR based on LC-HRMS/MS, which showed a high affinity to calcium. Calcium-peptide complexation was further characterized by ESI-MS (MS and MS/MS) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that the complexation of the two peptides with calcium was conducted mainly at the ratio of 1 : 1. The amino terminal group and the peptide bond of the peptide backbone as well as the amino group of the lysine side chain and the carboxylate of the glutamate side chain were the possible calcium binding sites for the two peptides. Meanwhile, several amino acid side chain groups, including the hydroxyl (Ser) and carboxylate (Asp) of GDKGESGEAGER and the imine (His) of GEKGEGGHR, were crucial in the complexation. The arginine residue in GEKGEGGHR also participated in the calcium coordination. Additionally, several active fragments with calcium-chelating activity were obtained using MS/MS spectra, including GDKGESGEAGE, GEAGER, GEK, EKG and KGE. This study suggests that gelatin-derived peptides have the potential to be used as a calcium-chelating ingredient to combat calcium deficiency.

  6. Direct observations of conformational distributions of intrinsically disordered p53 peptides using UV Raman and explicit solvent simulations

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Kan; Zwier, Matthew C.; Myshakina, Nataliya S.; Burger, Virginia M.; Asher, Sanford A.; Chong, Lillian T.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental measurements of Ramachandran Ψ-angle distributions for intrinsically disordered peptides: the N-terminal peptide fragment of tumor suppressor p53 and its P27 mutant form. To provide atomically detailed views of the conformational distributions, we performed classical, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations on the microsecond timescale. Upon binding its partner protein, MDM2, wild-type p53 peptide adopts an α-helical conformation. Mutation of Pro27 to serine results in the highest affinity yet observed for MDM2-binding of the p53 peptide. Both UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) and simulations reveal that the P27S mutation decreases the extent of PPII helical content and increases the probability for conformations that are similar to the α-helical MDM2-bound conformation. In addition, UVRR measurements were performed on peptides that were isotopically labeled at the Leu26 residue preceding the Pro27 in order to determine the conformational distributions of Leu26 in the wild-type and mutant peptides. The UVRR and simulation results are in quantitative agreement in terms of the change in the population of non-PPII conformations involving Leu26 upon mutation of Pro27 to serine. Finally, our simulations reveal that the MDM2-bound conformation of the peptide is significantly populated in both the wild-type and mutant isolated peptide ensembles in their unbound states, suggesting that MDM2 binding of the p53 peptides may involve conformational selection. PMID:21528875

  7. Cloning of human prourokinase cDNA without the signal peptide and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Li, J; Yu, W; Fang, J

    1993-01-01

    Human prourokinase (pro-UK) cDNA without the signal peptide was obtained using synthetic oligonucleotide and DNA recombination techniques and was successfully expressed in E. coli. The plasmid pMMUK which contained pro-UK cDNA (including both the entire coding sequence and the sequence for signal peptide) was digested with Hind III and PstI, so that the N-terminal 371-bp fragment could be recovered. A 304-bp fragment was collected from the 371-bp fragment after partial digestion with Fnu4HI in order to remove the signal peptide sequence. An intermediate plasmid was formed after this 304-bp fragment and the synthetic oligonucleotide was ligated with pUC18. Correctness of the ligation was confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing. By joining the PstI-PstI fragment of pro-UK to the plasmid we obtained the final plasmid which contained the entire coding sequence of pro-UK without the signal peptide. The coding sequence with correct orientation was inserted into pBV220 under the control of the temperature-induced promoter PRPL, and mature pro-UK was expressed in E. coli at 42 degrees C. Both sonicated supernatant and inclusion bodies of the bacterial host JM101 showed positive results by ELISA and FAPA assays. After renaturation, the biological activity of the expressed product was increased from 500-1000IU/L to about 60,000IU/L. The bacterial pro-UK showed a molecular weight of about 47,000 daltons by Western blot analysis. It can be completely inhibited by UK antiserum but not by t-PA antiserum nor by normal rabbit serum.

  8. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R.

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are twomore » major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.« less

  9. Use of a Designed Peptide Array To Infer Dissociation Trends for Nontryptic Peptides in Quadrupole Ion Trap and Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Gaucher, Sara P.; Morrow, Jeffrey A.; Faulon, Jean-Loup M.

    2007-09-14

    Observed peptide gas-phase fragmentation patterns are a complex function of many variables. In order to systematically probe this phenomenon, an array of 40 peptides was synthesized for study. The array of sequences was designed to hold certain variables (peptide length) constant and randomize or balance others (peptide amino acid distribution and position). A high-quality tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data set was acquired for each peptide for all observed charge states on multiple MS instruments, quadrupole-time-of-flight and quadrupole ion trap. The data were analyzed as a function of total charge state and number of mobile protons. Previously known dissociation trends weremore » observed, validating our approach. In addition, the general influence of basic amino acids on dissociation could be determined because, in contrast to the more widely studied tryptic peptides, the amino acids H, K, and R were positionally distributed. Interestingly, our results suggest that cleavage at all basic amino acids is suppressed when a mobile proton is available. Cleavage at H becomes favored only under conditions where a partially mobile proton is present, a caveat to the previously reported trend of enhanced cleavage at H. In conclusion, all acquired data were used as a benchmark to determine how well these sequences would have been identified in a database search using a common algorithm, Mascot.« less

  10. Prothrombin fragments in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Páramo, J A

    2010-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), which comes from in vivo cleavage of prothrombin by factor Xa, is considered to be useful for diagnosis of thrombosis. Recognition of the central role of thrombosis in the pathogenesis ofcardiovascular disease has prompted growing interest in the association o F1+2 with cardiovascular clinical syndromes. Increased F1+2 levels have reported in venous thromboembolism, inflammation, cancer, sepsis, acute coronary syndromes, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, atrial fibrillation and during the postoperative period. However, a clear relationship with the appearance of thrombosis has not always been consistently demonstrated. Besides its potential prognostic and diagnostic value, it could also be usefu in assessing the impact of various therapies. However, it should be kept in mind that measurement of hemostasis activation markers has several important biological and methodological disadvantages. Activation markers reflect the presence of thrombosis in any vascular bed, so they are not specific. Furthermore, elevations occur not only in the presence of overt thrombosis but also during the hypercoagulable state. The cutoff level to be used for the definition of elevations is still largely unknown due to the use of different analytical methods, none of which have been standardized until know. Finally, the prognostic value of F1+2 and other markers of coagulation activation remains to be fully defined in future studies.

  11. Scrutinizing MHC-I binding peptides and their limits of variation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian P; Perna, Anna M; Pillong, Max; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Wrede, Paul; Folkers, Gerd; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2013-01-01

    Designed peptides that bind to major histocompatibility protein I (MHC-I) allomorphs bear the promise of representing epitopes that stimulate a desired immune response. A rigorous bioinformatical exploration of sequence patterns hidden in peptides that bind to the mouse MHC-I allomorph H-2K(b) is presented. We exemplify and validate these motif findings by systematically dissecting the epitope SIINFEKL and analyzing the resulting fragments for their binding potential to H-2K(b) in a thermal denaturation assay. The results demonstrate that only fragments exclusively retaining the carboxy- or amino-terminus of the reference peptide exhibit significant binding potential, with the N-terminal pentapeptide SIINF as shortest ligand. This study demonstrates that sophisticated machine-learning algorithms excel at extracting fine-grained patterns from peptide sequence data and predicting MHC-I binding peptides, thereby considerably extending existing linear prediction models and providing a fresh view on the computer-based molecular design of future synthetic vaccines. The server for prediction is available at http://modlab-cadd.ethz.ch (SLiDER tool, MHC-I version 2012).

  12. Molecular Dynamics Information Improves cis-Peptide-Based Function Annotation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreetama; Bhadra, Pratiti; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Pal, Debnath

    2017-08-04

    cis-Peptide bonds, whose occurrence in proteins is rare but evolutionarily conserved, are implicated to play an important role in protein function. This has led to their previous use in a homology-independent, fragment-match-based protein function annotation method. However, proteins are not static molecules; dynamics is integral to their activity. This is nicely epitomized by the geometric isomerization of cis-peptide to trans form for molecular activity. Hence we have incorporated both static (cis-peptide) and dynamics information to improve the prediction of protein molecular function. Our results show that cis-peptide information alone cannot detect functional matches in cases where cis-trans isomerization exists but 3D coordinates have been obtained for only the trans isomer or when the cis-peptide bond is incorrectly assigned as trans. On the contrary, use of dynamics information alone includes false-positive matches for cases where fragments with similar secondary structure show similar dynamics, but the proteins do not share a common function. Combining the two methods reduces errors while detecting the true matches, thereby enhancing the utility of our method in function annotation. A combined approach, therefore, opens up new avenues of improving existing automated function annotation methodologies.

  13. Andromeda: a peptide search engine integrated into the MaxQuant environment.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jürgen; Neuhauser, Nadin; Michalski, Annette; Scheltema, Richard A; Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    A key step in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is the identification of peptides in sequence databases by their fragmentation spectra. Here we describe Andromeda, a novel peptide search engine using a probabilistic scoring model. On proteome data, Andromeda performs as well as Mascot, a widely used commercial search engine, as judged by sensitivity and specificity analysis based on target decoy searches. Furthermore, it can handle data with arbitrarily high fragment mass accuracy, is able to assign and score complex patterns of post-translational modifications, such as highly phosphorylated peptides, and accommodates extremely large databases. The algorithms of Andromeda are provided. Andromeda can function independently or as an integrated search engine of the widely used MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and both are freely available at www.maxquant.org. The combination enables analysis of large data sets in a simple analysis workflow on a desktop computer. For searching individual spectra Andromeda is also accessible via a web server. We demonstrate the flexibility of the system by implementing the capability to identify cofragmented peptides, significantly improving the total number of identified peptides.

  14. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  15. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  16. FRAGMENTATION OF CONTINENTAL UNITES STATES FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m land-cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indices measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes from 2....

  17. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  18. Fungal Fragments as Indoor Air Biocontaminants

    PubMed Central

    Górny, Rafał L.; Reponen, Tiina; Willeke, Klaus; Schmechel, Detlef; Robine, Enric; Boissier, Marjorie; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2002-01-01

    The aerosolization process of fungal propagules of three species (Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Cladosporium cladosporioides) was studied by using a newly designed and constructed aerosolization chamber. We discovered that fungal fragments are aerosolized simultaneously with spores from contaminated agar and ceiling tile surfaces. Concentration measurements with an optical particle counter showed that the fragments are released in higher numbers (up to 320 times) than the spores. The release of fungal propagules varied depending on the fungal species, the air velocity above the contaminated surface, and the texture and vibration of the contaminated material. In contrast to spores, the release of fragments from smooth surfaces was not affected by air velocity, indicating a different release mechanism. Correlation analysis showed that the number of released fragments cannot be predicted on the basis of the number of spores. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with monoclonal antibodies produced against Aspergillus and Penicillium fungal species showed that fragments and spores share common antigens, which not only confirmed the fungal origin of the fragments but also established their potential biological relevance. The considerable immunological reactivity, the high number, and the small particle size of the fungal fragments may contribute to human health effects that have been detected in buildings with mold problems but had no scientific explanation until now. This study suggests that future fungal spore investigations in buildings with mold problems should include the quantitation of fungal fragments. PMID:12089037

  19. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Treesearch

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  20. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  1. Cardioprotection by a nonerythropoietic, tissue-protective peptide mimicking the 3D structure of erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Ueba, Hiroto; Brines, Michael; Yamin, Michael; Umemoto, Tomio; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-ichi; Cerami, Anthony; Kawakami, Masanobu

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), originally identified for its critical hormonal role in regulating production and survival of erythrocytes, is a member of the type 1 cytokine superfamily. Recent studies have shown that EPO has cytoprotective effects in a wide variety of tissues, including the heart, by preventing apoptosis. However, EPO also has undesirable effects, such as thrombogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether a helix B-surface peptide (HBSP), a nonerythropoietic, tissue-protective peptide mimicking the 3D structure of erythropoietin, protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, HBSP clearly inhibited apoptosis (≈80%) induced by TNF-α, which was comparable with the effect of EPO, and activated critical signaling pathways of cell survival, including Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3. Among these pathways, Akt was shown to play an essential role in HBSP-induced prevention of apoptosis, as assessed by using a small interfering RNA approach. In the dilated cardiomyopathic hamster (J2N-k), whose cardiac tissues diffusely expressed TNF-α, HBSP also inhibited apoptosis (≈70%) and activated Akt in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the levels of serum creatine kinase activity and of cardiac expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, a marker of chronic heart failure, were down-regulated in animals treated with HBSP. These data demonstrate that HBSP protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and leads to a favorable outcome in failing hearts through an Akt-dependent pathway. Because HBSP does not have the undesirable effects of EPO, it could be a promising alternative for EPO to treat cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. PMID:20660739

  2. Radical Anions of Oxidized vs. Reduced Oxytocin: Influence of Disulfide Bridges on CID and Vacuum UV Photo-Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAleese, Luke; Girod, Marion; Nahon, Laurent; Giuliani, Alexandre; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2018-06-01

    The nonapeptide oxytocin (OT) is used as a model sulfur-containing peptide to study the damage induced by vacuum UV (VUV) radiations. In particular, the effect of the presence (or absence in reduced OT) of oxytocin's internal disulfide bridge is evaluated in terms of photo-fragmentation yield and nature of the photo-fragments. Intact, as well as reduced, OT is studied as dianions and radical anions. Radical anions are prepared and photo-fragmented in two-color experiments (UV + VUV) in a linear ion trap. VUV photo-fragmentation patterns are analyzed and compared, and radical-induced mechanisms are proposed. The effect of VUV is principally to ionize but secondary fragmentation is also observed. This secondary fragmentation seems to be considerably enabled by the initial position of the radical on the molecule. In particular, the possibility to form a radical on free cysteines seems to increase the susceptibility to VUV fragmentation. Interestingly, disulfide bridges, which are fundamental for protein structure, could also be responsible for an increased resistance to ionizing radiations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Final excitation energy of fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Karl-Heinz; Jurado, Beatriz

    We study how the excitation energy of the fully accelerated fission fragments is built up. It is stressed that only the intrinsic excitation energy available before scission can be exchanged between the fission fragments to achieve thermal equilibrium. This is in contradiction with most models used to calculate prompt neutron emission, where it is assumed that the total excitation energy of the final fragments is shared between the fragments by the condition of equal temperatures. We also study the intrinsic excitation-energy partition in statistical equilibrium for different level-density descriptions as a function of the total intrinsic excitation energy of themore » fissioning system. Excitation energies are found to be strongly enhanced in the heavy fragment, if the level density follows a constant-temperature behavior at low energies, e.g., in the composed Gilbert-Cameron description.« less

  4. Packet Fragmentation and Reassembly in Molecular Communication.

    PubMed

    Furubayashi, Taro; Nakano, Tadashi; Eckford, Andrew; Okaie, Yutaka; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes packet fragmentation and reassembly to achieve reliable molecular communication among bionanomachines. In the molecular communication described in this paper, a sender bionanomachine performs packet fragmentation, dividing a large molecular message into smaller pieces and embedding into smaller molecular packets, so that molecular packets have higher diffusivity to reach the receiver bionanomachine. The receiver bionanomachine then performs packet reassembly to retrieve the original molecular message from a set of molecular packets that it receives. To examine the effect of packet fragmentation and reassembly, we develop analytical models and conduct numerical experiments. Numerical results show that packet fragmentation and reassembly can improve the message delivery performance. Numerical results also indicate that packet fragmentation and reassembly may degrade the performance in the presence of drift in the environment.

  5. Ranking Fragment Ions Based on Outlier Detection for Improved Label-Free Quantification in Data-Independent Acquisition LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Aivett; Zhang, Ying; Varesio, Emmanuel; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Lisacek, Frédérique; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition LC-MS/MS techniques complement supervised methods for peptide quantification. However, due to the wide precursor isolation windows, these techniques are prone to interference at the fragment ion level, which in turn is detrimental for accurate quantification. The “non-outlier fragment ion” (NOFI) ranking algorithm has been developed to assign low priority to fragment ions affected by interference. By using the optimal subset of high priority fragment ions these interfered fragment ions are effectively excluded from quantification. NOFI represents each fragment ion as a vector of four dimensions related to chromatographic and MS fragmentation attributes and applies multivariate outlier detection techniques. Benchmarking conducted on a well-defined quantitative dataset (i.e. the SWATH Gold Standard), indicates that NOFI on average is able to accurately quantify 11-25% more peptides than the commonly used Top-N library intensity ranking method. The sum of the area of the Top3-5 NOFIs produces similar coefficients of variation as compared to the library intensity method but with more accurate quantification results. On a biologically relevant human dendritic cell digest dataset, NOFI properly assigns low priority ranks to 85% of annotated interferences, resulting in sensitivity values between 0.92 and 0.80 against 0.76 for the Spectronaut interference detection algorithm. PMID:26412574

  6. Dispersion Characteristics of a Helix Loaded Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    be employed to increase the bandwidth of gyroton amplifiers. The structure consists of helical wires contained concentrially 6. in a cylindrical...bandwidth of gyroton amplifiers. The structure consists of helical wires contained concentrially in a cylindrical conductor. The helical wires are close

  7. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  8. Peptides Against Autoimmune Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Alexey; Lomakin, Yakov; Gabibov, Alexander; Belogurov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a nearly perfect defensive system polished by a hundred million years of evolution. Unique flexibility and adaptivity have created a virtually impenetrable barrier to numerous exogenous pathogens that are assaulting us every moment. Unfortunately, triggers that remain mostly enigmatic will sometimes persuade the immune system to retarget against self-antigens. This civil war remains underway, showing no mercy and taking no captives, eventually leading to irreversible pathological changes in the human body. Research that has emerged during the last two decades has given us hope that we may have a chance to overcome autoimmune diseases using a variety of techniques to "reset" the immune system. In this report, we summarize recent advances in utilizing short polypeptides - mostly fragments of autoantigens - in the treatment of autoimmune neurodegeneration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Binding of Soluble Natural Ligands to a Soluble Human T-Cell Receptor Fragment Produced in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilyard, Katherine L.; Reyburn, Hugh; Chung, Shan; Bell, John I.; Strominger, Jack L.

    1994-09-01

    An Escherichia coli expression system has been developed to produce milligram quantities of the variable domains of a human T-cell receptor from a cytotoxic T cell that recognizes the HLA-A2-influenza matrix peptide complex as a single polypeptide chain. The recombinant protein was purified by metal-chelate chromatography and then refolded in a redox buffer system. The refolded protein was shown to directly bind both Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B and the major histocompatibility complex protein-peptide complex using a BIAcore biosensor. Thus this preparation of a single-chain, variable-domain, T-cell receptor fragment can bind both of its natural ligands and some of it is therefore a functional fragment of the receptor molecule.

  10. Missing Fragments: Detecting Cooperative Binding in Fragment-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of fragment-based drug design (FBDD) is to identify molecular fragments that bind to alternate subsites within a given binding pocket leading to cooperative binding when linked. In this study, the binding of fragments to human phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase is used to illustrate how (a) current protocols may fail to detect fragments that bind cooperatively, (b) theoretical approaches can be used to validate potential hits, and (c) apparent false positives obtained when screening against cocktails of fragments may in fact indicate promising leads. PMID:24900472

  11. Atypical Signaling and Functional Desensitization Response of MAS Receptor to Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Desnoyer, Russell; Speth, Robert C.; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2014-01-01

    MAS is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in multiple physiological processes. Several physiological peptide ligands such as angiotensin-(1–7), angiotensin fragments and neuropeptide FF (NPFF) are reported to act on MAS. Studies of conventional G protein signaling and receptor desensitization upon stimulation of MAS with the peptide ligands are limited so far. Therefore, we systematically analyzed G protein signals activated by the peptide ligands. MAS-selective non-peptide ligands that were previously shown to activate G proteins were used as controls for comparison on a common cell based assay platform. Activation of MAS by the non-peptide agonist (1) increased intracellular calcium and D-myo-inositol-1-phosphate (IP1) levels which are indicative of the activation of classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathways, (2) decreased Gαi mediated cAMP levels and (3) stimulated Gα12-dependent expression of luciferase reporter. In all these assays, MAS exhibited strong constitutive activity that was inhibited by the non-peptide inverse agonist. Further, in the calcium response assay, MAS was resistant to stimulation by a second dose of the non-peptide agonist after the first activation has waned suggesting functional desensitization. In contrast, activation of MAS by the peptide ligand NPFF initiated a rapid rise in intracellular calcium with very weak IP1 accumulation which is unlike classical Gαq-phospholipase C signaling pathway. NPFF only weakly stimulated MAS-mediated activation of Gα12 and Gαi signaling pathways. Furthermore, unlike non-peptide agonist-activated MAS, NPFF-activated MAS could be readily re-stimulated the second time by the agonists. Functional assays with key ligand binding MAS mutants suggest that NPFF and non-peptide ligands bind to overlapping regions. Angiotensin-(1–7) and other angiotensin fragments weakly potentiated an NPFF-like calcium response at non-physiological concentrations (≥100 µM). Overall, our data

  12. Mechanical stabilization of proteolytically degradable polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate hydrogels through peptide interaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun Ju; Khan, Zara; Lu, Xi; Perera, T Hiran; Wilems, Thomas S; Ravivarapu, Krishna T; Smith Callahan, Laura A

    2018-04-15

    Balancing enhancement of neurite extension against loss of matrix support in synthetic hydrogels containing proteolytically degradable and bioactive signaling peptides to optimize tissue formation is difficult. Using a systematic approach, polyethylene glycol hydrogels containing concurrent continuous concentration gradients of the laminin derived bioactive signaling peptide, Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val (IKVAV), and collagen derived matrix metalloprotease degradable peptide, GPQGIWGQ, were fabricated and characterized. During proteolytic degradation of the concentration gradient hydrogels, the IKVAV and IWGQ cleavage fragment from GPQGIWGQ were found to interact and stabilize the bulk Young's Modulus of the hydrogel. Further testing of discrete samples containing GPQGIWGQ or its cleavage fragments, GPQG and IWGQ, indicates hydrophobic interactions between the peptides are not necessary for mechanical stabilization of the hydrogel, but changes in the concentration ratio between the peptides tethered in the hydrogel and salts and ions in the swelling solution can affect the stabilization. Encapsulation of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells did not reduce the mechanical properties of the hydrogel over a 14 day neural differentiation culture period, and IKVAV was found to maintain concentration dependent effects on neurite extension and mRNA gene expression of neural cytoskeletal markers, similar to previous studies. As a result, this work has significant implications for the analysis of biological studies in matrices, as the material and mechanical properties of the hydrogel may be unexpectedly temporally changing during culture due to interactions between peptide signaling elements, underscoring the need for greater matrix characterization during the degradation and cell culture. Greater emulation of the native extracellular matrix is necessary for tissue formation. To achieve this, matrices are becoming more complex, often including multiple

  13. Very low-molecular-mass fragments of albumin in the plasma of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hellin, Joan Lopez; Bech-Serra, Joan J; Moctezuma, Enrique Lara; Chocron, Sara; Santin, Sheila; Madrid, Alvaro; Vilalta, Ramon; Canals, Francesc; Torra, Roser; Meseguer, Anna; Nieto, Jose L

    2009-11-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a glomerular disease that frequently does not respond to treatment and progresses to kidney failure. FSGS can be of either genetic origin, caused by mutations in slit diaphragm proteins, such as podocin, or idiopathic origin of unknown cause. Case series. Children with FSGS (aged 3-18 years); 15 with idiopathic and 11 with genetic forms of FSGS. Genetic versus idiopathic forms. Differentially expressed proteins in the plasma proteome, detected using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, Western blot, and liquid chromatography electron spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for fragmentation and identification of the peptides. We found 3 very low-molecular-mass (9.2, 6.9, and 4.7 kDa; isoelectric point, 5.7) spots that were present in pooled samples from patients with genetic FSGS, but missing in patients with idiopathic FSGS and healthy individuals. Spots were identified using mass spectrometry as fragments of albumin, 2 of them apparently containing peptides from both C- and N-terminal parts of the whole protein. Proteomic analyses were carried out on all genetic patients individually; of these, 10 of 11 patients had > or =1 albumin fragment detected in the pool. We did not find an evident relationship between type of mutation or clinical status of patients and albumin fragments observed. Very low-molecular-weight albumin fragments also can be produced by other diseases. We describe for the first time the presence of very low-molecular-mass albumin fragments in plasma of patients with FSGS with podocyte protein mutations that are absent in patients with idiopathic FSGS or healthy individuals. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether these fragments could be potential biomarkers to distinguish between genetic and idiopathic forms of FSGS.

  14. Automated Validation of Results and Removal of Fragment Ion Interferences in Targeted Analysis of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (MS) using SWATHProphet*

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew; Bader, Samuel L.; Shteynberg, David; Hood, Leroy; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics by mass spectrometry technology is widely used for identifying and quantifying peptides and proteins. The breadth and sensitivity of peptide detection have been advanced by the advent of data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry. Analysis of such data, however, is challenging due to the complexity of fragment ion spectra that have contributions from multiple co-eluting precursor ions. We present SWATHProphet software that identifies and quantifies peptide fragment ion traces in data-independent acquisition data, provides accurate probabilities to ensure results are correct, and automatically detects and removes contributions to quantitation originating from interfering precursor ions. Integration in the widely used open source Trans-Proteomic Pipeline facilitates subsequent analyses such as combining results of multiple data sets together for improved discrimination using iProphet and inferring sample proteins using ProteinProphet. This novel development should greatly help make data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry accessible to large numbers of users. PMID:25713123

  15. Factors Affecting Pro- and Anti-Oxidant Properties of Fragments of the b-Protein Precursor (bPP): Implication for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Andorn, Anne C.; Kalaria, Rajesh N.

    2000-06-01

    Oxidative stress may have a key pathogenetic role in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). While there is evidence that some amyloid-b (Ab) peptides can initiate oxidative stress at micromolar doses, there is also some evidence that oxidative stress increases the concentration of the b-protein precursor (bPP) and the potential for increased formation of the Ab peptides. The following studies were performed to test the hypothesis that fragments of bPP could be antioxidants and hence that oxidative stress might be an early event in AD. We found that several fragments of bPP, including the Ab peptides, inhibit ascorbate-stimulated lipid peroxidation (ASLP) in membrane fragment preparations of postmortem human brain. In contrast, other fragments of bPP enhance ASLP. These data indicate that bPP or fragments of bPP could play a key role in the redox status of cells and that alterations in bPP processing could have profound effects on the cellular response to oxidative stress.

  16. NMR studies of excluded volume interactions in peptide dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Sheveleva, Nadezhda N; Markelov, Denis A; Vovk, Mikhail A; Mikhailova, Maria E; Tarasenko, Irina I; Neelov, Igor M; Lähderanta, Erkki

    2018-06-11

    Peptide dendrimers are good candidates for diverse biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and low toxicity. The local orientational mobility of groups with different radial localization inside dendrimers is important characteristic for drug and gene delivery, synthesis of nanoparticles, and other specific purposes. In this paper we focus on the validation of two theoretical assumptions for dendrimers: (i) independence of NMR relaxations on excluded volume effects and (ii) similarity of mobilities of side and terminal segments of dendrimers. For this purpose we study 1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation time, T 1H , of two similar peptide dendrimers of the second generation, with and without side fragments in their inner segments. Temperature dependences of 1/T 1H in the temperature range from 283 to 343 K were measured for inner and terminal groups of the dendrimers dissolved in deuterated water. We have shown that the 1/T 1H temperature dependences of inner groups for both dendrimers (with and without side fragments) practically coincide despite different densities of atoms inside these dendrimers. This result confirms the first theoretical assumption. The second assumption is confirmed by the 1/T 1H temperature dependences of terminal groups which are similar for both dendrimers.

  17. Habitat fragmentation resulting in overgrazing by herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Michio

    2003-12-21

    Habitat fragmentation sometimes results in outbreaks of herbivorous insect and causes an enormous loss of primary production. It is hypothesized that the driving force behind such herbivore outbreaks is disruption of natural enemy attack that releases herbivores from top-down control. To test this hypothesis I studied how trophic community structure changes along a gradient of habitat fragmentation level using spatially implicit and explicit models of a tri-trophic (plant, herbivore and natural enemy) food chain. While in spatially implicit model number of trophic levels gradually decreases with increasing fragmentation, in spatially explicit model a relatively low level of habitat fragmentation leads to overgrazing by herbivore to result in extinction of the plant population followed by a total system collapse. This provides a theoretical support to the hypothesis that habitat fragmentation can lead to overgrazing by herbivores and suggests a central role of spatial structure in the influence of habitat fragmentation on trophic communities. Further, the spatially explicit model shows (i) that the total system collapse by the overgrazing can occur only if herbivore colonization rate is high; (ii) that with increasing natural enemy colonization rate, the fragmentation level that leads to the system collapse becomes higher, and the frequency of the collapse is lowered.

  18. On disciplinary fragmentation and scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called "schools of thought". We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model's implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science.

  19. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    PubMed Central

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  20. Heavy ion fragmentation experiments at the bevatron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, H. H.

    1976-01-01

    Collaborative research efforts to study the fragmentation processes of heavy nuclei in matter using heavy ion beams of the Bevatron/Bevalac are described. The goal of the program is to obtain the single particle inclusive spectra of secondary nuclei produced at 0 deg by the fragmentation of heavy ion beam projectiles. The process being examined is B+T yields F + anything, where B is the beam nucleus, T is the target nucleus, and F is the detected fragment. The fragments F are isotopically identified by experimental procedures involving magnetic analysis, energy loss and time-of-flight measurements. Effects were also made to: (a) study processes of heavy nuclei in matter, (b) measure the total and partial production cross section for all isotopes, (c) test the applicability of high energy multiparticle interaction theory to nuclear fragmentation, (d) apply the cross section data and fragmentation probabilities to cosmic ray transport theory, and (e) search for systematic behavior of fragment production as a means to improve existing semi-empirical theories of cross-sections.

  1. Introduction to fragment-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Erlanson, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has emerged in the past decade as a powerful tool for discovering drug leads. The approach first identifies starting points: very small molecules (fragments) that are about half the size of typical drugs. These fragments are then expanded or linked together to generate drug leads. Although the origins of the technique date back some 30 years, it was only in the mid-1990s that experimental techniques became sufficiently sensitive and rapid for the concept to be become practical. Since that time, the field has exploded: FBDD has played a role in discovery of at least 18 drugs that have entered the clinic, and practitioners of FBDD can be found throughout the world in both academia and industry. Literally dozens of reviews have been published on various aspects of FBDD or on the field as a whole, as have three books (Jahnke and Erlanson, Fragment-based approaches in drug discovery, 2006; Zartler and Shapiro, Fragment-based drug discovery: a practical approach, 2008; Kuo, Fragment based drug design: tools, practical approaches, and examples, 2011). However, this chapter will assume that the reader is approaching the field with little prior knowledge. It will introduce some of the key concepts, set the stage for the chapters to follow, and demonstrate how X-ray crystallography plays a central role in fragment identification and advancement.

  2. Dual Fragment Impact of PBX Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskins, Peter; Briggs, Richard; Leeming, David; White, Nathan; Cheese, Philip; DE&S MoD UK Team; Ordnance Test Solutions Ltd Team

    2017-06-01

    Fragment impact can pose a significant hazard to many systems containing explosives or propellants. Testing for this threat is most commonly carried out using a single fragment. However, it can be argued that an initial fragment strike (or strikes) could sensitise the energetic material to subsequent impacts, which may then lead to a more violent reaction than would have been predicted based upon single fragment studies. To explore this potential hazard we have developed the capability to launch 2 fragments from the same gun at a range of velocities, and achieve impacts on an acceptor charge with good control over the spatial and temporal separation of the strikes. In this paper we will describe in detail the experimental techniques we have used, both to achieve the dual fragment launch and observe the acceptor charge response. In addition, we will describe the results obtained against PBX filled explosive targets; discuss the mechanisms controlling the target response and their significance for vulnerability assessment. Results of these tests have clearly indicated the potential for detonation upon the second strike, at velocities well below those needed for shock initiation by a single fragment.

  3. Fragmentation in the branching coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck): growth, survivorship, and reproduction of colonies and fragments.

    PubMed

    Lirman

    2000-08-23

    Acropora palmata, a branching coral abundant on shallow reef environments throughout the Caribbean, is susceptible to physical disturbance caused by storms. Accordingly, the survivorship and propagation of this species are tied to its capability to recover after fragmentation. Fragments of A. palmata comprised 40% of ramets within populations that had experienced recent storms. While the survivorship of A. palmata fragments was not directly related to the size of fragments, removal of fragments from areas where they settled was influenced by size. Survivorship of fragments was also affected by type of substratum; the greatest mortality (58% loss within the first month) was observed on sand, whereas fragments placed on top of live colonies of A. palmata fused to the underlying tissue and did not experience any losses. Fragments created by Hurricane Andrew on a Florida reef in August 1992 began developing new growth (proto-branches) 7 months after the storm. The number of proto-branches on fragments was dependent on size, but growth was not affected by the size of fragments. Growth-rates of proto-branches increased exponentially with time (1.7 cm year(-1) for 1993-1994, 2.7 cm year(-1) for 1994-1995, 4.2 cm year(-1) for 1995-1996, and 6.5 cm year(-1) for 1996-1997), taking over 4 years for proto-branches to achieve rates comparable to those of adult colonies on the same reef (6.9 cm year(-1)). In addition to the initial mortality and reduced growth-rates, fragmentation resulted in a loss of reproductive potential. Neither colonies that experienced severe fragmentation nor fragments contained gametes until 4 years after the initial damage. Although A. palmata may survive periodic fragmentation, the long-term effects of this process will depend ultimately on the balance between the benefits and costs of this process.

  4. Application of the fragment molecular orbital method analysis to fragment-based drug discovery of BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal proteins) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Motoyasu; Ozawa, Tomonaga; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    The molecular interactions of inhibitors of bromodomains (BRDs) were investigated. BRDs are protein interaction modules that recognizing ε-N-acetyl-lysine (εAc-Lys) motifs found in histone tails and are promising protein-protein interaction (PPI) targets. First, we analyzed a peptide ligand containing εAc-Lys to evaluate native PPIs. We then analyzed tetrahydroquinazoline-6-yl-benzensulfonamide derivatives found by fragment-based drug design (FBDD) and examined their interactions with the protein compared with the peptide ligand in terms of the inter-fragment interaction energy. In addition, we analyzed benzodiazepine derivatives that are high-affinity ligands for BRDs and examined differences in the CH/π interactions of the amino acid residues. We further surveyed changes in the charges of the amino acid residues among individual ligands, performed pair interaction energy decomposition analysis and estimated the water profile within the ligand binding site. Thus, useful insights for drug design were provided. Through these analyses and considerations, we show that the FMO method is a useful drug design tool to evaluate the process of FBDD and to explore PPI inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Food-derived immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mata-Haro, Verónica; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2016-08-01

    Food proteins contain specific amino acid sequences within their structures that may positively impact bodily functions and have multiple immunomodulatory effects. The functional properties of these specific sequences, also referred to as bioactive peptides, are revealed only after the degradation of native proteins during digestion processes. Currently, milk proteins have been the most explored source of bioactive peptides, which presents an interesting opportunity for the dairy industry. However, plant- and animal-derived proteins have also been shown to be important sources of bioactive peptides. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence of the role of various food proteins as sources of immunomodulatory peptides and discusses the possible pathways involving these properties. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cardioprotective peptides from marine sources.

    PubMed

    Harnedy, Padraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Elevated blood pressure or hypertension is one of the fastest growing health problems worldwide. Although the etiology of essential hypertension has a genetic component, dietary factors play an important role. With the high costs and adverse side-effects associated with synthetic antihypertensive drugs and the awareness of the link between diet and health there has been increased focus on identification of food components that may contribute to cardiovascular health. In recent years special interest has been paid to the cardioprotective activity of peptides derived from food proteins including marine proteins. These peptides are latent within the sequence of the parent protein and only become active when released by proteolytic digestion during gastrointestinal digestion or through food processing. Current data on antihypertensive activity of marine-derived protein hydrolysates/peptides in animal and human studies is reviewed herein. Furthermore, products containing protein hydrolysates/peptides from marine origin with antihypertensive effects are discussed.

  8. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  9. Biomedical Applications of Organometal-Peptide Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    Peptides are well suited as targeting vectors for the directed delivery of metal-based drugs or probes for biomedical investigations. This chapter describes synthetic strategies for the preparation of conjugates of medically interesting peptides with covalently bound metal complexes. Peptides that were used include neuropeptides (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin), uptake peptides (TAT and poly-Arg), and intracellular localization sequences. To these peptides, a whole variety of transition metal complexes has been attached in recent years by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) techniques. The metal complex can be attached to the peptide on the resin as part of the SPPS scheme. Alternatively, the metal complex may be attached to the peptide as a postsynthetic modification. Advantages as well as disadvantages for either strategy are discussed. Biomedical applications include radiopharmaceutical applications, anticancer and antibacterial activity, metal-peptide conjugates as targeted CO-releasing molecules, and metal-peptide conjugates in biosensor applications.

  10. Structural and biophysical characterization of an antimicrobial peptide chimera comprised of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin.

    PubMed

    Haney, Evan F; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G M; Vogel, Hans J

    2012-03-01

    Lactoferricin and lactoferrampin are two antimicrobial peptides found in the N-terminal lobe of bovine lactoferrin with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as Candida albicans. A heterodimer comprised of lactoferrampin joined to a fragment of lactoferricin was recently reported in which these two peptides were joined at their C-termini through the two amino groups of a single Lys residue (Bolscher et al., 2009, Biochimie 91(1):123-132). This hybrid peptide, termed LFchimera, has significantly higher antimicrobial activity compared to the individual peptides or an equimolar mixture of the two. In this work, the underlying mechanism behind the increased antibacterial activity of LFchimera was investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry studies demonstrated that all the peptides influenced the thermotropic phase behaviour of anionic phospholipid suspensions. Calcein leakage and vesicle fusion experiments with anionic liposomes revealed that LFchimera had enhanced membrane perturbing properties compared to the individual peptides. Peptide structures were evaluated using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy to gain insight into the structural features of LFchimera that contribute to the increased antimicrobial activity. The NMR solution structure, determined in a miscible co-solvent mixture of chloroform, methanol and water, revealed that the Lys linkage increased the helical content in LFchimera compared to the individual peptides, but it did not fix the relative orientations of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin with respect to each other. The structure of LFchimera provides insight into the conformation of this peptide in a membranous environment and improves our understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Combinatorial Approach for Large-scale Identification of Linked Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G.; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Bourne, Philip E.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  12. Zinc Interactions With Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Related Peptide Fragments.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, A; La Mendola, D

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal development and survival, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function. Dysregulation of BDNF signaling is involved in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Alteration of metal ion homeostasis is observed both in normal aging and in many neurodegenerative diseases. Interestingly, there is a significant overlap between brain areas characterized by metal ion dyshomeostasis and those where BDNF exerts its biological activity. Therefore, it is reasonable to speculate that metal ions, especially zinc, can modulate the activity of BDNF. The synthesis of BDNF peptidomimetic can be helpful both to understand the molecular interaction of BDNF with metal ions and to develop new drugs for neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: The nonlinear fragmentation equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Matthieu H.; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2007-04-01

    We study the kinetics of nonlinear irreversible fragmentation. Here, fragmentation is induced by interactions/collisions between pairs of particles and modelled by general classes of interaction kernels, for several types of breakage models. We construct initial value and scaling solutions of the fragmentation equations, and apply the 'non-vanishing mass flux' criterion for the occurrence of shattering transitions. These properties enable us to determine the phase diagram for the occurrence of shattering states and of scaling states in the phase space of model parameters.

  15. Heart Rate Fragmentation: A Symbolic Dynamical Approach.

    PubMed

    Costa, Madalena D; Davis, Roger B; Goldberger, Ary L

    2017-01-01

    Background: We recently introduced the concept of heart rate fragmentation along with a set of metrics for its quantification. The term was coined to refer to an increase in the percentage of changes in heart rate acceleration sign, a dynamical marker of a type of anomalous variability. The effort was motivated by the observation that fragmentation, which is consistent with the breakdown of the neuroautonomic-electrophysiologic control system of the sino-atrial node, could confound traditional short-term analysis of heart rate variability. Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1) introduce a symbolic dynamical approach to the problem of quantifying heart rate fragmentation; (2) evaluate how the distribution of the different dynamical patterns ("words") varied with the participants' age in a group of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); and (3) quantify the differences in the fragmentation patterns between the two sample populations. Methods: The symbolic dynamical method employed here was based on a ternary map of the increment NN interval time series and on the analysis of the relative frequency of symbolic sequences (words) with a pre-defined set of features. We analyzed annotated, open-access Holter databases of healthy subjects and patients with CAD, provided by the University of Rochester Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW). Results: The degree of fragmentation was significantly higher in older individuals than in their younger counterparts. However, the fragmentation patterns were different in the two sample populations. In healthy subjects, older age was significantly associated with a higher percentage of transitions from acceleration/deceleration to zero acceleration and vice versa (termed "soft" inflection points). In patients with CAD, older age was also significantly associated with higher percentages of frank reversals in heart rate acceleration (transitions from acceleration to deceleration and vice

  16. Plant peptides in defense and signaling.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Nelson; Maestri, Elena

    2014-06-01

    This review focuses on plant peptides involved in defense against pathogen infection and those involved in the regulation of growth and development. Defense peptides, defensins, cyclotides and anti-microbial peptides are compared and contrasted. Signaling peptides are classified according to their major sites of activity. Finally, a network approach to creating an interactomic peptide map is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. TEMPO-Assisted Free Radical-Initiated Peptide Sequencing Mass Spectrometry (FRIPS MS) in Q-TOF and Orbitrap Mass Spectrometers: Single-Step Peptide Backbone Dissociations in Positive Ion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Inae; Lee, Sun Young; Hwangbo, Song; Kang, Dukjin; Lee, Hookeun; Kim, Hugh I.; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that one-step peptide backbone fragmentations can be achieved using the TEMPO [2-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl)]-assisted free radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry in a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer and a Q-Exactive Orbitrap instrument in positive ion mode, in contrast to two-step peptide fragmentation in an ion-trap mass spectrometer (reference Anal. Chem. 85, 7044-7051 (30)). In the hybrid Q-TOF and Q-Exactive instruments, higher collisional energies can be applied to the target peptides, compared with the low collisional energies applied by the ion-trap instrument. The higher energy deposition and the additional multiple collisions in the collision cell in both instruments appear to result in one-step peptide backbone dissociations in positive ion mode. This new finding clearly demonstrates that the TEMPO-assisted FRIPS approach is a very useful tool in peptide mass spectrometry research.

  18. Flanking signal and mature peptide residues influence signal peptide cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Khar Heng; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2008-01-01

    Background Signal peptides (SPs) mediate the targeting of secretory precursor proteins to the correct subcellular compartments in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identifying these transient peptides is crucial to the medical, food and beverage and biotechnology industries yet our understanding of these peptides remains limited. This paper examines the most common type of signal peptides cleavable by the endoprotease signal peptidase I (SPase I), and the residues flanking the cleavage sites of three groups of signal peptide sequences, namely (i) eukaryotes (Euk) (ii) Gram-positive (Gram+) bacteria, and (iii) Gram-negative (Gram-) bacteria. Results In this study, 2352 secretory peptide sequences from a variety of organisms with amino-terminal SPs are extracted from the manually curated SPdb database for analysis based on physicochemical properties such as pI, aliphatic index, GRAVY score, hydrophobicity, net charge and position-specific residue preferences. Our findings show that the three groups share several similarities in general, but they display distinctive features upon examination in terms of their amino acid compositions and frequencies, and various physico-chemical properties. Thus, analysis or prediction of their sequences should be separated and treated as distinct groups. Conclusion We conclude that the peptide segment recognized by SPase I extends to the start of the mature protein to a limited extent, upon our survey of the amino acid residues surrounding the cleavage processing site. These flanking residues possibly influence the cleavage processing and contribute to non-canonical cleavage sites. Our findings are applicable in defining more accurate prediction tools for recognition and identification of cleavage site of SPs. PMID:19091014

  19. Complete covalent structure of statherin, a tyrosine-rich acidic peptide which inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation from human parotid saliva.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D H; Hay, D I

    1977-03-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin, a peptide which strongly inhibits precipitation from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, and therefore stabilizes supersaturated saliva, has been determined. The NH2-terminal half of this Mr=5380 (43 amino acids) polypeptide was determined by automated Edman degradations (liquid phase) on native statherin. The peptide was digested separately with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Staphylococcus aureus protease, and the resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration. Manual Edman degradations on purified peptide fragments yielded peptides that completed the amino acid sequence through the penultimate COOH-terminal residue. These analyses, together with carboxypeptidase digestion of native statherin and of peptide fragments of statherin, established the complete sequence of the molecule. The 2 serine residues (positions 2 and 3) in statherin were identified as phosphoserine. The amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin is striking in a number of ways. The NH2-terminal one-third is highly polar and includes three polar dipeptides: H2PO3-Ser-Ser-H2PO3-Arg-Arg-, and Glu-Glu-. The COOH-terminal two-thirds of the molecule is hydrophobic, containing several repeating dipeptides: four of -Gn-Pro-, three of -Tyr-Gln-, two of -Gly-Tyr-, two of-Gln-Tyr-, and two of the tetrapeptide sequence -Pro-Tyr-Gln-Pro-. Unusual cleavage sites in the statherin sequence obtained with chymotrypsin and S. aureus protease were also noted.

  20. Human Platelet-Rich Plasma- and Extracellular Matrix-Derived Peptides Promote Impaired Cutaneous Wound Healing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Wolf, Lindsey; Deckenback, Jeffry; Hamblin, Michael R.; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has described several pro-angiogenic short peptides derived from endothelial extracellular matrices degraded by bacterial collagenase. Here we tested whether these peptides could stimulate wound healing in vivo. Our experiments demonstrated that a peptide created as combination of fragments of tenascin X and fibrillin 1 (comb1) applied into cranial dermal wounds created in mice treated with cyclophosphamide to impair wound healing, can improve the rate of wound closure. Furthermore, we identify and characterize a novel peptide (UN3) created and modified from two naturally-occurring peptides, which are present in human platelet-rich plasma. In vitro testing of UN3 demonstrates that it causes a 50% increase in endothelial proliferation, 250% increase in angiogenic response and a tripling of epithelial cell migration in response to injury. Results of in vivo experiments where comb1 and UN3 peptides were added together to cranial wounds in cyclophosphamide-treated mice leads to improvement of wound vascularization as shown by an increase of the number of blood vessels present in the wound beds. Application of the peptides markedly promotes cellular responses to injury and essentially restores wound healing dynamics to those of normal, acute wounds in the absence of cyclophosphamide impairment. Our current work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the stimulatory effects of these peptides as well as identification of the cellular receptors mediating these effects. PMID:22384158

  1. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Structural Heterogeneity of Doubly-Charged Peptide b-Ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yiqun; O’Connor, Peter B.; Lin, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Performing collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) in tandem has shown great promise in providing comprehensive sequence information that was otherwise unobtainable by using either fragmentation method alone or in duet. However, the general applicability of this MS3 approach in peptide sequencing may be undermined by the formation of non-direct sequence ions, as sometimes observed under CAD, particularly when multiple stages of CAD are involved. In this study, varied-sized doubly-charged b-ions from three tachykinin peptides were investigated by ECD. Sequence scrambling was observed in ECD of all b-ions from neurokinin A (HKTDSFVGLM-NH2), suggesting the presence of N- and C-termini linked macro-cyclic conformers. On the contrary, none of the b-ions from eledoisin (pEPSKDAFIGLM-NH2) produced non-direct sequence ions under ECD, as it does not contain a free N-terminal amino group. ECD of several b-ions from Substance P (RPKPQQFFGLM-NH2) showed series of cm-Lys fragment ions which suggested that the macro-cyclic structure may also be formed by connecting the C-terminal carbonyl group and the ε-amino group of the lysine side chain. Theoretical investigation of selected Substance P b-ions revealed several low energy conformers, including both linear oxazolones and macro-ring structures, in corroboration with the experimental observation. This study showed that a b-ion may exist as a mixture of several forms, with their propensities influenced by its N-terminus, length, and certain side-chain groups. Further, the presence of several macro-cyclic structures may result in erroneous sequence assignment when the combined CAD and ECD methods are used in peptide sequencing. PMID:21472584

  3. Structural Heterogeneity of Doubly-Charged Peptide b-Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yiqun; O'Connor, Peter B.; Lin, Cheng

    2011-02-01

    Performing collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) in tandem has shown great promise in providing comprehensive sequence information that was otherwise unobtainable by using either fragmentation method alone or in duet. However, the general applicability of this MS3 approach in peptide sequencing may be undermined by the formation of non-direct sequence ions, as sometimes observed under CAD, particularly when multiple stages of CAD are involved. In this study, varied-sized doubly-charged b-ions from three tachykinin peptides were investigated by ECD. Sequence scrambling was observed in ECD of all b-ions from neurokinin A (HKTDSFVGLM-NH2), suggesting the presence of N- and C-termini linked macro-cyclic conformers. On the contrary, none of the b-ions from eledoisin (pEPSKDAFIGLM-NH2) produced non-direct sequence ions under ECD, as it does not contain a free N-terminal amino group. ECD of several b-ions from Substance P (RPKPQQFFGLM-NH2) showed series of cm-Lys fragment ions which suggested that the macro-cyclic structure may also be formed by connecting the C-terminal carbonyl group and the ɛ-amino group of the lysine side chain. Theoretical investigation of selected Substance P b-ions revealed several low energy conformers, including both linear oxazolones and macro-ring structures, in corroboration with the experimental observation. This study showed that a b-ion may exist as a mixture of several forms, with their propensities influenced by its N-terminus, length, and certain side-chain groups. Further, the presence of several macro-cyclic structures may result in erroneous sequence assignment when the combined CAD and ECD methods are used in peptide sequencing.

  4. Allergenic proteins are fragmented in low concentrations of sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Eggleston, P A

    2001-07-01

    To facilitate allergen removal from indoor environments, it would be helpful to have household cleaning products that modified allergenic activity. Because NaOCl dissolves proteins in high concentrations and is both capable of killing bacteria and viruses and inactivating viral antigens at somewhat lower concentrations, we explored its effects on Mus m 1 and other indoor allergens. To examine the ability of NaOCl to reduce the allergenicity of Mus m 1 and other indoor allergens. Using purified mouse urinary allergen, we examined the effect on protein measured by Coomassie protein assay and on Mus m 1 measured by ELISA. We also examined the effects using SDS/PAGE and Western blots probed with sheep anti-Mus m 1 and with allergic human serum. When NaOCl and Mus m 1 were combined in a molar ratio of 100 : 1, IgE binding to Mus m 1 on Western blot was significantly reduced. At higher NaOCl concentrations the protein appeared to fragment and eventually became undetectable. Fragmentation appeared to be random in that peptides of a wide range of apparent molecular weight were produced. The reaction was complete within 1-2 min at OCl : pr ratios of greater than 200 : 1 and was optimal at pH 7.4. Immunological activity of other allergens (Fel d 1, Bla g 1, Der p 1) was decreased in vitro and dried allergen extracts were removed from surfaces. Adding an extraneous protein, BSA, to NaOCl:Mus m 1 solutions decreased the effect of NaOCl on the allergen. We concluded that NaOCl at concentrations commonly used in household products is capable of dramatically affecting allergenic protein.

  5. Human Milk: Bioactive Proteins/Peptides and Functional Properties.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2016-06-23

    Breastfeeding has been associated with many benefits, both in the short and in the long term. Infants being breastfed generally have less illness and have better cognitive development at 1 year of age than formula-fed infants. Later in life, they have a lower risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Several components in breast milk may be responsible for these different outcomes, but bioactive proteins/peptides likely play a major role. Some proteins in breast milk are comparatively resistant towards digestion and may therefore exert their functions in the gastrointestinal tract in intact form or as larger fragments. Other milk proteins may be partially digested in the upper small intestine and the resulting peptides may exert functions in the lower small intestine. Lactoferrin, lysozyme and secretory IgA have been found intact in the stool of breastfed infants and are therefore examples of proteins that are resistant against proteolytic degradation in the gut. Together, these proteins serve protective roles against infection and support immune function in the immature infant. α-lactalbumin, β-casein, κ-casein and osteopontin are examples of proteins that are partially digested in the upper small intestine, and the resulting peptides influence functions in the gut. Such functions include stimulation of immune function, mineral and trace element absorption and defense against infection. © 2016 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. De novo peptide sequencing using CID and HCD spectra pairs.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Kusalik, Anthony J; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    In tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), there are several different fragmentation techniques possible, including, collision-induced dissociation (CID) higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD), electron-capture dissociation (ECD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). When using pairs of spectra for de novo peptide sequencing, the most popular methods are designed for CID (or HCD) and ECD (or ETD) spectra because of the complementarity between them. Less attention has been paid to the use of CID and HCD spectra pairs. In this study, a new de novo peptide sequencing method is proposed for these spectra pairs. This method includes a CID and HCD spectra merging criterion and a parent mass correction step, along with improvements to our previously proposed algorithm for sequencing merged spectra. Three pairs of spectral datasets were used to investigate and compare the performance of the proposed method with other existing methods designed for single spectrum (HCD or CID) sequencing. Experimental results showed that full-length peptide sequencing accuracy was increased significantly by using spectra pairs in the proposed method, with the highest accuracy reaching 81.31%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Peptides containing internal residues of pyroglutamic acid: proton NMR characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    The proton NMR characteristics of internal pyroglutamic acid (Glp; 5-oxoproline) residues in seven tripeptides of the general structure Boc-Xxx-Glp-Yyy-NH/sub 2/ were studied. In general, the chemical shifts of several diagnostic protons moved downfield on going from the Glu-containing peptides (Boc-Xxx-Glu-Yyy-NH/sub 2/) to the corresponding Glp-containing peptides. The C-2 proton of the Xxx residue was shifted by about 1.1 ppm. The N-2 proton of the Yyy residue was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. The C-2 proton of the Glx residue itself was shifted by about 0.5 ppm. One of the Glx C-3 protons was also shifted by about 0.5 ppm, butmore » the other remained essentially unchanged. Finally, the Glx C-4 protons were shifted by about 0.3 ppm. Internal Glu residues are readily converted chemically into internal Glp residues. This conversion also occurs as a side reaction during HP cleavage of the protecting group from Glu(OBzl) residues. The spontaneous fragmentation of serum proteins C3, C4 and lambda/sub 2/-macroglobulin under denaturing conditions is probably due to regioselective hydrolysis of an internal Glp residue formed in each of these proteins upon denaturation. These proton NMR characteristics may be useful in establishing the presence of internal Glp residues in synthetic and natural peptides.« less

  8. History of on-orbit satellite fragmentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. L.; Gabbard, J. R.; Devere, G. T.; Johnson, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The causes of on-orbit fragmentations are varied and may be intentional or accidental. The cause of many fragmentations remains unknown. While a few cases are currently under investigation as on-orbit collision candidates, man is directly responsible for the vast majority of artificial debris polluting the near-Earth space environment. It should be emphasized that the number of fragments listed with each event in this document represent only those debris officially cataloged by NORAD. Each known on-orbit satellite fragementation is described within this document in module format. Also listed are pertinent characteristics of each fragmentation event. Comments regarding the nature of the satellite and additional details of the events are given.

  9. Literalism, perspectivism, chaotic fragmentalism and psychotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Leitner, L M

    1982-12-01

    Literalism and chaotic fragmentalism have been advanced as two concepts to explain psychopathology while perspectivism has been used to explain psychological health (Landfield, 1980 a). It is hypothesized that, to the extent that they are therapeutic, all therapies move clients toward perspectivism and away from literalism and chaotic fragmentalism. Eight major schools of psychotherapy are discussed in terms of the principles of technique which enable them to change literalism and chaotic fragmentalism. The advantages of a unifying theory permitting diversity of techniques are discussed in relation to the ability of the clinician to be flexible yet not confused. Further, the unifying concepts of literalism, perspectivism, and chaotic fragmentalism are used to understand systematically the strengths and weaknesses of many therapeutic techniques. Finally, the implications of the differences in therapeutic techniques for changing different types of literalisms are discussed.

  10. Integration of fragment screening and library design.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Gregg; Ab, Eiso; Schultz, Jan

    2007-12-01

    With more than 10 years of practical experience and theoretical analysis, fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has entered the mainstream of the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. An array of biophysical techniques has been used to detect the weak interaction between a fragment and the target. Each technique presents its own requirements regarding the fragment collection and the target; therefore, in order to optimize the potential of FBDD, the nature of the target should be a driving factor for simultaneous development of both the library and the screening technology. A roadmap is now available to guide fragment-to-lead evolution when structural information is available. The next challenge is to apply FBDD to targets for which high-resolution structural information is not available.

  11. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  12. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  13. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  14. Marked differences between metalloproteases meprin A and B in substrate and peptide bond specificity.

    PubMed

    Bertenshaw, G P; Turk, B E; Hubbard, S J; Matters, G L; Bylander, J E; Crisman, J M; Cantley, L C; Bond, J S

    2001-04-20

    Meprin A and B are highly regulated, secreted, and cell-surface metalloendopeptidases that are abundantly expressed in the kidney and intestine. Meprin oligomers consist of evolutionarily related alpha and/or beta subunits. The work herein was carried out to identify bioactive peptides and proteins that are susceptible to hydrolysis by mouse meprins and kinetically characterize the hydrolysis. Gastrin-releasing peptide fragment 14-27 and gastrin 17, regulatory molecules of the gastrointestinal tract, were found to be the best peptide substrates for meprin A and B, respectively. Peptide libraries and a variety of naturally occurring peptides revealed that the meprin beta subunit has a clear preference for acidic amino acids in the P1 and P1' sites of substrates. The meprin alpha subunit selected for small (e.g. serine, alanine) or hydrophobic (e.g. phenylalanine) residues in the P1 and P1' sites, and proline was the most preferred amino acid at the P2' position. Thus, although the meprin alpha and beta subunits share 55% amino acid identity within the protease domain and are normally localized at the same tissue cell surfaces, they have very different substrate and peptide bond specificities indicating different functions. Homology models of the mouse meprin alpha and beta protease domains, based on the astacin crystal structure, revealed active site differences that can account for the marked differences in substrate specificity of the two subunits.

  15. C-terminal peptides of tissue factor pathway inhibitor are novel host defense molecules.

    PubMed

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; Rydengård, Victoria; Albiger, Barbara; Lundqvist, Katarina; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2010-09-03

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) inhibits tissue factor-induced coagulation, but may, via its C terminus, also modulate cell surface, heparin, and lipopolysaccharide interactions as well as participate in growth inhibition. Here we show that C-terminal TFPI peptide sequences are antimicrobial against the gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungi Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen for the "classic" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. The killing of E. coli, but not P. aeruginosa, by the C-terminal peptide GGLIKTKRKRKKQRVKIAYEEIFVKNM (GGL27), was enhanced in human plasma and largely abolished in heat-inactivated plasma, a phenomenon linked to generation of antimicrobial C3a and activation of the classic pathway of complement activation. Furthermore, GGL27 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS shock. Importantly, TFPI was found to be expressed in the basal layers of normal epidermis, and was markedly up-regulated in acute skin wounds as well as wound edges of chronic leg ulcers. Furthermore, C-terminal fragments of TFPI were associated with bacteria present in human chronic leg ulcers. These findings suggest a new role for TFPI in cutaneous defense against infections.

  16. Chimerization of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin peptides strongly potentiates the killing activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bolscher, Jan; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; van 't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno

    2012-06-01

    Bovine lactoferrin harbors 2 antimicrobial sequences (LFcin and LFampin), situated in close proximity in the N1-domain. To mimic their semi parallel configuration we have synthesized a chimeric peptide (LFchimera) in which these sequences are linked in a head-to-head fashion to the α- and ε-amino group, respectively, of a single lysine. In line with previously described bactericidal effects, this peptide was also a stronger candidacidal agent than the antimicrobial peptides LFcin17-30 and LFampin265-284, or a combination of these 2. Conditions that strongly reduced the candidacidal activities of LFcin17-30 and LFampin265-284, such as high ionic strength and energy depletion, had little influence on the activity of LFchimera. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy showed that LFchimera severely affected the membrane morphology, resulting in disintegration of the membrane bilayer and in an efflux of small and high molecular weight molecules such as ATP and proteins. The differential effects displayed by the chimeric peptide and a mixture of its constituent peptides clearly demonstrate the synergistic effect of linking these peptides in a fashion that allows a similar spatial arrangement as in the parent protein, suggesting that in bovine lactoferrrin the corresponding fragments act in concert in its candidacidal activity.

  17. pDeep: Predicting MS/MS Spectra of Peptides with Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xie-Xuan; Zeng, Wen-Feng; Chi, Hao; Luo, Chunjie; Liu, Chao; Zhan, Jianfeng; He, Si-Min; Zhang, Zhifei

    2017-12-05

    In tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics, search engines rely on comparison between an experimental MS/MS spectrum and the theoretical spectra of the candidate peptides. Hence, accurate prediction of the theoretical spectra of peptides appears to be particularly important. Here, we present pDeep, a deep neural network-based model for the spectrum prediction of peptides. Using the bidirectional long short-term memory (BiLSTM), pDeep can predict higher-energy collisional dissociation, electron-transfer dissociation, and electron-transfer and higher-energy collision dissociation MS/MS spectra of peptides with >0.9 median Pearson correlation coefficients. Further, we showed that intermediate layer of the neural network could reveal physicochemical properties of amino acids, for example the similarities of fragmentation behaviors between amino acids. We also showed the potential of pDeep to distinguish extremely similar peptides (peptides that contain isobaric amino acids, for example, GG = N, AG = Q, or even I = L), which were very difficult to distinguish using traditional search engines.

  18. Dimeric MHC-peptides inserted into an immunoglobulin scaffold as new immunotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Burt; Bona, Constantin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The interactions of the T cell receptor (TCR) with cognate MHC-peptide and co-stimulatory molecules expressed at surface of antigen presenting cells (APC) leads to activation or tolerance of T cells. The development of molecular biological tools allowed for the preparation of soluble MHC-peptide molecules as surrogate for the APC. A decade ago a monomeric class II MHC molecule in which the peptide was covalently linked to β-chain of class II molecule was generated. This type of molecule had a low-binding affinity and did not cause the multimerization of TCR. The requirement of multimerization of TCR led to development of a new class of reagents, chimeric peptides covalently linked to MHC that was dimerized via Fc fragment of an immunoglobulin and linked to 3′ end of the β-chain of MHC class II molecule. These soluble dimerized MHC-peptide chimeric molecules display high affinity for the TCR and caused multimerization of TCR without processing by an APC. Because dimeric molecules are devoid of co-stimulatory molecules interacting with CD28, a second signal, they induce anergy rather the activation of T cells. In this review, we compare the human and murine dimerized MHC class II-peptides and their effect on CD4+ T cells, particularly the generation of T regulatory cells, which make these chimeric molecules an appealing approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21435177

  19. Screening a fragment cocktail library using ultrafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Sayaka; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Napuli, Alberto; Kelley, Angela M.; Mueller, Natasha; Ross, Jennifer; Zucker, Frank H.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Merritt, Ethan A.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Fan, Erkang

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafiltration provides a generic method to discover ligands for protein drug targets with millimolar to micromolar Kd, the typical range of fragment-based drug discovery. This method was tailored to a 96-well format, and cocktails of fragment-sized molecules, with molecular masses between 150 and 300 Da, were screened against medical structural genomics target proteins. The validity of the method was confirmed through competitive binding assays in the presence of ligands known to bind the target proteins. PMID:21750879

  20. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  1. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  2. Fragmentation of Continental United States Forests

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; James D. Wickham; Robert V. O' Neill; K. Bruce Jones; Elizabeth R. Smith; John W. Coulston; Timothy G. Wade; Jonathan H. Smith

    2002-01-01

    We report a multiple-scale analysis of forest fragmentation based on 30-m (0.09 ha pixel-1) land- cover maps for the conterminous United States. Each 0.09-ha unit of forest was classified according to fragmentation indexes measured within the surrounding landscape, for five landscape sizes including 2.25, 7.29, 65.61, 590.49, and 5314.41 ha....

  3. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with