Science.gov

Sample records for a-ii coagulation factor

  1. Coagulation Factor Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... your coagulation factors. Coagulation factors are known by Roman numerals (I, II VIII, etc.) or by name ( ... need this test if you have a family history of bleeding disorders. Most bleeding disorders are inherited . ...

  2. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3,more » 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.« less

  3. Different Recovery Profiles of Coagulation Factors, Thrombin Generation, and Coagulation Function After Hemorrhagic Shock in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-06

    Different recovery profiles of coagulation factors, thrombin generation, and coagulation function after hemorrhagic shock in pigs Wenjun Z. Martini ...Defense. Address for reprints: Wenjun Z. Martini , PhD, The US Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Ft. Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX...control number 1. REPORT DATE 01 SEP 2015 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Different recovery profiles of

  4. Rare coagulation disorders: fibrinogen, factor VII and factor XIII.

    PubMed

    de Moerloose, P; Schved, J-F; Nugent, D

    2016-07-01

    Rare coagulation disorders (RCDs) include the inherited deficiencies of fibrinogen, factor (F) II, FV, combined FV and VIII, FVII, FX, combined FVII and X, FXI, FXIII and combined congenital deficiency of vitamin K-dependent factors (VKCFDs). Despite their rarity, a deep comprehension of all these disorders is essential to really understand haemostasis. Indeed, even if they share some common features each RCD has some particularity which makes it unique. In this review, we focus on three disorders: fibrinogen, FVII and FXIII. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Enzymatically oxidized phospholipids restore thrombin generation in coagulation factor deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Slatter, David A; Percy, Charles L; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M; Brooks, Nick J; Clayton, Aled; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Rosas, Marcela; Lauder, Sarah N; Watson, Andrew; Dul, Maria; Garcia-Diaz, Yoel; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Heurich, Meike; Hall, Judith; Morrissey, James H; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Delignat, Sandrine; Jenkins, P Vincent; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2018-03-22

    Hemostatic defects are treated using coagulation factors; however, clot formation also requires a procoagulant phospholipid (PL) surface. Here, we show that innate immune cell-derived enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPL) termed hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) restore hemostasis in human and murine conditions of pathological bleeding. HETE-PLs abolished blood loss in murine hemophilia A and enhanced coagulation in factor VIII- (FVIII-), FIX-, and FX-deficient human plasma . HETE-PLs were decreased in platelets from patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To explore molecular mechanisms, the ability of eoxPL to stimulate individual isolated coagulation factor/cofactor complexes was tested in vitro. Extrinsic tenase (FVIIa/tissue factor [TF]), intrinsic tenase (FVIIIa/FIXa), and prothrombinase (FVa/FXa) all were enhanced by both HETE-PEs and HETE-PCs, suggesting a common mechanism involving the fatty acid moiety. In plasma, 9-, 15-, and 12-HETE-PLs were more effective than 5-, 11-, or 8-HETE-PLs, indicating positional isomer specificity. Coagulation was enhanced at lower lipid/factor ratios, consistent with a more concentrated area for protein binding. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed binding of FII and FX to HETE-PEs. HETE-PEs increased membrane curvature and thickness, but not surface charge or homogeneity, possibly suggesting increased accessibility to cations/factors. In summary, innate immune-derived eoxPL enhance calcium-dependent coagulation factor function, and their potential utility in bleeding disorders is proposed.

  6. Enzymatically oxidized phospholipids restore thrombin generation in coagulation factor deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, David A.; Percy, Charles L.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Brooks, Nick J.; Tyrrell, Victoria J.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Watson, Andrew; Dul, Maria; Garcia-Diaz, Yoel; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Heurich, Meike; Hall, Judith; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Delignat, Sandrine; Jenkins, P. Vincent; Collins, Peter W.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.

    2018-01-01

    Hemostatic defects are treated using coagulation factors; however, clot formation also requires a procoagulant phospholipid (PL) surface. Here, we show that innate immune cell–derived enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPL) termed hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid–phospholipids (HETE-PLs) restore hemostasis in human and murine conditions of pathological bleeding. HETE-PLs abolished blood loss in murine hemophilia A and enhanced coagulation in factor VIII- (FVIII-), FIX-, and FX-deficient human plasma . HETE-PLs were decreased in platelets from patients after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To explore molecular mechanisms, the ability of eoxPL to stimulate individual isolated coagulation factor/cofactor complexes was tested in vitro. Extrinsic tenase (FVIIa/tissue factor [TF]), intrinsic tenase (FVIIIa/FIXa), and prothrombinase (FVa/FXa) all were enhanced by both HETE-PEs and HETE-PCs, suggesting a common mechanism involving the fatty acid moiety. In plasma, 9-, 15-, and 12-HETE-PLs were more effective than 5-, 11-, or 8-HETE-PLs, indicating positional isomer specificity. Coagulation was enhanced at lower lipid/factor ratios, consistent with a more concentrated area for protein binding. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed binding of FII and FX to HETE-PEs. HETE-PEs increased membrane curvature and thickness, but not surface charge or homogeneity, possibly suggesting increased accessibility to cations/factors. In summary, innate immune-derived eoxPL enhance calcium-dependent coagulation factor function, and their potential utility in bleeding disorders is proposed. PMID:29563336

  7. Autotransfusion from experimental hemothorax: levels of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Napoli, V M; Symbas, P J; Vroon, D H; Symbas, P N

    1987-03-01

    The coagulation system was investigated in five dogs undergoing autotransfusion from experimental hemothorax. One fourth of the blood volume was bled into the pleural space, drained, and autotransfused. The hemothorax blood showed: very prolonged PT and PTT; very low platelets and fibrinogen; midly elevated FDP; very low coagulation factors VIII, and V; reduced XII, prothrombin, X, XI, and VII. Partial clotting, mild fibrinolysis, and fibrin deposition over the pulmonary pleura seemed to cause incoagulability of hemothorax blood. Post autotransfusion arterial blood showed: normal PT and PTT; 25% decrease in platelets, and 31% decrease in fibrinogen from baseline values. There was also an overall 20% reduction of fibrinogen from baseline values. There was also an overall 20% reduction of all clotting factors, but their levels remained above 50% activity. It was concluded that autotransfusion from a hemothorax of 25% the blood volume in dogs causes a mild loss of hemostatic components, but does not significantly compromise the clotting mechanism.

  8. Two distinct forms of Factor VIII coagulant protein in human plasma. Cleavage by thrombin, and differences in coagulant activity and association with von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E

    1984-01-01

    We have characterized Factor VIII coagulant protein, present in normal human plasma, that reacts with a specific human 125I-labeled anti-human VIII:C antigen Fab antibody fragment. Two major Factor VIII coagulant antigen populations were present. The first, approximately 85% of the total antigen, was bound to von Willebrand factor and when tested in a standard one-stage assay had Factor VIII coagulant activity. The second antigenic population, eluting near fibrinogen when plasma was gel filtered, was not bound to von Willebrand protein, did not have Factor VIII coagulant activity unless activated, but did block anti-VIII:C Fab neutralization of clotting activity. The two antigenic populations were separable by cryoprecipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis. Although the two antigenic populations differed in their Factor VIII coagulant activity and in their binding to von Willebrand factor, the principal member of both populations is of mol wt 2.4 X 10(5). Both antigens, when proteolyzed by thrombin, were quickly converted to a 1 X 10(5)-mol wt form in association with the appearance of VIII:C activity. The 1 X 10(5)-mol wt antigen was further slowly degraded to an 8 X 10(4)-mol wt form while Factor VIII coagulant activity declined. These results demonstrate the presence of an inactive Factor VIII coagulant protein in plasma, not associated with von Willebrand factor, that can react with thrombin to yield Factor VIII coagulant activity. Images PMID:6421875

  9. Biological and analytical variations of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests and the activity of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shou, Weiling; Wu, Wei; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Yujuan; Huang, Chunmei; Cui, Wei

    2015-04-01

    To accurately estimate longitudinal changes in individuals, it is important to take into consideration the biological variability of the measurement. The few studies available on the biological variations of coagulation parameters are mostly outdated. We confirmed the published results using modern, fully automated methods. Furthermore, we added data for additional coagulation parameters. At 8:00 am, 12:00 pm, and 4:00 pm on days 1, 3, and 5, venous blood was collected from 31 healthy volunteers. A total of 16 parameters related to coagulation screening tests as well as the activity of coagulation factors were analyzed; these included prothrombin time, fibrinogen (Fbg), activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, international normalized ratio, prothrombin time activity, activated partial thromboplastin time ratio, fibrin(-ogen) degradation products, as well as the activity of factor II, factor V, factor VII, factor VIII, factor IX, and factor X. All intraindividual coefficients of variation (CVI) values for the parameters of the screening tests (except Fbg) were less than 5%. Conversely, the CVI values for the activity of coagulation factors were all greater than 5%. In addition, we calculated the reference change value to determine whether a significant difference exists between two test results from the same individual. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Chronic sleep deprivation markedly reduces coagulation factor VII expression

    PubMed Central

    Pinotti, Mirko; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Frigato, Elena; Branchini, Alessio; Cavallari, Nicola; Baba, Kenkichi; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Ehlen, J. Christopher; Bernardi, Francesco; Paul, Ketema N.; Tosini, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    Chronic sleep loss, a common feature of human life in industrialized countries, is associated to cardiovascular disorders. Variations in functional parameters of coagulation might contribute to explain this relationship. By exploiting the mouse model and a specifically designed protocol, we demonstrated that seven days of partial sleep deprivation significantly decreases (−30.5%) the thrombin generation potential in plasma evaluated upon extrinsic (TF/FVIIa pathway) but not intrinsic activation of coagulation. This variation was consistent with a decrease (−49.8%) in the plasma activity levels of factor VII (FVII), the crucial physiologicalal trigger of coagulation, which was even more pronounced at the liver mRNA level (−85.7%). The recovery in normal sleep conditions for three days completely restored thrombin generation and FVII activity in plasma. For the first time, we demonstrate that chronic sleep deprivation on its own reduces, in a reversible manner, the FVII expression levels, thus influencing the TF/FVIIa activation pathway efficiency. PMID:20418241

  11. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2015-12-16

    To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Crossover trial. Main meeting room of Leiden University's Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. The primary outcome measures were markers, or "fear factors" of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Bloodcurdling movies and measures of coagulation: Fear Factor crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Banne; Scheres, Luuk J J; Lijfering, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether, as has been hypothesised since medieval times, acute fear can curdle blood. Design Crossover trial. Setting Main meeting room of Leiden University’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology, the Netherlands, converted to a makeshift cinema. Participants 24 healthy volunteers aged ≤30 years recruited among students, alumni, and employees of the Leiden University Medical Center: 14 were assigned to watch a frightening (horror) movie followed by a non-threatening (educational) movie and 10 to watch the movies in reverse order. The movies were viewed more than a week apart at the same time of day and both lasted approximately 90 minutes. Main outcome measures The primary outcome measures were markers, or “fear factors” of coagulation activity: blood coagulant factor VIII, D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and prothrombin fragments 1+2. The secondary outcome was participant reported fear experienced during each movie using a visual analogue fear scale. Results All participants completed the study. The horror movie was perceived to be more frightening than the educational movie on a visual analogue fear scale (mean difference 5.4, 95% confidence interval 4.7 to 6.1). The difference in factor VIII levels before and after watching the movies was higher for the horror movie than for the educational movie (mean difference of differences 11.1 IU/dL (111 IU/L), 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 21.0 IU/dL). The effect of either movie on levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes, D-dimer, and prothrombin fragments 1+2 did not differ. Conclusion Frightening (in this case, horror) movies are associated with an increase of blood coagulant factor VIII without actual thrombin formation in young and healthy adults. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02601053. PMID:26673787

  13. Quality control in the development of coagulation factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Snape, T J

    1987-01-01

    Limitation of process change is a major factor contributing to assurance of quality in pharmaceutical manufacturing. This is particularly true in the manufacture of coagulation factor concentrates, for which presumptive testing for poorly defined product characteristics is an integral feature of finished product quality control. The development of new or modified preparations requires that this comfortable position be abandoned, and that the effect on finished product characteristics of changes to individual process steps (and components) be assessed. The degree of confidence in the safety and efficacy of the new product will be determined by, amongst other things, the complexity of the process alteration and the extent to which the results of finished product tests can be considered predictive. The introduction of a heat-treatment step for inactivation of potential viral contaminants in coagulation factor concentrates presents a significant challenge in both respects, quite independent of any consideration of assessment of the effectiveness of the viral inactivation step. These interactions are illustrated by some of the problems encountered with terminal dry heat-treatment (72 h. at 80 degrees C) of factor VIII and prothrombin complex concentrates manufactured by the Blood Products Laboratory.

  14. Coagulation management in trauma-associated coagulopathy: allogenic blood products versus coagulation factor concentrates in trauma care.

    PubMed

    Klages, Matthias; Zacharowski, Kai; Weber, Christian Friedrich

    2016-04-01

    Coagulation management by transfusion of allogenic blood products and coagulation factors are competing concepts in current trauma care. Rapid and adequate therapy of trauma-associated coagulopathy is crucial to survival of severely injured patients. Standard coagulation tests such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time are commonly used, but these tests are inappropriate for monitoring and guiding therapy in trauma patients. Coagulation factor-based treatment showed promising results, but randomized trials have not yet been performed. In addition, viscoelastic tests are needed to guide therapy, although there is in fact limited evidence for these in tests in trauma care. Regarding transfusion therapy with allogenic blood products, plasma transfusion has been associated with improved survival in trauma patients following massive transfusion. In contrast, patients not requiring massive transfusion seem to be at risk for suffering complications with increasing volumes of plasma transfused. The collective of trauma patients is heterogeneous. Despite the lack of evidence, there are strong arguments for individualized patient treatment with coagulation factors for some indications and to abstain from the use of fresh frozen plasma. In patients with severe trauma and major bleeding, plasma, platelets, and red blood cells should be considered to be administered at a ratio of 1 : 1 : 1.

  15. [Coagulation factor VII levels in uremic patients and theirs influence factors].

    PubMed

    Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Wei, Wen-Ning; Song, Shan-Jun

    2004-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate coagulation factor VII level in uremic patients with chronic renal failure and to explore theirs influence factors. The plasma levels of coagulation factor VII were detected in 30 uremic patients with chronic renal failure before and after hemodialysis for 1 month, the factor VII activity (FVII:C) was determined by one-stage coagulation method, while activated factor VII (FVIIa) was measured by one-stage coagulation method using recombinant soluble tissue factor, and factor VII antigen was detected by ELISA. The results showed that: (1) The FVIIa, FVII:C and FVIIAg levels in chronic uremic patients before hemodialysis were 4.00 +/- 0.86 microg/L, (148.5 +/- 40.4)% and (99.8 +/- 21.1)% respectively, which were significantly increased, as compared with healthy controls [2.77 +/- 1.02 microg/L, (113.1 +/- 33.0)% and (73.7 +/- 18.3)% respectively, P < 0.05]. (2) After hemodialysis the FVIIa, FVII:C and FVIIAg levels in uremic patients significantly enhanced to 5.56 +/- 1.45 microg/L, (200.8 +/- 68.7)% and (124.1 +/- 19.3)% respectively (P < 0.05). (3) The abnormal increase of coagulation factor VII was positively correlated with levels of blood uria nitrogen and serum creatinine before hemodialysis but not after hemodialysis. It is concluded that the enhanced levels of coagulation factor VII in chronic uremic patients suggested abnormal activated state, herperactivity and elevated production of factor VII which correlated with renal functional injury. The abnormality of factor VII in uremia may be aggravated by hemodialysis. Coagulation factor (FVII) may be a risk factor for cardiovascular events in uremic patients who especially had been accepted long-term hemodialysis.

  16. Genetic Factors Influencing Coagulation Factor XIII B-Subunit Contribute to Risk of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hanscombe, Ken B; Traylor, Matthew; Hysi, Pirro G; Bevan, Stephen; Dichgans, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Worrall, Bradford B; Seshadri, Sudha; Sudlow, Cathie; Williams, Frances M K; Markus, Hugh S; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal coagulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, but how this association is mediated and whether it differs between ischemic stroke subtypes is unknown. We determined the shared genetic risk between 14 coagulation factors and ischemic stroke and its subtypes. Using genome-wide association study results for 14 coagulation factors from the population-based TwinsUK sample (N≈2000 for each factor), meta-analysis results from the METASTROKE consortium ischemic stroke genome-wide association study (12 389 cases, 62 004 controls), and genotype data for 9520 individuals from the WTCCC2 ischemic stroke study (3548 cases, 5972 controls-the largest METASTROKE subsample), we explored shared genetic risk for coagulation and stroke. We performed three analyses: (1) a test for excess concordance (or discordance) in single nucleotide polymorphism effect direction across coagulation and stroke, (2) an estimation of the joint effect of multiple coagulation-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in stroke, and (3) an evaluation of common genetic risk between coagulation and stroke. One coagulation factor, factor XIII subunit B (FXIIIB), showed consistent effects in the concordance analysis, the estimation of polygenic risk, and the validation with genotype data, with associations specific to the cardioembolic stroke subtype. Effect directions for FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly discordant with cardioembolic disease (smallest P=5.7×10(-04)); the joint effect of FXIIIB-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms was significantly predictive of ischemic stroke (smallest P=1.8×10(-04)) and the cardioembolic subtype (smallest P=1.7×10(-04)). We found substantial negative genetic covariation between FXIIIB and ischemic stroke (rG=-0.71, P=0.01) and the cardioembolic subtype (rG=-0.80, P=0.03). Genetic markers associated with low FXIIIB levels increase risk of ischemic stroke cardioembolic subtype. © 2015 The

  17. Effect of Hemodilution on Coagulation and Recombinant Factor VIIa Efficacy in Human Blood In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    thrombasthenia.12 In trauma, when a blood vessel is injured, tissue factor on subendothelial pericytes is exposed and binds to endogenous FVII ...a more complex effect on coagulation than simply dilution of any single coagulation factor like FVII or fibrinogen (Fig. 1). It is interesting to note...ORIGINAL ARTICLE Effect of Hemodilution on Coagulation and Recombinant Factor VIIa Efficacy in Human Blood In Vitro Daniel N. Darlington, PhD, Angel

  18. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  19. Coagulation factor VII variants resistant to inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Alessio; Baroni, Marcello; Pfeiffer, Caroline; Batorova, Angelika; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Schved, Jean F; Mariani, Guglielmo; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2014-11-01

    Replacement therapy is currently used to prevent and treat bleeding episodes in coagulation factor deficiencies. However, structural differences between the endogenous and therapeutic proteins might increase the risk for immune complications. This study was aimed at identifying factor (F)VII variants resistant to inhibitory antibodies developed after treatment with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in a FVII-deficient patient homozygous for the p.A354V-p.P464Hfs mutation, which predicts trace levels of an elongated FVII variant in plasma. We performed fluorescent bead-based binding, ELISA-based competition as well as fluorogenic functional (activated FX and thrombin generation) assays in plasma and with recombinant proteins. We found that antibodies displayed higher affinity for the active than for the zymogen FVII (half-maximal binding at 0.54 ± 0.04 and 0.78 ± 0.07 BU/ml, respectively), and inhibited the coagulation initiation phase with a second-order kinetics. Isotypic analysis showed a polyclonal response with a large predominance of IgG1. We hypothesised that structural differences in the carboxyl-terminus between the inherited FVII and the therapeutic molecules contributed to the immune response. Intriguingly, a naturally-occurring, poorly secreted and 5-residue truncated FVII (FVII-462X) escaped inhibition. Among a series of truncated rFVII molecules, we identified a well-secreted and catalytically competent variant (rFVII-464X) with reduced binding to antibodies (half-maximal binding at 0.198 ± 0.003 BU/ml) as compared to the rFVII-wt (0.032 ± 0.002 BU/ml), which led to a 40-time reduced inhibition in activated FX generation assays. Taken together our results provide a paradigmatic example of mutation-related inhibitory antibodies, strongly support the FVII carboxyl-terminus as their main target and identify inhibitor-resistant FVII variants.

  20. Quarantine versus pathogen-reduced plasma-coagulation factor content and rotational thromboelastometry coagulation.

    PubMed

    Theusinger, Oliver M; Goslings, David; Studt, Jan-Dirk; Brand-Staufer, Brigitte; Seifert, Burkhardt; Spahn, Donat R; Frey, Beat M

    2017-03-01

    Different types of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) exist, and the concentrations of plasma proteins vary between individuals and blood groups. Furthermore, processing may also influence the content. Quarantine-stored plasma (qFFP) and plasma that was pathogen-reduced using blood-safety (Intercept) technology (piFFP) were analyzed regarding procoagulant and anticoagulant hemostasis proteins, including endogenous thrombin (thrombin-generation) potential (ETP). Thirty-five samples of each type of FFP were analyzed using only male Blood Group O donors. FFP units were stored frozen for comparable periods of time before plasma protein content was assessed. Once the units were thawed, all tests were completed within 4 hours. The results are presented as means ± standard deviations or as median (minimum; maximum) and were compared using independent-sample t tests (significance, p < 0.01). Significantly higher concentrations of adintegrin-like and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-13 motifs (ADAMTS13), fibrinogen, Factor (F)V, FVIII, FXIII, protein S, protein S activity, antithrombin, microvesicle (<900 nm), and α2 antiplasmin were observed in qFFP. The variability of factors was significantly lower in piFFP. Tissue factor (TF) at 1 picomolar (pM) exhibited significantly longer lag time, a lower peak, lower ETP, and a lower velocity index in qFFP compared with piFFP. In TF at 5 pM, significant differences in lag time (longer in qFFP), velocity index (lower in qFFP), and peak (lower in qFFP) were observed. Rotational thromboelastometry revealed a significantly longer (p = 0.002) clot-formation time with intrinsic thromboelastometry for piFFP and a significantly shorter clotting time (p = 0.004) with thromboelastometry fibrinogen testing for piFFP. Pathogen reduction reduces procoagulant and anticoagulant coagulation factors as well as variability. A thrombin-generation assay showed no reduced ETP and no supraphysiological thrombin generation. None of the

  1. Purification and Autoactivation Method for Recombinant Coagulation Factor VII.

    PubMed

    Granovski, Vladimir; Freitas, Marcela C C; Abreu-Neto, Mario Soares; Covas, Dimas T

    2018-01-01

    Recombinant coagulation factor VII is a very important and complex protein employed for treatment of hemophiliac patients (hemophilia A/B) who develop inhibitors antibodies to conventional treatments (FVIII and FIX). The rFVII is a glycosylated molecule and circulates in plasma as zymogen of 50 kDa. When activated the molecule is cleaved to 20-30 kDa and has a half-life of about 3 h, needing to be processed fast and efficiently until freeze-drying. Here, we describe a very simple and fast purification sequence for rFVII using affinity FVII Select resin and a dialysis system that can be easily scaled up.

  2. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  3. Structure and dynamics of zymogen human blood coagulation factor X.

    PubMed

    Venkateswarlu, Divi; Perera, Lalith; Darden, Tom; Pedersen, Lee G

    2002-03-01

    The solution structure and dynamics of the human coagulation factor X (FX) have been investigated to understand the key structural elements in the zymogenic form that participates in the activation process. The model was constructed based on the 2.3-A-resolution x-ray crystallographic structure of active-site inhibited human FXa (PDB:1XKA). The missing gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) and part of epidermal growth factor 1 (EGF1) domains of the light chain were modeled based on the template of GLA-EGF1 domains of the tissue factor (TF)-bound FVIIa structure (PDB:1DAN). The activation peptide and other missing segments of FX were introduced using homology modeling. The full calcium-bound model of FX was subjected to 6.2 ns of molecular dynamics simulation in aqueous medium using the AMBER6.0 package. We observed significant reorientation of the serine-protease (SP) domain upon activation leading to a compact multi-domain structure. The solution structure of zymogen appears to be in a well-extended conformation with the distance between the calcium ions in the GLA domain and the catalytic residues estimated to be approximately 95 A in contrast to approximately 83 A in the activated form. The latter is in close agreement with fluorescence studies on FXa. The S1-specificity residues near the catalytic triad show significant differences between the zymogen and activated structures.

  4. Self-production of tissue factor-coagulation factor VII complex by ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yokota, N; Koizume, S; Miyagi, E; Hirahara, F; Nakamura, Y; Kikuchi, K; Ruf, W; Sakuma, Y; Tsuchiya, E; Miyagi, Y

    2009-12-15

    Thromboembolic events are a major complication in ovarian cancer patients. Tissue factor (TF) is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissue and correlates with intravascular thrombosis. TF binds to coagulation factor VII (fVII), changing it to its active form, fVIIa. This leads to activation of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. fVII is produced by the liver and believed to be supplied from blood plasma at the site of coagulation. However, we recently showed that ovarian cancer cells express fVII transcripts under normoxia and that this transcription is inducible under hypoxia. These findings led us to hypothesise that ovarian cancer cells are intrinsically associated with TF-fVIIa coagulation activity, which could result in thrombosis. In this study, we examined whether ectopically expressed fVII could cause thrombosis by means of immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. Ectopic fVII expression occurs frequently in ovarian cancers, particularly in clear cell carcinoma. We further showed that ovarian cancer cells express TF-fVIIa on the cell surface under normoxia and that this procoagulant activity is enhanced by hypoxic stimuli. Moreover, we showed that ovarian cancer cells secrete microparticles (MPs) with TF-fVIIa activity. Production of this procoagulant secretion is enhanced under hypoxia. These results raise the possibility that cancer cell-derived TF-fVIIa could cause thrombotic events in ovarian cancer patients.

  5. Abnormal factor VIII coagulant antigen in patients with renal dysfunction and in those with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E; Schmitt, G W; Hamburger, R H; Bauer, K A; Troll, J H; Janson, P; Deykin, D

    1985-01-01

    Factor VIII antigen (VIII:CAg) exhibits molecular weight heterogeneity in normal plasma. We have compared the relative quantities of VIII:CAg forms present in normal individuals (n = 22) with VIII:CAg forms in renal dysfunction patients (n = 19) and in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC; n = 7). In normal plasma, the predominant VIII: CAg form, detectable by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was of molecular weight 2.4 X 10(5), with minor forms ranging from 8 X 10(4) to 2.6 X 10(5) D. A high proportion of VIII:CAg in renal dysfunction patients, in contrast, was of 1 X 10(5) mol wt. The patients' high 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII: CAg level correlated with increased concentrations of serum creatinine, F1+2 (a polypeptide released upon prothrombin activation), and with von Willebrand factor. Despite the high proportion of the 1 X 10(5) mol wt VIII:CAg form, which suggests VIII:CAg proteolysis, the ratio of Factor VIII coagulant activity to total VIII:CAg concentration was normal in renal dysfunction patients. These results could be simulated in vitro by thrombin treatment of normal plasma, which yielded similar VIII:CAg gel patterns and Factor VIII coagulant activity to antigen ratios. DIC patients with high F1+2 levels but no evidence of renal dysfunction had an VIII:CAg gel pattern distinct from renal dysfunction patients. DIC patients had elevated concentrations of both the 1 X 10(5) and 8 X 10(4) mol wt VIII:CAg forms. We conclude that an increase in a particular VIII:CAg form correlates with the severity of renal dysfunction. The antigen abnormality may be the result of VIII:CAg proteolysis by a thrombinlike enzyme and/or prolonged retention of proteolyzed VIII:CAg fragments. Images PMID:3932466

  6. Tissue Factor Coagulant Activity is Regulated by the Plasma Membrane Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuanjie; Böing, Anita N; Hau, Chi M; Hajji, Najat; Ruf, Wolfram; Sturk, Auguste; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2018-06-01

     Tissue factor (TF) can be present in a non-coagulant and coagulant form. Whether the coagulant activity is affected by the plasma membrane microenvironment is unexplored.  This article studies the presence and coagulant activity of human TF in plasma membrane micro-domains.  Plasma membranes were isolated from human MIA PaCa2 cells, MDA-MB-231 cells and human vascular smooth muscle cells by Percoll gradient ultracentrifugation after cell disruption. Plasma membranes were fractionated by OptiPrep gradient ultracentrifugation, and the presence of TF, flotillin, caveolin, clathrin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and phosphatidylserine (PS) were determined.  Plasma membranes contain two detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) compartments differing in density and biochemical composition. High-density DRMs (DRM-H) have a density ( ρ ) of 1.15 to 1.20 g/mL and contain clathrin, whereas low-density DRMs (DRM-L) have a density between 1.09 and 1.13 g/mL and do not contain clathrin. Both DRMs contain TF, flotillin and caveolin. PDI is detectable in DRM-H, TFPI is not detectable in either DMR-H or DRM-L and PS is detectable in DRM-L. The DRM-H-associated TF (> 95% of the TF antigen) lacks detectable coagulant activity, whereas the DRM-L-associated TF triggers coagulation. This coagulant activity is inhibited by lactadherin and thus PS-dependent, but seemed insensitive to 16F16, an inhibitor of PDI.  Non-coagulant and coagulant TF are present within different types of DRMs in the plasma membrane, and the composition of these DRMs may affect the TF coagulant activity. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  7. [Influencing factors and mechanism of arsenic removal during the aluminum coagulation process].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Xia; Hu, Cheng-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Feng; Tong, Hua-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Aluminum coagulants are widely used in arsenic (As) removal during the drinking water treatment process. Aluminium chloride (AlCl3) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl) which contains high content of Al13 were used as coagulants. The effects of aluminum species, pH, humic acid (HA) and coexisting anions on arsenic removal were investigated. Results showed that AlCl3 and PACl were almost ineffective in As(II) removal while the As(V) removal efficiency reached almost 100%. pH was an important influencing factor on the arsenic removal efficiency, because pH influenced the distribution of aluminum species during the coagulation process. The efficiency of arsenic removal by aluminum coagulants was positively correlated with the content of Al13 species. HA and some coexisting anions showed negative impact on arsenic removal because of the competitive adsorption. The negative influence of HA was more pronounced at low coagulant dosages. PO4(3-) and F(-) showed marked influence during arsenic removal, but there was no obvious influence when SiO3(2-), CO3(2-) and SO4(2-) coexisted. The present study would be helpful to direct arsenic removal by enhanced coagulation during the drinking water treatment.

  8. Differential roles of tissue factor and phosphatidylserine in activation of coagulation.

    PubMed

    Spronk, Henri M H; ten Cate, Hugo; van der Meijden, Paola E J

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that the main physiological trigger of coagulation, tissue factor, possesses limited procoagulant activity and occurs in an inactive or so-called encrypted state. For the conversion of encrypted into decrypted tissue factor with sufficient procoagulant activity, four distinct models have been proposed: 1; dimer formation, 2; lipid rafts, 3; disulfide bonds, and 4; phosphatidylserine exposure. Pro and cons can be given for each of these mechanisms of tissue factor encryption/decryption, however, it seems most likely that two or more mechanisms act together in activating the procoagulant activity. The exposure of phosphatidylserine in the outer layer of cell membranes supports coagulation through enhanced formation of the tenase (factors IXa, VIIIa and X) and prothrombinase (factors Xa, Va and prothrombin) complexes. The proposed role for phosphatidylserine in decryption of tissue factor could contribute to the correct orientation of the tissue factor - factor VII complex. Overall, the contribution of both tissue factor and phosphatidylserine to coagulation seems distinct with tissue factor being the physiological activator and phosphatidylserine the driving force of propagation of coagulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  10. Congenital combined deficiency of coagulation factors: a study of seven patients.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Majid; Tabibian, Shadi; Hosseini, Maryam Sadat; Alizadeh, Shaban; Hosseini, Soudabeh; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Combined deficiency of coagulation factors is considered as an extremely rare bleeding disorder (RBD) inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This disorder is more likely to occur in regions with a high rate of consanguineous marriages or in restricted communities. Sistan and Baluchistan, a province in southeast of Iran with a high rate of consanguinity, is a clear model of such regions with a very high prevalence of recessively inherited disorders. The aim of this study was to report the frequency of combined factor deficiency in this province. This descriptive study was conducted on 358 patients with RBD. Demographic information and medical history of each patient were recorded, and the patients were examined by a physician. Routine screening tests were carried out for all patients, and further coagulation tests including coagulation factor activity and antigen assays were subsequently performed for all suspected patients. Among 358 patients, four were found to be affected with combined factor (F)V and FVIII deficiency (F5F8D). In addition, one patient with combined deficiency of FVII-FXIII, one with combined FVII-FX and one with combined FVIII-FIX deficiency were identified. In Sistan and Baluchistan Province, coinheritance of recessively inherited disorders like combined coagulation factor deficiencies was surprisingly higher than expected.

  11. Effects on coagulation factor production following primary hepatomitogen-induced direct hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Ohashi, Kazuo; Taminishi, Sanae; Takagi, Soichi; Utoh, Rie; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori; Okano, Teruo

    2009-11-14

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in coagulation factor expression and/or function during direct hyperplasia (DH)-mediated liver regeneration. Direct hyperplasia-mediated liver regeneration was induced in female C57BL/6 mice by administering 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP), a representative hepatomitogen. Mice were weighed and sacrificed at various time points [Day 0 (D0: prior to injection), 3 h, D1, D2, D3, and D10] after TCPOBOP administration to obtain liver and blood samples. Using the RNA samples extracted from the liver, a comprehensive analysis was performed on the hepatic gene expression profiling of coagulation-related factors by real-time RT-PCR (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XIIIbeta, plasminogen, antithrombin, protein C, protein S, ADAMTS13, and VWF). The corresponding plasma levels of coagulation factors (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and VWF) were also analyzed and compared with their mRNA levels. Gavage administration of TCPOBOP (3 mg/kg body weight) resulted in a marked and gradual increase in the weight of the mouse livers relative to the total body weight to 220% by D10 relative to the D0 (control) ratios. At the peak of liver regeneration (D1 and D2), the gene expression levels for most of the coagulation-related factors (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V, VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII, XIIIbeta, plasminogen, antithrombin, protein C, ADAMTS13, VWF) were found to be down-regulated in a time-dependent manner, and gradually recovered by D10 to the basal levels. Only mRNA levels of factor X and protein S failed to show any decrease during the regenerative phase. As for the plasma levels, 5 clotting factors (prothrombin, factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) demonstrated a significant decrease (P<0.05) during the regeneration phase compared with D0. Among these 5 factors, factor IX and factor XI showed the most dramatic decline in their activities by about

  12. Fish as bioreactors: transgene expression of human coagulation factor VII in fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyulin; Müller, Ferenc; Rahman, M Aziz; Williams, Darren W; Murdock, Paul J; Pasi, K John; Goldspink, Geoffrey; Farahmand, Hamid; Maclean, Norman

    2004-01-01

    A plasmid containing human coagulation factor VII (hFVII) complementary DNA regulated by a cytomegalovirus promoter was microinjected into fertilized eggs of zebrafish, African catfish, and tilapia. The active form of hFVll was detected in the fish embryos by various assays. This positive expression of human therapeutic protein in fish embryos demonstrates the possibility of exploitation of transgenic fish as bioreactors.

  13. Reduced plasma levels of coagulation factors in relation to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beecken, Wolf-Dietrich; Bentas, Wassilios; Engels, Knut; Glienke, Wolfgang; Urbschat, Anja; Jonas, Dietger; Binder, Jochen; Scharrer, Inge

    2002-10-01

    Prostate cancer has historically been associated with coagulation abnormalities. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of abnormalities of coagulation factors in patients with prostate cancer before and after radical prostatectomy (RP). Because coagulation factors have been shown to be involved in tumor angiogenesis, the vascular density of the prostate tumors was assessed. Plasma of 40 consecutive patients with histologically proven prostate cancer was investigated pre-RP and post-RP. The antigen level for antithrombin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and heparin cofactor-II, and the plasma activity of antithrombin and plasminogen were determined by using immunologic and chromogenic assays. The values of these assays were compared with a group of 28 male, age-matched patients without any evidence of cancer and 18 patients with orthopedic interventions preoperatively and postoperatively. The vascular density of the prostate tumors was assessed by staining paraffin sections with an antibody to CD34. The median plasma antigen levels and/or activities of the investigated factors were below normal in the prostate cancer patients before RP. Furthermore, coagulation factors were significantly lower than in the age-matched control group and patients before and after orthopedic surgery. In prostate cancer patients, the median values of all investigated factors went up to normal levels within 2 weeks after RP, whereas postsurgical levels in orthopedic patients remained stable. No correlations to tumor parameters have been observed. We assume that the reduction of these coagulation factors is a principle concept in prostate cancer that needs further investigation. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Normal Hemostatic Profiles and Coagulation Factors in Healthy Free-Living Florida Manatees ( Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Barratclough, Ashley; Floyd, Ruth Francis; Conner, Bobbi; Reep, Roger; Ball, Ray; Stacy, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Hemostatic disorders presumptively play an important role in the pathophysiology of several important disease conditions in the Florida manatee ( Trichechus manatus latirostris). Prior to pursuing such clinical implications, it is essential to establish normal hemostatic profiles in clinically healthy animals. During annual health assessments of free-living manatees organized by the US Geological Survey, blood samples were collected from 12 healthy animals from the Atlantic coast and 28 from the Gulf of Mexico coast of Florida, with body lengths of 210-324 cm. The following analyses were performed on citrated plasma: prothrombin (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and concentrations of fibrinogen, D-dimers, and coagulation factors VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Compared to other mammalian species, manatees had short PT (9.2±1.5 s) and PTT (10.7±0.5 s), fibrinogen was 369±78.7 mg/dL, antithrombin III was 132±11%, and D-dimer was 142±122 ng/mL. Baseline concentrations for the listed coagulation factors were established. When comparing coagulation factors between locations, Atlantic coast manatees had significantly higher factors VIII, IX, and X than did Gulf Coast manatees. This finding may reflect differences in water salinity, diet, or genetics. There were no differences in coagulation factors when among sexes and sizes. These baselines for hemostatic profiles and coagulation factors in healthy free-living manatees lay the foundation for diagnosis and future research of hemostatic disorders and contribute to understanding their role in the pathophysiology of manatees affected by various diseases.

  15. The polyphosphate–factor XII pathway drives coagulation in prostate cancer-associated thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, Katrin F.; Ronquist, Göran; Langer, Florian; Labberton, Linda; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Sauter, Guido; Graefen, Markus; Mackman, Nigel; Stavrou, Evi X.; Ronquist, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of thrombosis. We identify a new procoagulant mechanism that contributes to thromboembolism in prostate cancer and allows for safe anticoagulation therapy development. Prostate cancer-mediated procoagulant activity was reduced in plasma in the absence of factor XII or its substrate of the intrinsic coagulation pathway factor XI. Prostate cancer cells and secreted prostasomes expose long chain polyphosphate on their surface that colocalized with active factor XII and initiated coagulation in a factor XII-dependent manner. Polyphosphate content correlated with the procoagulant activity of prostasomes. Inherited deficiency in factor XI or XII or high-molecular-weight kininogen, but not plasma kallikrein, protected mice from prostasome-induced lethal pulmonary embolism. Targeting polyphosphate or factor XII conferred resistance to prostate cancer-driven thrombosis in mice, without increasing bleeding. Inhibition of factor XII with recombinant 3F7 antibody reduced the increased prostasome-mediated procoagulant activity in patient plasma. The data illustrate a critical role for polyphosphate/factor XII-triggered coagulation in prostate cancer-associated thrombosis with implications for anticoagulation without therapy-associated bleeding in malignancies. PMID:26153520

  16. Immunogenicity and immune tolerance coagulation Factors VIII and IX.

    PubMed

    Rup, B

    2003-01-01

    Some of the major issues related to the development and control of antibodies that occur during treatment of haemophilia with replacement factors (Factor VIII and Factor IX) are reviewed. Information on analytical issues, immunogenicity, and immune tolerance may be applicable to the study of other therapeutic proteins. Conversely, new information obtained from evaluation of other therapeutic protein products may address issues that remain unresolved for Factor VIII and FIX replacement therapy.

  17. [Effects of various adsorbants on coagulation factors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Soulier, J P; Prou-Wartelle, O

    1975-01-01

    Adsorption of clotting factors by various adsorbants is studied (tricalcium phosphate, baryum sulfate or carbonate or citrate, calcium oxalate, aluminium hydroxyde and several silicate such as: kaolin, celite, bentonite, attapulgite, beidellite, asbestos). The main properties of each adsorbant are listed as well as several applications such as: selective adsorption of fibrinogen, separation between fibrinogen and factor VIII, separation of factor II from the other components of the prothrombin complex. Activation of factors XII and XI by the various silicates, as well as the activation of factor V by attapulgite are studied. Finally, the action of such adsorbants on the fibrinolytic system is summarized.

  18. Development of a microplate coagulation assay for Factor V in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2011-06-28

    Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical regulator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation. There is a need of a simple, fast, and inexpensive microplate-based coagulation assay to measure the functional activity of FV in human plasma. The objective of this study was to develop a microplate-based assay that measures FV coagulation activity during clot formation in human plasma, which is currently not available. The FV assay requires a kinetic microplate reader to measure the change in absorbance at 405nm during fibrin formation in human plasma. The FV assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation in human plasma. The FV microplate assay is simple, fast, economical, sensitive to approx 24-80pM, and multiple samples may be analyzed simultaneously. All the required materials are commercially available. Standard curves of time or initial rate of fibrin clot formation vs FV activity in the 1-stage assay (Without activation by thrombin) may be used to measure FV activity in samples of human plasma. The assay was used to demonstrate that in nine patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), the FV 1-stage, 2-stage (With activation by thrombin), and total (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity) activities were decreased, on average, by approximately 54%, 44%, and 42%, respectively, from prolonged clot times when compared to normal pooled human reference plasma (NHP). The results indicate that the FV in the DIC patient plasmas supported both a delayed and slower rate of fibrin clot formation compared with NHP; however, the extent of fibrin clot formation in the DIC patients remained largely unchanged from that observed with NHP. The FV microplate assay may be easily adapted to measure the activity of any coagulation factor using the appropriate factor-deficient plasma and clot initiating reagent. The microplate assay will find use in both research and clinical laboratories to provide measurement

  19. Effect of chitosan and coagulation factors on the wound repair phenotype of bioengineered blood clots.

    PubMed

    Hoemann, Caroline D; Marchand, Catherine; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; El-Gabalawy, Hani; Poubelle, Patrice E

    2017-11-01

    Controlling the blood clot phenotype in a surgically prepared wound is an evolving concept in scaffold-guided tissue engineering. Here, we investigated the effect of added chitosan (80% or 95% Degree of Deacetylation, DDA) or coagulation factors (recombinant human Factor VIIa, Tissue Factor, thrombin) on inflammatory factors released by blood clots. We tested the hypothesis that 80% DDA chitosan specifically enhances leukotriene B 4 (LTB 4 ) production. Human or rabbit whole blood was combined with isotonic chitosan solutions, coagulation factors, or lipopolysaccharide, cultured in vitro at 37°C, and after 4hours the serum was assayed for LTB 4 or inflammatory factors. Only 80% DDA chitosan clots produced around 15-fold more LTB 4 over other clots including 95% DDA chitosan clots. All serum contained high levels of PDGF-BB and CXCL8. Normal clots produced very low type I cytokines compared to lipopolysaccharide clots, with even lower IL-6 and IL-12 and more CCL3/CCL4 produced by chitosan clots. Coagulation factors had no detectable effect on clot phenotype. Conclusion In blood clots from healthy individuals, 80% DDA chitosan has a unique influence of inducing more LTB 4 , a potent neutrophil chemoattractant, with similar production of PDGF-BB and CXCL8, and lower type I cytokines, compared to whole blood clots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Upregulation of the coagulation factor VII gene during glucose deprivation is mediated by activating transcription factor 4.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Katherine R; Mangan, Thomas P; Carew, Josephine A

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive production of blood coagulation proteins by hepatocytes is necessary for hemostasis. Stressful conditions trigger adaptive cellular responses and delay processing of most proteins, potentially affecting plasma levels of proteins secreted exclusively by hepatocytes. We examined the effect of glucose deprivation on expression of coagulation proteins by the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2. Expression of coagulation factor VII, which is required for initiation of blood coagulation, was elevated by glucose deprivation, while expression of other coagulation proteins decreased. Realtime PCR and ELISA demonstrated that the relative percentage expression +/- SD of steady-state F7 mRNA and secreted factor VII antigen were significantly increased (from 100+/-15% to 188+/-27% and 100+/-8.8% to 176.3+/-17.3% respectively, p<0.001) at 24 hr of treatment. The integrated stress response was induced, as indicated by upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 and of additional stress-responsive genes. Small interfering RNAs directed against ATF4 potently reduced basal F7 expression, and prevented F7 upregulation by glucose deprivation. The response of the endogenous F7 gene was replicated in reporter gene assays, which further indicated that ATF4 effects were mediated via interaction with an amino acid response element in the F7 promoter. Our data indicated that glucose deprivation enhanced F7 expression in a mechanism reliant on prior ATF4 upregulation primarily due to increased transcription from the ATF4 gene. Of five coagulation protein genes examined, only F7 was upregulated, suggesting that its functions may be important in a systemic response to glucose deprivation stress.

  1. Upregulation of the Coagulation Factor VII Gene during Glucose Deprivation Is Mediated by Activating Transcription Factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Katherine R.; Mangan, Thomas P.; Carew, Josephine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Constitutive production of blood coagulation proteins by hepatocytes is necessary for hemostasis. Stressful conditions trigger adaptive cellular responses and delay processing of most proteins, potentially affecting plasma levels of proteins secreted exclusively by hepatocytes. We examined the effect of glucose deprivation on expression of coagulation proteins by the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of coagulation factor VII, which is required for initiation of blood coagulation, was elevated by glucose deprivation, while expression of other coagulation proteins decreased. Realtime PCR and ELISA demonstrated that the relative percentage expression +/− SD of steady-state F7 mRNA and secreted factor VII antigen were significantly increased (from 100+/−15% to 188+/−27% and 100+/−8.8% to 176.3+/−17.3% respectively, p<0.001) at 24 hr of treatment. The integrated stress response was induced, as indicated by upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 and of additional stress-responsive genes. Small interfering RNAs directed against ATF4 potently reduced basal F7 expression, and prevented F7 upregulation by glucose deprivation. The response of the endogenous F7 gene was replicated in reporter gene assays, which further indicated that ATF4 effects were mediated via interaction with an amino acid response element in the F7 promoter. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicated that glucose deprivation enhanced F7 expression in a mechanism reliant on prior ATF4 upregulation primarily due to increased transcription from the ATF4 gene. Of five coagulation protein genes examined, only F7 was upregulated, suggesting that its functions may be important in a systemic response to glucose deprivation stress. PMID:22848420

  2. Tissue factor-dependent coagulation activation by heme: A thromboelastometry study.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Gleice Regina; Hounkpe, Bidossessi Wilfried; Fiusa, Maiara Marx Luz; Colella, Marina Pereira; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Traina, Fabiola; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; De Paula, Erich Vinicius

    2017-01-01

    Heme has been characterized as potent trigger of inflammation. In hemostasis, although heme has been shown to both induce and inhibit different compartments of hemostasis, its net effect on the hemostatic balance, and the biological relevance of these effects remain to be determined. Herein we evaluated the effect of heme on hemostasis using a global assay able to generate clinically relevant data in several other complex hemostatic diseases. Citrated whole blood samples from healthy participants were stimulated by heme or vehicle and incubated for 4h at 37°C. Rotational thromboelastometry was immediately performed. The participation of tissue factor in coagulation activation was evaluated using inhibitory antibody. Heme was able of inducing ex vivo coagulation activation in whole blood, affecting predominantly parameters associated with the initial phases of clot formation. This activation effect was at least partially dependent on hematopoietic tissue factor, since the effects of heme were partially abrogated by the inhibition of human tissue factor. In conclusion, using a global hemostasis assay, our study confirmed that heme is able to activate coagulation in whole blood, in a tissue factor-dependent way. These findings could explain the disturbance in hemostatic balance observed in conditions associated with the release of heme such as sickle cell disease.

  3. Rational and timely haemostatic interventions following cardiac surgery - coagulation factor concentrates or blood bank products.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mariann; Fenger-Eriksen, Christian; Wierup, Per; Greisen, Jacob; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Sørensen, Benny

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac surgery may cause a serious coagulopathy leading to increased risk of bleeding and transfusion demands. Blood bank products are commonly first line haemostatic intervention, but has been associated with hazardous side effect. Coagulation factor concentrates may be a more efficient, predictable, and potentially a safer treatment, although prospective clinical trials are needed to further explore these hypotheses. This study investigated the haemostatic potential of ex vivo supplementation of coagulation factor concentrates versus blood bank products on blood samples drawn from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. 30 adults were prospectively enrolled (mean age=63.9, females=27%). Ex vivo haemostatic interventions (monotherapy or combinations) were performed in whole blood taken immediately after surgery and two hours postoperatively. Fresh-frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), and recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) were investigated. The haemostatic effect was evaluated using whole blood thromboelastometry parameters, as well as by thrombin generation. Immediately after surgery the compromised maximum clot firmness was corrected by monotherapy with fibrinogen or platelets or combination therapy with fibrinogen. At two hours postoperatively the coagulation profile was further deranged as illustrated by a prolonged clotting time, a reduced maximum velocity and further diminished maximum clot firmness. The thrombin lagtime was progressively prolonged and both peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential were compromised. No monotherapy effectively corrected all haemostatic abnormalities. The most effective combinations were: fibrinogen+rFVIIa or fibrinogen+PCC. Blood bank products were not as effective in the correction of the coagulopathy. Coagulation factor concentrates appear to provide a more optimal haemostasis profile following cardiac surgery compared to blood bank products. Copyright © 2017

  4. Risk factors for disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Kumiya; Satoh, Hideyuki; Shiromori, Sadaaki; Sugitate, Kei; Arifuku, Hajime; Yoshida, Naruo; Watanabe, Hiroyoshi; Tokita, Shingo; Wakayama, Tomoshige; Tatewaki, Masamitsu; Souma, Ryosuke; Koyama, Kenya; Hirata, Hirokuni; Fukushima, Yasutsugu

    2018-05-31

    The mortality rate from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is higher in patients with lung cancer than in non-lung cancer patients. Moreover, the prevalence of DIC varies among the pathologic types of lung cancer. This study analyzed the relationship between coagulation factors and the pathologic types of lung cancer. Twenty-six patients with progressive, inoperable stage IIB or higher lung cancer (20 men, 6 women; mean age 71 years; 11 Adeno, 10 squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 small cell carcinoma) and five healthy volunteers without respiratory disease (3 men, 2 women; mean age 72 years) were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected at lung cancer diagnosis, before treatment. White blood cell count, platelet count, serum C-reactive protein, fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products, fibrinogen, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and D-dimer levels differed significantly between lung cancer patients and the control group, but not among the pathologic types of lung cancer. Thrombomodulin levels were significantly higher in patients with Adeno and squamous cell carcinoma than in those with small cell carcinoma (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Antithrombin levels were significantly lower in patients with squamous cell carcinoma than in those with Adeno (P < 0.05). Coagulation disorders may develop secondary to chronic inflammation in patients with progressive lung cancer. DIC in lung cancer may be attributed to changes in anticoagulation factors, such as thrombomodulin and antithrombin, but not in other coagulation factors. © 2018 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Studies on a family with combined functional deficiencies of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, G H; Pence, R E; Ratnoff, O D; Adelstein, D J; Furie, B

    1982-01-01

    Two siblings with m ild hemorrhagic symptoms had combined functional deficiencies of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. Prothrombin (0.18-0.20 U/ml) and Stuart factor (Factor X, 0.18-0.20 U/ml) and Stuart factor (Factor X, 0.18-0.20 U/ml) were most severely affected. Antigenic amounts of affected coagulation factors were normal and normal generation of thrombin activity occurred in the patients' plasmas after treatment with nonophysiologic activators that do not require calcium for prothrombin activation. Hepatobilary disease, malabsorptive disorders, and plasma warfarin were not present. Both parents had normal levels of all coagulation factors. The patients' plasmas contained prothrombin that reacted both with antibody directed against des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin and native prothrombin. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis of patients' plasmas and studies of partially purified patient prothrombin suggested the presence of a relatively homogeneous species of dysfunctional prothrombin, distinct from the heterologous species found in the plasma of warfarin-treated persons. These studies are most consistent with a posttranslational defect in hepatic carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent factors. This kindred uniquely possesses an autosomal recessive disorder of vitamin K-dependent factor formation that causes production of an apparently homogeneous species of dysfunctional prothrombin; the functional deficiencies in clotting factors are totally corrected by oral or parenteral administration of vitamin K1. Images PMID:7085873

  6. Sepsis-Induced Coagulation in the Baboon Lung Is Associated with Decreased Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiwang; Ivanciu, Lacramioara; Popescu, Narcis; Peer, Glenn; Hack, Erik; Lupu, Cristina; Taylor, Fletcher B.; Lupu, Florea

    2007-01-01

    Increased tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity in sepsis may be partly due to decreased expression or function of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). To test this hypothesis, baboons were infused with live Escherichia coli and sacrificed after 2, 8, or 24 hours. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed increased leukocyte infiltration and fibrin deposition in the intravascular and interstitial compartments. Large amounts of TF were detected by immunostaining in leukocytes and platelet-rich microthrombi. TF induction was documented by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and coagulation assays. Lung-associated TFPI antigen and mRNA decreased during sepsis, and TFPI activity diminished abruptly at 2 hours. Blocking antibodies against TFPI increased fibrin deposition in septic baboon lungs, suggesting that TF-dependent coagulation might be aggravated by reduced endothelial TFPI. Decreased TFPI activity coincided with the release of tissue plasminogen activator and the peak of plasmin generation, suggesting that TFPI could undergo proteolytic inactivation by plasmin. Enhanced plasmin produced in septic baboons by infusion of blocking antibodies against plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 led to decreased lung-associated TFPI and unforeseen massive fibrin deposition. We conclude that activation of TF-driven coagulation not adequately countered by TFPI may underlie the widespread thrombotic complications of sepsis. PMID:17640967

  7. [Molecular genetic analysis for a pedigree with severe hereditary coagulation factor VII deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiu-lan; Wang, Hong-li; Wang, Xue-feng; Wang, Ming-shan; Fu, Qi-hua; Wu, Wen-man; Hu, Yi-qun; Wang, Zhen-yi

    2003-10-01

    To identify the genetic mutations of a severe inherited coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency pedigree. The diagnosis was validated by coagulant and haemostatic parameters. FVII gene mutations were screened in the propositus and his family members by DNA direct sequencing and confirmed by digestions of the restriction enzymes of the PCR production. Two heterozygous missense mutations were found in the propositus of the pedigree: a G to T transversion at position 9482 in exon 6 and a C to T mutation at position 11348 in exon 8 resulting in the amino acid substitution of Arg152 with Leu and Arg304 with Trp, respectively. A heterozygous single nucleotide deletion (C) at position 11487-11489(CCC) within exon 8 was identified, which predicted the frameshift mutation at position His351 followed by the changes of six corresponding amino acids and appearance of a premature protein caused by stop codon. The heterozygous mutations identified in the proband were derived from his father (Arg152 to Leu) and his mother (Arg304 to Trp mutation) and a heterozygous deletion (C) at position 11487-9(CCC). By tracing the other pedigree members, it was found that his grandmother had a heterozygous mutation of Arg304Trp and a heterozygous polymorphism of Arg353Gln and his grandfather had a heterozygous Arg152Leu mutation. Three heterozygous mutations were found in a pedigree with hereditary coagulation factor VII deficiency. Arg152Leu and deletion C at position 11487-9(CCC) were novel mutations.

  8. Positive Feedback Loops for Factor V and Factor VII Activation Supply Sensitivity to Local Surface Tissue Factor Density During Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Balandina, A.N.; Shibeko, A.M.; Kireev, D.A.; Novikova, A.A.; Shmirev, I.I.; Panteleev, M.A.; Ataullakhanov, F.I.

    2011-01-01

    Blood coagulation is triggered not only by surface tissue factor (TF) density but also by surface TF distribution. We investigated recognition of surface TF distribution patterns during blood coagulation and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. For these investigations, we employed 1), an in vitro reaction-diffusion experimental model of coagulation; and 2), numerical simulations using a mathematical model of coagulation in a three-dimensional space. When TF was uniformly immobilized over the activating surface, the clotting initiation time in normal plasma increased from 4 min to >120 min, with a decrease in TF density from 100 to 0.7 pmol/m2. In contrast, surface-immobilized fibroblasts initiated clotting within 3–7 min, independently of fibroblast quantity and despite a change in average surface TF density from 0.5 to 130 pmol/m2. Experiments using factor V-, VII-, and VIII-deficient plasma and computer simulations demonstrated that different responses to these two TF distributions are caused by two positive feedback loops in the blood coagulation network: activation of the TF–VII complex by factor Xa, and activation of factor V by thrombin. This finding suggests a new role for these reactions: to supply sensitivity to local TF density during blood coagulation. PMID:22004734

  9. Measurement of Factor V Activity in Human Plasma Using a Microplate Coagulation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase 1, 2. Manual FV assays have been described 3, 4, but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported 5-7, but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput 8, 9. Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis 10, platelet aggregation 11, and coagulation Factors 12, but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) 13. The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections 14. DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality above the pre

  10. Development of a microplate coagulation assay for Factor V in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical regulator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation. There is a need of a simple, fast, and inexpensive microplate-based coagulation assay to measure the functional activity of FV in human plasma. The objective of this study was to develop a microplate-based assay that measures FV coagulation activity during clot formation in human plasma, which is currently not available. Methods The FV assay requires a kinetic microplate reader to measure the change in absorbance at 405nm during fibrin formation in human plasma. The FV assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation in human plasma. Results The FV microplate assay is simple, fast, economical, sensitive to approx 24-80pM, and multiple samples may be analyzed simultaneously. All the required materials are commercially available. Standard curves of time or initial rate of fibrin clot formation vs FV activity in the 1-stage assay (Without activation by thrombin) may be used to measure FV activity in samples of human plasma. The assay was used to demonstrate that in nine patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), the FV 1-stage, 2-stage (With activation by thrombin), and total (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity) activities were decreased, on average, by approximately 54%, 44%, and 42%, respectively, from prolonged clot times when compared to normal pooled human reference plasma (NHP). The results indicate that the FV in the DIC patient plasmas supported both a delayed and slower rate of fibrin clot formation compared with NHP; however, the extent of fibrin clot formation in the DIC patients remained largely unchanged from that observed with NHP. Conclusions The FV microplate assay may be easily adapted to measure the activity of any coagulation factor using the appropriate factor-deficient plasma and clot initiating reagent. The microplate assay will find use in both research and

  11. Measurement of factor v activity in human plasma using a microplate coagulation assay.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Derek; Levit, Irina; Samis, John A

    2012-09-09

    In response to injury, blood coagulation is activated and results in generation of the clotting protease, thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin which forms an insoluble clot that stops hemorrhage. Factor V (FV) in its activated form, FVa, is a critical cofactor for the protease FXa and accelerator of thrombin generation during fibrin clot formation as part of prothrombinase (1, 2). Manual FV assays have been described (3, 4), but they are time consuming and subjective. Automated FV assays have been reported (5-7), but the analyzer and reagents are expensive and generally provide only the clot time, not the rate and extent of fibrin formation. The microplate platform is preferred for measuring enzyme-catalyzed events because of convenience, time, cost, small volume, continuous monitoring, and high-throughput (8, 9). Microplate assays have been reported for clot lysis (10), platelet aggregation (11), and coagulation Factors (12), but not for FV activity in human plasma. The goal of the method was to develop a microplate assay that measures FV activity during fibrin formation in human plasma. This novel microplate method outlines a simple, inexpensive, and rapid assay of FV activity in human plasma. The assay utilizes a kinetic microplate reader to monitor the absorbance change at 405 nm during fibrin formation in human plasma (Figure 1) (13). The assay accurately measures the time, initial rate, and extent of fibrin clot formation. It requires only μl quantities of plasma, is complete in 6 min, has high-throughput, is sensitive to 24-80 pM FV, and measures the amount of unintentionally activated (1-stage activity) and thrombin-activated FV (2-stage activity) to obtain a complete assessment of its total functional activity (2-stage activity - 1-stage activity). Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired coagulopathy that most often develops from pre-existing infections (14). DIC is associated with a poor prognosis and increases mortality

  12. Treatment tailoring for factor V deficient patients and perioperative management using global hemostatic coagulation assays.

    PubMed

    Levy-Mendelovich, Sarina; Barg, Assaf Arie; Rosenberg, Nurit; Avishai, Einat; Luboshitz, Jacob; Misgav, Mudi; Kenet, Gili; Livnat, Tami

    2018-07-01

    Congenital factor V deficiency (FVD) is a rare bleeding disorder with an estimated incidence of 1 in 1000,000 in the general population. Since the common coagulation tests do not correlate with the bleeding tendency there is an unmet need to predict FVD patients' bleeding hazard prior to surgical interventions. To optimize treatment prior to surgical interventions, using global coagulation assays, thrombin generation (TG) and rotating thromboelastogram (ROTEM). Our cohort included 5 patients with FVD, 4 severe and one mild. Two of them underwent TG and ROTEM prior to surgical interventions, including ex vivo spiking assays using bypass agents and platelets spiking. All five patients exhibited prolonged PT and PTT, non-dependent on their bleeding tendency. Patient 1, who demonstrated severe bleeding phenotype, underwent surgery treated by combination of APCC (FEIBA) and platelet transfusion. Therapy was guided by global tests (TG as well as ROTEM) results. During the pre and post-operative period neither excessive bleeding nor any thrombosis was noted. In contrast, TG and ROTEM analysis of patient 4 has lead us to perform the surgery without any blood products' support. Indeed, the patient did not encounter any bleeding. Global coagulation assays may be useful ancillary tools guiding treatment decisions in FVD patients undergoing surgical procedures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuro-Coagulopathy: Blood Coagulation Factors in Central Nervous System Diseases.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Ciro; Virtuoso, Assunta; Maggio, Nicola; Papa, Michele

    2017-10-12

    Blood coagulation factors and other proteins, with modulatory effects or modulated by the coagulation cascade have been reported to affect the pathophysiology of the central nervous system (CNS). The protease-activated receptors (PARs) pathway can be considered the central hub of this regulatory network, mainly through thrombin or activated protein C (aPC). These proteins, in fact, showed peculiar properties, being able to interfere with synaptic homeostasis other than coagulation itself. These specific functions modulate neuronal networks, acting both on resident (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) as well as circulating immune system cells and the extracellular matrix. The pleiotropy of these effects is produced through different receptors, expressed in various cell types, in a dose- and time-dependent pattern. We reviewed how these pathways may be involved in neurodegenerative diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases), multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke and post-ischemic epilepsy, CNS cancer, addiction, and mental health. These data open up a new path for the potential therapeutic use of the agonist/antagonist of these proteins in the management of several central nervous system diseases.

  14. Mannose-binding lectin and its associated proteases (MASPs) mediate coagulation and its deficiency is a risk factor in developing complications from infection, including disseminated intravascular coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazue; Chang, Wei-Chuan; Takahashi, Minoru; Pavlov, Vasile; Ishida, Yumi; La Bonte, Laura; Shi, Lei; Fujita, Teizo; Stahl, Gregory L.; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The first line of host defense is the innate immune system that includes coagulation factors and pattern recognition molecules, one of which is mannose-binding lectin (MBL). Previous studies have demonstrated that MBL deficiency increases susceptibility to infection. Several mechanisms are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, including reduced opsonophagocytic killing and reduced lectin complement pathway activation. In this study, we demonstrate that MBL and MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-1/3 together mediate coagulation factor-like activities, including thrombin-like activity. MBL and/or MASP-1/3 deficient hosts demonstrate in vivo evidence that MBL and MASP-1/3 are involved with hemostasis following injury. Staphylococcus aureus infected MBL null mice developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which was associated with elevated blood IL-6 levels (but not TNF-α and multi-organ inflammatory responses). Infected MBL null mice also develop liver injury. These findings suggest that MBL deficiency may manifest into DIC and organ failure during infectious diseases. PMID:20399528

  15. Coagulation Profile as a Risk Factor for 30-day Morbidity Following Cervical Laminectomy and Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bronheim, Rachel S; Oermann, Eric K; Cho, Samuel K; Caridi, John M

    2018-02-15

    Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of abnormal coagulation profile to predict adverse events following posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion (PCLF). PCLF is an increasingly common procedure used to treat a variety of traumatic and degenerative spinal conditions. Abnormal coagulation profile is associated with postoperative adverse events, including blood transfusion. There is a paucity of literature that specifically addresses the relationship between coagulation profile and complications following PCLF. ACS-NSQIP was utilized to identify patients undergoing PCLF between 2006 and 2013. A total of 3546 patients met inclusion criteria. Multivariate analysis was utilized to identify associations between abnormal coagulation profile and postoperative complications. Membership in the low-platelet cohort was an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction (Odds Ratio (OR) = 5.4 [1.0, 29.1], P = 0.049) and bleeding transfusion (OR = 2.0 [1.2, 3.4], P = 0.011). Membership in the high international normalized ratio group was an independent risk factor for pneumonia (OR = 6.3 [2.5, 16.1], P < 0.001), ventilation >48 hours (OR = 6.5 [2.3, 18.4], P < 0.001), organ space surgical site infection (OR = 11.1 [2.1, 57.3], P = 0.004), urinary tract infection (OR = 3.0 [1.2, 8.0], P = 0.024), bleeding transfusion (OR = 6.0 [3.4, 10.7], P < 0.001), sepsis (OR = 5.1 [1.6, 16.4], P = 0.006), and septic shock (OR = 6.8 [1.7, 27.4], P = 0.007). Membership in the bleeding disorders cohort was an independent predictor of unplanned intubation (OR = 3.2 [1.1, 9.5], P = 0.041), pneumonia (OR = 2.9 [1.2, 7.2], P = 0.023), ventilation >48 hours (OR = 4.8 [1.9, 12.4], P = 0.001), cerebrovascular accident/stroke with neurological deficit (OR = 24.8 [2.9, 210.6], P = 0.003), bleeding transfusion (OR = 2.1 [1

  16. Evaluation of Consequences of Dust Positioned in Southwest of Iran on Coagulant Factors

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Keivan; Sarizade, Gholamreza; Khodadi, Mohammad; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Various regions in Iran, especially the Khuzestan Province, have been covered by dust and dirt during the past two years due to environmental changes in the Middle East. We sought to evaluate the effect of these pollutants on the coagulant factors of people residing in Abadan and Khoramshahr, two major cities of Khuzestan Province. Methods: One hundred twenty-nine healthy individuals were enrolled into this study, and their prothrombin time as well as fibrinogen, platelet, and Factor VIII levels were measured before and after climate changes. Results: After climate changes, the mean prothrombin time decreased, while the fibrinogen, platelet, and Factor VIII levels rose. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that the pollutants deployed in the Middle East can affect prothrombin time as well as fibrinogen, platelet, and Factor VII levels considerably and increase coagulant state. The pollutants can, consequently, increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. It seems that cooperation at government levels between Iran and its neighboring countries is required to reverse desertification and avoid inaccurate usage of subterranean water resources so as to lessen air pollution. PMID:23825886

  17. Blood coagulation factor XII drives adaptive immunity during neuroinflammation via CD87-mediated modulation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Göbel, Kerstin; Pankratz, Susann; Asaridou, Chloi-Magdalini; Herrmann, Alexander M.; Bittner, Stefan; Merker, Monika; Ruck, Tobias; Glumm, Sarah; Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Krug, Thorsten F.; Breuer, Johanna; Herold, Martin; Gross, Catharina C.; Beckmann, Denise; Korb-Pap, Adelheid; Schuhmann, Michael K.; Kuerten, Stefanie; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Ruppert, Clemens; Nolte, Marc W.; Panousis, Con; Klotz, Luisa; Kehrel, Beate; Korn, Thomas; Langer, Harald F.; Pap, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses represent the underlying cause of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent evidence implicated the crosstalk between coagulation and immunity in CNS autoimmunity. Here we identify coagulation factor XII (FXII), the initiator of the intrinsic coagulation cascade and the kallikrein–kinin system, as a specific immune cell modulator. High levels of FXII activity are present in the plasma of MS patients during relapse. Deficiency or pharmacologic blockade of FXII renders mice less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a model of MS) and is accompanied by reduced numbers of interleukin-17A-producing T cells. Immune activation by FXII is mediated by dendritic cells in a CD87-dependent manner and involves alterations in intracellular cyclic AMP formation. Our study demonstrates that a member of the plasmatic coagulation cascade is a key mediator of autoimmunity. FXII inhibition may provide a strategy to combat MS and other immune-related disorders. PMID:27188843

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant coagulation factor VIII-SingleChain in patients with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Roberts, J; Tortorici, M; Veldman, A; St Ledger, K; Feussner, A; Sidhu, J

    2017-06-01

    Essentials rVIII-SingleChain is a unique recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) molecule. A population pharmacokinetic model was based on FVIII activity of severe hemophilia A patients. The model was used to simulate factor VIII activity-time profiles for various dosing scenarios. The model supports prolonged dosing of rVIII-SingleChain with intervals of up to twice per week. Background Single-chain recombinant coagulation factor VIII (rVIII-SingleChain) is a unique recombinant coagulation factor VIII molecule. Objectives To: (i) characterize the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of rVIII-SingleChain in patients with severe hemophilia A; (ii) identify correlates of variability in rVIII-SingleChain PK; and (iii) simulate various dosing scenarios of rVIII-SingleChain. Patients/Methods A population PK model was developed, based on FVIII activity levels of 130 patients with severe hemophilia A (n = 91 for ≥ 12-65 years; n = 39 for < 12 years) who had participated in a single-dose PK investigation with rVIII-SingleChain 50 IU kg -1 . PK sampling was performed for up to 96 h. Results A two-compartment population PK model with first-order elimination adequately described FVIII activity. Body weight and predose level of von Willebrand factor were significant covariates on clearance, and body weight was a significant covariate on the central distribution volume. Simulations using the model with various dosing scenarios estimated that > 85% and > 93% of patients were predicted to maintain FVIII activity level above 1 IU dL -1 , at all times with three-times-weekly dosing (given on days 0, 2, and 4.5) at the lowest (20 IU kg -1 ) and highest (50 IU kg -1 ) doses, respectively. For twice weekly dosing (days 0 and 3.5) of 50 IU kg -1 rVIII-SingleChain, 62-80% of patients across all ages were predicted to maintain a FVIII activity level above 1 IU dL -1 at day 7. Conclusions The population PK model adequately characterized rVIII-SingleChain PK, and the model

  19. The first EGF domain of coagulation factor IX attenuates cell adhesion and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kitano, Hisataka; Mamiya, Atsushi; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    Coagulation factor IX (FIX) is an essential plasma protein for blood coagulation. The first epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif of FIX (EGF-F9) has been reported to attenuate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of this motif on cell adhesion and apoptosis. Treatment with a recombinant EGF-F9 attenuated cell adhesion to the ECM within 10 min. De-adhesion assays with native FIX recombinant FIX deletion mutant proteins suggested that the de-adhesion activity of EGF-F9 requires the same process of FIX activation as that which occurs for coagulation activity. The recombinant EGF-F9 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release into the medium and increased the number of cells stained with annexin V and activated caspase-3, by 8.8- and 2.7-fold respectively, indicating that EGF-F9 induced apoptosis. Activated caspase-3 increased very rapidly after only 5 min of administration of recombinant EGF-F9. Treatment with EGF-F9 increased the level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not that of phosphorylated MAPK 44/42 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibitors of caspase-3 suppressed the release of LDH. Caspase-3 inhibitors also suppressed the attenuation of cell adhesion and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by EGF-F9. Our data indicated that EGF-F9 activated signals for apoptosis and induced de-adhesion in a caspase-3 dependent manner. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Development and Implementation of a Coagulation Factor Testing Method Utilizing Autoverification in a High-volume Clinical Reference Laboratory Environment

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Paul W.; Gallea, Benoit; Valcour, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Background: Testing coagulation factor activities requires that multiple dilutions be assayed and analyzed to produce a single result. The slope of the line created by plotting measured factor concentration against sample dilution is evaluated to discern the presence of inhibitors giving rise to nonparallelism. Moreover, samples producing results on initial dilution falling outside the analytic measurement range of the assay must be tested at additional dilutions to produce reportable results. Methods: The complexity of this process has motivated a large clinical reference laboratory to develop advanced computer algorithms with automated reflex testing rules to complete coagulation factor analysis. A method was developed for autoverification of coagulation factor activity using expert rules developed with on an off the shelf commercially available data manager system integrated into an automated coagulation platform. Results: Here, we present an approach allowing for the autoverification and reporting of factor activity results with greatly diminished technologist effort. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind providing a detailed procedure for implementation of autoverification expert rules as applied to coagulation factor activity testing. Advantages of this system include ease of training for new operators, minimization of technologist time spent, reduction of staff fatigue, minimization of unnecessary reflex tests, optimization of turnaround time, and assurance of the consistency of the testing and reporting process. PMID:28706751

  1. Development and Implementation of a Coagulation Factor Testing Method Utilizing Autoverification in a High-volume Clinical Reference Laboratory Environment.

    PubMed

    Riley, Paul W; Gallea, Benoit; Valcour, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Testing coagulation factor activities requires that multiple dilutions be assayed and analyzed to produce a single result. The slope of the line created by plotting measured factor concentration against sample dilution is evaluated to discern the presence of inhibitors giving rise to nonparallelism. Moreover, samples producing results on initial dilution falling outside the analytic measurement range of the assay must be tested at additional dilutions to produce reportable results. The complexity of this process has motivated a large clinical reference laboratory to develop advanced computer algorithms with automated reflex testing rules to complete coagulation factor analysis. A method was developed for autoverification of coagulation factor activity using expert rules developed with on an off the shelf commercially available data manager system integrated into an automated coagulation platform. Here, we present an approach allowing for the autoverification and reporting of factor activity results with greatly diminished technologist effort. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind providing a detailed procedure for implementation of autoverification expert rules as applied to coagulation factor activity testing. Advantages of this system include ease of training for new operators, minimization of technologist time spent, reduction of staff fatigue, minimization of unnecessary reflex tests, optimization of turnaround time, and assurance of the consistency of the testing and reporting process.

  2. Absence of in vitro Procoagulant Activity in Immunoglobulin Preparations due to Activated Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, Adriana E.; Bernardi, María E.; Guglielmone, Hugo A.; Vitali, María S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Immunoglobulin (IG) products, including intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) immunoglobulins are considered safe and effective for medical therapy; however, a sudden and unexpected increase in thromboembolic events (TE) after administration of certain batches of IVIG products has been attributed to the presence of activated coagulation factors, mainly factor XIa. Our aims were to examine the presence of enduring procoagulant activity during the manufacturing process of IGs, with special focus on monitoring factor XIa, and to evaluate the presence of in vitro procoagulant activity attributed to coagulation factors in different lots of IVIG and SCIG. Methods Samples of different steps of IG purification, 19 lots of IVIG and 9 of SCIG were analyzed and compared with 1 commercial preparation of IVIG and 2 of SCIG, respectively. Factors II, VII, IX, XI and XIa and non-activated partial thromboplastin time (NAPTT) were assayed. Results The levels of factors II, VII, IX, X and XI were non-quantifiable once fraction II had been re-dissolved and in all analyzed lots of IVIG and SCIG. The level of factor XIa at that point was under the detection limits of the assay, and NAPTT yielded values greater than the control during the purification process. In SCIG, we detected higher concentrations of factor XIa in the commercial products, which reached values up to 5 times higher than the average amounts found in the 9 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Factor XIa in commercial IVIG reached levels slightly higher than those of the 19 batches produced by UNC-Hemoderivados. Conclusion IVIG and SCIG manufactured by UNC-Hemoderivados showed a lack of thrombogenic potential, as demonstrated not only by the laboratory data obtained in this study but also by the absence of any reports of TE registered by the post marketing pharmacovigilance department. PMID:26733772

  3. Studies of Factors V and VIII:C in an animal model of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Giles, A R; Nesheim, M E; Mann, K G

    1984-01-01

    An experimental animal model of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) induced by the co-infusion of coagulant-active phospholipid and activated Factor X (Factor Xa) is described. The infusion of Factor Xa at a dose of 6.6 X 10(-12) mol/kg with phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PCPS) lipid vesicles at a dose of 4.0 X 10(-8) mol/kg was associated with significant falls in the levels of fibrinogen and Factors V and VIII, and a bleeding diathesis developed. Assays of Factors V and VIII were performed by a one-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thrombin time system, respectively. In additional experiments, the effect of the same dose combination of Factor Xa/PCPS on Factor V kinetics was studied by preinfusing 125I-labeled Factor V. After Factor Xa/PCPS infusion, Factors VIII and V were reduced at 2 min by 90 and 50% of the preinfusion levels, respectively, and at 1 h by 80 and 75%, respectively. During the same period, there was little change in the total circulating radioactivity. Autoradiography indicated small but detectable levels of circulating proteolytic products of Factor V that comigrated with peptides obtained by the incubation of Factor V with Factor Xa and activated protein C. The majority of radioactivity remained associated with the intact single-chain precursor Factor V. These observations suggested maintenance of the precursor pool after the onset of DIC. This was confirmed by performing two-stage assays of Factors V and VIII, whereby each was completely converted to the active cofactor, i.e., Va and VIII:Ca, by preincubation of the test sample with thrombin before assaying in a one-stage system as before. The Factor V levels assayed by the two-stage procedure did not change appreciably over 1 h. The Factor VIII levels fell but corrected within 1 h at a time when the level measured by a one-stage assay remained depressed. These results indicate that in the dog, infusion of Factor Xa/PCPS induces changes characteristic of DIC, and

  4. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of coagulation factor VII gene in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaolin; Xu, Baohong; Xiao, Tiaoyi; Su, Jianming; Zhong, Lei

    2013-08-01

    Coagulation factor VII has been studied in several species but, to date, not in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), a commercially important freshwater fish found in China. In this study, the full-length cDNA of grass carp coagulation factor VII (GcCFVII) was cloned using a RACE-Ready cDNA Kit, grass carp were challenged with a hemorrhagic virus, and temporal expression profiles of GcCFVII in the thymus, gills, liver, spleen, and head kidney were examined at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 96 h, and 138 h using fluorescence quantitative PCR. The results showed the 1480 bp GcCFVII to contain three conservative motifs: Gla, EGF-CA, and Tryp-SPc, similar to other species. Phylogenetic analysis showed the evolution of GcCFVII gene to be consistent with the evolution of the species. After viral challenge, GcCFVII expression in five tissues of grass carp showed different patterns of fluctuation. These results provide a solid basis for further investigation of GcCFVII and its relationship with grass carp hemorrhage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiotherapy, rehabilitation and sports in countries with limited replacement coagulation factor supply.

    PubMed

    Buzzard, B M

    2007-09-01

    It is well documented that physiotherapy and rehabilitation benefit people with haemophilia by strengthening the key muscle groups and protecting joints from the adverse effects of repeated haemorrhages. Rehabilitation, in conjunction with the availability of replacement coagulation factor products, has revolutionized approaches to the management of patients with haemophilia in developed countries and has led to a substantial decrease in both the morbidity and mortality rates among the haemophilic population. Modern treatment approaches have also enabled persons with haemophilia to participate in sporting activities along with their peers; however, these improvements in care have not been achieved in developing nations, where health-care resources and facilities are scarce and the supply of coagulation factor products is limited. This article attempts to address the following questions about the management of haemophilic patients in developing countries: Can physiotherapy, rehabilitation and sports prevent disabilities and preserve independence? Is participation in sports activities possible in developing countries? Do countries differ with regard to guidelines for participation in sports? Should we be encouraging participation in sports or allowing patients with haemophilia to do as they choose?

  6. Anomalous coagulation factors in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy with central retinal vein occlusion: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Min Ho; Seong, Mincheol; Cho, Heeyoon; Shin, Yong Un

    2018-04-01

    Non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is characterized by sudden, painless visual loss and optic disc edema. NAION occurs mainly in the presence of cardiovascular disease and hypercoagulability, mainly in patients over 50 years of age. We experienced a case of NAION associated with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) in a young man with no underlying disease. A 46-year-old man was referred to our clinic following a sudden loss of vision in his right eye. The patient exhibited no underlying disease and reported no ongoing medication. Significant visual loss and visual disturbance of the right eye were observed. The pupil of the right eye was enlarged and an afferent pupillary defect was observed. On fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage was observed in the peripheral retina; macular edema was observed in optical coherence tomography analysis. However, optic disc edema was not evident. No abnormal findings were found in routine blood tests for hypercoagulability. After 3 days of steroid intravenous injection, macular edema disappeared and visual acuity was improved, but optic disc edema began to appear. One week later, optic disc edema was evident and visual acuity was significantly reduced; thus, the patient was diagnosed with NAION. In fluorescein angiography, peripheral retinal ischemia was observed, suggesting that CRVO was complicated. Blood tests, including analysis of coagulation factors, were performed again, showing that coagulation factors IX and XI were increased. Anomalous coagulation factors in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy with central retinal vein occlusion. Systemic steroids were administered. One month later, optic disc edema and retinal hemorrhage gradually diminished and eventually disappeared; however, visual acuity did not recover. In young patients without underlying disease, cases of NAION require careful screening for coagulation disorders. Even if there is no abnormality in the test for routine

  7. [Role and clinical significance of coagulation and inflammatory factors in moderate and severe ovarian endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Ding, S J; Zhu, T H; Li, T T; Huang, X F; Zhang, X M

    2018-03-25

    Objective: To determine the levels of coagulation and inflammatory factors in women with moderate and severe ovarian endometriosis so as to investigate the possible role of coagulation and inflammatory factors in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Methods: From June 2015 and June 2017, clinical data of 366 patients with pathologically diagnosed moderate and severe ovarian endometriosis (case group) and 244 patients with pathologically diagnosed benign ovarian cysts (control group) in Women's Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine were retrospectively analyzed. The levels of coagulation indicators, inflammatory factors and serum tumor markers were measured. Then, the values of these indicators in diagnosis of endometriosis were analyzed. Results: (1) The levels of plasma prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT) in patients with ovarian endometriosis [median: 12.8 s (range: 12.4-13.2 s) and 15.5 s (range: 15.1-15.9 s), respectively] were significantly shorter than those with benign ovarian cysts [median: 13.0 s (range: 12.5-13.4 s) and 15.7 s (range: 15.3-16.1 s), respectively; all P <0.01]. The levels of plasma fibrinogen (FIB) and D-dimer [D-D; median: 3.1 g/L (range: 2.8-3.5 g/L) and 0.9 mg/L (range: 0.6-2.1 mg/L) , respectively] in patients with ovarian endometriosis were significantly higher than those with benign ovarian cysts [median: 2.8 g/L (range: 2.6-3.2 g/L) and 0.6 mg/L (range: 0.4-1.2 mg/L), respectively; P =0.000]. Moreover, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio [PLR; median: 2.3 (range: 1.8-3.1) and 144 (range: 113-179), respectively] in patients with ovarian endometriosis were significantly higher than those with benign ovarian cysts [median: 2.1 (range: 1.6-2.8) and 128 (range: 104-165), respectively; P <0.01]. Furthermore, in patients with ovarian endometriosis, the levels of PT were significantly shorter in stage Ⅳ endometriosis than that in stage Ⅲ endometriosis ( P <0

  8. Coagulation Profile as a Risk Factor for 30-Day Morbidity and Mortality Following Posterior Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bronheim, Rachel S; Oermann, Eric K; Cho, Samuel K; Caridi, John M

    2017-06-15

    A retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to identify associations between abnormal coagulation profile and postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion (PLF). The literature suggests that abnormal coagulation profile is associated with postoperative complications, notably the need for blood transfusion. However, there is little research that directly addresses the influence of coagulation profile on postoperative complications following PLF. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (ACS-NSQIP) was utilized to identify patients undergoing PLF between 2006 and 2013. Nine thousand two hundred ninety-five patients met inclusion criteria. Multivariate analysis was utilized to identify associations between abnormal coagulation profile and postoperative complications. Low platelet count was an independent risk factor for organ space surgical site infections (SSIs) [odds ratio (OR) = 6.0, P < 0.001], ventilation >48 hours (OR = 4.5, P = 0.002), Acute renal failure (OR = 5.8, P = 0.007), transfusion (OR = 1.6, P < 0.001), sepsis (OR = 2.2, P = 0.037), reoperation (OR = 2.5, P = 0.001), and death (OR = 3.7, P = 0.049). High partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was an independent risk factor for ventilation >48 hours (OR = 5.6, P = 0.002), cerebrovascular accident (CVA)/stroke with neurological deficit (OR = 5.1, P = 0.011), cardiac arrest (OR = 5.4, P = 0.030), transfusion (OR = 1.5, P = 0.020), and death (OR = 4.5, P = 0.050). High International Normalized Ration (INR) was an independent risk factor for pneumonia (OR = 8.7, P = 0.001), pulmonary embolism (OR = 5.6, P = 0.021), deep venous thrombosis/Thrombophlebitis (OR = 4.8, P = 0.011), septic shock (OR = 8.4, P = 0.048), and death (OR = 9.8, P = 0.034). Bleeding disorder was an

  9. Coagulation factor Xa drives tumor cells into apoptosis through BH3-only protein Bim up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borensztajn, Keren S.; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.

    2007-07-15

    Coagulation Factor (F)Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role during blood coagulation by converting prothrombin into active thrombin. Recently, however, it emerged that besides this role in coagulation, FXa induces intracellular signaling leading to different cellular effects. Here, we show that coagulation factor (F)Xa drives tumor cells of epithelial origin, but not endothelial cells or monocytes, into apoptosis, whereas it even enhances fibroblast survival. FXa signals through the protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to activate extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38. This activation is associated with phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, and in tumor cells withmore » up-regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim, leading to caspase-3 cleavage, the main hallmark of apoptosis. Transfection of tumor cells with dominant negative forms of CREB or siRNA for either PAR-1, Bim, ERK1 and/or p38 inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of FXa. In fibroblasts, FXa-induced PAR-1 activation leads to down-regulation of Bim and pre-treatment with PAR-1 or Bim siRNA abolishes proliferation. We thus provide evidence that beyond its role in blood coagulation, FXa plays a key role in cellular processes in which Bim is the central player in determining cell survival.« less

  10. Retinal venous thrombosis in a young patient with coagulation factor XII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Borrego-Sanz, L; Santos-Bueso, E; Sáenz-Francés, F; Martínez-de-la-Casa, J M; García-Feijoo, J; Gegúndez-Fernández, J A; García-Sánchez, J

    2014-08-01

    A 35-year-old woman, with no relevant medical history, was referred for sudden vision loss in the left eye. Ophthalmological examination showed best corrected visual acuity of 1.0 in the right eye and 0.3 in left eye, with normal anterior pole and intraocular pressure. Fundus examination of the left eye revealed a venous thrombosis in the superior temporal branch, with dilated and tortuous retinal veins. The patient was referred to the hematology unit for thrombophilia study, and was diagnosed with a coagulation XII or Hageman factor deficiency. The development of retinal vessel occlusions, in patients under 50 years of age, is frequently associated with thrombophilia or hypercoagulability disorders. Factor XII deficiency is a rare condition, and its presence could contribute to a higher risk of thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. An Easy Method to Eliminate the Effect of Lupus Anticoagulants in the Coagulation Factor Assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Yin, Shiyu

    2016-07-01

    To build and evaluate intrinsic coagulation factor assays which can eliminate the effect of lupus anticoagulants (LAC). Commercial silica clotting time confirmatory (SCT-C) reagent containing sufficient synthetic phospholipid and routine activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagent were each used for one-stage detection of FVIII, FIX, and FXI activities, in samples with or without LAC, and the results were compared. For samples without LAC, consistent results of FVIII, FIX, and FXI using both SCT-C reagent and APTT reagent were obtained. For samples with LAC, the assays with SCT-C reagent not only could eliminate the effect of strong lupus anticoagulants but also needed fewer dilutions than that with routine APTT reagent. The intrinsic factor detections by SCT-C reagent are credible and convenient to be used for samples with LAC.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes induce Tissue Factor expression in endothelial cells and support the assembly of multimolecular coagulation complexes

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo MB; Seydel, Karl B; Monteiro, Robson Q; Whitten, Richard O; Erexson, Cindy R; Noronha, Almério LL; Ostera, Graciela R.; Kamiza, Steve B; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Ward, Jerrold M; Taylor, Terrie E

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria infects 300–500 million people every year causing 1–2 million deaths annually. Evidence of a coagulation disorder, activation of endothelial cells (EC) and increase in inflammatory cytokines are often present in malaria. Objectives We have asked whether parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) interaction with EC induces Tissue Factor expression in vitro and in vivo. The potential of phosphatidylserine-containing pRBC to support the assembly of blood coagulation complexes was also investigated. Results We demonstrate that mature forms of pRBC induce functional expression of tissue factor (TF) by endothelial cells (EC) in vitro with productive assembly of the extrinsic Xnase complex and initiation of the coagulation cascade. Late stage pRBC also support the prothrombinase and intrinsic Xnase complex formation in vitro, and may function as activated platelets in the amplification phase of the blood coagulation. Notably, postmortem brain sections obtained from P. falciparum-infected children who died from Cerebral Malaria and other causes display a consistent staining for TF in the EC. Conclusions These findings place TF expression by endothelium and the amplification of the coagulation cascade by pRBC and/or activated platelets as potentially critical steps in the pathogenesis of malaria. Furthermore, it may allow investigators to test other therapeutic alternatives targeting TF or modulators of EC function in the treatment of malaria and/or its complications. PMID:17002660

  13. [A case of pancreatic and duodenal fistula after total gastrectomy successfully treated with coagulation factor XIII].

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hitoe; Kojima, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Hirokazu; Nakagawa, Koji; Fumura, Masao; Kikuchi, Norio

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic fistula( PF) is a challenging postoperative complication. We report a case of PF following gastrectomy successfully treated using intravenous coagulation factor XIII( FXIII).A 78-year-old man with early gastric cancer underwent total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. PF developed postoperatively, following which, leakage from the duodenal stump was observed. Percutaneous drainage and re-operative surgery were performed. A somatostatin analogue, antibiotic drugs, and gabexate mesilate were administrated along with nutritional support. The pancreatic and duodenal fistula had been producing duodenal juice for over 30 days since the re-operative surgery. As suspected, reduced FXIII activity was confirmed in the patient. After administering FXIII for 5 days, the amount of duodenal juice from the fistula markedly reduced, and the fistula closed immediately afterwards. The results of our study suggest that administration of FXIII could be a reasonable and effective treatment for patients with pancreatic or/and enterocutaneous fistula who are resistant to standard treatments.

  14. EFFECT OF THE TREATMENT WITH P-32 ON BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS IN POLYCYTHEMIA VERA (in Italian)

    SciTech Connect

    Austoni, M.; Masetto, I.; Butto, M.

    1961-01-01

    Blood coagulation factors were investigated in 14 patients with polycythemia vera, before and after P/sup 32/ treatment. In connection with the improvement of clinical signs of thrombosis or hemorrhage and with the red cell count decrease, significant changes were observed, especially in the platelet sector. A general normalization of the platelet function occurred with a decrease from 420000 before to 186200/cmm after the therapy. This was evident with the Heparin tolerance test in vitro: the mean values, which were 6'39"/3 heparin Units/ml, 8'57"/7 heparin U/ml, and 12'31"/10 heparin U/ml before treatment, passed to 7'36", 11'10", and 16'08", in connection withmore » the improvement of the plasmatic thrombogenic diathesis. (P.C.H.)« less

  15. Targeted inactivation of the mouse locus encoding coagulation factor XIII-A: hemostatic abnormalities in mutant mice and characterization of the coagulation deficit.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Peter; Metzner, Hubert J; Zettlmeissl, Gerd; Li, Meng; Smith, Austin G; Lathe, Richard; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2002-12-01

    Blood coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) promotes cross-linking of fibrin during blood coagulation; impaired clot stabilization in human genetic deficiency is associated with marked pathologies of major clinical impact, including bleeding symptoms and deficient wound healing. To investigate the role of FXIII we employed homologous recombination to generate a targeted deletion of the inferred exon 7 of the FXIII-A gene. FXIII transglutaminase activity in plasma was reduced to about 50% in mice heterozygous for the mutant allele, and was abolished in homozygous null mice. Plasma fibrin gamma-dimerization was also indetectable in the homozygous deficient animals, confirming the absence of activatable FXIII. Homozygous mutant mice were fertile, although reproduction was impaired. Bleeding episodes, hematothorax, hematoperitoneum and subcutaneous hemorrhage in mutant mice were associated with reduced survival. Arrest of tail-tip bleeding in FXIII-A deficient mice was markedly and significantly delayed; replacement of mutant mice with human plasma FXIII (Fibrogammin P) restored bleeding time to within the normal range. Thrombelastography (TEG) experiments demonstrated impaired clot stabilization in FXIII-A mutant mice, replacement with human FXIII led to dose-dependent TEG normalization. The mutant mice thus reiterate some key features of the human genetic disorder: they will be valuable in assessing the role of FXIII in other associated pathologies and the development of new therapies.

  16. Multiplexed targeted proteomic assay to assess coagulation factor concentrations and thrombosis-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Vlijmen, Bart J.; Yang, Juncong; Percy, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The plasma levels of pro- and anticoagulant proteins are important markers for venous thrombosis (VT) risk and can be affected by both genetic and acquired factors, including cancer. Generally, these markers are measured using activity- or antibody-based assays. Targeted proteomics with stable-isotope–labeled internal standards has proven adept at the rapid, multiplex, and precise quantification of proteins in complex biological samples such as plasma. We used liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to evaluate the concentrations of 31 coagulation- and fibrinolysis-related proteins in plasma from 25 healthy controls, 25 patients with VT, and 25 patients with VT who were also diagnosed with cancer. The concentration level of 1 to 3 proteotypic peptides per protein was determined, and all samples were previously characterized using traditional antibody- or activity-based methods. When comparing the conventional and the MRM strategies, the mean Pearson correlation for the 13 proteins (covered by 36 target peptides) shared between the 2 approaches was 0.77, indicating a good correlation. Additionally, MRM offers higher sensitivity (mean regression slope, 0.81), higher multiplicity in a single run, and good ability to leverage all measurements to discriminate groups using unsupervised clustering, which identified vitamin K antagonist users as well as patients with VT and cancer. The data collected using MRM show that the combination of coagulation factor levels yields signature information on VT and cancer, which was not obvious from a single measurement. These results encourage the further validation and investigation of MRM in profiling protein signature of disease. PMID:29296750

  17. Coagulation Factor XIIIA (F13A1): Novel Perspectives in Treatment and Pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Gemmati, Donato; Vigliano, Marco; Burini, Francesco; Mari, Rosella; El Mohsein, Hodeib Hossam Abd; Parmeggiani, Francesco; Serino, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    Factor XIII (FXIII) is a key molecule in the field of blood coagulation and in the last decades it has weakened attention within the field of angiogenesis and tissue repair. FXIII positively influences wound healing in several tissues by exerting multiple plasma and cellular functions. In the field of haemostasis, FXIII cross-links the neo formed fibrin fibers and supports platelet adhesion to the damaged sub-endothelium warranting a solid architecture. In addition, the pro-angiogenic functions of FXIII are directed by the interaction of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the integrin αVβ3, on the cell membrane, favouring an important step in the formation of granulation tissue at the wound site for optimal tissue healing. Conversely, the same mechanisms could lead to undesired increased neovascularisation, for example in inflammatory bowel disease or in the retinal degenerative pathologies. The classical symptoms of FXIII deficiency span from intracranial haemorrhage to delay bleeding or the staying of chronic wounds in the skin including impaired mucosal healing. In this view, FXIII bridges primary haemostasis, coagulation and definite tissue healing. Another important recently discovered function ascribed to FXIII is its ability to limit bacterial spreading from the lesion by incorporating specific macromolecules addressed to cellular infiltration, favouring in turn cell migration and survival, as observed also in fibrin-heart cultures for stem cell recruitment. In the field of the novel prognostic biomarkers, the monitoring of the residual circulating FXIII level during acute myocardial infarction has been considered predictive of the post-myocardial infarction healing. Accordingly, adequate FXIII levels can drive and predict the prognosis of complex diseases and the outcome of the associated therapies or interventions. In addition, peculiar pharmacogenetics aspects of the FXIII gene are of extraordinary interest. The present review

  18. The effects of three factor VII polymorphisms on factor VII coagulant levels in healthy Singaporean Chinese, Malay and Indian newborns.

    PubMed

    Quek, S C; Low, P S; Saha, N; Heng, C K

    2006-11-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Three polymorphisms of the factor VII gene (F7) were studied in a group of healthy newborns comprising 561 Chinese, 398 Malays and 226 Asian Indians from Singapore. The allele frequencies of 3 polymorphisms (R353Q, Promoter 0/10bp Del/Ins and Intron 7) in the FVII gene were ascertained through genotyping by polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion of amplified fragments. In Chinese the minor allele frequencies are Q: 0.04, Ins: 0.03, R7: 0.44; Malays, Q: 0.06, Ins: 0.10, R7: 0.41; and Indians, Q: 0.25, Ins: 0.23, R7: 0.43. Strong linkage disequilibrium (Delta > 0.7) is observed between the 0/10 bp and the R353Q sites in all ethnic groups. We conclude that: (i) the prevalence of the minor Q and Ins alleles of the R353Q and 0/10 bp polymorphisms are significantly higher in the Indian newborns than the Chinese and Malays; (ii) the Q allele is significantly associated (p = 0.01) with a lower plasma FVII coagulant level in the Indian and Malay neonates; and this polymorphism explains up to 3.8% of the variance in FVII coagulant levels; (iii) there is no significant difference in allele frequencies of the three polymorphisms between neonates with and without family histories of CAD.

  19. Virus elimination during the recycling of chromatographic columns used during the manufacture of coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    Various chromatographic procedures are used during the purification and manufacture of plasma products such as coagulation factors. These steps contribute to the overall safety of such products by removing potential virus contamination. Virus removal by two affinity chromatography procedures, i.e. monoclonal antibody chromatography and metal chelate chromatography (immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography), used during the manufacture of the high purity factor VIII (Replenate®) and factor IX (Replenine®-VF), respectively, has been investigated. In addition, as these columns are recycled after use, the effectiveness of the sanitisation procedures for preventing possible cross-contamination, has also been investigated. Both chromatographic steps proved effective for eliminating a range of model enveloped and non-enveloped viruses by 4 to >6 and 5 to >8 log for the monoclonal and metal chelate columns, respectively. The effectiveness of the relatively mild column sanitisation conditions used, i.e. ethanol for factor IX and acetic acid for factor VIII, was confirmed using non-spiked column runs. The chemicals used contributed to virus elimination by inactivation and/or by physical removal of the virus. In summary, these studies demonstrate that potential virus contamination between chromatographic runs can be prevented when an effective column recycling and sanitisation procedure is included. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI.

    PubMed

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I; Ivanov, Ivan S; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A; Morrissey, James H; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2016-01-01

    Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP.

  1. Discovery of glycyrrhetinic acid as an orally active, direct inhibitor of blood coagulation factor xa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lilong; Wang, Qiong; Shen, Shu; Xiao, Tongshu; Li, Youbin

    2014-03-01

    Factor Xa (FXa) plays an important role in blood coagulation. This study investigated glycyrrhetinic acid, a small molecule derived from Chinese herbs, and whether it has a direct inhibitory effect on FXa to display its anticoagulant activity. Enzyme activities of FXa, plasmin, trypsin and thrombin, inhibition of FXa enzyme kinetics and plasma clotting time by glycyrrhentinic acid were performed in vitro. A rat tail-bleeding model and a rat venous stasis model were also used to evaluate in vivo tail-bleeding time and thrombus formation, respectively. Glycyrrhetinic acid in vitro directly inhibited FXa uncompetitivly with IC50 of 32.6 ± 1.24 μmol/L, and displayed 2-, 14- and 20-fold selectivity for FXa when compared to plasmin, thrombin and trypsin, respectively. The plasma clotting time was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The prothrombin time doubled (PT2), when the concentration of glycyrrhetinic acid reached 2.02 mmol/L. During in vivo experiments intragastric administration of glycyrrhetinic acid caused a dose-dependent reduction in thrombus weight on the rat venous stasis model (all P<0.05). 50 mg/kg glycyrrhetinic acid resulted in 34.8% of venous thrombus weight lost, compared to the control. In addition, 200, 300 and 400 mg/kg doses of glycyrrhetinic acid caused a moderate hemorrhagic effect in the rat tail-bleeding model by prolonging bleeding time 1.1-, 1.5- and 1.9-fold compared to the control, respectively. Glycyrrhetinic acid is a direct inhibitor of FXa that is effective by oral administration, and with further research could be used to treat blood coagulation disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of eight novel coagulation factor XIII subunit A mutations: implied consequences for structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Biswas, Arijit; Bevans, Carville; Schroeder, Verena; Kohler, Hans Peter; Rott, Hannelore; Halimeh, Susan; Petrides, Petro E.; Lenk, Harald; Krause, Manuele; Miterski, Bruno; Harbrecht, Ursula; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe hereditary coagulation factor XIII deficiency is a rare homozygous bleeding disorder affecting one person in every two million individuals. In contrast, heterozygous factor XIII deficiency is more common, but usually not associated with severe hemorrhage such as intracranial bleeding or hemarthrosis. In most cases, the disease is caused by F13A gene mutations. Causative mutations associated with the F13B gene are rarer. Design and Methods We analyzed ten index patients and three relatives for factor XIII activity using a photometric assay and sequenced their F13A and F13B genes. Additionally, structural analysis of the wild-type protein structure from a previously reported X-ray crystallographic model identified potential structural and functional effects of the missense mutations. Results All individuals except one were heterozygous for factor XIIIA mutations (average factor XIII activity 51%), while the remaining homozygous individual was found to have severe factor XIII deficiency (<5% of normal factor XIII activity). Eight of the 12 heterozygous patients exhibited a bleeding tendency upon provocation. Conclusions The identified missense (Pro289Arg, Arg611His, Asp668Gly) and nonsense (Gly390X, Trp664X) mutations are causative for factor XIII deficiency. A Gly592Ser variant identified in three unrelated index patients, as well as in 200 healthy controls (minor allele frequency 0.005), and two further Tyr167Cys and Arg540Gln variants, represent possible candidates for rare F13A gene polymorphisms since they apparently do not have a significant influence on the structure of the factor XIIIA protein. Future in vitro expression studies of the factor XIII mutations are required to confirm their pathological mechanisms. PMID:20179087

  3. Identification of eight novel coagulation factor XIII subunit A mutations: implied consequences for structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Biswas, Arijit; Bevans, Carville; Schroeder, Verena; Kohler, Hans Peter; Rott, Hannelore; Halimeh, Susan; Petrides, Petro E; Lenk, Harald; Krause, Manuele; Miterski, Bruno; Harbrecht, Ursula; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Severe hereditary coagulation factor XIII deficiency is a rare homozygous bleeding disorder affecting one person in every two million individuals. In contrast, heterozygous factor XIII deficiency is more common, but usually not associated with severe hemorrhage such as intracranial bleeding or hemarthrosis. In most cases, the disease is caused by F13A gene mutations. Causative mutations associated with the F13B gene are rarer. We analyzed ten index patients and three relatives for factor XIII activity using a photometric assay and sequenced their F13A and F13B genes. Additionally, structural analysis of the wild-type protein structure from a previously reported X-ray crystallographic model identified potential structural and functional effects of the missense mutations. All individuals except one were heterozygous for factor XIIIA mutations (average factor XIII activity 51%), while the remaining homozygous individual was found to have severe factor XIII deficiency (<5% of normal factor XIII activity). Eight of the 12 heterozygous patients exhibited a bleeding tendency upon provocation. The identified missense (Pro289Arg, Arg611His, Asp668Gly) and nonsense (Gly390X, Trp664X) mutations are causative for factor XIII deficiency. A Gly592Ser variant identified in three unrelated index patients, as well as in 200 healthy controls (minor allele frequency 0.005), and two further Tyr167Cys and Arg540Gln variants, represent possible candidates for rare F13A gene polymorphisms since they apparently do not have a significant influence on the structure of the factor XIIIA protein. Future in vitro expression studies of the factor XIII mutations are required to confirm their pathological mechanisms.

  4. Coagulation factor VII is regulated by androgen receptor in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is widely expressed in breast cancer; however, there is limited information on the key molecular functions and gene targets of AR in this disease. In this study, gene expression data from a cohort of 52 breast cancer cell lines was analyzed to identify a network of AR co-expressed genes. A total of 300 genes, which were significantly enriched for cell cycle and metabolic functions, showed absolute correlation coefficients (|CC|) of more than 0.5 with AR expression across the dataset. In this network, a subset of 35 "AR-signature" genes were highly co-expressed with AR (|CC|>0.6) that included transcriptional regulators PATZ1, NFATC4, and SPDEF. Furthermore, gene encoding coagulation factor VII (F7) demonstrated the closest expression pattern with AR (CC=0.716) in the dataset and factor VII protein expression was significantly associated to that of AR in a cohort of 209 breast tumors. Moreover, functional studies demonstrated that AR activation results in the induction of factor VII expression at both transcript and protein levels and AR directly binds to a proximal region of F7 promoter in breast cancer cells. Importantly, AR activation in breast cancer cells induced endogenous factor VII activity to convert factor X to Xa in conjunction with tissue factor. In summary, F7 is a novel AR target gene and AR activation regulates the ectopic expression and activity of factor VII in breast cancer cells. These findings have functional implications in the pathobiology of thromboembolic events and regulation of factor VII/tissue factor signaling in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymorphisms of the factor VII gene associated with the low activities of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors in one-month-old infants.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Goto, Kenji; Sugiura, Tokio; Muramatsu, Kanji; Ando, Toshihiro; Maniwa, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Takao; Sugiyama, Kohachiro; Togari, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Despite administration of vitamin K (VK), some infants show lower activity of VK-dependent coagulation factors and they could develop intracranial hemorrhage. For preventing VK deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in infants, oral administration of VK and a screening test for VK deficiency are carried out in Japan. For the screening, the total activity of VK-dependent coagulation factors is measured using a commercial product, Normotest. This study was undertaken to clarify the importance of the following genetic and environmental factors on the coagulation status in one-month-old infants: two polymorphisms in the factor VII gene, -323P0/10 (a 10-bp insertion in the promoter region at position -323) and R353Q (the replacement of arginine [R] with glutamine [Q] at residue 353) and sex, age, gestational age, birth weight, and feeding regimen. Two hundred Japanese infants (34.6 +/- 4.0 days old) were screened for VK-dependent coagulation activity with Normotest and were genotyped for the two polymorphisms. Among the subjects screened, 18 infants (9%) carried the P10 allele and 26 (13%) carried the R353Q allele. Multiple regression analysis showed that the 10-bp inserted (P10) allele or the Q allele was associated with the lower coagulation activities. The coagulation activities for the R/Q genotype were significantly lower than those for the R/R genotype and those for the P0/P10 genotype were significantly lower than those for the P0/P0 genotype. Therefore, infants who carry the P10 allele or the Q allele show lower activity of VK-dependent coagulation factors. These infants may have a higher risk of VKDB manifestation.

  6. Differential Roles for the Coagulation Factors XI and XII in Regulating the Physical Biology of Fibrin.

    PubMed

    Sylman, Joanna L; Daalkhaijav, Uranbileg; Zhang, Ying; Gray, Elliot M; Farhang, Parsa A; Chu, Tiffany T; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I; Smith, Stephanie A; Morrissey, James H; Walker, Travis W; Nan, Xiaolin L; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2017-05-01

    In the contact activation pathway of the coagulation, zymogen factor XII (FXII) is converted to FXIIa, which triggers activation of FXI leading to the activation of FIX and subsequent thrombin generation and fibrin formation. Feedback activation of FXI by thrombin has been shown to promote thrombin generation in a FXII-independent manner and FXIIa can bypass FXI to directly activate FX and prothrombin in the presence of highly negatively charged molecules, such as long-chain polyphosphates (LC polyP). We sought to determine whether activation of FXII or FXI differentially regulate the physical biology of fibrin formation. Fibrin formation was initiated with tissue factor, ellagic acid (EA), or LC polyP in the presence of inhibitors of FXI and FXII. Our data demonstrated that inhibition of FXI decreased the rate of fibrin formation and fiber network density, and increased the fibrin network strength and rate of fibrinolysis when gelation was initiated via the contact activation pathway with EA. FXII inhibition decreased the fibrin formation and fibrin density, and increased the fibrinolysis rate only when fibrin formation was initiated via the contact activation pathway with LC polyP. Overall, we demonstrate that inhibition of FXI and FXII distinctly alter the biophysical properties of fibrin.

  7. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII.

  8. An exploratory factor analysis of inflammatory and coagulation markers associated with femoral artery atherosclerosis in the San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Egnot, Natalie Suder; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Jenny, Nancy S; Wassel, Christina L

    2018-04-01

    Several biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation have been implicated in lower extremity atherosclerosis. We utilized an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to identify distinct factors derived from circulating inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers then examined the associations of these factors with measures of lower extremity subclinical atherosclerosis, including the ankle-brachial index (ABI), common and superficial femoral intima-media thickness (IMT), and atherosclerotic plaque presence, burden, and characteristics. The San Diego Population Study (SDPS) is a prospective, community-living, multi-ethnic cohort of 1103 men and women averaged age 70. Regression analysis was used to assess cross-sectional associations between the identified groupings of biomarkers (factors) and the ABI and femoral artery atherosclerosis measurements. Two biomarker factors emerged from the factor analysis. Factor 1 consisting of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and fibrinogen was significantly associated with higher odds (OR = 1.99, p < 0.01) of a borderline ABI value (0.91-0.99), while Factor 2 containing D-dimer and pentraxin (PTX)-3 was significantly associated with higher common femoral artery (CFA) IMT (β = 0.23, p < 0.01) and lower ABI (β = -0.03, p < 0.01). Two groupings of biomarkers were identified via EFA of seven circulating biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation. These distinct groups are differentially associated with markers of lower extremity subclinical atherosclerosis. Our findings suggest that high inflammatory and coagulation burden were better markers of more severe lower-extremity disease as indicated by low ABI rather than early atherosclerotic lesion development in the femoral artery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of different methods of leucoreduction on plasma coagulation factors.

    PubMed

    Aboul Enein, Azza A; Abdel Rahman, Hala A; Abdel Maged, Mohamed M M; El Sissy, Maha H

    2017-03-01

    Removal of leucocytes from blood products, namely leucoreduction, improves the safety of blood transfusion by reducing adverse events associated with the incidental transfusion of leucocytes. Coagulation factors might be compromised during leucoreduction because of exposure of plasma to a variety of filter materials. The aim of the current study was to assess the effect of different methods of prestorage leucofiltration (apheresis and whole blood filters) on prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, partial thromboplastin time and factors V and VIII. There was a significant prolongation of prothrombin time as well as elevation of international normalized ratio in plasma after leucoreduction (14.5 ± 0.7 s vs. 13.9 ± 0.7 s, P = 0.008 and 1.14 ± 0.07 vs. 1.09 ± 0.07, P = 0.005, respectively). Also, there was a statistically significant prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time in nonleucoreduced plasma (55.6 ± 9.9 s vs. 43.2 ± 12.8 s, P = 0.001). There was no significant filtration effect on factors V and VIII levels. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in factors V and VIII levels between plasma filtered by inline whole blood filters and apheresis machine. Leucodepleted plasma originating from both inline whole blood filter and apheresis machine maintained satisfactory levels of factors V and VIII.

  10. Influential factors of formation kinetics of flocs produced by water treatment coagulants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunde; Wang, Lin; Hu, Bing; Ye, Jian

    2013-05-01

    The growth rate and size of floc formation is of great importance in water treatment especially in coagulation process. The floc formation kinetics and the coagulation efficiency of synthetic water were investigated by using an on-line continuous optical photometric dispersion analyze and the analysis of water quality. Experimental conditions such as alum dosage, pH value for coagulation, stirring intensity and initial turbidity were extensively examined. The photometric dispersion analyze results showed that coagulation of kaolin suspensions with two coagulants (alum and polyaluminium chloride) could be taken as a two-phase process: slow and rapid growth periods. Operating conditions with higher coagulant doses, appropriate pH and average shear rate might be particularly advantageous. The rate of overall floc growth was mainly determined by a combination of hydraulic and water quality conditions such as pH and turbidity. The measurement of zeta potential indicates that polyaluminium chloride exhibited higher charge-neutralizing ability than alum and achieved lower turbidities than alum for equivalent Al dosages. Under the same operating conditions, the alum showed a higher grow rate, but with smaller floc size.

  11. Revisiting the mechanism of coagulation factor XIII activation and regulation from a structure/functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sneha; Biswas, Arijit; Akhter, Mohammad Suhail; Krettler, Christoph; Reinhart, Christoph; Dodt, Johannes; Reuter, Andreas; Philippou, Helen; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The activation and regulation of coagulation Factor XIII (FXIII) protein has been the subject of active research for the past three decades. Although discrete evidence exists on various aspects of FXIII activation and regulation a combinatorial structure/functional view in this regard is lacking. In this study, we present results of a structure/function study of the functional chain of events for FXIII. Our study shows how subtle chronological submolecular changes within calcium binding sites can bring about the detailed transformation of the zymogenic FXIII to its activated form especially in the context of FXIIIA and FXIIIB subunit interactions. We demonstrate what aspects of FXIII are important for the stabilization (first calcium binding site) of its zymogenic form and the possible modes of deactivation (thrombin mediated secondary cleavage) of the activated form. Our study for the first time provides a structural outlook of the FXIIIA2B2 heterotetramer assembly, its association and dissociation. The FXIIIB subunits regulatory role in the overall process has also been elaborated upon. In summary, this study provides detailed structural insight into the mechanisms of FXIII activation and regulation that can be used as a template for the development of future highly specific therapeutic inhibitors targeting FXIII in pathological conditions like thrombosis. PMID:27453290

  12. The Non-catalytic B Subunit of Coagulation Factor XIII Accelerates Fibrin Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Souri, Masayoshi; Osaki, Tsukasa; Ichinose, Akitada

    2015-01-01

    Covalent cross-linking of fibrin chains is required for stable blood clot formation, which is catalyzed by coagulation factor XIII (FXIII), a proenzyme of plasma transglutaminase consisting of catalytic A (FXIII-A) and non-catalytic B subunits (FXIII-B). Herein, we demonstrate that FXIII-B accelerates fibrin cross-linking. Depletion of FXIII-B from normal plasma supplemented with a physiological level of recombinant FXIII-A resulted in delayed fibrin cross-linking, reduced incorporation of FXIII-A into fibrin clots, and impaired activation peptide cleavage by thrombin; the addition of recombinant FXIII-B restored normal fibrin cross-linking, FXIII-A incorporation into fibrin clots, and activation peptide cleavage by thrombin. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-fibrinogen antibody revealed an interaction between the FXIII heterotetramer and fibrinogen mediated by FXIII-B and not FXIII-A. FXIII-B probably binds the γ-chain of fibrinogen with its D-domain, which is near the fibrin polymerization pockets, and dissociates from fibrin during or after cross-linking between γ-chains. Thus, FXIII-B plays important roles in the formation of a ternary complex between proenzyme FXIII, prosubstrate fibrinogen, and activator thrombin. Accordingly, congenital or acquired FXIII-B deficiency may result in increased bleeding tendency through impaired fibrin stabilization due to decreased FXIII-A activation by thrombin and secondary FXIII-A deficiency arising from enhanced circulatory clearance. PMID:25809477

  13. A specific antidote for reversal of anticoagulation by direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Genmin; DeGuzman, Francis R; Hollenbach, Stanley J; Karbarz, Mark J; Abe, Keith; Lee, Gail; Luan, Peng; Hutchaleelaha, Athiwat; Inagaki, Mayuko; Conley, Pamela B; Phillips, David R; Sinha, Uma

    2013-04-01

    Inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (fXa) have emerged as a new class of antithrombotics but lack effective antidotes for patients experiencing serious bleeding. We designed and expressed a modified form of fXa as an antidote for fXa inhibitors. This recombinant protein (r-Antidote, PRT064445) is catalytically inactive and lacks the membrane-binding γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain of native fXa but retains the ability of native fXa to bind direct fXa inhibitors as well as low molecular weight heparin-activated antithrombin III (ATIII). r-Antidote dose-dependently reversed the inhibition of fXa by direct fXa inhibitors and corrected the prolongation of ex vivo clotting times by such inhibitors. In rabbits treated with the direct fXa inhibitor rivaroxaban, r-Antidote restored hemostasis in a liver laceration model. The effect of r-Antidote was mediated by reducing plasma anti-fXa activity and the non-protein bound fraction of the fXa inhibitor in plasma. In rats, r-Antidote administration dose-dependently and completely corrected increases in blood loss resulting from ATIII-dependent anticoagulation by enoxaparin or fondaparinux. r-Antidote has the potential to be used as a universal antidote for a broad range of fXa inhibitors.

  14. The relevance of coagulation factor X protection of adenoviruses in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M R; Doszpoly, A; Turner, G; Nicklin, S A; Baker, A H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous delivery of adenoviruses is the optimal route for many gene therapy applications. Once in the blood, coagulation factor X (FX) binds to the adenovirus capsid and protects the virion from natural antibody and classical complement-mediated neutralisation in mice. However, to date, no studies have examined the relevance of this FX/viral immune protective mechanism in human samples. In this study, we assessed the effects of blocking FX on adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) activity in the presence of human serum. FX prevented human IgM binding directly to the virus. In individual human sera samples (n=25), approximately half of those screened inhibited adenovirus transduction only when the Ad5–FX interaction was blocked, demonstrating that FX protected the virus from neutralising components in a large proportion of human sera. In contrast, the remainder of sera tested had no inhibitory effects on Ad5 transduction and FX armament was not required for effective gene transfer. In human sera in which FX had a protective role, Ad5 induced lower levels of complement activation in the presence of FX. We therefore demonstrate for the first time the importance of Ad–FX protection in human samples and highlight subject variability and species-specific differences as key considerations for adenoviral gene therapy. PMID:27014840

  15. Functional assembly of intrinsic coagulation proteases on monocytes and platelets. Comparison between cofactor activities induced by thrombin and factor Xa

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Generation of coagulation factor Xa by the intrinsic pathway protease complex is essential for normal activation of the coagulation cascade in vivo. Monocytes and platelets provide membrane sites for assembly of components of this protease complex, factors IXa and VIII. Under biologically relevant conditions, expression of functional activity by this complex is associated with activation of factor VIII to VIIIa. In the present studies, autocatalytic regulatory pathways operating on monocyte and platelet membranes were investigated by comparing the cofactor function of thrombin-activated factor VIII to that of factor Xa-activated factor VIII. Reciprocal functional titrations with purified human factor VIII and factor IXa were performed at fixed concentrations of human monocytes, CaCl2, factor X, and either factor IXa or factor VIII. Factor VIII was preactivated with either thrombin or factor Xa, and reactions were initiated by addition of factor X. Rates of factor X activation were measured using chromogenic substrate specific for factor Xa. The K1/2 values, i.e., concentration of factor VIIIa at which rates were half maximal, were 0.96 nM with thrombin- activated factor VIII and 1.1 nM with factor Xa-activated factor VIII. These values are close to factor VIII concentration in plasma. The Vsat, i.e., rates at saturating concentrations of factor VIII, were 33.3 and 13.6 nM factor Xa/min, respectively. The K1/2 and Vsat values obtained in titrations with factor IXa were not significantly different from those obtained with factor VIII. In titrations with factor X, the values of Michaelis-Menten coefficients (Km) were 31.7 nM with thrombin- activated factor VIII, and 14.2 nM with factor Xa-activated factor VIII. Maximal rates were 23.4 and 4.9 nM factor Xa/min, respectively. The apparent catalytic efficiency was similar with either form of factor VIIIa. Kinetic profiles obtained with platelets as a source of membrane were comparable to those obtained with monocytes

  16. The effect of exercise on coagulation and fibrinolysis factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Karaolanis, Georgios; Kouvelos, Georgios N; Hart, Collin; Metheiken, Sean

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a widely prevalent atherosclerotic occlusive disorder. Symptoms commence with exercise-induced pain in the lower extremities, known as claudication. Despite the fact that exercise has been shown to improve fibrinolytic profile some patients, the effect of exercise on coagulation and fibrinolysis cascades in claudicants has not been comprehensively defined. Literature search in English language yielded 13 studies of exercise on claudicants, including 420 patients. Claudicants tend to have a higher coagulation activity at rest compared to healthy individuals, a trend that persists even after exercise. Post-exercise coagulation activity of claudicants is increased when compared to their respective baseline levels, but it is so in a non-consistent manner. From the available data, it has been suggested that claudicants have a functional and effective fibrinolytic mechanism in place, operating continuously at a relatively higher activity level compared to healthy individuals. Fibrinolysis seems to be activated by exercise; a positive outcome with a prolonged effect as shown by a few of the studies. A final conclusion whether coagulation or fibrinolysis activity is affected mostly by exercise type and intensity in claudicants could not be answered. All conclusions regarding the effect of exercise on the coagulation and fibrinolysis mechanisms should be taken under cautious consideration, due to the limited number of studies, the small number of patients and the different exercise strategies employed in each study. Further randomized studies with similar exercise protocols could provide safer conclusions in the future. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. Establishment of the 2nd Korean national biological reference standard for blood coagulation factor VIII:C concentrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Naery; Seo, Ji Suk; Kim, Jae Ok; Ban, Sang Ja

    2017-05-01

    Since the 1st Korean national biological reference standard for factor (F)VIII concentrate, established in 2001, has shown declining potency, we conducted this study to replace this standard with a 2nd Korean national biological reference standard for blood coagulation FVIII concentrate. The candidate materials for the 2nd standard were prepared in 8000 vials with 10 IU/ml of target potency, according to the approved manufacturing process of blood coagulation Factor VIII:C Monoclonal Antibody-purified, Freeze-dried Human Blood Coagulation Factor VIII:C. Potency was evaluated by one-stage clotting and chromogenic methods and the stability was confirmed to meet the specifications during a period of 73 months. Since the potencies obtained by the two methods differed significantly (P < 0.015), the values were determined separately according to the geometric means (8.9 and 7.4 IU/vial, respectively). The geometric coefficients of interlaboratory variability were 3.4% and 7.6% by the one-stage clotting and chromogenic assays, respectively. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Platelet Surface-Associated Activation and Secretion-Mediated Inhibition of Coagulation Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Artemenko, Elena O.; Podoplelova, Nadezhda A.; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N.; Demina, Irina A.; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I.; Panteleev, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor XII (fXII) is important for arterial thrombosis, but its physiological activation mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we elucidated the role of platelets and platelet-derived material in fXII activation. FXII activation was only observed upon potent platelet stimulation (with thrombin, collagen-related peptide, or calcium ionophore, but not ADP) accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure and was localised to the platelet surface. Platelets from three patients with grey platelet syndrome did not activate fXII, which suggests that platelet-associated fXII-activating material might be released from α-granules. FXII was preferentially bound by phosphotidylserine-positive platelets and annexin V abrogated platelet-dependent fXII activation; however, artificial phosphotidylserine/phosphatidylcholine microvesicles did not support fXII activation under the conditions herein. Confocal microscopy using DAPI as a poly-phosphate marker did not reveal poly-phosphates associated with an activated platelet surface. Experimental data for fXII activation indicates an auto-inhibition mechanism (k i/k a = 180 molecules/platelet). Unlike surface-associated fXII activation, platelet secretion inhibited activated fXII (fXIIa), particularly due to a released C1-inhibitor. Platelet surface-associated fXIIa formation triggered contact pathway-dependent clotting in recalcified plasma. Computer modelling suggests that fXIIa inactivation was greatly decreased in thrombi under high blood flow due to inhibitor washout. Combined, the surface-associated fXII activation and its inhibition in solution herein may be regarded as a flow-sensitive regulator that can shift the balance between surface-associated clotting and plasma-dependent inhibition, which may explain the role of fXII at high shear and why fXII is important for thrombosis but negligible in haemostasis. PMID:25688860

  19. EGF domain of coagulation factor IX is conducive to exposure of phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Kitano, Hisataka

    2017-04-01

    Lipid rafts are an initiation site for many different signals. Recently, we reported that an EGF domain in activated coagulation factor IX (EGF-F9) increases lipid raft formation and accelerates cell migration. However, the detailed mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of EGF-F9 on the cell membrane. A431 cells (derived from human squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with recombinant EGF-F9. Cells were immunocytochemically stained with probes for lipid rafts or phosphatidylserine (PS). After 3 min of treatment with EGF-F9, cholera toxin subunit B (CTxB) binding domains emerged at the adhesive tips of filopodia. Subsequently, CTxB staining was observed on the filopodial shaft. Finally, large clusters of CTxB domains were observed at the edge of cell bodies. Markers for lipid rafts, such as caveolin-1 and a GPI anchored protein, co-localized with CTxB. Staining with annexin V and XII revealed that PS was exposed at the tips of filopodia, translocated on filopodial shafts, and co-localized with CTxB at the rafts. Immunocytochemistry showed that scramblase-1 protein was present at the filopodial tips. Our data indicates that EGF-F9 accelerates PS exposure around the filopodial adhesion complex and induces clustering of lipid rafts in the cell body. PS exposure is thought to occur on cells undergoing apoptosis. Further study of the function of the EGF-F9 motif in mediating signal transduction is necessary because it is shared by a number of proteins. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  20. Accumulation of functional recombinant human coagulation factor IX in transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Nicolau B; Murad, André M; Ramos, Gustavo L; Maranhão, Andréia Q; Brígido, Marcelo M; Araújo, Ana Cláudia G; Lacorte, Cristiano; Aragão, Francisco J L; Covas, Dimas T; Fontes, Aparecida M; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Vianna, Giovanni R; Rech, Elíbio L

    2011-08-01

    The seed-based production of recombinant proteins is an efficient strategy to achieve the accumulation, correct folding, and increased stability of these recombinant proteins. Among potential plant molecular farming systems, soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] is a viable option for the production of recombinant proteins due to its high protein content, known regulatory sequences, efficient gene transfer protocols, and a scalable production system under greenhouse conditions. We report here the expression and stable accumulation of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) in transgenic soybean seeds. A biolistic process was utilised to co-introduce a plasmid carrying the hFIX gene under the transcriptional control of the α' subunit of a β-conglycinin seed-specific promoter and an α-Coixin signal peptide in soybean embryonic axes from mature seeds. The 56-kDa hFIX protein was expressed in the transgenic seeds at levels of up to 0.23% (0.8 g kg(-1) seed) of the total soluble seed protein as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry assays indicated that the recombinant hFIX in seed cotyledonary cells was efficiently directed to protein storage vacuoles. Mass spectrometry characterisation confirmed the presence of the hFIX recombinant protein sequence. Protein extracts from transgenic seeds showed a blood-clotting activity of up to 1.4% of normal plasma. Our results demonstrate the correct processing and stable accumulation of functional hFIX in soybean seeds stored for 6 years under room temperature conditions (22 ± 2°C).

  1. Manufacturing challenges in the commercial production of recombinant coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Jiang, R; Monroe, T; McRogers, R; Larson, P J

    2002-03-01

    Advances in gene technology have led to the development of a method to manufacture recombinant coagulation Factor VIII (rFVIII) for haemophilia A. Because rFVIII is a large and complex protein, its commercialization has required that many challenges in manufacturing, purification and processing be overcome. In order to license the first generation of rFVIII (Kogenate) in 1993, Bayer Corporation invested over 10 years in research and manufacturing development. Seven additional years were subsequently devoted to research and manufacturing improvements in order to accomplish the recent licensing of a second rFVIII product (KOGENATE Bayer or Kogenate FS). This product differs from its predecessor, in that human albumin is removed from the purification and the formulation steps. In addition, fewer chromatography steps are involved resulting in greater yields per mL of conditioned medium, and a solvent-detergent viral inactivation step replaces the heat-processing step used for the previous product. Despite these changes in the manufacturing, the protein backbone and carbohydrate structure of the final rFVIII molecule are identical. The complexity of the production processes is reflected by over 100 000 manufacturing data entries and by 600 quality control tests for each batch of rFVIII. Manufacturers are continuing to develop the next generation of rFVIII, which will be produced without the addition of any human or animal proteins or byproducts. Investments in research, development and manufacturing technology are expected to result in the development of new products with enhanced safety profiles, and in an increase in the production capacity for products that are chronically in short supply.

  2. [Use of thrombelastography to guide posttraumatic hemostatic therapy: More coagulation factor concentrates and less allogenic blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    David, J S; Imhoff, E; Parat, S; Augey, L; Geay-Baillat, M-O; Incagnoli, P; Tazarourte, K

    2016-11-01

    Viscoelastic technics are used for 10 years and include the ROTEM ® and the TEG ® . These devices that exploit the viscoelastic properties of the clotting blood, allow a rapid and global analysis of the haemostatic process taking into account all the process interfering with haemostasis such as inflammation. It has been shown that the use of these technics in clinical situations such as trauma, postpartum haemorrhage, gastrointestinal bleeding or cardiac surgery may reduce the need for blood product, the cost and perhaps may improve the outcome of the patients. Thanks to a rapid identification of the underlying coagulation deficit, these technics facilitate decision-making during acute care and help to guide the treatment, particularly with coagulation factor's concentrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The M358R variant of α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, William P., E-mail: sheffiel@mcmaster.ca; Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Bhakta, Varsha

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assaysmore » of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 2} M{sup −1}sec{sup −1}. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.« less

  4. The production of coagulation factor VII by adipocytes is enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-α or isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Yoshizaki, T; Hiranaka, N; Kumano, O; Suzuki, T; Akanuma, M; Yui, T; Kanazawa, K; Yoshida, M; Naito, S; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y; Ieko, M

    2015-05-01

    A relationship has been reported between blood concentrations of coagulation factor VII (FVII) and obesity. In addition to its role in coagulation, FVII has been shown to inhibit insulin signals in adipocytes. However, the production of FVII by adipocytes remains unclear. We herein investigated the production and secretion of FVII by adipocytes, especially in relation to obesity-related conditions including adipose inflammation and sympathetic nerve activation. C57Bl/6J mice were fed a low- or high-fat diet and the expression of FVII messenger RNA (mRNA) was then examined in adipose tissue. 3T3-L1 cells were used as an adipocyte model for in vitro experiments in which these cells were treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or isoproterenol. The expression and secretion of FVII were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of FVII mRNA in the adipose tissue of mice fed with high-fat diet was significantly higher than that in mice fed with low-fat diet. Expression of the FVII gene and protein was induced during adipogenesis and maintained in mature adipocytes. The expression and secretion of FVII mRNA were increased in the culture medium of 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with TNF-α, and these effects were blocked when these cells were exposed to inhibitors of mitogen-activated kinases or NF-κB activation. The β-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol stimulated the secretion of FVII from mature adipocytes via the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway. Blockade of secreted FVII with the anti-FVII antibody did not affect the phosphorylation of Akt in the isoproterenol-stimulated adipocytes. Obese adipose tissue produced FVII. The production and secretion of FVII by adipocytes was enhanced by TNF-α or isoproterenol via different mechanisms. These results indicate that FVII is an adipokine that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity.

  5. Prevalence of nucleic acid sequences specific for human parvoviruses, hepatitis A and hepatitis E viruses in coagulation factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Modrow, S; Wenzel, J J; Schimanski, S; Schwarzbeck, J; Rothe, U; Oldenburg, J; Jilg, W; Eis-Hübinger, A M

    2011-05-01

    Due to their high resistance to inactivation procedures, nonenveloped viruses such as parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV), human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) pose a particular threat to blood products. Virus transmission to patients treated with blood products presents an additional burden to disease. We determined the frequency and the amount of nucleic acid specific for nonenveloped viruses in recently manufactured preparations of commercial coagulation factor concentrates. At least three different batches of each of 13 different plasma-derived and recombinant coagulation factor products were tested for the presence and the amount of nucleic acid for parvovirus B19, HBoV, human parvovirus 4, hepatitis A virus and HEV by using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Whereas none of the recombinant products tested positive for any of these viruses, parvovirus B19 DNA with amounts ranging between 2×10(1) and 1.3×10(3) genome equivalents/ml was detected in five plasma-derived products. In addition to parvovirus B19 genotype 1, genotypes 2 and 3 were observed in two batches of a factor VIII/von-Willebrand factor product. In two products (one factor VIII concentrate and one activated prothrombin complex concentrate), a combination of both genotypes 1 and 2 of parvovirus B19 was detected. The data show that nucleic acids from several relevant nonenveloped viruses are not found at detectable levels in coagulation factor concentrates. In some cases, parvovirus B19 DNA was detectable at low levels. Testing of the plasma pools for the full range of parvovirus genotypes is advocated for ensuring product safety. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. In silico designing of hyper-glycosylated analogs for the human coagulation factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Fahimeh; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Karkhane, Ali Asghar; Khorramizadeh, M Reza

    2016-07-01

    N-glycosylation is a process during which a glycan moiety attaches to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation consensus sequence (Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr), where Xxx can be any amino acid except proline. Introduction of a new N-glycosylation site into a protein backbone leads to its hyper-glycosylation, and may improve the protein properties such as solubility, folding, stability, and secretion. Glyco-engineering is an approach to facilitate the hyper-glycosylation of recombinant proteins by application of the site-directed mutagenesis methods. In this regard, selection of a suitable location on the surface of a protein for introduction of a new N-glycosylation site is a main concern. In this work, a computational approach was conducted to select suitable location(s) for introducing new N-glycosylation sites into the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX). With this aim, the first 45 residues of mature hFIX were explored to find out suitable positions for introducing either Asn or Ser/Thr residues, to create new N-glycosylation site(s). Our exploration lead to detection of five potential positions, for hyper-glycosylation. For each suggested position, an analog was defined and subjected for N-glycosylation efficiency prediction. After generation of three-dimensional structures, by homology-based modeling, the five designed analogs were examined by molecular dynamic (MD) simulations, to predict their stability levels and probable structural distortions caused by amino acid substitutions, relative to the native counterpart. Three out of five suggested analogs, namely; E15T, K22N, and R37N, reached equilibration state with relatively constant Root Mean Square Deviation values. Additional analysis on the data obtained during MD simulations, lead us to conclude that, R37N is the only qualified analog with the most similar structure and dynamic behavior to that of the native counterpart, to be considered for further experimental investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  7. Thrombin and factor Xa link the coagulation system with liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ameet; Sadiq, Fouzia; Anstee, Quentin M; Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D; Thursz, Mark R

    2018-05-08

    Thrombin activates hepatic stellate cells via protease-activated receptor-1. The role of Factor Xa (FXa) in hepatic fibrosis has not been elucidated. We aimed to evaluate the impact of FXa and thrombin in vitro on stellate cells and their respective inhibition in vivo using a rodent model of hepatic fibrosis. HSC-LX2 cells were incubated with FXa and/or thrombin in cell culture, stained for αSMA and relative gene expression and gel contraction calculated. C57BL/6 J mice were administered thioacetamide (TAA) for 8 weeks with Rivaroxaban (n = 15) or Dabigatran (n = 15). Control animals received TAA alone (n = 15). Fibrosis was scored and quantified using digital image analysis and hepatic tissue hydroxyproline estimated. Stellate cells treated with FXa and thrombin demonstrated upregulation of procollagen, TGF-beta, αSMA and significant cell contraction (43.48%+/- 4.12) compared to culturing with FXa or thrombin alone (26.90%+/- 8.90, p = 0.02; 13.1%+/- 9.84, p < 0.001). Mean fibrosis score, percentage area of fibrosis and hepatic hydroxyproline content (2.46 vs 4.08, p = 0.008; 2.02% vs 3.76%, p = 0.012; 276.0 vs 651.3, p = 0.0001) were significantly reduced in mice treated with the FXa inhibitor compared to control mice. FXa inhibition was significantly more effective than thrombin inhibition in reducing percentage area of fibrosis and hepatic hydroxyproline content (2.02% vs 3.70%,p = 0.031; 276.0 vs 413.1,p = 0.001). FXa promotes stellate cell contractility and activation. Early inhibition of coagulation using a FXa inhibitor significantly reduces TAA induced murine liver fibrosis and may be a viable treatment for liver fibrosis in patients.

  8. Monitoring of coagulation factor therapy in patients with von Willebrand disease type 3 using a microchip flow chamber system.

    PubMed

    Ågren, Anna; Holmström, Margareta; Schmidt, David E; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Blombäck, Margareta; Hjemdahl, Paul

    2017-01-05

    Patients with type 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD-3) have no measurable levels of VW factor (VWF) and usually require treatment with VWF-FVIII concentrate to prevent and/or stop bleeding. Even though the patients are treated prophylactically, they may experience bleeding symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of VWF-FVIII concentrate treatment in VWD-3 patients with the Total Thrombus Analysis System (T-TAS ® ), which measures thrombus formation under flow conditions. Coagulation profiles of 10 VWD-3 patients were analysed using T-TAS before and 30 minutes after VWF-FVIII concentrate (Haemate ® ) injection. Results were compared to VWF- and FVIII activity in plasma, and results with thromboelastometry and ristocetin-activated platelet impedance aggregometry (Multiplate ® ) in whole blood. For comparison, 10 healthy controls were also analysed with T-TAS. A median dose of 27 (range 15-35) IU/kg of VWF-FVIII concentrate increased VWF- and FVIII activity as expected. T-TAS thrombus formation was enhanced when a tissue factor/collagen-coated flow chamber was used at low shear, but treatment effects at high shear using a collagen-coated flow chamber were minimal. Whole blood coagulation assessed by thromboelastometry was normal and did not change (p > 0.05) but ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation improved (p < 0.001). In conclusion, T-TAS detects effects of VWF-FVIII concentrate treatment on coagulation-dependent thrombus formation at low shear, but minor effects are observed on platelet-dependent thrombus formation at high shear. The poor prediction of bleeding by conventional laboratory monitoring in VWD-3 patients might be related to insufficient restoration of platelet-dependent thrombus formation.

  9. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  10. Normal Coagulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-04

    LO TTIN G with vitamin K antagonist...confidential until formal publication.6 F CHAPTER 34 Normal Coagulation 531 SE C T IO N 7 B LEED IN G A N D C LO TTIN G Table 34-1 Procoagulant...formal publication.8 F CHAPTER 34 Normal Coagulation 533 SE C T IO N 7 B LEED IN G A N D C LO TTIN G Figure 34-4 Vitamin K–dependent com-

  11. Breeding of transgenic cattle for human coagulation factor IX by a combination of lentiviral system and cloning.

    PubMed

    Monzani, P S; Sangalli, J R; De Bem, T H C; Bressan, F F; Fantinato-Neto, P; Pimentel, J R V; Birgel-Junior, E H; Fontes, A M; Covas, D T; Meirelles, F V

    2013-02-28

    Recombinant coagulation factor IX must be produced in mammalian cells because FIX synthesis involves translational modifications. Human cell culture-based expression of human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) is expensive, and large-scale production capacity is limited. Transgenic animals may greatly increase the yield of therapeutic proteins and reduce costs. In this study, we used a lentiviral system to obtain transgenic cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce transgenic animals. Lentiviral vectors carrying hFIX driven by 3 bovine β-casein promoters were constructed. Bovine epithelial mammary cells were transduced by lentivirus, selected with blasticidin, plated on extracellular matrix, and induced by lactogenic hormones; promoter activity was evaluated by quantitative PCR. Transcriptional activity of the 5.335-kb promoter was 6-fold higher than the 3.392- and 4.279-kb promoters, which did not significantly differ. Transgenic bovine fibroblasts were transduced with lentivirus carrying the 5.335-kb promoter and used as donor cells for SCNT. Cloned transgenic embryo production yielded development rates of 28.4%, similar to previous reports on cloned non-transgenic embryos. The embryos were transferred to recipient cows (N = 21) and 2 births of cloned transgenic cattle were obtained. These results suggest combination of the lentiviral system and cloning may be a good strategy for production of transgenic cattle.

  12. Effects of MASP-1 of the Complement System on Activation of Coagulation Factors and Plasma Clot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Katharina; Ajjan, Ramzi; Phoenix, Fladia; Dobó, József; Gál, Péter; Schroeder, Verena

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous interactions between the coagulation and complement systems have been shown. Recently, links between coagulation and mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1) of the complement lectin pathway have been proposed. Our aim was to investigate MASP-1 activation of factor XIII (FXIII), fibrinogen, prothrombin, and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) in plasma-based systems, and to analyse effects of MASP-1 on plasma clot formation, structure and lysis. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a FXIII incorporation assay and specific assays to measure the activation products prothrombin fragment F1+2, fibrinopeptide A (FPA), and activated TAFI (TAFIa). Clot formation and lysis were assessed by turbidimetric assay. Clot structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy. MASP-1 activated FXIII and, contrary to thrombin, induced FXIII activity faster in the Val34 than the Leu34 variant. MASP-1-dependent generation of F1+2, FPA and TAFIa showed a dose-dependent response in normal citrated plasma (NCP), albeit MASP-1 was much less efficient than FXa or thrombin. MASP-1 activation of prothrombin and TAFI cleavage were confirmed in purified systems. No FPA generation was observed in prothrombin-depleted plasma. MASP-1 induced clot formation in NCP, affected clot structure, and prolonged clot lysis. Conclusions/Significance We show that MASP-1 interacts with plasma clot formation on different levels and influences fibrin structure. Although MASP-1-induced fibrin formation is thrombin-dependent, MASP-1 directly activates prothrombin, FXIII and TAFI. We suggest that MASP-1, in concerted action with other complement and coagulation proteins, may play a role in fibrin clot formation. PMID:22536427

  13. Overview of the coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Palta, Sanjeev; Saroa, Richa; Palta, Anshu

    2014-09-01

    Coagulation is a dynamic process and the understanding of the blood coagulation system has evolved over the recent years in anaesthetic practice. Although the traditional classification of the coagulation system into extrinsic and intrinsic pathway is still valid, the newer insights into coagulation provide more authentic description of the same. Normal coagulation pathway represents a balance between the pro coagulant pathway that is responsible for clot formation and the mechanisms that inhibit the same beyond the injury site. Imbalance of the coagulation system may occur in the perioperative period or during critical illness, which may be secondary to numerous factors leading to a tendency of either thrombosis or bleeding. A systematic search of literature on PubMed with MeSH terms 'coagulation system, haemostasis and anaesthesia revealed twenty eight related clinical trials and review articles in last 10 years. Since the balance of the coagulation system may tilt towards bleeding and thrombosis in many situations, it is mandatory for the clinicians to understand physiologic basis of haemostasis in order to diagnose and manage the abnormalities of the coagulation process and to interpret the diagnostic tests done for the same.

  14. Overview of the coagulation system

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Sanjeev; Saroa, Richa; Palta, Anshu

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation is a dynamic process and the understanding of the blood coagulation system has evolved over the recent years in anaesthetic practice. Although the traditional classification of the coagulation system into extrinsic and intrinsic pathway is still valid, the newer insights into coagulation provide more authentic description of the same. Normal coagulation pathway represents a balance between the pro coagulant pathway that is responsible for clot formation and the mechanisms that inhibit the same beyond the injury site. Imbalance of the coagulation system may occur in the perioperative period or during critical illness, which may be secondary to numerous factors leading to a tendency of either thrombosis or bleeding. A systematic search of literature on PubMed with MeSH terms ‘coagulation system, haemostasis and anaesthesia revealed twenty eight related clinical trials and review articles in last 10 years. Since the balance of the coagulation system may tilt towards bleeding and thrombosis in many situations, it is mandatory for the clinicians to understand physiologic basis of haemostasis in order to diagnose and manage the abnormalities of the coagulation process and to interpret the diagnostic tests done for the same. PMID:25535411

  15. A comparative study of tissue factor and kaolin on blood coagulation assays using rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Grodecki, Richard; Rizoli, Sandro; Shek, Pang N

    2016-01-01

    Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and thromboelastography (TEG) have been increasingly used to diagnose acute coagulopathy and guide blood transfusion. The tests are routinely performed using different triggering activators such as tissue factor and kaolin, which activate different pathways yielding different results. To optimize the global blood coagulation assays using ROTEM and TEG, we conducted a comparative study on the activation methods employing tissue factor and kaolin at different concentrations as well as standard reagents as recommended by the manufacturer of each device. Key parameter values were obtained at various assay conditions to evaluate and compare coagulation and fibrinolysis profiles of citrated whole blood collected from healthy volunteers. It was found that tissue factor reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R, and increased ROTEM clot formation time and TEG K in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, tissue factor affected ROTEM alpha angle, and maximum clot firmness, especially in the absence of kaolin activation, whereas both ROTEM and TEG clot lysis (LI30, CL30, and LY30) remained unaffected. Moreover, kaolin reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R and K, but to a lesser extent than tissue factor, in-tem and ex-tem. Correlations in all corresponding parameters between ROTEM and TEG were observed, when the same activators were used in the assays compared with lesser correlations between standard kaolin TEG and ROTEM (INTEM/EXTEM). The two types of viscoelastic point-of-care devices provide different results, depending on the triggering reagent used to perform the assay. Optimal assay condition was obtained to reduce assay time and improve assay accuracy.

  16. Two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy for a severe hemophilia A child patient with coagulation factor VII deficiency

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin Peng; Feng, Jie Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The main complication of patients with severe hemophilia is recurrent bleeding events that usually affected musculoskeletal contractures. And replacement therapy methods were continuously improved to minimize adverse impacts brought by those complications. However, only several cases reported about the appendectomy for hemophilia A. We report a case of acute appendicitis treated by two-incision laparoscopy in a boy with hemophilia A and coagulation factor VII deficiency for the first time. Patient concerns: An 8y7m-old Chinese boy presented with half a day of right sided abdominal pain, fever, nausea, and vomiting. Diagnoses: He received a computed tomography (CT) scan which revealed an enlarged appendix, thickened wall and appendiceal fecalith, and had received a conservative anti-bacterial treatment for his acute appendicitis but failed. He was diagnosed with hemophilia A and coagulation factor VII deficiency. Interventions: Two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy was made in success with a careful management of perioperative period. We monitored the clotting factor FVIII level and gave him a replacement therapy. Outcomes: The patient had an uneventful recovery. Lessons: It is important to exclude intraabdominal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage in patients suffering from hemophilia and acute abdominal pain. Pre-operative evaluation of validity of the FVIII replacement therapy is another effective strategy to assess the safety and feasibility of applying an operation procedure. The two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy is an effective treatment for this kind of patients for its minimal trauma and fast recovery characteristics. Our report shows that laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible in a child suffering from hemophilia after adequate blood clotting factor replacement treatment. PMID:29019885

  17. [Haplotype Analysis of Coagulation Factor VII Gene in a Patient with Congenital Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency with Heterozygous p.Arg337Cys Mutation and o.Aro413Gin Polymorphism..

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Yoshioka, Tomoko; Obara, Takehiro; Suwabe, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare hemorrhagic disease with an autosomal reces- sive inheritance pattern. We analyzed coagulation factor VII gene (F7) of a patient with FVII deficiency and used expression studies to investigate the effect of a missense mutation on FVII secretion. The proband, a 69-year-old Japanese woman, had a history of postpartum bleeding and excessive bleeding after dental extrac- tion. She was found to have mildly increased PT-INR (1.17) before an ophthalmic operation. FVII activity and antigen were reduced (29.0% and 32.8%). Suspecting that the proband was FVII deficient, we analyzed F7 of the patient. Sequence analysis revealed that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation (p.Arg337Cys) in the catalytic domain and polymorphisms: the decanucleotide insertion at the promoter re- gion, dimorphism (c.525C >T) in exon 5, and p.Arg413Gln in exon 8. Haplotype analysis clarified that p.Arg337Cys was located on the p.Arg413 allele (Ml allele). The other allele had the p.Arg413Gln polymor- phism(M2 allele) which is known to produce less FVII. Expression studies revealed that p.Arg337Cys causes impairment of FVII secretion. Insufficient secretion of FVII arising from both the p.Arg337Cys/M1 allele and the p.Arg337/M2 allele might lower the FVII level of this patient(<50%). The FVII level in a heterozygous FVII deficient patient might be influenced by F7 polymorphisms on the normal allele. There- fore, genetic analyses are important for the diagnosis of heterozygous FVII deficiency.

  18. Stable expression of recombinant human coagulation factor XIII in protein-free suspension culture of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Chun, B H; Bang, W G; Park, Y K; Woo, S K

    2001-11-01

    The recombinant a and bsubunits for human coagulation factor XIII were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. CHO cells were amplified and selected with methotrexate in adherent cultures containing serum, and CHO 1-62 cells were later selected in protein-free medium. To develop a recombinant factor XIII production process in a suspension culture, we have investigated the growth characteristics of CHO cells and the maintenance of factor XIII expression in the culture medium. Suspension adaptation of CHO cells was performed in protein-free medium, GC-CHO-PI, by two methods, such as serum weaning and direct switching from serum containing media to protein-free media. Although the growth of CHO cells in suspension culture was affected initially by serum depletion, cell specific productivity of factor XIII showed only minor changes by the direct switching to protein-free medium during a suspension culture. As for the long-term stability of factor XIII, CHO 1-62 cells showed a stable expression of factor XIII in protein-free condition for 1000 h. These results indicate that the CHO 1-62cells can be adapted to express recombinant human factor XIII in a stable maimer in suspension culture using a protein-free medium. Our results demonstrate that enhanced cell growth in a continuous manner is achievable for factor XIII production in a protein-free medium when a perfusion bioreactor culture system with a spin filter is employed.

  19. Simultaneous expression of tissue factor and tissue factor pathway inhibitor by human monocytes. A potential mechanism for localized control of blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Cells of monocytic lineage can initiate extravascular fibrin deposition via expression of blood coagulation mediators. This report is about experiments on three mechanisms with the potential to modulate monocyte- initiated coagulation. Monocyte procoagulant activity was examined as a function of lipid cofactor, protein cofactor, and specific inhibitor expression during short-term culture in vitro. Lipid cofactor activity was measured as the initial rate of factor X activation by intrinsic- pathway components, the assembly of which depends on this cofactor. Lipid cofactor activity levels changed by < 30% during 48-h culture. Protein cofactor, i.e., tissue factor (TF) antigen was measured by enzyme immunoassay. It increased from 461 pg/ml to a maximum value of 3,550 pg/ml at 24 h and remained at 70% of this value. Specific TF activity, measured as factor VII-dependent factor X activation rate, decreased from 54 to 18 nM FXa/min between 24 and 48 h. TF activity did not correlate well with either lipid cofactor or TF protein levels. In contrast, the decrease in TF activity coincided in time with maximal expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) mRNA, which was determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR), and with maximal TFPI protein levels measured by immunoassay. The number of mRNA copies coding for TFPI and TF in freshly isolated blood monocytes were 46 and 20 copies/cells, respectively. These values increased to 220 and 63 copies/cell during short-term cell culture in the presence of endotoxin. Results demonstrate concomitant expression by monocytes of genes coding for both the essential protein cofactor and the specific inhibitor of the extrinsic coagulation pathway. Together with functional and antigenic analyses, they also imply that the initiation of blood clotting by extravascular monocyte/macrophages can be modulated locally by TFPI independently of plasma sources of the inhibitor. PMID:8195712

  20. Severe coagulation factor VII deficiency caused by a novel homozygous mutation (p. Trp284Gly) in loop 140s.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiuping; Cheng, XiaoLi; Ye, Jiajia; Wang, Yingyu; Yang, LiHong; Wang, Mingshan; Jin, Yanhui

    2016-06-01

    Congenital coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare disorder caused by mutation in F7 gene. Herein, we reported a patient who had unexplained hematuria and vertigo with consanguineous parents. He has been diagnosed as having FVII deficiency based on the results of reduced FVII activity (2.0%) and antigen (12.8%). The thrombin generation tests verified that the proband has obstacles in producing thrombin. Direct sequencing analysis revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation p.Trp284Gly. Also noteworthy is the fact that the mutational residue belongs to structurally conserved loop 140s, which majorly undergo rearrangement after FVII activation. Model analysis indicated that the substitution disrupts these native hydrophobic interactions, which are of great importance to the conformation in the activation domain of FVIIa.

  1. Hemorrhage and blood loss-induced anemia associated with an acquired coagulation factor VIII inhibitor in a Thoroughbred mare.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Laramie S; Brooks, Marjory B

    2014-03-15

    A 23-year-old Thoroughbred mare was evaluated because of a coagulopathy causing hemoperitoneum, hematomas, and signs of blood loss-induced anemia. The mare had tachycardia, pallor, hypoperfusion, and a large mass in the right flank. The mass was further characterized ultrasonographically as an extensive hematoma in the body wall with associated hemoabdomen. Coagulation testing revealed persistent, specific prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (> 100 seconds; reference interval, 24 to 44 seconds) attributable to severe factor VIII deficiency (12%; reference interval, 50% to 200%). On the basis of the horse's age, lack of previous signs of a bleeding diathesis, and subsequent quantification of plasma factor VIII inhibitory activity (Bethesda assay titer, 2.7 Bethesda units/mL), acquired hemophilia A was diagnosed. The medical history did not reveal risk factors or underlying diseases; thus, the development of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII was considered to be idiopathic. The mare was treated with 2 transfusions of fresh whole blood and fresh-frozen plasma. Immunosuppressive treatment consisting of dexamethasone and azathioprine was initiated. Factor VIII deficiency and signs of coagulopathy resolved, and the inhibitory antibody titer decreased. The mare remained healthy with no relapse for at least 1 year after treatment. Horses may develop inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII that cause acquired hemophilia A. A treatment strategy combining transfusions of whole blood and fresh-frozen plasma and administration of immunosuppressive agents was effective and induced sustained remission for at least 1 year in the mare described here.

  2. Synergistic effect of a factor Xa inhibitor, TAK-442, and antiplatelet agents on whole blood coagulation and arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Noriko; Hiroe, Katsuhiko; Kawamura, Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Activated platelets facilitate blood coagulation by providing factor V and a procoagulant surface for prothrombinase. Here, we investigated the potential synergy of a potent factor Xa/prothrombinase inhibitor, TAK-442, plus aspirin or clopidogrel in preventing arterial thrombosis and whole blood coagulation. Thrombus formation was initiated by FeCl(3)-induced rat carotid injury. Bleeding time was evaluated with the rat tail transection model. Whole blood coagulation was assessed by thromboelastographic examination (TEG) for which blood obtained from control, aspirin-, or clopidogrel-treated rats was transferred to a TEG analyzer containing, collagen or adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and TAK-442 or vehicle. TAK-442 (3mg/kg, po), aspirin (100mg/kg, po) or clopidogrel (3mg/kg, po) alone had no significant effect on thrombus formation, whereas the combination of TAK-442 with aspirin and clopidogrel remarkably prolonged the time to thrombus formation without additional significant prolongation of bleeding time. TEG demonstrated that the onset of collagen-induced blood coagulation were slightly longer in aspirin-treated rats than control; however, when the blood from aspirin-treated rats was subsequently treated in vitro with 100 nM TAK-442, the onset of clotting was significantly prolonged. In contrast, only marginal prolongation was observed with TAK-442 treatment of blood from control animals. The onset time of ADP-induced blood coagulation was slightly longer in clopidogrel-treated rats compared with control, and it was further extended by TAK-442 treatment. These results demonstrate that blood coagulation can be markedly delayed by the addition of TAK-442 to antiplatelets treatment which could contribute to synergistic antithrombotic efficacy in these settings. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Associations of coagulation factors IX and XI levels with incident coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke: the REGARDS study.

    PubMed

    Olson, N C; Cushman, M; Judd, S E; Kissela, B M; Safford, M M; Howard, G; Zakai, N A

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Coagulation factors (F) IX and XI have been implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We studied associations of FIX and FXI with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Higher FIX antigen was associated with incident CHD risk in blacks but not whites. Higher levels of FIX antigen may be a CHD risk factor among blacks. Background Recent studies have suggested the importance of coagulation factor IX and FXI in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Objectives To determine whether basal levels of FIX or FXI antigen were associated with the risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischemic stroke. Patients/Methods The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study recruited 30 239 participants across the contiguous USA between 2003 and 2007. In a case-cohort study within REGARDS, FIX and FXI antigen were measured in participants with incident CHD (n = 609), in participants with incident ischemic stroke (n = 538), and in a cohort random sample (n = 1038). Hazard ratios (HRs) for CHD and ischemic stroke risk were estimated with Cox models per standard deviation higher FIX or FXI level, adjusted for CVD risk factors. Results In models adjusting for CHD risk factors, higher FIX levels were associated with incident CHD risk (HR 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.40) and the relationship of higher FXI levels was slightly weaker (HR 1.15; 95% CI 0.97-1.36). When stratified by race, the HR of FIX was higher in blacks (HR 1.39; 95% CI 1.10-1.75) than in whites (HR 1.06; 95% CI 0.86-1.31). After adjustment for stroke risk factors, there was no longer an association of FIX levels with ischemic stroke, whereas the association of FXI levels with ischemic stroke was slightly attenuated. Conclusions Higher FIX antigen levels were associated with incident CHD in blacks but not in whites. FIX levels may increase CHD risk among blacks. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Postprandial changes in platelet function and coagulation factors after high-fat meals with different fatty acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Freese, R; Mutanen, M

    1995-09-01

    To compare the postprandial effects of three oils differing in their fatty acid composition on platelet aggregation and coagulation. The oils studied were low-erucic acid rapeseed oil (RO, oleic acid 54% of fatty acids), sunflower oil (SO, linoleic acid 64% of fatty acids) and butter oil (BO, saturated fatty acids 62% of fatty acids). The postprandial effects of three fat-loads were followed for 5 h. Division of Nutrition, University of Helsinki. Twelve healthy female subjects (aged 23-38 years) were recruited among university students and employees. Postprandial lipaemia was induced by high-fat meals containing fat (RO, SO or BO) 1 g/kg of body weight, skim-milk powder, sugar, strawberries, and water. Each subject ingested each meal in three separate mornings after an overnight fast. The order of the meals was randomised. Blood samples were taken before and 1, 2.5, and 5 h after the test meal. All three test meals similarly affected platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma. Aggregation induced by collagen (0.6, 1 and 2.5 micrograms/ml) decreased during the 5-h period after the meals (P = 0.000). ADP-induced aggregation did not change during the follow-up period after any meal (P = 0.105-0.483). All fat loads increased factor VII coagulant activity (F VII:C) (P = 0.000), but in plasma fibrinogen concentration (P = 0.155) or antithrombin III activity (P = 0.278) no postprandial changes were found. These results show that high-fat meals have acute effects on platelet function and F VII:C in healthy women and that these effects are not mediated through the fatty acid composition of the meals.

  5. Expression and fast preparation of biologically active recombinant human coagulation factor VII in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W; Li, C Q; Xiao, X P; Lin, F Z

    2013-12-16

    Human coagulation factor VII (FVII) plays an important role in the blood coagulation process and exists in micro amounts in human plasma; therefore, any attempt at the large-scale production of FVII in significant quantities is challenging. The purpose of this study was to express and obtain biologically active recombinant FVII (rFVII) from Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. The full-length FVII cDNA was isolated from a HepG2 cell line and then subcloned in pcDNA3.1 to construct an expression vector, pcDNA-FVII. CHO-K1 cells were transfected with 1 µg pcDNA-FVII. The cell line that stably expressed secretory FVII was screened using 900 µg/mL G418. The FVII copy number in CHO-K1 cells was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The rFVII was purified in ligand affinity chromatography medium. The purified protein was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis. The biological activity of the purified FVII protein was determined by a prothrombin time assay. Three cell lines that permanently expressed rFVII were screened. The qPCR results demonstrated that each CHO-K1 cell harbored two FVII DNA copies. The SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the purified protein was about 50 kDa. The purity of the target protein was 95%. The prothrombin time assay indicated that the FVII-specific activity of rFVII was 2573 ± 75 IU/mg. This method enabled the fast preparation of high-purity rFVII from CHO-K1 cells, and the purified protein had good biological activity.

  6. Optical factors determined by the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement of absolute coagulation rate constants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shenghua; Liu, Jie; Sun, Zhiwei

    2006-12-01

    Turbidity measurement for the absolute coagulation rate constants of suspensions has been extensively adopted because of its simplicity and easy implementation. A key factor in deriving the rate constant from experimental data is how to theoretically evaluate the so-called optical factor involved in calculating the extinction cross section of doublets formed during aggregation. In a previous paper, we have shown that compared with other theoretical approaches, the T-matrix method provides a robust solution to this problem and is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology, as well as increasing measurement accuracy. This paper will provide a more comprehensive discussion of the physical insight for using the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement and associated technical details. In particular, the importance of ensuring the correct value for the refractive indices for colloidal particles and the surrounding medium used in the calculation is addressed, because the indices generally vary with the wavelength of the incident light. The comparison of calculated results with experiments shows that the T-matrix method can correctly calculate optical factors even for large particles, whereas other existing theories cannot. In addition, the data of the optical factor calculated by the T-matrix method for a range of particle radii and incident light wavelengths are listed.

  7. Blood coagulation, fibrinolytic activity and lipid profile in subclinical thyroid disease: subclinical hyperthyroidism increases plasma factor X activity.

    PubMed

    Erem, Cihangir

    2006-03-01

    Various abnormalities of coagulation and fibrinolysis occur in patients with thyroid diseases, and may range from subclinical laboratory abnormalities to clinically significant disorders of coagulation and, rarely, major haemorrhage or thromboembolism. The influence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SHypo) on haemostasis is controversial, both hypercoagulable and hypocoagulable states have been reported. A hypercoagulable state might be a risk factor for thromboembolic disease in SHypo. On the other hand, subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCHyper) is associated with enhanced cardiovascular risk. In the English literature, there are no studies on changes in coagulation and fibriolytic status in subjects with SCHyper. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the markers of endogenous coagulation and fibrinolysis, and to evaluate the relationships between serum lipid profile and thyroid hormones and these haemostatic parameters in subclinical thyroid patients. Various haemostatic parameters were investigated in 30 patients with SHypo and 20 patients with SCHyper and compared to 20 euthyroid controls. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, factors V, VII, VIII, IX and X activities, vWF, antithrombin III (AT III), protein C, protein S, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), as well as common lipid variables, were measured. The relationships between serum thyroid hormones and these haemostatic parameters were examined. Compared with the control subjects, only FX activity was significantly increased in patients with SCHyper (P < 0.01). Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were significantly higher in patients with SHypo compared with the control group (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). TC levels were significantly higher in patients with SCHyper than in controls (P < 0.05). No differences could be found in coagulation

  8. Recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1 from coagulation factor VII functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted glioma magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heng; Chen, Xiao; Xue, Wei; Chu, Chengchao; Liu, Yu; Tong, Haipeng; Du, Xuesong; Xie, Tian; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Weiguo

    The highly infiltrative and invasive nature of glioma cells often leads to blurred tumor margins, resulting in incomplete tumor resection and tumor recurrence. Accurate detection and precise delineation of glioma help in preoperative delineation, surgical planning and survival prediction. In this study, recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain-1, derived from human coagulation factor VII, was conjugated to iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) for targeted glioma magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The synthesized EGF1-EGFP-IONPs exhibited excellent targeting ability toward tissue factor (TF)-positive U87MG cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro, and demonstrated persistent and efficient MR contrast enhancement up to 12 h for preclinical glioma models with high targeting specificity in vivo. They hold great potential for clinical translation and developing targeted theranostics against brain glioma.

  9. Ordered adsorption of coagulation factor XII on negatively charged polymer surfaces probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jie; Paszti, Zoltan; Wang, Fulin; Schrauben, Joel N; Tarabara, Volodymyr V; Schmaier, Alvin H; Chen, Zhan

    2007-05-01

    Electrostatic interactions between negatively charged polymer surfaces and factor XII (FXII), a blood coagulation factor, were investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, supplemented by several analytical techniques including attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), zeta-potential measurement, and chromogenic assay. A series of sulfonated polystyrenes (sPS) with different sulfonation levels were synthesized as model surfaces with different surface charge densities. SFG spectra collected from FXII adsorbed onto PS and sPS surfaces with different surface charge densities showed remarkable differences in spectral features and especially in spectral intensity. Chromogenic assay experiments showed that highly charged sPS surfaces induced FXII autoactivation. ATR-FTIR and QCM results indicated that adsorption amounts on the PS and sPS surfaces were similar even though the surface charge densities were different. No significant conformational change was observed from FXII adsorbed onto surfaces studied. Using theoretical calculations, the possible contribution from the third-order nonlinear optical effect induced by the surface electric field was evaluated, and it was found to be unable to yield the SFG signal enhancement observed. Therefore it was concluded that the adsorbed FXII orientation and ordering were the main reasons for the remarkable SFG amide I signal increase on sPS surfaces. These investigations indicate that negatively charged surfaces facilitate or induce FXII autoactivation on the molecular level by imposing specific orientation and ordering on the adsorbed protein molecules.

  10. Selective depletion of plasma prekallikrein or coagulation factor XII inhibits thrombosis in mice without increased risk of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Revenko, Alexey S; Gao, Dacao; Crosby, Jeff R; Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Zhao, Chenguang; May, Chris; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P; MacLeod, A Robert

    2011-11-10

    Recent studies indicate that the plasma contact system plays an important role in thrombosis, despite being dispensable for hemostasis. For example, mice deficient in coagulation factor XII (fXII) are protected from arterial thrombosis and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. We demonstrate that selective reduction of prekallikrein (PKK), another member of the contact system, using antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) technology results in an antithrombotic phenotype in mice. The effects of PKK deficiency were compared with those of fXII deficiency produced by specific ASO-mediated reduction of fXII. Mice with reduced PKK had ∼ 3-fold higher plasma levels of fXII, and reduced levels of fXIIa-serpin complexes, consistent with fXII being a substrate for activated PKK in vivo. PKK or fXII deficiency reduced thrombus formation in both arterial and venous thrombosis models, without an apparent effect on hemostasis. The amount of reduction of PKK and fXII required to produce an antithrombotic effect differed between venous and arterial models, suggesting that these factors may regulate thrombus formation by distinct mechanisms. Our results support the concept that fXII and PKK play important and perhaps nonredundant roles in pathogenic thrombus propagation, and highlight a novel, specific and safe pharmaceutical approach to target these contact system proteases.

  11. Selective depletion of plasma prekallikrein or coagulation factor XII inhibits thrombosis in mice without increased risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Revenko, Alexey S.; Gao, Dacao; Crosby, Jeff R.; Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Zhao, Chenguang; May, Chris; Gailani, David; Monia, Brett P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the plasma contact system plays an important role in thrombosis, despite being dispensable for hemostasis. For example, mice deficient in coagulation factor XII (fXII) are protected from arterial thrombosis and cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. We demonstrate that selective reduction of prekallikrein (PKK), another member of the contact system, using antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) technology results in an antithrombotic phenotype in mice. The effects of PKK deficiency were compared with those of fXII deficiency produced by specific ASO-mediated reduction of fXII. Mice with reduced PKK had ∼ 3-fold higher plasma levels of fXII, and reduced levels of fXIIa-serpin complexes, consistent with fXII being a substrate for activated PKK in vivo. PKK or fXII deficiency reduced thrombus formation in both arterial and venous thrombosis models, without an apparent effect on hemostasis. The amount of reduction of PKK and fXII required to produce an antithrombotic effect differed between venous and arterial models, suggesting that these factors may regulate thrombus formation by distinct mechanisms. Our results support the concept that fXII and PKK play important and perhaps nonredundant roles in pathogenic thrombus propagation, and highlight a novel, specific and safe pharmaceutical approach to target these contact system proteases. PMID:21821705

  12. [Best time to administer coagulation factor XIII( Fibrogammin P) for postoperative intractable pancreatic fistula following gastrectomy for gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Shoda, Katsutoshi; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Arita, Tomohiro; Konishi, Hirotaka; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation factor XIII( Fibrogammin P, F XIII) has been used to treat postoperative pancreatic fistulas following gastrectomy for gastric cancer in Japan. However, little is known about the best timing to start this treatment for early recovery. This study was designed to examine the appropriate time to start Fibrogammin P treatment for pancreatic fistulas, based on nutritional and inflammatory parameters. We retrospectively examined 27 consecutive patients with Grade B or C pancreatic fistulas as defined by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Fistula( ISGPF) classification who underwent gastrectomy at our institute between 1997 and 2011. We analyzed data on total protein( TP), albumin (Alb), C-reactive protein( CRP), and hemoglobin( Hb) concentrations and white blood cell( WBC) and lymphocyte counts. We used this information to determine laboratory cut-off values that indicate the most advantageous time to start the administration of Fibrogammin P in order to achieve early recovery within 2 weeks. When Fibrogammin P administration was based on more than 2 cut-off values such as Alb>2.6 g/dL and Hb>9.0 g/dL and WBC<9,000/μL (p= 0.1563), early cure of pancreatic fistulas was achieved. The use of nutritional and inflammatory parameter values to determine the best time to administer Fibrogammin P may shorten the treatment period.

  13. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic correction of a novel coagulator factor IX gene mutation ameliorates hemophilia in mouse.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yuting; Ma, Yanlin; Li, Qi; Sun, Zhenliang; Ma, Lie; Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Liren; Zeng, Li; Shao, Yanjiao; Chen, Yuting; Ma, Ning; Lu, Wenqing; Hu, Kewen; Han, Honghui; Yu, Yanhong; Huang, Yuanhua; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2016-05-01

    The X-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulator factor IX, hemophilia B, is a disease ideally suited for gene therapy with genome editing technology. Here, we identify a family with hemophilia B carrying a novel mutation, Y371D, in the human F9 gene. The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to generate distinct genetically modified mouse models and confirmed that the novel Y371D mutation resulted in a more severe hemophilia B phenotype than the previously identified Y371S mutation. To develop therapeutic strategies targeting this mutation, we subsequently compared naked DNA constructs versus adenoviral vectors to deliver Cas9 components targeting the F9 Y371D mutation in adult mice. After treatment, hemophilia B mice receiving naked DNA constructs exhibited correction of over 0.56% of F9 alleles in hepatocytes, which was sufficient to restore hemostasis. In contrast, the adenoviral delivery system resulted in a higher corrective efficiency but no therapeutic effects due to severe hepatic toxicity. Our studies suggest that CRISPR/Cas-mediated in situ genome editing could be a feasible therapeutic strategy for human hereditary diseases, although an efficient and clinically relevant delivery system is required for further clinical studies. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. Targeted inversion and reversion of the blood coagulation factor 8 gene in human iPS cells using TALENs.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Yong; Kim, Jungeun; Kweon, Jiyeon; Son, Jeong Sang; Lee, Jae Souk; Yoo, Jeong-Eun; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2014-06-24

    Hemophilia A, one of the most common genetic bleeding disorders, is caused by various mutations in the blood coagulation factor VIII (F8) gene. Among the genotypes that result in hemophilia A, two different types of chromosomal inversions that involve a portion of the F8 gene are most frequent, accounting for almost half of all severe hemophilia A cases. In this study, we used a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) pair to invert a 140-kbp chromosomal segment that spans the portion of the F8 gene in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to create a hemophilia A model cell line. In addition, we reverted the inverted segment back to its normal orientation in the hemophilia model iPSCs using the same TALEN pair. Importantly, we detected the F8 mRNA in cells derived from the reverted iPSCs lines, but not in those derived from the clones with the inverted segment. Thus, we showed that TALENs can be used both for creating disease models associated with chromosomal rearrangements in iPSCs and for correcting genetic defects caused by chromosomal inversions. This strategy provides an iPSC-based novel therapeutic option for the treatment of hemophilia A and other genetic diseases caused by chromosomal inversions.

  15. Adhesion of Blood Clots Can Be Enhanced When Copolymerized with a Macromer That Is Crosslinked by Coagulation Factor XIIIa.

    PubMed

    Chan, Karen Y T; Zhao, Chunyi; Siren, Erika M J; Chan, Jeanne C Y; Boschman, Jeffrey; Kastrup, Christian J

    2016-06-13

    The adhesion of blood clots to blood vessels, such as through the adhesion of fibrin, is essential in hemostasis. While numerous strategies for initiating clot formation and preventing clot lysis are being developed to create improved hemostatic agents, strategies for enhancing clot adhesion have not been widely explored. Here, we show that adhesion of blood clots can be increased by adding a previously characterized synthetic polymer that is crosslinked by coagulation factor XIIIa during clotting. Addition of the polymer to normal plasma increased the adhesive strength of clots by 2-fold. It also recovered the adhesive strength of nonadhesive fibrinogen-deficient whole blood clots from <0.06 kPa to 1.9 ± 0.14 kPa, which is similar to the adhesive strength of a fibrinogen-rich clot (1.8 ± 0.64 kPa). The polymer also enabled plasma clots to remain adhered under fibrinolytic conditions. By demonstrating that the adhesive strength of clots can be increased with a synthetic material, this provides a potential strategy for creating advanced hemostatic materials, such as treatments for fibrinogen deficiency in trauma-induced coagulopathy.

  16. An interactive mutation database for human coagulation factor IX provides novel insights into the phenotypes and genetics of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Rallapalli, P M; Kemball-Cook, G; Tuddenham, E G; Gomez, K; Perkins, S J

    2013-07-01

    Factor IX (FIX) is important in the coagulation cascade, being activated to FIXa on cleavage. Defects in the human F9 gene frequently lead to hemophilia B. To assess 1113 unique F9 mutations corresponding to 3721 patient entries in a new and up-to-date interactive web database alongside the FIXa protein structure. The mutations database was built using MySQL and structural analyses were based on a homology model for the human FIXa structure based on closely-related crystal structures. Mutations have been found in 336 (73%) out of 461 residues in FIX. There were 812 unique point mutations, 182 deletions, 54 polymorphisms, 39 insertions and 26 others that together comprise a total of 1113 unique variants. The 64 unique mild severity mutations in the mature protein with known circulating protein phenotypes include 15 (23%) quantitative type I mutations and 41 (64%) predominantly qualitative type II mutations. Inhibitors were described in 59 reports (1.6%) corresponding to 25 unique mutations. The interactive database provides insights into mechanisms of hemophilia B. Type II mutations are deduced to disrupt predominantly those structural regions involved with functional interactions. The interactive features of the database will assist in making judgments about patient management. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H; Streatfield, Stephen J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (∼1 mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ∼2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP(+) regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ∼870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft(2) per annum yielding 24,000-36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Low cost industrial production of coagulation factor IX bioencapsulated in lettuce cells for oral tolerance induction in hemophilia B

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Zhu, Liqing; Sherman, Alexandra; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Shina; Kamesh, Aditya; Norikane, Joey H.; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies (inhibitors) developed by hemophilia B patients against coagulation factor IX (FIX) are challenging to eliminate because of anaphylaxis or nephrotic syndrome after continued infusion. To address this urgent unmet medical need, FIX fused with a transmucosal carrier (CTB) was produced in a commercial lettuce (Simpson Elite) cultivar using species specific chloroplast vectors regulated by endogenous psbA sequences. CTB-FIX (~1mg/g) in lyophilized cells was stable with proper folding, disulfide bonds and pentamer assembly when stored ~2 years at ambient temperature. Feeding lettuce cells to hemophilia B mice delivered CTB-FIX efficiently to the gut immune system, induced LAP+ regulatory T cells and suppressed inhibitor/IgE formation and anaphylaxis against FIX. Lyophilized cells enabled 10-fold dose escalation studies and successful induction of oral tolerance was observed in all tested doses. Induction of tolerance in such a broad dose range should enable oral delivery to patients of different age groups and diverse genetic background. Using Fraunhofer cGMP hydroponic system, ~870 kg fresh or 43.5 kg dry weight can be harvested per 1000 ft2 per annum yielding 24,000–36,000 doses for 20-kg pediatric patients, enabling first commercial development of an oral drug, addressing prohibitively expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and short shelf life of current protein drugs. PMID:26302233

  19. Effects of anti-aggregant, anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant drug consumption on the preparation and therapeutic potential of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF).

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Troya, María; Zalduendo, Mar; Orive, Gorka

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and incidence of trauma-related injuries, coronary heart disease and other chronic diseases increase dramatically with age. This population sector is therefore a regular consumer of different types of drugs that may affect platelet aggregation and the coagulation cascade. We have evaluated whether the consumption of acetylsalicylic acid, acenocoumarol, glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, and therefore their presence in blood, could interfere with the preparation and biological outcomes of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF). Clotting time, clot retraction and platelet activation of PRGF was evaluated. PRGF growth factor content and the release of different biomolecules by tendon fibroblasts were also quantified, as well as cell proliferation and cell migration. The preparation and biological potential of PRGF is not affected by the intake of the evaluated drugs, and solely its angiogenic potential and its capacity to induce HA and fibronectin synthesis, is reduced in patients taking anti-coagulants.

  20. Kreuth IV: European consensus proposals for treatment of haemophilia with coagulation factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, P L F; Peyvandi, F; O'Mahony, B; Behr-Gross, M-E; Hilger, A; Schramm, W; Mannucci, P M

    2017-05-01

    This report summarizes recommendations relating to haemophilia therapy arising from discussions among experts from 36 European countries during the 'Kreuth IV' meeting in May 2016. The objective of the meeting was for experts in the field of haemophilia from across Europe to draft resolutions regarding current issues relating to the treatment of haemophilia. Hospitals providing clinical care for people with haemophilia and related disorders are strongly recommended to seek formal designation as either European Haemophilia Treatment Centres (EHTC) or European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres (EHCCC). There should be agreed national protocols or guidelines on management of the ageing patient with haemophilia. The minimum consumption of factor VIII and IX concentrate in any country should be 4 IU and 0.5 IU per capita of general population respectively. Treatment for hepatitis C with direct-acting antiviral agents should be provided to all people with haemophilia on a priority basis. Genotype analysis should be offered to all patients with severe haemophilia. Genetic counselling, when given, should encompass the recommendation that genetic relatives of the affected person be advised to seek genetic counselling. People with inhibitors should have access to bypassing agents, immune tolerance and elective surgery. National or regional tenders for factor concentrates are encouraged. Outcome data including health related quality of life should be collected. Treatment with extended half-life factors should be individualized and protection against bleeding should be improved by increasing trough levels. Steps should be taken to understand and minimize the risk of inhibitor development. It is hoped that these recommendations will help to foster equity of haemophilia care throughout Europe. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cross-talk between the Tissue Factor/coagulation factor VIIa complex and the tyrosine kinase receptor EphA2 in cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Oskar; Thulin, Åsa; Asplund, Anna; Hegde, Geeta; Navani, Sanjay; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2016-05-31

    Tissue Factor (TF) forms a proteolytically active complex together with coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) and functions as the trigger of blood coagulation or alternatively activates cell signaling. We recently described that EphA2 of the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor family is cleaved directly by the TF/FVIIa complex. The aim of the present study was to further characterize the cross-talk between TF/FVIIa and EphA2 using in vitro model systems and human cancer specimens. Cleavage and phosphorylation of EphA2 was studied by Western blot. Subcellular localization of TF and EphA2 was investigated by a proximity ligation assay and confocal microscopy. Phalloidin staining of the actin cytoskeleton was used to study cell rounding and retraction fiber formation. Expression of TF and EphA2 in human colorectal cancer specimens was examined by immunohistochemistry. TF and EphA2 co-localized constitutively in MDA-MB-231 cells, and addition of FVIIa resulted in cleavage of EphA2 by a PAR2-independent mechanism. Overexpression of TF in U251 glioblastoma cells lead to co-localization with EphA2 at the leading edge and FVIIa-dependent cleavage of EphA2. FVIIa potentiated ephrin-A1-induced cell rounding and retraction fiber formation in MDA-MB-231 cells through a RhoA/ROCK-dependent pathway that did not require PAR2-activation. TF and EphA2 were expressed in colorectal cancer specimens, and were significantly correlated. These results suggest that TF/FVIIa-EphA2 cross-talk might potentiate ligand-dependent EphA2 signaling in human cancers, and provide initial evidence that it is possible for this interaction to occur in vivo.

  2. A Pilot Study of Tissue Factor-Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor Axis and Other Selected Coagulation Parameters in Broiler Chickens Administered in Ovo with Selected Prebiotics*.

    PubMed

    Buzala, Mateusz; Ponczek, Michal Blazej; Slomka, Artur; Roslewska, Aleksandra; Janicki, Bogdan; Zekanowska, Ewa; Bednarczyk, Marek

    The tissue factor (TF) - tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) axis plays a major role in hemostasis. Disorders of the coagulation system are commonly diagnosed with the help of screening tests such as prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and plasma fibrinogen concentration (PFC). However, the effect of prebiotics on the hemostasis system has not been characterized in poultry yet. This study was designed to determine the effect of in ovo administration ofprebiotics on blood coagulation parameters of broiler chickens depending on their age. The study was conducted with 180 broiler chick embryos, the air cells of which were injected on day 12 of incubation with prebiotics (experimental groups: Bi2tos, DiNovoo and RFO) or physiological saline solution (control group). At 1, 21 and 42 days of rearing, blood was sampled from 15 broiler chickens from each group. An enzyme immunoassay was performed to determine plasma TF and TFPI levels, and PT, aPTT and PFC were determined in the chicken blood. We demonstrated that: 1) total TF levels increased with age in the experimental groups, 2) prebiotics had no significant effect on TF levels between the groups at a particular age, 3) total TFPI levels differed between both the type of in ovo injected substance and the broiler chicken age, 4) in the control group, PT and aPTT were found to increase with age whilst fibrinogen concentration decreased. The main conclusion from this pilot study is that total TF and TFPI levels change with age, however no clear patterns regarding TFPI were detected yet. The levels of PT, aPTT and PFC varied with the prebiotics administered in ovo as well as with the age of broiler chickens.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces expression of human coagulation factor XII via Smad3 and JNK signaling pathways in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Ewa; Markart, Philipp; Zakrzewicz, Dariusz; Preissner, Klaus T; Wygrecka, Malgorzata

    2010-04-09

    Coagulation factor XII (FXII) is a liver-derived serine protease involved in fibrinolysis, coagulation, and inflammation. The regulation of FXII expression is largely unknown. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a multifunctional cytokine that has been linked to several pathological processes, including tissue fibrosis by modulating procoagulant and fibrinolytic activities. This study investigated whether TGF-beta1 may regulate FXII expression in human lung fibroblasts. Treatment of human lung fibroblasts with TGF-beta1 resulted in a time-dependent increase in FXII production, activation of p44/42, p38, JNK, and Akt, and phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus of Smad3. However, TGF-beta1-induced FXII expression was repressed only by the JNK inhibitor and JNK and Smad3 antisense oligonucleotides but not by MEK, p38, or phosphoinositide 3-kinase blockers. JNK inhibition had no effect on TGF-beta1-induced Smad3 phosphorylation, association with Smad4, and its translocation into the nucleus but strongly suppressed Smad3-DNA complex formation. FXII promoter analysis revealed that the -299/+1 region was sufficient for TGF-beta1 to induce FXII expression. Sequence analysis of this region detected a potential Smad-binding element at position -272/-269 (SBE-(-272/-269)). Chromatin immunoprecipitation and streptavidin pulldown assays demonstrated TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 binding to SBE-(-272/-269). Mutation or deletion of SBE-(-272/-269) substantially reduced TGF-beta1-mediated activation of the FXII promoter. Clinical relevance was demonstrated by elevated FXII levels and its co-localization with fibroblasts in the lungs of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Our results show that JNK/Smad3 pathway plays a critical role in TGF-beta1-induced FXII expression in human lung fibroblasts and implicate its possible involvement in pathological conditions characterized by elevated TGF-beta1 levels.

  4. Large deletions play a minor but essential role in congenital coagulation factor VII and X deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rath, M; Najm, J; Sirb, H; Kentouche, K; Dufke, A; Pauli, S; Hackmann, K; Liehr, T; Hübner, C A; Felbor, U

    2015-01-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) and factor X (FX) deficiencies belong to the group of rare bleeding disorders which may occur in separate or combined forms since both the F7 and F10 genes are located in close proximity on the distal long arm of chromosome 13 (13q34). We here present data of 192 consecutive index cases with FVII and/or FX deficiency. 10 novel and 53 recurrent sequence alterations were identified in the F7 gene and 5 novel as well as 11 recurrent in the F10 gene including one homozygous 4.35 kb deletion within F7 (c.64+430_131-6delinsTCGTAA) and three large heterozygous deletions involving both the F7 and F10 genes. One of the latter proved to be cytogenetically visible as a chromosome 13q34 deletion and associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum and psychomotor retardation. Large deletions play a minor but essential role in the mutational spectrum of the F7 and F10 genes. Copy number analyses (e. g. MLPA) should be considered if sequencing cannot clarify the underlying reason of an observed coagulopathy. Of note, in cases of combined FVII/FX deficiency, a deletion of the two contiguous genes might be part of a larger chromosomal rearrangement.

  5. Engineering of a membrane-triggered activity switch in coagulation factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Anders L.; Sorensen, Anders B.; Holmberg, Heidi L.; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Karlsson, Johan; Buchardt, Jens; Lamberth, Kasper; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Ley, Carsten Dan; Sørensen, Brit B.; Ruf, Wolfram; Olsen, Ole H.; Østergaard, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (FVIIa) variants with increased activity offer the promise to improve the treatment of bleeding episodes in patients with inhibitor-complicated hemophilia. Here, an approach was adopted to enhance the activity of FVIIa by selectively optimizing substrate turnover at the membrane surface. Under physiological conditions, endogenous FVIIa engages its cell-localized cofactor tissue factor (TF), which stimulates activity through membrane-dependent substrate recognition and allosteric effects. To exploit these properties of TF, a covalent complex between FVIIa and the soluble ectodomain of TF (sTF) was engineered by introduction of a nonperturbing cystine bridge (FVIIa Q64C-sTF G109C) in the interface. Upon coexpression, FVIIa Q64C and sTF G109C spontaneously assembled into a covalent complex with functional properties similar to the noncovalent wild-type complex. Additional introduction of a FVIIa-M306D mutation to uncouple the sTF-mediated allosteric stimulation of FVIIa provided a final complex with FVIIa-like activity in solution, while exhibiting a two to three orders-of-magnitude increase in activity relative to FVIIa upon exposure to a procoagulant membrane. In a mouse model of hemophilia A, the complex normalized hemostasis upon vascular injury at a dose of 0.3 nmol/kg compared with 300 nmol/kg for FVIIa. PMID:29109275

  6. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes that coexpress coagulation factors VIII and IX.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Shang, Chang-zhen; Lü, Li-hong; Qiu, De-chuan; Ren, Meng; Chen, Ya-jin; Min, Jun

    2010-11-01

    To establish an efficient culture system to support embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation into hepatocytes that coexpress F-VIII and F-IX. Mouse E14 ES cells were cultured in differentiation medium containing sodium butyrate (SB), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and/or bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) to induce the differentiation of endoderm cells and hepatic progenitor cells. Hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone were then used to induce the maturation of ES cell-derived hepatocytes. The mRNA expression levels of endoderm-specific genes and hepatocyte-specific genes, including the levels of F-VIII and F-IX, were detected by RT-PCR and real-time PCR during various stages of differentiation. Protein expression was examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot. At the final stage of differentiation, flow cytometry was performed to determine the percentage of cells coexpressing F-VIII and F-IX, and ELISA was used to detect the levels of F-VIII and F-IX protein secreted into the culture medium. The expression of endoderm-specific and hepatocyte-specific markers was upregulated to highest level in response to the combination of SB, bFGF, and BMP4. Treatment with the three inducers during hepatic progenitor differentiation significantly enhanced the mRNA and protein levels of F-VIII and F-IX in ES cell-derived hepatocytes. More importantly, F-VIII and F-IX were coexpressed with high efficiency at the final stage of differentiation, and they were also secreted into the culture medium. We have established a novel in vitro differentiation protocol for ES-derived hepatocytes that coexpress F-VIII and F-IX that may provide a foundation for stem cell replacement therapy for hemophilia.

  7. Depletion of coagulation factor XII ameliorates brain pathology and cognitive impairment in Alzheimer disease mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Revenko, Alexey S; Singh, Pradeep; MacLeod, A Robert; Norris, Erin H; Strickland, Sidney

    2017-05-04

    Vascular abnormalities and inflammation are found in many Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, but whether these changes play a causative role in AD is not clear. The factor XII (FXII) -initiated contact system can trigger both vascular pathology and inflammation and is activated in AD patients and AD mice. We have investigated the role of the contact system in AD pathogenesis. Cleavage of high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK), a marker for activation of the inflammatory arm of the contact system, is increased in a mouse model of AD, and this cleavage is temporally correlated with the onset of brain inflammation. Depletion of FXII in AD mice inhibited HK cleavage in plasma and reduced neuroinflammation, fibrinogen deposition, and neurodegeneration in the brain. Moreover, FXII-depleted AD mice showed better cognitive function than untreated AD mice. These results indicate that FXII-mediated contact system activation contributes to AD pathogenesis, and therefore this system may offer novel targets for AD treatment. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. The acute effect of moderate intensity aquatic exercise on coagulation factors in haemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Luis Gustavo Normanton; Abreu, Laurinda; Almeida, Jussara; Boullosa, Daniel Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the acute effect of aquatic exercise on haemostasis in persons with haemophilia. Ten adult haemophiliacs (8 type A, 2 type B) familiarized with aquatic training performed a 20-min exercise session in a swimming pool at an intensity of ~70% maximum heart rate (HR). Blood samples were collected immediately after the training session. The haemostatic parameters selected for analyses were factor VIII (FVIII), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and fibrinogen. There were unclear effects of the exercise bout on FVIII and APTT, with a possibly beneficial effect on PT (-11·4%; 90% confidence interval: -26·1;3·3%), and a trivial change on fibrinogen levels. It was found an association between the mean rise in HR during exercise and the decrement in PT after exercise (r = 0·729; P = 0·026). The greater changes were observed in the patients diagnosed with a moderate level of haemophilia. It is concluded that a short bout of moderate intensity of aquatic exercise may have a positive influence on PT in adults with haemophilia with greater changes in those individuals exhibiting a greater rise in HR during exercise. This may be an important issue to the haemostatic control of haemophiliacs in clinical settings. Further studies are warranted for testing the influence of different aquatic exercise intensities on haemostasis. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The molecular basis of low activity levels of coagulation factor VII: a Brazilian cohort.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, F Y; Jardim, L L; Landau, M B; Gadelha, T; Corrêa, M F B; Pereira, I F M; Rezende, S M

    2015-09-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is the most common among the rare bleeding disorders. It is transmitted as an autosomal recessive inheritance, due to mutations in the FVII gene (F7). Molecular studies of FVII deficiency are rare in non-Caucasian populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the molecular basis behind low levels of FVII activity (FVII:C) levels in a cohort of Brazilian patients. A total of 34 patients with low FVII levels were clinically evaluated and submitted to laboratory tests, among these, prothrombin time and FVII:C, with different thromboplastins. All exons and intron/exon boundaries of F7 were amplified and sequenced. A total of 14 genetic alterations were identified, of which six were described previously, c.1091G>A, c.1151C>T, c.-323_-313insCCTATATCCT, c.285G>A, c.525C>T, c.1238G>A and eight (54.0%) and eight were new, c.128G>A, c.252C>T, c.348G>A, c.417G>A, c.426G>A, c.745_747delGTG, c.843G>A and c.805+52C>T. In addition to the mutation c.1091G>A, known as FVII Padua, the mutation c.1151C>T also presented discrepant FVII:C levels when tested with human and rabbit brain thromboplastin. There was no association between phenotype and genotype. Most of the identified genetic alterations found were polymorphisms. Low levels of FVII:C in this population were mostly related to polymorphisms in F7 and associated with a mild clinical phenotype. Mutation c.1151C>T was associated with discrepant levels of FVII:C using different thromboplastins, such as reported with FVII Padua. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors affecting the lung perfused blood volume in patients with intrapulmonary clots after anti-coagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Munemasa; Masuda, Yu; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Nomura, Takafumi; Nakao, Sei; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kido, Shoji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2015-08-01

    Factors affecting the improvement in the lung perfused blood volume (LPBV) were evaluated based on the presence of intrapulmonary clots (IPCs) after anti-coagulation therapy using 64-slice dual-energy CT. 96 patients exhibiting venous thromboembolism underwent initial and repeated LPBV examinations between December 2008 and July 2014. Fifteen patients were excluded due to pulmonary comorbidities, and a total of 81 patients were included in this study. Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed in 46 of the patients (56.7%). LPBV images were three-dimensionally reconstructed with two threshold ranges: 1-120 HU (V120) and 1-5 HU (V5), and the relative value of V5 per V120 expressed as %V5. These values were subsequently compared with indicators of the severity of PE, such as the D-dimer level, heart rate and CT measurements. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. In patients with IPCs, the D-dimer, V5 and %V5values were significantly larger (p≤0.01) in the initial LPBV, although these differences disappeared in subsequent LPBV after treatment. The right ventricular (RV) diameter, RV/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio and %V5 values were also significantly reduced, whereas the V5 value did not significantly decrease (p=0.07), but V120 value significantly increased (p<0.001) after treatment. However, in patients with IPCs the change rate in %V5 [(subsequent-initial)/initial %V5] showed a better correlation with that in V5 (r=0.94, p<0.001) rate than that in V120 (r=0.19, p=0.19) after treatment. Increased whole lung perfusion (V120) and a decreased low perfusion volume (V5) affect the improvement in the %V5 values after treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved muscle-derived expression of human coagulation factor IX from a skeletal actin/CMV hybrid enhancer/promoter.

    PubMed

    Hagstrom, J N; Couto, L B; Scallan, C; Burton, M; McCleland, M L; Fields, P A; Arruda, V R; Herzog, R W; High, K A

    2000-04-15

    Hemophilia B is caused by the absence of functional coagulation factor IX (F.IX) and represents an important model for treatment of genetic diseases by gene therapy. Recent studies have shown that intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector into mice and hemophilia B dogs results in vector dose-dependent, long-term expression of biologically active F.IX at therapeutic levels. In this study, we demonstrate that levels of expression of approximately 300 ng/mL (6% of normal human F.IX levels) can be reached by intramuscular injection of mice using a 2- to 4-fold lower vector dose (1 x 10(11) vector genomes/mouse, injected into 4 intramuscular sites) than previously described. This was accomplished through the use of an improved expression cassette that uses the cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early enhancer/promoter in combination with a 1.2-kilobase portion of human skeletal actin promoter. These results correlated with enhanced levels of F.IX transcript and secreted F.IX protein in transduced murine C2C12 myotubes. Systemic F.IX expression from constructs containing the CMV enhancer/promoter alone was 120 to 200 ng/mL in mice injected with 1 x 10(11) vector genomes. Muscle-specific promoters performed poorly for F.IX transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. However, the incorporation of a sequence from the alpha-skeletal actin promoter containing at least 1 muscle-specific enhancer and 1 enhancer-like element further improved muscle-derived expression of F.IX from a CMV enhancer/promoter-driven expression cassette over previously published results. These findings will allow the design of a clinical protocol for therapeutic levels of F.IX expression with lower vector doses, thus enhancing efficacy and safety of the protocol. (Blood. 2000;95:2536-2542)

  12. Factor VII assay performance: an analysis of the North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association proficiency testing results.

    PubMed

    Zantek, N D; Hsu, P; Refaai, M A; Ledford-Kraemer, M; Meijer, P; Van Cott, E M

    2013-06-01

    The performance of factor VII (FVII) assays currently used by clinical laboratories was examined in North American Specialized Coagulation Laboratory Association (NASCOLA) proficiency tests. Data from 12 surveys conducted between 2008 and 2010, involving 20 unique specimens plus four repeat-tested specimens, were analyzed. The number of laboratories per survey was 49-54 with a total of 1224 responses. Numerous reagent/instrument combinations were used. For FVII > 80 or <40 U/dL, 99.5% of results (859/863) were correctly classified by laboratories as normal/abnormal. Classification of specimens with 40-73 U/dL FVII was heterogeneous. Interlaboratory precision was better for normal specimens (coefficient of variation (CV) 10.7%) than for FVII<20 U/dL (CV 33.1%), with a mean CV of 17.2% per specimen. Intralaboratory precision for repeated specimens demonstrated no significant difference between the paired survey results (mean absolute difference 2.5-5.0 U/dL). For specimens with FVII >50 U/dL, among commonly used methods, one thromboplastin and one calibrator produced results 5-6 U/dL higher and another thromboplastin and calibrator produced results 5-6 U/dL lower than all other methods, and human thromboplastin differed from rabbit by +7.6 U/dL. Preliminary evidence suggests these differences could be due to the calibrator. For FVII <50 U/dL, differences among the commonly used reagents and calibrators were generally not significant. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Relative effects of plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, and factor XIII on ROTEM coagulation profiles in an in vitro model of massive transfusion in trauma.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, David E; Halmin, Märit; Wikman, Agneta; Östlund, Anders; Ågren, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Massive traumatic haemorrhage is aggravated through the development of trauma-induced coagulopathy, which is managed by plasma transfusion and/or fibrinogen concentrate administration. It is yet unclear whether these treatments are equally potent in ensuring adequate haemostasis, and whether additional factor XIII (FXIII) administration provides further benefits. In this study, we compared ROTEM whole blood coagulation profiles after experimental massive transfusion with different transfusion regimens in an in vitro model of dilution- and transfusion-related coagulopathy. Healthy donor blood was mixed 1 + 1 with six different transfusion regimens. Each regimen contained RBC, platelet concentrate, and either fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or Ringer's acetate (RA). The regimens were further augmented through addition of a low- or medium-dose fibrinogen concentrate and FXIII. Transfusion with FFP alone was insufficient to maintain tissue-factor activated clot strength, coincidental with a deficiency in fibrin-based clot strength. Fibrinogen concentrate conserved, but did not improve coagulation kinetics and overall clot strength. Only combination therapy with FFP and low-dose fibrinogen concentrate improved both coagulation kinetics and fibrin-based clot strength. Administration of FXIII did not result in an improvement of clot strength. In conclusion, combination therapy with both FFP and low-dose fibrinogen concentrate improved clotting time and produced firm clots, representing a possible preferred first-line regimen to manage trauma-induced coagulopathy when RBC and platelets are also transfused. Further research is required to identify optimal first-line transfusion fluids for massive traumatic haemorrhage.

  14. Associations of activated coagulation factor VII and factor VIIa-antithrombin levels with genome-wide polymorphisms and cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Olson, N C; Raffield, L M; Lange, L A; Lange, E M; Longstreth, W T; Chauhan, G; Debette, S; Seshadri, S; Reiner, A P; Tracy, R P

    2018-01-01

    Essentials A fraction of coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as an activated protease (FVIIa). We evaluated FVIIa and FVIIa-antithrombin (FVIIa-AT) levels in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Polymorphisms in the F7 and PROCR loci were associated with FVIIa and FVIIa-AT levels. FVIIa may be an ischemic stroke risk factor in older adults and FVIIa-AT may assess mortality risk. Background A fraction of coagulation factor (F) VII circulates as an active protease (FVIIa). FVIIa also circulates as an inactivated complex with antithrombin (FVIIa-AT). Objective Evaluate associations of FVIIa and FVIIa-AT with genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and incident coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke and mortality. Patients/Methods We measured FVIIa and FVIIa-AT in 3486 Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) participants. We performed a genome-wide association scan for FVIIa and FVIIa-AT in European-Americans (n = 2410) and examined associations of FVII phenotypes with incident cardiovascular disease. Results In European-Americans, the most significant SNP for FVIIa and FVIIa-AT was rs1755685 in the F7 promoter region on chromosome 13 (FVIIa, β = -25.9 mU mL -1 per minor allele; FVIIa-AT, β = -26.6 pm per minor allele). Phenotypes were also associated with rs867186 located in PROCR on chromosome 20 (FVIIa, β = 7.8 mU mL -1 per minor allele; FVIIa-AT, β = 9.9 per minor allele). Adjusted for risk factors, a one standard deviation higher FVIIa was associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01, 1.23). Higher FVIIa-AT was associated with mortality from all causes (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03, 1.12). Among European-American CHS participants the rs1755685 minor allele was associated with lower ischemic stroke (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54, 0.88), but this association was not replicated in a larger multi-cohort analysis. Conclusions The results support the importance of the F7 and PROCR loci in

  15. Risk factors for post-colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) coagulation syndrome: a multicenter, prospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Jun; Higurashi, Takuma; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Nonaka, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Ashikari, Keiichi; Chiba, Hideyuki; Goto, Shungo; Taguri, Masataka; Sakaguchi, Takashi; Atsukawa, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aims  Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common neoplasms and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an effective treatment for early-stage CRC. However, it has been observed that patients undergoing ESD often complain of pain, even if ESD has been successfully performed. Risk factors for such pain still remain unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the risk factors for post-colorectal ESD coagulation syndrome (PECS). Patients and methods  This was a prospective multicenter observational trial (UMIN000016781) conducted in 106 of 223 patients who underwent ESD between March 2015 and April 2016. We investigated age, sex, tumor location, ESD operation time, lesion size, duration of hospitalization, and frequency of PECS. We defined PECS as local abdominal pain (evaluated on a visual analogue scale) in the region corresponding to the site of the ESD that occurred within 4 days of the procedure. Results  PECS occurred in 15/106 (14.2 %), and 10 were women ( P  = 0.01, OR: 7.74 [1.6 – 36.4]), 7 had lesions in the cecum ( P  < 0.001, OR: 20.6 [3.7 – 115.2]), and 9 in whom ESD operation time was > 90 min ( P  = 0.002, OR: 10.3 [2.4 – 44.6]). Frequency of deviation from the prescribed clinical path was significantly higher (47 % [7/15] vs. 2 % [2/91], P  < 0.001, OR: 38.9 [6.9 – 219.6]), and hospital stay was significantly longer in the PECS group.  Conclusions  Female gender, location of lesion in the cecum, and ESD operation time > 90 minutes were significant risk factors independent of PECS. These findings are important to management of PECS.  PMID:29527556

  16. Local activation of coagulation factor XIII reduces systemic complications and improves the survival of mice after Streptococcus pyogenes M1 skin infection.

    PubMed

    Deicke, Christin; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Pils, Marina C; Dickneite, Gerhard; Johansson, Linda; Medina, Eva; Loof, Torsten G

    2016-11-01

    Coagulation is a mechanism for wound healing after injury. Several recent studies delineate an additional role of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, also known as the contact system, in the early innate immune response against bacterial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of factor XIII (FXIII), which is activated upon coagulation induction, during Streptococcus pyogenes-mediated skin and soft tissue infections. FXIII has previously been shown to be responsible for the immobilization of bacteria within a fibrin network which may prevent systemic bacterial dissemination. In order to investigate if the FXIII-mediated entrapment of S. pyogenes also influences the disease outcome we used a murine S. pyogenes M1 skin and soft tissue infection model. Here, we demonstrate that a lack of FXIII leads to prolonged clotting times, increased signs of inflammation, and elevated bacterial dissemination. Moreover, FXIII-deficient mice show an impaired survival when compared with wildtype animals. Additionally, local reconstitution of FXIII-deficient mice with a human FXIII-concentrate (Fibrogammin ® P) could reduce the systemic complications, suggesting a protective role for FXIII during early S. pyogenes skin infection. FXIII therefore might be a possible therapeutically application to support the early innate immune response during skin infections caused by S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential functional readthrough over homozygous nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype in coagulation factor VII deficiency.

    PubMed

    Branchini, A; Ferrarese, M; Lombardi, S; Mari, R; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Potentially null homozygous Factor(F)7 nonsense mutations are associated to variable bleeding symptoms. Readthrough of p.Ser112X (life-threatening) and p.Cys132X (moderate) stop codons was investigated. Readthrough-mediated insertion of wild-type or tolerated residues produce functional proteins. Functional readthrough over homozygous F7 nonsense mutations contributes to the bleeding phenotype. Background Whereas the rare homozygous nonsense mutations causing factor (F)VII deficiency may predict null conditions that are almost completely incompatible with life, they are associated with appreciable differences in hemorrhagic symptoms. The misrecognition of premature stop codons (readthrough) may account for variable levels of functional full-length proteins. Objectives To experimentally evaluate the basal and drug-induced levels of FVII resulting from the homozygous p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X nonsense mutations that are associated with moderate (132X) or life-threatening (112X) symptoms, and that are predicted to undergo readthrough with (132X) or without (112X) production of wild-type FVII. Methods We transiently expressed recombinant FVII (rFVII) nonsense and missense variants in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and evaluated secreted FVII protein and functional levels by ELISA, activated FX generation, and coagulation assays. Results The levels of functional FVII produced by p.Cys132X and p.Ser112X mutants (rFVII-132X, 1.1% ± 0.2% of wild-type rFVII; rFVII-112X, 0.5% ± 0.1% of wild-type rFVII) were compatible with the occurrence of spontaneous readthrough, which was magnified by the addition of G418 - up to 12% of the wild-type value for the rFVII-132X nonsense variant. The predicted missense variants arising from readthrough abolished (rFVII-132Trp/Arg) or reduced (rFVII-112Trp/Cys/Arg, 22-45% of wild-type levels) secretion and function. These data suggest that the appreciable rescue of p.Cys132X function was driven by reinsertion of the wild

  18. Coagulation disorders in dogs with hepatic disease.

    PubMed

    Prins, M; Schellens, C J M M; van Leeuwen, M W; Rothuizen, J; Teske, E

    2010-08-01

    Liver disease has been associated with abnormalities in haemostasis. In this study, coagulation times, platelet counts, platelet activity parameters, activities of individual coagulation factors, D-dimers, antithrombin (AT) and protein C activity were measured in 42 dogs with histologically confirmed liver disease. Outcome was correlated with histological diagnosis. One or more coagulation abnormalities were present in 57% of dogs with hepatic disease. Activated partial thromboplastin time was significantly prolonged in dogs with chronic hepatitis (CH), with or without cirrhosis. Mean platelet numbers, AT and factor IX activity were significantly lower in dogs with CH plus cirrhosis, compared to dogs with other hepatopathies. D-dimers were not significantly increased in any group. Only three dogs, all with different histological diagnoses, satisfied the criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Haemostatic abnormalities were primarily seen in dogs with cirrhosis and this may be due to reduced synthesis rather than increased consumption of coagulation factors. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An updated concept of coagulation with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Romney, Gregory; Glick, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Over the past century, a series of models have been put forth to explain the coagulation mechanism. The coagulation cascade/waterfall model has gained the most widespread acceptance. This model, however, has problems when it is used in different clinical scenarios. A more recently proposed cell-based model better describes the coagulation process in vivo and provides oral health care professionals (OHCPs) with a better understanding of the clinical implications of providing dental care to patients with potentially increased bleeding tendencies. The authors conducted a literature search using the PubMed database. They searched for key words including "coagulation," "hemostasis," "bleeding," "coagulation factors," "models," "prothrombin time," "activated partial thromboplastin time," "international normalized ratio," "anticoagulation therapy" and "hemophilia" separately and in combination. The coagulation cascade/waterfall model is insufficient to explain coagulation in vivo, predict a patient's bleeding tendency, or correlate clinical outcomes with specific laboratory screening tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalized ratio. However, the cell-based model of coagulation that reflects the in vivo process of coagulation provides insight into the clinical ramifications of treating dental patients with specific coagulation factor deficiencies. Understanding the in vivo coagulation process will help OHCPs better predict a patient's bleeding tendency. In addition, applying the theoretical concept of the cell-based model of coagulation to commonly used laboratory screening tests for coagulation and bleeding will result in safer and more appropriate dental care.

  20. [Association between the C46T polymorphism of coagulation factor Ⅻ gene and the involvement of factor Ⅻ activity in patients with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion].

    PubMed

    Jin, Y H; Shen, X L; Wang, M S; Xu, X M; Liu, M N; Zhao, Z S; Zheng, J Y

    2016-08-25

    To explore the association between the C46T polymorphism of coagulation factor Ⅻ (FⅫ) gene and the involvement of FⅫ activity (FⅫ:C) in patients with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA), and to elucidate its role in the pathogenesis of URSA. This study included 203 patients with URSA (URSA group) and 171 healthy women with at least one child and no history of infertility or miscarriage (control group) in the southern area of Zhejiang Province. The C46T polymorphism of the FⅫ gene was analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) in all subjects. The values of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, FⅫ:C and other coagulant parameters were determined. The frequency distribution of the wild-type (CC), heterozygote (CT), homozygote (TT) genotypes and C and T alleles were compared between the patients and controls. A comprehensive analysis of association was conducted between C46T genotypes and the FⅫ:C levels in URSA patients. The CC, CT, TT genotypes of the FⅫ gene were observed in 7 (3.4%, 7/203), 83 (40.9%, 83/203) and 113 (55.7%, 113/203) patients with URSA versus 7 (4.1%, 7/171), 46 (26.9%, 46/171) and 118 (69.0%, 118/171) controls. The frequency of CT in the patients with URSA was significantly higher than that in controls, but the frequency of TT in the patients was lower than that in controls (χ(2)=7.939, OR=1.884, 95%CI: 1.210-2.935, P<0.05). The frequencies of allele C and allele T were observed in 97 (23.9%, 97/406) and 309 (76.1%, 309/406) patients with URSA versus 60 (17.5%, 60/342) and 282 (82.5%, 282/342) controls. The distribution frequency of allele T in URSA group was lower than that in control group (χ(2)=4.510, OR=1.475, 95%CI: 1.029-2.115, P<0.05). The FⅫ: C levels in the patients were (102±13)% in CC genotype, (78±11)% in CT genotype and (59±9)% in TT genotype, respectively. The differences of the FⅫ: C levels

  1. Expression of the human blood coagulation protein factor XIIIa in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: dependence of the expression levels from host-vector systems and medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Bröker, M; Bäuml, O; Göttig, A; Ochs, J; Bodenbenner, M; Amann, E

    1991-03-01

    The human blood coagulation protein Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae employing Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vectors based on a 2-mu plasmid. Several factors affecting high production yield of recombinant FXIIIa were analysed. The use of the regulatable GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter resulted in higher FXIIIa expression when compared with the constitutive ADCI promoter. Screening for suitable yeast strains for expression of FXIIIa under the transcriptional control of the GAL-CYC1 hybrid promoter revealed a broad spectrum of productivity. No obvious correlation between the expression rate and the genetic markers of the strains could be identified. The medium composition markedly influenced the FXIIIa expression rates. The expression of FXIIIa was strictly regulated by the carbon source. Glucose as the only sugar and energy source repressed the synthesis of FXIIIa, whereas addition of galactose induced FXIIIa expression. Special feeding schemes resulted in a productivity of up to 100 mg FXIIIa/l in shake flasks.

  2. Two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy for a severe hemophilia A child patient with coagulation factor VII deficiency: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    He, Jin Peng; Feng, Jie Xiong

    2017-10-01

    The main complication of patients with severe hemophilia is recurrent bleeding events that usually affected musculoskeletal contractures. And replacement therapy methods were continuously improved to minimize adverse impacts brought by those complications. However, only several cases reported about the appendectomy for hemophilia A. We report a case of acute appendicitis treated by two-incision laparoscopy in a boy with hemophilia A and coagulation factor VII deficiency for the first time. An 8y7m-old Chinese boy presented with half a day of right sided abdominal pain, fever, nausea, and vomiting. He received a computed tomography (CT) scan which revealed an enlarged appendix, thickened wall and appendiceal fecalith, and had received a conservative anti-bacterial treatment for his acute appendicitis but failed. He was diagnosed with hemophilia A and coagulation factor VII deficiency. Two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy was made in success with a careful management of perioperative period. We monitored the clotting factor FVIII level and gave him a replacement therapy. The patient had an uneventful recovery. It is important to exclude intraabdominal or retroperitoneal hemorrhage in patients suffering from hemophilia and acute abdominal pain. Pre-operative evaluation of validity of the FVIII replacement therapy is another effective strategy to assess the safety and feasibility of applying an operation procedure. The two-incision laparoscopic appendectomy is an effective treatment for this kind of patients for its minimal trauma and fast recovery characteristics. Our report shows that laparoscopic appendectomy is feasible in a child suffering from hemophilia after adequate blood clotting factor replacement treatment.

  3. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  4. Non anti-coagulant factors associated with filter life in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brain, Matthew; Winson, Elizabeth; Roodenburg, Owen; McNeil, John

    2017-02-20

    Optimising filter life and performance efficiency in continuous renal replacement therapy has been a focus of considerable recent research. Larger high quality studies have predominantly focussed on optimal anticoagulation however CRRT is complex and filter life is also affected by vascular access, circuit and management factors. We performed a systematic search of the literature to identify and quantify the effect of vascular access, circuit and patient factors that affect filter life and presented the results as a meta-analysis. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Ovid EMBASE libraries from inception to 29 th February 2016 for all studies with a comparator or independent variable relating to CRRT circuits and reporting filter life. Included studies documented filter life in hours with a comparator other than anti-coagulation intervention. All studies comparing anticoagulation interventions were searched for regression or hazard models pertaining to other sources of variation in filter life. Eight hundred nineteen abstracts were identified of which 364 were selected for full text analysis. 24 presented data on patient modifiers of circuit life, 14 on vascular access modifiers and 34 on circuit related factors. Risk of bias was high and findings are hypothesis generating. Ranking of vascular access site by filter longevity favours: tunnelled semi-permanent catheters, femoral, internal jugular and subclavian last. There is inconsistency in the difference reported between femoral and jugular catheters. Amongst published literature, modality of CRRT consistently favoured continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration (CVVHD-F) with an associated 44% lower failure rate compared to CVVH. There was a trend favouring higher blood flow rates. There is insufficient data to determine advantages of haemofilter membranes. Patient factors associated with a statistically significant worsening of filter life included mechanical

  5. Factor Xa Activation of Factor V is of Paramount Importance in Initiating the Coagulation System: Lessons from a Tick Salivary Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Daffre, Sirlei; DePonte, Kathleen; Wielders, Simone J.H.; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Hovius, Joppe W.; van der Poll, Tom; Fikrig, Erol; Bunce, Matthew W.; Camire, Rodney M.; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; van 't Veer, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Background Generation of active procoagulant cofactor FVa and its subsequent association with the enzyme FXa to form the prothrombinase complex is a pivotal initial event in blood coagulation and has been the subject of investigative effort, speculation and controversy. The current paradigm assumes that FV activation is initiated by limited proteolysis by traces of (meizo) thrombin. Methods and Results Recombinant tick salivary protein TIX-5 was produced and anticoagulant properties were studied using plasma, whole blood and purified systems. Here we report that TIX-5 specifically inhibits FXa-mediated FV activation involving the B-domain of FV and show that FXa activation of FV is pivotal for plasma and blood clotting. In line, tick feeding is impaired on TIX-5 immune rabbits displaying the in vivo importance of TIX-5. Conclusions Our data elucidate a unique molecular mechanism by which ticks inhibit the host's coagulation system. Based on our data we propose a revised blood coagulation scheme wherein direct FXa-mediated FV activation occurs in the initiation phase during which thrombin-mediated FV activation is restrained by fibrinogen and inhibitors. PMID:23817575

  6. Effects of aliskiren, a renin inhibitor, on biomarkers of platelet activity, coagulation and fibrinolysis in subjects with multiple risk factors for vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, V L; Malinin, A; Barsness, G; Vahabi, J; Atar, D

    2008-05-01

    Aliskiren, an octanamide, is nonpeptide, low molecular weight, orally active renin inhibitor effectively preventing angiotensin and aldosterone release. This drug has been recently approved for the treatment of hypertension. Considering potential links between hypertension, platelets, the coagulation cascade and fibrinolysis we sought to evaluate the effect of aliskiren on human biomarkers of hemostasis. In vitro effects of whole blood preincubation with escalating concentrations of aliskiren (500, 1,000 and 2,000 ng ml(-1)) were assessed in 20 aspirin-naive volunteers with multiple risk factors for vascular disease. A total of 33 biomarkers were measured, of which 18 are related to platelet function, 12 to coagulation and 3 to fibrinolysis. Pretreatment of blood samples with aliskiren 500 ng ml(-1) resulted in a significant increase of antithrombin-III (AT-III) activity (P=0.003). All other tested biomarkers were not significantly affected. Spiking whole blood with the higher aliskiren doses was associated with various trends in biomarker activity, where 1000 ng ml(-1) concentration mostly decreased (7/33), and 2,000 ng ml(-1) mostly increased (6/33) some biomarkers. In the therapeutic concentration of 500 ng ml(-1) aliskiren does not affect hemostatic biomarkers, except for a moderate but highly significant (P=0.003) increase of AT-III activity. Higher aliskiren doses were associated with more profound biomarker changes, but they are likely not to be clinically relevant since they show diverging (that is, both mild antiplatelet and platelet-activating) trends, and considering the 2- to 4-fold safety margin. It is suggested that antithrombotic properties of aliskiren be explored further in an ex vivo clinical setting.

  7. Sulfated Low Molecular Weight Lignins, Allosteric Inhibitors of Coagulation Proteinases via the Heparin Binding Site, Significantly Alter the Active Site of Thrombin and Factor Xa Compared to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. PMID:25242245

  8. Sulfated low molecular weight lignins, allosteric inhibitors of coagulation proteinases via the heparin binding site, significantly alter the active site of thrombin and factor xa compared to heparin.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brian L; Desai, Umesh R

    2014-11-01

    Sulfated low molecular weight lignins (LMWLs) have been found to bind in the heparin binding sites of coagulation proteinases. LMWLs represent a library of diverse non-carbohydrate, aromatic molecules which are structures different from heparin, but still potently inhibit thrombin and factor Xa. To better understand their mechanism of action, we studied the effects of three sulfated LMWLs (CDSO3, FDSO3, and SDSO3) on the active sites of thrombin and factor Xa. LMWLs were found to uniformly inhibit the catalytic activity of thrombin and factor Xa, regardless of the substrate used. Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies indicate that maximal velocity of hydrolysis of each chromogenic substrate decreases significantly in the presence of sulfated LMWLs, while the effect on Michaelis constant is dependent on the nature of the substrate. These studies indicate that LMWLs inhibit thrombin and factor Xa through allosteric disruption of the catalytic apparatus, specifically through the catalytic step. As opposed to heparin, LMWLs significantly alter the binding of the active site fluorescent ligand p-aminobenzamidine. LMWLs also had a greater effect on the molecular orientation of fluorescein-labeled His 57 than heparin. The molecular geometry surrounding the most important catalytic amino acid, Ser 195, was significantly altered by the binding of LMWLs while heparin had no measurable effect on Ser 195. These results further advance the concept of sulfated LMWLs as heparin mimics and will aid the design of anticoagulants based on their novel scaffold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term correction of canine hemophilia B by gene transfer of blood coagulation factor IX mediated by adeno-associated viral vector.

    PubMed

    Herzog, R W; Yang, E Y; Couto, L B; Hagstrom, J N; Elwell, D; Fields, P A; Burton, M; Bellinger, D A; Read, M S; Brinkhous, K M; Podsakoff, G M; Nichols, T C; Kurtzman, G J; High, K A

    1999-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a severe X-linked bleeding diathesis caused by the absence of functional blood coagulation factor IX, and is an excellent candidate for treatment of a genetic disease by gene therapy. Using an adeno-associated viral vector, we demonstrate sustained expression (>17 months) of factor IX in a large-animal model at levels that would have a therapeutic effect in humans (up to 70 ng/ml, adequate to achieve phenotypic correction, in an animal injected with 8.5x10(12) vector particles/kg). The five hemophilia B dogs treated showed stable, vector dose-dependent partial correction of the whole blood clotting time and, at higher doses, of the activated partial thromboplastin time. In contrast to other viral gene delivery systems, this minimally invasive procedure, consisting of a series of percutaneous intramuscular injections at a single timepoint, was not associated with local or systemic toxicity. Efficient gene transfer to muscle was shown by immunofluorescence staining and DNA analysis of biopsied tissue. Immune responses against factor IX were either absent or transient. These data provide strong support for the feasibility of the approach for therapy of human subjects.

  10. Dust coagulation in ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  11. Theories of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Riddel, James P; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Miaskowski, Christine; Lillicrap, David P

    2007-01-01

    Although the concept of the coagulation cascade represented a significant advance in the understanding of coagulation and served for many years as a useful model, more recent clinical and experimental observations demonstrate that the cascade/waterfall hypothesis does not fully and completely reflect the events of hemostasis in vivo. The goal of this article is to review the evolution of the theories of coagulation and their proposed models to serve as a tool when reviewing the research and practice literature that was published in the context of these different theories over time.

  12. Intraoperative Changes in Blood Coagulation and Thrombelastographic Monitoring in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yoo Goo; Martin, Douglas J.; Marquez, Jose; Lewis, Jessica H.; Bontempo, Franklin A.; Shaw, Byers W.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Winter, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    The blood coagulation system of 66 consecutive patients undergoing consecutive liver transplantations was monitored by thrombelastograph and analytic coagulation profile. A poor preoperative coagulation state, decrease in levels of coagulation factors, progressive fibrinolysis, and whole blood clot lysis were observed during the preanhepatic and anhepatic stages of surgery. A further general decrease in coagulation factors and platelets, activation of fibrinolysis, and abrupt decrease in levels of factors V and VIII occurred before and with reperfusion of the homograft. Recovery of blood coagulability began 30–60 min after reperfusion of the graft liver, and coagulability had returned toward baseline values 2 hr after reperfusion. A positive correlation was shown between the variables of thrombelastography and those of the coagulation profile. Thrombelastography was shown to be a reliable and rapid monitoring system. Its use was associated with a 33% reduction of blood and fluid infusion volume, whereas blood coagulability was maintained without an increase in the number of blood product donors. PMID:3896028

  13. The Mechanisms of Coagulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard; Jesty, Jolyon

    1994-01-01

    Several topics such as heart disease, strokes, biochemical reactions, blood components, and genetics can be related to blood clotting. Introduces a simple, safe and inexpensive hands-on demonstration using bovine (cattle) blood plasma of normal and abnormal coagulation. (ZWH)

  14. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G promoter polymorphism and coagulation factor VII Arg353-->Gln polymorphism in Korean patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Song, J.; Yoon, Y. M.; Jung, H. J.; Hong, S. H.; Park, H.; Kim, J. Q.

    2000-01-01

    An increased risk for arterial thrombosis is associated with high plasma levels of coagulation and fibrinolytic factors such as PAI-1 and FVII. In this study, the 4G/5G polymorphism in the promoter of PAI-1 gene and Arg353-->Gln polymorphism in the FVII gene were analysed in 139 normal adults and 158 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and their association with plasma lipid traits was investigated. There were no significant differences in the allele frequencies of PAI-1 and FVII polymorphisms between control and patient groups. The allelic distributions of both polymorphisms in Koreans were similar to those in Japanese but significantly different from those in Caucasians. In the CAD group, the 4G homozygotes of PAI-1 polymorphism showed significantly higher levels of total (p=0.0250) and LDL cholesterol (p=0.0335) with individuals having other genotypes. However, FVII polymorphism showed no association with lipid levels. In conclusion, the 4G/5G PAI-1 promoter polymorphism and Arg353-->Gln FVII polymorphism are not major genetic risk factors for CAD in Koreans. However, 4G allele of PAI-1 polymorphism revealed to be associated with the levels of cholesterol, especially LDL cholesterol levels in CAD patients. PMID:10803689

  15. The fibrinogen/CRP ratio as a new parameter for the diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with HELLP syndrome and as a predictive factor for neonatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Windsperger, Karin; Lehner, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if the fibrinogen/C-reactive protein (CRP) ratio could be used in obstetrics as a predictor for a disseminated intravascular coagulation. One hundred eleven patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome at the Department of Obstetrics and Fetomaternal Medicine (General Hospital, Vienna, Austria) were selected and divided into 2 groups (overt disseminated intravascular coagulation, no overt disseminated intravascular coagulation). The classical parameters and the fibrinogen/CRP ratio were compared. The analysis was carried out using IBM SPSS statistical package (SPSS, Inc, Cary, NC). The fibrinogen/CRP ratio showed significant differences. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis showed for the ratio (area under the curve, 0.74) significantly better discriminative power than for fibrinogen (area under curve, 0.59). The odds ratio for the fibrinogen/CRP ratio was 7.04. Finally, significant correlations between the ratio and the neonatal outcome were found. We suggest the implementation of the fibrinogen/CRP ratio within patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome as a diagnostic and prognostic factor for the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Whole blood coagulation analyzers.

    PubMed

    1997-08-01

    Whole blood Coagulation analyzers (WBCAs) are widely used point-of-care (POC) testing devices found primarily in cardiothoracic surgical suites and cardia catheterization laboratories. Most of these devices can perform a number of coagulation tests that provide information about a patient's blood clotting status. Clinicians use the results of the WBCA tests, which are available minutes after applying a blood sample, primarily to monitor the effectiveness of heparin therapy--an anticoagulation therapy used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, angioplasty, hemodialysis, and other clinical procedures. In this study we evaluated five WBCAs from four suppliers. Our testing focused on the applications for which WBCAs are primarily used: Monitoring moderate to high heparin levels, as would be required, for example, during CPB are angioplasty. For this function, WCBAs are typically used to perform an activated clotting time (ACT) test or, as one supplier refers to its test, a heparin management test (HMT). All models included in this study offered an ACT test or an HMT. Monitoring low heparin levels, as would be required, for example,during hemodialysis. For this function, WBCAs would normally be used to perform either a low-range ACT (LACT) test or a whole blood activated partial thromboplastin time (WBAPTT) test. Most of the evaluated units could perform at least one of these tests; one unit did not offer either test and was therefore not rated for this application. We rated and ranked each evaluated model separately for each of these two applications. In addition, we provided a combined rating and ranking that considers the units' appropriateness for performing both application. We based our conclusions on a unit's performance and humans factor design, as determined by our testing, and on its five-year life-cycle cost, as determined by our net present value (NPV) analysis. While we rated all evaluated units acceptable for each appropriate category, we did

  17. Imaging of blood plasma coagulation at supported lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Faxälv, Lars; Hume, Jasmin; Kasemo, Bengt; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-12-15

    The blood coagulation system relies on lipid membrane constituents to act as regulators of the coagulation process upon vascular trauma, and in particular the 2D configuration of the lipid membranes is known to efficiently catalyze enzymatic activity of blood coagulation factors. This work demonstrates a new application of a recently developed methodology to study blood coagulation at lipid membrane interfaces with the use of imaging technology. Lipid membranes with varied net charges were formed on silica supports by systematically using different combinations of lipids where neutral phosphocholine (PC) lipids were mixed with phospholipids having either positively charged ethylphosphocholine (EPC), or negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) headgroups. Coagulation imaging demonstrated that negatively charged SiO(2) and membrane surfaces exposing PS (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of PS) had coagulation times which were significantly shorter than those for plain PC membranes and EPC exposing membrane surfaces (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of EPC). Coagulation times decreased non-linearly with increasing negative surface charge for lipid membranes. A threshold value for shorter coagulation times was observed below a PS content of ∼6%. We conclude that the lipid membranes on solid support studied with the imaging setup as presented in this study offers a flexible and non-expensive solution for coagulation studies at biological membranes. It will be interesting to extend the present study towards examining coagulation on more complex lipid-based model systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro/in vivo effect of Citrus limon (L. Burm. f.) juice on blood parameters, coagulation and anticoagulation factors in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Mirza, Talat; Mustansir, Tazeen; Ahmed, Mansoor

    2014-07-01

    The genus Citrus of the family Rutaceae includes many species e.g. Citrus indica, Citrus aurantifolia and Citrus limon, among which Citrus limon L. Burm. f. has been reported to have highest antimicrobial activity. It is used as antidote against certain venom, due to its platelet inhibitory effect and also reported to have hypocholesterolemic effect. However its anticoagulant and thrombolytic effect were not been investigated, hence a prospective in-vitro/in-vivo study was designed to determine the effect of Citrus limon on blood parameters, coagulation and anticoagulation factors. In-vitro tests revealed highly significant increase in thrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time by Citrus limon, whereas fibrinogen concentration was significantly reduced in comparison to control, however prothrombin time was not affected significantly. In-vivo testing of Citrus limon was done at three different doses i.e. 0.2ml/kg, 0.4ml/kg and 0.6ml/kg in healthy rabbits. Significant changes were observed in hematological parameters such as erythrocytes, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Bleeding time and thrombin time was significantly prolonged and there was increase in protein C and thrombin antithrombin complex levels. These results may be due to inactivation of thrombin because it significantly decreases fibrinogen concentration and inhibit platelet aggregation. Citrus limon showed maximal anticoagulant effect at 0.4ml/kg, which suggest that Citrus limon possesses an anti-thrombin component and could prevent thrombosis playing a cardio protective role.

  19. Substitution of blood coagulation factor X-binding to Ad5 by position-specific PEGylation: Preventing vector clearance and preserving infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krutzke, L; Prill, J M; Engler, T; Schmidt, C Q; Xu, Z; Byrnes, A P; Simmet, T; Kreppel, F

    2016-08-10

    The biodistribution of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vector particles is heavily influenced by interaction of the particles with plasma proteins, including coagulation factor X (FX), which binds specifically to the major Ad5 capsid protein hexon. FX mediates hepatocyte transduction by intravenously-injected Ad5 vectors and shields vector particles from neutralization by natural antibodies and complement. In mice, mutant Ad5 vectors that are ablated for FX-binding become detargeted from hepatocytes, which is desirable for certain applications, but unfortunately such FX-nonbinding vectors also become sensitive to neutralization by mouse plasma proteins. To improve the properties of Ad5 vectors for systemic delivery, we developed a strategy to replace the natural FX shield by a site-specific chemical polyethylene glycol shield. Coupling of polyethylene glycol to a specific site in hexon hypervariable region 1 yielded vector particles that were protected from neutralization by natural antibodies and complement although they were unable to bind FX. These vector particles evaded macrophages in vitro and showed significantly improved pharmacokinetics and hepatocyte transduction in vivo. Thus, site-specific shielding of Ad5 vectors with polyethylene glycol rendered vectors FX-independent and greatly improved their properties for systemic gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of a low-dose monophasic preparation of levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol on coagulation and other hemostatic factors.

    PubMed

    Archer, D F; Mammen, E F; Grubb, G S

    1999-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects on hemostatic factors of a low-dose preparation of levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol in a 12-cycle study. Thirty healthy women began taking 100 microg levonorgestrel and 20 microg ethinyl estradiol on the first day of the menstrual cycle, continued to take the preparation for the next 21 days, and then took placebo for 7 days. Mean changes in prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and levels of factors VII and X, antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, protein S, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and D-dimer were analyzed at baseline and at cycles 3, 6, and 12 with paired Student t tests. Factor X, plasminogen antigen and activity, and D-dimer levels were significantly increased (P factor VII and protein S activity levels were significantly (P factors in healthy women of a monophasic preparation of 100 microg levonorgestrel and 20 microg ethinyl estradiol were similar to those of other low-dose oral contraceptives.

  1. Fat high in stearic acid favorably affects blood lipids and factor VII coagulant activity in comparison with fats high in palmitic acid or high in myristic and lauric acids.

    PubMed

    Tholstrup, T; Marckmann, P; Jespersen, J; Sandström, B

    1994-02-01

    The effect of fats high in individual, prevalent saturated dietary fatty acids on lipoproteins and hemostatic variables in young healthy subjects was evaluated in a randomized strictly controlled metabolic feeding study. Three experimental diets: shea butter (S; 42% stearic acid), palm oil (P; 43% palmitic palmitic acid), and palm-kernel oil with high-oleic sunflower oil (ML; 10% myristic acid, 30% lauric acid) were served to 15 men for 3 wk each, separated by washout periods. Diet S compared with diet P resulted in significant reduction in plasma cholesterol (22%) LDL cholesterol (26%), apolipoprotein B (18%), HDL cholesterol (12%), apolipoprotein A-I (13%), and a 13% lower factor VII coagulant activity (P = 0.001). Similar differences were observed between diets S and ML. In conclusion, intake of shea butter high in stearic acid favorably affects blood lipids and factor VII coagulant activity in young men, compared with fats high in saturated fatty acids with 12-16 carbons.

  2. In Vitro Assessment of Nanoparticle Effects on Blood Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Timothy M; Rodriguez, Jamie C; Neun, Barry W; Ilinskaya, Anna N; Cedrone, Edward; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2018-01-01

    Blood clotting is a complex process which involves both cellular and biochemical components. The key cellular players in the blood clotting process are thrombocytes or platelets. Other cells, including leukocytes and endothelial cells, contribute to clotting by expressing the so-called pro-coagulant activity (PCA) complex on their surface. The biochemical component of blood clotting is represented by the plasma coagulation cascade, which includes plasma proteins also known as coagulation factors. The coordinated interaction between platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and plasma coagulation factors is necessary for maintaining hemostasis and for preventing excessive bleeding. Undesirable activation of all or some of these components may lead to pathological blood coagulation and life-threatening conditions such as consumptive coagulopathy or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). In contrast, unintended inhibition of the coagulation pathways may lead to hemorrhage. Thrombogenicity is the property of a test material to induce blood coagulation by affecting one or more elements of the clotting process. Anticoagulant activity refers to the property of a test material to inhibit coagulation. The tendency to cause platelet aggregation, perturb plasma coagulation, and induce leukocyte PCA can serve as an in vitro measure of a nanomaterial's likelihood to be pro- or anticoagulant in vivo. This chapter describes three procedures for in vitro analyses of platelet aggregation, plasma coagulation time, and activation of leukocyte PCA. Platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation procedures have been described earlier. The revision here includes updated details about nanoparticle sample preparation, selection of nanoparticle concentration for the in vitro study, and updated details about assay controls. The chapter is expanded to describe a method for the leukocyte PCA analysis and case studies demonstrating the performance of these in vitro assays.

  3. Production of coagulation factor VII in human cell lines Sk-Hep-1 and HKB-11.

    PubMed

    Corrêa de Freitas, Marcela Cristina; Bomfim, Aline de Sousa; Mizukami, Amanda; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; Swiech, Kamilla; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2017-09-01

    Recombinant factor VII (rFVII) is the main therapeutic choice for hemophilia patients who have developed inhibitory antibodies against conventional treatments (FVIII and FIX). Because of the post-translational modifications, rFVII needs to be produced in mammalian cell lines. In this study, for the first time, we have shown efficient rFVII production in HepG2, Sk-Hep-1, and HKB-11 cell lines. Experiments in static conditions for a period of 96 h showed that HepG2-FVII produced the highest amounts of rhFVII, with an average of 1843 ng/mL. Sk-hep-1-FVII cells reached a maximum protein production of 1432 ng/mL and HKB-11-FVII cells reached 1468 ng/mL. Sk-Hep-1-rFVII and HKB-11-rFVII were selected for the first step of scale-up. Over 10 days of spinner flask culture, HKB-11 and SK-Hep-1 cells showed a cumulative production of rFVII of 152 μg and 202.6 μg in 50 mL, respectively. Thus, these human cell lines can be used for an efficient production of recombinant FVII. With more investment in basic research, human cell lines can be optimized for the commercial production of different bio therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differences in N-glycosylation of recombinant human coagulation factor VII derived from BHK, CHO, and HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Ernst; Seyfried, Birgit K; Dockal, Michael; Graninger, Michael; Hasslacher, Meinhard; Neurath, Marianne; Konetschny, Christian; Matthiessen, Peter; Mitterer, Artur; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2015-09-18

    BACKGROUND & Recombinant factor VII (rFVII), the precursor molecule for recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa), is, due to its need for complex post translational modifications, produced in mammalian cells. To evaluate the suitability of a human cell line in order to produce rFVII with post-translational modifications as close as possible to pdFVII, we compared the biochemical properties of rFVII synthesized in human embryonic kidney-derived (HEK)293 cells (HEK293rFVII) with those of rFVII expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO, CHOrFVII) and baby hamster kidney (BHK, BHKrFVII) cells, and also with those of plasma derived FVII (pdFVII), using various analytical methods. rFVII was purified from selected production clones derived from BHK, CHO, and HEK293 cells after stable transfection, and rFVII isolates were analyzed for protein activity, impurities and post-translational modifications. RESULTS & The analytical results showed no apparent gross differences between the various FVII proteins, except in their N-linked glycosylation pattern. Most N-glycans found on rFVII produced in HEK293 cells were not detected on rFVII from CHO and BHK cells, or, somewhat unexpectedly, on pdFVII; all other protein features were similar. HEK293rFVII glycans were mainly characterized by a higher structural variety and a lower degree of terminal sialylation, and a high amount of terminal N-acetyl galactosamines (GalNAc). All HEK293rFVII oligosaccharides contained one or more fucoses (Fuc), as well as hybrid and high mannose (Man) structures. From all rFVII isolates investigated, CHOrFVII contained the highest degree of sialylation and no terminal GalNAc, and CHO cells were therefore assumed to be the best option for the production of rFVII.

  5. Efficient stabilization of recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in the milk of transgenic mice using hFVIII and vWF co-expression vector transduction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoye; Gong, Xiuli; Cai, Qin; Guo, Xinbing; Xu, Miao; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Yitao

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the reasons for the instability of human coagulation factor FVIII (hFVIII) in milk which is an intractable obstacle during the hFVIII production by a transgenic mammary gland bioreactor. We constructed P1A3-hFVIIIBDD and P1A3-hFVIIIBDD-IRES-vWF co-expression cassettes for generating transgenic mice. P1A3-hFVIII/CMV-vWF double heterozygotes were also prepared by mating P1A3-hFVIIIBDD with CMV-vWF mice. hFVIII bioactivity in milk was determined under different storage conditions. The half-life (in vitro) of hFVIII bioactivity in P1A3-hFVIIIBDD-IRES-vWF mice was significantly longer than P1A3-hFVIIIBDD mice [77 ± 4.9 vs. 44 ± 2.6 h at 4 °C, 32.5 ± 5 vs. 19.7 ± 0.6 h at room temperature and 7.4 ± 1.4 vs. 3.4 ± 0.6 at 37 °C, respectively (P < 0.05)]. The half-life (in vitro) of hFVIII bioactivity in milk of double heterozygotes was similar to P1A3-hFVIIIBDD-IRES-vWF ones, demonstrating that the vWF transgene expression in hFVIII transgenic mice can efficiently improve the stabilization of hFVIII bioactivity in milk. We provide a new approach of P1A3-hFVIIIBDD-IRES-vWF co-expression to generate more stable hFVIII in transgenic milk with rapid and low cost as well as valuable information for producing pharmaceutical proteins by transgenic mammary gland bioreactor.

  6. Investigational drugs for coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Mancuso, Maria Elisa

    2013-08-01

    The current standard treatment in persons with hemophilia (PWH) is prophylaxis, given intravenously twice or thrice weekly, which is associated with a non negligible burden on patients' quality of life. Therefore the main attempts aiming to improve the management of PWH are targeted towards the development of a new generation of coagulation factors endowed with properties facilitating prophylaxis and/or a better control of bleeding. This article summarizes the main results obtained so far in the development of new antihemophilic products, and emphasizes the formidable requirements imposed upon by regulatory agencies to get marketing authorization for new drugs, which make progress in this field difficult. Published literature on new molecules for replacement treatment in hemophilia A and B has been retrieved by using PubMed search and all ongoing clinical trials have been looked for online. New molecules are usually engineered to have a longer plasma half-life but also in some instances a higher potency. The prolongation of half-life may be obtained by using sustained release delivery vehicles, by chemical modification or by creating fusion proteins. Factors VIII, IX and VII have been variably modified in order to obtain improved coagulation products and results from Phase I/II studies are encouraging, particularly for factor IX. However, Phase III studies that should provide evidence on efficacy and effectiveness more cogent for clinical use are still ongoing and results are not yet available.

  7. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Widlak, Piotr, E-mail: widlak@io.gliwice.pl; Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna

    specific features of serum proteome. The signature included upregulation of factors involved in acute or inflammatory response but also downregulation of plasma apolipoproteins and factors involved in blood coagulation.« less

  8. Coagulation management in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Robba, Chiara; Bertuetti, Rita; Rasulo, Frank; Bertuccio, Alessando; Matta, Basil

    2017-10-01

    Management of coagulation in neurosurgical procedures is challenging. In this contest, it is imperative to avoid further intracranial bleeding. Perioperative bleeding can be associated with a number of factors, including anticoagulant drugs and coagulation status but is also linked to the characteristic and the site of the intracranial disorder. The aim of this review will be to focus primarily on the new evidence regarding the management of coagulation in patients undergoing craniotomy for neurosurgical procedures. Antihemostatic and anticoagulant drugs have shown to be associated with perioperative bleeding. On the other hand, an increased risk of venous thromboembolism and hypercoagulative state after elective and emergency neurosurgery, in particular after brain tumor surgery, has been described in several patients. To balance the risk between thrombosis and bleeding, it is important to be familiar with the perioperative changes in coagulation and with the recent management guidelines for anticoagulated patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, in particular for those taking new direct anticoagulants. We have considered the current clinical trials and literature regarding both safety and efficacy of deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis in the neurosurgical population. These were mainly trials concerning both elective surgical and intensive care patients with a poor grade intracranial bleed or multiple traumas with an associated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Coagulation management remains a major issue in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. However, in this field of research, literature quality is poor and further studies are necessary to identify the best strategies to minimize risks in this group of patients.

  9. Vitamin K: from coagulation to calcification.

    PubMed

    Paakkari, Ilari

    Vitamin K is not only essential for the synthesis of coagulation factors in the liver, but it also strengthens the bones and prevents calcification of the arteries. These effects are mediated through the same mechanism, i.e. carboxylation of Gla target proteins. The discovery of novel Gla proteins that are not associated with blood coagulation or calcium metabolism indicates that vitamin K has additional effects in the pancreas and the central nervous system, for example. As dietary supplements, vitamin K1 of plant origin and vitamins K2 of bacterial origin may exert different effects.

  10. Successful synthesis of active human coagulation factor VII by co-expression of mammalian gamma-glutamyl carboxylase and modification of vit.K cycle in Drosophila Schneider S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Kotomi; Umemura, Kazuo; Kanayama, Naohiro; Iwaki, Takayuki

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian gamma-glutamyl carboxylase and reduced vitamin K are indispensable for synthesis of mature mammalian vitamin K dependent proteins including some of blood coagulation factors (factors II, VII, IX, and X). It was well known that Drosophila melanogaster expressed gamma-glutamyl carboxylase and possessed a vit.K cycle although native substrates for them have not been identified yet. Despite the potential capability of gamma carboxylation in D. melanogaster derived cells such as S2 cells, Drosophila gamma-glutamyl carboxylase failed to gamma carboxylate a peptide fused to the human coagulation factor IX propeptide. Thus, it had been believed that the Drosophila system was not adequate to synthesize mammalian vit.K dependent proteins. Indeed, we previously attempted to synthesize biologically active factor VII in S2 cells although we were not able to obtain it. However, recently, a successful transient expression of biologically active human factor IX from S2 cells was reported. In the present study, several expression vectors which enable expressing mammalian GGCX, VKORC1, and/or PDIA2 along with F7 were developed. S2 cells transfected with pMKA85, pMAK86, and pMAK219 successfully synthesized active FVII. Thus, mammalian GGCX was indispensable to synthesize active FVII while mammalian VKORC1 and PDIA2 were not critical but supportive factors for S2 cells.

  11. Coagulation factor XII genetic variation, ex vivo thrombin generation, and stroke risk in the elderly: results from the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Olson, N C; Butenas, S; Lange, L A; Lange, E M; Cushman, M; Jenny, N S; Walston, J; Souto, J C; Soria, J M; Chauhan, G; Debette, S; Longstreth, W T; Seshadri, S; Reiner, A P; Tracy, R P

    2015-10-01

    The relationships of thrombin generation (TG) with cardiovascular disease risk are underevaluated in population-based cohorts. To evaluate the relationships of TG influenced by the contact and tissue factor coagulation pathways ex vivo with common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and incident cardiovascular disease and stroke. We measured peak TG (pTG) in baseline plasma samples of Cardiovascular Health Study participants (n = 5411), both with and without inhibitory anti-factor XIa antibody (pTG/FXIa(-) ). We evaluated their associations with ~ 50 000 SNPs by using the IBCv2 genotyping array, and with incident cardiovascular disease and stroke events over a median follow-up of 13.2 years. The minor allele for an SNP in the FXII gene (F12), rs1801020, was associated with lower pTG in European-Americans (β = - 34.2 ± 3.5 nm; P = 3.3 × 10(-22) ; minor allele frequency [MAF] = 0.23) and African-Americans (β = - 31.1 ± 7.9 nm; P = 9.0 × 10(-5) ; MAF = 0.42). Lower FXIa-independent pTG (pTG/FXIa(-) ) was associated with the F12 rs1801020 minor allele, and higher pTG/FXIa(-) was associated with the ABO SNP rs657152 minor allele (β = 16.3 nm; P = 4.3 × 10(-9) ; MAF = 0.37). The risk factor-adjusted ischemic stroke hazard ratios were 1.09 (95% confidence interval CI 1.01-1.17; P = 0.03) for pTG, 1.06 (95% CI 0.98-1.15; P = 0.17) for pTG/FXIa(-) , and 1.11 (95% CI 1.02-1.21; P = 0.02) for FXIa-dependent pTG (pTG/FXIa(+) ), per one standard deviation increment (n = 834 ischemic strokes). In a multicohort candidate gene analysis, rs1801020 was not associated with incident ischemic stroke (β = - 0.02; standard error = 0.08; P = 0.81). These results support the importance of contact activation pathway-dependent TG as a risk factor for ischemic stroke, and indicate the importance of F12 SNPs for TG ex vivo and in vivo. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Coagulation factor VIIa-mediated protease-activated receptor 2 activation leads to β-catenin accumulation via the AKT/GSK3β pathway and contributes to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhishek; Ansari, Shabbir A; Das, Kaushik; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Mallik, Suman; Mukherjee, Ashis; Sen, Prosenjit

    2017-08-18

    Cell migration and invasion are very characteristic features of cancer cells that promote metastasis, which is one of the most common causes of mortality among cancer patients. Emerging evidence has shown that coagulation factors can directly mediate cancer-associated complications either by enhancing thrombus formation or by initiating various signaling events leading to metastatic cancer progression. It is well established that, apart from its distinct role in blood coagulation, coagulation factor FVIIa enhances aggressive behaviors of breast cancer cells, but the underlying signaling mechanisms still remain elusive. To this end, we investigated FVIIa's role in the migration and invasiveness of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Consistent with previous observations, we observed that FVIIa increased the migratory and invasive potential of these cells. We also provide molecular evidence that protease-activated receptor 2 activation followed by PI3K-AKT activation and GSK3β inactivation is involved in these processes and that β-catenin, a well known tumor-regulatory protein, contributes to this signaling pathway. The pivotal role of β-catenin was further indicated by the up-regulation of its downstream targets cyclin D1, c-Myc, COX-2, MMP-7, MMP-14, and Claudin-1. β-Catenin knockdown almost completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced enhancement of breast cancer migration and invasion. These findings provide a new perspective to counteract the invasive behavior of breast cancer, indicating that blocking PI3K-AKT pathway-dependent β-catenin accumulation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to control breast cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Optimum coagulant forecasting by modeling jar test experiments using ANNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiri, Sadaf; Daghighi, Amin; Moharramzadeh, Sina

    2018-01-01

    Currently, the proper utilization of water treatment plants and optimizing their use is of particular importance. Coagulation and flocculation in water treatment are the common ways through which the use of coagulants leads to instability of particles and the formation of larger and heavier particles, resulting in improvement of sedimentation and filtration processes. Determination of the optimum dose of such a coagulant is of particular significance. A high dose, in addition to adding costs, can cause the sediment to remain in the filtrate, a dangerous condition according to the standards, while a sub-adequate dose of coagulants can result in the reducing the required quality and acceptable performance of the coagulation process. Although jar tests are used for testing coagulants, such experiments face many constraints with respect to evaluating the results produced by sudden changes in input water because of their significant costs, long time requirements, and complex relationships among the many factors (turbidity, temperature, pH, alkalinity, etc.) that can influence the efficiency of coagulant and test results. Modeling can be used to overcome these limitations; in this research study, an artificial neural network (ANN) multi-layer perceptron (MLP) with one hidden layer has been used for modeling the jar test to determine the dosage level of used coagulant in water treatment processes. The data contained in this research have been obtained from the drinking water treatment plant located in Ardabil province in Iran. To evaluate the performance of the model, the mean squared error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (R2) parameters have been used. The obtained values are within an acceptable range that demonstrates the high accuracy of the models with respect to the estimation of water-quality characteristics and the optimal dosages of coagulants; so using these models will allow operators to not only reduce costs and time taken to perform experimental jar tests

  14. Coagulation and complement activation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, K; Larsson, R; Emanuelsson, H; Elgue, G; Larsson, A

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of heparin coating of a new stent construction (Stent Graft, Jomed Implantate GmbH, Germany) on platelet and coagulation activity. Stent grafts with an ePTFE membrane interfoliated between two stents were deployed in tubings to form Chandler loops. Fresh human blood with a low concentration of heparin was rotated for 1 h, then collected and used for measurements of platelet number, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), CD11b, C3a and C5b-9. There were five study groups: Group 1, conventional unmodified stents (n = 8); Group 2, untreated stent grafts (n = 8); Group 3, heparin-coated stents and untreated membrane (n = 7); Group 4, heparin-coated stents and membrane (n = 8); Group 5, heparin-coated PVC tubings with no stents (n = 8). There was a significant drop in platelet count, increase in TAT-values and CD11b expression in Groups 1-3 but not in Group 4 compared to Group 5. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed extensive activation on non-modified stents but almost no deposition of thrombotic material on heparin-modified stent grafts. With unmodified stents and membrane there were signs of significant activation of platelets and coagulation. In contrast, the heparin-coated stent graft induced much less alterations, indicating improved blood compatibility.

  15. Coagulation activation in autoimmune bullous diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Tedeschi, A; Spinelli, D; Fanoni, D; Crosti, C; Cugno, M

    2009-01-01

    The main autoimmune blistering skin disorders are pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and bullous pemphigoid (BP). They differ in the inflammatory infiltrate, which is more intense in BP. Inflammation is known to activate coagulation in several disorders. Local and systemic activation of coagulation was evaluated in BP and PV. We studied 20 BP patients (10 active and 10 remittent), 23 PV patients (13 active and 10 remittent) and 10 healthy subjects. The coagulation markers prothrombin fragment F1+2 and D-dimer were measured by enzyme-immunoassays in plasma. The presence of tissue factor (TF), the main initiator of blood coagulation, was evaluated immunohistochemically in skin specimens from 10 patients with active PV, 10 patients with active BP and 10 controls. Plasma F1+2 and D-dimer levels were significantly high in active BP (P = 0·001), whereas in active PV the levels were normal. During remission, F1+2 and D-dimer plasma levels were normal in both BP and PV. TF immunoreactivity was found in active BP but neither in active PV nor in normal skin. TF reactivity scores were higher in active BP than in controls or active PV (P = 0·0001). No difference in TF scores was found between active PV and controls. BP is associated with coagulation activation, which is lacking in PV. This suggests that BP but not PV patients have an increased thrombotic risk. The observation that thrombotic complications occur more frequently in BP than in PV further supports this view. PMID:19737228

  16. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects. PMID:23730696

  17. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased (“pure”) THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ’s ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  18. What Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leading to DIC. These diseases and conditions include: Sepsis (an infection in the bloodstream) Surgery and trauma ... intravascular coagulation (DIC). These diseases and conditions include: Sepsis (an infection in the bloodstream) Surgery and trauma ...

  19. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  20. Coagulation Management in Jersey Calves: An ex vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Gröning, Sabine; Maas, Judith; van Geul, Svenja; Rossaint, Rolf; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Grottke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Jersey calves are frequently used as an experimental animal model for in vivo testing of cardiac assist devices or orthopedic implants. In this ex vivo study, we analyzed the coagulation system of the Jersey calves and the potential of human-based coagulation management to circumvent perioperative bleeding complications during surgery. Experimental Procedure: Blood from 7 Jersey calves was subjected to standard laboratory tests and thromboelastometry analysis. An ex vivo model of dilutional coagulopathy was used to study the effects of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate supplementation. Fibrinolysis was induced with tissue plasminogen activator to identify potential therapeutic strategies involving tranexamic acid or aprotinin. Furthermore, anticoagulation strategies were evaluated by incubating the blood samples with dabigatran or rivaroxaban. Baseline values for thromboelastometry and standard laboratory parameters, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin III, and D-dimers, were established. Fifty percent diluted blood showed a statistically significant impairment of hemostasis. The parameters significantly improved after the administration of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate. Tranexamic acid and aprotinin ameliorated tissue plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. Both dabigatran and rivaroxaban significantly prolonged the coagulation parameters. In this ex vivo study, coagulation factors, factor concentrate, antifibrinolytic reagents, and anticoagulants regularly used in the clinic positively impacted coagulation parameters in Jersey calf blood. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Application of Cox model in coagulation function in patients with primary liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuan; Chen, Mingwei; Ding, Li; Zhao, Shan; Wang, Yuefei; Kang, Qinjiong; Liu, Yi

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the distribution of coagulation parameters in patients with primary liver cancer; explore the relationship between clinical staging, survival, and coagulation parameters by using Coxproportional hazard model; and provide a parameter for clinical management and prognosis. Coagulation parameters were evaluated in 228 patients with primary liver cancer, 52 patients with common liver disease, and 52 normal healthy controls. The relationship between primary livercancer staging and coagulation parameters wasanalyzed. Follow-up examinations were performed. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to analyze the relationship between coagulationparameters and survival. The changes in the coagulation parameters in patients with primary liver cancer were significantly different from those in normal controls. The effect of the disease on coagulation function became more obvious as the severity of liver cancer increased (p<0.05). The levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen degradation products (FDP), fibrinogen (FIB), and platelets (PLT) were negatively correlated with the long-term survival of patients with advanced liver cancer. The stages of primary liver cancer are associated with coagulation parameters. Coagulation parameters are related to survival and risk factors. Monitoring of coagulation parameters may help ensure better surveillance and treatment for liver cancer patients.

  2. Pilot testing of dissolved air flotation (DAF) in a highly effective coagulation-flocculation integrated (FRD) system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yili; Guo, Jinlong; Tang, Hongxiao

    2002-01-01

    Factors of pretreatment coagulation/flocculation units were studied using raw water of low temperature and low turbidity. Aluminum sulfate (AS) and selected polyaluminium chlorides (PACls) were all effective in the DAF process when used under favorable conditions of coagulant addition, coagulation, flocculation and flotation units. Compared with the AS coagulant, PACls, at lower dosage, could give the same effective performance even with shorter coagulation/flocculation time or lower recycle ratio during the treatment of cold water. This is attributed to the higher-charged polymeric Al species, and the lower hydrophilic and more compact flocculated flocs of PACl coagulant. Based on results of pilot experiments, the goal of FRD system can be achieved by combining a DAF heterocoagulation reactor with PACl coagulant (F), an efficient flocculation reactor (R), as well as an economical auto-dosing system (D).

  3. Competition of coagulation sink and source rate: New particle formation in the Pearl River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Youguo; Hu, Min; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Yue, Dingli; Liu, Feng; Wiedensohler, A.; Wang, Zhibin; Kalesse, H.; Liu, Shang; Wu, Zhijun; Xiao, Kaitao; Mi, Puchun; Zhang, Yuanhang

    The coagulation sink and its role in new particle formation are investigated based on data obtained during the PRIDE-PRD2004 campaign at Xinken of Pearl River Delta, China. Analysis of size distributions and mode contributions of the coagulation sink show that the observed higher load of accumulation mode particles impose a significant effect on the coagulation sink and result in higher coagulation sinks at Xinken despite of the lower total particle number compared with other areas. Hence it is concluded that the higher coagulation sink may depress the occurrence frequency of new particle formation events. The strategies targeting at controlling accumulation mode particles may have influences on the frequency of new particle formation events at this area. The factors affecting the coagulation sink are evaluated. The relatively lower ambient relative humidities may weaken the coagulation sink and facilitate the occurrence of new particle formation events during noontime, while the surmise of nucleation and growth involving organic matter may imply an actually higher coagulation sink than expected. These factors have a significant influence on the ultimate fate of the newly formed nuclei and new particle formation. A comparison of event and non-event days indicates that the coagulation sink is not the only decisive factor affecting new particle formation, other factors including the precursor vapors and photochemical activity are none the less important either. Competition of coagulation sink and high source rate leads to the occurrence of new particle formation events at Xinken.

  4. EXTRINSIC COAGULATION BLOCKADE ATTENUATES LUNG INJURY AND PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE RELEASE AFTER INTRATRACHEAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a potentially powerful regulator of local inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that blockade of TF-factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex would decrease lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine release after tracheal instillation o...

  5. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p<0.001 for all variables except for PT; p=0.08). Elderly age (>50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  6. Principles of dielectric blood coagulometry as a comprehensive coagulation test.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Brun, Marc-Aurèle; Machida, Kenzo; Nagasawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-06

    Dielectric blood coagulometry (DBCM) is intended to support hemostasis management by providing comprehensive information on blood coagulation from automated, time-dependent measurements of whole blood dielectric spectra. We discuss the relationship between the series of blood coagulation reactions, especially the aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes, and the dielectric response with the help of clot structure electron microscope observations. Dielectric response to the spontaneous coagulation after recalcification presented three distinct phases that correspond to (P1) rouleau formation before the onset of clotting, (P2) erythrocyte aggregation and reconstitution of aggregates accompanying early fibrin formation, and (P3) erythrocyte shape transformation and/or structure changes within aggregates after the stable fibrin network is formed and platelet contraction occurs. Disappearance of the second phase was observed upon addition of tissue factor and ellagic acid for activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively, which is attributable to accelerated thrombin generation. A series of control experiments revealed that the amplitude and/or quickness of dielectric response reflect platelet function, fibrin polymerization, fibrinolysis activity, and heparin activity. Therefore, DBCM sensitively measures blood coagulation via erythrocytes aggregation and shape changes and their impact on the dielectric permittivity, making possible the development of the battery of assays needed for comprehensive coagulation testing.

  7. Blood Coagulation and Asthma Exacerbation in Children.

    PubMed

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Mairiang, Dara; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Kadegasem, Praguywan; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the activation of coagulation pathways in asthmatic airways. This study aimed to determine systemic blood coagulation during asthma exacerbation compared with the stable state in children. Pediatric patients (aged between 5 and 15 years) suffering from asthma exacerbation were enrolled. von Willebrand factor (vWF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), protein C, D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured during asthma exacerbation and stable state. A total of 22 patients were enrolled. The median vWF, PAI-1, and CRP during asthma exacerbation were significantly higher than those of the stable state: 147.5% (interquartile range, IQR: 111.05-196.57) versus 94% (IQR: 69.72-109.62, p < 0.001), 41.9 ng/ml (IQR: 21.91-48.61) versus 26.17 ng/ml (IQR: 15.89-34.44, p < 0.03), and 4.46 mg/l (IQR: 2.15-16.23) versus 0.87 mg/l (IQR: 0.20-3.89, p < 0.015), respectively. However, the median protein C during asthma exacerbation was significantly lower than that of the stable state: 99.5% (IQR: 86.75-117) versus 113% (IQR: 94-115.25), p = 0.01. No significant difference was found between the levels of D-dimer, F1 + 2, and TAT during asthma exacerbation and stable state. Ultimately, D-dimer was positively correlated with asthma exacerbation score (R = 0.466, p = 0.027). A significant correlation was observed between vWF and CRP (R = 0.527, p = 0.012). Evidence was found of increased endothelial activation and increased PAI-1 during asthma exacerbation. This may emphasize the potential role of blood coagulation in asthma exacerbation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Reversal of trauma-induced coagulopathy using first-line coagulation factor concentrates or fresh frozen plasma (RETIC): a single-centre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Innerhofer, Petra; Fries, Dietmar; Mittermayr, Markus; Innerhofer, Nicole; von Langen, Daniel; Hell, Tobias; Gruber, Gottfried; Schmid, Stefan; Friesenecker, Barbara; Lorenz, Ingo H; Ströhle, Mathias; Rastner, Verena; Trübsbach, Susanne; Raab, Helmut; Treml, Benedikt; Wally, Dieter; Treichl, Benjamin; Mayr, Agnes; Kranewitter, Christof; Oswald, Elgar

    2017-06-01

    Effective treatment of trauma-induced coagulopathy is important; however, the optimal therapy is still not known. We aimed to compare the efficacy of first-line therapy using fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or coagulation factor concentrates (CFC) for the reversal of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the arising transfusion requirements, and consequently the development of multiple organ failure. This single-centre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised trial was done at the Level 1 Trauma Center in Innsbruck Medical University Hospital (Innsbruck, Austria). Patients with trauma aged 18-80 years, with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 15, bleeding signs, and plasmatic coagulopathy identified by abnormal fibrin polymerisation or prolonged coagulation time using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) were eligible. Patients with injuries that were judged incompatible with survival, cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the scene, isolated brain injury, burn injury, avalanche injury, or prehospital coagulation therapy other than tranexamic acid were excluded. We used a computer-generated randomisation list, stratification for brain injury and ISS, and closed opaque envelopes to randomly allocate patients to treatment with FFP (15 mL/kg of bodyweight) or CFC (primarily fibrinogen concentrate [50 mg/kg of bodyweight]). Bleeding management began immediately after randomisation and continued until 24 h after admission to the intensive care unit. The primary clinical endpoint was multiple organ failure in the modified intention-to-treat population (excluding patients who discontinued treatment). Reversal of coagulopathy and need for massive transfusions were important secondary efficacy endpoints that were the reason for deciding the continuation or termination of the trial. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01545635. Between March 3, 2012, and Feb 20, 2016, 100 out of 292 screened patients were included and randomly allocated to FFP (n=48) and CFC (n

  9. Impact of combined C1 esterase inhibitor/coagulation factor XIII or N-acetylcysteine/tirilazad mesylate administration on leucocyte adherence and cytokine release in experimental endotoxaemia.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Spies, C D; Mueller, J; Vargas Hein, O; Feller, J; Lehmann, C

    2008-01-01

    We determined the effects of combinations of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) with factor XIII and of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with tirilazad mesylate (TM) during lipo-polysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxaemia in rats. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control (CON) group received no LPS; the LPS, C1-INH + factor XIII and NAC + TM groups received endotoxin infusions (5 mg/kg per h). After 30 min of endotoxaemia, 100 U/kg C1-INH + 50 U/kg factor XIII was administered to the C1-INH + factor XIII group, and 150 mg/kg NAC + 10 mg/kg TM was administered in the NAC + TM group. Administration of C1-INH + factor XIII and NAC + TM both resulted in reduced leucocyte adherence and reduced levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). The LPS-induced increase in IL-6 levels was amplified by both drug combinations. There was no significant effect on mesenteric plasma extravasation. In conclusion, the administration of C1-INH + factor XIII and NAC + TM reduced endothelial leucocyte adherence and IL-1beta plasma levels, but increased IL-6 levels.

  10. Multiple roles of the coagulation protease cascade during virus infection.

    PubMed

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2014-04-24

    The coagulation cascade is activated during viral infections. This response may be part of the host defense system to limit spread of the pathogen. However, excessive activation of the coagulation cascade can be deleterious. In fact, inhibition of the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex reduced mortality in a monkey model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Other studies showed that incorporation of tissue factor into the envelope of herpes simplex virus increases infection of endothelial cells and mice. Furthermore, binding of factor X to adenovirus serotype 5 enhances infection of hepatocytes but also increases the activation of the innate immune response to the virus. Coagulation proteases activate protease-activated receptors (PARs). Interestingly, we and others found that PAR1 and PAR2 modulate the immune response to viral infection. For instance, PAR1 positively regulates TLR3-dependent expression of the antiviral protein interferon β, whereas PAR2 negatively regulates expression during coxsackievirus group B infection. These studies indicate that the coagulation cascade plays multiple roles during viral infections.

  11. Effect of platelet-derived β-thromboglobulins on coagulation.

    PubMed

    Egan, Karl; van Geffen, Johanna P; Ma, Hui; Kevane, Barry; Lennon, Aine; Allen, Seamus; Neary, Elaine; Parsons, Martin; Maguire, Patricia; Wynne, Kieran; O' Kennedy, Richard; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Áinle, Fionnuala Ní

    2017-06-01

    β-thromboglobulins are derived from the cleavage of the CXC chemokine platelet basic protein and are released in high concentrations by activated platelets. Platelet-derived β-thromboglobulins (βTG) share 70% homology with platelet factor 4 (PF4), another CXC chemokine released by activated platelets. PF4 modulates coagulation by inhibiting heparin-antithrombin interactions, promoting protein C activation, and attenuating the activity of activated protein C. In contrast, the effect of βTG on coagulation is unknown. Clotting times, thrombin generation, chromogenic clotting factor assays, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used to assess the effect of purified βTG on coagulation. In normal pooled plasma, βTG shortened the lagtime and time to peak thrombin generation of tissue factor (TF)-dependent and TF-independent thrombin generation. In factor VIII and factor IX-deficient plasmas, βTG induced thrombin generation in the absence of a TF stimulus and in the presence of anti-TF and factor VIIa inhibitory antibodies. The procoagulant effect was not observed when thrombin generation was independent of factor X activation (supplementation of factor X-deficient plasma with factor Xa). Cleavage of a factor Xa-specific chromogenic substrate was observed when βTG was incubated with factor X, suggesting a direct interaction between βTG and factor X. Using SPR, βTG were found to bind to immobilised factor X in a dose dependent manner. βTG modulate coagulation in vitro via an interaction with factor X. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro effects of recombinant activated factor VII on thrombin generation and coagulation following inhibition of platelet procoagulant activity by prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Mazzeffi, Michael; Szlam, Fania; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Tanaka, Kenichi A; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Levy, Jerrold H

    2013-07-01

    Prasugrel is a thienopyridyl P2Y12 antagonist with potent antiplatelet effects. At present, little is known about its effects on thrombin generation or what strategies may emergently reverse its anticoagulant effects. In the current study we evaluated whether recombinant activated factor VII may reverse prasugrel induced effects and increase thrombin generation in an in vitro model. The effect of prasugrel active metabolite, PAM (R-138727), was evaluated on platelet aggregation, thrombin generation, and rotational thromboelastometry parameters using blood from 20 healthy volunteers. Additionally, we evaluated the effects of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and recombinant activated factor VII on restoring these parameters towards baseline values. PAM reduced maximum platelet aggregation and led to platelet disaggregation. It also decreased peak thrombin, increased lag time, and increased time to peak thrombin. Treatment with recombinant activated factor VII restored all three parameters of thrombin generation towards baseline. ADP decreased lag time and time to peak thrombin, but had no effect on peak thrombin. When recombinant activated factor VII and ADP were combined they had a greater effect on thrombin parameters than either drug alone. PAM also increased thromboelastometric clotting time and clot formation time, but had no effect on maximum clot firmness. Treatment with either recombinant activated factor VII or ADP restored these values towards baseline. Recombinant activated factor VII restores thrombin generation in the presence of PAM. In patients taking prasugrel with life-threatening refractory bleeding it has the potential to be a useful therapeutic approach. Additional clinical studies are needed to validate our findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Correlation between polymorphisms in the coagulation factor VII gene hypervariable region 4 site and the risk of coronary heart disease in population with different ethnic backgrounds: a Meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-li; Ma, Bin; Qian, Dun; Pang, Jun; Yao, Ya-li

    2013-12-01

    To assess the correlation between polymorphisms in the coagulation factor VII (F VII)gene hypervariable region 4 (HVR4)site and risk related to coronary heart disease (CHD)in different ethnic populations, especially the Asian populations. Publications up to April 2013, from CBM, CNKI, Wanfang Database,VIP, PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase were searched to collect data from case-control studies related to F VII gene HVR4 site and CHD in populations from different ethnicities. Quality of studies was evaluated, available data extracted and both RevMan 5.1 and Stata 11.0 softwares were used for Meta-analysis. Fifteen case-control studies were included, involving 3167 cases with CHD group and 3168 cases in the control group. on this Meta-analysis showed that:a)polymorphism of the F VII gene HVR4 site H7/H6+H5 and CHD, b)H7H7/H6H6 + H7H6 and CHD were both slightly correlated between people with different ethnic backgrounds. However, the H6 allele versus H7+H5 allele and CHD showed different results-a high correlation seen in different ethnic groups. H5 allele versus H6+H7 allele and CHD did not appear significant difference(OR = 1.20, 95%CI:0.76-1.90, P = 0.43). Both F VII gene HVR4 polymorphisms H7 allele and the H7H7 genotype might have served as protective factors for CHD in different ethnic groups, H6 allele might serve as a risk factor for CHD, but H5 allele was likely not to be associated with CHD in different ethnic groups.

  14. Curcumin, hemostasis, thrombosis, and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Keihanian, Faeze; Saeidinia, Amin; Bagheri, Ramin Khameneh; Johnston, Thomas P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-06-01

    Atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Platelet activation and aggregation play a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Herbal medicines have been traditionally used in the management of cardiovascular disease and can help in modifying its progression, particularly in hemostasis and the coagulation process, as well as altering platelet function tests and some coagulation parameters. Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant and has been used extensively in complementary and alternative medicine, as it is nontoxic and safe with various therapeutic properties. Modern scientific research has demonstrated its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, antithrombotic, and cardiovascular protective effects. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the positive activity of curcumin in hemostasis, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis. We also presented molecular mechanisms associated with the antiplatelet and anticoagulant activities of curcumin and potential implications for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effects of long-term diet and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on coagulation factor VII and serum phospholipids with special emphasis on the R353Q polymorphism of the FVII gene.

    PubMed

    Lindman, Anja S; Pedersen, Jan I; Hjerkinn, Elsa M; Arnesen, Harald; Veierød, Marit B; Ellingsen, Ingrid; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of long-term diet and very long chain n-3 fatty acids (VLC n-3) intervention on plasma coagulation factor VII (FVII), choline-containing phospholipids (PC) and triglycerides (TG), especially related to the R353Q polymorphism of the FVII gene. The present investigation included 219 subjects from the Diet and Omega-3 Intervention Trial on atherosclerosis (DOIT), a 2x2 factorial designed study in elderly men with long-standing hypercholesterolemia. The subjects were randomly allocated to receive placebo capsules (corn oil) (control), placebo capsules and dietary advice ("Mediterranean type" diet), VLC n-3 capsules, or VLC n-3 capsules and dietary advice combined. The R353Q genotype and the levels of FVIIc, FVIIag, FVIIa, PC, and TG at baseline and after 6 months were determined. Diet intervention was followed by a significant reduction of 5.1% in the levels of FVIIag and 2.4 mU/ml in FVIIa (95% CI -7.4, -2.9, and -3.8, -1.1, respectively) (both p<0.001) compared to the no diet group, independent of genotype. No effects of diet intervention on FVIIc, PC or TG were observed. After VLC n-3 supplementation the TG levels were significantly reduced compared to placebo (p=0.01), whereas all FVII levels and PC remained unchanged. Dietary advice towards a "Mediterranean type" diet, but not VLC n-3 supplementation, was shown to reduce the levels of FVIIag and FVIIa after 6 months, independent of genotype. The results indicate the dietary advice to be more favourable in reducing this risk factor for CVD as compared to specific VLC n-3 supplementation.

  16. Reversal of Apixaban Induced Alterations in Hemostasis by Different Coagulation Factor Concentrates: Significance of Studies In Vitro with Circulating Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Roquer, Jaume; Reverter, Joan Carles; Sanz, Victoria Veronica; Molina, Patricia; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant with a specific inhibitory action on FXa. No information is available on the reversal of the antihemostatic action of apixaban in experimental or clinical settings. We have evaluated the effectiveness of different factor concentrates at reversing modifications of hemostatic mechanisms induced by moderately elevated concentrations of apixaban (200 ng/ml) added in vitro to blood from healthy donors (n = 10). Effects on thrombin generation (TG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were assessed. Modifications in platelet adhesive, aggregating and procoagulant activities were evaluated in studies with blood circulating through damaged vascular surfaces, at a shear rate of 600 s−1. The potential of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs; 50 IU/kg), activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCCs; 75 IU/kg), or activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa; 270 μg/kg), at reversing the antihemostatic actions of apixaban, were investigated. Apixaban interfered with TG kinetics. Delayed lag phase, prolonged time to peak and reduced peak values, were improved by the different concentrates, though modifications in TG patterns were diversely affected depending on the activating reagents. Apixaban significantly prolonged clotting times (CTs) in TEM studies. Prolongations in CTs were corrected by the different concentrates with variable efficacies (rFVIIa≥aPCC>PCC). Apixaban significantly reduced fibrin and platelet interactions with damaged vascular surfaces in perfusion studies (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Impairments in fibrin formation were normalized by the different concentrates. Only rFVIIa significantly restored levels of platelet deposition. Alterations in hemostasis induced by apixaban were variably compensated by the different factor concentrates investigated. However, effects of these concentrates were not homogeneous in all the tests, with PCCs showing more efficacy in TG, and rFVIIa being more effective on TEM

  17. SAR and X-ray Structures of Enantiopure 1,2-cis-(1R,2S)-cyclopentyldiamine and Cyclohexyldiamine Derivativies as Inhibitors of Coagulation Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao,J.; Chang, C.; Cheney, D.

    In the search of Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors structurally different from the pyrazole-based series, we identified a viable series of enantiopure cis-(1R,2S)-cycloalkyldiamine derivatives as potent and selective inhibitors of FXa. Among them, cyclohexyldiamide 7 and cyclopentyldiamide 9 were the most potent neutral compounds, and had good anticoagulant activity comparable to the pyrazole-based analogs. Crystal structures of 7-FXa and 9-FXa illustrate binding similarities and differences between the five- and the six-membered core systems, and provide rationales for the observed SAR of P1 and linker moieties.

  18. Factor XII (Hageman factor) deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders: coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  19. Development, Validation, and Application of a Novel Ligand-Binding Assay to Selectively Measure PEGylated Recombinant Human Coagulation Factor VIII (BAX 855).

    PubMed

    Weber, Alfred; Engelmaier, Andrea; Hainzelmayer, Sandra; Minibeck, Eva; Anderle, Heinz; Schwarz, Hans Peter; Turecek, Peter L

    2015-10-21

    BAX 855 is a PEGylated recombinant factor VIII preparation that showed prolonged circulatory half-life in nonclinical and clinical studies. This paper describes the development, validation, and application of a novel ligand-binding assay (LBA) to selectively measure BAX 855 in plasma. The LBA is based on PEG-specific capture of BAX 855, followed by immunological factor VIII (FVIII)-specific detection of the antibody-bound BAX 855. This assay principle enabled sensitive measurement of BAX 855 down to the low nanomolar range without interference from non-PEGylated FVIII as demonstrated by validation data for plasma from animals typically used for nonclinical characterization of FVIII. The selectivity of an in-house-developed anti-PEG and a commercially available preparation, shown by competition studies to primarily target the terminating methoxy group of PEG, also allowed assessment of the intactness of the attached PEG chains. Altogether, this new LBA adds to the group of methods to selectively, accurately, and precisely measure a PEGylated drug in complex biological matrices. The feasibility and convenience of using this method was demonstrated during extensive nonclinical characterization of BAX 855.

  20. Opposite effects of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb aqueous extracts on blood coagulation function

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wufeng; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Background Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb (APL) has showed anticoagulant and antithrombotic activities in some studies, whereas its actual effects on blood coagulation are still unclear. This study was designed to observe the in vitro effects of APL aqueous extracts on blood coagulation, as well as to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Studies were divided into four groups: 0, 4, 20, and 80 g/L of APL aqueous extracts mixed with plasma or whole blood samples. Clotting time of whole blood, plasma coagulation tests, activities of plasma coagulation factors, plasma calcium ion, platelet aggregation test, and platelet fibrinogen receptor as well as the blood viscosity were measured. Results It was observed that the APL aqueous extracts in 4 g/L significantly prolonged the whole blood clotting time and activated partial thromboplastin time, shortened prothrombin time, decreased activities of coagulation factor VIII, IX and XI, and levels of platelet aggregation and fibrinogen receptor expression. However, coagulation factor VII activity, and blood viscosity were increased after the extracts treatment. And the effects of APL extracts were in a concentration-dependent manner (0–80 g/L). Conclusions The results suggest that APL aqueous extracts have a total anticoagulant activity, whereas they exhibit opposite effects of greater anticoagulant activity than pro-coagulant activity. PMID:28480193

  1. Economic aspects of intraoperative coagulation management targeting higher fibrinogen concentrations during major craniosynostosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Haas, Thorsten; Spielmann, Nelly; Restin, Tanja; Schmidt, Alexander R; Schmugge, Markus; Cushing, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    Results of a previously published study demonstrated a significant decrease in transfusion requirements and calculated blood loss for pediatric major craniosynostosis surgery, if a ROTEM(®) FIBTEM trigger of <13 mm (early substitution group) was applied as compared to a trigger of <8 mm (conventional group). The aim of this study was a posthoc analysis of the costs for this coagulation management. The total volume as well as the number of units or bags for all transfused blood products and coagulation factors were recorded for each case. The number of laboratory and point-of-care coagulation tests was also analyzed. Total blood product costs were calculated according to the local prices per unit. The total cost for all transfused/administered blood products/coagulation factors per patient was a median of 1023EUR (IQR 850EUR-1058EUR) in the early substitution group as compared to a median of 910EUR (IQR 719EUR-1351EUR) in the conventional group (P = 0.81). No difference in the number of coagulation tests performed was observed. In this study, the use of a higher fibrinogen trigger was not linked to a significant increase in total costs for transfused blood products and coagulation factors, and may offer an economically equivalent approach to coagulation management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  3. Influence of blood lipids on global coagulation test results.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    High levels of blood lipids have been associated with high levels of coagulation factors. We investigated whether blood lipids influence the results of global coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombin generation assay (TGA). PT, aPTT, and TGA, along with procoagulant and anticoagulant factors, were measured in 488 normal individuals. Vitamin K status was assessed with prothrombin-induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II). The procoagulant factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI and anticoagulant factors protein C and protein S showed significant correlations with triglyceride, and the procoagulant factors II, V, VII, IX, X, XI, and XII and anticoagulant factors antithrombin and protein C correlated with total cholesterol. There were no correlations of blood lipid levels with PIVKA-II levels. Subjects with high triglyceride levels (≥200 mg/dL) showed shorter PT values than those with lower triglyceride levels. However, aPTT value was not changed in terms of blood lipid levels. In both 1 and 5 pM tissue factor-induced TGAs, subjects in the high-triglyceride or high-cholesterol groups (≥240 mg/dL) had high levels of lag time, time-to-peak, and endogenous thrombin potential. Total cholesterol was a significant determinant of PT and TGA values. High blood lipids were related with increased coagulation activity in a normal population. Our findings are expected to help interpret the global coagulation test results in individuals with high lipid levels.

  4. Influence of Blood Lipids on Global Coagulation Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Ji-Eun; Song, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background High levels of blood lipids have been associated with high levels of coagulation factors. We investigated whether blood lipids influence the results of global coagulation tests, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and thrombin generation assay (TGA). Methods PT, aPTT, and TGA, along with procoagulant and anticoagulant factors, were measured in 488 normal individuals. Vitamin K status was assessed with prothrombin-induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II). Results The procoagulant factors II, VII, IX, X, and XI and anticoagulant factors protein C and protein S showed significant correlations with triglyceride, and the procoagulant factors II, V, VII, IX, X, XI, and XII and anticoagulant factors antithrombin and protein C correlated with total cholesterol. There were no correlations of blood lipid levels with PIVKA-II levels. Subjects with high triglyceride levels (≥200 mg/dL) showed shorter PT values than those with lower triglyceride levels. However, aPTT value was not changed in terms of blood lipid levels. In both 1 and 5 pM tissue factor-induced TGAs, subjects in the high-triglyceride or high-cholesterol groups (≥240 mg/dL) had high levels of lag time, time-to-peak, and endogenous thrombin potential. Total cholesterol was a significant determinant of PT and TGA values. Conclusion High blood lipids were related with increased coagulation activity in a normal population. Our findings are expected to help interpret the global coagulation test results in individuals with high lipid levels. PMID:25553275

  5. No effect of isolated long-term supine immobilization or profound prolonged hypoxia on blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Venemans-Jellema, A; Schreijer, A J M; Le Cessie, S; Emmerich, J; Rosendaal, F R; Cannegieter, S C

    2014-06-01

    Long-distance air travel is associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. The most obvious factor that can explain air travel-related thrombosis is prolonged seated immobilization. In addition, hypobaric hypoxia has been shown to affect coagulation, and the lowered atmospheric pressures present in the cabin during the flight may therefore play an etiologic role. Because immobilization and hypoxic conditions are usually present simultaneously in airplanes or hypobaric chambers, their separate effects on the coagulation system or on thrombosis risk have not been studied extensively. To investigate the separate effects of long-term immobilization and profound prolonged hypoxia on blood coagulation. We performed two studies in collaboration with European Space Agency/European Space Research and Technology Centre. In the first study, 24 healthy, non-smoking, adult women underwent 60 days of -6° head-down bed rest. In the second study, we took blood samples from 25 healthy men who participated during their stay in the Concordia station in Antarctica, where, due to the atmospheric conditions, continuous severe hypobaric hypoxia is present. In both studies, we measured markers of blood coagulation at baseline and at several time points during the exposures. We observed no increase in coagulation markers during immobilization or in the hypobaric environment, compared with baseline measurements. Our results indicate that neither immobilization nor hypoxia per se affects blood coagulation. These results implicate that a combination of risk factors is necessary to induce the coagulation system during air travel. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. Effect of rivaroxaban on blood coagulation using the viscoelastic coagulation test ROTEM™.

    PubMed

    Casutt, M; Konrad, C; Schuepfer, G

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of the oral direct inhibitor of factor Xa rivaroxaban on blood coagulation measured by rotation thrombelastometry ROTEM™. Blood was obtained from 11 healthy male volunteers before and 2.5 h after oral administration of 10 mg rivaroxaban. In addition to standard coagulation tests clot formation was measured by ROTEM™ analyzing extrinsic (Extem) and intrinsic thrombelastometry (Intem). Significant differences to the baseline values were found in the Extem clotting time (Extem-CT, 58 ± 9 s and 87 ± 17 s, p < 0.01), Intem-CT (194 ± 26 s and 239 ± 43 s; p = 0.02), prothrombin time (PT, 86 ± 9% and 67 ± 7%; p < 0.01) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT, 28 ± 1 s and 35 ± 2 s; p < 0.01). There was a low correlation between Extem-CT and PT as well as between Intem-CT and aPTT before and after rivaroxaban intake. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis determined aPTT to be the most appropriate parameter for the prediction of rivaroxaban-induced anticoagulation, Intem-CT and Extem-CT proved to be moderate tests and PT had no significance in the prediction of rivaroxaban-induced anticoagulation. Of utmost clinical importance was the fact that rivaroxaban treated patients could still show normal ROTEM™ values. Thus, ROTEM™ cannot be a suitable test method to exclude inhibition of blood coagulation by rivaroxaban.

  7. On coagulation mechanisms of charged nanoparticles produced by combustion of hydrocarbon and metallized fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Savel'ev, A. M.; Starik, A. M.

    2009-02-15

    The contributions of van der Waals, Coulomb, and polarization interactions between nanometersized particles to the particle coagulation rate in both free-molecular and continuum regimes are analyzed for particle charges of various magnitudes and signs. Analytical expressions are obtained for the coagulation rate constant between particles whose interaction in the free-molecular regime is described by a singular potential. It is shown that van der Waals and polarization forces significantly increase the coagulation rate between a neutral and a charged particle (by a factor of up to 10) and can even suppress the Coulomb repulsion between like-charged particles of widely different sizes.

  8. The Organophosphate Paraoxon and Its Antidote Obidoxime Inhibit Thrombin Activity and Affect Coagulation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Golderman, Valery; Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Tamarin, Ilia; Rosman, Yossi; Shrot, Shai; Rosenberg, Nurit

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are potentially able to affect serine proteases by reacting with their active site. The potential effects of OPs on coagulation factors such as thrombin and on coagulation tests have been only partially characterized and potential interactions with OPs antidotes such as oximes and muscarinic blockers have not been addressed. In the current study, we investigated the in vitro interactions between coagulation, thrombin, the OP paraoxon, and its antidotes obidoxime and atropine. The effects of these substances on thrombin activity were measured in a fluorescent substrate and on coagulation by standard tests. Both paraoxon and obidoxime but not atropine significantly inhibited thrombin activity, and prolonged prothrombin time, thrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. When paraoxon and obidoxime were combined, a significant synergistic effect was found on both thrombin activity and coagulation tests. In conclusion, paraoxon and obidoxime affect thrombin activity and consequently alter the function of the coagulation system. Similar interactions may be clinically relevant for coagulation pathways in the blood and possibly in the brain. PMID:27689805

  9. Use of combined coagulation-adsorption process as pretreatment of landfill leachate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Landfill leachate is an important pollution factor resulting from municipal landfill sites. Physical and chemical processes are the better option for pretreatment or full treatment of landfill leachate. This article presents a combination of pre-treatment method (coagulation and adsorption) for leachate collected from municipal solid waste open dumping site. Physico chemical characteristics of stabilized and fresh leachate were examined. Coagulation process was examined by using alum and ferric chloride. A low cost adsorbent, fly ash was used for adsorption studies. Coagulation studies were carried out for fresh and stabilized leachate. Adsorption studies have been conducted for alum pre-treated stabilized leachate. Effect of coagulant dose, adsorbent dose, pH and contact time were carried out. The effective optimum coagulant dosages were 0.6 g/L and 0.7 g/L for alum and ferric chloride respectively for stabilized leachate and incase of fresh leachate 0.8 g/L and 0.6 g/L for alum and ferric chloride respectively. For the alum pretreated stabilized leachate, the maximum COD removal is 28% using fly ash adsorbent with equilibrium time of 210 min and optimum dose of 6 g/L. Overall COD removal efficiency of 82% was obtained by coagulation using alum and adsorption using fly ash for stabilized leachate. The results obtained showed that combined coagulation and adsorption process can be used effectively for stabilized leachate treatment. PMID:23517661

  10. Chemical coagulation-based processes for trace organic contaminant removal: current state and future potential.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jonathan T; Hai, Faisal I; Al-Aboud, Turki M

    2012-11-30

    Trace organic contaminants have become an increasing cause of concern for governments and water authorities as they attempt to respond to the potential challenges posed by climate change by implementing sustainable water cycle management practices. The augmentation of potable water supplies through indirect potable water reuse is one such method currently being employed. Given the uncertainty surrounding the potential human health impacts of prolonged ingestion of trace organic contaminants, it is vital that effective and sustainable treatment methods are utilized. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive literature review of the performance of the chemical coagulation process in removing trace organic contaminants from water. This study evaluated the removal data collated from recent research relating to various trace organic contaminants during the coagulation process. It was observed that there is limited research data relating to the removal of trace organic contaminants using coagulation. The findings of this study suggest that there is a gap in the current research investigating the potential of new types of coagulants and exploring coagulation-based hybrid processes to remove trace organic contaminants from water. The data analysed in this study regarding removal efficiency suggests that, even for the significantly hydrophobic compounds, hydrophobicity is not the sole factor governing removal of trace organic contaminants by coagulation. This has important implications in that the usual practice of screening coagulants based on turbidity (suspended solid) removal proves inadequate in the case of trace organic contaminant removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  12. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Revathi; Thachil, Jecko; Monagle, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in paediatrics is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there have been several recent advances in the pathophysiology of DIC, most of these studies were done in adults. Since the haemostatic system is very different in early life and changes dramatically with age, creating a variety of challenges for the clinician, delay in the diagnosis of DIC can happen until overt DIC is evident. In this review article, we report the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests and a management algorithm to guide paediatricians when treating patients with DIC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. A Novel Role for Pro-Coagulant Microvesicles in the Early Host Defense against Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Oehmcke, Sonja; Westman, Johannes; Malmström, Johan; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Herwald, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that stimulation of whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells with bacterial virulence factors results in the sequestration of pro-coagulant microvesicles (MVs). These particles explore their clotting activity via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathway of coagulation; however, their pathophysiological role in infectious diseases remains enigmatic. Here we describe that the interaction of pro-coagulant MVs with bacteria of the species Streptococcus pyogenes is part of the early immune response to the invading pathogen. As shown by negative staining electron microscopy and clotting assays, pro-coagulant MVs bind in the presence of plasma to the bacterial surface. Fibrinogen was identified as a linker that, through binding to the M1 protein of S. pyogenes, allows the opsonization of the bacteria by MVs. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a strong interaction between pro-coagulant MVs and fibrinogen with a KD value in the nanomolar range. When performing a mass-spectrometry-based strategy to determine the protein quantity, a significant up-regulation of the fibrinogen-binding integrins CD18 and CD11b on pro-coagulant MVs was recorded. Finally we show that plasma clots induced by pro-coagulant MVs are able to prevent bacterial dissemination and possess antimicrobial activity. These findings were confirmed by in vivo experiments, as local treatment with pro-coagulant MVs dampens bacterial spreading to other organs and improved survival in an invasive streptococcal mouse model of infection. Taken together, our data implicate that pro-coagulant MVs play an important role in the early response of the innate immune system in infectious diseases. PMID:23935504

  14. Reciprocal coupling of coagulation and innate immunity via neutrophil serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Massberg, Steffen; Grahl, Lenka; von Bruehl, Marie-Luise; Manukyan, Davit; Pfeiler, Susanne; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Lorenz, Michael; Bidzhekov, Kiril; Khandagale, Avinash B; Konrad, Ildiko; Kennerknecht, Elisabeth; Reges, Katja; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Braun, Siegmund; Reinhardt, Christoph; Spannagl, Michael; Preissner, Klaus T; Engelmann, Bernd

    2010-08-01

    Blood neutrophils provide the first line of defense against pathogens but have also been implicated in thrombotic processes. This dual function of neutrophils could reflect an evolutionarily conserved association between blood coagulation and antimicrobial defense, although the molecular determinants and in vivo significance of this association remain unclear. Here we show that major microbicidal effectors of neutrophils, the serine proteases neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, together with externalized nucleosomes, promote coagulation and intravascular thrombus growth in vivo. The serine proteases and extracellular nucleosomes enhance tissue factor- and factor XII-dependent coagulation in a process involving local proteolysis of the coagulation suppressor tissue factor pathway inhibitor. During systemic infection, activation of coagulation fosters compartmentalization of bacteria in liver microvessels and reduces bacterial invasion into tissue. In the absence of a pathogen challenge, neutrophil-derived serine proteases and nucleosomes can contribute to large-vessel thrombosis, the main trigger of myocardial infarction and stroke. The ability of coagulation to suppress pathogen dissemination indicates that microvessel thrombosis represents a physiological tool of host defense.

  15. Monitoring and treatment of coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. an international survey on current practices

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentieva, A.; Depetris, N.; Kaimakamis, E.; Berardino, M.; Stella, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The magnitude of coagulation abnormalities, and the definition and treatment of coagulopathy in burn patients are inadequately understood and continue to be discussed in the literature. We aimed to analyse physicians’ views on monitoring and treating coagulation abnormalities in burn patients. A total of 350 questionnaires were distributed electronically to burn ICU physicians. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Responses were analysed electronically and comparisons were made according to the region of the ICU or the specialty of the physician. Of the 350 questionnaires distributed, 55 (15.7%) were returned. The majority of burn specialists consider sepsis-induced coagulopathy to be the most frequent coagulopathy in burn patients, and 74.5% declare that they do not use any specific definition/scoring system in their department to detect coagulopathy. The majority of specialists (70.8%) use standard coagulation tests. The most frequent indications for plasma transfusion are massive bleeding (32.8%) and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation syndrome treatment (20%). The main specific factors reported in our study are cryoprecipitate (23.2%) and fibrinogen concentrate (18.9%). 21.1% of respondents state that they do not use any specific coagulation factor substitution in burn patients. Specific coagulation factor substitution is not a routine practice. The low response rate precludes the generalization of our results. PMID:28149244

  16. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  17. Plasmapheresis in severe septic shock with disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Zilow, E P; Selle, B; Zilow, G

    1994-01-01

    An 18-year-old female with CNS relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia after previous complete remission of the disease underwent chemotherapy. Due to the therapy she suffered from profound suppression of bone marrow with consecutive thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Despite prophylactic treatment, severe septicemia occurred with septic shock, hemolysis and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). As the clinical course became uncontrollable by means of conventional therapy, including broad-spectrum antibiotics, substitution of fresh frozen plasma, antithrombin III and heparin therapy, plasma exchange was used as a rescue therapy. This method succeeded in effective replacement of clotting factors and normalization of coagulation, in removal of fibrinogen degradation products and probably of toxins and shock mediators. The patient recovered from shock.

  18. The Mast Cell, Contact, and Coagulation System Connection in Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Guilarte, Mar; Sala-Cunill, Anna; Luengo, Olga; Labrador-Horrillo, Moisés; Cardona, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the most severe form of allergic reaction, resulting from the effect of mediators and chemotactic substances released by activated cells. Mast cells and basophils are considered key players in IgE-mediated human anaphylaxis. Beyond IgE-mediated activation of mast cells/basophils, further mechanisms are involved in the occurrence of anaphylaxis. New insights into the potential relevance of pathways other than mast cell and basophil degranulation have been unraveled, such as the activation of the contact and the coagulation systems. Mast cell heparin released upon activation provides negatively charged surfaces for factor XII (FXII) binding and auto-activation. Activated FXII, the initiating serine protease in both the contact and the intrinsic coagulation system, activates factor XI and prekallikrein, respectively. FXII-mediated bradykinin (BK) formation has been proven in the human plasma of anaphylactic patients as well as in experimental models of anaphylaxis. Moreover, the severity of anaphylaxis is correlated with the increase in plasma heparin, BK formation and the intensity of contact system activation. FXII also activates plasminogen in the fibrinolysis system. Mast cell tryptase has been shown to participate in fibrinolysis through plasmin activation and by facilitating the degradation of fibrinogen. Some usual clinical manifestations in anaphylaxis, such as angioedema or hypotension, or other less common, such as metrorrhagia, may be explained by the direct effect of the activation of the coagulation and contact system driven by mast cell mediators. PMID:28798744

  19. Emergent self-similarity of cluster coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmtiri O.

    A wide variety of nonequilibrium processes, such as coagulation of colloidal particles, aggregation of bacteria into colonies, coalescence of rain drops, bond formation between polymerization sites, and formation of planetesimals, fall under the rubric of cluster coagulation. We predict emergence of self-similar behavior in such systems when they are 'forced' by an external source of the smallest particles. The corresponding self-similar coagulation spectra prove to be power laws. Starting from the classical Smoluchowski coagulation equation, we identify the conditions required for emergence of self-similarity and show that the power-law exponent value for a particular coagulation mechanism depends on the homogeneity index of the corresponding coagulation kernel only. Next, we consider the current wave of mergers of large American banks as an 'unorthodox' application of coagulation theory. We predict that the bank size distribution has propensity to become a power law, and verify our prediction in a statistical study of the available economical data. We conclude this chapter by discussing economically significant phenomenon of capital condensation and predicting emergence of power-law distributions in other economical and social data. Finally, we turn to apparent semblance between cluster coagulation and turbulence and conclude that it is not accidental: both of these processes are instances of nonlinear cascades. This class of processes also includes river network formation models, certain force-chain models in granular mechanics, fragmentation due to collisional cascades, percolation, and growing random networks. We characterize a particular cascade by three indicies and show that the resulting power-law spectrum exponent depends on the indicies values only. The ensuing algebraic formula is remarkable for its simplicity.

  20. Coagulation under flow: the influence of flow-mediated transport on the initiation and inhibition of coagulation.

    PubMed

    Fogelson, Aaron L; Tania, Nessy

    2005-01-01

    A mathematical model of intravascular coagulation is presented; it encompasses the biochemistry of the tissue factor pathway, platelet activation and deposition on the subendothelium, and flow- and diffusion-mediated transport of coagulation proteins and platelets. Simulation experiments carried out with the model indicate the predominant role played by the physical processes of platelet deposition and flow-mediated removal of enzymes in inhibiting coagulation in the vicinity of vascular injury. Sufficiently rapid production of factors IXa and Xa by the TF:VIIa complex can overcome this inhibition and lead to formation of significant amounts of the tenase complex on the surface of activated platelets and, as a consequence, to substantial thrombin production. Chemical inhibitors are seen to play almost no (TFPI) or little (AT-III and APC) role in determining whether substantial thrombin production will occur. The role of APC is limited by the necessity for diffusion of thrombin from the site of injury to nearby endothelial cells to form the thrombomodulin-thrombin complex and for diffusion in the reverse direction of the APC made by this complex. TFPI plays an insignificant part in inhibiting the TF:VIIa complex under the conditions studied whether its action involves sequential binding of TFPI to Xa and then TFPI:Xa to TF:VIIa, or direct binding of TFPI to Xa already bound to the TF:VIIa complex. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  2. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  3. Blood coagulation abnormalities in multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Débora Santos da; Teixeira, Lisandra Antonia Castro; Beghini, Daniela Gois; Ferreira, André Teixeira da Silva; Pinho, Márcia de Berredo Moreira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Ribeiro, Marli Rambaldi; Freire, Monica Di Calafiori; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Tovar, Ana Maria Freire; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Perales, Jonas; Bozza, Fernando Augusto; Esquenazi, Danuza; Monteiro, Robson Queiroz; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2018-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection. In 2016, more than 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world, representing the most frequent cause of infectious irreversible deformities and disabilities. In the present work, we demonstrate a consistent procoagulant profile on 40 reactional and non-reactional multibacillary leprosy patients. A retrospective analysis in search of signs of coagulation abnormalities among 638 leprosy patients identified 35 leprosy patients (5.48%) which displayed a characteristic lipid-like clot formed between blood clot and serum during serum harvesting, herein named 'leprosum clot'. Most of these patients (n = 16, 45.7%) belonged to the lepromatous leprosy pole of the disease. In addition, formation of the leprosum clot was directly correlated with increased plasma levels of soluble tissue factor and von Willebrand factor. High performance thin layer chromatography demonstrated a high content of neutral lipids in the leprosum clot, and proteomic analysis demonstrated that the leprosum clot presented in these patients is highly enriched in fibrin. Remarkably, differential 2D-proteomics analysis between leprosum clots and control clots identified two proteins present only in leprosy patients clots: complement component 3 and 4 and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family heavy chain-related protein (IHRP). In agreement with those observations we demonstrated that M. leprae induces hepatocytes release of IHRP in vitro. We demonstrated that leprosy MB patients develop a procoagulant status due to high levels of plasmatic fibrinogen, anti-cardiolipin antibodies, von Willebrand factor and soluble tissue factor. We propose that some of these components, fibrinogen for example, presents potential as predictive biomarkers of leprosy reactions, generating tools for earlier diagnosis and treatment of these events.

  4. Enhancement of sedimentation and coagulation with static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin; Hajduk, Anna; Rusanowska, Paulina

    2017-11-01

    The static magnetic field can be an alternative method for wastewater treatment. It has been proved that this physical factor, accelerates the biochemical processes, catalyzes advanced oxidation, intensifies anaerobic and aerobic processes or reduces swelling of activated sludge. There are also reports proving the positive impact of the static magnetic field on the coagulation and sedimentation, as well as the conditioning and dewatering of sludge. In order to be applied in larger scale the published results should be verified and confirmed. In the studies, the enhancement of sedimentation by the static magnetic field was observed. The best sedimentation was noted in the experiment, where magnetizers were placed on activated sludge bioreactor and secondary settling tank. No effect of the static magnetic field on coagulation with the utilization of PIX 113 was observed. However, the static magnetic field enhanced coagulation with the utilization of PAX-XL9. The results suggest that increased sedimentation of colloids and activated sludge, can in practice mean a reduction in the size of the necessary equipment for sedimentation with an unchanged efficiency of the process.

  5. Fluid loss does not explain coagulation activation during air travel.

    PubMed

    Schreijer, Anja J M; Cannegieter, Suzanne C; Caramella, Marianna; Meijers, Joost C M; Krediet, Raymond T; Simons, Ries M; Rosendaal, Frits R

    2008-06-01

    The mechanism of air travel-related venous thrombosis is unclear. Although immobility plays a pivotal role, other factors such as fluid loss may contribute. We investigated whether fluid loss occurred more in individuals with coagulation activation after air travel than in subjects without. As a secondary aim, we investigated whether fluid loss per se occurred during air travel. In this crossover study, 71 healthy volunteers were exposed to eight hours of air travel, eight hours immobilization in a cinema, and a daily-life control situation. Markers of fluid loss (haematocrit, serum osmolality and albumin) and of coagulation activation were measured before and after each exposure. The study included 11 volunteers with and 55 volunteers without coagulation activation during the flight. The change in parameters of fluid loss was not different in volunteers with an activated clotting system from those without (difference between groups in haematocrit: -0.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.9 to 0.6). On a group level, mean haematocrit values decreased during all three exposures. However, in some individuals it increased, which occurred in more participants during the flight (34%; 95% CI 22 to 46) than during the daily-life situation (19%; 95% CI 10 to 28). These findings do not support the hypothesis that fluid loss contributes to thrombus formation during air travel.

  6. Coagulation parameters in senior athletes practicing endurance sporting activity.

    PubMed

    Cerneca, E; Simeone, R; Bruno, G; Gombacci, A

    2005-12-01

    Physical activity is practiced more and more by middle-aged people. We studied the behavior of the coagulation system before and after near-maximum, specific and standardized exercise tests in 2 groups of senior athletes. The subjects of the study were 2 groups of athletes over 40 years of age (ranging 41 to 60 years): 10 rowers and 10 marathon runners. The data were compared with 10 controls (ranging in age from 40 to 71 years) tested on the cycle ergometer. The first group (rowers) was tested on a rowing machine; the second group (marathon runners) performed a maximal exercise on the treadmill. All subjects were tested to a maximal level of cardiovascular and muscular exertion and cardiac and respiratory parameters were monitored. The following coagulation tests were performed before and after maximal exercise: prothrombin time (PT), partial activated thromboplastin time (PTT), fibrinogen (FBG), antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C (PC), protein S (PS), prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), tissue activator of plasminogen (t-PA) and its inhibitor (PAI). All subjects performed a complete maximal specific test. The results showed all individuals produced a significant increase of FBG, PT and PTT activities and a lowering trend for PC and PS inhibitors after maximal exercise testing. ATIII levels increased significantly in trained subjects. After the test, data regarding fibrinolysis showed higher t-PA levels in athletes as compared with controls. PAI levels indicated a more marked decrease in athletes. The F1+2 showed a moderate but significant increase in the control group. Coagulative tests showed an increase in procoagulant and fibrinolysis parameters in all the groups but the increased fibrinolytic activity in trained athletes indicates a protective factor and greater vascular efficiency. The results demonstrate that sporting activity practiced by middle-aged people accelerates fibrinolytic activity in conditioned subjects. In conclusion, physical activity benefits

  7. Effects of Oritavancin on Coagulation Tests in the Clinical Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Belley, Adam; Robson, Richard; Francis, John L; Adcock, Dorothy M; Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Rubino, Christopher M; Moeck, Greg; Sylvester, David; Dudley, Michael N; Loutit, Jeffery

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that some lipoglycopeptide and lipopeptide antimicrobial agents may cause falsely elevated values for some phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests. The effect of oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, on coagulation test results was explored using pooled human plasma samples spiked with drug and in a clinical study after an infusion of a single 1,200-mg intravenous dose of oritavancin in normal healthy volunteers. Pooled plasma with oritavancin added ex vivo showed concentration-dependent prolongation of prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and dilute Russell viper venom time (DRVVT) test results. In contrast, oritavancin had no effect on the activated protein C resistance assay, chromogenic anti-factor Xa assay (anti-FXa), thrombin time, and an immunoassay for the laboratory diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. In participants that received a single dose of oritavancin, elevations in PT/INR result, aPTT, DRVVT, activated clotting time, and silica clotting time occurred, with the maximum times to resolution of test interference determined to be 12, 120, 72, 24, and 18 h, respectively. The anti-FXa assay was unaffected, whereas transient elevations in D dimer levels were observed in 30% of participants, with a maximum time to resolution of 72 h. Although oritavancin has no impact on the coagulation system in vivo, a single dose of oritavancin can produce falsely elevated values of some coagulation tests used to monitor hemostasis. The interference of oritavancin on affected tests is transient, and the test results revert to normal ranges within specified times after dosing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Effects of Oritavancin on Coagulation Tests in the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Richard; Francis, John L.; Adcock, Dorothy M.; Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Rubino, Christopher M.; Moeck, Greg; Sylvester, David; Dudley, Michael N.; Loutit, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that some lipoglycopeptide and lipopeptide antimicrobial agents may cause falsely elevated values for some phospholipid-dependent coagulation tests. The effect of oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, on coagulation test results was explored using pooled human plasma samples spiked with drug and in a clinical study after an infusion of a single 1,200-mg intravenous dose of oritavancin in normal healthy volunteers. Pooled plasma with oritavancin added ex vivo showed concentration-dependent prolongation of prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and dilute Russell viper venom time (DRVVT) test results. In contrast, oritavancin had no effect on the activated protein C resistance assay, chromogenic anti-factor Xa assay (anti-FXa), thrombin time, and an immunoassay for the laboratory diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. In participants that received a single dose of oritavancin, elevations in PT/INR result, aPTT, DRVVT, activated clotting time, and silica clotting time occurred, with the maximum times to resolution of test interference determined to be 12, 120, 72, 24, and 18 h, respectively. The anti-FXa assay was unaffected, whereas transient elevations in D dimer levels were observed in 30% of participants, with a maximum time to resolution of 72 h. Although oritavancin has no impact on the coagulation system in vivo, a single dose of oritavancin can produce falsely elevated values of some coagulation tests used to monitor hemostasis. The interference of oritavancin on affected tests is transient, and the test results revert to normal ranges within specified times after dosing. PMID:27956417

  9. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Torsten G.; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit. PMID:25309880

  10. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Loof, Torsten G; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit.

  11. TREATMENT OF LANDFILL LEACHATE BY COUPLING COAGULATION-FLOCCULATION OR OZONATION TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION.

    PubMed

    Oloibiri, Violet; Ufomba, Innocent; Chys, Michael; Audenaert, Wim; Demeestere, Kristof; Van Hulle, Stijn W H

    2015-01-01

    A major concern for landfilling facilities is the treatment of their leachate. To optimize organic matter removal from this leachate, the combination of two or more techniques is preferred in order to meet stringent effluent standards. In our study, coagulation-flocculation and ozonation are compared as pre- treatment steps for stabilized landfill leachate prior to granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The efficiency of the pre treatment techniques is evaluated using COD and UVA254 measurements. For coagulation- flocculation, different chemicals are compared and optimal dosages are determined. After this, iron (III) chloride is selected for subsequent adsorption studies due to its high percentage of COD and UVA254 removal and good sludge settle-ability. Our finding show that ozonation as a single treatment is effective in reducing COD in landfill leachate by 66% compared to coagulation flocculation (33%). Meanwhile, coagulation performs better in UVA254 reduction than ozonation. Subsequent GAC adsorption of ozonated effluent, coagulated effluent and untreated leachate resulted in 77%, 53% and 8% total COD removal respectively (after 6 bed volumes). The effect of the pre-treatment techniques on GAC adsorption properties is evaluated experimentally and mathematically using Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. Mathematical modelling of the experimental GAC adsorption data shows that ozonation increases the adsorption capacity and break through time with a factor of 2.5 compared to coagulation-flocculation.

  12. [Effects on phenol removal in the process of enhanced coagulation by manganese dioxide formed in situ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhu; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Jun; Yu, Min; Li, Xin

    2011-10-01

    Phenol was selected as a model compound. Factors, such as Ca2+, tannic acid, dose of kaolinite, dose of manganese dioxide formed in situ and pH, were invested on phenol removal in the process of enhanced coagulation by manganese dioxide formed in situ. Results showed that the addition of Ca2+ is beneficial for phenol removal. In the range of Ca2+ varied from 0 to 1.0 mmol x L(-1), the efficiency of phenol removal was enhanced more than 10%. Tannic acid can enhance phenol removal significantly when they are coexisted in water. As tannic acid was added to 10 mg x L(-1), phenol removal can be increased about 30% and 50% in the process of coagulation by AlCl3 and enhanced coagulation by manganese dioxide formed in situ, respectively. The dose of coagulant can be reduced in the process of enhanced coagulation with the addition of manganese dioxide formed in situ. The point of 1 mg x L(-1) manganese dioxide formed in situ linked with 30 mg x L(-1) AlCl3 can have the same phenol removal efficiency as the addition of 50 mg x L(-1) AlCl3. In the range of pH varied from 5 to 9, phenol can be removed with the high efficiency in the process of enhanced coagulation by manganese dioxide formed in situ. While under the strong acid condition and strong basic condition, phenol has lower removal efficiency.

  13. Effects of oversulfated and fucosylated chondroitin sulfates on coagulation. Challenges for the study of anticoagulant polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Oliveira, Stephan-Nicollas M C G; Pomin, Vitor H; Mecawi, André S; Araujo, Iracema G; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2010-05-01

    We report the effects of a chemically oversulfated chondroitin sulfate and a naturally fucosylated chondroitin sulfate on the coagulation system. The former has been recently identified as a contaminant of heparin preparations and the latter has been proposed as an alternative anticoagulant. The mechanism of action of these polymers on coagulation is complex and target different components of the coagulation system. They have serpin-independent anticoagulant activity, which preponderates in plasma. They also have serpin-dependent anticoagulant activity but differ significantly in the target coagulation protease and preferential serpin. Their anticoagulant effects differ even more markedly when tested as inhibitors of coagulation proteases using plasma as a source of serpins. It is possible that the difference is due to the high availability of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate whereas oversulfated chondroitin sulfate has strong unspecific binding to plasma protein and low availability for the binding to serpins. When tested using a venous thrombosis experimental model, oversulfated chondroitin sulfate is less potent as an antithrombotic agent than fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. These highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates activate factor XII in in vitro assays, based on kallikrein release. However, only fucosylated chondroitin sulfate induces hypotension when intravenously injected into rats. In conclusion, the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the action of highly sulfated polysaccharides in coagulation requires their analysis by a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Our results are relevant due to the urgent need for new anticoagulant drugs or alternative sources of heparin.

  14. Measurement of the coagulation dynamics of bovine liver using the modified microscopic Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Terenji, Albert; Willmann, Stefan; Osterholz, Jens; Hering, Peter; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim

    2005-06-01

    During heating, the optical properties of biological tissues change with the coagulation state. In this study, we propose a technique, which uses these changes to monitor the coagulation process during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). Untreated and coagulated (water bath, temperatures between 35 degrees C and 90 degrees C for 20 minutes.) samples of bovine liver tissue were examined using a Nd:YAG (lambda = 1064 nm) frequency-domain reflectance spectrometer. We determined the time integrated intensities (I(DC)) and the phase shifts (Phi) of the photon density waves after migration through the tissue. From these measured quantities, the time of flight (TOF) of the photons and the absorption coefficients of the samples were derived using the modified microscopic Beer-Lambert law. The absorption coefficients of the liver samples decreased significantly with the temperature in the range between 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C. At the same time, the TOF of the investigated photos was found increased indicating an increased scattering. The coagulation dynamics could be well described using the Arrhenius formalism with the activation energy of 106 kJ/mol and the frequency factor of 1.59 x 10(13)/second. Frequency-domain reflectance spectroscopy in combination with the modified microscopic Beer-Lambert (MBL) is suitable to measure heat induced changes in the absorption and scattering properties of bovine liver in vitro. The technique may be used to monitor the coagulation dynamics during local thermo-coagulation in vivo. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Activation of coagulation and endothelium with concurrent impairment of anticoagulant mechanisms in patients with typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Hanna K; Parry, Chris M; van der Vaart, Thomas W; Kager, Liesbeth M; van den Ende, Stannie J; Maude, Rapeephan R; Wijedoru, Lalith; Ghose, Aniruddha; Hassan, Mohammed U; Hossain, Mohammed A; Dondorp, Arjan M; Baker, Steve; Faiz, M Abul; Meijers, Joost C M; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2018-05-07

    Typhoid fever caused by Salmonella Typhi remains a major burden worldwide. Gastrointestinal bleeding can be seen in up to 10 percent of patients and may be fatal. The coagulopathy, which may be the driver of this severe complication in patients with typhoid fever, however is ill defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of coagulation, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis in patients with acute typhoid fever. Parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis were measured in 28 hospitalized patients with culture-confirmed or PCR-confirmed typhoid fever and compared to 38 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients demonstrated activation of the coagulation system, as reflected by elevated in vitro thrombin generation and high plasma levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 in concert with consumption of coagulation factors resulting in a prolonged prothrombin-time and activated-partial-thromboplastin-time. Concurrently, the anticoagulant proteins, protein C and antithrombin, were significantly lower in comparison to healthy controls. Patients also demonstrated evidence of activation and inhibition of fibrinolysis and a marked activation of endothelial cells. The extent of coagulation activation was associated with the course of the disease, repeated testing during convalescence showed a return toward normal values. Activation of coagulation is an important clinical feature of typhoid fever and is associated with severity of disease. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of an acidic environment on coagulation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gissel, M; Brummel-Ziedins, K E; Butenas, S; Pusateri, A E; Mann, K G; Orfeo, T

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Acidosis, an outcome of traumatic injury, has been linked to impaired procoagulant efficiency. In vitro model systems were used to assess coagulation dynamics at pH 7.4 and 7.0. Clot formation dynamics are slightly enhanced at pH 7.0 in blood ex vivo. Acidosis induced decreases in antithrombin efficacy offset impairments in procoagulant activity. Background Disruption of hydrogen ion homeostasis is a consequence of traumatic injury often associated with clinical coagulopathy. Mechanisms by which acidification of the blood leads to aberrant coagulation require further elucidation. Objective To examine the effects of acidified conditions on coagulation dynamics using in vitro models of increasing complexity. Methods Coagulation dynamics were assessed at pH 7.4 and 7.0 as follows: (i) tissue factor (TF)-initiated coagulation proteome mixtures (±factor [F]XI, ±fibrinogen/FXIII), with reaction progress monitored as thrombin generation or fibrin formation; (ii) enzyme/inhibitor reactions; and (iii) TF-dependent or independent clot dynamics in contact pathway-inhibited blood via viscoelastometry. Results Rate constants for antithrombin inhibition of FXa and thrombin were reduced by ~ 25-30% at pH 7.0. At pH 7.0 (+FXI), TF-initiated thrombin generation showed a 20% increase in maximum thrombin levels and diminished thrombin clearance rates. Viscoelastic analyses showed a 25% increase in clot time and a 25% reduction in maximum clot firmness (MCF). A similar MCF reduction was observed at pH 7.0 when fibrinogen/FXIII were reacted with thrombin. In contrast, in contact pathway-inhibited blood (n = 6) at pH 7.0, MCF values were elevated 6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1%-11%) in TF-initiated blood and 15% (95% CI: 1%- 29%) in the absence of TF. Clot times at pH 7.0 decreased 32% (95% CI: 15%-49%) in TF-initiated blood and 51% (95% CI: 35%-68%) in the absence of TF. Conclusions Despite reported decreased procoagulant catalysis at pH 7.0, clot formation dynamics

  17. The Intrinsic Pathway of Coagulation as a Target for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Allison P.; Gailani, David

    2016-01-01

    Plasma coagulation in the activated partial thromboplastin time assay is initiated by sequential activation of coagulation factors XII, XI and IX – the classical intrinsic pathway of coagulation. It is well recognized that this series of proteolytic reactions is not an accurate model for hemostasis in vivo, as factor XII deficiency does not cause abnormal bleeding, and fXI deficiency causes a relatively mild propensity to bleed excessively with injury. Despite their limited roles in hemostasis, there is mounting evidence that fXI and fXII contribute to thrombosis, and that inhibiting them can produce an antithrombotic effect with a relatively small effect on hemostasis. In this chapter the contributions of components of the intrinsic pathway to thrombosis in animal models and humans are discussed, and results of early clinical trials of drugs targeting factors IX, XI and XII are presented. PMID:27637310

  18. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders: coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  19. Factor X deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders: coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  20. Factor VII deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders: coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. ... Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  1. Elastic scattering spectroscopy of coagulated brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateş, Filiz; Tabakoğlu, Haşim Özgür; Bozkulak, Özgüncem; Canpolat, Murat; Gülsoy, Murat

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this study was to differentiate the parts of lamb brain according to elastic scattering spectroscopy and detect the optical alterations due to coagulation. Cells and tissues are not uniform and have complex structures and shapes. They can be referred to as scattering particles. The process of scattering depends on the light wavelength and on the scattering medium properties; especially on the size and the density of the medium. When elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) is employed, the morphological alterations of tissues can be detected using spectral measurements of the elastic scattered light over a wide range of wavelengths. In this study firstly, the slopes of ESS spectra were used to differentiate the parts of lamb brains (brainstem, cerebellum, gray matter, white matter) in vitro in the range of 450 - 750 nm. Secondly, tissues were coagulated at different temperatures (45, 60, and 80 °C) and ESS spectra were taken from native and coagulated tissues. It was observed that as the coagulation temperature increased, the slope of the elastic scattering spectra decreased. Thus, optical properties of tissues were changed with respect to the change in nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio due to the water loss. Results showed that the slopes of ESS spectra in the visible range revealed valuable information about the morphological changes caused by coagulation.

  2. Effects of alum coagulation on speciation and distribution of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs).

    PubMed

    Gang, Dianchen; Clevenger, Thomas E; Banerji, Shankha K

    2005-01-01

    The impacts of alum coagulation on the distribution of disinfection by-products (DBPs), trihalomethanes (THMs), and haloacetic acids (HAAs) were evaluated under controlled chlorination conditions using four surface waters. Among the nine HAAs found in waters, dihaloacetic acids (X2AAs) have been found to be the dominant species in all of the raw and alum treated waters. Alum coagulation tends to remove more monohaloacetic acids (XAAs) and trihaloacetic acids (X3AAs) precursors than that of dihaloacetic acids (X2AAs). Alum coagulation treated water had a lower HAA9/TTHM ratio compared with that of the raw water. The increase of THM bromine incorporation factors (BIFalpha) value of alum treated water was statistically significant in comparison with the raw water. On average, BIFalpha increased by 54% after the alum coagulation process in these four different waters. This indicated that THM speciations shifted in favor of the more brominated compounds. However, alum coagulation treatment process had less effect on HAA bromi ne incorporation factors (BIFbeta)than it did on BIFalpha. Bromine incorporation factor (BIF) values decreased with time in the THM and HAA formation processes, especially within the first 10 h of the reaction time. This suggested that brominated THMs or HAAs formed faster than the chlorinated species in the initial period.

  3. Hepatic dysfunction contributes to coagulation disturbances in patients undergoing whole body hyperthermia by use of extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Worel, Nina; Knöbl, Paul; Karanikas, Georgios; Fuchs, Eva-Maria; Bojic, Andja; Brodowicz, Thomas; Jilma, Petra; Zielinski, Christoph C; Köstler, Wolfgang J; Locker, Gottfried J

    2014-09-01

    This phase I study was performed to evaluate coagulation alterations during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) induced whole body hyperthermia (WBHT) in 12 patients with advanced soft tissue sarcomas. To distinguish between effects of normothermic ECC and ECC-WBHT, blood samples were drawn at different time points: at baseline, after 30 min on normothermic ECC, at the end of the heating period, and 24 h and 7 days thereafter. Standard coagulation tests, coagulation factors, thrombelastography,platelets and reticulated platelets, liver enzymes, and scintigraphic platelet imaging were performed. Normothermic ECC resulted in coagulation alterations most likely due to systemic anticoagulation. Induction of hyperthermia caused thrombocytopenia, increased fibrin degradation products,prolonged clotting times, alteration in coagulation factors, and increased liver enzymes. The majority of these effects was most pronounced 24 h after ECC-WBHT. In addition, late liver sequestration of platelets was demonstrated in scintigraphic imaging at that time point. Temporal correlation between hemostatic alterations and elevation in liver enzymes leads to the assumption that liver impairment might play a crucial role in coagulation disturbances observed during ECC-WBHT and thereafter, thus strongly supported by liver sequestration of platelets.Therefore a close monitoring of hepatic derived coagulation alterations in patients undergoing extracorporeal whole body hypothermia is warranted.

  4. Coagulation Imbalance and Neurocognitive Functioning in Older HIV+ Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Jessica l.; Iudicello, Jennifer; Oppenheim, Hannah A.; Fazeli, Pariya l.; Potter, Michael; MA, Qing; Mills, Paul J.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott l.; Moore, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare plasma biomarkers of coagulation between HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected controls and to assess the impact of disturbances in coagulation on neurocognitive functioning in HIV. Design Cross-sectional study of 66 antiretroviral therapy-treated virally suppressed HIV-infected and 34 HIV-uninfected older (≥50 years of age) adults. Methods Participants completed standardized neurobehavioral and neuromedical assessments. Neurocognitive functioning was evaluated using a well-validated comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Plasma biomarkers associated with procoagulation (fibrinogen, p-selectin, tissue factor, and von Willebrand factor), anticoagulation (antithrombin, protein C, and thrombomodulin), fibrinolysis (d-dimer, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and plasminogen) were collected. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the interaction of HIV and coagulation on neurocognitive functioning. Results Most participants were male (78.0%) and non-Hispanic white (73.0%) with a mean age of 57.8 years. Among HIV-infected participants, mean estimated duration of HIV infection was 19.4 years and median current CD4+ cell count was 654 cells/mm3. Levels of soluble biomarkers of procoagulation, anticoagulation, and fibrinolysis were comparable between the HIV serostatus groups. Coagulation and HIV had an interacting effect on neurocognitive functioning, such that greater coagulation imbalance was associated with poorer neurocognitive functioning among the HIV-infected participants. The moderating effect of coagulation on neurocognition was driven by procoagulant but not anticoagulant or fibrinolytic biomarkers. Conclusions Elevated levels of procoagulants may exert a particularly detrimental effect on neurocognitive functioning among older HIV-infected persons. A better understanding of the specific role of coagulation in the etiology of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders may lead to treatments aimed at reducing coagulopathy

  5. Coagulation imbalance and neurocognitive functioning in older HIV-positive adults on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jessica L; Iudicello, Jennifer; Oppenheim, Hannah A; Fazeli, Pariya L; Potter, Michael; Ma, Qing; Mills, Paul J; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L; Moore, David J

    2017-03-27

    The aim of this study was to compare plasma biomarkers of coagulation between HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected controls and to assess the impact of disturbances in coagulation on neurocognitive functioning in HIV. A cross-sectional study of 66 antiretroviral therapy treated, virally suppressed, HIV-infected and 34 HIV-uninfected older (≥50 years of age) adults. Participants completed standardized neurobehavioral and neuromedical assessments. Neurocognitive functioning was evaluated using a well validated comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Plasma biomarkers associated with procoagulation (fibrinogen, p-selectin, tissue factor and von Willebrand factor), anticoagulation (antithrombin, protein C and thrombomodulin), fibrinolysis (d-dimer, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and plasminogen) were collected. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the interaction of HIV and coagulation on neurocognitive functioning. Most participants were male (78.0%) and non-Hispanic white (73.0%) with a mean age of 57.8 years. Among HIV-infected participants, mean estimated duration of HIV infection was 19.4 years and median current CD4 cell count was 654 cells/μl. Levels of soluble biomarkers of procoagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolysis were comparable between the HIV serostatus groups. Coagulation and HIV had an interacting effect on neurocognitive functioning, such that greater coagulation imbalance was associated with poorer neurocognitive functioning among the HIV-infected participants. The moderating effect of coagulation on neurocognition was driven by procoagulant but not anticoagulant or fibrinolytic biomarkers. Elevated levels of procoagulants may exert a particularly detrimental effect on neurocognitive functioning among older HIV-infected persons. A better understanding of the specific role of coagulation in the cause of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders may lead to treatments aimed at reducing coagulopathy, thereby improving

  6. Infrared coagulation: a new treatment for hemorrhoids

    SciTech Connect

    Leicester, R.J.; Nicholls, R.J.; Mann, C.V.

    Many methods, which have effectively reduced the number of patients requiring hospital admission, have been described for the outpatient treatment of hemorrhoids. However, complications have been reported, and the methods are often associated with unpleasant side effects. In 1977 Neiger et al. described a new method that used infrared coagulation, which produced minimal side effects. The authors have conducted a prospective, randomized trial to evaluate infrared coagulation compared with more traditional methods of treatment. The authors' results show that it may be more effective than injection sclerotherapy in treating non-prolapsing hemorrhoids and that it compares favorably with rubber band ligationmore » in most prolapsing hemorrhoids. No complications occurred, and significantly fewer patients experienced pain after infrared coagulation (P . less than 0.001).« less

  7. Protein corona changes mediated by surface modification of amorphous silica nanoparticles suppress acute toxicity and activation of intrinsic coagulation cascade in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Aoyama, Michihiko; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Tanaka, Kota; Nagano, Kazuya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nanomaterial-mediated biological effects have been shown to be governed by the interaction of nanomaterials with some kinds of proteins in biological fluids, and the physical characteristics of the nanomaterials determine the extent and type of their interactions with proteins. Here, we examined the relationships between the surface properties of amorphous silica nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70), their interactions with some proteins in biological fluids, and their toxicity in mice after intravenous administration. The surface modification of nSP70 with amino groups (nSP70-N) prevented acute lethality and abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade found in the nSP70-treated group of mice. Since our previous study showed that coagulation factor XII played a role in the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade, we examined the interaction of nSP70 and nSP70-N with coagulation factor XII. Coagulation factor XII bonded to the surface of nSP70 to a greater extent than that observed for nSP70-N, and consequently more activation of coagulation factor XII was observed for nSP70 than for nSP70-N. Collectively, our results suggest that controlling the interaction of nSP70 with blood coagulation factor XII by modifying the surface properties would help to inhibit the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the blood coagulation cascade.

  8. Coagulation Testing in the Core Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Winter, William E; Flax, Sherri D; Harris, Neil S

    2017-11-08

    Primary hemostasis begins with endothelial injury. VWF, produced by endothelial cells, binds to platelets and links them to subendothelial collagen. Platelet-derived ADP and thromboxane activate non-adhered platelets via their GPIIb/IIIa receptors, allowing these platelets to participate in platelet aggregation. Secondary hemostasis is initiated with the binding of factor VII to extravascular tissue factor (TF). Factors II, VII, IX and X are vitamin K-dependent factors. The role of vitamin K is to assist in the addition of gamma carboxylate groups to glutamic acids in the "GLA" domains of these factors.In vitro the intrinsic pathway is initiated when fresh whole blood is placed in a glass tube. The negative charge of the glass initiates the "contact pathway" where FXII is activated and then FXIa cleaves FIX to FIXa. The extrinsic pathway is triggered when tissue factor, phospholipid and calcium are added to plasma anticoagulated with citrate. In vitro, FVII is activated to FVIIa, and TF-FVIIa preferentially converts FX to FXa activating the common pathway.The prothrombin time is commonly used to monitor warfarin anticoagulant therapy. To correct for differences in reagent and instrument, the international normalized ratio was developed to improve standardization of PT reporting globally. The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is used to evaluate the intrinsic and common pathways of coagulation. The aPTT is useful clinically as a screening test for inherited and acquired factor deficiencies as well as to monitor unfractionated heparin therapy although the anti-Xa assay is now the preferred measure of the effects of unfractionated heparin. The Clauss assay is the most commonly performed fibrinogen assay and uses diluted plasma where clotting is initiated with a high concentration of reagent thrombin.The mixing study assists in the assessment of an abnormally prolonged PT or aPTT. An equal volume of citrated patient plasma is mixed with normal pooled plasma

  9. Pharmacogenomics of Anti-platelet and Anti-coagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Perry, Christina G.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a major component of vascular disease, especially myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Current anti-thrombotic therapies such as warfarin and clopidogrel are effective in inhibiting cardiovascular events; however, there is great inter-individual variability in response to these medications. In recent years, it has been recognized that genetic factors play a significant role in drug response, and, subsequently, common variants in genes responsible for metabolism and drug action have been identified. These discoveries along with the new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies on the horizon hold promise for more effective individualized anti-coagulation and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:23797323

  10. Synthesis of Phosphatidylserine and Its Stereoisomers: Their Role in Activation of Blood Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Suman; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Sen, Prosenjit

    2018-05-10

    Natural phosphatidylserine (PS), which contains two chiral centers, enhances blood coagulation. However, the process by which PS enhanced blood coagulation is not completely understood. An efficient and flexible synthetic route has been developed to synthesize all of the possible stereoisomers of PS. In this study, we examined the role of PS chiral centers in modulating the activity of the tissue factor (TF)-factor VIIa coagulation initiation complex. Full length TF was relipidated with phosphatidylcholine, and the synthesized PS isomers were individually used to estimate the procoagulant activity of the TF-FVIIa complex via a FXa generation assay. The results revealed that the initiation complex activity was stereoselective and had increased sensitivity to the configuration of the PS glycerol backbone due to optimal protein-lipid interactions.

  11. Assessing blood coagulation status with laser speckle rheology

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and investigated a novel optical approach, Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR), to evaluate a patient’s coagulation status by measuring the viscoelastic properties of blood during coagulation. In LSR, a blood sample is illuminated with laser light and temporal speckle intensity fluctuations are measured using a high-speed CMOS camera. During blood coagulation, changes in the viscoelastic properties of the clot restrict Brownian displacements of light scattering centers within the sample, altering the rate of speckle intensity fluctuations. As a result, blood coagulation status can be measured by relating the time scale of speckle intensity fluctuations with clinically relevant coagulation metrics including clotting time and fibrinogen content. Our results report a close correlation between coagulation metrics measured using LSR and conventional coagulation results of activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time and functional fibrinogen levels, creating the unique opportunity to evaluate a patient’s coagulation status in real-time at the point of care. PMID:24688816

  12. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1500 ml; group B, 1500 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 1700 ml; group C, 1700 ml ≤ bleeding amount < 2000 ml. Then, coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P < 0.001). Fibrinogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets strikingly decreased, whereas prothrombin time and APTT values significantly increased with bleeding amounts in both quick and slow-bleeding groups. Interestingly, compared with slow-bleeding patients, coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.

  13. [The implantation of bipolar coagulation to remove endometriosis foci].

    PubMed

    Sobkiewicz, S; Palatyński, A; Salata, I

    2001-05-01

    The paper compares the results of bipolar coagulation bey means of ERBE ICC 300 diatermy coagulator and WISAP endocoagulator. The results of both types of coagulation were assessed with reference to the changes occurring on peritoneum ligamenti sacro-uterini, Douglas pouch and ovary. The best results of endometriosis foci coagulation were obtained with bipolar ball at 20-30 W; no side effects or feelings of malaise were observed in patients just after the operation or over a longer period of convalescence.

  14. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  15. Coagulation dynamics of a blood sample by multiple scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, Magalie; Peltié, Philippe; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Cosnier, Marie-Line; Cubizolles, Myriam; Nougier, Christophe; Négrier, Claude; Pouteau, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    We report a new technique to measure coagulation dynamics on whole-blood samples. The method relies on the analysis of the speckle figure resulting from a whole-blood sample mixed with coagulation reagent and introduced in a thin chamber illuminated with a coherent light. A dynamic study of the speckle reveals a typical behavior due to coagulation. We compare our measured coagulation times to a reference method obtained in a medical laboratory.

  16. Coagulation monitoring during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: the role of thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Stammers, A H; Willett, L; Fristoe, L; Merrill, J; Stover, T; Hunt, A; Morrow, J; Newberry, J

    1995-09-01

    Patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are at an increased risk for developing coagulopathies due to the adverse effects of extracorporeal circulation on the hemostatic mechanism. Methods of determining causative factors of bleeding diathesis are often inconsistent and non-specific. ECMO patients require aggressive transfusion therapy with autogenic blood products to stabilize and maintain hemostasis. The present study evaluated the coagulation status of newborn patients undergoing ECMO therapy, using a viscoelastic monitor (Thrombelastograph -TEG) that measures functional aspects of clot development and stabilization. Seventeen neonatal patients undergoing ECMO for severe respiratory dysfunction were entered into this study. Serial blood samples were obtained and routine coagulation assessment including fibrinogen concentration, platelet count and ionized calcium was performed. In addition, fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP), d-Dimers, antithrombin III and plasma free hemoglobin were measured. Transfusion indicators were established and total transfusion requirements recorded. TEG profiles were determined with the use of heparinase, an enzyme that degrades heparin but has little effect on other coagulation factors. The most commonly encountered complication was hemorrhaging which was diagnosed by laboratory and clinical assessment in 11 of 17 patients. Transfusion requirements (measured in ml/kg/ECMO hour) were the following: packed red blood cells--1.34 +/- 0.5; platelets--0.71 +/- 0.57; fresh frozen plasma--0.09 +/- 0.12; cryoprecipitate 0.05 +/- 0.05. Thrombelastograph profiles reflected hemostatic conditions that ranged from severe coagulopathies (DIC) to hypercoagulability. Interpretation of TEG profiles identified hemostatic abnormalities in 57 of 101 profiles (46.5%), with the most common etiology related to platelet dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Roles for vitamin K beyond coagulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent interest in vitamin K has been motivated by evidence of physiological roles beyond that of coagulation. Vitamin K and vitamin K-dependent proteins may be involved in regulation of calcification, energy metabolism, and inflammation. However, the evidence for many of these proposed roles in the...

  18. Coagulant from Leucaena leucocephala for Chromium Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. H. Abd; Khairuddin, N.; Ismail, K. N.; Musa, M.

    2018-05-01

    This research investigated the effectiveness of leucaena leucocephala as a natural coagulant for chromium removal. Leucaena leucocephala is a permanent non-climbing shrub tree which is wild and abundant in Malaysia and commonly known as petai belalang. Coagulation experiment using jar test were performed where the effect of coagulant dosage and pH were examined. The parameters investigated were suspended solid (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), biological oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity and chromium content. The optimum of leucaena leucocephala coagulant dosage for removal of suspended solid, turbidity, COD, BOD and Chromium is at range 400-600 mg/L which yielded 45, 31.4, 38.5, 27.5 and 4.05% removal respectively. While the optimum pH is at pH 2-4 (acidic) which give 33.3, 26.8, 33.75, 31.4 and 14.06% removal of suspended solid, COD, BOD, turbidity and chromium content respectively. It is concluded that the leucaena leucocephala showed tremendous potential for chromium removal.

  19. Quinine-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Spearing, R L; Hickton, C M; Sizeland, P; Hannah, A; Bailey, R R

    Recurrent disseminated intravascular coagulation occurred in 3 women after ingestion of quinine tablets for cramp. All had circulating quinine-dependent antibodies to platelets and in 2 there was initial evidence of antibody consumption, with low titres that rose steeply over the next few days and remained high for many months.

  20. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864...

  5. Could light meal jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests?

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Presently the necessity of fasting time for coagulation tests is not standardized. Our hypothesis is that this can harm patient safety. This study is aimed at evaluating whether a light meal (i.e. breakfast) can jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests. A blood sample was firstly collected from 17 fasting volunteers (12 h). Immediately after blood collection, the volunteers consumed a light meal. Then samples were collected at 1, 2 and 4 h after the meal. Coagulation tests included: activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin III (AT), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS). Differences between samples were assessed by Wilcoxon ranked-pairs test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Mean % differences were determined and differences between and baseline and 1, 2 and 4h samples were compared with reference change value (RCV). A significantly higher % activity of AT was observed at 1 h and 4 h after meal vs. baseline specimen [113 (104-117) and 111 (107-120) vs. 109 (102-118), respectively; P = 0.029 and P = 0.016]. APTT at 2 h was found significantly lower than baseline samples [32.0 (29.9-34.8) vs. 34.1 (32.2-35.2), respectively; P = 0.041]. The results of both Fbg and PS tests were not influenced by a light meal. Furthermore, no coagulation tests had significant variation after comparison with RCV. A light meal does not influence the laboratory coagulation tests we assessed, but we suggest that the laboratory quality managers standardize the fasting time for all blood tests at 12 hours, to completely metabolize the lipids intake.

  6. Coagulation indices in very preterm infants from cord blood and postnatal samples.

    PubMed

    Neary, E; McCallion, N; Kevane, B; Cotter, M; Egan, K; Regan, I; Kirkham, C; Mooney, C; Coulter-Smith, S; Ní Áinle, F

    2015-11-01

    Very premature infants are at high risk of bleeding complications; however, few data exist on ranges for standard coagulation tests. The primary objective of this study was to measure standard plasma coagulation tests and thrombin generation in very premature infants compared with term infants. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether an association existed between coagulation indices and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Cord and peripheral blood of neonates < 30 weeks gestational age (GA) was drawn at birth, on days 1 and 3 and fortnightly until 30 weeks corrected gestational age. Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen and coagulation factor levels were measured and tissue factor-stimulated thrombin generation was characterized. Control plasma was obtained from cord blood of term neonates. One hundred and sixteen infants were recruited. Median (range) GA was 27.7 (23.7-29.9) weeks and mean (SD) birth weight was 1020 (255) g. Median (5th-95th percentile) day 1 PT, APTT and fibrinogen were 17.5 (12.7-26.6) s, 78.7 (48.7-134.3) s and 1.4 (0.72-3.8) g L(-1) , respectively. No difference in endogenous thrombin potential between preterm and term plasma was observed, where samples were available. Levels of coagulation factors II, VII, IX and X, protein C, protein S and antithrombin were reduced in preterm compared with term plasma. Day 1 APTT and PT were not associated with IVH. In the largest cross-sectional study to date of very preterm infants, typical ranges for standard coagulation tests were determined. Despite long clotting times, thrombin generation was observed to be similar in very preterm and term infants. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  7. Enhanced coagulation for improving coagulation performance and reducing residual aluminum combining polyaluminum chloride with diatomite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenchao; Wu, Chunde

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of using enhanced coagulation, which combined polyaluminum chloride (PAC) with diatomite for improving coagulation performance and reducing the residual aluminum (Al), was discussed. The effects of PAC and diatomite dosage on the coagulation performance and residual Al were mainly investigated. Results demonstrated that the removal efficiencies of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV254 were significantly improved by the enhanced coagulation, compared with PAC coagulation alone. Meaningfully, the five forms of residual Al (total Al (TAl), total dissolved Al (TDAl), dissolved organic Al (DOAl), dissolved monomeric Al (DMAl), and dissolved organic monomeric Al (DOMAl)) all had different degrees of reduction in the presence of diatomite and achieved the lowest concentrations (0.185, 0.06, 0.053, 0.014, and 0 mg L(-1), respectively) at a PAC dose of 15 mg L(-1) and diatomite dose of 40 mg L(-1). In addition, when PAC was used as coagulant, the majority of residual Al existed in dissolved form (about 31.14-70.16%), and the content of DOMAl was small in the DMAl.

  8. Comparison of functional aspects of the coagulation cascade in human and sea turtle plasmas.

    PubMed

    Soslau, Gerald; Wallace, Bryan; Vicente, Catherine; Goldenberg, Seth J; Tupis, Todd; Spotila, James; George, Robert; Paladino, Frank; Whitaker, Brent; Violetta, Gary; Piedra, Rotney

    2004-08-01

    Functional hemostatic pathways are critical for the survival of all vertebrates and have been evolving for more than 400 million years. The overwhelming majority of studies of hemostasis in vertebrates have focused on mammals with very sparse attention paid to reptiles. There have been virtually no studies of the coagulation pathway in sea turtles whose ancestors date back to the Jurassic period. Sea turtles are often exposed to rapidly altered environmental conditions during diving periods. This may reduce their blood pH during prolonged hypoxic dives. This report demonstrates that five species of turtles possess only one branch of the mammalian coagulation pathway, the extrinsic pathway. Mixing studies of turtle plasmas with human factor-deficient plasmas indicate that the intrinsic pathway factors VIII and IX are present in turtle plasma. These two factors may play a significant role in supporting the extrinsic pathway by feedback loops. The intrinsic factors, XI and XII are not detected which would account for the inability of reagents to induce coagulation via the intrinsic pathway in vitro. The analysis of two turtle factors, factor II (prothrombin) and factor X, demonstrates that they are antigenically/functionally similar to the corresponding human factors. The turtle coagulation pathway responds differentially to both pH and temperature relative to each turtle species and relative to human samples. The coagulation time (prothrombin time) increases as the temperature decreases between 37 and 15 degrees C. The increased time follows a linear relationship, with similar slopes for loggerhead, Kemps ridley and hawksbill turtles as well as for human samples. Leatherback turtle samples show a dramatic nonlinear increased time below 23 degrees C, and green turtle sample responses were similar but less dramatic. All samples also showed increased prothrombin times as the pH decreased from 7.8 to 6.4, except for three turtle species. The prothrombin times decreased

  9. Exosites in the substrate specificity of blood coagulation reactions.

    PubMed

    Bock, P E; Panizzi, P; Verhamme, I M A

    2007-07-01

    The specificity of blood coagulation proteinases for substrate, inhibitor, and effector recognition is mediated by exosites on the surfaces of the catalytic domains, physically separated from the catalytic site. Some thrombin ligands bind specifically to either exosite I or II, while others engage both exosites. The involvement of different, overlapping constellations of exosite residues enables binding of structurally diverse ligands. The flexibility of the thrombin structure is central to the mechanism of complex formation and the specificity of exosite interactions. Encounter complex formation is driven by electrostatic ligand-exosite interactions, followed by conformational rearrangement to a stable complex. Exosites on some zymogens are in low affinity proexosite states and are expressed concomitant with catalytic site activation. The requirement for exosite expression controls the specificity of assembly of catalytic complexes on the coagulation pathway, such as the membrane-bound factor Xa*factor Va (prothrombinase) complex, and prevents premature assembly. Substrate recognition by prothrombinase involves a two-step mechanism with initial docking of prothrombin to exosites, followed by a conformational change to engage the FXa catalytic site. Prothrombin and its activation intermediates bind prothrombinase in two alternative conformations determined by the zymogen to proteinase transition that are hypothesized to involve prothrombin (pro)exosite I interactions with FVa, which underpin the sequential activation pathway. The role of exosites as the major source of substrate specificity has stimulated development of exosite-targeted anticoagulants for treatment of thrombosis.

  10. Activation of the coagulation cascade in patients with scrub typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jeong; Park, Chi-Young; Park, Sang-Gon; Yoon, Na-Ra; Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Choon-Hae

    2017-09-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the levels of coagulation factors and presence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in patients with scrub typhus. We included patients confirmed to have scrub typhus at the Chosun University Hospital between September 2004 and December 2009. The DIC scores were evaluated in 365 patients and 36 healthy controls. The median concentrations of fibrinogen, d-dimer, and fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) were compared between patients and healthy controls (p<0.001 for all tests). Patients with scrub typhus had longer prothrombin time and lower platelet counts than the controls. Major bleeding was observed in 18/365 patients with scrub typhus. Fifty-one (14.0%) patients presented with severe complications of scrub typhus. Overt DIC and thrombocytopenia (<100,000 platelets/mm 3 ) were observed more frequently in patients with bleeding and severe illness. Furthermore, median platelet counts were low in both groups. Approximately 2.7% (n=10) and 16.4% (n=60) patients with scrub typhus had overt DIC, as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis DIC score (DIC1) and the DIC-scoring template with a fibrinogen/C-reactive protein-ratio (DIC2), respectively. Three (16.7%) and 10 (55.6%) patients with bleeding had overt DIC, as defined by the DIC1 and DIC2, respectively. Seven (13.7%) and 26 (51%) patients with severe illness had overt DIC, as defined by DIC1 and DIC2, respectively. In conclusion, activation of the coagulation system is an important feature of scrub typhus and is correlated with severe disease, including bleeding. This is the first study to report a relationship between DIC and scrub typhus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neprilysin Inhibits Coagulation through Proteolytic Inactivation of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Matthew; Henderson, Simon J.; Ravnefjord, Anna; Schweikart, Fritz; Fowler, Susan B.; Witt, Susanne; Hansson, Kenny M.; Webster, Carl I.

    2016-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) is an endogenous protease that degrades a wide range of peptides including amyloid beta (Aβ), the main pathological component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We have engineered NEP as a potential therapeutic for AD but found in pre-clinical safety testing that this variant increased prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The objective of the current study was to investigate the effect of wild type NEP and the engineered variant on coagulation and define the mechanism by which this effect is mediated. PT and APTT were measured in cynomolgus monkeys and rats dosed with a human serum albumin fusion with an engineered variant of NEP (HSA-NEPv) as well as in control plasma spiked with wild type or variant enzyme. The coagulation factor targeted by NEP was determined using in vitro prothrombinase, calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) and fibrin formation assays as well as N-terminal sequencing of fibrinogen treated with the enzyme. We demonstrate that HSA-NEP wild type and HSA-NEPv unexpectedly impaired coagulation, increasing PT and APTT in plasma samples and abolishing fibrin formation from fibrinogen. This effect was mediated through cleavage of the N-termini of the Aα- and Bβ-chains of fibrinogen thereby significantly impairing initiation of fibrin formation by thrombin. Fibrinogen has therefore been identified for the first time as a substrate for NEP wild type suggesting that the enzyme may have a role in regulating fibrin formation. Reductions in NEP levels observed in AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy may contribute to neurovascular degeneration observed in these conditions. PMID:27437944

  12. Enzymatic lipid oxidation by eosinophils propagates coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Uderhardt, Stefan; Ackermann, Jochen A.; Fillep, Tobias; Hammond, Victoria J.; Willeit, Johann; Stark, Konstantin; Rossaint, Jan; Schubert, Irene; Mielenz, Dirk; Dietel, Barbara; Raaz-Schrauder, Dorette; Ay, Cihan; Thaler, Johannes; Heim, Christian; Collins, Peter W.; Schabbauer, Gernot; Mackman, Nigel; Voehringer, David; Nadler, Jerry L.; Lee, James J.; Massberg, Steffen; Rauh, Manfred; O’Donnell, Valerie B.

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation is essential for physiological hemostasis but simultaneously contributes to thrombotic disease. However, molecular and cellular events controlling initiation and propagation of coagulation are still incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate an unexpected role of eosinophils during plasmatic coagulation, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Using a large-scale epidemiological approach, we identified eosinophil cationic protein as an independent and predictive risk factor for thrombotic events in humans. Concurrent experiments showed that eosinophils contributed to intravascular thrombosis by exhibiting a strong endogenous thrombin-generation capacity that relied on the enzymatic generation and active provision of a procoagulant phospholipid surface enriched in 12/15-lipoxygenase–derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid–phosphatidylethanolamines. Our findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of eosinophils and enzymatic lipid oxidation as regulatory elements that facilitate both hemostasis and thrombosis in response to vascular injury, thus identifying promising new targets for the treatment of thrombotic disease. PMID:28566277

  13. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p <  0.0500) higher in sepsis than in trauma, whereas platelet count and plasma fibrinogen were significantly lower in multiple trauma. Activation markers of coagulation were elevated in both groups, however, thrombin-antithrombin-complex was significantly higher in multiple trauma. DIC scores of 5 were not exceeded in any of the two groups. Analysing the influences on mortality (11/34; 32.35% ), which was not different in both groups, non-survivors were significantly older, had significantly higher multiple organ failure (MOF) scores, lactate, abnormal prothrombin times and lower C1-inhibitor activities, even more pronounced in early deaths, than survivors. In septic non-survivors protein C was significantly lower than in trauma. We conclude from these data that activation of the complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients

  14. Magnetic Resonance Mediated Radio Frequency Coagulation for Vascular Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    Purpose. Magnetic Resonance Mediated Radiofrequency Coagulation employs the RF heating effect of MRI scanning to coagulate biomaterials for repair of vascular defects. Coagulation of a protein biomaterial by MR-induced RF heating is a novel means to effect repair of defects such as aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. Our novel method is to coagulate a thermosetting material (such as egg white, which can be used for investigating heat coagulation behavior and MR relaxation properties) delivered endovascularly by catheter and coagulated by RF-induced heating of an intracatheter resonant wire antenna in the scanner. Methods. Experiments were performed on a Siemens 1.5 T MRI scanner and a Bruker 14T NMR spectrometer. Egg white was brought to equilibrium at seven temperatures (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 37 °C) in sequence. Measurement of the water spin-lattice relaxation time Ti, spin-spin relaxation time T2, spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame T1p, or full width at half maximum of the MT spectrum were performed at each temperature. Relaxation parameters of raw egg white and egg white after coagulation at 70 °C were measured in the scanner at 20 °C to determine optimum inversion time, echo time and offset frequency for good image contrast between coagulated and uncoagulated protein. Finally, coagulation of egg white within a glass aneurysm phantom by RF heating in the scanner was performed to demonstrate the MR coagulation methodology and the ability to achieve image contrast between coagulated and uncoagulated biomaterial. Results. Water T2, T1p and MT gave the most definitive indication of the change from uncoagulated at low temperature to fully coagulated at 60 °C, while water T1 showed only the expected gradual increase with temperature, and no response to coagulation. MT weighted imaging is expected to be the optimum method to establish the coagulation condition of the biomaterial.

  15. Blocking of platelets or intrinsic coagulation pathway-driven thrombosis does not prevent cerebral infarctions induced by photothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Braeuninger, Stefan; Pham, Mirko; Austinat, Madeleine; Nölte, Ingo; Renné, Thomas; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bendszus, Martin; Stoll, Guido

    2008-04-01

    Models of photochemically-induced thrombosis are widely used in cerebrovascular research. Photothrombotic brain infarctions can be induced by systemic application of photosensitizing dyes followed by focal illumination of the cerebral cortex. Although the ensuing activation of platelets is well established, their contribution for thrombosis and tissue damage has not formally been proved. Infarction to the cerebral cortex was induced in mice by Rose Bengal and a cold light source. To assess the functional role of platelets, animals were platelet-depleted by anti-GPIbalpha antibodies or treated with GPIIb/IIIa-blocking F(ab)(2) fragments. The significance of the plasmatic coagulation cascade was determined by using blood coagulation factor XII (FXII)-deficient mice or heparin. Infarct development and infarct volumes were determined by serial MRI and conventional and electron microscopy. There was no difference in development and final size of photothrombotic infarctions in mice with impaired platelet function. Moreover, deficiency of FXII, which initiates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and is essential for thrombus formation, or blockade of FXa, the key protease during the waterfall cascade of plasmatic coagulation, by heparin likewise did not affect lesion development. Our data demonstrate that platelet activation, factor XII-driven thrombus formation, and plasmatic coagulation pathways downstream of FX are not a prerequisite for ensuing tissue damage in models of photothrombotic vessel injury indicating that other pathomechanisms are involved. We suggest that this widely used model does not depend on platelet- or plasmatic coagulation-derived thrombosis.

  16. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  17. Point-of-Care Coagulation Monitoring in Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Stein, Philipp; Kaserer, Alexander; Spahn, Gabriela H; Spahn, Donat R

    2017-06-01

    Trauma remains one of the major causes of death and disability all over the world. Uncontrolled blood loss and trauma-induced coagulopathy represent preventable causes of trauma-related morbidity and mortality. Treatment may consist of allogeneic blood product transfusion at a fixed ratio or in an individualized goal-directed way based on point-of-care (POC) and routine laboratory measurements. Viscoelastic POC measurement of the developing clot in whole blood and POC platelet function testing allow rapid and tailored coagulation and transfusion treatment based on goal-directed, factor concentrate-based algorithms. The first studies have been published showing that this concept reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and improves outcome. This review highlights the concept of goal-directed POC coagulation management in trauma patients, introduces a selection of POC devices, and presents algorithms which allow a reduction in allogeneic blood product transfusion and an improvement of trauma patient outcome. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Effect of flomoxef on blood coagulation and alcohol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Matsubara, T

    1991-01-01

    The effect of flomoxef, a newly developed oxacephem antibiotic with an N-hydroxyethyltetrazolethiol (HTT) side chain, on blood coagulation and alcohol metabolism was compared with that of a series of cephalosporin antibiotics with N-methyltetrazolethiol (NMTT), thiadiazolethiol (TDT) or methylthiadiazolethiol (MTDT) side chains in position 3' of the cephalosporin nucleus known to cause hypoprothrombinemia and bleeding in patients who are malnourished, debilitated and/or of high age. A disulfiram-like effect caused by inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed for NMTT-containing antibiotics. Studies were carried out on healthy volunteers and on rats. Eight-day treatment with 2 g flomoxef i.v. once or twice daily in five and six healthy male volunteers, respectively, did not cause any significant changes in prothrombin time (PT), coagulation factors II, VII, IX or X, in hepaplastin values or fibrinogen levels, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), platelet counts, bleeding time, or collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase was observed in rats treated with flomoxef, yet to a much lesser extent than observed for cephalosporins with NMTT, TDT or MTDT side chains. This defect was quickly normalized by vitamin K injection. There were no differences between oxacephem (1-O) and cephem (1-S) compounds with respect to effects on blood clotting and platelet aggregation. Flomoxef and its side chain HTT showed no influence on alcohol metbolism.

  19. Patterned retinal coagulation with a scanning laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Jain, ATul; Paulus, Yannis; Andersen, Dan; Blumenkranz, Mark S.

    2007-02-01

    Pan-retinal photocoagulation in patients with diabetic retinopathy typically involves application of more than 1000 laser spots; often resulting in physician fatigue and patient discomfort. We present a semi-automated patterned scanning laser photocoagulator that rapidly applies predetermined patterns of lesions; thus, greatly improving the comfort, efficiency and precision of the treatment. Patterns selected from a graphical user interface are displayed on the retina with an aiming beam, and treatment can be initiated and interrupted by depressing a foot pedal. To deliver a significant number of burns during the eye's fixation time, each pulse should be considerably shorter than conventional 100ms pulse duration. We measured coagulation thresholds and studied clinical and histological outcomes of the application of laser pulses in the range of 1-200ms in pigmented rabbits. Laser power required for producing ophthalmoscopically visible lesions with a laser spot of 132μm decreased from 360 to 37mW with pulse durations increasing from 1 to 100ms. In the range of 10-100ms clinically and histologically equivalent light burns could be produced. The safe therapeutic range of coagulation (ratio of the laser power required to produce a rupture to that for a light burn) decreased with decreasing pulse duration: from 3.8 at 100ms, to 3.0 at 20ms, to 2.5 at 10ms, and to 1.1 at 1ms. Histology demonstrated increased confinement of the thermal damage with shorter pulses, with coagulation zone limited to the photoreceptor layer at pulses shorter than 10ms. Durations of 10-20ms appear to be a good compromise between the speed and safety of retinal coagulation. Rapid application of multiple lesions greatly improves the speed, precision, and reduces pain in retinal photocoagulation.

  20. Effects of In Vitro Hemodilution, Hypothermia and rFVIIa Addition on Coagulation in Human Blood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    primary fluids used by many trauma units and the US Army for pre-hospital resuscitation [17]. HX, a hetastarch-based product in a balanced electro...and has been associated with dilution of coagulation factors and hypothermia. Recombinant activated Factor VII (rFVIIa) has been used, often as a...of rFVIIa results in an enhancement of thrombin generation on the platelet surface at the site of injury independent of the presence of Factor VIII

  1. Exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronczak, Agata; Chmiel, Anna; Fronczak, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    This paper outlines an exact combinatorial approach to finite coagulating systems. In this approach, cluster sizes and time are discrete and the binary aggregation alone governs the time evolution of the systems. By considering the growth histories of all possible clusters, an exact expression is derived for the probability of a coagulating system with an arbitrary kernel being found in a given cluster configuration when monodisperse initial conditions are applied. Then this probability is used to calculate the time-dependent distribution for the number of clusters of a given size, the average number of such clusters, and that average's standard deviation. The correctness of our general expressions is proved based on the (analytical and numerical) results obtained for systems with the constant kernel. In addition, the results obtained are compared with the results arising from the solutions to the mean-field Smoluchowski coagulation equation, indicating its weak points. The paper closes with a brief discussion on the extensibility to other systems of the approach presented herein, emphasizing the issue of arbitrary initial conditions.

  2. A small amount can make a difference: a prospective human study of the paradoxical coagulation characteristics of hemothorax.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Zachary; Harrison, Hannah B; Salhanick, Marc A; Higgins, Russell A; Ortiz, Alfonso; Olson, John D; Schwacha, Martin G; Harrison, Chantal R; Aydelotte, Jayson D; Stewart, Ronald M; Dent, Daniel L

    2013-12-01

    The evacuated hemothorax has been poorly described because it varies with time, it has been found to be incoagulable, and its potential effect on the coagulation cascade during autotransfusion is largely unknown. This is a prospective descriptive study of adult patients with traumatic chest injury necessitating tube thoracostomy. Pleural and venous samples were analyzed for coagulation, hematology, and electrolytes at 1 to 4 hours after drainage. Pleural samples were also analyzed for their effect on the coagulation cascade via mixing studies. Thirty-four subjects were enrolled with a traumatic hemothorax. The following measured coagulation factors were significantly depleted compared with venous blood: international normalized ratio (>9 vs 1.1) (P < .001) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (>180 vs 24.5 seconds) (P < .001). Mixing studies showed a dose-dependent increase in coagulation dilutions through 1:8 (P < .05). An evacuated hemothorax does not vary in composition significantly with time and is incoagulable alone. Mixing studies with hemothorax plasma increased coagulation, raising safety concerns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Coagulation removal of humic acid-stabilized carbon nanotubes from water by PACl: influences of hydraulic condition and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si; Liu, Changli; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2012-11-15

    Discharged carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can adsorb the widely-distributed humic acid (HA) in aquatic environments and thus be stabilized. HA-stabilized CNTs can find their way into and challenge the potable water treatment system. This study investigated the efficiency of coagulation and sedimentation techniques in the removal of the HA-stabilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) as a coagulant, with a focus on the effects of hydraulic conditions and water chemistry. Stirring speeds in the mixing and reacting stages were gradually changed to examine the effect of the hydraulic conditions on the removal rate. The stirring speed in the reacting stage affected floc formation and thereby had a greater impact on the removal rate than the stirring speed in the mixing stage. Water chemistry factors such as pH and ionic strength had a significant effect on the stability of MWCNT suspension and the removal efficiency. Low pH (4-7) was favorable for saving the coagulant and maintaining high removal efficiency. High ionic strength facilitated the destabilization of the HA-stabilized MWCNTs and thereby lowered the required PACl dosage for the coagulation. However, excessively high ionic strength (higher than the critical coagulation concentration) decreased the maximum removal rate, probably by inhibiting ionic activity of PACl hydrolyzate in water. These results are expected to shed light on the potential improvement of coagulation removal of aqueous stabilized MWCNTs in water treatment systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An in vitro analysis of the effect of acidosis on coagulation in chronic disease states - a thromboelastograph study.

    PubMed

    White, Hayden; Bird, Robert; Sosnowski, Kellie; Jones, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Thrombosis is a complication of many chronic illnesses. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes mellitus are common medical conditions frequently associated with a hypercoagulable state. Acidaemia has been shown to reduce coagulation. COPD and diabetes mellitus during acute deterioration can present with a severe acidaemia. The impact of this acidaemia on coagulation is poorly studied. Patients presenting with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis or type II respiratory failure from COPD and a pH of less than 7.2 were included in our study. A coagulation screen and a thromboelastograph (TEG) were performed on admission and 24 hours later. The mean pH on admission was 7.07 and mean base excess was -16.3. The activated partial thromboplastin time was associated with pH change but remained within the normal range (26-41 s). All other coagulation and TEG parameters failed to show evidence of association (p>0.05). In the two models of non-haemorrhagic acidosis investigated, coagulation was not altered by the changes in pH. More work is needed to understand the complex relationship between factors affecting coagulation in individual disease processes. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  5. Coagulation activation by MC28 fibrosarcoma cells facilitates lung tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, M; Francis, J L

    1995-01-01

    Tumor cells interact with the hemostatic system in various ways and may thus influence malignant growth and spread. MC28 fibrosarcoma cells possess a potent procoagulant activity (PCA) and form lung tumors following intravenous injection. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between PCA, intravascular coagulation and lung seeding in the MC28 model. MC28 cells were injected into control, warfarinized and heparinized hooded Lister rats. Coagulation changes were monitored by thromboelastography (TEG) and Sonoclot analysis (SA), lung fibrin formation by light and electron microscopy, tumor seeding by macroscopic counting and tumor cell and platelet deposition in the lungs by radiolabelling. PCA was measured by chromogenic assay. MC28 PCA was characterized as a tissue factor-factor VIIa complex that probably arose during cell culture or disaggregation of solid tumors. Injection of tumor cells caused marked coagulopathy and was rapidly (within 30 min) followed by fibrin deposition in the lungs and accumulation of radiolabelled platelets. Heparin and warfarin significantly reduced lung seeding (p < 0.001) and reduced retention of radiolabelled tumor cells in the pulmonary circulation (p < 0.01). Inhibition of cellular PCA by prior treatment with concanavalin A markedly reduced intravascular coagulation and lung seeding. We conclude that MC28 cells cause intravascular coagulation as a direct result of their procoagulant activity. The data suggest that tumor cells form complexes with platelets and fibrin which are retained in the lungs long enough for extravasation and seeding to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processesmore » observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.« less

  7. The effect of corn trypsin inhibitor and inhibiting antibodies for FXIa and FXIIa on coagulation of plasma and whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hansson, K M; Nielsen, S; Elg, M; Deinum, J

    2014-10-01

    Corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI), an inhibitor of FXIIa, is used to prevent plasma coagulation by contact activation, to specifically investigate tissue factor (TF)-initiated coagulation. In the present work the specificity of CTI for factor (F) XIIa is questioned. In the commercial available plasma coagulation assays CTI was found to double activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) at a plasma concentration of 7.3 ± 1.5 μm CTI (assay concentration 2.4 μm). No effect was found on the prothrombin time (PT) when high TF concentrations were used. Also, with specific antibodies for FXIIa and for FXIa only APTT was found to be extended but not PT. With specific enzyme assays using chromogenic substrates CTI was shown to be a strong inhibitor of FXIIa and a competitive inhibitor of FXIa with Ki  = 8.1 ± 0.3 μm, without effect on the coagulation factors FVIIa, FIXa, FXa and thrombin. In thrombin generation and coagulation (free oscillation rheometry, FOR) assays, initiated with low TF concentrations, no effect of CTI (plasma concentrations of 4.4 and 13.6 μm CTI, 25 resp. 100 mg L(-1) in blood) was found with ≥ 1 pm TF. At ≤ 0.1 pm TF in the FOR whole blood assay the coagulation time (CT) concentration dependently increased while the plasma CT became longer than the observation time. To avoid inhibition of FXIa and the thrombin feedback loop we recommend that for coagulation assays the concentration of CTI in blood should be below 20 mg L(-1) (1.6 μm) and in plasma below 3 μm. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Intestinal volvulus with coagulative hepatic necrosis in a chicken.

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Goryo, Masanobu; Sasaki, Jun; Okada, Kosuke

    2010-04-01

    A 7-week-old SPF chicken inoculated at 4 weeks of age with chicken anemia virus was puffed up depressed and had ruffled feathers and a good body condition. Intestinal volvulus involving the jejunum and part of the duodenum forming two loops with one knob was observed. Microscopically, venous infarction of the obstructed loops, periportal and sublobular multifocal coagulative hepatic necrosis and granulomatous inflammation of the cecal tonsils were observed. Gram staining revealed no bacteria in hepatic tissue; however, gram-positive bacilli were detected in the necrotic debris in the intestinal lumen. Immunosuppression might have predisposed the chicken to intestinal and cecal tonsil infection that then progressed to volvulus. Loss of the mucosal barrier in infarction might allow bacterial toxins and vasoactive factors to escape into the systemic circulation (toxemia) and be responsible for the hepatic necrosis.

  9. CHARGING AND COAGULATION OF DUST IN PROTOPLANETARY PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L. S.; Land, V.; Hyde, T. W., E-mail: lorin_matthews@baylor.edu

    2012-01-01

    Combining a particle-particle, particle-cluster, and cluster-cluster agglomeration model with an aggregate charging model, the coagulation and charging of dust particles in plasma environments relevant for protoplanetary disks have been investigated, including the effect of electron depletion in high dust density environments. The results show that charged aggregates tend to grow by adding small particles and clusters to larger particles and clusters, and that cluster-cluster aggregation is significantly more effective than particle-cluster aggregation. Comparisons of the grain structure show that with increasing aggregate charge the compactness factor, {phi}{sub {sigma}}, decreases and has a narrower distribution, indicating a fluffier structure. Neutral aggregatesmore » are more compact, with larger {phi}{sub {sigma}}, and exhibit a larger variation in fluffiness. Overall, increased aggregate charge leads to larger, fluffier, and more massive aggregates.« less

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation: pathophysiology and principles of management.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, R K; Mitra, S; Marwaha, N

    1998-03-01

    DIC is a thrombohemorrhagic syndrome which occurs in association with well-defined clinical disorders such as septicemia, acute leukemia, snake envenomation, hypoxic states, etc. These disease conditions trigger the coagulation cascade in vivo resulting in formation of microthrombi, activation of fibrinolysis and a bleeding tendency. The important and most frequently observed laboratory abberrations include reduced platelet counts, low levels of fibrinogen, factors V and XIII with increased FDP's. Therapy primarily consists of recognizing the cause of DIC, removing the triggering process and administering anticoagulant therapy in specific situations. Component replacement is required if patients continue to bleed inspite of instituting the above mentioned measures. Rarely, drugs which inhibit fibrinolysis may be indicated. Early recognition and prompt institution of appropriate remedial measures coupled with adequate laboratory monitoring help in reducing morbidity and mortality due to DIC.

  11. Multiple response optimization of the coagulation process for upgrading the quality of effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Hu, Yi; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J.; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-05-01

    To meet the high quality standard of receiving water, the coagulation process using polyferric chloride (PFC) was used to further improve the water quality of effluent from wastewater treatment plants. Uniform design (UD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to assess the effects of the main influence factors: coagulant dosage, pH and basicity, on the removal of total organic carbon (TOC), NH4+-N and PO43--P. A desirability function approach was used to effectively optimize the coagulation process for the comprehensive removal of TOC, NH4+-N and PO43--P to upgrade the effluent quality in practical application. The optimized operating conditions were: dosage 28 mg/L, pH 8.5 and basicity 0.001. The corresponding removal efficiencies for TOC, NH4+-N and PO43--P were 77.2%, 94.6% and 20.8%, respectively. More importantly, the effluent quality could upgrade to surface water Class V of China through coagulation under optimal region. In addition, grey relational analysis (GRA) prioritized these three factors as: pH > basicity > dosage (for TOC), basicity > dosage > pH (for NH4+-N), pH > dosage > basicity (for PO43--P), which would help identify the most important factor to control the treatment efficiency of various effluent quality indexes by PFC coagulation.

  12. Anxiety and depression in patients three months after myocardial infarction: Association with markers of coagulation and the relevance of age.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Franziska; Urbach, Anne Sarah; Harbrecht, Ursula; Conrad, Rupert; Pötzsch, Bernd; Amann, Nele; Kiesewetter, Katharina; Sieke, Alexandra; Wolffs, Kyra; Skowasch, Dirk

    2017-08-01

    Anxiety and depression are associated with an activation of coagulation and an impairment of fibrinolysis, which may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk associated with the two disorders. However, very few studies have examined the impact of psychological distress on coagulation factors in coronary artery disease patients. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between anxiety/depression and factors of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients who had suffered an acute MI three months prior. In 148 patients, anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) shortly after MI and three months later. At the second time of assessment, plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, prothrombin-fragment 1 and 2, tissue-plasminogen-activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, D-dimer, and homocysteine were measured. In 32% of the patients, elevated levels of anxiety and depression were found three months after a MI. Multiple regression analyses showed that coagulation and fibrinolysis markers were not significantly associated with HADS anxiety and depression scores. We found that age, gender, BMI, and smoking status were significant predictors for haemostasis factors. A higher age was associated with a higher coagulability but lower anxiety levels. We measured parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients three months after MI and found no predictive value of HADS anxiety and depression scores shortly after MI or at the time of blood sampling. The effects of age on the relationship between anxiety and haemostasis should be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Histology assessment of bipolar coagulation and argon plasma coagulation on digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Teresa; Baba, Elisa R; Wodak, Stephanie; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of bipolar electrocoagulation and argon plasma coagulation on fresh specimens of gastrointestinal tract. METHODS: An experimental evaluation was performed at Hospital das Clinicas of the University of São Paulo, on 31 fresh surgical specimens using argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocoagulation at different time intervals. The depth of tissue damage was histopathologically analyzed by single senior pathologist unaware of the coagulation method and power setting applied. To analyze the results, the mucosa was divided in superficial mucosa (epithelial layer of the esophagus and superficial portion of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) intermediate mucosa (until the lamina propria of the esophagus and until the bottom of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) and muscularis mucosa. Necrosis involvement of the layers was compared in several combinations of power and time interval. RESULTS: Involvement of the intermediate mucosa of the stomach and of the muscularis mucosa of the three organs was more frequent when higher amounts of energy were used with argon plasma. In the esophagus and in the colon, injury of the intermediate mucosa was frequent, even when small amounts of energy were used. The use of bipolar electrocoagulation resulted in more frequent involvement of the intermediate mucosa and of the muscularis mucosa of the esophagus and of the colon when higher amounts of energy were used. In the stomach, these involvements were rare. The risk of injury of the muscularis propria was significant only in the colon when argon plasma coagulation was employed. CONCLUSION: Tissue damage after argon plasma coagulation is deeper than bipolar electrocoagulation. Both of them depend on the amount of energy used. PMID:25031789

  14. A new approach using coagulation rate constant for evaluation of turbidity removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sameraiy, Mukheled

    2017-06-01

    Coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation processes for treating three levels of bentonite synthetic turbid water using date seeds (DS) and alum (A) coagulants were investigated in the previous research work. In the current research, the same experimental results were used to adopt a new approach on a basis of using coagulation rate constant as an investigating parameter to identify optimum doses of these coagulants. Moreover, the performance of these coagulants to meet (WHO) turbidity standard was assessed by introducing a new evaluating criterion in terms of critical coagulation rate constant (kc). Coagulation rate constants (k2) were mathematically calculated in second order form of coagulation process for each coagulant. The maximum (k2) values corresponded to doses, which were obviously to be considered as optimum doses. The proposed criterion to assess the performance of coagulation process of these coagulants was based on the mathematical representation of (WHO) turbidity guidelines in second order form of coagulation process stated that (k2) for each coagulant should be ≥ (kc) for each level of synthetic turbid water. For all tested turbid water, DS coagulant could not satisfy it. While, A coagulant could satisfy it. The results obtained in the present research are exactly in agreement with the previous published results in terms of finding optimum doses for each coagulant and assessing their performances. On the whole, it is recommended considering coagulation rate constant to be a new approach as an indicator for investigating optimum doses and critical coagulation rate constant to be a new evaluating criterion to assess coagulants' performance.

  15. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to <1 mg/L but in practice, this option would incur significant costs. The treatment performance of the purified recovered coagulants was compared to that of virgin reagent with reference to key water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperature effects on flocculation, using different coagulants.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, C S B; Fradin, E; Gregory, J

    2004-01-01

    Temperature is known to affect flocculation and filter performance. Jar tests have been conducted in the laboratory, using a photometric dispersion analyser (PDA) to assess the effects of temperature on floc formation, breakage and reformation. Alum, ferric sulphate and three polyaluminium chloride (PACI) coagulants have been investigated for temperatures ranging between 6 and 29 degrees C for a suspension of kaolin clay in London tap water. Results confirm that floc formation is slower at lower temperatures for all coagulants. A commercial PACl product, PAX XL 19, produces the largest flocs for all temperatures; and alum the smallest. Increasing the shear rate results in floc breakage in all cases and the flocs never reform to their original size. This effect is most notable for temperatures around 15 degrees C. Breakage, in terms of floc size reduction, is greater for higher temperatures, suggesting a weaker floc. Recovery after increased shear is greater at lower temperatures implying that floc break-up is more reversible for lower temperatures.

  17. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  18. Natural organic matters removal efficiency by coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapingi, Mohd Sharizal Mohd; Pishal, Munirah; Murshed, Mohamad Fared

    2017-10-01

    The presence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in surface water results in unwanted characteristics in terms of color, odor, and taste. NOM content reaction with free chlorine in treated water lowers the water quality further. Chlorine is added for disinfection and produces undesirable disinfection by-products (DPBs). DBPs in drinking water are carcinogenic to consumers and may promote cancerous cell development in the human body. This study was performed to compare the coagulant efficiency of aluminum sulfate (Alum) and ferric chloride (FeCl3) on NOM removal (as in UV254 absorbance) and turbidity removal under three pH conditions (pH 6, pH 7, and sample actual pH). The three sampling points for these studies were Jalan Baru River, Kerian River, and Redac Pond. Additional sampling points, such as Lubuk Buntar and a tubewell located in the Civil Engineering School, were included to observe differences in characteristics. DOC, UV absorbance, and full wavelength were tested, after which samples treated with alum were also tested to further analyze the NOM content. Based on UV254 absorbance and DOC data, specific UV value was calculated to obtain vital synopsis of the characteristics of NOM content, as well as coagulation efficiency.

  19. Coagulation profile of Sudanese children with homozygous sickle cell disease and the effect of treatment with omega-3 fatty acid on the coagulation parameters.

    PubMed

    Awoda, Shiekh; Daak, Ahmed A; Husain, Nazik Elmalaika; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Elbashir, Mustafa I

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that patients with SCD do have an abnormal coagulation profile. Coagulopathy is thought to be one of the key factors that contribute to the vaso-occlusive crisis that characterises sickle cell disease (SCD). In this study, we investigated whether Sudanese sickle cell patients have an abnormal coagulation profile. In addition, the effect of treatment with either omega-3 fatty acids or hydroxyurea on coagulation profile was assessed. Homozygous SCD patients untreated ( n  = 52), omega-3 treated ( n  = 44), hydroxyurea (HU) treated ( n  = 8) and healthy (HbAA) controls ( n  = 52) matched for age (4-20 years), gender and socioeconomic status were enrolled. Patients on omega-3 fatty acids, according to age, received one to four capsules containing 277.8 mg DHA and 39.0 mg eicosapentnoic. Patients on Hydroxyurea were in on dosage more than 20 mg/kg/day. The steady state levels of the coagulation parameters and the effect of the treatments with either HU or omega-3 fatty acids on markers of coagulation were investigated. Compared to the healthy controls, treated and untreated HbSS patients had lower hemoglobin, plasma Protein C, proteins S and higher white blood cell count (WBC), platelets count (PLTs) and plasma D-dimer levels,( p  < 0.05). In comparison to untreated HbSS, treatment with neither omega-3 nor HU had effect on the WBC, plasma proteins C and S, ( p  > 0.05). HU treated group had a lower PLTs count compared to HbSS untreated group ( p  < 0.5). The prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times and international normalized ratio (INR) of untreated patients are significantly higher than n-3 treated, HU-treated patients and health controls, ( p  < 0.05). Patients treated with omega-3 had lowered D-dimer levels in comparison to HU-treated and untreated HbSS patients, ( p  < 0.001). This study provides evidence that Sudanes patients have abnormal coagulation profile and treatment with either HU or omega-3 fatty

  20. Polyferric sulphate: preparation, characterisation and application in coagulation experiments.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, A I; Moussas, P A; Vasilakou, F

    2008-07-15

    The process of coagulation is a core environmental protection technology, which is mainly used in the water or wastewater treatment facilities. Research is now focused on the development of inorganic pre-polymerised coagulants. A characteristic example is PFS (polyferric sulphate), a relatively new pre-polymerised inorganic coagulant with high cationic charge. In this paper, the role of major parameters, including temperature, types of chemical reagents, ratio r=[OH]/[Fe], rate of base addition in the preparation stages of PFS were investigated. Furthermore, the prepared PFS was characterised based on typical properties, such as the percentage of the polymerised iron present in the compound, z-potential, pH, etc. Moreover, dynamics of coagulation process were examined by means of the Photometric Dispersion Analyzer (PDA). Finally, the coagulation efficiency of PFS in treating kaolin suspension and biologically pre-treated wastewater was evaluated in comparison with the respective conventional coagulant agent. The results indicate that certain parameters, such as the r value, the rate of base addition and the duration and temperature of the polymerisation stage, significantly affected the properties of the PFS. Additionally, the prepared PFS polymerised coagulants exhibit a significantly better coagulation performance than the respective non-polymerised one, i.e. ferric sulphate.

  1. Coagulation pretreatment for ultrafiltration of deinking effluents containing flexographic inks

    Treesearch

    Bruno Chabot; Gopal A. Krishnagopalan; Said Abubakr

    1999-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the potential of coagulation pretreatment with organic or inorganic coagulants to improve ultrafiltration performance during processing of wash deinking effluents containing flexographic inks. Wash filtrate effluents generated from mixtures of old flexographic and offset newspapers and old magazines were pretreated with a...

  2. Metals in airpollution particles decrease whole blood coagulation time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism underlying the pro-coagulative effect of air pollution particle exposure is not known. We tested the postulate that 1) the soluble fraction ofan air pollution particle can affect whole blood coagulation time and 2) metals included in the soluble fraction are respons...

  3. Analysis and optimization of coagulation and flocculation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, V.; Srinivas, N.; Srikanth Vuppala, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Natural coagulants have been the focus of research of many investigators through the last decade owing to the problems caused by the chemical coagulants. Optimization of process parameters is vital for the effectiveness of coagulation process. In the present study optimization of parameters like pH, dose of coagulant and mixing speed were studied using natural coagulants sago and chitin in comparison with alum. Jar test apparatus was used to perform the coagulation. The results showed that the removal of turbidity was up to 99 % by both alum and chitin at lower doses of coagulant, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L, whereas sago has shown a reduction of 70-100 % at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 g/L. The optimum conditions observed for sago were 6 and 7 whereas chitin was stable at all pH ranges, lower coagulant doses, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L and mixing speed—rapid mixing at 100 rpm for 10 min and slow mixing 20 rpm for 20 min. Hence, it can be concluded that sago and chitin can be used for treating water even with large seasonal variation in turbidity.

  4. [Effect of ferrate preoxidation on coagulation of Songhua River].

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-juan; Ma, Jun; Liang, Tao

    2008-06-01

    The preoxidation of polluted surface water with ferrate was conducted with respect to its impact on the following coagulation. It can be seen that UV254-absorbance, turbidity and TOC substantially decreased by 36.7%, 80.2%, 31.1%, respectively, after coagulation, without ferrate preoxidation, and by 63.3%, 89.6%, 37.0%, respectively, after coagulation, with ferrate preoxidation. It is noted that NH4+-N concentration is increased by 17% after coagulation with ferrate. This phenomenon can be explained by the fact that organics containing nitrogen in raw water were partly oxidized to inorganic nitrogen by ferrate preoxidation. After coagulation, AOC and AOC/TOC are increased from 998 microg x L(-1) to 1241 microg x L(-1), from 28.4% to 38.7%, respectively, by ferrate preoxidation. AOC-P17/AOC after coagulation is up to 83% with ferrate preoxidation. These suggest that preoxidation with ferrate promoted the biodegradation of organics with substantial increases of AOC, AOC/TOC. The results indicate that the concentration of organics with relative molecular mass (Mr) of 10000-100000 and less than 500 were substantially increased after the raw water was coagulated with ferrate preoxidation, which suggested that some high molecular weight organic substances were broken into smaller ones during ferrate preoxidation. After coagulation, organics of less than Mr = 500 in TOC are increased up to 65.0% with preoxidation from 38.9% without ferrate preoxidation. These oxidation products are biodegradable.

  5. The immediate and late effects of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine) on murine coagulation gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Boelen, Anita; Reitsma, Pieter H; van Vlijmen, Bart J M

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is associated with changes in coagulation. The aim of our study was to gain more insight into the role of thyroid hormone in coagulation control. C57Black/6J mice received a low-iodine diet and drinking water supplemented with perchlorate to suppress endogenous triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) production. Under these conditions, the impact of exogenous T3 on plasma coagulation, and hepatic and vessel-wall-associated coagulation gene transcription was studied in a short- (4 hours) and long-term (14 days) setting. Comparing euthyroid conditions (normal mice), with hypothyroidism (conditions of a shortage of thyroid hormone) and those with replacement by incremental doses of T3, dosages of 0 and 0.5 μg T3/mouse/day were selected to study the impact of T3 on coagulation gene transcription. Under these conditions, a single injection of T3 injection increased strongly hepatic transcript levels of the well-characterized T3-responsive genes deiodinase type 1 (Dio1) and Spot14 within 4 hours. This coincided with significantly reduced mRNA levels of Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, and Serpin10, and the reduction of the latter three persisted upon daily treatment with T3 for 14 days. Prolonged T3 treatment induced a significant down-regulation in factor (F) 2, F9 and F10 transcript levels, while F11 and F12 levels increased. Activity levels in plasma largely paralleled these mRNA changes. Thbd transcript levels in the lung (vessel-wall-associated coagulation) were significantly up-regulated after a single T3 injection, and persisted upon prolonged T3 exposure. Two-week T3 administration also resulted in increased Vwf and Tfpi mRNA levels, whereas Tf levels decreased. These data showed that T3 has specific effects on coagulation, with Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, Serpin10 and Thbd responding rapidly, making these likely direct thyroid hormone receptor targets. F2, F9, F10, F11, F12, Vwf, Tf and Tfpi are late responding genes and probably indirectly

  6. Performance and characterization of a new tannin-based coagulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Gómez-Muñoz, C.

    2012-09-01

    Diethanolamine and formaldehyde were employed to cationize tannins from black wattle. This novel coagulant called CDF was functionally characterized in removing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (anionic surfactant) and Palatine Fast Black WAN (azoic dye). Refined tannin-derived commercial coagulants exhibited similar efficiency, while CDF presented higher coagulant ability than alum, a usual coagulant agent. Low doses of CDF (ca. 100 mg L-1) were able to remove more than 70 % of surfactant and more than 85 % of dye (initial pollutant concentration of ca. 100 mg L-1) and it presented no temperature affection and worked at a relatively wide pH range. Surfactant and dye removal responded to the classical coagulant-and-adsorption models, such as Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim or Gu and Zhu in the case of surfactant, and Langmuir and Freundlich in the case of dye.

  7. Interplay between coagulation and vascular inflammation in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited hematologic disorder that leads to the irreversible damage of multiple organs. Although sickling of red blood cells and vaso-occlusion are central to the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease the importance of hemolytic anemia and vasculopathy has been recently recognized. Hypercoagulation state is another prominent feature of sickle cell disease and is mediated by activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. Growing evidence demonstrates that coagulation may not only contribute to the thrombotic complications, but also to vascular inflammation associated with this disease. This article summarizes the role of vascular inflammation and coagulation activation, discusses potential mechanisms responsible for activation of coagulation and reviews recent data demonstrating the crosstalk between coagulation and vascular inflammation in sickle cell disease. PMID:23593937

  8. Performance of ultrafiltration membrane process combined with coagulation/sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Jang, N Y; Watanabe, Y; Minegishi, S

    2005-01-01

    Effects of coagulation/sedimentation as a pre-treatment on the dead-end ultrafiltration (UF) membrane process were studied in terms of membrane fouling and removal efficiency of natural dissolved organic matter, using Chitose River water. Two types of experiment were carried out. One was a bench scale membrane filtration with jar-test and the other was membrane filtration pilot plant combined with the Jet Mixed Separator (JMS) as a pre-coagulation/sedimentation unit. In the bench scale experiment, the effects of coagulant dosage, pH and membrane operating pressure on the membrane fouling and removal efficiency of natural dissolved organic matter were investigated. In the pilot plant experiment, we also investigated the effect of pre-coagulation/sedimentation on the membrane fouling and the removal efficiency of natural dissolved organic matter. Coagulation/sedimentation prior to membrane filtration process controlled the membrane fouling and increased the removal efficiency of natural dissolved organic matter.

  9. Adherence and Coagulation Assays in Dabigatran-treated Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Atrial Fibrillation; Medication Adherence; Blood Coagulation Tests; Anticoagulants; Circulating, Hemorrhagic Disorder; Drug Effect; Drug Use; Drug Toxicity; Drug Intolerance; Blood Clot; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Laboratory Problem; Bleeding; Thrombosis

  10. Direct observation on the Brownian coagulation of PSL particles through optical microscope in the regime near critical coagulation concentration (CCC).

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tomonori; Adachi, Yasuhisa

    2010-04-15

    Microscopic monitoring of floc structure, floc size distribution and the rate of coagulation was carried out for Brownian coagulation of PSL particles. Experiments were designed for the condition of salt concentration that is slightly below critical coagulation concentration (CCC). The density of the solvent was controlled by using deuterium oxide (D(2)O) to avoid sedimentation. Results are summarized as follows: (i) Near CCC, floc restructuring from the beginning stage of coagulation was evidenced, i.e., the ratio of linear triplet is found to be remarkably reduced as compared with the result obtained for the case of rapid coagulation which was implemented under sufficiently high salt concentration. (ii) The increase of fractal dimension from 1.8 in the case of rapid coagulation to 2.2 was confirmed by the analysis of mass balance using size distribution of flocs. This increment resulted in the decrease of effective excluded volume of flocs. (iii) The rate of coagulation was constant until later stage. This result contrasts to the result of rapid coagulation [T. Fukasawa, Y. Adachi, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 304 (2006) 115]. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D [Albuquerque, NM; Stewart, Thomas A [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  12. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the accuracy of the prothrombin time assay of plasma coagulation factor II+VII+X activity in subjects infused with the drug. Influence of time and temperature.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Sixtus; Teisner, Ane; Jensen, Søren Astrup; Philips, Malou; Dalhoff, Kim; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The prothrombin time (PT) assay of factor II+VII+X activity is an important predictor of liver damage in paracetamol poisoned patients. It complicates interpretation of results that the antidote, acetylcysteine (NAC) depresses this activity. The aim was to investigate if NAC influences the accuracy of the plasma PT assay. The accuracy of Nycotest PT was studied using plasma added NAC in vitro and plasma from subjects infused with NAC. The latter results were compared with those obtained by analysis of PT by CoaguChek S. Therapeutic NAC concentrations added to plasma in vitro decreased factor II+VII+X activity at 37 degrees C in a time-dependent manner. This effect was quenched at temperatures <24 degrees C. Activity lost at 37 degrees C could partly be recovered by subsequent incubation at 5 or 20 degrees C. Incubation at 37 degrees C prior to assay led to a significant additional depression of factor II+VII+X activity in plasma from subjects infused with NAC during the first 3h of infusion indicating that it contained reactive NAC. The risk that this NAC interfered with the accuracy of the PT assay was considered minimal with samples stored below 24 degrees C. This was supported by similarity of results obtained by analysis of appropriately stored plasma and simultaneously drawn blood by CoaguChek S. Residual reactive NAC does not interfere with the accuracy of the PT assay of plasma stored below 24 degrees C, but NAC-induced loss in activity at 37 degrees C may be partly recovered during subsequent storage below 24 degrees C.

  13. The Loss of Homeostasis in Hemostasis: New Approaches in Treating and Understanding Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Critically Ill Patients*

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) profoundly increases the morbidity and mortality of patients who have sepsis. Both laboratory and clinical research advanced the understanding of the biology and pathophysiology of DIC. This, in turn, gave rise to improved therapies and patient outcomes. Beginning with a stimulus causing disruption of vascular integrity, cytokines and chemokines cause activation of systemic coagulation and inflammation. Seemingly paradoxically, the interplay between coagulation and inflammation also inhibits endogenous anticoagulants, fibrinolytics, and antiinflammatory pathways. The earliest documented and best‐studied microbial cause of DIC is the lipopolysaccharide endotoxin of Gram‐negative bacteria. Extensive microvascular thrombi emerge in the systemic vasculature due to dysregulation of coagulation. The result of this unrestrained, widespread small vessel thromboses multiorgan system failure. Consumption of platelets and coagulation factors during this process can lead to an elevated risk of hemorrhage. The management of these patients with simultaneous hemorrhage and thrombosis is complex and challenging. Definitive treatment of DIC, and attenuation of end‐organ damage, requires control of the inciting cause. Currently, activated protein C is the only approved therapy in the United States for sepsis complicated by DIC. Further research is needed in this area to improve clinical outcomes for patients with sepsis. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume 5: 85–92 PMID:22376264

  14. Differences in coagulation among Asians and Caucasians and the implication for reconstructive microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Dhruv; Smorodinsky, Emmanuil; Guo, Lifei

    2011-01-01

    Microvascular reconstructive surgery has seen a revival with the introduction of muscle-sparing perforator flaps. Recognition of potential ethnic differences in coagulation profiles would be important to a microvascular surgeon. Based on clinical observations, we hypothesize that Asian patients have a less thrombogenic coagulation profile than Caucasians. An extensive retrospective review was performed. The annual incidence of venous thromboembolism in the United States is generally accepted to range from 70 to 120 events per 100,000 people versus 16 to 17 events per 100,000 persons in Asia. Autopsy analysis of pulmonary embolism incidence was noted to be 15% in North Americans and less than 1% in Asian populations. Thromboelastography analysis of Asian and Caucasian patients undergoing cholecystectomy revealed different hemostatic mechanisms. Comparison of Asians and Caucasians undergoing the Fontan procedure revealed significantly lower postoperative factor levels in Asians than Caucasians. Baseline comparison of factor and serum levels revealed Asians with the least thrombogenic profiles compared with other ethnic groups. Asians and Caucasians demonstrate different baseline rates of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, different hemostatic responses to surgery, and different baseline levels of clotting factors. Further study may lead to better pre-, intra-, and postoperative care of the free flap patient based on their ethnic coagulation profile. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. Treatment of waste water by coagulation and flocculation using biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muruganandam, L.; Saravana Kumar, M. P.; Jena, Amarjit; Gulla, Sudiv; Godhwani, Bhagesh

    2017-11-01

    The present study deals with the determination of physical and chemical parameters in the treatment process of waste water by flocculation and coagulation processes using natural coagulants and assessing their feasibility for water treatment by comparing the performance with each other and with a synthetic coagulant. Initial studies were done on the synthetic waste water to determine the optimal pH and dosage, the activity of natural coagulant, followed by the real effluent from tannery waste. The raw tannery effluent was bluish-black in colour, mildly basic in nature, with high COD 4000mg/l and turbidity in the range 700NTU, was diluted and dosed with organic coagulants, AloeVera, MoringaOleifera and Cactus (O.ficus-indica). The study observed that coagulant Moringa Oleifera of 15 mg/L dose at 6 pH gave the best reduction efficiencies for major physicochemical parameters followed by Aloe Vera and Cactus under identical conditions. The study reveals that the untreated tannery effluents can be treated with environmental confirmative naturally occurring coagulants.

  16. Electromagnetic induction sensor for dynamic testing of coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Yu, Yuanhua; Yu, Zhanjiang; Chen, Qimeng

    2018-03-01

    With the increasing demand for coagulation POCT for patients in the surgery department or the ICU, rapid coagulation testing techniques and methods have drawn widespread attention from scholars and businessmen. This paper proposes the use of electromagnetic induction sensor probe for detection of dynamic process causing changes in the blood viscosity and density before and after coagulation based on the damped vibration principle, in order to evaluate the coagulation status. Utilizing the dynamic principle, the differential equation of vibration system comprising elastic support and electromagnetic induction device is established through sensor dynamic modeling. The structural parameters of elastic support are optimized, and the circular sheet spring is designed. Furthermore, harmonic response analysis and vibration fatigue coupling analysis are performed on the elastic support of the sensor by considering the natural frequency of the system, and the electromagnetic induction sensor testing device is set up. Using the device and coagulation reagent, the standard curve for coagulation POCT is plotted, and the blood sample application in clinical patients is established, which are methodologically compared with the imported POCT coagulation analyzer. The results show that the sensor designed in this paper has a first-order natural frequency of 11.368 Hz, which can withstand 5.295 × 10 2 million times of compressions and rebounds. Its correlation with the results of SONOCLOT analyzer reaches 0.996, and the reproducibility 0.002. The electromagnetic induction coagulation testing sensor designed has good elasticity and anti-fatigue, which can meet the accuracy requirement of clinical detection. This study provides the core technology for developing the electromagnetic induction POCT instrument for dynamic testing of coagulation process.

  17. Coagulation Abnormalities of Sickle Cell Disease: Relationship with Clinical Outcomes and the Effect of Disease Modifying Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Noubouossie, Denis; Key, Nigel S.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hypercoagulable state. Patients exhibit increased platelet activation, high plasma levels of markers of thrombin generation, depletion of natural anticoagulant proteins, abnormal activation of the fibrinolytic system, and increased tissue factor expression, even in the non-crisis “steady state.” Furthermore, SCD is characterized by an increased risk of thrombotic complications. The pathogenesis of coagulation activation in SCD appears to be multi-factorial, with contributions from ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation, hemolysis and nitric oxide deficiency, and increased sickle RBC phosphatidylserine expression. Recent studies in animal models suggest that activation of coagulation may contribute to the pathogenesis of SCD, but the data on the contribution of coagulation and platelet activation to SCD-related complications in humans are limited. Clinical trials of new generations of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, using a variety of clinical endpoints are warranted. PMID:26776344

  18. IgMk paraprotein from gammopathy patient can bind to cardiolipin and interfere with coagulation assay: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Yao; Yin, Yu-Feng; Teng, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Li-Wei; Yang, Cheng-de

    2017-06-23

    The monoclonal gammopathies are a group of plasma-cell proliferative disorders characterized by the secretion of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M protein or paraprotein). Some rare cases have revealed the specific affinity of paraprotein as autoantibody. Here we report a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) accompanied by a remarkable increase of anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) and an extensively decreased coagulation factor activity, however, without any clinical signs of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and bleeding. Our further investigation indicated that IgMκ paraprotein of this patient possessed an antibody activity against phospholipids so as to bind to cardiolipin and interfere with coagulation assay in vitro. This case might be indicative that an abnormality of coagulation tests, disturbed by IgMκ paraprotein, does not predict a risk of bleeding in this patient.

  19. Implementation of a microcontroller-based semi-automatic coagulator.

    PubMed

    Chan, K; Kirumira, A; Elkateeb, A

    2001-01-01

    The coagulator is an instrument used in hospitals to detect clot formation as a function of time. Generally, these coagulators are very expensive and therefore not affordable by a doctors' office and small clinics. The objective of this project is to design and implement a low cost semi-automatic coagulator (SAC) prototype. The SAC is capable of assaying up to 12 samples and can perform the following tests: prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and PT/APTT combination. The prototype has been tested successfully.

  20. Changes in the human blood coagulating system during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatova, L. M.; Anashkin, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the coagulating system of the blood were studied in six subjects during prolonged hypokinesia. Thrombogenic properties of the blood rose in all cases on the 8th day. These changes are explained by stress reaction due to unusual conditions for a healthy person. Changes in the blood coagulating system in the group subjected to physical exercise and without it ran a practically parallel course. Apparently physical exercise is insufficient to prevent such changes that appear in the coagulating system of the blood during prolonged hypokinesia.

  1. Coagulation challenges after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, Anna M; Blaisdell, William

    2012-06-01

    During the past 50 years, there have been huge changes in the approach to coagulopathic bleeding following the treatment of traumatic hemorrhagic shock (HS). Treatment during the 1960s consisted primarily of physiologic saline (balanced electrolyte solution [BES]) and whole blood supported with sodium bicarbonate for acidosis. Subsequent coagulopathy was assumed to be caused by lack of the labile factors (FV and FVIII) which were then replaced by fresh whole blood. The decade of 1970s saw the implementation of component therapy by the American Blood Banking Association so that HS was treated with BES and packed red blood cells (RBC). A new paradigm had to be learned to determine when and how much fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was needed to restore all coagulation factors. By the end of 1970s, most trauma centers were supplementing BES and RBC with FFP in patients with severe injuries requiring massive transfusion of more than one circulating blood volume. By the 1980s, the use of FFP skyrocketed, creating a crisis for the American Blood Banking Association. This led to a National Institute of Health Consensus Development Conference which concluded that FFP should be given to only those patients who had a documented coagulopathy as evidenced by a prolongation of the prothrombin time and the partial thromboplastin time. Restriction of FFP replacement to patients with proven coagulopathy after treatment for HS led to postoperative bleeding which was sometimes fatal. During the 1990s, uncontrolled clinical studies and rigorously controlled animal studies showed that FFP should be administered before the onset of proven coagulopathy with prolongation of the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time. Later during the 1990s, recombinant-activated factor VII (FVIIa) was purported to provide quicker hemostasis in patients treated with HS. The efficacy of FVIIa supplementation is still being assessed. During the 2010s, the military surgeons promoted the use of a

  2. [Influence of cytostatic combination therapy with vincristine sulphate and iphosphamide on blood coagulation].

    PubMed

    Neidhardt, B; Hartwich, G

    1975-02-28

    Disorders of blood coagulation were investigated before and during a cytostatic combination therapy with vincristine sulphate and iphosphamide (Asta Z 4942) in 12 patients with malignant tumours or haemoblastoses. Thromboplastin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, heat-dependent fibrin, clot retraction, and clotting factors II, V, VIII, IX, X, and the platelet count were determined. A change in the plasmatic coagulation system attributable to the combination therapy could not be demonstrated in any patient. The influence of the cytostatic combination on the platelet-dependent haemostasis was small; a decrease in platelet count could be observed in only one patient, in whom an additional causative damage to thrombopoiesis due to the underlying disease could be assumed. Regardless of the cytostatic therapy there were indications of a hypercoagulability in 10 patients. This explains the increased susceptibility of such patients for thromboses or consumption coagulopathy.

  3. An ecoimmunological approach to study evolutionary and ancient links between coagulation, complement and Innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kasetty, Gopinath; Alyafei, Saud; Smeds, Emanuel; Salo-Ahen, Outi M. H.; Hansson, Stefan R.; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coagulation, complement, and innate immunity are tightly interwoven and form an alliance that can be traced back to early eukaryotic evolution. Here we employed an ecoimmunological approach using Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)-1-derived peptides from the different classes of vertebrates (i.e. fish, reptile, bird, and mammals) and tested whether they can boost killing of various human bacterial pathogens in plasma. We found signs of species-specific conservation and diversification during evolution in these peptides that significantly impact their antibacterial activity. Though all peptides tested executed bactericidal activity in mammalian plasma (with the exception of rodents), no killing was observed in plasma from birds, reptiles, and fish, pointing to a crucial role for the classical pathway of the complement system. We also observed an interference of these peptides with the human intrinsic pathway of coagulation though, unlike complement activation, this mechanism appears not to be evolutionary conserved. PMID:29473457

  4. Removal of sodium lauryl sulphate by coagulation/flocculation with Moringa oleifera seed extract.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Heredia, J; Sánchez-Martín, J

    2009-05-30

    Among other natural flocculant/coagulant agents, Moringa oleifera seed extract ability to remove an anionic surfactant has been evaluated and it has been found to be very interesting. Sodium lauryl sulphate was removed from aqueous solutions up to 80% through coagulation/flocculation process. pH and temperature were found to be not very important factors in removal efficiency. Freundlich (F), Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim (FFG) and Gu-Zhu (GZ) models were used to adjust experimental data in a solid-liquid adsorption hypothesis. Last one resulted to be the most accurate one. Several data fit parameters were determined, as Freundlich order, which was found to be 1.66, Flory-Huggins interaction parameter from FFG model, which was found to be 4.87; and limiting Moringa surfactant adsorption capacity from GZ model, which was found to be 2.13 x 10(-3)mol/g.

  5. Surface-mediated molecular events in material-induced blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik

    Coagulation and thrombosis persist as major impediments associated with the use of blood-contacting medical devices. We are investigating the molecular mechanism underlying material-induced blood-plasma coagulation focusing on the role of the surface as a step towards prospective development of improved hemocompatible biomaterials. A classic observation in hematology is that blood/blood-plasma in contact with clean glass surface clots faster than when in contact with many plastic surfaces. The traditional biochemical theory explaining the underlying molecular mechanism suggests that hydrophilic surfaces, like that of glass, are specific activators of the coagulation cascade because of the negatively-charged groups on the surface. Hydrophobic surfaces are poor procoagulants or essentially "benign" because they lack anionic groups. Further, these negatively-charged surfaces are believed to not only activate blood factor XII (FXII), the key protein in contact activation, but also play a cofactor role in the amplification and propagation reactions that ultimately lead to clot formation. In sharp contrast to the traditional theory, our investigations indicate a need for a paradigm shift in the proposed sequence of contact activation events to incorporate the role of protein adsorption at the material surfaces. These studies have lead to the central hypothesis for this work proposing that protein adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces attenuates the contact activation reactions so that poorly-adsorbent hydrophilic surfaces appear to be stronger procoagulants relative to hydrophobic surfaces. Our preliminary studies measuring the plasma coagulation response of activated FXII (FXIIa) on different model surfaces suggested that the material did not play a cofactor role in the processing of this enzyme dose through the coagulation pathway. Therefore, we focused our efforts on studying the mechanism of initial production of enzyme at the procoagulant surface. Calculations for the

  6. Coagulation Profile in Patients with Different Etiologies for Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Amit; Lodish, Maya; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies reported a higher prevalence of venous-thromboembolic events among patients with Cushing disease (CD) compared to those with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) from adrenal sources. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the coagulation profile of patients with CS from different etiologies. A prospective observational study was conducted at a clinical research center. The study included adult patients admitted for evaluation of suspected CS (n=85), that were divided into 3 groups: CD (n=22), ACTH-independent CS from an adrenal tumor/hyperplasia (adrenal CS, n=21), and a control group consisting of subjects with negative screening for CS (rule-out CS, n=42). Coagulation profiles were drawn before and 8.5±4.3 months after surgery (trans-sphenoidal or adrenalectomy, n=18), and included fibrinogen, Factor VIII (FVIII), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), antithrombin III (ATIII), Protein C (PC), Protein S (PS), α2-antiplasmin (α2AP), and aPTT measurements. Patients with CD had higher baseline mean cortisol levels, ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels compared with adrenal CS. Differences in ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels remained even after controlling for BMI, and ATIII after also controlling for 24-h urinary free cortisol collections. Our study showed for the first time the differences in coagulation profiles between various etiologies of CS. We assume that the higher cortisol burden among CD patients may explain the differences found in the coagulation profile as well as the higher risk for VTE compared with primary adrenal CS patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Betrixaban: Impact on Routine and Specific Coagulation Assays-A Practical Laboratory Guide.

    PubMed

    Siriez, Romain; Evrard, Jonathan; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Pochet, Lionel; Gheldof, Damien; Chatelain, Bernard; Mullier, François; Douxfils, Jonathan

    2018-06-11

     Betrixaban is a novel direct oral factor Xa inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration for prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in adult patients hospitalized for an acute illness at risk for thromboembolic complications. Assessment of the anti-coagulant effect of betrixaban may be useful in some situations. Also, clinicians need to know how routine coagulation assays are influenced.  The aim of this study is to determine which coagulation assay(s) should be used to assess the impact of betrixaban on haemostasis and provide laboratory guidance for their interpretation.  Betrixaban was spiked at final concentrations ranging from 0 to 250 ng/mL in platelet-poor plasma. Different reagents from several manufacturers were tested and the impact of betrixaban on pro-thrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), dilute Russel viper venom time (dRVV-T), chromogenic anti-Xa assays, thrombin generation assay (TGA), and a large panel of haemostasis diagnostic tests has been assessed.  A concentration-dependent prolongation of aPTT, PT and dRVV-T is observed. The sensitivity mainly depends on the reagent. Chromogenic anti-Xa assays show high sensitivity depending on the reagent and/or the methodology. These assays applicable for other direct factor Xa inhibitors have to be adapted to obtain a relevant range of measurement. TGA may also be attractive to assess the anti-coagulant activity of betrixaban.  Adapted chromogenic anti-Xa assays are the most appropriate assays to estimate the concentration of betrixaban. Betrixaban significantly affects several haemostasis diagnostic tests and this needs to be taken into consideration when requesting and interpreting such tests. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  8. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease. PMID:26057532

  9. Activation of Blood Coagulation in Two Prototypic Autoimmune Skin Diseases: A Possible Link with Thrombotic Risk.

    PubMed

    Cugno, Massimo; Tedeschi, Alberto; Borghi, Alessandro; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Asero, Riccardo; Venegoni, Luigia; Griffini, Samantha; Grovetti, Elena; Berti, Emilio; Marzano, Angelo Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation activation has been demonstrated in two prototypic autoimmune skin diseases, chronic autoimmune urticaria and bullous pemphigoid, but only the latter is associated with increased thrombotic risk. Two markers of coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and fibrin fragment D-dimer) were measured by immunoenzymatic methods in plasma samples from 30 patients with active chronic autoimmune urticaria, positive for autologous serum skin test, 30 patients with active bullous pemphigoid and 30 healthy subjects. In skin biopsies, tissue factor expression was evaluated by both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. F1+2 and D-dimer levels were higher in active chronic autoimmune urticaria (276.5±89.8 pmol/L and 5.56±4.40 nmol/L, respectively) than in controls (145.2±38.0 pmol/L and 1.06±0.25 nmol/L; P=0.029 and P=0.011) and were much higher in active bullous pemphigoid (691.7±318.7 pmol/L and 15.24±9.09 nmol/L, respectively) (P<0.0001). Tissue factor positivity was evident in skin biopsies of both disorders with higher intensity in bullous pemphigoid. F1+2 and D-dimer, during remission, were markedly reduced in both disorders. These findings support the involvement of coagulation activation in the pathophysiology of both diseases. The strong systemic activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid may contribute to increase the thrombotic risk and provides the rationale for clinical trials on anticoagulant treatments in this disease.

  10. Proposal of the Coagulation Score as a Predictor for Short-Term and Long-Term Outcomes of Patients with Resectable Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Tanaka, Chie; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Mizuno, Akira; Tanaka, Yuri; Takami, Hideki; Iwata, Naoki; Hayashi, Masamichi; Niwa, Yukiko; Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Murotani, Kenta; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Systemic hemostasis and thrombosis activation has been implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the use of coagulation factors as a novel prediction method for postoperative outcomes after curative gastrectomy in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer (GC). Overall, 126 patients with stage II/III GC who underwent gastrectomy between May 2003 and February 2016 were eligible for inclusion in the study. We retrospectively evaluated the predictive value of preoperative platelet count and plasma fibrinogen and d-dimer levels, and coagulation score (0: fibrinogen and d-dimer both below upper limits; 1: either fibrinogen or d-dimer over upper limits; 2: both fibrinogen and d-dimer over upper limits) for short- and long-term outcomes. Postoperative complications were significantly more frequent in patients with elevated preoperative d-dimer levels compared with those with normal d-dimer levels (26 vs. 10 %; p = 0.032). The prevalence of postoperative complications showed a stepwise increase in proportion to the coagulation score. Patients with a coagulation score of 2 had significantly larger tumors (p = 0.013) and significantly greater intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.004) than those who scored 0 or 1. Coagulation score showed the highest values distinguished high-risk patients in overall and disease-free survival, and a coagulation score of 2 was an independent prognostic factor for recurrence. Patients with a coagulation score of 2 experienced a significantly higher prevalence of liver metastasis as an initial recurrence than those who scored 0 or 1 (p = 0.019). The coagulation score is a simple and promising predictor for postoperative complications and recurrence after gastrectomy in stage II/III GC patients.

  11. Micro- and mesoscopic process interactions in protein coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Biagio, P. L.; Martorana, V.; Emanuele, A.; Vaiana, S. M.; Manno, M.; Bulone, D.; Palma-Vittorelli, M. B.; Palma, M. U.

    2000-04-01

    It has recently been recognized that pathological protein coagulation is responsible for lethal pathologies as diverse as amyloidosis, Alzheimer and TSE. Understanding the coagulation mechanisms is therefore stirring great interest. In previous studies we have shown that on profoundly different systems coagulation is the result of a strong interaction between two processes on different length scales (mesoscopic and microscopic). Here we report experiments on bovine serum albumin (BSA) showing that the overall mechanism is the result of at least 3 distinct and strongly intertwined processes, on both length scales: molecular conformational changes, solution demixing and intermolecular crosslinking. This mechanism involves the statistical mechanics of protein-solvent interaction, its relation to the protein's landscape of configurational free energy and to the solution's thermodynamic stability, and its relation to the topological problem of crosslink-percolation, responsible for coagulation.

  12. Surgical Coagulator With Carbon Dioxide Laser For Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinski, Wieslaw; Kazmirowski, Antoni; Korobowicz, Witold; Olborski, Zbigniew

    1987-10-01

    The technical data and parameters of the CO2 surgical laser for gynecology are given. Coagulator was designed and constructed in Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics Warsaw Technical University.

  13. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  14. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants deliveredmore » promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.« less

  15. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  16. MR Coagulation: A Novel Minimally Invasive Approach to Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ouri; Zhao, Ming; Nevo, Erez; Ackerman, Jerome L

    2017-11-01

    To demonstrate a proof of concept of magnetic resonance (MR) coagulation, in which MR imaging scanner-induced radiofrequency (RF) heating at the end of an intracatheter long wire heats and coagulates a protein solution to effect a vascular repair by embolization. MR coagulation was simulated by finite-element modeling of electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate (SAR) in a phantom. A glass phantom consisting of a spherical cavity joined to the side of a tube was incorporated into a flow system to simulate an aneurysm and flowing blood with velocities of 0-1.7 mL/s. A double-lumen catheter containing the wire and fiberoptic temperature sensor in 1 lumen was passed through the flow system into the aneurysm, and 9 cm 3 of protein solution was injected into the aneurysm through the second lumen. The distal end of the wire was laid on the patient table as an antenna to couple RF from the body coil or was connected to a separate tuned RF pickup coil. A high RF duty-cycle turbo spin-echo pulse sequence excited the wire such that RF energy deposited at the tip of the wire coagulated the protein solution, embolizing the aneurysm. The protein coagulation temperature of 60°C was reached in the aneurysm in ∼12 seconds, yielding a coagulated mass that largely filled the aneurysm. The heating rate was controlled by adjusting pulse-sequence parameters. MR coagulation has the potential to embolize vascular defects by coagulating a protein solution delivered by catheter using MR imaging scanner-induced RF heating of an intracatheter wire. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood coagulation status of small-for-dates and postmature infants.

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, M; Dvilansky, A

    1975-01-01

    In a prospective study of blood coagulation status in small-for-dates and postmature infants there was often evidence of intravascular coagulation. Abnormal coagulation findings correlated with the degree of growth retardation and with the degree of postmaturity. Macroscopical placental infarction and neonatal polycythaemia were associated with coagulation abnormalities; asphyxia, however, was not. Intravascular coagulation may be an additional hazard to small-for-dates and postmature infants. PMID:1170815

  18. Monitoring soft tissue coagulation by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihachev, A.; Lihacova, I.; Heinrichs, H.; Spigulis, J.; Trebst, T.; Wehner, M.

    2017-12-01

    Laser tissue welding (LTW) or laser tissue soldering (LTS) is investigated since many years for treatment of incisions, wound closure and anastomosis of vessels [1, 2]. Depending on the process, a certain temperature in the range between 65 °C to 85 °C must be reached and held for a few seconds. Care has to be taken not to overheat the tissue, otherwise necrosis or tissue carbonization may occur and will impair wound healing. Usually the temperature is monitored during the process to control the laser power [3]. This requires either bulky equipment or expensive and fragile infrared fibers to feed the temperature signal to an infrared detector. Alternatively, changes in tissue morphology can be directly observed by analysis of spectral reflectance. We investigate spectral changes in the range between 400 nm to 900 nm wavelength. Characteristic spectral changes occur when the temperature of tissue samples increase above 70 °C which is a typical setpoint value for temperature control of coagulation. We conclude that simple spectroscopy in the visible range can provide valuable information during LTS and LTW and probably replace the delicate measurement of temperature. A major advantage is that optical measurements can be performed using standard optical fibers and can be easily integrated into a surgical tool.

  19. Oxidation Inhibits Iron-Induced Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood. PMID:23170793

  20. Planetesimal formation by sweep-up coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmark, Fredrik; Birnstiel, Til; Ormel, Chris W.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals is often accredited to collisional sticking of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. The exact process is however unknown, as collisions between larger aggregates tend to lead to fragmentation or bouncing rather than sticking. These growth barriers tend to halt the dust growth already at millimeters or centimeters in size, which is far below the kilometer-sizes that are needed for gravity to aid in the accretion. To study how far dust coagulation can proceed, we have developed a new collision model based on the latest laboratory experiments, and have used it together with a dust-size evolution code capable of resolving all grain interactions in the protoplanetary disk. We find that for the general dust population, bouncing and fragmenting collisions prevent the growth above millimeter-sizes. However, a small number of lucky particles can grow larger than the rest by only interacting at low, sticky velocities. As they grow, they become increasingly resilient to fragmentation caused by the small grains. In this way, two populations are formed: One which remains small due to the collisional barriers, and one that continues to grow by sweeping up the smaller grains around them.

  1. Does whole blood coagulation analysis reflect developmental haemostasis?

    PubMed

    Ravn, Hanne Berg; Andreasen, Jo Bønding; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-04-01

    : Developmental haemostasis has been well documented over the last 3 decades and age-dependent reference ranges have been reported for a number of plasmatic coagulation parameters. With the increasing use of whole blood point-of-care tests like rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and platelet function tests, an evaluation of age-dependent changes is warranted for these tests as well. We obtained blood samples from 149 children, aged 1 day to 5.9 years, and analysed conventional plasmatic coagulation tests, including activated partial prothrombin time, prothrombin time, and fibrinogen (functional). Whole blood samples were analysed using ROTEM to assess overall coagulation capacity and Multiplate analyzer to evaluate platelet aggregation. Age-dependent changes were analysed for all variables. We found age-dependent differences in all conventional coagulation tests (all P values < 0.05), but there was no sign of developmental changes in whole blood coagulation assessment when applying ROTEM, apart from clotting time in the EXTEM assay (P < 0.03). Despite marked differences in mean platelet aggregation between age groups, data did not reach statistical significance. Citrate-anticoagulated blood showed significantly reduced platelet aggregation compared with blood anticoagulated with heparin or hirudin (all P values < 0.003). We confirmed previous developmental changes in conventional plasmatic coagulation test. However, these age-dependent changes were not displayed in whole blood monitoring using ROTEM or Multiplate analyzer. Type of anticoagulant had a significant influence on platelet aggregation across all age groups.

  2. A Pontential Agriculture Waste Material as Coagulant Aid: Cassava Peel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N.; Abd-Rahim, N.-S.; Tuan-Besar, S.-N.-F.; Mohd-Asharuddin, S.; Kumar, V.

    2018-02-01

    All A large amount of cassava peel waste is generated annually by small and medium scale industries. This has led to a new policy of complete utilization of raw materials so that there will be little or no residue left that could pose pollution problems. Conversion of these by-products into a material that poses an ability to remove toxic pollutant would increase the market value and ultimately benefits the producers. This study investigated the characteristics of cassava peel as a coagulant aid material and optimization process using the cassava peel was explored through coagulation and flocculation. This research had highlighted that the Cassava peels contain sugars in the form of polysaccharides such as starch and holocellulose. The FTIR results revealed that amino acids containing abundant of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups which has significant capabilities in removing pollutants. Whereas analysis by XRF spectrometry indicated that the CP samples contain Fe2O3 and Al2O3 which might contribute to its coagulation ability. The optimum condition allowed Cassava peel and alum removed high turbidity up to 90. This natural coagulant from cassava peel is found to be an alternative coagulant aid to reduce the usage of chemical coagulants

  3. Effects of low temperature on coagulation of kaolinite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Ma, Jun; Yi, Peng; Huang, Ju-Chang Howard

    2008-06-01

    In this study, coagulation of kaolinite suspensions at low temperatures is compared with that at an ambient temperature of 22 degrees C, and the process is examined with regard to the coagulation rate (CR) and chemical aspects of coagulation. Experiments using a photometric dispersion analyzer (PDA) show that coagulation of kaolinite suspensions can be taken as a two-phase process. Low temperature greatly reduces the CR of the first phase but not that of the second one. On the other hand, results show that low temperature did not serve to impede the hydrolysis of aluminum [Al(III)] within 1 min of alum addition. The measurements of electrophoretic mobility (EM) indicate that destabilization of kaolinite particles by hydrolyzed Al species was not hindered by low temperature within 1 min of alum addition. Slow coagulation at low temperature is due to the lowered CR but not the altered chemistry aspect of Al(III). Furthermore, the change in settled turbidity after 20-min flocculation as a function of coagulant dosage was more severe in the cold because of the low CR. Elongating floc-growth time, as observed, was able to counterbalance the retarded CR at low temperature and improve turbidity removal efficiency.

  4. Coagulation cascade and complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Xie, Shang-Bo; Wu, Chang-Hao; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Qin; Li, Si; Fan, Yin-Guang; Leng, Rui-Xue; Pan, Hai-Feng; Xiong, Hua-Bao; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted to (1) characterize coagulation cascade and complement system in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); (2) evaluate the associations between coagulation cascade, complement system, inflammatory response and SLE disease severity; (3) test the diagnostic value of a combination of D-dimer and C4 for lupus activity. Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics were performed in 24 SLE patients and 24 healthy controls. The levels of ten coagulations, seven complements and three cytokines were measured in 112 SLE patients. Clinical data were collected from 2025 SLE patients. The analysis of multi-omics data revealed the common links for the components of coagulation cascade and complement system. The results of ELISA showed coagulation cascade and complement system had an interaction effect on SLE disease severity, this effect was pronounced among patients with excess inflammation. The analysis of clinical data revealed a combination of D-dimer and C4 provided good diagnostic performance for lupus activity. This study suggested that coagulation cascade and complement system become ‘partners in crime’, contributing to SLE disease severity and identified the diagnostic value of D-dimer combined with C4for lupus activity. PMID:29599912

  5. Colloids removal from water resources using natural coagulant: Acacia auriculiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M.; Roslan, A.; Kamarulzaman, M. F. H.; Erat, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    All waters, especially surface waters contain dissolved, suspended particles and/or inorganic matter, as well as several biological organisms, such as bacteria, algae or viruses. This material must be removed because it can affect the water quality that can cause turbidity and colour. The objective of this study is to develop water treatment process from Seri Alam (Johor, Malaysia) lake water resources by using natural coagulant Acacia auriculiformis pods through a jar test experiment. Jar test is designed to show the effectiveness of the water treatment. This process is a laboratory procedure that will simulate coagulation/flocculation with several parameters selected namely contact time, coagulant dosage and agitation speed. The most optimum percentage of colloids removal for each parameter is determined at 0.2 g, 90 min and 80 rpm. FESEM (Field-emission Scanning Electron Microscope) observed the small structures of final floc particles for optimum parameter in this study to show that the colloids coagulated the coagulant. All result showed that the Acacia auriculiformis pods can be a very efficient coagulant in removing colloids from water.

  6. [The blood coagulation system and microcirculatory disorders in ixodid tick-borne borreliosis caused by Borrelia miyamotoi].

    PubMed

    Platonov, A E; Sarksyan, D S; Karan, L S; Shipulin, G A; Gordygina, E V; Malinin, O V; Maleev, V V

    2015-01-01

    To study blood coagulation and microcirculatory disorders as a possible cause of transient dysfunctions of organs (the kidney, liver, heart, lung, etc.) in patients with ixodid tick-borne borreliosis caused by Borrelia miyamotoi (Bmt). SUBJECTS AND METHODS; Twenty-four patients with Lyme disease (LD) and 28 Bmt patients treated at Izhevsk City Hospital (Udmurtia) were examined in the study. Platelet counts and the presence of D-dimers were determined; activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen and antithrombin III levels, and Factor XIIa-dependent fibrin clot lysis time were measured. Slit lamp microscopy of the conjunctiva was. also carried out. Results. Platelet counts'were less than 150,000 per pL of blood in 43% of the Bmt patients. All the Bmt patients had at least one abnormal coagulation parameter of the eight ones that were tested; 64% of them had marked coagulation disorders with three or more abnormal laboratory findings. In contrast, all the eight parameters were normal in 71% of the LD patients. The other seven LD patients had only one or two abnormal coagulation parameters (p < 0.001 in comparison with Bmt patients). Microscopic examination of eye capillary blood flow revealed pathological findings that included aggregates of erythrocytes and obstructed and/or sinuous capillaries in 22 (79%) of the Bmt patients, but none of the LD patients. A total of 14 Bmt patients had both coagulation and microcirculatory abnormalities. Eleven of them also had transient signs of organ dysfunction. As far as Borrelia secrete no known toxins, we hypothesized that uncovered disorders of blood coagulation and microcirculation in Bmt patients may contribute to organ dysfunction.

  7. A prospective multicenter cohort study of the association between global tissue hypoxia and coagulation abnormalities during early sepsis resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Stephen; Jones, Alan E; Shapiro, Nathan I; Pusateri, Anthony E; Arnold, Ryan C; Rizzuto, Michael; Arora, Tanisha; Parrillo, Joseph E; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2010-04-01

    resuscitation for sepsis, we found that exposure to global tissue hypoxia (as quantified by low central venous oxygen saturation) was not associated with major coagulation activation. Further investigation to elucidate the clinical factors that trigger or intensify the procoagulant response to sepsis is warranted.

  8. Differential action of medically important Indian BIG FOUR snake venoms on rodent blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Vilas; Nanjaraj Urs, A N; Joshi, Vikram; Suvilesh, K N; Savitha, M N; Urs Amog, Prathap; Rudresha, G V; Yariswamy, M; Vishwanath, B S

    2016-02-01

    Snakebite is a global health problem affecting millions of people. According to WHO, India has the highest mortality and/or morbidity due to snakebite. In spite of commendable research on Indian BIG FOUR venomous species; Naja naja and Bungarus caeruleus (elapid); Daboia russelii and Echis carinatus (viperid), no significant progress has been achieved in terms of diagnosis and management of biting species with appropriate anti-snake venom. Major hurdle is identification of offending species. Present study aims at differentiation of Indian BIG FOUR snake venoms based on their distinguish action on rodent blood coagulation. Assessment of coagulation alterations by elapid venoms showed negligible effect on re-calcification time, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and factors assay (I, II, V, VIII and X) both in vitro and in vivo. However, viperid venoms demonstrated significant anticoagulant status due to their remarkable fibrinogen degradation potentials as supported by fibrinogenolytic activity, fibrinogen zymography and rotational thromboelastometry. Though results provide hint on probable alterations of Indian BIG FOUR snake venoms on blood coagulation, the study however needs validation from human victim's samples to ascertain its reliability for identification of biting snake species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Promyelocytic extracellular chromatin exacerbates coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Muhua; Li, Tao; He, Zhangxiu; Wang, Lixiu; Yang, Xiaoyan; Kou, Yan; Zou, Lili; Dong, Xue; Novakovic, Valerie A.; Bi, Yayan; Kou, Junjie; Yu, Bo; Fang, Shaohong; Wang, Jinghua; Zhou, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Despite routine treatment of unselected acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), early death because of hemorrhage remains unacceptably common, and the mechanism underlying this complication remains elusive. We have recently demonstrated that APL cells undergo a novel cell death program, termed ETosis, which involves release of extracellular chromatin. However, the role of promyelocytic extracellular chromatin in APL-associated coagulation remains unclear. Our objectives were to identify the novel role of ATRA-promoted extracellular chromatin in inducing a hypercoagulable and hyperfibrinolytic state in APL and to evaluate its interaction with fibrin and endothelial cells (ECs). Results from a series of coagulation assays have shown that promyelocytic extracellular chromatin increases thrombin and plasmin generation, causes a shortening of plasma clotting time of APL cells, and increases fibrin formation. DNase I but not anti-tissue factor antibody could inhibit these effects. Immunofluorescence staining showed that promyelocytic extracellular chromatin and phosphatidylserine on APL cells provide platforms for fibrin deposition and render clots more resistant to fibrinolysis. Additionally, coincubation assays revealed that promyelocytic extracellular chromatin is cytotoxic to ECs, converting them to a procoagulant phenotype. This cytotoxity was blocked by DNase I by 20% or activated protein C by 31%. Our current results thus delineate the pathogenic role of promyelocytic extracellular chromatin in APL coagulopathy. Furthermore, the remaining coagulation disturbance in high-risk APL patients after ATRA administration may be treatable by intrinsic pathway inhibition via accelerating extracellular chromatin degradation. PMID:28053193

  10. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously.

  11. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F.; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p < 0.05, respectively). Factor VIII activity declined at 4 and 6 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), blood antithrombin concentration was higher at 2 and 4 hours (p < 0.05, respectively), and the activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged significantly at 2 and 4 hours following NK administration (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). All the changes, however, were within the normal range. In conclusion, thus, a single-dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  12. Crosstalk between coagulation and inflammation in mastitis and metritis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bobowiec, Ryszard; Wessely-Szponder, Joanna; Hola, Piotr

    2009-06-01

    Coagulation and inflammation are closely related as part of the mechanisms of host defence during a severe infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between thrombin as a factor in both the coagulative and inflammatory processes and neutrophil secretory function on the basis of lactoferrin (LF), elastase and myeloperoxidase release in the course of mastitis and metritis in cows. Thrombin generation was measured on the basis of hydrolysis of SAR-PRO-ARG-pNA and lactoferrin concentration was estimated by an ELISA method. The greatest thrombin generation was observed in the metritis group (1.18 +/- 0.62 IU). The level of LF was the highest in the group of cows with mastitis (0.74 +/- 0.55 mg/ml) in the first phase of the disease. In the second phase of the diseases the level of serum LF in cows with mastitis diminished to the value of 0.41 +/- 0.16 mg/ml, whereas in cows with metritis the level of LF increased to 0.51 +/- 0.17 mg/ml. This study reveals that the excessive production of thrombin not only causes hypercoagulatory disorders but also exaggerates neutrophil function by the release of some enzymes which may play a destructive role during disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). These enzymes also inhibit anticoagulative systems, thus potentially worsening the course of the disease.

  13. Innovative physico-chemical treatment of wastewater incorporating Moringa oleifera seed coagulant.

    PubMed

    Bhuptawat, Hitendra; Folkard, G K; Chaudhari, Sanjeev

    2007-04-02

    Moringa oleifera is a pan tropical, multipurpose tree whose seeds contain a high quality edible oil (up to 40% by weight) and water soluble proteins that act as effective coagulants for water and wastewater treatment. The use of this natural coagulant material has not yet realised its potential. A water extract of M. oleifera seed was applied to a wastewater treatment sequence comprising coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation-sand filtration. The study was laboratory based using an actual wastewater. Overall COD removals of 50% were achieved at both 50 and 100mg/l M. oleifera doses. When 50 and 100mg/l seed doses were applied in combination with 10mg/l of alum, COD removal increased to 58 and 64%, respectively. The majority of COD removal occurred during the filtration process. In the tests incorporating alum, sludge generation and filter head loss increased by factors of 3 and 2, respectively. These encouraging treatment results indicate that this may be the first treatment application that can move to large scale adoption. The simple water extract may be obtained at minimal cost from the presscake residue remaining after oil extraction from the seed. The regulatory compliance issues of adopting 'new materials' for wastewater treatment are significantly less stringent than those applying to the production of potable water.

  14. Should anti-inhibitor coagulant complex and tranexamic acid be used concomitantly?

    PubMed

    Valentino, L A; Holme, P A

    2015-11-01

    Inhibitor development in haemophilia patients is challenging especially when undergoing surgical procedures. The development of an inhibitor precludes using factor VIII (FVIII) therapy thereby requiring a bypassing agent (BPA) for surgical bleeding prophylaxis if the FVIII inhibitor titre >5 BU. Concomitant use of anti-inhibitor coagulant complex (AICC) and tranexamic acid has been reported in the literature as a beneficial treatment for this population. Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is known to cause an increase in thrombin generation and tranexamic acid inhibits fibrinolysis. Hence, the combined used of AICC and tranexamic acid has been limited due to safety concerns over possibilities of increased risk of thrombotic events and disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, the rationale for concomitant therapy is to obtain a potential synergistic effect and to increase clot stability. We conducted a literature review of past studies and individual case reports of concomitant use of AICC and tranexamic acid, which was extensively used during dental procedures. Evidence also exists for concomitant use of the combined therapy in orthopaedic procedures, control of gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis and cerebral haemorrhages. Some patients who received the combined therapy had failed monotherapy with a single BPA prior to combined therapy. There were no reports of thrombotic complications related to the concomitant therapy and haemostasis was achieved in all cases. Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex and tranexamic acid therapy was found to be safe, well-tolerated and effective therapy in haemophilia patients with inhibitors. Additional randomized controlled studies should be performed to confirm these findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Enhanced algae removal by Ti-based coagulant: comparison with conventional Al- and Fe-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Zhao, Yanxia; Gao, Baoyu; Zhao, Qian

    2018-05-01

    The water eutrophication caused by cyanobacteria seasonally proliferates, which is a hot potato to be resolved for water treatment plants. This study firstly investigated coagulation performance of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl 4 ) for Microcystis aeruginosa synthetic water treatment. Results show complete algal cell removal by TiCl 4 coagulation without damage to cell membrane integrity even under harsh conditions; 60 mg/L TiCl 4 was effective in removing the microcystins up to 85%. Furthermore, besides having stronger UV 254 removal capability and the higher removal of fluorescent substances over Al- and Fe-based coagulants, TiCl 4 coagulant required more compact coagulation and sedimentation tanks due to its significantly improved floc growth and sedimentation speed. Meanwhile, its' short hydraulic retention time avoided algal cell breakage and subsequent algal organic matter release. Microcystin concentrations were kept at a low level during sludge storage period, indicating that the TiCl 4 flocs could prevent algal cells from natural lysis. To facilitate water recycling without secondary contamination, the algae-containing sludge after TiCl 4 coagulation ought to be disposed within 12 days at 20 °C and 8 days at 35 °C.

  16. [Reference values for the blood coagulation tests in Mexico: usefulness of the pooled plasma from blood donors].

    PubMed

    Calzada-Contreras, Adriana; Moreno-Hernández, Manuel; Castillo-Torres, Noemi Patricia; Souto-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Ricardo-Moreno, María Tania; Sánchez-Fernández, Maria Guadalupe de Jesús; García-González, América; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The blood coagulation system maintains the blood in a liquid state and bleeding and thrombosis are the manifestations of its malfunction. Blood coagulation laboratory evaluates the physiology of this system. To establish both, the reference values for several tests performed at the blood coagulation laboratory as well as the utility of the pooled plasma to perform these assays. MATERIAL AND: In this descriptive, cross-sectional, randomized study, we collected plasma from Mexican Mestizos. Each pooled plasma was prepared with the plasma from at least 20 blood donors. We performed screening and special tests and the Levey-Jennings graphs were built and interpreted after each pass. Results of the tests were analyzed and their distribution was established using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. To establish the reference values we used 95% confidence intervals. We collected 72 pooled plasmas. The distribution for PT, APTT, and TT tests was abnormal. Although the PT test showed a bimodal distribution it was normal for factor VII. The reference values for the hemostatic, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic factors were different from those suggested by the manufacturers. We established the reference values for the blood coagulation tests in the adult Mexican population. We have shown that the pooled plasma must be used for the screening tests. We suggest that each clinical laboratory should establish its own reference values (at least for the screening tests). To reach this objective, we encourage the use of the pooled plasma.

  17. Short communication: Prediction of milk coagulation and acidity traits in Mediterranean buffalo milk using Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manuelian, C L; Visentin, G; Boselli, C; Giangolini, G; Cassandro, M; De Marchi, M

    2017-09-01

    Milk coagulation and acidity traits are important factors to inform the cheesemaking process. Those traits have been deeply studied in bovine milk, whereas scarce information is available for buffalo milk. However, the dairy industry is interested in a method to determine milk coagulation and acidity features quickly and in a cost-effective manner, which could be provided by Fourier-transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of FT-MIR to predict coagulation and acidity traits of Mediterranean buffalo milk. A total of 654 records from 36 herds located in central Italy with information on milk yield, somatic cell score, milk chemical composition, milk acidity [pH, titratable acidity (TA)], and milk coagulation properties (rennet coagulation time, curd firming time, and curd firmness) were available for statistical analysis. Reference measures of milk acidity and coagulation properties were matched with milk spectral information, and FT-MIR prediction models were built using partial least squares regression. The data set was divided into a calibration set (75%) and a validation set (25%). The capacity of FT-MIR spectroscopy to correctly classify milk samples based on their renneting ability was evaluated by a canonical discriminant analysis. Average values for milk coagulation traits were 13.32 min, 3.24 min, and 39.27 mm for rennet coagulation time, curd firming time, and curd firmness, respectively. Milk acidity traits averaged 6.66 (pH) and 7.22 Soxhlet-Henkel degrees/100 mL (TA). All milk coagulation and acidity traits, except for pH, had high variability (17 to 46%). Prediction models of coagulation traits were moderately to scarcely accurate, whereas the coefficients of determination of external validation were 0.76 and 0.66 for pH and TA, respectively. Canonical discriminant analysis indicated that information on milk coagulating ability is present in the MIR spectra, and the model correctly classified as

  18. [Comparison of thromboelastography and routine coagulation tests for evaluation of blood coagulation function in patients].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Yi; Ou Yang, Xi-Lin; Wu, Jing-Hui; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Jin-Hua; Gu, Li-Nan; Lu, Zhu-Jie; Zhao, Xiao-Zi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the correlation and consistency between thromboelastography(TEG) and routine coagulation tests, and to evaluate the value of the two methods in determining the blood coagulation of patients. The TEG, routine coagulation tests and platelet counts of 182 patients from the Intensive Care Unit(ICU) and Department of Gastroenterology in our hospital from January to September 2014 were performed and analyzed retrospectively for their correlation, Kappa identity test analysis and chi-square test, and the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of both methods in the patients with bleeding were evaluated. The TEG R time and PT, R time and APTT showed a linear dependence (P<0.01). The relationship between the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA and Fibrinogen showed a linear dependence (P<0.001). And the relationship between the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA and the platelet count were in a linear dependent way (P<0.001). The Kappa values of the TEG R time with PT and APTT were 0.038 (P>0.05) and 0.061 (P>0.05), respectively. The chi-square test values of the TEG R time with PT and APTT were 35.309 (P<0.001) and 15.848 (P<0.001), respectively. The Fibrinogen and the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA value had statistical significance (P<0.001), with a Kappa value of 0.323, 0.288 and 0.427, respectively. The chi-square test values between Fibrinogen and the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA value were not statistically significant, with X2=1.091 (P=0.296), X2=1.361 (P=0.243), X2=0.108 (P=0.742). The Kappa values of the platelet count and the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA value were 0.379, 0.208 and 0.352, respectively, which were also statistically significant difference (P<0.001). The chi-square test values between the platelet count and the TEG K value, α-Angle, MA value showed a statistically significant difference (P<0.001), with X2=37.5, X2=37.23, X2=26.630. The diagnostic sensitivity of the two methods for the patients with bleeding was less than 50%. There was a significant correlation

  19. Real-World Analysis of Dispensed IUs of Coagulation Factor IX and Resultant Expenditures in Hemophilia B Patients Receiving Standard Half-life Versus Extended Half-life Products and Those Switching from Standard Half-life to Extended Half-life Products.

    PubMed

    Tortella, Bartholomew J; Alvir, José; McDonald, Margaret; Spurden, Dean; Fogarty, Patrick F; Chhabra, Amit; Pleil, Andreas M

    2018-01-24

    Hemophilia B requires replacement therapy with factor IX (FIX) coagulation products to treat and prevent bleeding episodes. A recently introduced extended half-life (EHL) recombinant FIX replacement product provided the opportunity to compare the amount of dispensed factor and expenditures for EHL treatment compared with a standard half-life (SHL) product. To determine factor international units (IUs) dispensed and expenditures associated with switching from nonacog alfa, the most commonly used SHL replacement product, to eftrenonacog alfa, an EHL FIX replacement product. Two U.S. claims databases were analyzed. A large national specialty pharmacy dispensation claims database was used to identify the number of IUs dispensed and monthly charges for all patients with hemophilia B from April 2015 to June 2016. Truven Health MarketScan Research Databases (January 2010-July 2016) were used to identify IUs and expenditures for patients with claims data for at least 3 months before and after switching from the SHL to the EHL product. Medians for IUs and expenditures are presented to accommodate for skewness of data distribution. The national specialty pharmacy database analysis included 296 patients with moderate or severe hemophilia B (233 on SHL; 94 on EHL). Median monthly factor dispensed was 11% lower (2,142 IU) in the EHL versus SHL cohort over the study period, while individual monthly reductions ranged from 32% to 47% (9,838 IU to 16,514 IU). Using the wholesale acquisition cost, the median per-patient monthly factor expenditures over the 15-month study period were 94% higher ($23,005) for the EHL than for the SHL product. Individual median monthly expenditure differences ranged from 15% ($6,562) to 49% ($19,624). In the Truven database, 14 patients switched from the SHL to the EHL product. The amount of factor dispensed was variable; in the 1-year period before and after the switch from the SHL to the EHL product, mean IUs dispensed decreased by 3,005 IU, while

  20. Dysfunction in the coagulation system and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, S; Amaral, O B; Mezzasalma, M A U; Panizzutti, R; Nardi, A E

    2016-01-01

    Although different hypotheses have been formulated to explain schizophrenia pathogenesis, the links between them are weak. The observation that five psychotic patients on chronic warfarin therapy for deep-vein thrombosis showed long-term remission of psychotic symptoms made us suspect that abnormalities in the coagulation pathway, specifically low tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) activity, could be one of the missing links. Our hypothesis is supported by a high prevalence of conditions affecting tPA activity in drug-naive schizophrenia, such as antiphospholipid antibodies, elevated cytokine levels, hyperinsulinemia and hyperhomocysteinemia. We recently screened a group of schizophrenia patients and controls for conditions affecting tPA activity. Free-protein S deficiency was highly prevalent among patients, but not found in controls. Free-protein S and functional protein C are natural anticoagulants that form complexes that inhibit tPA inhibitors. All participants had normal protein C levels, suggesting that protein S could have a role in schizophrenia, independent of protein C. Chronic patients and those studied during acute episodes had between three and six conditions affecting tPA and/or protein S activity, while patients in remission had up to two, which led us to postulate that multiple conditions affecting tPA and/or protein S activity could contribute to the full expression of schizophrenia phenotype. This paper describes the physiological roles of tPA and protein S, reviewing how their activity influences pathogenesis and comorbidity of schizophrenia. Next, it analyzes how activity of tPA and protein S is influenced by biochemical abnormalities found in schizophrenia. Last, it suggests future directions for research, such as studies on animal models and on therapeutic approaches for schizophrenia aiming at increasing tPA and protein S activity. PMID:26731441

  1. Principal component analysis to assess the efficiency and mechanism for enhanced coagulation of natural algae-laden water using a novel dual coagulant system.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hua-Se; Wei, Chao-Hai; Deng, Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun; Ren, Yuan; Hu, Yun

    2014-02-01

    A novel dual coagulant system of polyaluminum chloride sulfate (PACS) and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) was used to treat natural algae-laden water from Meiliang Gulf, Lake Taihu. PACS (Aln(OH)mCl3n-m-2k(SO4)k) has a mass ratio of 10 %, a SO4 (2-)/Al3 (+) mole ratio of 0.0664, and an OH/Al mole ratio of 2. The PDADMAC ([C8H16NCl]m) has a MW which ranges from 5 × 10(5) to 20 × 10(5) Da. The variations of contaminants in water samples during treatments were estimated in the form of principal component analysis (PCA) factor scores and conventional variables (turbidity, DOC, etc.). Parallel factor analysis determined four chromophoric dissolved organic matters (CDOM) components, and PCA identified four integrated principle factors. PCA factor 1 had significant correlations with chlorophyll-a (r=0.718), protein-like CDOM C1 (0.689), and C2 (0.756). Factor 2 correlated with UV254 (0.672), humic-like CDOM component C3 (0.716), and C4 (0.758). Factors 3 and 4 had correlations with NH3-N (0.748) and T-P (0.769), respectively. The variations of PCA factors scores revealed that PACS contributed less aluminum dissolution than PAC to obtain equivalent removal efficiency of contaminants. This might be due to the high cationic charge and pre-hydrolyzation of PACS. Compared with PACS coagulation (20 mg L(-1)), the removal of PCA factors 1, 2, and 4 increased 45, 33, and 12 %, respectively, in combined PACS-PDADMAC treatment (0.8 mg L(-1) +20 mg L(-1)). Since PAC contained more Al (0.053 g/1 g) than PACS (0.028 g/1 g), the results indicated that PACS contributed less Al dissolution into the water to obtain equivalent removal efficiency.

  2. Structural bioinformatics: methods, concepts and applications to blood coagulation proteins.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2002-06-01

    Structural and theoretical analyses of proteins are central to the understanding of complex molecular mechanisms and are fundamental to the drug discovery process. Computational techniques yield useful insights into an ever-wider range of biomolecular systems. Protein three-dimensional structures and molecular functions can be predicted in some circumstances, while experimental structures can be analyzed in depth via such computational approaches. Non-covalent binding of biomolecules can be understood by considering structural, thermodynamic and kinetic issues, and theoretical simulations of such events can be attempted. The central role of electrostatic interactions with regard to protein function, structure and stability has been investigated and some electrostatic properties can be modeled theoretically. Computer methods thus help to prioritize, design, analyze and rationalize biochemical experiments. Cardiovascular diseases and associated blood coagulation disorders are leading causes of death worldwide. Blood coagulation involves more than 30 proteins that interact specifically with various degrees of affinity. Many of these molecules can also bind transiently to phospholipid surfaces. Numerous point mutations in the genes of coagulation proteins and regulators have been identified. Understanding the coagulation cascade, its regulation and the impact of mutations is required for the development of new therapies and diagnostic tools. In this review, we describe concepts and methods pertaining to the field of structural bioinformatics. We provide examples of applications of these approaches to blood coagulation proteins and show that such studies can give insights about molecular mechanisms contributing to cardiovascular disease susceptibility.

  3. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidation and coagulation of humic substances by potassium ferrate.

    PubMed

    Graham, N J D; Khoi, T T; Jiang, J-Q

    2010-01-01

    Ferrate (FeO₄²⁻) is believed to have a dual role in water treatment, both as oxidant and coagulant. Few studies have considered the coagulation effect in detail, mainly because of the difficulty of separating the oxidation and coagulation effects. This paper summarises some preliminary results from laboratory-based experiments that are investigating the coagulation reaction dynamically via a PDA instrument, between ferrate and humic acid (HA) at different doses and pH values, and comparing the observations with the use of ferric chloride. The PDA output gives a comparative measure of the rate of floc growth and the magnitude of floc formation. The results of the tests show some significant differences in the pattern of behaviour between ferrate and ferric chloride. At pH 5 the chemical dose range (as Fe) corresponding to HA coagulation was much broader for ferrate than ferric chloride, and the optimal Fe dose was greater. Ferrate oxidation appears to increase the hydrophilic and electronegative nature of the HA leading to an extended region of charge neutralisation. A consequence of the ferrate oxidation is that the extent of HA removal was slightly lower ( approximately 5%) than with ferric chloride. At pH 7, in the sweep flocculation domain, ferrate achieved much greater floc formation than ferric chloride, but a substantially lower degree of HA removal.

  5. Coagulation monitoring based on blood elastic measurement using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Zhu, Jiang; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-02-01

    Blood coagulation monitoring is important to diagnose hematological diseases and cardiovascular diseases and to predict the risk of bleeding and excessive clotting. In this study, we developed a system to dynamically monitor blood coagulation and quantitatively determine the coagulation function by blood elastic measurement. When blood forms a clot from a liquid, ultrasonic force induces a shear wave, which is detected by optical coherence tomography (OCT). The coagulation of porcine whole blood recalcified by calcium chloride is assessed using the metrics of reaction time, clot formation kinetics and maximum shear modulus. The OCE system can noninvasively monitor the blood coagulation and quantitatively determine the coagulation function.

  6. Comparison of Moringa stenopetala seed extract as a clean coagulant with Alum and Moringa stenopetala-Alum hybrid coagulant to remove direct dye from Textile Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Arash; Gholibegloo, Elham; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Golchinpoor, Najmeh; Khazaei, Mohammad; Kamani, Hossein; Hosseini, Sara Sadat; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Moringa stenopetala seed extract was compared with alum and M. stenopetala-alum hybrid coagulant to remove Direct Red 23 azo dye from textile wastewater. The effects of parameters such as pH, coagulant dose, type of salt used for the extraction of coagulant and initial dye concentration on dye removal efficiency were investigated. Moreover, the existing functional groups on the structure of M. stenopetala coagulant (MSC) were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the morphology of sludge produced by MSC, alum, and hybrid coagulant was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Ninhydrin test was also used to determine the quantity of primary amines in the MSC and Moringa oleifera coagulant (MOC). According to the results, with increasing the coagulant dose and decreasing the initial dye concentration, dye removal efficiency has increased. The maximum dye removal of 98.5, 98.2, and 98.3 % were obtained by using 240, 120, and 80 mg/L MSC, alum and hybrid coagulant at pH 7, respectively. The results also showed MSC was much more effective than MOC for dye removal. The volume of sludge produced by MSC was one fourth and half of those produced by alum and hybrid coagulant, respectively. Based on the results, hybrid coagulant was the most efficient coagulant for direct dye removal from colored wastewater.

  7. Host defense peptides of thrombin modulate inflammation and coagulation in endotoxin-mediated shock and Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kalle, Martina; Papareddy, Praveen; Kasetty, Gopinath; Mörgelin, Matthias; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Rydengård, Victoria; Malmsten, Martin; Albiger, Barbara; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative sepsis is accompanied by a disproportionate innate immune response and excessive coagulation mainly induced by endotoxins released from bacteria. Due to rising antibiotic resistance and current lack of other effective treatments there is an urgent need for new therapies. We here present a new treatment concept for sepsis and endotoxin-mediated shock, based on host defense peptides from the C-terminal part of human thrombin, found to have a broad and inhibitory effect on multiple sepsis pathologies. Thus, the peptides abrogate pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to endotoxin in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, they interfere with coagulation by modulating contact activation and tissue factor-mediated clotting in vitro, leading to normalization of coagulation responses in vivo, a previously unknown function of host defense peptides. In a mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis, the peptide GKY25, while mediating a modest antimicrobial effect, significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory response, decreased fibrin deposition and leakage in the lungs, as well as reduced mortality. Taken together, the capacity of such thrombin-derived peptides to simultaneously modulate bacterial levels, pro-inflammatory responses, and coagulation, renders them attractive therapeutic candidates for the treatment of invasive infections and sepsis.

  8. Purification and characterization of a heteromultimeric glycoprotein from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex with an inhibitory effect on human blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2011-01-01

    Plant latex has many health benefits and has been used in folk medicine. In this study, the biological effect of Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex on human blood coagulation was investigated. By a combination of heat precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography, a heat stable heteromultimeric glycoprotein (HSGPL1) was purified from jackfruit milky latex. The apparent molecular masses of the monomeric proteins on SDS/PAGE were 33, 31 and 29 kDa. The isoelectric points (pIs) of the monomers were 6.63, 6.63 and 6.93, respectively. Glycosylation and deglycosylation tests confirmed that each subunit of HSGPL1 formed the native multimer by sugar-based interaction. Moreover, the multimer of HSGPL1 also resisted 2-mercaptoethanol action. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis indicated that HSGPL1 was a complex protein related to Hsps/chaperones. HSGPL1 has an effect on intrinsic pathways of the human blood coagulation system by significantly prolonging the activated partial thrombin time (APTT). In contrast, it has no effect on the human extrinsic blood coagulation system using the prothrombin time (PT) test. The prolonged APTT resulted from the serine protease inhibitor property of HSGPL1, since it reduced activity of human blood coagulation factors XI(a) and α-XII(a).

  9. Comparison between thromboelastography and conventional coagulation test: Should we abandon conventional coagulation tests in polytrauma patients?

    PubMed

    Tur Martínez, Jaume; Petrone, Patrizio; Axelrad, Alexander; Marini, Corrado P

    2018-05-12

    TEG provides an in-vivo assessment of viscoelastic clot strength in whole blood compared with CCT, which may not reflect the influence of platelets. The aim of this study was to compare TEG vs. CCT in trauma patients stratified by mechanism of injury (MOI) and pre-existing coagulation status. A retrospective, observational study of 230 polytrauma patients admitted to a University Hospital Level 1 Trauma Center, with TEG and CCT on admission stratified by MOI: multiple trauma (MT), isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI) or MT+TBI. Statistical analysis included correlation between TEG and CCT in all groups and a subgroup analysis of anticoagulated patients. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Spearman and lineal regression when appropriate. Statistical significance was accepted at P<0.05. TEG was normal in 28.7%, hypercoagulable in 68.3%, hypocoagulable in 7%. There was no difference in TEG status among the groups. The coagulation status was not affected by age, ISS or shock. The CCT were abnormal in 63.6% of patients with normal TEG. Normal or hypercoagulable-TEG was found in 21/23 patients on Coumadin who had elevated INR and in 10/11 patients on NOAC. An analysis of the 23 patients on Coumadin stratified by INR showed a normal or hypercoagulable-TEG in 21/23 patients. Only 2 patients had a hypocoagulable-TEG. Mortality was 5.2% (58.3% severe TBI). TEG is more useful than CCT in polytrauma patients, including patients on anticoagulants. TBI could increase the incidence of hypercoagulability in trauma. CCT are not useful from the standpoint of treatment. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of leukapheresis on blood coagulation in patients with hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van de Louw, Andry

    2017-04-01

    Leukapheresis has been proposed to reduce white blood cell (WBC) count in hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no survival benefit has been proven and leukapheresis can potentially affect coagulation and worsen bleeding and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We analyzed the effect of leukapheresis on coagulation tests in a cohort of hyperleukocytic AML patients. Retrospective chart review of hyperleukocytic AML patients who underwent leukapheresis between 2003 and 2014. Blood coagulation tests (platelets, PT, INR, aPTT, fibrinogen, D-Dimers and fibrin degradation products (FDP)) were collected before and after each procedure and DIC score was computed. Transfusions of platelets and coagulation factors were collected. Ninety patients and 129 leukapheresis sessions were screened. After exclusion of the sessions associated with transfusions, we observed in 44 patients a significant decrease in platelets (from 75.69±89.48 to 44.59±47.71.10 9 /L, p=0.001) and fibrinogen (from 4.05±1.29 to 3.35±1.37g/L, p<0.0005) along with an increase in PT (from 14.62±2.73 to 15.62±3.63s, p=0.001), aPTT (from 33.70±6.32 to 39.24±13.53s, p=0.009) and INR (from 1.33±0.2 to 1.45±0.34, p=0.002) after the first procedure. Bleeding complications, all intracerebral hemorrhages, were documented in 3 patients within 24h of leukapheresis. After combining 73 repeat procedures, we observed similar significant results except for the aPTT prolongation. The platelets and PT components of the DIC score, but not the fibrinogen component, were significantly increased after leukapheresis. In hyperleukocytic AML patients, leukapheresis is associated with clinically significant decreases in platelets and fibrinogen and prolonged clotting times. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of coagulation pretreatment of produced water from natural gas well by polyaluminium chloride and polyferric sulphate coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun; Huang, Zejin; Rahaman, Md Hasibur; Li, Yue; Mei, Longyue; Ma, Hongpu; Hu, Xuebin; Xiao, Haiwen; Luo, Zhiyong; Wang, Kunping

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to optimise coagulation pretreatment of the produced water (PW) collected from a natural gas field. Two coagulants, polyferric sulphate (PFS) and polyaluminium chloride (PACl), were applied separately for the organics, suspended solids (SS), and colour removal. Treatment performance at different coagulant dosages, initial pH values, stirring patterns, and the addition of cationic polyacrylamide (PAM) was investigated in jar tests. The optimal coagulation conditions were dosage of PACl 25 g/L or PFS 20 g/L with that of PAM 30 mg/L, initial pH of 11, and fast mixing of 1.5 min (for PACl) or 2 min (for PFS) at 250 rpm followed by slow mixing of 15 min at 50 rpm for both coagulants. PACl performed better than PFS to remove chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), SS, and colour, and achieved a removal efficiency of 90.1%, 89.4%, 99.0%, and 99.9%, respectively, under the optimal condition; while PFS efficiency was 86.1%, 86.1%, 99.0%, and 98.2%, respectively. However, oil removal was higher in PFS coagulation compared to PACl and showed 98.9% and 95.3%, respectively. Biodegradability, ratio of the biological oxygen demand (five-day) (BOD 5 )/COD, of the PW after pretreatment increased from 0.08 to 0.32 for PFS and 0.43 for PACl. Zeta potential (Z-potential) analysis at the optimum coagulant dosage of PACl and PFS suggests that charge neutralisation was the predominant mechanism during coagulation. Better efficiency was observed at higher pH. The addition of PAM and starring pattern had a minor influence on the removal performance of both coagulants. The results suggest that PACl or PFS can be applied for the pretreatment of PW, which can provide substantial removal of carbon, oil, and colour, a necessary first step for subsequent main treatment units such as chemical oxidation or biological treatment.

  12. Coagulation and oxidative stress plasmatic levels in a type 2 diabetes population.

    PubMed

    Barillari, Giovanni; Fabbro, Elisabetta; Pasca, Samantha; Bigotto, Enrico

    2009-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a metabolic disorder characterized by relative insulin deficiency, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. DM2 improperly managed can cause severe complications such as renal failure, blindness or arterial disease. In addition to serious complications due to DM2, in the past 20 years, several studies have demonstrated the association between DM2, insulin resistance and prothrombotic risk. In our study, we wanted to evaluate the correlation between coagulation factor levels, oxidative plasmatic levels and DM2. We considered 20 DM2 patients (65% women and 35% men), 40-65 years of age, who had a BMI between 25 and 40 kg/m2 and followed a diet with or without oral antidiabetic treatment and 20 controls, blood donors, 15 men (75%) and five women (25%), who had a BMI between 25 and 40 kg/m2 and their age was between 40 and 65 years. Plasmatic levels of oxidative stress markers (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitrotyrosine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein) and coagulation markers (factors VII, VIII, IX, XI, XII, antithrombin III and fibrinogen) of both populations were analyzed following statistic criteria. The analyzed data of this study related to oxidative stress and coagulation factors proved that the differences observed between diabetic patients and controls were not statistically significant (P < 0.05) for tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nitrotyrosine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, factor VII and factor XI; conversely for factor VIII, factor IX, factor XII, antithrombin III and fibrinogen, the results gave a difference statistically significant (P < 0.01). In patients with DM2, factor VIII increased from 79 to 103%, factor IX from 88 to 103%, factor XII from 87 to 105% and finally, antithrombin III from 81 to 103%. Different results between literature and our study could be due to fact that the patients considered were in the early stage of diabetes when endothelial damage is absent and vascular complications are not clinically

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  14. [Coagulation Monitoring and Bleeding Management in Cardiac Surgery].

    PubMed

    Bein, Berthold; Schiewe, Robert

    2018-05-01

    The transfusion of allogeneic blood products is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. An impaired hemostasis is frequently found in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and may in turn cause bleeding and transfusions. A goal directed coagulation management addressing the often complex coagulation disorders needs sophisticated diagnostics. This may improve both patients' outcome and costs. Recent data suggest that coagulation management based on a rational algorithm is more effective than traditional therapy based on conventional laboratory variables such as PT and INR. Platelet inhibitors, cumarins, direct oral anticoagulants and heparin need different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. An algorithm specifically developed for use during cardiac surgery is presented. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Multifrequency acoustics as a probe of mesoscopic blood coagulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Adarsh; Rajendran, Gokulnath; Ercole, Ari; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Coagulation is a complex enzymatic polymerisation cascade. Disordered coagulation is common in medicine and may be life-threatening yet clinical assays are typically bulky and/or provide an incomplete picture of clot mechanical evolution. We present the adaptation of an in-plane acoustic wave device: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation at multiple harmonics to determine the time-evolution of mesoscale mechanical properties of clot formation in vitro. This approach is sensitive to changes in surface and bulk clot structure in various models of induced coagulopathy. Furthermore, we are able to show that clot formation at surfaces has different kinetics and mechanical strength to that in the bulk, which may have implications for the design of bioprosthetic materials. The "Multifrequency acoustics" approach thus enables unique capability to portray biological processes concerning blood coagulation.

  16. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  17. Adaptive force sonorheometry for assessment of whole blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, F William; Viola, Francesco; Hamer, Theresa C; Ahmed, Eman M; Crawford, Shawna B; Haverstick, Doris M; Lawrence, Michael B; Walker, William F

    2010-05-02

    Viscoelastic diagnostics that monitor the hemostatic function of whole blood (WB), such as thromboelastography, have been developed with demonstrated clinical utility. By measuring the cumulative effects of all components of hemostasis, viscoelastic diagnostics have circumvented many of the challenges associated with more common tests of blood coagulation. We describe a new technology, called sonorheometry, that adaptively applies acoustic radiation force to assess coagulation function in WB. The repeatability (precision) of coagulation parameters was assessed using citrated WB samples. A reference range of coagulation parameters, along with corresponding measurements from prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT), were obtained from WB samples of 20 healthy volunteers. In another study, sonorheometry monitored anticoagulation with heparin (0-5 IU/ml) and reversal from varied dosages of protamine (0-10 IU/ml) in heparinized WB (2 IU/ml). Sonorheometry exhibited low CVs for parameters: clot initiation time (TC1), <7%; clot stabilization time (TC2), <6.5%; and clotting angle (theta), <3.5%. Good correlation was observed between clotting times, TC1 and TC2, and PTT (r=0.65 and 0.74 respectively; n=18). Linearity to heparin dosage was observed with average linearity r>0.98 for all coagulation parameters. We observed maximum reversal of heparin anticoagulation at protamine to heparin ratios of 1.4:1 from TC1 (P=0.6) and 1.2:1 from theta (P=0.55). Sonorheometry is a non-contact method for precise assessment of WB coagulation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protein Z efficiently depletes thrombin generation in disseminated intravascular coagulation with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nuri; Kim, Ji-Eun; Gu, Ja-Yoon; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Inho; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Seonyang; Han, Kyou-Sup; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is characterized by consumption of coagulation factors and anticoagulants. Thrombin generation assay (TGA) gives useful information about global hemostatic status. We developed a new TGA system that anticoagulant addition can deplete thrombin generation in plasma, which may reflect defective anticoagulant system in DIC. TGAs were measured on the calibrated automated thrombogram with and without thrombomodulin or protein Z in 152 patients who were suspected of having DIC, yielding four parameters including lag time, endogenous thrombin potential, peak thrombin and time-to-peak in each experiment. Nonsurvivors showed significantly prolonged lag time and time-to-peak in TGA-protein Z system, which was performed with added protein Z. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, lag time and time-to-peak in TGA system were significant independent prognostic factors. In TGA-protein Z system, lag time and time-to-peak were revealed as independent prognostic factors of DIC. Protein Z addition could potentiate its anticoagulant effect in DIC with poor prognosis, suggesting the presence of defective protein Z system. The prolonged lag time and time-to-peak in both TGA and TGA-protein Z systems are expected to be used as independent prognostic factors of DIC.

  19. Dust Coagulation Regulated by Turbulent Clustering in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Enohata, Kei; Umemura, Masayuki; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-02-01

    The coagulation of dust particles is a key process in planetesimal formation. However, the radial drift and bouncing barriers are not completely resolved, especially for silicate dust. Since the collision velocities of dust particles are regulated by turbulence in a protoplanetary disk, turbulent clustering should be properly treated. To that end, direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of the Navier–Stokes equations are requisite. In a series of papers, Pan & Padoan used a DNS with Reynolds number Re ∼ 1000. Here, we perform DNSs with up to Re = 16,100, which allow us to track the motion of particles with Stokes numbers of 0.01 ≲ St ≲ 0.2 in the inertial range. Through the DNSs, we confirm that the rms relative velocity of particle pairs is smaller by more than a factor of two, compared to that by Ormel & Cuzzi. The distributions of the radial relative velocities are highly non-Gaussian. The results are almost consistent with those by Pan & Padoan or Pan et al. at low Re. Also, we find that the sticking rates for equal-sized particles are much higher than those for different-sized particles. Even in the strong-turbulence case with α-viscosity of 10‑2, the sticking rates are as high as ≳50% and the bouncing probabilities are as low as ∼10% for equal-sized particles of St ≲ 0.01. Thus, turbulent clustering plays a significant role in the growth of centimeter-sized compact aggregates (pebbles) and also enhances the solid abundance, which may lead to the streaming instability in a disk.

  20. Coagulation parameters following equine herpesvirus type 1 infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M E; Holz, C L; Kopec, A K; Dau, J J; Luyendyk, J P; Soboll Hussey, G

    2018-04-15

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is the cause of respiratory disease, abortion storms, and outbreaks of herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM). Infection of the spinal cord is characterised by multifocal regions of virally infected vascular endothelium, associated with vasculitis, thrombosis and haemorrhage that result in ischaemia and organ dysfunction. However, the mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. To evaluate tissue factor (TF) procoagulant activity and thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) levels in horses following infection with EHV-1. In vitro and in vivo studies following experimental EHV-1 infection. Horses were infected with EHV-1 and levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated TF activity; plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived microvesicle (MV)-associated TF activity and TAT complexes in plasma were examined. EHV-1 infection increased PBMC TF procoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo. In infected horses, this increase was observed during the acute infection and was most marked at the onset and end of viraemia. However, no significant differences were observed between the horses that showed signs of EHM and the horses that did not develop EHM. Significant changes in MV-associated TF procoagulant activity and TAT complexes were not observed in infected horses. A small number of horses typically exhibit clinical EHM following experimental infection. The results indicate that EHV-1 infection increases PBMC-associated TF procoagulant activity in vivo and in vitro. Additional in vivo studies are needed to better understand the role of TF-dependent coagulation during EHM pathogenesis in horses. © 2018 EVJ Ltd.

  1. Ambient hemolysis and activation of coagulation is different between HeartMate II and HeartWare left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Birschmann, Ingvild; Dittrich, Marcus; Eller, Thomas; Wiegmann, Bettina; Reininger, Armin J; Budde, Ulrich; Strüber, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are still a major cause of complications. Therefore, the balance between anti-coagulant and pro-coagulant factors needs to be tightly controlled. The principle hypothesis of this study is that different pump designs may have an effect on hemolysis and activation of the coagulation system. Referring to this, the HeartMate II (HMII; Thoratec Corp, Pleasanton, CA) and the HeartWare HVAD (HeartWare International Inc, Framingham, MA) were investigated. For 20 patients with LVAD support (n = 10 each), plasma coagulation, full blood count, and clinical chemistry parameters were measured. Platelet function was monitored using platelet aggregometry, platelet function analyzer-100 system ( Siemens, Marburg, Germany), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay, immature platelet fraction, platelet-derived microparticles, and von Willebrand diagnostic. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome could be detected in all patients. Signs of hemolysis, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase levels (mean, 470 U/liter HMII, 250 U/liter HVAD; p < 0.001), were more pronounced in the HMII patients. In contrast, D-dimer analysis indicated a significantly higher activation of the coagulation system in HVAD patients (mean, 0.94 mg/liter HMII, 2.01 mg/liter HVAD; p < 0.01). The efficacy of anti-platelet therapy using clopidogrel was not sufficient in more than 50% of the patients. Our results support the finding that all patients with rotary blood pumps suffered from von Willebrand syndrome. In addition, a distinct footprint of effects on hemolysis and the coagulation system can be attributed to different devices. As a consequence, the individual status of the coagulation system needs to be controlled in long-term patients. © 2013 Published by International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation on behalf of International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

  2. A data-driven approach for the study of coagulation phenomena in waste lubricant oils and its relevance in alkaline regeneration treatments.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, C T; Ascensão, V R; Reis, M S; Quina, M J; Gando-Ferreira, L M

    2017-12-01

    Coagulation phenomena can occur in certain types of waste lubricant oils (WLO) during regeneration processes involving alkaline treatments, causing plant shutdowns. In this context, this study addresses the nature of the compounds responsible for the coagulation phenomena after the alkaline treatment. For such, an empirical test was developed to assess the coagulation behaviour of WLO, consisting in the addition of KOH to the WLO followed by heating under stirring conditions. This test was performed on 133 samples and four coagulation classes were identified: A; B1; B2 and C. Moreover, a physicochemical characterization of WLO was carried out regarding viscosity at 40°C, saponification number (SN), total acid number (TAN), surface tension, water content, elemental analysis and functional groups (FTIR). 56 samples of fresh lubricant oils for different applications were also characterized and their properties assessed and compared. Multivariate methods were applied to WLO to discriminate among coagulation classes based on FTIR spectra. It was found that coagulation classes A and B1 exhibit statistically similar patterns for all properties determined. Spectral discriminating analysis did not reveal discriminant peaks for class B1 samples, and the presence of specific additives was pointed as the possible factor underlying the increase in viscosity in this oils. Class B2 presents the absence of additives and oxidation products as differentiating features. In addition, B2 samples showed lower TAN SN, and lower concentration of some elements. Lubricants from gear or hydraulic applications can give rise to this class of WLO. Oils of Class C are mainly composed by synthetic ester type base oils, which hamper regeneration processes using alkaline pretreatments. In future studies, WLO type A and B1 can be classified as a single class. The coagulation phenomena classification becomes A - negative, B - precipitate formation and C - positive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  3. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of Rivaroxaban Using a Computer Model for Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Gaub, Thomas; Kuepfer, Lars; Sensse, Anke; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Weiss, Wolfgang; Mueck, Wolfgang; Lippert, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor approved in the European Union and several other countries for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in adult patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement surgery and is in advanced clinical development for the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Its mechanism of action is antithrombin independent and differs from that of other anticoagulants, such as warfarin (a vitamin K antagonist), enoxaparin (an indirect thrombin/Factor Xa inhibitor) and dabigatran (a direct thrombin inhibitor). A blood coagulation computer model has been developed, based on several published models and preclinical and clinical data. Unlike previous models, the current model takes into account both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade, and possesses some unique features, including a blood flow component and a portfolio of drug action mechanisms. This study aimed to use the model to compare the mechanism of action of rivaroxaban with that of warfarin, and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of different rivaroxaban doses with other anticoagulants included in the model. Rather than reproducing known standard clinical measurements, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time clotting tests, the anticoagulant benchmarking was based on a simulation of physiologically plausible clotting scenarios. Compared with warfarin, rivaroxaban showed a favourable sensitivity for tissue factor concentration inducing clotting, and a steep concentration–effect relationship, rapidly flattening towards higher inhibitor concentrations, both suggesting a broad therapeutic window. The predicted dosing window is highly accordant with the final dose recommendation based upon extensive clinical studies. PMID:21526168

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban using a computer model for blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Gaub, Thomas; Kuepfer, Lars; Sensse, Anke; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Weiss, Wolfgang; Mueck, Wolfgang; Lippert, Joerg

    2011-04-22

    Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor approved in the European Union and several other countries for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in adult patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement surgery and is in advanced clinical development for the treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Its mechanism of action is antithrombin independent and differs from that of other anticoagulants, such as warfarin (a vitamin K antagonist), enoxaparin (an indirect thrombin/Factor Xa inhibitor) and dabigatran (a direct thrombin inhibitor). A blood coagulation computer model has been developed, based on several published models and preclinical and clinical data. Unlike previous models, the current model takes into account both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade, and possesses some unique features, including a blood flow component and a portfolio of drug action mechanisms. This study aimed to use the model to compare the mechanism of action of rivaroxaban with that of warfarin, and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of different rivaroxaban doses with other anticoagulants included in the model. Rather than reproducing known standard clinical measurements, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time clotting tests, the anticoagulant benchmarking was based on a simulation of physiologically plausible clotting scenarios. Compared with warfarin, rivaroxaban showed a favourable sensitivity for tissue factor concentration inducing clotting, and a steep concentration-effect relationship, rapidly flattening towards higher inhibitor concentrations, both suggesting a broad therapeutic window. The predicted dosing window is highly accordant with the final dose recommendation based upon extensive clinical studies.

  5. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and control...

  6. Demonstration of the Coagulation and Diffusion of Homemade Slime Prepared under Acidic Conditions without Borate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isokawa, Naho; Fueda, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Korin; Kanno, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) precipitates in many kinds of aqueous salt solutions. While sodium sulfate, a coagulant for PVA fiber, precipitates PVA to yield a white rigid gel, coagulation of PVA with aluminum sulfate, a coagulant for water treatment, yields a slime-like viscoelastic fluid. One type of homemade slime is prepared under basic…

  7. 21 CFR 864.5425 - Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation... Hematology Devices § 864.5425 Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies. (a) Identification. A multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies is a device consisting of one automated or semiautomated...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5425 - Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation... Hematology Devices § 864.5425 Multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies. (a) Identification. A multipurpose system for in vitro coagulation studies is a device consisting of one automated or semiautomated...

  9. Aversion substance(s) of the rat coagulating glands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gawienowski, Anthony M.; Berry, Iver J.; Kennelly, James J.

    1982-01-01

    The aversive substance(s) present in adult male urine were not found in castrate rat urine. Removal of the coagulating glands also resulted in a loss of the aversion compounds. The aversion substances were restored to the urine after androgen treatment of the castrate rats.

  10. Action of Nanoparticles on Platelet Activation and Plasmatic Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials can get into the blood circulation after injection or by release from implants but also by permeation of the epithelium after oral, respiratory or dermal exposure. Once in the blood, they can affect hemostasis, which is usually not intended. This review addresses effects of biological particles and engineered nanomaterials on hemostasis. The role of platelets and coagulation in normal clotting and the interaction with the immune system are described. Methods to identify effects of nanomaterials on clotting and results from in vitro and in vivo studies are summarized and the role of particle size and surface properties discussed. The literature overview showed that mainly pro-coagulative effects of nanomaterials have been described. In vitro studies suggested stronger effects of smaller than of larger NPs on coagulation and a greater importance of material than of surface charge. For instance, carbon nanotubes, polystyrene particles, and dendrimers inferred with clotting independent from their surface charge. Coating of particles with polyethylene glycol was able to prevent interaction with clotting by some particles, while it had no effect on others and the more recently developed bio-inspired surfaces might help to design coatings for more biocompatible particles. The mainly pro-coagulative action of nanoparticles could present a particular risk for individuals affected by common diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Under standardized conditions, in vitro assays using human blood appear to be a suitable tool to study mechanisms of interference with hemostasis and to optimize hemocompatibility of nanomaterials. PMID:26063498

  11. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  12. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6 g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion.

  13. Critical assessment of chitosan as coagulant to remove cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Noyma, Natalia Pessoa; de Magalhães, Leonardo; Miranda, Marcela; Mucci, Maíra; van Oosterhout, Frank; Huszar, Vera L M; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi

    2017-06-01

    Removal of cyanobacteria from the water column using a coagulant and a ballast compound is a promising technique to mitigate nuisance. As coagulant the organic, biodegradable polymer chitosan has been promoted. Results in this study show that elevated pH, as may be common during cyanobacterial blooms, as well as high alkalinity may hamper the coagulation of chitosan and thus impair its ability to effectively remove positively buoyant cyanobacteria from the water column. The underlying mechanism is likely a shielding of the protonated groups by anions. Inasmuch as there are many chitosan formulations, thorough testing of each chitosan prior to its application is essential. Results obtained in glass tubes were similar to those from standard jar tests demonstrating that glass tube tests can be used for testing effects of coagulants and ballasts in cyanobacteria removal whilst allowing far more replicates. There was no relation between zeta potential and precipitated cyanobacteria. Given the well-known antibacterial activity of chitosan and recent findings of anti-cyanobacterial effects, pre-application tests are needed to decipher if chitosan may cause cell leakage of cyanotoxins. Efficiency- and side-effect testing are crucial for water managers to determine if the selected approach can be used in tailor-made interventions to control cyanobacterial blooms and to mitigate eutrophication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Does Bicarbonate Correct Coagulation Function Impaired by Acidosis in Swine?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    requires sufficient fibrinogen available in the circulation . At any time, fibrinogen availabil- Fig. 4. Thrombin generation kinetics at baseline (T0... circulation can potentially impact physiologic function. As the precursor in the coagulation process, fibrinogen is primarily involved in maintaining...with different proteins. It is also possible that following acidosis insult, some of the albumin loss from the circulation was compensated for by

  15. Performance Evaluation of the Sysmex CS-5100 Automated Coagulation Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liming; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation testing is widely applied clinically, and laboratories increasingly demand automated coagulation analyzers with short turn-around times and high-throughput. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Sysmex CS-5100 automated coagulation analyzer for routine use in a clinical laboratory. The prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), and D-dimer were compared between the Sysmex CS-5100 and Sysmex CA-7000 analyzers, and the imprecision, comparison, throughput, STAT function, and performance for abnormal samples were measured in each. The within-run and between-run coefficients of variation (CV) for the PT, APTT, INR, and D-dimer analyses showed excellent results both in the normal and pathologic ranges. The correlation coefficients between the Sysmex CS-5100 and Sysmex CA-7000 were highly correlated. The throughput of the Sysmex CS-5100 was faster than that of the Sysmex CA-7000. There was no interference at all by total bilirubin concentrations and triglyceride concentrations in the Sysmex CS-5100 analyzer. We demonstrated that the Sysmex CS-5100 performs with satisfactory imprecision and is well suited for coagulation analysis in laboratories processing large sample numbers and icteric and lipemic samples.

  16. Cosmetic wastewater treatment by coagulation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Naumczyk, Jeremi; Bogacki, Jan; Marcinowski, Piotr; Kowalik, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the treatment process of three cosmetic wastewater types has been investigated. Coagulation allowed to achieve chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 74.6%, 37.7% and 74.0% for samples A (Al2(SO4)3), B (Brentafloc F3) and C (PAX 16), respectively. The Fenton process proved to be effective as well - COD removal was equal to 75.1%, 44.7% and 68.1%, respectively. Coagulation with FeCl3 and the subsequent photo-Fenton process resulted in the best values of final COD removal equal to 92.4%, 62.8% and 90.2%. In case of the Fenton process, after coagulation these values were equal to 74.9%, 50.1% and 84.8%, while in case of the H2O2/UV process, the obtained COD removal was 83.8%, 36.2% and 80.9%. High value of COD removal in the Fenton process carried out for A and C wastewater samples was caused by a significant contribution of the final neutralization/coagulation. Very small effect of the oxidation reaction in the Fenton process in case of sample A resulting from the presence of antioxidants, 'OH radical scavengers' in the wastewater.

  17. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radio-frequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery.

  18. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  19. Reduction of Turbidity of Water Using Locally Available Natural Coagulants

    PubMed Central

    Asrafuzzaman, Md.; Fakhruddin, A. N. M.; Hossain, Md. Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity imparts a great problem in water treatment. Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab were used as locally available natural coagulants in this study to reduce turbidity of synthetic water. The tests were carried out, using artificial turbid water with conventional jar test apparatus. Optimum mixing intensity and duration were determined. After dosing water-soluble extracts of Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab reduced turbidity to 5.9, 3.9, and 11.1 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU), respectively, from 100 NTU and 5, 3.3, and 9.5, NTU, respectively, after dosing and filtration. Natural coagulants worked better with high, turbid, water compare to medium, or low, turbid, water. Highest turbidity reduction efficiency (95.89%) was found with Cicer arietinum. About 89 to 96% total coliform reduction were also found with natural coagulant treatment of turbid water. Using locally available natural coagulants, suitable, easier, and environment friendly options for water treatment were observed. PMID:23724307

  20. Bladder perforation owing to a unipolar coagulating device.

    PubMed

    Pakter, J; Budnick, L D

    1981-09-15

    A report on a patient who sustained a burn and perforation of the urinary bladder from visible sparks emanating from a unipolar coagulating device during the couse of laparoscopic sterilization is presented. It is the first report of urinary bladder burns using a unipolar coagulating device. A 24-year-old woman, gravida 10, para 3, abortus 7, underwent a laparoscopic sterilization with a unipolar coagulating device. As the physician was finishing the coagulation, a spark from the device caused a 1-2 cm burn with a central area of perforation into the urinary bladder. Conservative treatment was recommended, and consisted of Foley catheterization and drainage for 5 days. Initial urine culture revealed Klebsiella species, and oral ampicillin was prescribed. Hematuria was noted throughout the patient's hospitalization, and blood clots were present in the urine on Day 2 postoperation. The patient had no abdominal or flank pain, was afebrile, and had a stable hemoglobin level during the hospital stay. Cystography was performed on Day 5 postoperatively and demonstrated no perforation. Foley catheter was removed. Patient was discharged 2 days later and remains in good health 3 months postoperatively.

  1. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  2. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  3. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.; McCabe, C.W.

    1985-02-08

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radiofrequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery. 4 figs.

  4. Genetic parameters for milk coagulation properties in Estonian Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Vallas, M; Bovenhuis, H; Kaart, T; Pärna, K; Kiiman, H; Pärna, E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate heritabilities and repeatabilities for milk coagulation traits [milk coagulation time (RCT) and curd firmness (E(30))] and genetic and phenotypic correlations between milk yield and composition traits (milk fat percentage and protein percentage, urea, somatic cell count, pH) in first-lactation Estonian Holstein dairy cattle. A total of 17,577 test-day records from 4,191 Estonian Holstein cows in 73 herds across the country were collected during routine milk recordings. Measurements of RCT and E(30) determined with the Optigraph (Ysebaert, Frepillon, France) are based on an optical signal in the near-infrared region. The cows had at least 3 measurements taken during the period from April 2005 to January 2009. Data were analyzed using a repeatability animal model. There was substantial variation in milk coagulation traits with a coefficient of variation of 27% for E(30) and 9% for the log-transformed RCT. The percentage of variation explained by herd was 3% for E(30) and 4% for RCT, suggesting that milk coagulation traits are not strongly affected by herd conditions (e.g., feeding). Heritability was 0.28 for RCT and 0.41 for E(30), and repeatability estimates were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. Genetic correlation between both milk coagulation traits was negligible, suggesting that RCT and E(30) have genetically different foundations. Milk coagulation time had a moderately high positive genetic (0.69) and phenotypic (0.61) correlation with milk pH indicating that a high pH is related to a less favorable RCT. Curd firmness had a moderate positive genetic (0.48) and phenotypic (0.45) correlation with the protein percentage. Therefore, a high protein percentage is associated with favorable curd firmness. All reported genetic parameters were statistically significantly different from zero. Additional univariate random regression analysis for milk coagulation traits yielded slightly higher average heritabilities of 0.38 and 0

  5. In situ coagulation versus pre-coagulation for gravity-driven membrane bioreactor during decentralized sewage treatment: Permeability stabilization, fouling layer formation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Ding, An; Wang, Jinlong; Lin, Dachao; Tang, Xiaobin; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Li, Guibai; Ren, Nanqi; Liang, Heng

    2017-12-01

    Gravity-driven membrane filtration systems are promising for decentralized sewage treatment due to their low energy consumption and low maintenance. However, the low stable permeability/flux is currently limiting their wider application. With the ultimate goal of increasing permeability, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of coagulation (in situ coagulation and pre-coagulation) on the performance of a gravity-driven membrane bioreactor (GDMBR) during treatment of synthetic sewage. Results show that in situ coagulation significantly increased permeability (more than two-fold); however, no stabilization of permeability occurred over the whole operation, when non-coagulated and pre-coagulated reactors were compared. The high permeability observed was attributed to the accumulated aluminium floc in the reactor, which prevented formation of fluorescent microbial metabolites (aromatic and tryptophan proteins, as well as fulvic acids), and further avoided membrane pore blocking. In addition, the surface porosity of the fouling layer was improved (from 11.2% to 32.4% for non-coagulated and in situ coagulated reactors). The unstable permeability was possibly associated with lower biological processes within the fouling layer. These might include lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and lower fluorescent metabolites from the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) caused by the accumulated Al (compared with the control). On the other hand, pre-coagulation improved the level of stable permeability compared with the control (80 versus 40 L/m 2 h bar), mainly because pre-coagulation decreased the EPS content and also maintained high ATP content of the fouling layer. In addition, both coagulation processes reduced the total filtration resistance, mainly the hydraulically reversible resistance and cake layer resistance, which could lower the cleaning frequency. Overall, coagulation could greatly increase the removal efficiency and improve the GDMBR

  6. Role of altered coagulation-fibrinolytic system in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Behl, Tapan; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Kotwani, Anita

    2017-05-01

    The implications of altered coagulation-fibrinolytic system in the pathophysiology of several vascular disorders, such as stroke and myocardial infarction, have been well researched upon and established. However, its role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy has not been explored much. Since a decade, it is known that hyperglycemia is associated with a hypercoagulated state and the various impairments it causes are well acknowledged as independent risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases. But recent studies suggest that the hypercoagulative state and diminished fibrinolytic responses might also alter retinal homeostasis and induce several deleterious molecular changes in retinal cells which aggravate the already existing hyperglycemia-induced pathological conditions and thereby lead to the progression of diabetic retinopathy. The major mediators of coagulation-fibrinolytic system whose concentration or activity get altered during hyperglycemia include fibrinogen, antithrombin-III (AT-III), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and von Willebrand factor (vWF). Inhibiting the pathways by which these altered mediators get involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy can serve as potential targets for the development of an adjuvant novel alternative therapy for diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Elimination of interleukin 6 attenuates coagulation activation in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The role of interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the toxic sequelae of sepsis is controversial. To assess the part of IL-6 in inflammatory responses to endotoxin, we investigated eight chimpanzees after either a bolus intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (n = 4; 4 ng/kg) or after the same dose of endotoxin with a simultaneous bolus intravenous injection of an anti-IL-6 mAb (30 mg; n = 4). Anti-IL-6 did not affect the induction of the cytokine network (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], soluble TNF receptors types I and II, and IL-8) by endotoxin, nor did it influence the occurrence of a neutrophilic leukocytosis and neutrophil degranulation, as monitored by the measurement of elastase- alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes. In contrast, anti-IL-6 markedly attenuated endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation, monitored with the plasma levels of the prothrombin fragment F1+2 and thrombin- antithrombin III complexes, whereas activation of fibrinolysis, determined with the plasma concentrations of plasmin-alpha 2- antiplasmin complexes, remained unaltered. We conclude that IL-6 does not have a feedback effect on the release of other cytokines after injection of endotoxin, and that it is not involved in endotoxin- induced neutrophilia or neutrophil degranulation. IL-6 is, however, an important intermediate factor in activation of coagulation in low grade endotoxemia in chimpanzees. PMID:8145042

  8. Moderate-intensity exercise improves the thromboelastography coagulation index in children with severe hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Li, Kui-Xing; Xiao, Juan; Zhao, Yong-Qiang; Shou, Wei-Ling; Chen, Meng; Li, Zhuo; Poon, Man-Chiu; Han, Hui-Jun

    2016-10-01

    This pilot study explored the effect of moderate-intensity exercise on factor VIII (FVIII) activity and global hemostatic status of the children with severe hemophilia A. Eleven children aged 6 to 15 years with severe hemophilia A participated in a moderate-intensity exercise test by using Recumbent Cross Trainer (NuStep, T5XR) for at least 10 min after reaching the target heart rate or until volitional exhaustion within a safety framework. Blood samples were collected pre and postexercise for plasma FVIII: C and thromboelastography (TEG) parameters and coagulation index. The average duration of exercise was 11.8 min (10-13 min). There was no report on bleeding events or adverse symptoms requiring termination of the exercise test. The average FVIII activity of the 11 children was 0.66 (0.5-0.8) IU/dl before and 0.93 (0.5-2.3) IU/dl after exercise. The increase of FVIII in the 11 children as a group was not statistically significant (P = 0.052). There were significant changes of TEG measurements, with shortening of R (P < 0.05), and increase in K decrease (P < 0.05), alpha angle (P < 0.05), maximum amplitude (P < 0.05), and coagulation index (P < 0.01). Among the 11 children, the relative coagulation index increase after exercise was greater than 50% in seven (63.6%), less than 20% in three (27.3%), and less than 10% in one (9.1%). TEG analysis showed that the global hemostatic function for the children with severe hemophilia A can be enhanced after moderate-intensity exercise.

  9. [Comparison of shaft temperature related treatment efficacy between "air-cooled" microwave coagulation and traditional microwave coagulation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Li, Jin-Qing; Chen, Min-Shan; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Zhang, Ya-Qi

    2004-11-01

    The application and development of traditional percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) has been limited by high shaft temperature. The "air-cooled" PMCT is the newest advancement. This study was to compare shaft temperature related treatment efficacy between "air-cooled" PMCT and traditional PMCT. Two pigs underwent traditional PMCT, and "air-cooled" PMCT at 80 W for 10 min separately. Skin injury, surface temperature of guide-needle, charring tissue sticking to the shaft, and lesion shape in 2 pigs were compared. Five patients with liver tumor received traditional PMCT, and 8 patients with liver tumor received "air-cooled" PMCT. Feeling of pain, skin injury, charring tissue sticking to the shaft, local therapeutic efficacy, and recurrence of these 2 groups of patients were compared. In the pig underwent traditional PMCT, surface temperature of guide-needle reached 119-160 Centigrade; skin burn around puncture points was serious; charring tissue stuck to the front of electrodes; a trail sign was observed in coagulated lesion. In the pig underwent "air-cooled" PMCT, surface temperature of guide-needle was 28.8-39.9 Centigrade; no skin injury was found around puncture points; no charring tissue stuck to the front of electrodes; no obvious trail sign was observed in coagulated lesion. In 5 patients received traditional PMCT, 3 had skin injury; 2 had charring tissue stuck to the front of electrode; all felt moderate or serious epigastric pain lasted for 1-8 weeks; 4 had complete coagulation; 1 had local recurrence. In 8 patients received "air-cooled" PMCT, no one had skin injury, and charring tissue stuck to "air-cooled" electrode; 4 felt slight epigastric pain within 1 week; all had complete coagulation; no local recurrence was found. The technique of "air-cooled" electrode may decrease temperature of shaft safely and reliably, and eliminate side effects arose from high temperature of shaft. Treatment efficacy of "air-cooled" PMCT is better than that of

  10. Life-threatening urethral hemorrhage after placement of a Foley catheter in a patient with uroseptic disseminated intravascular coagulation due to chronic urinary retention induced by untreated benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Yoshida, Keisuke; Imaizumi, Tsuyoshi; Isosu, Tsuyoshi; Kurosawa, Shin; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    A 77-year-old man with severe septic disseminated intravascular coagulation following urinary infection was transported to our hospital. He had developed urinary retention induced by untreated prostatic hyperplasia. Immediate drainage with a Foley catheter was successfully carried out, but the hematuria progressed to life-threatening hemorrhage. Complete hemostasis was impossible by surgical treatment because the tissue around the prostatic urethra was very fragile and hemorrhagic. Organized treatments (continuous hemodiafiltration combined with polymyxin-B immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion and systemic treatment with antibiotics and coagulation factors) were commenced soon after the operation. The patient eventually recovered from the septic disseminated intravascular coagulation. This case report illustrates the risk of placement of Foley catheters in patients with severe septic disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  11. Circulating erythrocyte-derived microparticles are associated with coagulation activation in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Schaap, Marianne C.L.; Berckmans, René J.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Sturk, Augueste; van Doormaal, Frederiek F.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Biemond, Bart J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is characterized by a hypercoagulable state as a result of multiple factors, including chronic hemolysis and circulating cell-derived microparticles. There is still no consensus on the cellular origin of such microparticles and the exact mechanism by which they may enhance coagulation activation in sickle cell disease. Design and Methods In the present study, we analyzed the origin of circulating microparticles and their procoagulant phenotype during painful crises and steady state in 25 consecutive patients with sickle cell disease. Results The majority of microparticles originated from platelets (GPIIIa,CD61) and erythrocytes (glycophorin A,CD235), and their numbers did not differ significantly between crisis and steady state. Erythrocyte-derived microparticles strongly correlated with plasma levels of markers of hemolysis, i.e. hemoglobin (r=−0.58, p<0.001) and lactate dehydrogenase (r=0.59, p<0.001), von Willebrand factor as a marker of platelet/endothelial activation (r=0.44, p<0.001), and D-dimer and prothrombin fragment F1+2 (r=0.52, p<0.001 and r=0.59, p<0.001, respectively) as markers of fibrinolysis and coagulation activation. Thrombin generation depended on the total number of microparticles (r=0.63, p<0.001). Anti-human factor XI inhibited thrombin generation by about 50% (p<0.001), whereas anti-human factor VII was ineffective (p>0.05). The extent of factor XI inhibition was associated with erythrocyte-derived microparticles (r=0.50, p=0.023). Conclusions We conclude that the procoagulant state in sickle cell disease is partially explained by the factor XI-dependent procoagulant properties of circulating erythrocyte-derived microparticles. PMID:19815831

  12. Treatment of oilfield wastewater by combined process of micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenchao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, a combined process was developed that included micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation to treat oilfield fracturing wastewater. Micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation were applied to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) organic load and to enhance organic components gradability, respectively. Orthogonal experiment were employed to investigate the influence factors of micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation on COD removal efficiency. For micro-electrolysis, the optimum conditions were: pH, 3; iron-carbon dosage, 50 mg/L; mass ratio of iron-carbon, 2:3; reaction time, 60 min. For Fenton oxidation, a total reaction time of 90 min, a H 2 O 2 dosage of 12 mg/L, with a H 2 O 2 /Fe 2+ mole ratio of 30, pH of 3 were selected to achieve optimum oxidation. The optimum conditions in coagulation process: pH, cationic polyacrylamide dosage, mixing speed and time is 4.3, 2 mg/L, 150 rpm and 30 s, respectively. In the continuous treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater fell 56.95%, 46.23%, 30.67%, respectively, from last stage and the total COD removal efficiency reached 83.94% (from 4,314 to 693 mg/L). In the overall treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater was reduced from 4,314 to 637 mg/L, and the COD removal efficiency reached 85.23%. The contribution of each stage is 68.45% (micro-electrolysis), 24.07% (Fenton oxidation), 7.48% (coagulation), respectively. Micro-electrolysis is the uppermost influencing process on COD removal. Compared with the COD removal efficiency of three processes on raw wastewater under optimized conditions: the COD removal efficiency of single micro-electrolysis, single Fenton oxidation, single coagulation is 58.34%, 44.88% and 39.72%, respectively. Experiments proved the effect of combined process is marvelous and the overall water quality of the final effluent could meet the class III national wastewater discharge standard of petrochemical industry of China

  13. Effects of pentastarch and albumin infusion on cardiorespiratory function and coagulation in patients with severe sepsis and systemic hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Rackow, E C; Mecher, C; Astiz, M E; Griffel, M; Falk, J L; Weil, M H

    1989-05-01

    Twenty consecutive patients with severe sepsis were randomized to fluid challenge with 5% albumin or 10% low MW hydroxyethyl starch (pentastarch) solutions. Fluid challenge was administered iv as 250 ml of test colloid every 15 min until the pulmonary artery wedge pressure (WP) was greater than or equal to 15 mm Hg or a maximum dose of 2000 ml was infused. Hemodynamic, respiratory, and coagulation profiles were measured before and after fluid infusion. The amount of colloid required to achieve a WP of 15 mm Hg was comparable between groups. Both colloid infusions resulted in similar increases in cardiac output, stroke output, and stroke work. The effect of fluid infusion with pentastarch on coagulation was not significantly different from albumin, although pentastarch was associated with a 45% decrease in factor VIII:c. We conclude that pentastarch is equivalent to albumin for fluid resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis.

  14. Administration of tissue plasminogen activator without coagulation results in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoming; Zhao, Songyao; Yin, Liujie; Dou, Hailing; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yifan; Li, Mingzhe; Chen, Ruifang; Fu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xin; Yang, Gaiqing; Wang, Runqing; Jia, Xinzhou; Bu, Shufang; Ma, Dongpu; Wang, Baoyu; Li, Shize

    2018-03-01

    Routine coagulation test before intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) use increases the door to needle time (DNT). We sought to evaluate the safety of tPA use without coagulation results and its impact on prognosis. In our stroke registry, tPA was delivered with coagulation results from December 2015 to April 2016 and without coagulation results from May 2016 to December 2016. Differences of demographics, clinical characteristic, and prognosis between these two groups were analyzed. In addition, logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify predictors for DNT of over 60 min. A total of 201 stroke patients were included in the final analysis. Of these, 81 patients received tPA with coagulation results and 120 patients without coagulation results. Only one (0.8%) patient with abnormal coagulation results met the exclusion criteria of tPA use in patients without coagulation results. The difference of DNT between groups with (mean, 61.7 min) and without (mean, 41.9 min) coagulation results was significant (P = 0.00). The group without coagulation results had a higher rate of favorable 90-day outcome (74.2 vs 70.4%) and lower rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage/nonintracranial hemorrhage (4.9 and 22.2% vs 1.7 and 19.2%) than the group with coagulation results did; these differences were not statistically significant. In multivariate analysis, only tPA use with coagulation results was the predictor for DNT of over 60 min (P = 0.0030, OR = 2.44, 95% CI 1.28-4.65). The present study suggests that tPA could be delivered safely without coagulation results in patients without suspected coagulopathy, and avoiding coagulation tests reduces significantly the DNT interval.

  15. Effects of dairy factory, milk casein content and titratable acidity on coagulation properties in Trentingrana dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Penasa, Mauro; Toffanin, Valentina; Cologna, Nicola; Cassandro, Martino; De Marchi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental factors, milk casein content and titratable acidity on milk coagulation properties (MCP) of samples routinely collected in the Trento province (northeast Italy) under field conditions. Rennet coagulation time (RCT, min), curd-firming time (k20, min) and curd firmness (a30, mm) were determined by Formagraph on 14 971 samples from 635 herds associated to 17 dairy factories. Besides MCP, fat, protein, and casein percentages, titratable acidity (TA), and somatic cell and bacterial counts were available. A standardised index of milk aptitude to coagulate (IAC) was derived using information of RCT and a30. An analysis of variance was conducted on MCP and IAC using a fixed effects linear model. Approximately 3% of milk samples did not form a curd within the testing time (30 min) and k20 was missing for 26% of milks. The percentage of samples without information on k20 largely differed among dairy factories (1·7-20·9%). Significant differences were estimated between the best and the worst dairy factory for RCT (-2 min), k20 (-1·2 min), a30 (+3·4 mm) and IAC (+2·6 points). Milk casein content and TA were important factors in explaining the variation of MCP and IAC, supporting the central role of these two traits on technological properties. The Trento province is heterogeneous in terms of dairy systems and this could explain the differences among dairy factories.

  16. Response surface methodology investigation into the interactions between arsenic and humic acid in water during the coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Watson, Malcolm Alexander; Tubić, Aleksandra; Agbaba, Jasmina; Nikić, Jasmina; Maletić, Snežana; Molnar Jazić, Jelena; Dalmacija, Božo

    2016-07-15

    Interactions between arsenic and natural organic matter (NOM) are key limiting factors during the optimisation of drinking water treatment when significant amounts of both must be removed. This work uses Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to investigate how they interact during their simultaneous removal by iron chloride coagulation, using humic acid (HA) as a model NOM substance. Using a three factor Box-Behnken experimental design, As and HA removals were modelled, as well as a combined removal response. ANOVA results showed the significance of the coagulant dose for all three responses. At high initial arsenic concentrations (200μg/l), As removal was significantly hindered by the presence of HA. In contrast, the HA removal response was found to be largely independent of the initial As concentration, with the optimum coagulant dose increasing at increasing HA concentrations. The combined response was similar to the HA removal response, and the interactions evident are most interesting in terms of optimising treatment processes during the preparation of drinking water, highlighting the importance of utilizing RSM for such investigations. The combined response model was successfully validated with two different groundwaters used for drinking water supply in the Republic of Serbia, showing excellent agreement under similar experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Aqueous extract from Brownea grandiceps flowers with effect on coagulation and fibrinolytic system.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Betzabeth; Brazón, Josmary

    2015-02-03

    Brownea grandiceps flowers are used in Venezuelan folk medicine as anti-hemorrhagic in women with heavy menstrual blood loss (menorrhagia). However, prior to this study, there were no scientific investigations to support this fact, because the aqueous extract from Brownea grandiceps flowers had not been previously evaluated neither phytochemically nor biologically. The objective of this work was to evaluate in vitro the effects of aqueous extract from Brownea grandiceps flowers on the coagulation system and fibrinolysis. An infusion of Brownea grandiceps flowers (160g) was performed; then, it was homogenized, centrifuged and lyophilized to obtain the aqueous extract, and this was called BGE. Subsequently, the extract was characterized on the one hand, phytochemically and on the other hand, biologically, employing prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT) and thrombin time (TT) to determine the effects on extrinsic, intrinsic and common coagulation pathways, respectively. In addition to that, the fibrinogenolytic and fibronectinase activity was evaluated by SDS-PAGE using Tris-Tricine system and analyzed by densitometric study utilizing ImageJ program. Also, by using specific chromogenic substrates for Factor Xa (FXa), thrombin, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and plasmin, it was assessed whether BGE exhibited some enzyme-like activity, and inhibitory activity of the afore mentioned enzymes. Fibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities were determined by a fibrin plate method. Data were analyzed by an nonparametric method. BGE presented tannins, saponins, glycosides, alkaloids, flavonoids, coumarins, and did not contain triterpenoids and steroids. Also, BGE at low concentrations (250-1250µg/mL) reduced the PT, while higher concentrations (15000-25000µg/mL) prolonged this time. However, BGE concentrations between 1250 and 25000µg/mL prolonged the PTT. Prolongation of PT and PTT was observed at high

  18. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  19. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    DeVille, R.E.L., E-mail: rdeville@illinois.edu; Riemer, N., E-mail: nriemer@illinois.edu; West, M., E-mail: mwest@illinois.edu

    2011-09-20

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangianmore » trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.« less

  20. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVille, R. E. L.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2011-09-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangian trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.

  1. Removal of cadmium from contaminated Lentinula edodes by optimized complexation and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Chen; Cheng, Wei; Bian, Yinbing; Guo, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a serious problem for Lentinula edodes ; however, the treatment of contaminated L. edodes has seldom been studied. This study investigated the removal of cadmium (Cd) from contaminated L. edodes and its lentinan by complexation and coagulation. Some influencing factors, such as pH, medical dosage, and preoxidation were examined. Cd complexation from contaminated L .  edodes was shown to be more efficient under acidic conditions (pH 5.0), with a clearance rate of 80.47% in 25 mmol/L EDTA and 78.45% in 25 mmol/L sodium citrate. The Cd content in the lentinan of the contaminated L. edodes was markedly lower than that in the powdered mushroom (2.77 mg/kg vs. 19.49 mg/kg) and was easier to remove. The maximum Cd clearance rate (96.3%) for lentinan was obtained using an optimized process that involved preoxidation with 0.5 mg/L KMnO 4 , complexing with 25 mmol/L EDTA and 25 mmol/L sodium citrate, and coagulation with 50 mg/L activated carbon (AC) at pH 10.0.

  2. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy analysis of landfill leachate DOM in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Chuang; Dong, Xingwei

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate contains a variety of organic matters, some of which can be excited and emit fluorescence signal. In order to degrade these organic matters, the pretreatment of the leachate is needed, which can improve the degradation performance of post-treatment process. Coagulation-flocculation is one of the important pretreatment processes to treat landfill leachate. Assessing the chemical compositions of landfill leachate is helpful in the understanding of their sources and fates as well as the mechanistic behaviors in the water environment. The present work aimed to use fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to characterize the chemical fractions of landfill leachate dissolved organic matter (DOM) in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Results showed that the DOM of landfill leachate tested in this study was identified resulting from microbial input, which included five typical characteristic peaks and four kinds of PARAFAC fractions. These fractions were mainly composed of hydrophobic macromolecule humic acid-like (HM-HA), hydrophilic intermediate molecular fulvic acid-like (HIM-FA), and hydrophilic small molecule protein-like substances (HSM-PS). HM-HA and HIM-FA were found to be easier to remove than HSM-PS. Further research on HSM-PS removal by coagulation-flocculation still needs to be improved.

  3. A Common Suite of Coagulation Proteins Function in Drosophila Muscle Attachment.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicole; Odell, Nadia; Zych, Molly; Clark, Cheryl; Wang, Zong-Heng; Biersmith, Bridget; Bajzek, Clara; Cook, Kevin R; Dushay, Mitchell S; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2016-11-01

    The organization and stability of higher order structures that form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mediate the attachment of muscles are poorly understood. We have made the surprising discovery that a subset of clotting factor proteins are also essential for muscle attachment in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster One such coagulation protein, Fondue (Fon), was identified as a novel muscle mutant in a pupal lethal genetic screen. Fon accumulates at muscle attachment sites and removal of this protein results in decreased locomotor behavior and detached larval muscles. A sensitized genetic background assay reveals that fon functions with the known muscle attachment genes Thrombospondin (Tsp) and Tiggrin (Tig). Interestingly, Tig is also a component of the hemolymph clot. We further demonstrate that an additional clotting protein, Larval serum protein 1γ (Lsp1γ), is also required for muscle attachment stability and accumulates where muscles attach to tendons. While the local biomechanical and organizational properties of the ECM vary greatly depending on the tissue microenvironment, we propose that shared extracellular protein-protein interactions influence the strength and elasticity of ECM proteins in both coagulation and muscle attachment. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Preparation of modified waterworks sludge particles as adsorbent to enhance coagulation of slightly polluted source water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Gao, Xiaohong; Xu, Hang; Wang, Kang; Chen, Taoyuan

    2017-08-01

    Without treatment, waterworks sludge is ineffective as an adsorbent. In this study, raw waterworks sludge was used as the raw material to prepare modified sludge particles through high-temperature calcination and alkali modification. The feasibility of using a combination of modified particles and polyaluminum chloride (PAC) as a coagulant for treatment of slightly polluted source water was also investigated. The composition, structure, and surface properties of the modified particles were characterized, and their capabilities for removing ammonia nitrogen and turbidity were determined. The results indicate that the optimal preparation conditions for the modified sludge particles were achieved by preparing the particles with a roasting temperature of 483.12 °C, a roasting time of 3.32 h, and a lye concentration of 3.75%. Furthermore, enhanced coagulation is strengthened with the addition of modified sludge particles, which is reflected by reduction of the required PAC dose and enhancement of the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen and turbidity by over 80 and 93%, respectively. Additional factors such as pH, temperature, dose, and dosing sequence were also evaluated. The optimum doses of modified particles and PAC were 40 and 15 mg/L, respectively, and adding modified particles at the same time as or prior to adding PAC improves removal efficiency.

  5. Early coagulation events induce acute lung injury in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hideki; Donahue, Deborah L; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and systemic coagulopathy are serious complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that frequently lead to poor clinical outcomes. Although the release of tissue factor (TF), a potent initiator of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation, from the injured brain is thought to play a key role in coagulopathy after TBI, its function in ALI following TBI remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the systemic appearance of TF correlated with the ensuing coagulopathy that follows TBI in ALI using an anesthetized rat blunt trauma TBI model. Blood and lung samples were obtained after TBI. Compared with controls, pulmonary edema and increased pulmonary permeability were observed as early as 5 min after TBI without evidence of norepinephrine involvement. Systemic TF increased at 5 min and then diminished 60 min after TBI. Lung injury and alveolar hemorrhaging were also observed as early as 5 min after TBI. A biphasic elevation of TF was observed in the lungs after TBI, and TF-positive microparticles (MPs) were detected in the alveolar spaces. Fibrin(ogen) deposition was also observed in the lungs within 60 min after TBI. Additionally, preadministration of a direct thrombin inhibitor, Refludan, attenuated lung injuries, thus implicating thrombin as a direct participant in ALI after TBI. The results from this study demonstrated that enhanced systemic TF may be an initiator of coagulation activation that contributes to ALI after TBI. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. A Common Suite of Coagulation Proteins Function in Drosophila Muscle Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nicole; Odell, Nadia; Zych, Molly; Clark, Cheryl; Wang, Zong-Heng; Biersmith, Bridget; Bajzek, Clara; Cook, Kevin R.; Dushay, Mitchell S.; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2016-01-01

    The organization and stability of higher order structures that form in the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mediate the attachment of muscles are poorly understood. We have made the surprising discovery that a subset of clotting factor proteins are also essential for muscle attachment in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. One such coagulation protein, Fondue (Fon), was identified as a novel muscle mutant in a pupal lethal genetic screen. Fon accumulates at muscle attachment sites and removal of this protein results in decreased locomotor behavior and detached larval muscles. A sensitized genetic background assay reveals that fon functions with the known muscle attachment genes Thrombospondin (Tsp) and Tiggrin (Tig). Interestingly, Tig is also a component of the hemolymph clot. We further demonstrate that an additional clotting protein, Larval serum protein 1γ (Lsp1γ), is also required for muscle attachment stability and accumulates where muscles attach to tendons. While the local biomechanical and organizational properties of the ECM vary greatly depending on the tissue microenvironment, we propose that shared extracellular protein–protein interactions influence the strength and elasticity of ECM proteins in both coagulation and muscle attachment. PMID:27585844

  7. Infrared coagulation versus rubber band ligation in early stage hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P J

    2003-10-01

    The ideal therapy for early stages of hemorrhoids is always debated. Some are more effective but are more painful, others are less painful but their efficacy is also lower. Thus, comfort or efficacy is a major concern. In the present randomized study, a comparison is made between infrared coagulation and rubber band ligation in terms of effectiveness and discomfort. One hundred patients with second degree bleeding piles were randomized prospectively to either rubber band ligation (N = 54) or infrared coagulation (N = 46). Parameters measured included postoperative discomfort and pain, time to return to work, relief in incidence of bleeding, and recurrence rate. The mean age was 38 years (range 19-68 years). The mean duration of disease was 17.5 months (range 12 to 34 months). The number of male patients was double that of females. Postoperative pain during the first week was more intense in the band ligation group (2-5 vs 0-3 on a visual analogue scale). Post-defecation pain was more intense with band ligation and so was rectal tenesmus (P = 0.0059). The patients in the infrared coagulation group resumed their duties earlier (2 vs 4 days, P = 0.03), but also had a higher recurrence or failure rate (P = 0.03). Thus, we conclude that band ligation, although more effective in controlling symptoms and obliterating hemorrhoids, is associated with more pain and discomfort to the patient. As infrared coagulation can be conveniently repeated in case of recurrence, it could be considered to be a suitable alternative office procedure for the treatment of early stage hemorrhoids.

  8. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  9. Sonoclot evaluation of whole blood coagulation in healthy adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Babski, Danielle M; Brainard, Benjamin M; Krimer, Paula M; Ralph, Alan G; Pittman, Jennifer R; Koenig, Amie

    2012-12-01

    To establish a standard protocol for analysis of canine whole blood and genera